Podcasts about university professors

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Best podcasts about university professors

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Latest podcast episodes about university professors

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Episode 688: Dr Peter Hotez and "Ophinnegan" Christian Finnegan and Ophira Eisenberg

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 79:15


Hello to Kim,Melanie and Dr. Jen who HAVE to be the only 3 people who read the show notes! You 3 are the greatest and should receive many rewards in life! I thank you for supporting the show notes and you are now "The Show Notes 3" or the SN3. I hope you will agree to work on a public service project together

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio
Vladimir Putin is scrambling; here's the evidence

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 23:27


Vladimir Putin bet against Ukraine's resilience. He also bet against the West's ability to stay united. Now, nearly seven months since Russia invaded Ukraine, Putin appears to be scrambling. How has Ukraine managed to gain momentum on the frontlines? Why has Volodymyr Zelenskyy proven to be such an effective leader? What impact has the United States had on the war? Could Putin actually be removed from office? Dr. Melissa Chakars, Saint Joseph's University Professor and Chair of the Department of History, and Dr. Lisa Baglione, Saint Joseph's University Professor of Political Science, caution that while Russia might seem to be on its heels, the country remains extremely dangerous. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Green Dreamer: Sustainability and Regeneration From Ideas to Life

In this episode, we revisit our past conversation with Mark Rectanus, a University Professor of German Studies (Emeritus) in the Department of World Languages and Cultures at Iowa State University. His publications include research on the German publishing industry, the book and electronic media, contemporary German literature, corporate sponsorships, cultural politics, museum studies, and contemporary art. His most recent book is Museums Inside Out: Artist Collaborations and New Exhibition Ecologies. Some of the topics we explore in this conversation include "culture incorporated", funding in art, decolonizing museums, what it means to be a museum in the 21st century, and more. (The musical offering featured in this episode is Black Moss by Johanna Warren.) Green Dreamer would not be possible without the direct support from our listeners. Help us keep the show alive by reciprocating a gift of any amount today: GreenDreamer.com/support

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio
Most Americans agree: democracy is in jeopardy. So, why is the nation so divided?

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 31:48


Guess what? For as divided as the United States has become, polls show that most Americans agree: our democracy is at risk. So why do we have such a hard time getting along? Saint Joseph's University Professor of Political Science Dr. Susan Liebell takes a look at the health of democracy in America, and explains why she thinks the country has reached a crossroads, especially as tensions grow between what voters want, and the people who represent them. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

College Matters. Alma Matters.
Prof. Kymberly Harris of Georgia Southern University on UG Research: Students Become Scholars.

College Matters. Alma Matters.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 38:27


Prof. Harris was a school teacher before she became a University Professor. As a teacher you collect a lot of data. On academics, achievement test scores, how to motivate students, what time to day do they learn better etc. Research on that data, helps teachers provide better education to the kids in their classrooms! On our podcast, Prof. Harris talks about UG Research at Georgia Southern, the role CUR plays, Impact of Research on Students, Success Stories, and finally the Skills for high schoolers to do Research. Topics discussed in this episode: Introducing Prof. Kymberly Harris, GSU [] Hi Fives - Podcast Highlights [] Professional Background [] Why UG Research? [] Cascading Impact [] Chair of UG Research [] CUR's Role [] Student Participation [] Engaging Students [] Success Stories [] Impact on Students [] What's Ahead? [] Advice for High Schoolers [] Our Guest: Kymberly Harris is an Assoc. Professor in Elementary & Special Education & the Chair of Undergraduate Research Council at Georgia Southern University. Prof. Harris received the Bachelor of Arts degrees in secondary Education and Teaching from Athens State University. She then earned her PhD in Special Education and Teaching from the University of Alabama. Memorable Quote: “ I mean, it [Research] is for everybody. It helps everybody, but it's especially helpful for those students who, you know, haven't really got their feet set in the path that they want to go because it gives them so much more interest.” Prof. Kymberly Harris on UG Research . Episode Transcript: Please visit Episode's Transcript. Calls-to-action: Subscribe to our Weekly Podcast Newsletter. Follow us on Instagram. To Ask the Guest a question, or to comment on this episode, email podcast@almamatters.io. Subscribe or Follow our podcasts at any of these locations: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify.

ON Point with Alex Pierson
Why Are University Professors Self Censoring Their Material?

ON Point with Alex Pierson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 12:55


There's a lack of academic freedom when it comes to universities across this country, and now professors are afraid to have the conversations that are necessary for good learning by self censoring. How is this harming our education system? Joining Alex is Dr. Christopher Dummitt is Professor of Canadian history at Trent University. He is the co-author of a recent Macdonald-Laurier Institute paper titled "The viewpoint diversity crisis at Canadian universities: Political homogeneity, self-censorship, and threats to academic freedom."

The News with Gene Valicenti
09-13-22 Brown University Professor Wendy Schiller

The News with Gene Valicenti

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 4:18


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Larry Richert and John Shumway
Carnegie Mellon University professor receives support from students

Larry Richert and John Shumway

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 21:54


Hour Two - Larry and Marty discuss the situation this hour. 

New Books in Biography
Book Talk 55: Courtney B. Hodrick and Amir Eshel on Hannah Arendt's "Rachel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewish Woman"

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 91:06


Hannah Arendt said that she had one life-long “best friend.” That was Rachel Varnhagen, a Jewish woman who lived in Enlightenment-era Berlin around 1800 and died 73 years before Arendt was born, in 1906. Arendt wrote her first book, a startlingly original literary biography of Varnhagen who founded one of the most celebrated yet short-lived salons in Enlightenment era Prussia. I spoke with Courtney Blair Hodrick, a doctoral candidate completing a book-long study of Arendt, and Professor Amir Eshel, both of Stanford University to discover what is at stake in Arendt's unusual biography, why the book meant at once so much to Arendt and why she nonetheless almost neglected to publish it, and what this biography of a Jewish women in 19th century Berlin can teach us today about questions of identity, belonging, assimilation, women, Jews, anti-Semitism, freedom, politics, the private and the public, and many of the other topics that concerned Arendt throughout her lifetime. Uli Baer teaches literature and photography as University Professor at New York University. A recipient of Guggenheim, Getty and Humboldt awards, in addition to hosting "Think About It” he hosts (with Caroline Weber) the podcast "The Proust Questionnaire” and is Editorial Director at Warbler Press. Email ucb1@nyu.edu; Twitter @UliBaer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in German Studies
Book Talk 55: Courtney B. Hodrick and Amir Eshel on Hannah Arendt's "Rachel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewish Woman"

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 91:06


Hannah Arendt said that she had one life-long “best friend.” That was Rachel Varnhagen, a Jewish woman who lived in Enlightenment-era Berlin around 1800 and died 73 years before Arendt was born, in 1906. Arendt wrote her first book, a startlingly original literary biography of Varnhagen who founded one of the most celebrated yet short-lived salons in Enlightenment era Prussia. I spoke with Courtney Blair Hodrick, a doctoral candidate completing a book-long study of Arendt, and Professor Amir Eshel, both of Stanford University to discover what is at stake in Arendt's unusual biography, why the book meant at once so much to Arendt and why she nonetheless almost neglected to publish it, and what this biography of a Jewish women in 19th century Berlin can teach us today about questions of identity, belonging, assimilation, women, Jews, anti-Semitism, freedom, politics, the private and the public, and many of the other topics that concerned Arendt throughout her lifetime. Uli Baer teaches literature and photography as University Professor at New York University. A recipient of Guggenheim, Getty and Humboldt awards, in addition to hosting "Think About It” he hosts (with Caroline Weber) the podcast "The Proust Questionnaire” and is Editorial Director at Warbler Press. Email ucb1@nyu.edu; Twitter @UliBaer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

New Books in Literary Studies
Book Talk 55: Courtney B. Hodrick and Amir Eshel on Hannah Arendt's "Rachel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewish Woman"

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 91:06


Hannah Arendt said that she had one life-long “best friend.” That was Rachel Varnhagen, a Jewish woman who lived in Enlightenment-era Berlin around 1800 and died 73 years before Arendt was born, in 1906. Arendt wrote her first book, a startlingly original literary biography of Varnhagen who founded one of the most celebrated yet short-lived salons in Enlightenment era Prussia. I spoke with Courtney Blair Hodrick, a doctoral candidate completing a book-long study of Arendt, and Professor Amir Eshel, both of Stanford University to discover what is at stake in Arendt's unusual biography, why the book meant at once so much to Arendt and why she nonetheless almost neglected to publish it, and what this biography of a Jewish women in 19th century Berlin can teach us today about questions of identity, belonging, assimilation, women, Jews, anti-Semitism, freedom, politics, the private and the public, and many of the other topics that concerned Arendt throughout her lifetime. Uli Baer teaches literature and photography as University Professor at New York University. A recipient of Guggenheim, Getty and Humboldt awards, in addition to hosting "Think About It” he hosts (with Caroline Weber) the podcast "The Proust Questionnaire” and is Editorial Director at Warbler Press. Email ucb1@nyu.edu; Twitter @UliBaer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in European Studies
Book Talk 55: Courtney B. Hodrick and Amir Eshel on Hannah Arendt's "Rachel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewish Woman"

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 91:06


Hannah Arendt said that she had one life-long “best friend.” That was Rachel Varnhagen, a Jewish woman who lived in Enlightenment-era Berlin around 1800 and died 73 years before Arendt was born, in 1906. Arendt wrote her first book, a startlingly original literary biography of Varnhagen who founded one of the most celebrated yet short-lived salons in Enlightenment era Prussia. I spoke with Courtney Blair Hodrick, a doctoral candidate completing a book-long study of Arendt, and Professor Amir Eshel, both of Stanford University to discover what is at stake in Arendt's unusual biography, why the book meant at once so much to Arendt and why she nonetheless almost neglected to publish it, and what this biography of a Jewish women in 19th century Berlin can teach us today about questions of identity, belonging, assimilation, women, Jews, anti-Semitism, freedom, politics, the private and the public, and many of the other topics that concerned Arendt throughout her lifetime. Uli Baer teaches literature and photography as University Professor at New York University. A recipient of Guggenheim, Getty and Humboldt awards, in addition to hosting "Think About It” he hosts (with Caroline Weber) the podcast "The Proust Questionnaire” and is Editorial Director at Warbler Press. Email ucb1@nyu.edu; Twitter @UliBaer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
Book Talk 55: Courtney B. Hodrick and Amir Eshel on Hannah Arendt's "Rachel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewish Woman"

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 91:06


Hannah Arendt said that she had one life-long “best friend.” That was Rachel Varnhagen, a Jewish woman who lived in Enlightenment-era Berlin around 1800 and died 73 years before Arendt was born, in 1906. Arendt wrote her first book, a startlingly original literary biography of Varnhagen who founded one of the most celebrated yet short-lived salons in Enlightenment era Prussia. I spoke with Courtney Blair Hodrick, a doctoral candidate completing a book-long study of Arendt, and Professor Amir Eshel, both of Stanford University to discover what is at stake in Arendt's unusual biography, why the book meant at once so much to Arendt and why she nonetheless almost neglected to publish it, and what this biography of a Jewish women in 19th century Berlin can teach us today about questions of identity, belonging, assimilation, women, Jews, anti-Semitism, freedom, politics, the private and the public, and many of the other topics that concerned Arendt throughout her lifetime. Uli Baer teaches literature and photography as University Professor at New York University. A recipient of Guggenheim, Getty and Humboldt awards, in addition to hosting "Think About It” he hosts (with Caroline Weber) the podcast "The Proust Questionnaire” and is Editorial Director at Warbler Press. Email ucb1@nyu.edu; Twitter @UliBaer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

Larry Richert and John Shumway
Tweet from Carnegie Mellon University professor goes viral

Larry Richert and John Shumway

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 20:06


Hour Two - Larry and Marty discuss what the professor said last week in regard to Queen Elizabeth. 

Think About It
Book Talk 55: Courtney B. Hodrick and Amir Eshel on Hannah Arendt's "Rachel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewish Woman"

Think About It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 91:06


Hannah Arendt said that she had one life-long “best friend.” That was Rachel Varnhagen, a Jewish woman who lived in Enlightenment-era Berlin around 1800 and died 73 years before Arendt was born, in 1906. Arendt wrote her first book, a startlingly original literary biography of Varnhagen who founded one of the most celebrated yet short-lived salons in Enlightenment era Prussia. I spoke with Courtney Blair Hodrick, a doctoral candidate completing a book-long study of Arendt, and Professor Amir Eshel, both of Stanford University to discover what is at stake in Arendt's unusual biography, why the book meant at once so much to Arendt and why she nonetheless almost neglected to publish it, and what this biography of a Jewish women in 19th century Berlin can teach us today about questions of identity, belonging, assimilation, women, Jews, anti-Semitism, freedom, politics, the private and the public, and many of the other topics that concerned Arendt throughout her lifetime. Uli Baer teaches literature and photography as University Professor at New York University. A recipient of Guggenheim, Getty and Humboldt awards, in addition to hosting "Think About It” he hosts (with Caroline Weber) the podcast "The Proust Questionnaire” and is Editorial Director at Warbler Press. Email ucb1@nyu.edu; Twitter @UliBaer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Women's History
Book Talk 55: Courtney B. Hodrick and Amir Eshel on Hannah Arendt's "Rachel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewish Woman"

New Books in Women's History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 91:06


Hannah Arendt said that she had one life-long “best friend.” That was Rachel Varnhagen, a Jewish woman who lived in Enlightenment-era Berlin around 1800 and died 73 years before Arendt was born, in 1906. Arendt wrote her first book, a startlingly original literary biography of Varnhagen who founded one of the most celebrated yet short-lived salons in Enlightenment era Prussia. I spoke with Courtney Blair Hodrick, a doctoral candidate completing a book-long study of Arendt, and Professor Amir Eshel, both of Stanford University to discover what is at stake in Arendt's unusual biography, why the book meant at once so much to Arendt and why she nonetheless almost neglected to publish it, and what this biography of a Jewish women in 19th century Berlin can teach us today about questions of identity, belonging, assimilation, women, Jews, anti-Semitism, freedom, politics, the private and the public, and many of the other topics that concerned Arendt throughout her lifetime. Uli Baer teaches literature and photography as University Professor at New York University. A recipient of Guggenheim, Getty and Humboldt awards, in addition to hosting "Think About It” he hosts (with Caroline Weber) the podcast "The Proust Questionnaire” and is Editorial Director at Warbler Press. Email ucb1@nyu.edu; Twitter @UliBaer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Jewish Studies
Book Talk 55: Courtney B. Hodrick and Amir Eshel on Hannah Arendt's "Rachel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewish Woman"

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 91:06


Hannah Arendt said that she had one life-long “best friend.” That was Rachel Varnhagen, a Jewish woman who lived in Enlightenment-era Berlin around 1800 and died 73 years before Arendt was born, in 1906. Arendt wrote her first book, a startlingly original literary biography of Varnhagen who founded one of the most celebrated yet short-lived salons in Enlightenment era Prussia. I spoke with Courtney Blair Hodrick, a doctoral candidate completing a book-long study of Arendt, and Professor Amir Eshel, both of Stanford University to discover what is at stake in Arendt's unusual biography, why the book meant at once so much to Arendt and why she nonetheless almost neglected to publish it, and what this biography of a Jewish women in 19th century Berlin can teach us today about questions of identity, belonging, assimilation, women, Jews, anti-Semitism, freedom, politics, the private and the public, and many of the other topics that concerned Arendt throughout her lifetime. Uli Baer teaches literature and photography as University Professor at New York University. A recipient of Guggenheim, Getty and Humboldt awards, in addition to hosting "Think About It” he hosts (with Caroline Weber) the podcast "The Proust Questionnaire” and is Editorial Director at Warbler Press. Email ucb1@nyu.edu; Twitter @UliBaer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books Network
Book Talk 55: Courtney B. Hodrick and Amir Eshel on Hannah Arendt's "Rachel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewish Woman"

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 91:06


Hannah Arendt said that she had one life-long “best friend.” That was Rachel Varnhagen, a Jewish woman who lived in Enlightenment-era Berlin around 1800 and died 73 years before Arendt was born, in 1906. Arendt wrote her first book, a startlingly original literary biography of Varnhagen who founded one of the most celebrated yet short-lived salons in Enlightenment era Prussia. I spoke with Courtney Blair Hodrick, a doctoral candidate completing a book-long study of Arendt, and Professor Amir Eshel, both of Stanford University to discover what is at stake in Arendt's unusual biography, why the book meant at once so much to Arendt and why she nonetheless almost neglected to publish it, and what this biography of a Jewish women in 19th century Berlin can teach us today about questions of identity, belonging, assimilation, women, Jews, anti-Semitism, freedom, politics, the private and the public, and many of the other topics that concerned Arendt throughout her lifetime. Uli Baer teaches literature and photography as University Professor at New York University. A recipient of Guggenheim, Getty and Humboldt awards, in addition to hosting "Think About It” he hosts (with Caroline Weber) the podcast "The Proust Questionnaire” and is Editorial Director at Warbler Press. Email ucb1@nyu.edu; Twitter @UliBaer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Life Is A Classroom
Classroom Corner #25 : Our Emotions As Tools

Life Is A Classroom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 12:34


In this episode of the Classroom Corner, we speak to Dr. Ed Daube, a Best Selling Author, speaker, and University Professor specializing in Psychology. Known as "The Emotions Doctor," Dr. Ed Daube has several books that can help the reader learn how to utilize their emotions as tools to aid them in success.

Mike Gallagher Podcast
Carnegie Mellon University Professor's Vicious Remarks On Queen Elizabeth II's Death

Mike Gallagher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 51:54


The News with Gene Valicenti
09-06-22 Brown University Professor Wendy Schiller

The News with Gene Valicenti

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 7:46


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - BETTY JEAN CRAIGE - Conversations with Cosmos

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 41:28


Betty Jean Craige is University Professor of Comparative Literature and Director of the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts at the University of Georgia. She has published books in the fields of literature, history of ideas, politics, ecology, and art. Two of her translations of Marjorie Agosín's poetry were published by Sherman Asher: Poems for Josefina and Mother, Speak to Us of War / Madre, háblanos de la guerra. Her books Reconnection: Dualism to Holism in Literary Study, which won the Frederic W. Ness Book Award from the Association of American Colleges, Laying the Ladder Down: The Emergence of Cultural Holism, which won the Georgia Author of the Year Award, American Patriotism in a Global Society, and Eugene Odum: Ecosystem Ecologist and Environmentalist explore the development in the twentieth century of a holistic understanding of culture and nature. Betty Jean Craige has also published several art books on the Spanish artist Alvar Suñol. Her documentary Alvar Suñol: His Vision and His Art won first place in Short Documentary at the Indie Gathering film festival in 2006. - http://www.cosmotalks.com/ ******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

Craft Podcast
Saidiya Hartman – Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments

Craft Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 30:29


A revolution took place in the United States after Emancipation. A great migration north of the formerly enslaved brought with it convulsive changes in the organisation of cities, the shape of communities, and the practices of everyday life. In Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments: Intimate Histories of Riotous Black Girls, Troublesome Women and Queer Radicals (2019), Saidiya Hartman charts the nature of those changes, tracking African American women and queer radicals who were pathologised in their time period and reframing them as revolutionaries, the avant-garde of new ways of living in the early twentieth century. In this final episode of our pilot season, Saidiya discusses her routes into the book, how it grew from her earlier work on Atlantic slavery, and how through it she sought to find life, agency, and vibrance through the gaps, holes, and absences in the historical archive. Saidiya is the author of Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery, and Self-Making in Nineteenth-Century America (1997) and Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route (2007). She has received the National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism, the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction, the Mary Nickliss Prize from the Organization of American Historians, and a MacArthur Fellowship (2019). She is University Professor at Columbia University. 'I wanted to think about making and doing and the practices of everyday life that are so important not just to sustaining survival but to making another way in the context of the enclosure.' Craft is brought to you by Wasafiri, the magazine of international contemporary literature. Check out our website, www.wasafiri.org, for outtakes and a full transcript of this interview, and much more from writers all over the world. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

CareTalk Podcast: Healthcare. Unfiltered.
Dr. Peter Hotez on Anti-Science

CareTalk Podcast: Healthcare. Unfiltered.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 24:10


Dr. Peter Hotez joins CareTalk to discuss the anti-science culture that has developed in recent years and how it's impacting our response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Hotez explains how the anti-vaccine movement is based on misinformation and fearmongering. The result is a dangerous impact on public health that puts everyone at risk, not just those who are unvaccinated.Dr. Hotez also talks about how social media is playing a role in spreading this misinformation. Platforms like Facebook and Twitter are amplified the voices of those who peddle conspiracy theories and false information. This makes it difficult for people to know what to believe, and it's contributing to the spread of COVID-19.TOPICS:(0:21) What is anti-science?(1:45) What is the history of the anti-vaccination movement?(6:28) What is Corbevax and when will it be available?(12:12) Why is the anti-vaccination movement dangerous to public health?(14:24) What can we do to combat vaccine misinformation?(18:27) When it comes to COVID-19, what can we learn from our response to HIV?(21:36) Will anti-science get better or worse?ABOUT CARETALKCareTalk is a weekly podcast that provides an incisive, no B.S. view of the US healthcare system. Join co-hosts John Driscoll (CEO, CareCentrix) and David Williams (President, Health Business Group) as they debate the latest in US healthcare news, business and policy. ABOUT DR. PETER HOTEZDr. Peter Hotez is an American scientist, pediatrician, and advocate in the fields of global health, vaccinology, and neglected tropical disease control. He serves as founding dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine, Professor of Pediatrics and Molecular Virology & Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine, where he is also Director of the Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development and Texas Children's Hospital Endowed Chair in Tropical Pediatrics, and University Professor of Biology at Baylor College of Medicine.GET IN TOUCHBecome a CareTalk Podcast sponsor: https://www.caretalkpodcast.com/work-with-us Guest appearance requests: https://www.caretalkpodcast.com/contact-us Visit us at https://www.caretalkpodcast.comFOLLOW CARETALK Spotify Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Follow John on Twitter Follow David on Twitter#healthcarepodcast #healthcareindustry #healthcarebusiness #healthcarepolicy #ushealthcare #misinformation #peterhotez #vaccine #covid19 #science #medicine #pediatrics #publichealth #coronavirus 

The Creative Process Podcast
Highlights - Mona Sarfaty - Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health | Ed Maibach - Communication Scientist

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 14:50


“The Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 is really a bill which is using the financial structure of the country to stimulate business. This is a very different kind of solution than one might have conjured up some years ago. Back in 2010, Congress tried to do something on climate change and the main solution under consideration was a carbon tax. So that was also an effort to use the financial system, but this is a very different approach.This is putting out stimulus so that the business community can do what's necessary to build a clean energy economy. And so consumers can help support the growth of that clean energy economy by purchasing all those products that will allow individual people, families, and communities to be part of the solution by owning electric cars, by putting solar panels on their homes, by buying heat pumps to put in their homes, by improving the insulation in their private homes or buildings and thereby cutting their heating and cooling costs.”Dr. Mona Sarfaty is the Executive Director and Founder of the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health, comprised of societies representing 70% of all U.S. physicians. She founded the Communication in 2016 in conjunction with the George Mason University Center for Climate Change. Under her leadership, the Consortium has grown into a nationwide coalition of societies, organizations, and advocates mobilizing support for equitable policies that address the health impacts of climate change.Edward Maibach is Director of the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication, a distinguished University Professor and communication scientist who is expert in the uses of strategic communication and social marketing to address climate change and related public health challenges. His research – funded by NSF, NASA, and private foundations – focuses on public understanding of climate change and clean energy; and the psychology underlying public engagement. In 2021, Ed was identified by Thompson Reuters as one of the world's 10 most influential scientists working on climate change.https://medsocietiesforclimatehealth.orghttps://twitter.com/docsforclimatewww.climatechangecommunication.org/all/climate-change-american-mind-april-2022/www.climatechangecommunication.org/all/politics-global-warming-april-2022/www.oneplanetpodcast.org

Education · The Creative Process
Dr. Mona Sarfaty - Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health | Dr. Ed Maibach - Communication Scientist

Education · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 52:28


Dr. Mona Sarfaty is the Executive Director and Founder of the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health, comprised of societies representing 70% of all U.S. physicians. She founded the Consortium in 2016 in conjunction with the George Mason University Center for Climate Change. Under her leadership, the Consortium has grown into a nationwide coalition of societies, organizations, and advocates mobilizing support for equitable policies that address the health impacts of climate change.Edward Maibach is Director of the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication, a distinguished University Professor and communication scientist who is expert in the uses of strategic communication and social marketing to address climate change and related public health challenges. His research – funded by NSF, NASA, and private foundations – focuses on public understanding of climate change and clean energy; and the psychology underlying public engagement. In 2021, Ed was identified by Thompson Reuters as one of the world's 10 most influential scientists working on climate change.“Take a step back and sort of look at the big picture of why is this a tough issue to deal with. Why is it that people worldwide were struggling with making the kinds of decisions and enacting the decisions that will get to the root causes of the problem and stop the warming and start to protect our communities so that people and other things we care about aren't needlessly hurt. And the answer to that question is most people worldwide accept the realities of climate change, but they see it as a distant problem, distant on three different dimensions: Distant in terms of time, so they see it not necessarily as today's problem but a future problem. Distant in terms of location - you know, maybe somewhere somebody's dealing with this, but not us, not here in my community. And, perhaps most importantly, distant in terms of species.So people tend to see this as a plants, penguins, and polar bears problem and not a people problem. And that's a challenge that creates a challenge for us to engage the public in thinking about what this means for them today because, on all three of those dimensions, they feel like they've got some time, some distance in order to think these problems through.”https://medsocietiesforclimatehealth.orghttps://twitter.com/docsforclimatewww.climatechangecommunication.org/all/climate-change-american-mind-april-2022/www.climatechangecommunication.org/all/politics-global-warming-april-2022/www.oneplanetpodcast.org

The Creative Process Podcast
Dr. Mona Sarfaty - Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health | Dr. Ed Maibach - Communication Scientist

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 52:28


Dr. Mona Sarfaty is the Executive Director and Founder of the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health, comprised of societies representing 70% of all U.S. physicians. She founded the Communication in 2016 in conjunction with the George Mason University Center for Climate Change. Under her leadership, the Consortium has grown into a nationwide coalition of societies, organizations, and advocates mobilizing support for equitable policies that address the health impacts of climate change.Edward Maibach is Director of the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication, a distinguished University Professor and communication scientist who is expert in the uses of strategic communication and social marketing to address climate change and related public health challenges. His research – funded by NSF, NASA, and private foundations – focuses on public understanding of climate change and clean energy; and the psychology underlying public engagement. In 2021, Ed was identified by Thompson Reuters as one of the world's 10 most influential scientists working on climate change.“The Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 is really a bill which is using the financial structure of the country to stimulate business. This is a very different kind of solution than one might have conjured up some years ago. Back in 2010, Congress tried to do something on climate change and the main solution under consideration was a carbon tax. So that was also an effort to use the financial system, but this is a very different approach.This is putting out stimulus so that the business community can do what's necessary to build a clean energy economy. And so consumers can help support the growth of that clean energy economy by purchasing all those products that will allow individual people, families, and communities to be part of the solution by owning electric cars, by putting solar panels on their homes, by buying heat pumps to put in their homes, by improving the insulation in their private homes or buildings and thereby cutting their heating and cooling costs.”https://medsocietiesforclimatehealth.orghttps://twitter.com/docsforclimatewww.climatechangecommunication.org/all/climate-change-american-mind-april-2022/www.climatechangecommunication.org/all/politics-global-warming-april-2022/www.oneplanetpodcast.org

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process
Highlights - Mona Sarfaty - Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health | Ed Maibach - Communication Scientist

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 14:50


“Humanity needs to do three things if it wants to continue to flourish, and it will. The three things that humanity needs to do are decarbonize the global economy, drawdown, capture, harvest much of that heat-trapping pollution that we've already pumped into the atmosphere over the past hundred years because as long as it's up in our atmosphere, we're going to have continued warming. And the third thing that humanity needs to do is become more resilient to the impacts of climate change, which unfortunately will continue for the next several generations at least, even as we succeed in decarbonizing the global economy and harvesting that heat-trapping pollution from the atmosphere.So these are the three things that have to happen. These three things will happen. The open question is how rapidly will they happen? Any business that can play a vital role in making any one or two or all three of those things happen, those are businesses that are going to flourish going forward. And any business that's sitting on the side and not contributing to one of those three areas, I really think they will become increasingly irrelevant, if not completely antiquated and increasingly understood to be harmful.”Dr. Mona Sarfaty is the Executive Director and Founder of the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health, comprised of societies representing 70% of all U.S. physicians. She founded the Communication in 2016 in conjunction with the George Mason University Center for Climate Change. Under her leadership, the Consortium has grown into a nationwide coalition of societies, organizations, and advocates mobilizing support for equitable policies that address the health impacts of climate change.Edward Maibach is Director of the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication, a distinguished University Professor and communication scientist who is expert in the uses of strategic communication and social marketing to address climate change and related public health challenges. His research – funded by NSF, NASA, and private foundations – focuses on public understanding of climate change and clean energy; and the psychology underlying public engagement. In 2021, Ed was identified by Thompson Reuters as one of the world's 10 most influential scientists working on climate change.https://medsocietiesforclimatehealth.orghttps://twitter.com/docsforclimatewww.climatechangecommunication.org/all/climate-change-american-mind-april-2022/www.climatechangecommunication.org/all/politics-global-warming-april-2022/www.oneplanetpodcast.org

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process
Dr. Mona Sarfaty - Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health | Dr. Ed Maibach - Communication Scientist

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 52:28


Dr. Mona Sarfaty is the Executive Director and Founder of the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health, comprised of societies representing 70% of all U.S. physicians. She founded the Communication in 2016 in conjunction with the George Mason University Center for Climate Change. Under her leadership, the Consortium has grown into a nationwide coalition of societies, organizations, and advocates mobilizing support for equitable policies that address the health impacts of climate change.Edward Maibach is Director of the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication, a distinguished University Professor and communication scientist who is expert in the uses of strategic communication and social marketing to address climate change and related public health challenges. His research – funded by NSF, NASA, and private foundations – focuses on public understanding of climate change and clean energy; and the psychology underlying public engagement. In 2021, Ed was identified by Thompson Reuters as one of the world's 10 most influential scientists working on climate change.“Humanity needs to do three things if it wants to continue to flourish, and it will. The three things that humanity needs to do are decarbonize the global economy, drawdown, capture, harvest much of that heat-trapping pollution that we've already pumped into the atmosphere over the past hundred years because as long as it's up in our atmosphere, we're going to have continued warming. And the third thing that humanity needs to do is become more resilient to the impacts of climate change, which unfortunately will continue for the next several generations at least, even as we succeed in decarbonizing the global economy and harvesting that heat-trapping pollution from the atmosphere.So these are the three things that have to happen. These three things will happen. The open question is how rapidly will they happen? Any business that can play a vital role in making any one or two or all three of those things happen, those are businesses that are going to flourish going forward. And any business that's sitting on the side and not contributing to one of those three areas, I really think they will become increasingly irrelevant, if not completely antiquated and increasingly understood to be harmful.”https://medsocietiesforclimatehealth.orghttps://twitter.com/docsforclimatewww.climatechangecommunication.org/all/climate-change-american-mind-april-2022/www.climatechangecommunication.org/all/politics-global-warming-april-2022/www.oneplanetpodcast.org

Ernie Pyle WWII Museum Podcast
Episode 7 - Indiana State University Professor Dr. Christopher Fischer

Ernie Pyle WWII Museum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 20:00


In this episode, we discuss with Indiana State University Professor Dr. Christopher Fischer regarding Ernie Pyle and WWII.

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast
Dr. Mona Sarfaty - Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health | Dr. Ed Maibach - Communication Scientist

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 52:28


Dr. Mona Sarfaty is the Executive Director and Founder of the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health, comprised of societies representing 70% of all U.S. physicians. She founded the Communication in 2016 in conjunction with the George Mason University Center for Climate Change. Under her leadership, the Consortium has grown into a nationwide coalition of societies, organizations, and advocates mobilizing support for equitable policies that address the health impacts of climate change.Edward Maibach is Director of the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication, a distinguished University Professor and communication scientist who is expert in the uses of strategic communication and social marketing to address climate change and related public health challenges. His research – funded by NSF, NASA, and private foundations – focuses on public understanding of climate change and clean energy; and the psychology underlying public engagement. In 2021, Ed was identified by Thompson Reuters as one of the world's 10 most influential scientists working on climate change.“Humanity needs to do three things if it wants to continue to flourish, and it will. The three things that humanity needs to do are decarbonize the global economy, drawdown, capture, harvest much of that heat-trapping pollution that we've already pumped into the atmosphere over the past hundred years because as long as it's up in our atmosphere, we're going to have continued warming. And the third thing that humanity needs to do is become more resilient to the impacts of climate change, which unfortunately will continue for the next several generations at least, even as we succeed in decarbonizing the global economy and harvesting that heat-trapping pollution from the atmosphere.So these are the three things that have to happen. These three things will happen. The open question is how rapidly will they happen? Any business that can play a vital role in making any one or two or all three of those things happen, those are businesses that are going to flourish going forward. And any business that's sitting on the side and not contributing to one of those three areas, I really think they will become increasingly irrelevant, if not completely antiquated and increasingly understood to be harmful.”https://medsocietiesforclimatehealth.orghttps://twitter.com/docsforclimatewww.climatechangecommunication.org/all/climate-change-american-mind-april-2022/www.climatechangecommunication.org/all/politics-global-warming-april-2022/www.oneplanetpodcast.org

The News with Gene Valicenti
08-30-22 Brown University Professor Wendy Schiller

The News with Gene Valicenti

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 10:02


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast
Highlights - Mona Sarfaty - Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health | Ed Maibach - Communication Scientist

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 14:50


“Humanity needs to do three things if it wants to continue to flourish, and it will. The three things that humanity needs to do are decarbonize the global economy, drawdown, capture, harvest much of that heat-trapping pollution that we've already pumped into the atmosphere over the past hundred years because as long as it's up in our atmosphere, we're going to have continued warming. And the third thing that humanity needs to do is become more resilient to the impacts of climate change, which unfortunately will continue for the next several generations at least, even as we succeed in decarbonizing the global economy and harvesting that heat-trapping pollution from the atmosphere.So these are the three things that have to happen. These three things will happen. The open question is how rapidly will they happen? Any business that can play a vital role in making any one or two or all three of those things happen, those are businesses that are going to flourish going forward. And any business that's sitting on the side and not contributing to one of those three areas, I really think they will become increasingly irrelevant, if not completely antiquated and increasingly understood to be harmful.”Dr. Mona Sarfaty is the Executive Director and Founder of the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health, comprised of societies representing 70% of all U.S. physicians. She founded the Communication in 2016 in conjunction with the George Mason University Center for Climate Change. Under her leadership, the Consortium has grown into a nationwide coalition of societies, organizations, and advocates mobilizing support for equitable policies that address the health impacts of climate change.Edward Maibach is Director of the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication, a distinguished University Professor and communication scientist who is expert in the uses of strategic communication and social marketing to address climate change and related public health challenges. His research – funded by NSF, NASA, and private foundations – focuses on public understanding of climate change and clean energy; and the psychology underlying public engagement. In 2021, Ed was identified by Thompson Reuters as one of the world's 10 most influential scientists working on climate change.https://medsocietiesforclimatehealth.orghttps://twitter.com/docsforclimatewww.climatechangecommunication.org/all/climate-change-american-mind-april-2022/www.climatechangecommunication.org/all/politics-global-warming-april-2022/www.oneplanetpodcast.org

Education · The Creative Process
Highlights - Mona Sarfaty - Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health | Ed Maibach - Communication Scientist

Education · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 14:50


“Take a step back and sort of look at the big picture of why is this a tough issue to deal with. Why is it that people worldwide were struggling with making the kinds of decisions and enacting the decisions that will get to the root causes of the problem and stop the warming and start to protect our communities so that people and other things we care about aren't needlessly hurt. And the answer to that question is most people worldwide accept the realities of climate change, but they see it as a distant problem, distant on three different dimensions: Distant in terms of time, so they see it not necessarily as today's problem but a future problem. Distant in terms of location - you know, maybe somewhere somebody's dealing with this, but not us, not here in my community. And, perhaps most importantly, distant in terms of species.So people tend to see this as a plants, penguins, and polar bears problem and not a people problem. And that's a challenge that creates a challenge for us to engage the public in thinking about what this means for them today because, on all three of those dimensions, they feel like they've got some time, some distance in order to think these problems through.”Dr. Mona Sarfaty is the Executive Director and Founder of the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health, comprised of societies representing 70% of all U.S. physicians. She founded the Consortium in 2016 in conjunction with the George Mason University Center for Climate Change. Under her leadership, the Consortium has grown into a nationwide coalition of societies, organizations, and advocates mobilizing support for equitable policies that address the health impacts of climate change.Edward Maibach is Director of the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication, a distinguished University Professor and communication scientist who is expert in the uses of strategic communication and social marketing to address climate change and related public health challenges. His research – funded by NSF, NASA, and private foundations – focuses on public understanding of climate change and clean energy; and the psychology underlying public engagement. In 2021, Ed was identified by Thompson Reuters as one of the world's 10 most influential scientists working on climate change.https://medsocietiesforclimatehealth.orghttps://twitter.com/docsforclimatewww.climatechangecommunication.org/all/climate-change-american-mind-april-2022/www.climatechangecommunication.org/all/politics-global-warming-april-2022/www.oneplanetpodcast.org

One Planet Podcast
Highlights - Mona Sarfaty - Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health | Ed Maibach - Communication Scientist

One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 14:50


“The Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 is really a bill which is using the financial structure of the country to stimulate business. This is a very different kind of solution than one might have conjured up some years ago. Back in 2010, Congress tried to do something on climate change and the main solution under consideration was a carbon tax. So that was also an effort to use the financial system, but this is a very different approach.This is putting out stimulus so that the business community can do what's necessary to build a clean energy economy. And so consumers can help support the growth of that clean energy economy by purchasing all those products that will allow individual people, families, and communities to be part of the solution by owning electric cars, by putting solar panels on their homes, by buying heat pumps to put in their homes, by improving the insulation in their private homes or buildings and thereby cutting their heating and cooling costs.”Dr. Mona Sarfaty is the Executive Director and Founder of the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health, comprised of societies representing 70% of all U.S. physicians. She founded the Communication in 2016 in conjunction with the George Mason University Center for Climate Change. Under her leadership, the Consortium has grown into a nationwide coalition of societies, organizations, and advocates mobilizing support for equitable policies that address the health impacts of climate change.Edward Maibach is Director of the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication, a distinguished University Professor and communication scientist who is expert in the uses of strategic communication and social marketing to address climate change and related public health challenges. His research – funded by NSF, NASA, and private foundations – focuses on public understanding of climate change and clean energy; and the psychology underlying public engagement. In 2021, Ed was identified by Thompson Reuters as one of the world's 10 most influential scientists working on climate change.https://medsocietiesforclimatehealth.orghttps://twitter.com/docsforclimatewww.climatechangecommunication.org/all/climate-change-american-mind-april-2022/www.climatechangecommunication.org/all/politics-global-warming-april-2022/www.oneplanetpodcast.org

One Planet Podcast
Dr. Mona Sarfaty - Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health | Dr. Ed Maibach - Communication Scientist

One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 52:28


Dr. Mona Sarfaty is the Executive Director and Founder of the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health, comprised of societies representing 70% of all U.S. physicians. She founded the Communication in 2016 in conjunction with the George Mason University Center for Climate Change. Under her leadership, the Consortium has grown into a nationwide coalition of societies, organizations, and advocates mobilizing support for equitable policies that address the health impacts of climate change.Edward Maibach is Director of the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication, a distinguished University Professor and communication scientist who is expert in the uses of strategic communication and social marketing to address climate change and related public health challenges. His research – funded by NSF, NASA, and private foundations – focuses on public understanding of climate change and clean energy; and the psychology underlying public engagement. In 2021, Ed was identified by Thompson Reuters as one of the world's 10 most influential scientists working on climate change.“The Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 is really a bill which is using the financial structure of the country to stimulate business. This is a very different kind of solution than one might have conjured up some years ago. Back in 2010, Congress tried to do something on climate change and the main solution under consideration was a carbon tax. So that was also an effort to use the financial system, but this is a very different approach.This is putting out stimulus so that the business community can do what's necessary to build a clean energy economy. And so consumers can help support the growth of that clean energy economy by purchasing all those products that will allow individual people, families, and communities to be part of the solution by owning electric cars, by putting solar panels on their homes, by buying heat pumps to put in their homes, by improving the insulation in their private homes or buildings and thereby cutting their heating and cooling costs.”https://medsocietiesforclimatehealth.orghttps://twitter.com/docsforclimatewww.climatechangecommunication.org/all/climate-change-american-mind-april-2022/www.climatechangecommunication.org/all/politics-global-warming-april-2022/www.oneplanetpodcast.org

The Creative Process in 10 minutes or less · Arts, Culture & Society
Dr. Mona Sarfaty - Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health | Dr. Ed Maibach - Communication Scientist

The Creative Process in 10 minutes or less · Arts, Culture & Society

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 14:50


“The Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 is really a bill which is using the financial structure of the country to stimulate business. This is a very different kind of solution than one might have conjured up some years ago. Back in 2010, Congress tried to do something on climate change and the main solution under consideration was a carbon tax. So that was also an effort to use the financial system, but this is a very different approach.This is putting out stimulus so that the business community can do what's necessary to build a clean energy economy. And so consumers can help support the growth of that clean energy economy by purchasing all those products that will allow individual people, families, and communities to be part of the solution by owning electric cars, by putting solar panels on their homes, by buying heat pumps to put in their homes, by improving the insulation in their private homes or buildings and thereby cutting their heating and cooling costs.”Dr. Mona Sarfaty is the Executive Director and Founder of the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health, comprised of societies representing 70% of all U.S. physicians. She founded the Consortium in 2016 in conjunction with the George Mason University Center for Climate Change. Under her leadership, the Consortium has grown into a nationwide coalition of societies, organizations, and advocates mobilizing support for equitable policies that address the health impacts of climate change.Edward Maibach is Director of the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication, a distinguished University Professor and communication scientist who is expert in the uses of strategic communication and social marketing to address climate change and related public health challenges. His research – funded by NSF, NASA, and private foundations – focuses on public understanding of climate change and clean energy; and the psychology underlying public engagement. In 2021, Ed was identified by Thompson Reuters as one of the world's 10 most influential scientists working on climate change.https://medsocietiesforclimatehealth.orghttps://twitter.com/docsforclimatewww.climatechangecommunication.org/all/climate-change-american-mind-april-2022/www.climatechangecommunication.org/all/politics-global-warming-april-2022/www.oneplanetpodcast.org

The KORE Women Podcast
Professional Coach, Virginia Commonwealth University Professor of Entrepreneurship, Outsourced VP of Sale - April Palmer

The KORE Women Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 33:45


This week on the KORE Women podcast, Dr. Summer Watson welcomes April Palmer, who is a Coach, VCU Professor of Entrepreneurship, someone that likes to lead with humor and authenticity, and “believes in leveling the playing field for all entrepreneurs—particularly women and people of color — in all places to close the opportunity gap, create stronger communities, and remove obstacles using creative solutions to persistent problems." Her passion is to work towards building a vibrant and inclusive entrepreneurial ecosystem that intentionally supports a diverse group of entrepreneurs across all sectors. April's expertise lies in serving as a fractional or outsourced VP of Sales who can help small and medium-sized businesses boost sales and profits for long-term success. She will work with teams to co-create the strategic revenue plan, scale hiring, and ultimately deliver sustainable and long-term growth. Available for short-term and long-term contracts You can follow April Palmer on LinkedIn, on Twitter at: myfuckitbucket and at DuckBillGroup.com Thank you for taking the time to listen to the KORE Women podcast and being a part of the KORE Women experience. You can listen to The KORE Women podcast on your favorite podcast directory - Pandora, iHeartRadio, Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, YouTube, Spotify, Stitcher, Podbean, JioSaavn, Amazon and at: www.KOREWomen.com/podcast. Please leave your comments and reviews about the podcast and check out KORE Women on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. You can also learn more about the host, Dr. Summer Watson and KORE Women at: www.korewomen.com

The News with Gene Valicenti
08-23-22 Brown University Professor Wendy Schiller

The News with Gene Valicenti

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 10:06


Who won the first Providence Mayoral Debate. Professor Wendy Schiller of Brown University goes over the trios performance with Gene Valicenti. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The News with Gene Valicenti
08-16-22 Brown University Professor Wendy Schiller

The News with Gene Valicenti

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 7:22


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Native Stories
Indigenous Mathematicians: Bryan Dawson

Native Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 25:37


Dr. Bryan Dawson is a University Professor of Mathematics, from Union University in Jackson, Tennessee. He has a public Canvas course called “Calculus with Infinitesimals”: https://uu.instructure.com/courses/13558

New Books in Environmental Studies
J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke, "The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945" (Harvard UP, 2016)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 68:15


The Earth has entered a new age—the Anthropocene—in which humans are the most powerful influence on global ecology. Since the mid-twentieth century, the accelerating pace of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and population growth has thrust the planet into a massive uncontrolled experiment. J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke's book The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945 (Harvard UP, 2016) explains its causes and consequences, highlighting the role of energy systems, as well as trends in climate change, urbanization, and environmentalism. More than any other factor, human dependence on fossil fuels inaugurated the Anthropocene. Before 1700, people used little in the way of fossil fuels, but over the next two hundred years coal became the most important energy source. When oil entered the picture, coal and oil soon accounted for seventy-five percent of human energy use. This allowed far more economic activity and produced a higher standard of living than people had ever known—but it created far more ecological disruption. We are now living in the Anthropocene. The period from 1945 to the present represents the most anomalous period in the history of humanity's relationship with the biosphere. Three-quarters of the carbon dioxide humans have contributed to the atmosphere has accumulated since World War II ended, and the number of people on Earth has nearly tripled. So far, humans have dramatically altered the planet's biogeochemical systems without consciously managing them. If we try to control these systems through geoengineering, we will inaugurate another stage of the Anthropocene. Where it might lead, no one can say for sure. J.R. McNeill holds the appointment of University Professor at Georgetown University, serving as a faculty member of the School of Foreign Service and History Department. Professor McNeill is also a past president of American Society for Environmental History and the American Historical Association. Peter Engelke is the Deputy Director of Foresight at the Atlantic Council's Scowcroft Strategy Initiative and a Nonresident Senior Fellow, Global Energy Center. Brady McCartney is an interdisciplinary environmental social scientist at the University of Florida. Email: Brady.McCartney@UFL.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books in History
J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke, "The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945" (Harvard UP, 2016)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 68:15


The Earth has entered a new age—the Anthropocene—in which humans are the most powerful influence on global ecology. Since the mid-twentieth century, the accelerating pace of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and population growth has thrust the planet into a massive uncontrolled experiment. J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke's book The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945 (Harvard UP, 2016) explains its causes and consequences, highlighting the role of energy systems, as well as trends in climate change, urbanization, and environmentalism. More than any other factor, human dependence on fossil fuels inaugurated the Anthropocene. Before 1700, people used little in the way of fossil fuels, but over the next two hundred years coal became the most important energy source. When oil entered the picture, coal and oil soon accounted for seventy-five percent of human energy use. This allowed far more economic activity and produced a higher standard of living than people had ever known—but it created far more ecological disruption. We are now living in the Anthropocene. The period from 1945 to the present represents the most anomalous period in the history of humanity's relationship with the biosphere. Three-quarters of the carbon dioxide humans have contributed to the atmosphere has accumulated since World War II ended, and the number of people on Earth has nearly tripled. So far, humans have dramatically altered the planet's biogeochemical systems without consciously managing them. If we try to control these systems through geoengineering, we will inaugurate another stage of the Anthropocene. Where it might lead, no one can say for sure. J.R. McNeill holds the appointment of University Professor at Georgetown University, serving as a faculty member of the School of Foreign Service and History Department. Professor McNeill is also a past president of American Society for Environmental History and the American Historical Association. Peter Engelke is the Deputy Director of Foresight at the Atlantic Council's Scowcroft Strategy Initiative and a Nonresident Senior Fellow, Global Energy Center. Brady McCartney is an interdisciplinary environmental social scientist at the University of Florida. Email: Brady.McCartney@UFL.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke, "The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945" (Harvard UP, 2016)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 68:15


The Earth has entered a new age—the Anthropocene—in which humans are the most powerful influence on global ecology. Since the mid-twentieth century, the accelerating pace of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and population growth has thrust the planet into a massive uncontrolled experiment. J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke's book The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945 (Harvard UP, 2016) explains its causes and consequences, highlighting the role of energy systems, as well as trends in climate change, urbanization, and environmentalism. More than any other factor, human dependence on fossil fuels inaugurated the Anthropocene. Before 1700, people used little in the way of fossil fuels, but over the next two hundred years coal became the most important energy source. When oil entered the picture, coal and oil soon accounted for seventy-five percent of human energy use. This allowed far more economic activity and produced a higher standard of living than people had ever known—but it created far more ecological disruption. We are now living in the Anthropocene. The period from 1945 to the present represents the most anomalous period in the history of humanity's relationship with the biosphere. Three-quarters of the carbon dioxide humans have contributed to the atmosphere has accumulated since World War II ended, and the number of people on Earth has nearly tripled. So far, humans have dramatically altered the planet's biogeochemical systems without consciously managing them. If we try to control these systems through geoengineering, we will inaugurate another stage of the Anthropocene. Where it might lead, no one can say for sure. J.R. McNeill holds the appointment of University Professor at Georgetown University, serving as a faculty member of the School of Foreign Service and History Department. Professor McNeill is also a past president of American Society for Environmental History and the American Historical Association. Peter Engelke is the Deputy Director of Foresight at the Atlantic Council's Scowcroft Strategy Initiative and a Nonresident Senior Fellow, Global Energy Center. Brady McCartney is an interdisciplinary environmental social scientist at the University of Florida. Email: Brady.McCartney@UFL.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in World Affairs
J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke, "The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945" (Harvard UP, 2016)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 68:15


The Earth has entered a new age—the Anthropocene—in which humans are the most powerful influence on global ecology. Since the mid-twentieth century, the accelerating pace of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and population growth has thrust the planet into a massive uncontrolled experiment. J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke's book The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945 (Harvard UP, 2016) explains its causes and consequences, highlighting the role of energy systems, as well as trends in climate change, urbanization, and environmentalism. More than any other factor, human dependence on fossil fuels inaugurated the Anthropocene. Before 1700, people used little in the way of fossil fuels, but over the next two hundred years coal became the most important energy source. When oil entered the picture, coal and oil soon accounted for seventy-five percent of human energy use. This allowed far more economic activity and produced a higher standard of living than people had ever known—but it created far more ecological disruption. We are now living in the Anthropocene. The period from 1945 to the present represents the most anomalous period in the history of humanity's relationship with the biosphere. Three-quarters of the carbon dioxide humans have contributed to the atmosphere has accumulated since World War II ended, and the number of people on Earth has nearly tripled. So far, humans have dramatically altered the planet's biogeochemical systems without consciously managing them. If we try to control these systems through geoengineering, we will inaugurate another stage of the Anthropocene. Where it might lead, no one can say for sure. J.R. McNeill holds the appointment of University Professor at Georgetown University, serving as a faculty member of the School of Foreign Service and History Department. Professor McNeill is also a past president of American Society for Environmental History and the American Historical Association. Peter Engelke is the Deputy Director of Foresight at the Atlantic Council's Scowcroft Strategy Initiative and a Nonresident Senior Fellow, Global Energy Center. Brady McCartney is an interdisciplinary environmental social scientist at the University of Florida. Email: Brady.McCartney@UFL.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

Success to Significance: Life After Breaking Through Glass Ceilings
Making Your 'Why' Bigger Than Your 'Why Not' with Dan Clark

Success to Significance: Life After Breaking Through Glass Ceilings

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 69:36


The way to find Success and turn it into significance in life is not easy. But once we answer 'Why', figuring out the how becomes clear and simple. Everything else falls into place. Join Jen and her special guest Dan Clark, founder and CEO of a multi-million dollar international communications company. Listen along as Dan shares why finding your 'Why' is so important for your journey to success! Are you a successful professional, ready to share your story? Email admin@jenduplessis.com to get scheduled! _____________________________________________________ Learn more about Dan BIO: DAN CLARK is founder and CEO of a multi-million dollar international communications company; University Professor; High Performance Business Coach; Podcast Host; Gold Record Songwriter; Film Maker; New York Times Best Selling Author of 37 books; a Primary Contributing Author to the Chicken Soup For The Soul series; and an Award Winning Athlete who fought his way back from a paralyzing injury that cut short his football career. Dan has been inducted into the Professional Speakers Hall of Fame; was Named on e of the Top Ten Motivational Speakers In The World ; and has spoken to more than 6000 audiences, to over 6 million people, in 73 countries, to most of the Fortune 500, Super Bowl Champions, the United Nations, and to our military combat troops in Iraq, Afghanistan, Europe, Asia and Africa. Dan has appeared on over 500 television and radio shows including Oprah and Glenn Beck; and has been featured in Success Magazine, Forbes, Entrepreneur, Inc, Sports Illustrated, Millionaire and the Mayo Clinic Journal. Clark's inspiring life includes soaring to the edge of space in a U2 Spy Plane; flying fighter jets with the Air Force Thunderbirds; racing automobiles at Nur-burg-ring; serving on the Olympic Committee and carrying the Olympic Torch in the Winter Games; receiving the United States Distinguished Service Medal-America's Highest Civilian Award presented by the Secretary of the Air Force; and most importantly - being named Utah Father of the year. Get in touch with Dan Clark: LN IG FB WEBSITE NEW BOOK - The Art of Significance: Achieving the Level Beyond Success Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning
Loretta Breuning, Ph.D. on ”Habits of a Happy Brain: Rewiring Your Brain to Boost Serotonin, Oxytocin, and Endorphin Levels”

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 57:39


The secret of being happy is accepting where you are in life and making the most out of every day…. Or is it? Is there a secret to happiness that we can uncover by looking into the chemicals in our brain? We will find this out today. Watch this interview on YouTube here https://youtu.be/6Sb8wAsvwQ8 On the episode we will explore: ✔  A deep dive into the four happy chemicals in our brain. ✔ How to move past old patterns, behaviors and stress response circuits in our brain, for new results. ✔ Healthy ways to increase our happiness neurotransmitters. ✔ Vicious cycles we should all be aware of, and ways to break these cycles. ✔ How to rewire a "low trust" brain and what we can learn from how monkeys build trust in others. Welcome back to The Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast, where we cover the science-based evidence behind social and emotional learning (for schools) and emotional intelligence training (in the workplace) with tools, ideas and strategies that we can all use for immediate results. I'm Andrea Samadi, and on today's episode #236, we have Loretta Breuning, the Founder of the Inner Mammal Institute,[i] Professor Emerita of Management at California State University and the author of  Habits of a Happy Brain[ii] and Status Games: Why We Play and How to Stop. Her work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Psychology Today, Real Simple and numerous podcasts. Loretta helps people to build their power over their mammalian brain chemistry, reminding us that “happiness comes from chemicals we've inherited from earlier mammals: dopamine, serotonin, oxytocin and endorphin levels. When you know how they work in animals, your ups and downs make sense. Our happy chemicals evolved to reward survival behaviors, not to make us feel good all the time. But you can feel good more often when you understand nature's operating system.” Let's meet Dr. Loretta Breuning and learn together, how to retrain our brain to boost our serotonin, dopamine, oxytocin and endorphin levels, for a happier and healthier life by understanding why these neurotransmitters are important for happiness to occur in the present moment of our lives. Welcome Loretta, thank you for coming on the podcast. We have been focused on our brain as it relates to learning, and when I saw your book, Habits of a Happy Brain I jumped to learn more about it, because who doesn't want to learn more about our brain chemistry, especially when it comes to retraining our brain for happiness. INTRO Q: Can we start with where your interest in this topic began? How did you go from being a University Professor, to writing books about our brain chemistry and connecting us back to our “inner mammal” and how our brain is wired for survival?  Q1: You mentioned something in another interview[iii], that I think is important for us to understand. You said “we are all wired by our early experiences because this is when we have the most neuroplasticity.” What should we all know about how our brains are wired, that makes us all unique, right down to the level of the neurons in our brain? Q1B: So, if we are to dive deeper into this, you know how we all have a trauma response, or when we are stressed, or experiencing overwhelm, we experience either fight (anger/irritability) flight (let's talk about something else and avoid all of this) freeze (unable to move and disassociate), or fawn (where you keep the peace as a people please to avoid conflict)…all of these reactions hard-wired from our early experiences. I'm sure each of us, if asked, could think about which trauma response we use predominately. Once we are aware of our stress response circuit, what do we do with that?  Is it enough to just pay attention to whatever it is that's causing a reaction and notice if it's really a threat to you, or if we can just move beyond it? Q2: When I think about happiness, I don't usually think about what's going on at the brain level (until reading your book).  I'm thinking, I want to move towards this, or I don't. This makes me feel good, or it doesn't. Do more of X, and less of Y. What's behind this feeling of happiness? What 4 chemicals are showing up in the brain, and what should we know about how these 4 brain chemicals work?  (Page 14) Q2B: To intentionally retrain our brain towards more happiness, is this a good formula? “look for the joy=dopamine, beware of masking my pain, it will be temporary (endorphins), look for those I trust (oxytocin) and keep an eye on my pride/desire for social importance with serotonin? Is this enough, or am I missing anything important? (Page 16) 2C: What are healthy ways to increase each neurotransmitter? Q3: How does our brain wire itself early in life, and how difficult is it to break old wiring/habits? Q4: What are some common vicious cycles we should be aware of? What is the solution to getting out of these cycles, or resisting habits that make you feel good in the moment, and then bad later? Q4B: What tools do you have for people who are struggling to break a habit? Q5: In Chapter 2, Meet Your Happy Chemicals, you say that “your dopamine circuits are built from your past experiences” and “that dopamine builds a neural template that helps you find your rewards” (page 36, Habits of a Happy Brain) all built from our life experiences, like the child who discovers a berry patch with their mother, triggering dopamine with the whole experience. What happens to the rush this person feels later in life, (eating berries, or other experiences that have been wired into the brain) and what should we understand about the ups and downs of dopamine? Q5B: How can we translate this understanding into our parenting? Q6: What about endorphin, that “masks pain for a short time” (Page 41) “that is only released if you push past your capacity to the point of distress” and allows you to move forward. We have recently addressed chronic pain[iv], with ways to retrain our brain using mindfulness and meditation, along with other strategies, but endorphin doesn't seem to be a long-term solution to pain management. How does it contribute to our happiness if it's a short-term solution to our pain? Q7: What is the connection between oxytocin and trust? If you were standing in front of someone who just feels off to you for some reason, what happens at your brain level? Is oxytocin ONLY secreted with trust? Q7B: You say that “our oxytocin pathways are built with life experience” (page 48) so would it make sense that if we have a hard time trusting in our past experiences that these neural pathways would lean towards mistrust with others until we had rewired a new pathway of trust? Q7C: How would you rewire a “low-trust' pattern in our brain? Q8: How can we recognize when serotonin is flowing in our brain as we seek that feeling of being important or being respected, and how do our past serotonin experiences create our present expectations?   Q9: What is your 45-day plan to rewire our brain towards happiness? How can we take all of this and make it applicable? Q10: Why does our brain create unhappiness? What's important with experiencing the contrast of happiness and it's opposite? Q11: Is there anything important that I have missed? Final Thoughts: Thank you Dr. Breuning for sharing your Habits of a Happy Brain and all of your research on this podcast. For people to learn more about your work, and access the incredible free video series you've created, I will put the link to your resources and where people can follow you in the show notes. FOLLOW DR. LORETTA BREUNING WEBSITE https://innermammalinstitute.org/trainings/ TWITTER https://twitter.com/InnerMammal FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/LorettaBreuningPhD LINKEDIN https://www.linkedin.com/in/lorettabreuning/ YOUTUBE https://www.youtube.com/c/InnerMammalInstitute   REFERENCES:   [i] https://innermammalinstitute.org/about/   [ii] Habits of a Happy Brain: Retrain Your Brain to Boost Your Serotonin, Dopamine, Oxytocin and Endorphin Levels https://innermammalinstitute.org/books/habits-of-a-happy-brain/   [iii] The Quest for Status with Dr. Breuning and Mark Queppet https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQFzCq8bSdk [iv] Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #133 with Ashok Gupta on “Getting to the Root of Chronic Pain and Illness” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/ashok-gupta-on-heath-and-happiness-getting-to-the-root-of-chronic-pain-and-illness-long-covid-fibromyalgia-chronic-fatigue-and-others/  

Murder Sheet
The Delphi Murders: On Internet Predators: A Conversation with Dr. David Finkelhor.

Murder Sheet

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 29:45


Researching and thinking about the Delphi case requires us all to think about dark subjects most people are not be familiar with– topics such as internet predators and child sexual abuse materials. We feel that it would help us all understand better what happened in Delphi back in 2017 if we were able to get more context in those areas. So we have decided to begin a series of interviews with experts who have spent their careers studying these matters in order to get the benefit of their knowledge. We are beginning this endeavor by talking with David Finkelhor. Dr. Finkelhor has been researching issues involving child victimization, child maltreatment and family violence since 1977– which is even before there was an internet. He is the Director of Crimes against Children Research Center, Co-Director of the Family Research Laboratory, Professor of Sociology, and University Professor, at the University of New Hampshire. At the end of the episode, we will have a few words about next Tuesday's episode as well as a bit of news about the future of the Murder Sheet. Sponsors:Best Fiends Download your new favorite getaway, BEST FIENDS, for FREE today on the App Store or Google Play. You'll get $5 worth of in-game rewards when you reach Level 5. That's friends, without the r—Best Fiends.Everlywell Everlywell helps you find out what you need for a better tomorrow. Everlywell offers over 30 at home lab tests so you can find the one that can help you get the answers you need. For listeners of our show Everlywell is offering a special discount of twenty percent off an at home test at everlywell dot com slash msheet.Dermawand Dermawand is the non surgical and non invasive way to make your skin look younger. Now you have the chance to plug Dermawand into your routine — you'll also get a $100 value if you purchase, along with free shipping and free 30 day returns. Head to dermawand.com and enter promo MSHEET20 for a 20% discount on your order. That's M-S-H-E-E-T-2-0 to get 20% off your order.Follow the Murder Sheet on social media:FacebookTwitterInstagramAnd send tips to murdersheet@gmail.com.The Murder Sheet is a production of Mystery Sheet LLC .SummaryThe story of the 1903 Evansville race riot.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Think About It
Book Talk 54: Anne Fernald on Virginia Woolf's "Mrs. Dalloway"

Think About It

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 95:44


Halfway through Mrs Dalloway, Septimus Smith mutters to himself: "Communication is health; communication is happiness, communication.” It's easy to write off his message that communication is vital for human existence. He's a shell-shocked World War I vet, who, in this moment, hallucinates that the birds are communicating with him in grief. But in her landmark 1925 novel, Mrs Dalloway, Virginia Woolf understands his traumatized psyche with deep generosity and compassion. Indeed, the book's pervasive sense is that “it takes a lot of bravery to live a single day,” but that such everyday bravery is amply, richly, wonderfully rewarded in even the simplest of acts. I spoke with Anne Fernald about Mrs Dalloway's profound politics of emotion—and a host of other ideas. Anne is Professor of English and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Fordham University. She is the editor of Mrs. Dalloway (2014) and the Norton Critical Edition of Mrs. Dalloway (2021), and the author of Virginia Woolf: Feminism and the Reader (2006). Her incredible knowledge of and love for Woolf is itself an act of bravery, as you can hear in our conversation. You can find Warbler Press's authoritative edition, with a new introduction by me, here. Uli Baer teaches literature and photography as University Professor at New York University. A recipient of Guggenheim, Getty and Humboldt awards, in addition to hosting "Think About It” he hosts (with Caroline Weber) the podcast "The Proust Questionnaire” and is Editorial Director at Warbler Press. Email ucb1@nyu.edu; Twitter @UliBaer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books Network
Book Talk 54: Anne Fernald on Virginia Woolf's "Mrs. Dalloway"

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 95:44


Halfway through Mrs Dalloway, Septimus Smith mutters to himself: "Communication is health; communication is happiness, communication.” It's easy to write off his message that communication is vital for human existence. He's a shell-shocked World War I vet, who, in this moment, hallucinates that the birds are communicating with him in grief. But in her landmark 1925 novel, Mrs Dalloway, Virginia Woolf understands his traumatized psyche with deep generosity and compassion. Indeed, the book's pervasive sense is that “it takes a lot of bravery to live a single day,” but that such everyday bravery is amply, richly, wonderfully rewarded in even the simplest of acts. I spoke with Anne Fernald about Mrs Dalloway's profound politics of emotion—and a host of other ideas. Anne is Professor of English and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Fordham University. She is the editor of Mrs. Dalloway (2014) and the Norton Critical Edition of Mrs. Dalloway (2021), and the author of Virginia Woolf: Feminism and the Reader (2006). Her incredible knowledge of and love for Woolf is itself an act of bravery, as you can hear in our conversation. You can find Warbler Press's authoritative edition, with a new introduction by me, here. Uli Baer teaches literature and photography as University Professor at New York University. A recipient of Guggenheim, Getty and Humboldt awards, in addition to hosting "Think About It” he hosts (with Caroline Weber) the podcast "The Proust Questionnaire” and is Editorial Director at Warbler Press. Email ucb1@nyu.edu; Twitter @UliBaer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network