Podcast appearances and mentions of Patrick Ewing

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Jamaican-American basketball player

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Patrick Ewing

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Best podcasts about Patrick Ewing

Latest podcast episodes about Patrick Ewing

Casual Hoya: for Georgetown Hoyas fans
Ep 128: Twitter Q & A with Casual Hoya!

Casual Hoya: for Georgetown Hoyas fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 61:15


Bobby and Andrew are back to answer your Georgetown Twitter questions while also talking about the now finalized in stone 21-22 schedule. First things first the guys talked about Jamorko Pickett's success with the Detroit Pistons as he hopes to be the latest NBA Hoya and first Patrick Ewing recruit to get into the league. Next we tried to figure out why Georgetown's official roster is still missing, we discussed how the documenting lunch NIL deals went over with many Hoyas participating, Andrew gave some us a post Hurricane update, and much, much, more. Subscribe and listen to Kente Korner today! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Red Inker With Jarrod Kimber
The West Indies Basketball Myth with Machel St. Patrick Hewitt

Red Inker With Jarrod Kimber

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 46:24


This episode we talk about the myth that basketball is killing West Indies' cricket. So I got on a podcaster to help explain it, Machel St. Patrick Hewitt. We talk about Australian basketball, taxi drivers, Patrick Ewing, cable TV and show how little we know about Bahamas cricket. - To support the podcast please go to our Patreon page. https://www.patreon.com/user?u=32090121. If you like this podcast, you may enjoy other things I create, check them all out at https://linktr.ee/jarrodkimber. You can find Machel on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/CaribCricket. And his podcast, the Caribbean Cricket Podcast, is here: https://www.caribbeancricketpodcast.com. This podcast is edited, mixed and produced by Nick McCorriston, he's at https://www.nickamc.com and https://www.twitter.com/nickamc. The theme tune is by Red Crickets: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Red_Crickets/Red_Crickets.

Raw Data By P3
Jeff Sagarin

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 86:06


There's a place where sports and data meet, and it's as powerful a collision as on any football field!  Jeff Sagarin has been a figurehead in the sports analytics realm for decades, and we're thrilled to have had the chance to have him on to talk about his data journey!  There's a fair mix of math AND sports geek out time in this episode.  And, did we mention that Dr. Wayne Winston is sitting in on this episode as well? References in this Episode: 2 Frictionless Colliding Boxes Video Scorigami Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello, friends. Today's guest is Jeff Sagarin. Is that name familiar to you? It's very familiar to me. In my life, Jeff's work might very well be my first brush with the concept of using data for any sort of advantage. His Power Ranking Columns, first appeared in USA Today in 1985, when I was 11 years old. And what a fascinating concept that was. Rob Collie (00:00:29): It probably won't surprise you if I confess that 11-year-old me was not particularly good at sports, but I was still fascinated and captivated by them. 11-year-old kids in my neighborhood were especially prone to associating sports with their tribal identity. Everyone had their favorite teams, their favorite sports stars. And invariably, this led to arguments about which sports star was better than the other sports star, who was going to win this game coming up and who would win a tournament amongst all of these teams and things of that sort. Rob Collie (00:01:01): Now that I've explained it that way though, I guess being an adult sports fan isn't too terribly different, is it? Those arguments, of course, aren't the sorts of arguments where there's anything resembling a clear winner. But in practice, the person who won was usually the one with the loudest voice or the sickest burn that they could deliver to their friends. And then in 1985, the idea was planted in my head by Jeff Sagarin's column in USA Today, that there actually was a relatively objective way to evaluate teams that had never played against one another and likely never would. Rob Collie (00:01:33): I wasn't into computers at the time. I certainly wasn't into the concept of data. I didn't know what a database was. I didn't know what a spreadsheet was. And yet, this was still an incredibly captivating and powerful idea. So in my life, Jeff Sagarin is the first public figure that I encountered in the sports analytics industry long before it was cool. And because it was sports, a topic that was relevant to 11-year-old me, he's really also my first brush with analytics at all. Rob Collie (00:02:07): It's not surprising then, that to me, Jeff is absolutely a celebrity. As a guest, in insider podcasting lingo, Jeff is what we call a good get. We owe that pleasure, of course, to him being close friends with Wayne Winston, a former guest on the show, who also joined us today as co-guest. Rob Collie (00:02:28): Now, if none of that speaks to you, let's try this alternate description. He's probably also the world's most famous active FORTRAN programmer. I admit that I was so starstruck by this that I didn't even really push as hard as I normally would, in terms of getting into the techniques that he uses. I didn't want to run afoul of asking him for trade secrets. At times, this conversation did devolve into four dudes sitting around talking about sports. Rob Collie (00:02:59): But setting that aside, there are some really, really interesting and heartwarming things happening in this conversation as well. Again, the accidental path to where he is today, the intersection of persistence and good fortune that's required really for success in anything. Bottom line, this is the story of a national and highly influential figure at the intersection of the sports industry and the analytics industry for more than three decades. It's not every day you get to hear that story. So let's get into it. Announcer (00:03:34): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention, please? Announcer (00:03:39): This is the Raw Data by P3 Adaptive podcast with your host, Rob Colley and your co-host, Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to p3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:04:02): Welcome to the show, Jeff Sagarin. And welcome back to the show. Wayne Winston. So thrilled to have the two of you with us today. This is awesome. We've been looking forward to this for a long time. So thank you very much gentlemen, for being here. Jeff Sagarin (00:04:16): You're welcome. Rob Collie (00:04:18): Jeff, usually we kick these things off with, "Hey, tell us a little about yourself, your background, blah, blah, blah." Let's start off with me telling you about you. It's a story about you that you wouldn't know. I remember for a very long time being aware of you. Rob Collie (00:04:35): So I'm 47 years old, born in 1974. My father had participated for many years in this shady off-the-books college football pick'em pool that was run out of the high school in a small town in Florida. Like the sheets with everybody's entries would show up. They were run on ditto paper, like that blue ink. It was done in the school ditto room and he did this every year. This was like the most fascinating thing that happened in the entire year to me. Like these things showing up at our house, this packet of all these picks, believe it or not, they were handwritten. These grids were handwritten with everyone's picks. It was ridiculous. Rob Collie (00:05:17): He got eliminated every year. There were a couple of hundred entries every year and he just got his butt kicked every year. But then one year, he did his homework. He researched common opponents and things like that or that kind of stuff. I seem to recall this having something to do timing wise with you. So I looked it up. Your column first appeared in USA Today in 1985. Is that correct? Jeff Sagarin (00:05:40): Yeah. Tuesday, January 8th 1985. Rob Collie (00:05:44): I remember my dad winning this pool that year and using the funds to buy a telescope to look at Halley's Comet when it showed up. And so I looked up Halley's Comet. What do you know? '86. So it would have been like the January ballgames of 1986, where he won this pool. And in '85, were you power ranking college football teams or was that other sports? Jeff Sagarin (00:06:11): Yes. Rob Collie (00:06:12): Okay. So when my dad said that he did his research that year, what he really did was read your stuff. You bought my dad a telescope in 1986 so that we could go have one of the worst family vacations of all time. It was just awful. Thank you. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:31): You're very welcome. Rob Collie (00:06:39): I kind of think of you as the first publicly known figure in sports analytics. You probably weren't the first person to apply math and computers to sports analytics, but you're the first person I heard of. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:51): There is a guy that people don't even talk about very much. Now a guy named Earnshaw Cook, who first inspired me when I was a sophomore in high school in the '63-'64 school year, there was an article by Frank Deford in Sports Illustrated about Earnshaw Cook publishing a book called Percentage Baseball. So I convinced my mom to let me have $10 to order it by mail and I got it. I started playing around with his various ideas in it. He was the first guy I ever heard of and that was in March of 1964. Rob Collie (00:07:28): All right, so everyone's got an origin story. Jeff Sagarin (00:07:31): The Dunkel family started doing the Dunkel ratings back I believe in 1929. Then there was a professor, I think he was at Vanderbilt, named [Lipkin House 00:07:41], he was I think at Vanderbilt. And for years, he did the high school ratings in states like maybe Tennessee and Kentucky. I think he gave Kentucky that Louisville courier his methodology before he died. But I don't know if they continue his work or not. But there were people way before me. Rob Collie (00:08:03): But they weren't in USA Today. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:04): That's true. Rob Collie (00:08:06): They weren't nationally distributed, like on a very regular basis. I've been hearing your name longer than I've even been working with computers. That's pretty crazy. How did you even get hooked up with USA Today? Jeff Sagarin (00:08:23): People might say, "You got lucky." My answer, as you'll see as well, I'd worked for 12 years to be in a position to get lucky. I started getting paid for doing this in September of 1972 with an in-house publication of pro football weekly called Insider's Pro Football Newsletter. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:45): In the Spring of '72, I'd written letters to like 100 newspapers saying because I had started by hand doing my own rating system for pro football in the fall of 1971. Just by hand, every Sunday night, I'd get the scores and add in the Monday night. I did it as a hobby. I wasn't doing it for a living. I did it week by week and charted the teams. It was all done with some charts I'd made up with a normal distribution and a slide rule. So I sent out letters in the spring of '72 to about 100 papers saying, "Hey, would you be interested in running my stuff?" Jeff Sagarin (00:09:19): They either didn't answer me or all said, "No, not interested." But I got a call right before I left to go to California when an old college friend that spring. It was from William Wallace, who was a big time football correspondent for The New York Times. That anecdote may be in that article by Andy Glockner. He called me up, he was at the New York Times, but he said also, "I write articles for extra money for pro football weekly. I wanted to just kind of talk to you." Jeff Sagarin (00:09:49): He wrote an article that appeared in Pro Quarterback magazine in September of '72. But during the middle of that summer, I got a phone call from Pro Football weekly, the publisher, a guy named [inaudible 00:10:04] said, "Hey Jeff. Have you seen our ad in street and Smith's?" It didn't matter. It could have been their pro magazine or college. I said, "Yeah, I did." And he said, "Do you notice it said we've got a world famous handicapper to do our predictions for us?" I said, "Yeah, I did see that." He said, "How would you like to be that world famous handicapper? We don't have anybody." Jeff Sagarin (00:10:25): We just said that because he said William Wallace told us to call you. So I said, "Okay, I'll be your world famous handicapper." I didn't start off that well and they had this customer, it was a paid newsletter and there was a customer from Hawaii. He had a great name, Charles Fujiwara. He'd send letters every week saying, "Sagarin's terrible, but he's winning a fortune for me. I just reverse his picks every week." So finally, finally, my numbers turn the tide and I had this one great week, where I went 8-0. He sent another letter saying, "I'm bankrupt. The kid destroyed me." Because he was reversing all my picks. That's a true story. Rob Collie (00:11:07): At least he had a sense of humor. It sounds like a pretty interesting fellow on the other end of that letter. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:13): He sounds like he could have been like the guy, if you've ever seen reruns of the old show, '77 Sunset Strip. In it, there this guy who's kind of a racetrack trout gambler named Roscoe. He sounds like he could have been Roscoe. Rob Collie (00:11:26): We have to look that one up. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:11:27): It's before your time. Rob Collie (00:11:28): I don't think I saw that show. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:29): Yeah. Wayne's seen it though. Rob Collie (00:11:31): Yes. I love that. There are things that are both before my time and I have like old man knees. So I've heard this kind of thing before, by the way. It's called the 10-year overnight success. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:47): I forgot. How did I get with USA Today? I started with Pro Football weekly and continued with them. I was with them until actually why don't we say sometime in the fall of '82. I ended up in other newspapers, little by little: The Boston Globe, Louisville Courier Journal. And then in the spring of '81, I got into a conversation over the phone with Jim van Valkenburg, who is the stat guy at the NCAA. I happened to mention that going into the tournament, I had Indiana to win the tournament. They were rated like 10th in the conventional polls. Jeff Sagarin (00:12:23): And so he remembered that and he kept talking behind the scenes to people in the NCAA about that. And so years later, in 1988, they called me out to talk to them. But anyhow, I had developed a good reputation and I gave him as a reference. Wayne called me up excitedly in let's say, early September of 1984. He said, "Hey, Jeff. You've got to buy a copy of today's USA Today and turn to the end of the sports section. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:12:53): I said, "Really? Okay." So I opened to where he said and I was sick. They had computer ratings by some guy. He was a good guy named Thomas Jech, J-E-C-H. And I said, "Damn, that should be me. I've been doing this for all these years and I didn't even know they were looking for this." So I call up on the phone. Sometimes there's a lot of luck involved. I got to talk to a guy named Bob Barbara who I believe is retired now there. He had on the phone this gruff sounding voice out of like a Grade B movie from the film, The War. "What's going on Kitty?" It sounds like he had a cigar in his mouth. Jeff Sagarin (00:13:30): I said, "Well, I do these computer ratings." [inaudible 00:13:33] Said "Well, really? That's interesting. We've already got somebody." He said, "But how would you even send it to us?" I said, "Well, I dictate over the phone." He said, "Dictate? We don't take dictation at USA Today, kid. Have you ever heard of personal computers and a modem?" I said, "Well, I have but I just do it on a mainframe at IU and I dictate over the phone to the Louisville Courier and the local..." Jeff Sagarin (00:13:58): Well, the local paper here, I gave them a printout. He said, "Kid, you need to buy yourself a PC and learn how to use a modem." So I kind of was embarrassed. I said, "Well, I'll see." So about 10 days later, I called him up and said, "Hey, what's the phone number for your modem?" He said, "Crap. You again, kid? I thought I got rid of you." He says, "All right. I'll give you the phone number." So I sent him a sample printout. He says, "Yeah, yeah, we got it. Keep in touch. We're not going to change for football. But this other guy, he may not want to do basketball. So keep in touch. Who knows what will happen for basketball?" Jeff Sagarin (00:14:31): So every month I'd call up saying, "It's me again, keeping touch." He said, "I can't get rid of you. You're like a bad penny that keeps turning up." So finally he says look, after about five of these calls, spreading out until maybe late November, "Look kid, why don't you wait... Call me up the first Sunday of the new year," which would have been like Sunday, January 6 of 1985 I believe. So I waited. I called him up. Sure enough, he said, "You again?" I said, "You told me you wanted to do college basketball." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:04): He said, "Yeah, you're kind of right. The other guy doesn't want to do it." So he said, "Well, do you mind if we call it the USA Today computer ratings? We kind of like to put our own name on everything." I said, "Well, wait a minute. During the World Series, you had Pete Rose as your guest columnist, you want not only gave his name, but you had a picture of him." He said, "God damn it." He said, "I can't..." He said, "You win again kid. Give us a bio." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:32): An old friend of both me and Wayne was on a business trip. He lived in California, but one of the companies he did work for was Magnavox, which at the time had a presence in Fort Wayne. So he had stopped off in Bloomington so we could say hi. We hadn't seen each other for many years. So he wrote my bio for me, which is still used in the agate in the USA Today. So it's the same bio all these years. Jeff Sagarin (00:15:56): So they started printing me on Tuesday, January 8 of 1985. On the front page that day and I got my editor of a couple years ago, he found an old physical copy of that paper and sent it to me and I thought that's pretty cool. And on the front page, they said, "Well, this would be the 50th birthday of Elvis Presley." I get, they did not have a banner headline at the top, "Turn to the sports and see Jeff Sagarin's debut." That was not what they did. It was all about Elvis Presley. And so people will tell me, "Wow! You got really lucky." Jeff Sagarin (00:16:30): Yeah, but I was in a position. I'd worked for 12 years since the fall of '72 to get in position to then get lucky. They told me I had some good recommendations from people. Rob Collie (00:16:42): Well, even that persistence to keep calling in the face of relatively discouraging feedback. So that conversation took place, and then two days later, you're in the paper. Jeff Sagarin (00:16:54): Well, yeah. He said, "Send us the ratings." They might have needed a time lag. So if I sent the ratings in on a Sunday night or Monday morning, they'd print them on Tuesday. They're not as instant. Now, I update every day on their website. For the paper, they take whatever the most recent ones they can access off their website, depending on I've sent it in, which is I always send them in early in the morning like when I get up. So they print on a Tuesday there'll be taking the ratings that they would have had in their hands Monday, which would be through Sunday's games. Rob Collie (00:17:26): That Tuesday, was that just college basketball? Jeff Sagarin (00:17:28): Then it was. Then in the fall of 85. They began using me for college football, not that they thought I was better or worse one way or the other than Thomas Jech who was a smart guy, he was a math professor at the time at Penn State. He just got tired of doing it. He had more important things to do. Serious, I don't mean that sarcastically. That was just like a fun hobby for him from what I understand. Rob Collie (00:17:50): I was going to ask you if you hadn't already gone and answered the question ahead of time. I was going to ask you well, what happened to the other guy? Did you go like all Tonya Harding on him or whatever? Did you take out your rival? No, sounds like Nancy Kerrigan just went ahead and retired. Although I hate to make you Tonya Harding in this analogy and I just realized I just Hardinged you. Jeff Sagarin (00:18:10): He was just evidently a really good math professor. It was just something he did for fun to do the ratings. Rob Collie (00:18:17): Opportunity and preparation right where they intersect. That's "luck". Jeff Sagarin (00:18:22): It would be as if Wally Pipp had retired and Lou Gehrig got to replace him in the analogy, Lou Gehrig gets the first base job but actually Wally Pipp in real life did not retire. He had the bad luck to get a cold or something or an injury and he never got back in the starting lineup after that. Rob Collie (00:18:38): What about Drew Bledsoe? I think he did get hurt. Did we ever see him again? Thomas LaRock (00:18:43): The very next season, he was in Buffalo and then he went to Dallas. Rob Collie (00:18:46): I don't remember this at all. Thomas LaRock (00:18:47): And not only that, but when he went to Dallas, he got hurt again and Tony Romo came on to take over. Rob Collie (00:18:53): Oh my god! So Drew Bledsoe is Wally Pipp X2. Thomas LaRock (00:18:58): Yeah, X2. Rob Collie (00:19:02): I just need to go find wherever Drew Bledsoe is right now and go get in line behind him. Thomas LaRock (00:19:08): He's making wine in Walla Walla, Washington. I know exactly where he is. Rob Collie (00:19:12): I'm about to inherit a vineyard gentlemen. Okay, so Wayne's already factored into this story. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:23): A little bit. Rob Collie (00:19:23): A bit part but an important one. We would call you Mr. Narrative Hook in the movie. Like you'd be the guy that's like, "Jeff, you've got to get a copy of USA Today and turn to page 10. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:19:37): Well, I was I'm glad Wayne told me to do it. If I'd never known that, who knows what I'd be doing right now? Rob Collie (00:19:44): Yeah. So you guys are longtime friends, right? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:47): Yeah. Jeff, should take this. Jeff Sagarin (00:19:49): September 1967 in the TV room at Ashdown Graduate's House across from the dorm we lived, because the graduate students there had rigged up, we call it a full screen TV that was actually quite huge. It's simply projected from a regular TV onto a maybe a 10 foot by 10 foot old fashioned movie projector screen. We'd go there to watch ballgames. Okay, because better than watching on a 10 inch diagonal black and white TV in the dorm. And it turned out we both had a love for baseball and football games. Thomas LaRock (00:20:26): So just to be clear, though, this was no ordinary school. This is MIT. Because this is what people at MIT would do is take some weird tech thing and go, "We can make this even better, make a big screen TV." Jeff Sagarin (00:20:38): We didn't know how to do it, which leads into Wayne's favorite story about our joint science escapades at MIT. If Wayne wants to start it off, you might like this. I was a junior and Wayne was a sophomore at the time. I'll set Wayne up for it, there was a requirement that MIT no matter what your major, one of the sort of distribution courses you had to take was a laboratory class. Why don't we let Wayne take the ball for a while on this? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:21:05): I'm not very mechanically inclined. I got a D in wood shop and a D in metal shop. Jeff's not very mechanically inclined either. We took this lab class and we were trying to figure out identifying a coin based on the sound waves it would produce under the Scylla scope. And so the first week, we couldn't get the machine to work. And the professor said, "Turn it on." And so we figured that step out and the next week, the machine didn't work. He said, "Plug it in." Jeff can take it from there. Jeff Sagarin (00:21:46): It didn't really fit the mathematical narrative exactly of what metals we knew were in the coin. But then I noticed, nowadays we'd probably figure out this a reason. If we multiplied our answers by something like 100 pi, we got the right numbers. So they were correctly proportional. So we just multiplied our answers by 100 pi and said, "As you can see, it's perfectly deducible." Rob Collie (00:22:14): There's a YouTube video that we should probably link that is crazy. It shows that two boxes on a frictionless surface a simulation and the number of times that they collide, when you slide them towards a wall together, when they're like at 10X ratio of mass, the number of times that they impact each other starts to become the digits of pi. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:34): Wow. Rob Collie (00:22:35): Before they separate. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:36): That's interesting. Rob Collie (00:22:36): It's just bizarre. And then they go through explaining like why it is pi and you understand it while the video is playing. And then the video ends and you've completely lost it. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:49): I'm just asking now, are they saying if you do that experiment an infinite amount of times, the average number of times they collide will be pi? Rob Collie (00:22:57): That's a really good question. I think it's like the number of collisions as you increase the ratios of the weight or something like that start to become. It's like you'll get 314 collisions, for instance, in a certain weight ratio, because that's the only three digits of pi that I remember. It's 3.14. It's a fascinating little watch. So the 100 pi thing, you said that, I'm like, "Yeah, that just... Of course it's 100 pi." Even boxes colliding on a frictionless surface do pi things apparently. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:29): Maybe it's a universal constant in everything we do. Rob Collie (00:23:29): You just don't expect pi to surface itself. It has nothing to do with waves, no wavelength, no arcs of circles, nothing like that. But that sneaky video, they do show you that it actually has something to do with circles and angles and stuff. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:44): Mutual friend of me and Wayne, this guy named Robin. He loves Fibonacci. And so every time I see a particular game end by a certain score, I'll just say, "Hey, Robin. Research the score of..." I think it was blooming to North against some other team. And he did. It turned out Bloomington North had won 155-34, which are the two adjacent Fibonacci, the two particular adjacent Fibonacci. Robin loves that stuff. You'll find a lot of that actually. It's hard to double Fibonacci a team though. That would be like 89-34. Rob Collie (00:24:18): I know about the Fibonacci sequence. But I can't pick Fibonacci sequence numbers out of the wild. Are you familiar with Scorigami? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:26): Who? I'd never heard of it obviously. Rob Collie (00:24:29): I think a Scorigami is a score in the NFL that's never happened. Jeff Sagarin (00:24:32): There was one like that about 10 years ago, 11-10, I believe. Pittsburgh was involved in the game or 12-11, something like that. Rob Collie (00:24:40): I think there was a Scorigami in last season. With scoring going up, the chances of Scorigami is increasing. There's just more variance at the higher end of the spectrum of numbers, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:50): I've always thought about this. In Canada, Canadian football, they have this extra rule that I think is kind of cool because it would probably make more scores happen. If a punter kicks the ball into the end zone, it can't roll there. Like if he kicks it on the fly into the end zone and the other team can't run it out, it's called a rouge and the kicking team gets one point for it. That's kind of cool. Because once you add the concept of scoring one point, you make a lot more scores more probable of happening. Rob Collie (00:25:21): Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, totally. You can win 1-0. Thomas LaRock (00:25:25): So the end zone is also... It's 20 yards deep. So the field's longer, it's 110 yards. But the end zone's deeper and part of it is that it's too far to kick for a field goal. But you know what? If I can punt it into the end zone and if I get a cover team down there, we can get one point out. I'm in favor of it. I think that'd be great. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:43): I think you have to kick out on the fly into the end zone. It's not like if it rolls into it. Thomas LaRock (00:25:47): No, no, no. It's like a pop flop. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:50): Yeah. Okay. Rob Collie (00:25:50): If you punt it out of the end zone, is it also a point? Thomas LaRock (00:25:52): It's a touch back. No, touch back. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:54): That'd be too easy of a way to get a point. Rob Collie (00:25:57): You've had a 20 yard deep target to land in. In Canadian fantasy football, if there was such a thing, maybe there is, punters, you actually could have punters as a position because they can score points. That would be a really sad and un-fun way to play. Rob Collie (00:26:14): But so we're amateur sports analytics people here on the show. We're not professionals. We're probably not even very good at it. But that doesn't mean that we aren't fascinated by it. We're business analytics people here for sure. Business and sports, they might share some techniques, but it's just very, very, very different, the things that are valuable in the two spaces. I mean, they're sort of spiritually linked but they're not really tools or methods that provide value. Rob Collie (00:26:39): Not that you would give them. But we're not looking for any of your secrets here today. But you're not just writing for USA Today, there's a number of places where your skills are used these days, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:26:51): Well, not as much as that. But I want to make a favorable analogy for Wayne. In the world of sports analytics, whatever the phrases are, I consider myself to be maybe an experimental applied physicist. Wayne is an advanced theoretical physicist. I do the grunt work of collecting data and doing stuff with it. But Wayne has a large over-viewing of things. He's like a theoretical physicist. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:27:17): Jeff is too modest because he's experimented for years on the best parameters for his models. Rob Collie (00:27:27): It's again that 10-year, 20-year overnight success type of thing. You've just got to keep grinding at it. Do the two of you collaborate at all? Jeff Sagarin (00:27:35): Well, we did on two things, the Hoops computer game and Win Val. I forgot. How could I forget? It was actually my favorite thing that we did even though we've made no money doing the randomization using Game Theory of play calling for football. And we based it actually and it turned out that I got great numerical results that jive with empirical stuff that Virgil Carter had gotten and our economist, named Romer, had gotten and we had more detailed results than them. Jeff Sagarin (00:28:06): But in the areas that we intersected, we had the same as them. We used a game called Pro Quarterback and we modeled it. We had actually, a fellow, I wasn't a professor but a fellow professor of Wayne's, a great guy, just a great guy named Vic Cabot, who wrote a particular routine to insert the FORTRAN program that solved that particular linear programming problem that would constantly reoccur or else we couldn't do it. That was the favorite thing and we got to show it once to Sam White, who we really liked. And White said, "I like this guy. I may have played this particular game," we told him what we based it on, "when I was a teenager." Jeff Sagarin (00:28:46): He said, "I know exactly what you want to do." You don't make the same call in the same situation all the time. You have a random, but there's an optimal mix Game Theory, as you probably know for both offense and defense. White said, "The problem is this is my first year here. It was the summer of '83." And he said, "I don't really have the security." Said, "Imagine it's third and one, we're on our own 15 yard line. And it's third and one. And the random number generator says, 'Throw the bomb on this play with a 10% chance of calling up but it'll still be in the mix. And it happens to come up.'" Jeff Sagarin (00:29:23): He said, "It was my eight year here. I used to play these games myself. I know exactly." But then he patted his hip. He said, "It's mine on the line this first year." He said, "It's kind of nerve wracking to do that when you're a rookie coach somewhere, to call the bomb when it's third and one on your own 15. If it's incomplete, you'll be booed out of the stadium." Rob Collie (00:29:46): Yeah, I mean, it's similar to there's the general reluctance in coaches for so long to go for it on fourth and one. When the analytics were very, very, very clear that this was a plus expected value, +EV, move to go for it on fourth and one. But the thing is, you've got to consider the bigger picture. Right? The incentives, the coaches number one goal is actually don't get fired. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:14): You were right. That's what White was telling us. Rob Collie (00:30:14): Yeah. Winning a Super Bowl is a great thing to do. Because it helps you not get fired. It's actually weird. Like, if your goal is to win as many games as possible, yes, go for it on fourth and one. But if your goal is to not get fired, maybe. So it takes a bit more courage even to follow the numbers. And for good reason, because the incentives aren't really aligned the way that we think they are when you first glance at a situation. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:41): Well, there's a human factor that there's no way unless you're making a guess how to take it into account. It may be demoralizing to your defense if you go for it on fourth and one and you're on your own 15. I've seen the numbers, we used to do this. It's a good mathematical move to go for it. Because you could say, "Well, if you're forced to punt, the other team is going to start on the 50. So what's so good about that? But psychologically, your defense may be kind of pissed off and demoralized when they have to come out on the field and defend from their own 15 after you've not made it and the numbers don't take that into account. Rob Collie (00:31:19): Again, it's that judgment thing. Like the coach hung out to dry. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:22): Can I say a word about Vic Cabot, that Jeff mentioned? Jeff Sagarin (00:31:26): Yeah, He's great. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:27): Yeah. So Vic was the greatest guy any of us in the business school ever knew. He was a fantastic person. He died of throat cancer in 1994, actually 27 years ago this week or last week. Jeff Sagarin (00:31:43): Last week. It was right around Labor Day. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:46): Right. But I want to mention, basically, when he died, his daughter was working in the NYU housing office. After he died, she wrote a little book called The Princess Diaries. She's worth how many millions of dollars now? But he never got to see it. Jeff Sagarin (00:32:06): He had a son, a big kid named Matt Cabot, who played at Bloomington South High School. I got a nice story about Matthew. I believe the last time I know of him, he was a state trooper in the state of Colorado. I used to tell him when I was still young enough and Spry enough, we'd play a little pickup or something. I'd say, "Matthew, forget about points. The most important thing, a real man gets rebounds." Jeff Sagarin (00:32:32): They played in the semi state is when it was just one class. In '88, me and Wayne and a couple of Wayne's professor buddies, we all... Of course, Vic would have been there but we didn't go in the same car. It was me, Wayne and maybe [inaudible 00:32:48] and somebody else, Wayne? Jeff Sagarin (00:32:49): They played against Chandler Thompson's great team from Muncie Central. In the first three minutes, Chris Lawson, who was the star of the team went up for his patented turn around jumper from six feet away in the lane and Chandler Thompson spiked it like a volleyball and on the run of Muncie Central player took it with no one near him and laid it in and the game essentially ended but Matt Cabot had the game of his life. Jeff Sagarin (00:33:21): I think he may have led the game of anyone, the most rebounds in the game. I compliment him. He was proud of that. And he's played, he said many a pickup game with Chandler Thompson, he said the greatest jumper he's ever been on the court within his entire life. You guys look up because I don't know if you know who Chandler Thompson. Is he played at Ball State. Look up on YouTube his put back dunk against UNLV in the 90 tournaments, the year UNLV won it at all. Look up Chandler Thompson's put back dunk. Rob Collie (00:33:52): Yeah, I was just getting into basketball then, I think. Like in the Loyola Marymount days. Yeah, Jerry Tarkanian. Does college basketball have the same amount of personalities it used to like in the coaching figures. I kind of doubt that it does. Rob Collie (00:34:06): With Tark gone, and of course, Bob Knight, it'll be hard to replace personalities like that. I don't know. I don't really watch college basketball anymore, so I wouldn't really know. But I get invited into those pick'em pools for the tournament March Madness every year and I never had the stamina to fill them out. And they offer those sheets where they'll fill it out for you. But why would I do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:34:28): I've got to tell you a story involving Wayne and I. Rob Collie (00:34:31): Okay. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:31): In the 80 tournament, I had gotten a program running that would to simulate the tournament if you fed in the power ratings. It understood who'd play who and you simulate it a zillion times, come up with the odds. So going into the tournament, we had Purdue maybe the true odds against him should have been let's say, I'll make it up seven to one. Purdue and Iowa, they had Ronnie Lester, I remember. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:57): The true odds against them should have been about 7-1. The bookmakers were giving odds of 40-1. So Wayne and I looked at each other and said, "That seems like a big edge." In theory, well, odds are still against them. Let's bet $25 apiece on both Purdue and Iowa. The two of them made the final four. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:20): In Indianapolis, I'll put it this way, their consolation game gave us no consolation. Rob Collie (00:35:30): Man. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:31): And then one of the games, Joe Barry Carroll of Purdue, they're down by one they UCLA. I'm sure he was being contested. I don't mean he was all by himself. It's always easy for the fan who can't play to mock the player. I don't mean... He was being fiercely contested by UCLA. The net result was he missed with fierce contesting one foot layup that would have won the game for Purdue, that would have put them into the championship game and Iowa could have beaten Louisville, except their best player, Ronnie Lester had to leave the game because he had aggravated a bad knee injury that he just couldn't play well on. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:11): But as I said, no consolation, right Wayne? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:36:14): Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:15): That was the next to the last year they ever had a consolation game. The last one was in '81 between LSU and Virginia. Rob Collie (00:36:23): Was it the '81 tournament that you said that you liked Indiana to win it? Jeff Sagarin (00:36:28): Wait, I'm going to show you how you get punished for hubris. I learned my lesson. The next year in '82, I had gotten a lot of notoriety, good kind of notoriety for having them to win in '81. People thought, "Wow! This is like the Oracle." So now as the tournament's about to begin in '82, I started getting a lot of calls, which I never used to do like from the media, "Who do you got Jeff?" I said confidently, "Oregon State." I had them number one, I think they'd only lost one game the whole year and they had a guy named Charlie Sitting, a 6'8 guy who was there all American forward. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:06): He was the star and I was pretty confident and to be honest, probably obnoxious when I'd be talking to the press. So they make the regional final against Georgetown and it was being held out west. I'm sort of confidently waiting for the game to be played and I'm sure there'll be advancing to the final four. And they were playing against freshmen, Patrick Ewing. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:29): In the first 10 seconds of the game, maybe you can find the video, there was a lob pass into Ewing, his back was to the basket, he's like three feet from the basket without even looking, he dunks backwards over his head over Charlie Sitton. And you should see the expression on Charlie Sitton's face. I said, "Oh my god! This game is over." The final score was 68-43 in Georgetown's favor. It was a massacre. It taught me the lesson, never be cocky, at least in public because you get slapped down, you get slapped down when you do that. Rob Collie (00:38:05): I don't want to get into this yet again on this show. But you should call up Nate Silver and maybe talk to him a little bit about the same sort of thing. Makes very big public calls that haven't been necessarily so great lately. Just for everyone's benefit, because even though I'd live in the state of Indiana, I didn't grow up here. Let's just be clear. Who won the NCAA tournament in 1981? Jeff Sagarin (00:38:29): Indiana. Rob Collie (00:38:30): Okay. All right, so there you go. Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:38:33): But who didn't win it in 1982? Oregon State. Rob Collie (00:38:38): Yeah. Did you see The Hunt for Red October where Jack Ryan's character, there's a point where he guesses. He says, "Ramy, as always, goes to port in the bottom half of the hour with his crazy Ivan maneuvers and he turns out to be right." And that's how he ends up getting the captain of the American sub to trust him as Jack Ryan knew this Captain so well, even knew which direction he would turn in the crazy Ivan. But it turns out he was just bluffing. He knew he needed a break and it was 50/50. Rob Collie (00:39:08): So it's a good thing that they were talking to you in the Indiana year, originally. Not the Oregon State year. That wouldn't be a good first impression. If you had to have it go one way or the other in those two years, the order in which it happened was the right order. Jeff Sagarin (00:39:22): Yeah, nobody would have listened to me. They would have said, "You got lucky." They said, "You still were terrible in the Oregon State year." Rob Collie (00:39:28): But you just pick the 10th rated team and be right. The chances of that being just luck are pretty low. I like it. That's a good story. So the two of you have never collaborated like on the Mark Cuban stuff? On the Mavs or any of that? Jeff Sagarin (00:39:43): We've done three things together. The Hoops computer game, which we did from '86-'95. And then we did the Game Theory thing for football, but we never got a client. But we did get White to kind of follow it. There's an interesting anecdote, I won't I mentioned the guy who kind of screwed it up. But he assigned a particular grad assistant to fill and we needed a matrix filled in each week with a bunch of numbers with regarding various things like turnovers. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:13): If play A is called against defense B, what would happen type of thing? The grad assistant hated doing it. And one week, he gave us numbers such that the computer came back with when Indiana had the ball, it should quick kick on first down every time it got the ball. We figured it out what was going on, the guy had given Indiana a 15% chance of a turnover, no matter what play they called in any situation against any defense. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:44): So the computer correctly surmised it were better to punt the ball. This is like playing Russian roulette with the ball. Let's just kick it away. So we ended up losing the game in real life 10-0. White told us then when we next saw him, we used to see him on Monday or Tuesday mornings, real early in the day, like seven o'clock, but that's when you could catch him. And he kind of looked at us and said, "You know what? We couldn't have done any worse said had we kicked [inaudible 00:41:14]." Rob Collie (00:41:13): That's nice. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:14): And then we did Mark Cuban. That was the last thing. We did that with Cuban from basically 2000-2011 with a couple of random projects in the summer for him, but really on a day to day basis during a season from 2000-2011. Rob Collie (00:41:30): And during that era is when I met Wayne at Microsoft. That was very much an active, ongoing project when Wayne was there in Redmond a couple of times that we crossed paths. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:41:43): And we worked for the Knicks one year, and they won 54 games. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:47): Here with Glen Grunwald. So they won more games than they'd ever won in a whole bunch of years. And like three weeks before the season starts or so in mid September, the next fire, Glen Grunwald. Let's put it this way, it didn't bother us that the Knicks never made the playoffs again until this past season. Rob Collie (00:42:10): That's great. You were doing, was it lineup optimization for those teams? Jeff Sagarin (00:42:15): Wayne knows more about this than I do. Because I would create the raw data, well, I call it output, but it needed refinement. That was Wayne's department. So you do all the talking now, Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:42:26): Yeah. Jeff wrote an amazing FORTRAN program. So basically, Jeff rated teams and we figured out we could rate players based on how the score of the game moved during the game. We could evaluate lineups and figure out head to head how certain players did against each other. Now, every team does this stuff and ESPN has Real Plus-Minus and Nate Silver has Raptor. But we started this. Jeff Sagarin (00:42:58): I mean, everybody years ago knew about Plus-Minus. Well, intuitively, let's say you're a gym rat, you first come to a gym, you don't know anyone there and you start getting in the crowd of guys that show up every afternoon to play pickup. You start sensing, you don't even have to know their names. Hey, when that guy is on the court, no matter who his teammates are, they seem to win. Jeff Sagarin (00:43:20): Or when this guy's on the court, they always seem to lose. Intuitively since it matters, who's on the court with you and who your opponents are. Like to make an example for Rob, let's say you happen to be in a pickup game. You've snuck into Pauley Pavilion during the summer and you end up with like four NBA current playing professionals on your team and let's say an aging Michael Jordan now shows up. He ends up with four guys who are graduate students in philosophy because they have to exercise. You're going to have a better plus-minus than Michael Jordan. But when you take into account who your teammates were and who's his were, if you knew enough about the players, he'd have a better rating than you, new Michael Jordan would. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:08): But you'd have a better raw plus-minus than he would. You have to know who the people on the court were. That was Wayne's insight. Tell them how it all started, how you met ran into Mark Cuban, Wayne, when you were in Dallas? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:20): Well, Mark was in my class in 1981, statistics class and I guess the year 1999, we went to a Pacers Maverick game in Dallas. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:31): March of 2000. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:33): March of 2000, because our son really liked the Pacers. Mark saw me in the stands. He said, "I remember you from class and I remember you for being on Jeopardy." He had just bought the team. And he said, "If you can do anything to help the Mavericks, let me know." And then I was swimming in the pool one day and I said, "If Jeff rates teams, we should rate players." And so we worked on this and Jeff wrote this amazing FORTRAN program, which I'm sure he could not rewrite today. Jeff Sagarin (00:45:04): Oh, God. Well, I was motivated then. Willingness to work hard for many hours at a time, for days at a time to get something to work when you could use the money that would result from it. I don't have that in me anymore. I'm amazed when I look at the source code. I say, "Man, I couldn't do that now." I like to think I could. Necessity is the mother of invention. Rob Collie (00:45:28): I've many, many, many times said and this is still true to this day, like a previous version of me that made something amazing like built a model or something like that, I look back and go, "Whoo, I was really smart back then." Well, at the same time I know I'm improving. I know that I'm more capable today than I was a year ago. Even just accrued wisdom makes a big difference. When you really get lasered in on something and are very, very focused on it, you're suddenly able to execute at just a higher level than what you're typically used to. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:01): As time went on, we realized what Cuban wanted and other teams like the next would want. Nobody really wanted to wade through the monster set of files that the FORTRAN would create. I call that the raw output that nobody wanted to read, but it was needed. Wayne wrote these amazing routines in Excel that became understandable and usable by the clients. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:26): The way Wayne wrote the Excel, they could basically say, "Tell us what happens when these three guys are in the lineup, but these two guys are not in the lineup." It was amazing the stuff that he wrote. Wayne doesn't give himself the credit that otherwise after a while, nobody would have wanted what we were doing because what I did was this sort of monstrous and to some extent boring. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:46:48): This is what Rob's company does basically. They try and distill data into understandable form that basically helps the company make decisions. Rob Collie (00:46:58): It is a heck of a discipline, right? Because if you have the technical and sort of mental skills to execute on something that's that complex, and it starts down in the weeds and just raw inputs, it's actually really, really, really easy to hand it off in a form that isn't yet quite actionable for the intended audience. It's really fascinating to you, the person that created it. Rob Collie (00:47:23): It's not digestible or actionable yet for the consumer crowd, whoever the target consumer is. I've been there. I've handed off a lot of things back in the day and said, "The professional equivalent of..." And it turned out to not be... It turned out to be, "Go back and actually make it useful, Rob." So I'm familiar with that. For sure. I think I've gotten better at that over the years. As a journey, you're never really complete with. Something I wanted to throw in here before I forget, which is, Jeff, you have an amazing command of certain dates. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:47:56): Oh, yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:47:57): Give me some date that you know the answer about what day of the week it was, and I'll tell you, but I'll tell you how I did it. Rob Collie (00:48:04): Okay, how about June 6, 1974? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:08): That'd be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:10): Holy cow. Okay. How do you do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:11): June 11th of 1974 would be a Tuesday, so five days earlier would be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:19): How do you know June 11? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:19): I just do. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:23): It's his birthday. Rob Collie (00:48:24): No, it's not. He wasn't born in '74. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:27): No, but June 11th. Jeff Sagarin (00:48:29): I happen to know that June 11 was a Tuesday in 1974, that's all. Rob Collie (00:48:34): I'm still sitting here waiting what passes for an explanation. Is one coming? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:39): I'll tell you another way I could have done it, but I didn't. In 1963, John Kennedy gave his famous speech in Berlin, Ich bin ein Berliner, on Wednesday, June 26th. That means that three weeks earlier was June 5, the Wednesday. So Thursday would have been June 6th. You're going to say, "Well, why is that relevant?" Well, 1963 is congruent to 1974 days of the week was. Rob Collie (00:49:07): Okay. This is really, really impressive. Jeff, you seem so normal up until now. Thomas LaRock (00:49:16): You want throw him off? Just ask for any date before 1759? Jeff Sagarin (00:49:20): No, I can do that. It'll take me a little longer though. Thomas LaRock (00:49:22): Because once they switch from Gregorian- Jeff Sagarin (00:49:25): No, well, I'll give it a Gregorian style, all right. I'm assuming that it's a Gregorian date. The calendar totally, totally repeats every possible cycle every 400 years. For example, if you happen to say, "What was September 10, of 1621?" I would quickly say, "It's a Friday." Because 1621 is exactly the same as 2021 says. Rob Collie (00:49:52): Does this translate into other domains as well? Do you have sort of other things that you can sort of get this quick, intuitive mastery over or is it very, very specific to this date arithmetic? Jeff Sagarin (00:50:02): Probably specific. In other words, I think Wayne's a bit quicker than me. I'm certain does mental arithmetic stuff, but to put everybody in their place, I don't think you ever met him, Wayne. Remember the soccer player, John Swan? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:50:14): Yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:50:15): He had a friend from high school, they went to Brownsburg High School. I forgot the kid's name. He was like a regular student at IU. He was not a well scholar, but he was a smart kid. I'd say he was slightly faster than me at most mental arithmetic things. So you should never get cocky and think that other people, "Oh, they don't have the pedigree." Some people are really good at stuff you don't expect them to be good at, really good. This kid was really good. Rob Collie (00:50:45): As humans, we need to hyper simplify things in order to have a mental model we can use to navigate a very, very complicated world. That's a bit of a strength. But it's also a weakness in many ways. We tend to try to reduce intelligence down to this single linear number line, when it's really like a vast multi dimensional coordinate space. There are so many dimensions of intelligence. Rob Collie (00:51:11): I grew up with the trope in my head that athletes weren't very bright. Until the first time that I had to try to run a pick and roll versus pick and pop. I discovered that my brain has a clock speed that's too slow to run the pick and roll versus pick and pop. It's not that I'm not smart enough to know if this, than that. I can't process it fast enough to react. You look at like an NFL receiver or an NFL linebacker or whatever, has to process on every single snap. Rob Collie (00:51:45): It's amazing how much information they have the processor. Set aside the physical skill that they have, which I also don't have and never did. On top of that, I don't have the brain at all to do these sorts of things. It's crazy. Jeff Sagarin (00:52:00): With the first few years, I was in Bloomington from, let's say, '77 to '81, I needed the money, so I tutored for the athletic department. They tutored math. And I remember once I was given an assignment, it was a defensive end, real nice kid. He was having trouble with the kind of math we would find really easy. But you could tell he had a mental block. These guys had had bad experiences and they just, "I can't do this. I can't do this." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:25): I asked this defensive end, "Tell me what happens when the ball snap, what do you have to do?" I said, "In real time, you're being physically pulverized, the other guy's putting a forearm or more right into your face. And your brain has to be checking about five different things going on in the backfield, other linemen." I said, "What you're doing with somebody else trying to hurt you physically is much more intellectually difficult, at least to my mind than this problem in the book in front of you and the book is not punching you in the face." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:57): He relaxed and he can do the problems in the room. I'd make sure. I picked not a problem that I had solved. I'd give him another one that I hadn't solved and he could do it. I realized, my God, what these guys they're doing takes actually very quick reacting brainpower and my own personal experience in elementary school, let's say in sixth grade after school, we'd be playing street football, just touch football. When I'd be quarterback, I'd start running towards the line of scrimmage. Jeff Sagarin (00:53:26): If the other team came after me, they'd leave a receiver wide open. I said, "This is easy." So I throw for touchdown. Well, in seventh grade, we go to junior high. We have squads in gym class, and on a particular day, I got to be quarterback. Now, instead of guys sort of leisurely counting one Mississippi, two Mississippi, they are pouring in. It's not that you're going to get hurt, but you're going to get tagged and the play would be over. It says touch football, and I'd be frantically looking for receivers to get open. Let's just say it was not a good experience. I realized there's a lot more to be in quarterback than playing in the street. It's so simple. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:08): They come after you and they leave the receivers wide open. That's what evidently sets apart. Let's say the Tom Brady's from the guys who don't even make it after one year in the NFL. If you gave them a contest throwing the ball, seeing who could throw it through a tire at 50 yards, maybe the young kid is better than Tom Brady but his brain can't process what's happening on the field fast enough. Thomas LaRock (00:54:32): As someone who likes to you know, test things thoroughly, that student of yours who was having trouble on the test, you said the book wasn't hitting him physically. Did you try possibly? Jeff Sagarin (00:54:45): I should have shoved it in his face. Thomas LaRock (00:54:49): Physically, just [crosstalk 00:54:50]. Rob Collie (00:54:50): Just throw things at him. Yeah. Thomas LaRock (00:54:52): Throw an eraser, a piece of chalk. Just something. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:56): I'll tell you now, I don't want to name him. He's a real nice guy. I'll tell you a funny anecdote about him. I had hurt my knuckle in a pickup basketball game. I had a cast on it and I was talking to my friend. And he had just missed making a pro football team the previous summer and he was on the last cut. He'd made it to the final four guys. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:18): He was trying to become a linebacker I think. They told him, "You're just not mean enough." That was in my mind. I thought, "Well, I don't know about that." He said, "Yeah, I had the same kind of fractured knuckle you got." I said, "How'd you get it?" "Pick up [inaudible 00:55:32]. Punching a guy in the face." But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. And I heard a story from a friend of mine who I witnessed it, this guy was at one point working security at a local holiday inn that would have these dances. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:47): There was some guy who was like from the Hells Angels who was causing trouble. He's a big guy, 6'5, 300 whatever. And he actually got into an argument with my friend who was the security guy. Angel guy throws a punch at this guy who's not mean enough for the NFL. With one punch the Jeff Sagarin tutoree knocked the Hell's Angels guy flat unconscious. He was a comatose on the floor. But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. Rob Collie (00:56:17): Tom if I told my plus minus story about my 1992 dream team on this show, I think maybe I have. I don't remember. Thomas LaRock (00:56:24): You might have but this seems like a perfect episode for that. Rob Collie (00:56:27): I think Jeff and Wayne, if I have told it before, it was probably with Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:56:31): I don't remember. Rob Collie (00:56:32): Perfect. It'll be new to everyone that matters. Tom remembers. So, in 1992, the Orlando Magic were a recent expansion team in the NBA. Sometime in that summer, the same summer where the 1992 Dream Team Olympic team went and dominated, there was a friend of our family who ran a like a luxury automotive accessories store downtown and he basically hit the jackpot. He'd been there forever. There was like right next to like the magic practice facility. Rob Collie (00:57:09): And so all the magic players started frequenting his shop. That was where they tricked out all their cars and added all the... So his business was just booming as a result of magic coming to town. I don't know this guy ever had ever been necessarily terribly athletic at any point in his life. He had this bright idea to assemble a YMCA team that would play in the local YMCA league in Orlando, the city league. Rob Collie (00:57:35): He had secured the commitment of multiple magic players to be on our team as well as like Jack Givens, who was the radio commentator for The Magic and had been a longtime NBA star with his loaded team. And then it was like, this guy, we'll call this guy Bill. It's not his real name. So it was Bill and the NBA players and me and my dad, a couple of younger guys that actually I didn't know, but were pretty good but they weren't even like college level players. Rob Collie (00:58:07): And so we signed up for the A league, the most competitive league that Orlando had to offer. And then none of the NBA players ever showed up. I said never, but they did show up one time. But we were getting blown out. Some of the people who were playing against us were clearly ex college players. We couldn't even get the ball across half court. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:33): Wayne, does this sound familiar to you? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:58:35): Yes, tell this story. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:38): Wayne, when he was a grad student at Yale, and I'm living in the White Irish neighborhood called Dorchester in Boston, I was young and spry. At that time, I would think I could play. Wayne as a grad student at Yale had entered a team with a really intimidating name of administration science in the New Haven City League, which was played I believe at Hill House high school at night. So Wayne said, "Hey Jeff, why don't you take a Greyhound bus down. We're going to play against this team called the New Haven All Stars. It ought to be interesting." Rob Collie (00:59:14): Wayne's voice in that story sound a little bit like the guy at USA Today for a moment. It was the same voice, the cigar chomping. Anyway, continue. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:25): They edged this out 75-31. I thought I was lined up against the guy... I thought it was Paul Silas who was may be sort of having a bus man's holiday playing for the New Haven all-stars. So a couple weeks later, Paul Silas was my favorite player on the Celtics. He could rebound, that's all I could do. I was pitiful at anything else. But I worked at that and I was pretty strong and I worked at jumping, etc. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:53): So a few weeks later, Wayne calls me up and says, "Hey Jeff, we're playing the New Haven All-Stars again. Why don't you come down again and we'll get revenge against them this time?" Let's just say it didn't work out that way. And I remember one time I had Paul Silas completely boxed out. It was perfect textbook and I could jump. If my hands were maybe at rim level and I could see a pair of pants a foot over mine from behind, he didn't tell me and he got the rebound and I'm at rim level. Jeff Sagarin (01:00:24): We were edged out by a score so monstrous, I won't repeat it here. I'm not a guard at all. But I ended up with the ball... They full court pressed the whole game. Rob Collie (01:00:34): Of course, once they figure out- Jeff Sagarin (01:00:36): That we can't play and I'm not even a guard. It was ludicrous. My four teammates left me in terror. They just said, "We're going down court." So I'm all alone, they have four guys on me and my computer like my thought, "Well, they've got four guys on me. That must mean my four teammates are being guarded by one guy down court. This should be easy." I look, I look. They didn't steal the ball out of my hands or nothing. I'm still holding on to it. They're pecking away but they didn't foul me. I give them credit for that. I was like, "Where the hell are my teammates?" Jeff Sagarin (01:01:08): They were in terror hiding in single file behind the one guy and I basically... I don't care if you bleeping or not, I said, "Fuck it." And I just threw the ball. Good two overhand pass, long pass. I had my four teammates down there and they had one guy and you can guess who got the ball. After the game I asked them, I said, "You guys seem fairly good. Are you anybody?" The guy said, "Yeah, we're the former Fairfield varsity we were in the NIT about two years ago." Jeff Sagarin (01:01:39): I looked it up once. Fairfield did make the NIT, I think in '72. And this took place in like February of '74. It taught me a lesson because I looked up what my computer rating for Fairfield would have been compared that to, let's say, UCLA and NC State and figured at a minimum, we'd be at least a 100-200 point underdog against them in a real game, but it would have been worse because we would never get the ball pass mid-court. Rob Collie (01:02:10): Yeah, I mean, those games that I'm talking about in that YMCA League, I mean, the scores were far worse. We were losing like 130-11. Jeff Sagarin (01:02:19): Hey, good that's worse than New Haven all-stars beat us but not quite that bad. Rob Collie (01:02:24): I remember one time actually managing to get the ball across half court and pulling up for a three-point shot off of the break. And then having the guy that had assembled the team, take me aside at the next time out and tell me that I needed to pass that. I'm just like, "No. You got us into this embarrassment. If I get to the point where like, there's actually a shot we can take like a shot, we could take a shot. I'm not going to dump it off to you." Thomas LaRock (01:02:57): Not just a shot, but the shot of gold. Rob Collie (01:03:00): The one time we did get those guys to show up, we were still kind of losing because those guys didn't want to get hurt. It didn't make any sense for them to be there. There was no upside for them to be in this game. I'm sure that they just sort of been guilted into showing up. But then this Christian Laettner lookalike on the other team. He was as big as Laettner. Rob Collie (01:03:25): This is the kind of teams we were playing against. There was a long rebound and that Laettner lookalike got that long rebound and basically launched from the free throw line and dunked over Terry Catledge, the power forward for the Magic at the time. And at that moment, Terry Catledge scored the next 45 points in the game himself. That was all it was. Rob Collie (01:03:50): He'd just be standing there waiting for me to inbound the ball to him, he would take it coast to coast and score. He'd backpedal on defense and he would somehow steal the ball and he'd go down and score again. He just sent a message. And if that guy hadn't dunked over Catledge, we would have never seen what Catledge was capable of. So remember, this is a team th

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Lakers Talk with Allen Sliwa
HR 2: Top Three Laker Threats

Lakers Talk with Allen Sliwa

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 46:44


John Wall is available but can anyone afford him... 21 years ago Patrick Ewing traded to Supersonics from the NY Knicks, Aaron Gordon's big 4 year extension are some of the Top NBA Stories. Who are the top three Laker threats. Lakers have a new jersey patch sponsor Bibigo based in South Korea showing how international the Lakers brand is. Dennis Schroder has found his sense of humor in Boston. Shaq and Kobe, what could of been and more.

The Left Hand Layups Podcast
Ep 206: NBA Summer League standouts | NFL Preseason Week 1

The Left Hand Layups Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 22:01


Ep 206! The Patrick Ewing episode! This episode, we talk the NBA Summer League standout players, the NFL Preseason, and so much more! Follow the podcast on IG/Twitter! Gram https://www.instagram.com/shopheirlooms/ Twitter https://twitter.com/ShopHeirlooms Head to the website for premier vintage goods & memorabilia! Shop Heirlooms https://www.shopheirlooms.store Listen to the #LeftHandLayups ⛹

7:31 AM
August 10th, 2021: Luka Doncic Signs With Mavs, Draftkings Aquires Golden Nugget Gaming, Saweetie Lands A Mickey D's Meal & More

7:31 AM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 7:11


On today's show:On this day in 1984, Michael Jordan, Sam Perkins, Chris Mullin, Patrick Ewing and Jeff Turner led the U.S to a Olympic gold medal.Luka Doncic agrees to a five year 207 million dollar extension with the Dallas Mavericks. (Sports)The MLB is Eyeing Alternative Broadcasting Methods including Barstool, YouTube and Peacock. (Sports)NIL D'Eric King becomes the first college player to sign an endorsement deal with the Florida Panthers. (Sports)Actor and comedian Sebastian Maniscalco is set to play Foreman Spike in The Upcoming Super Mario Bros. Movie. (Entertainment)Haroshi launches first-ever NFT collectibles. (NFTs)Yesterday Draftkings agreed to acquire Golden Nugget Online Gaming for 1.56 billion dollars. (Gambling)XBox insiders will no longer need their console to play games from their PC. (Gaming)Similar to Travis Scott and J. Balvin, Saweetie now has her own McDonald's meal. For more details on these stories and many more, follow ONE37pm on IG, Twitter, FB and TT.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The SwordCast
Episode XCII: Patrick Ewing On The Orlando Magic

The SwordCast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 83:39


This week on The SwordCast WE BRING THE TOP 5's BACK! We recap a wild week of wrestling, a crazy NBA Draft, breakdown up to the minute NBA Free Agency transactions, and dig in on a TOUGH "Pick 3" segment. What's Your Top 5?

3 in the Key
EP. 194: Patrick Ewing Jr. & The NBA Draft

3 in the Key

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 97:48


Elias and Fuad are back for another edition of 3 in the Key! The fellas discuss the NBA draft and the Raptors pick at #4. Taking Barnes over Suggs. The guys are also joined by Patrick Ewing Jr., the lead assistant coach for the Ottawa BlackJacks in the CEBL. The guys discuss the team, the league, his time in Ottawa so far, his playing days and much more!

Running It Back
Space Jam and Space Jam 2

Running It Back

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 23:32


Tarlin and Mike are back again with a special bonus episode of Running It Back where we look for lessons learned from the Space Jam franchise coinciding with the recent release of LeBron's new film, Space Jam: A New Legacy. To start, we give respect and a little tunefulness in honor of the late great Biz Markie, RIP. Then we begin by digging back into the context around the first Space Jam movie which was fleshed out in The Last Dance documentary which we've covered on other shows. We bask in a little 90s nostalgia for MJ's charisma and a cast of NBA Legends at the time including Patrick Ewing, Charles Barkley, Larry Johnson, Mugsy Bogues, and Shawn Bradley. From there, we jump to the Summer of 2021 and the release of the new Space Jam vehicle featuring LeBron, Diana Taurasi, Clay Thompson among others. How does the new version stack up against the OG Space Jam? What are our thoughts on Don Cheadle's performance as Al G Rithm in the WB Serververse? What marketing advice do we have for Warner Brothers and who is Mike's pick to star in Space Jam 3? Listen in to find out! For more great shows like this Subscribe to Running It Back wherever you get your podcasts. And check us out at RunningItBack.fm

Speak For Yourself with Whitlock & Wiley
'The Last Dance' for Rodgers & Adams?, Team USA's loss to France, Cowboys' Super Bowl chances, Baker Mayfield

Speak For Yourself with Whitlock & Wiley

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 89:54


00:00 Should the Packers rework Rodgers' deal to make him happy? 14:17 Surprised USA basketball lost to France in their opener?  28:43 Are the Cowboys “legit Super Bowl contenders”? 42:25 Is it smart for Baker Mayfield to take a wait and see approach to his contract extension? 56:18 What will happen next in the Aaron Rodgers saga? 1:11:47 Do you agree w/ Patrick Ewing that “the rest of the world has caught up” to USA basketball? 1:21:36 Which 2-year QB do you expect to take the biggest leap: Joe Burrow, Justin Herbert, or Tua Tagovailoa? 1:25:18 Will this season be “The Last Dance” for Rodgers & Adams? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Drunk Sports Podcast
Top 9 @ 9: The Best NBA Players To Never Win A Ring

The Drunk Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 12:36


Colby and Timm break down a list of the top players in the Association to never win an NBA championship. Is YOUR guy on the list?

Aussie Hoopla NBL & NBA Podcast
Andre Moore (Brisbane Bullets Legend) talks Ben Simmons Boomers Saga, Scottie Pippens New Book, Josh Giddey and the 1990s Brisbane Bullets teams

Aussie Hoopla NBL & NBA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 58:21


Andre Moore joins the show to talk about his NBA and NBL career as well as what's happening on the Australian Basketball scene today. Moore was drafted by the Denver Nuggets in the 2nd round of the 1987 NBA Draft. In 10 games with the Nuggets and Milwaukee Bucks, he averaged 2.4 points, 1.4 rebounds and 0.6 assists per game. Moore then embarked on a career in Australia when he signed with the Brisbane Bullets in 1990 and led them to that year's NBL Grand Final before losing to the Perth Wildcats. His teammates on Brisbane included fellow Americans Derek Rucker and Leroy Loggins. Moore's outstanding play saw him selected to the 1990 All-NBL Team after he averaged 26.9 points, 12.6 rebounds, and two blocks per game while shooting 61.1% from the field. After playing for the Bullets, Moore spent time with the Hobart Devils (1995) and Cairns Taipans (1999-01). Topics include... Andre Moore launches his first signature sneaker 20 years after retiring from the NBL (2:00) Working in juvenile detention centres with his program for underprivileged youth Big Feat Basketball (8:00) Navigating gangs and drugs while growing up in Chicago (12:00) College basketball and facing Patrick Ewing and the Georgetown Hoyas in 1986 (16:00) His friendship with Scottie Pippen from his time preparing for the NBA draft in 1997 and thoughts on his new book (21:00) NBA memories playing against Utahs Karl Malone and alongside forgotten NBA stars like Lafayette Lever, Alex English and Sidney Moncrief (26:00) How Andre found his way from the NBA to the Brisbane Bullets in 1990 (31:00) Thoughts on the 2021 NBL Grand Final (33:30) Going up against the 1990 Perth Wildcats (38:00) Nathan Sobey's breakout season and Boomer's chances (40:00) Ben Simmons and his decision to not play in the Tokyo Olympics (41:00) Why aren't power forwards as important in the NBL today as they were in the 1990s (48:00) Josh Giddey draft chances (52:00) Visit dunk.com.au for your next set of basketball uniforms. Listen to our previous interviews with the biggest stars in Australian Basketball, head to Aussiehoopla.com. Check out previous podcasts featuring; Australian Basketball Legends - Luc Longley, Andrew Gaze, Shane Heal, Mark Bradtke, Leroy Loggins, David Andersen, Andrew Vlahov, Phil Smyth, CJ Bruton, Chris Anstey, Brett Maher, John Rillie, Tony Ronaldson, Damian Martin Current NBL Stars - Jack White, Dejan Vasiljevic, AJ Ogilvy, Daniel Kickert, Thomas Abercrombie, Jason Cadee, Bryce Cotton, Chris Goulding, Mitch McCarron, Cam Gliddon, Anthony Drmic, Brad Newley Our Finest Coaching Minds - Brian Goorjian, Barry Barnes, Joey Wright, Adrian Hurley, Aaron Fearne, Rob Beveridge, Ian Stacker, Shawn Dennis, Dean Vickerman, Trevor Gleeson, Lindsey Gaze, Ken Cole, Will Weaver, Bruce Palmer NBA Stars Past & Present - Andrew Bogut, Matthew Dellavedova, Stephen Jackson, Randy Livingston, Torrey Craig, Acie Earl, Josh Childress, Reggie Smith, Todd Lichti, Ryan Broekhoff, Doug Overton, Donald Sloan The NBL's Greatest Imports - Darryl McDonald, Ricky Grace, Derek Rucker, Leon Trimmingham, Scott Fisher, Lanard Copeland, Mike Mitchell, Darnell Mee, Isaac Burton, Adonis Jordan, Shawn Redhage, Willie Farley, Al Green, Corey "Homicide" Williams, Andre Moore, Steve Woodberry, Mike Mitchell, Ebi Ere, Doug Overton, Kevin Lisch And the men who run things - Larry Kestelman, Mal Speed, Paul Maley, Vince Crivelli, Jeremy Loeliger, Chuck Harmison, Jeff Van Groningen, Bob Turner All that and much more. Follow @AussieHoopla on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or email us at info@aussiehoopla.com

A Coach's Perspective
Episode 215 - June 23, 2021 – Patrick Ewing and Dale Lamberth – Catching up with Coaches

A Coach's Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 50:14


Episode 215 - In this episode, we caught up with former NBA Superstar and current Head Men's Basketball coach at Georgetown University, Patrick Ewing. We talked about his career as a Hoya player, a stellar NBA career and how he uses all of his experiences to be the best coach he can be. My thanks to Coach Ewing for his time and sharing his perspective. We also caught up with local basketball coach, Dale Lamberth and discussed his college playing days at Missouri State University and his Flight Basketball program and the mission of serving a lot of our basketball youth in the community. We will be preempted the next two weeks. When we return on July 16 we will host national branding consultant for athletes, Frances Reimers. Listen at acoachsperspective.com, on Apple iTunes, Spotify or Vrbul podcasts under A Coach's Perspective. A Coach's Perspective: Tune in Wednesday night's live from 6:00-7:00 pm on 99.9FM/96.9FM or on the Radio-Springfield app. Listen at Previous Shows on the website acoachsperspective.com Or on Apple iTunes, Spotify or Vrbul Podcast under A Coach's Perspective. Like-Facebook: @CoachJeniHopkins Follow-Twitter: @coachhopkins987 Subscribe-Website: acoachsperspective.com Subscribe-Apple iTunes, Spotify or Vrbul Podcast: A Coach's Perspective

Mike Safo
Mike Safo with Paul Knepper, Author of "Knicks of the Nineties"

Mike Safo

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 47:00


Joined today by author of the incredible book “Knicks of the Nineties: Ewing, Oakley, Starks and the Brawlers that Almost Won It All”, Paul Knepper. Paul and I chat about growing up in the Big Apple, why he moved to the Lone Star State and what he misses the most about New York City. He talks about this being his first book, what made him want to tackle the subject and the difficulties of writing a sports book by juggling games, stats and stories. We touch on the cornerstone of the Franchise, Patrick Ewing, what his expectations were, why he was perfect for NYC and why he is the most underrated superstar of our generation. We talk about the importance of Pat Riley and how he changed from Hollywood to a gritty defensive minded coach. We discuss the wars with Jordan and the Bulls, the Charles Smith missed layups and how there was always “one thing” missing from that illusive championship. Paul and I talk about the importance of Charles Oakley, Anthony Mason, John Starks and the other iconic Knicks of the 90’s. We talk about 1994 in NYC with the Rangers and Knicks owning the back pages and OJ owning the TV. We relieve some of the classic rivalries during that time (Heat, Pacers, Bulls). From missed opportunities with free agents to Allan Houston and Spreewell coming to the Garden join us try to capture a special decade in New York History.  Follow Paul here and purchase this tremendous book:  Twitter: https://twitter.com/paulieknep Book: https://theknicksofthenineties.com/ Purchase the book here: https://www.amazon.com/Knicks-Nineties-Oakley-Starks-Brawlers-ebook/dp/B08KBLCKX7/ref=sr_1_1?crid=37JXHLUSHVO2Z&dchild=1&keywords=the+knicks+of+the+nineties&qid=1622393865&sprefix=knicks+of+nin%2Caps%2C177&sr=8-1

Purple Cups X Champagne
Episode 062 | Mikey Likes It

Purple Cups X Champagne

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 54:37


The Purple Cup Pirates take a trip to Harlem to sit with none other than Michael "Mikey" Cole, owner of Mikey Likes It Ice Cream, the number 1 New York made ice-cream. Mike puts us on to the history behind his brand, how he stumbled upon ice cream as his saving grace, and the driving force behind his success - love. His dedication to his community and people are driven by that main ingredient. He strives to bring joy to any and everyone who steps foot into one of his locations, and makes sure that everyone on his team lives this vision. We speak on all the connections and dreams that have been realized via ice cream. From watching Patrick Ewing's car parked outside his hood as a young lad, to now being side by side with the New York Legend and collaborating on sneakers together. Being able to inspire kids to get good grades to earn free ice cream, the same kids that he once was. Taking his aunt's recipe and fine-tuning it to serve the masses - and he's just getting started. We hope you enjoy this one as much as we enjoyed stuffing our faces with this AMAZING ice cream - no lies told! Order Mikey's famous ice cream online at www.MikeyLikesItIceCream.com and follow him on Instagram @MikeyLikesItIceCream Visit one of Mikey's locations: Mikey Likes It Ice Cream East Village 199 Avenue A, New York NY 10009 Mikey Likes It Ice Cream Harlem 2500 Frederick Douglass Blvd, New York NY 10030

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo
Julio Jones Says He’s Done With the Falcons, Plus Jorge Sedano on the NBA Playoffs and NBA Champion Rick Mahorn on Motivating Charles Barkley

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 98:25


Russillo opens with Shannon Sharpe getting Julio Jones to say he’s done with the Falcons and whether Julio knew he was on-air (2:00). Then, he chats with ESPN’s Jorge Sedano about whether the Clippers are in trouble against Luka and the Mavs, LeBron and the Lakers, and the Heat being down 0-2 against the Bucks (13:30). Next, he’s joined by NBA champion Rick Mahorn to talk about being teammates with Charles Barkley, his beef with Patrick Ewing, and the line between playing physical and playing dirty (43:45). Finally, Ryen closes it out with some listener-submitted Life Advice questions (1:17:00). Host: Ryen Russillo Guests: Rick Mahorn and Jorge Sedano Producers: Kyle Crichton and Steve Ceruti 

The Powers Sports Memorabilia Show
1986 FLEER Basketball Cards - Where are the Investment Opportunities? | PSM

The Powers Sports Memorabilia Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 14:04


I'm back at it again dishing out some of those sweet stat numbers. This time, we are diving in deep to the 1986 Fleer basketball set. This set remains to be so iconic to the hobby community, and why shouldn't it be? The players in here are legends! Rookie cards from guys like Michael Jordan, Patrick Ewing, Karl Malone, and Dominque Wilkins just to name a few.With the Michael Jordan 1986 Fleer card becoming out of reach financially for most people, collectors and investors have been looking into the other cards to find opportunities. We are going to be talking about all kinds of cool numbers and facts. We'll look at some interesting ratios and compare sale performance to POP report performance. There is just so much information buried in these cards, waiting to be dug up. That's what we're going to do today, so enjoy the Powers Sports Memorabilia Show!Website: https://www.powerssportsmemorabilia.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/powersautographsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/PowersCollectiblesTwitter: https://twitter.com/powerscoWant 20% off Sports Card Investors Market Movers software program?  Use my affiliate link below and code POWERS20.  I may receive a small commission if you use the link below.https://www.sportscardinvestor.com/plans/?ref=49Need jerseys or photos for my upcoming autograph signings?  Fanatics has you covered.  Affiliate link below.  I may receive a small commission if you use the link below.https://fanatics.ncw6.net/vnN0yj0:00 Coming Up0:30 Today's Topic2:00 The Data2:33 Quick Data3:57 $/POP Count4:45 POP Rank Higher Than Sales Rank9:10 Biggest Ratio Difference10:56 Top 8 Stickers12:10 Sticker Price Higher Than Base Card#sportscards #powerssportsmemorabilia #1986fleer

Cookies: A Basketball Podcast
Humility Records: Cookies 296

Cookies: A Basketball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 93:36


New episodes drop first on our Patreon page! Kuo's art show closes (1:40), why are Uber and Lyft so freaking expensive? (18:25), subways are back to running 24 hours a day (24:02), Mare of Easttown episode 5 with spoilers (37:39), Kwame Brown takes on all haters (45:31), what makes an NBA player a bust (55:33), Chris Webber makes the Hall of Fame (1:03:37), is Julius Randle the best Knick since Patrick Ewing? (1:14:50), Sixers' easy route to Eastern Conference Finals (1:21:44).  Pods

The Showtime Podcast with Lakers Legend Coop

On this Bonus episode of Showtime With Coop sponsored by betonline.ag, Michael Cooper and Ari Temkin talk about Wednesday nights Lakers Vs. Warriors play-in game.It was a great game of basketball that was not about LeBron and Anthony Davis, it was about the role players. Also discussed, thoughts on Draymond Green as a defensive player, does experience win championships, can the Lakers win 16 more games, and more.   Showtime Podcast with Lakers Legend Michael Cooper 1:00 20 out of 30 NBA teams are in the playoffs. 2:15 Last nights game against Golden State was a great game. 3:20 This game was not about LeBron or AD, it was about the Role players. 4:10 May 20th 1994 Scotty Pippen dunk over Patrick Ewing compared to Draymond Greens foul over LeBron. Foul's depend on who is doing the fouling. 9:16 BetOnline Ad Read. 10:05 Thoughts on Draymond Green as a defensive player. 11:20 Thoughts on Anthony Davis' game. 14:19 Ari Temkin: "Was this game fools gold?" 17:28 The NBA is the only sport where experience and knowing how to win championships matters. 19:00 Do the Lakers have the availability to win 16 more games? Who will they play in the Western Conference Finals? 21:25 The difference fans make being there. 22:15 Thoughts on Lakers and Suns series and Trailblazers and Jazz series. Listen and Subscribe to the Showtime Lakers Podcast with Michael Cooper and Ari Temkin on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and the CLNS Media Network mobile app.

The Powers Sports Memorabilia Show
Top 50 Basketball Rookie Sports Cards | PSM

The Powers Sports Memorabilia Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 19:19


I found a listing from clutchpoints.com of which NBA stars they considered to be in the TOP 50 players, and that inspired me to go digging a little bit and see how these guys are doing on the sports card market.Most specifically I zoned in on their rookie cards and took an in-depth look at various stats to see who is doing well on the card market and who isn't. I know you will be surprised by at least a few of these. Plus, I would even say there are some undervalued gems hidden in this list!We are all familiar with the famous 1986 fleer basketball set with iconic cards such as Michael Jordan, Patrick Ewing, and Karl Malone.  But did you know there is a hidden gym within that rookie card set?I also took at look at who were some of the hardest rookie cards to find and also which ones were the most expensive and affordable.Is LeBron James rookie card undervalued?Lastly, the PSA population report was taken into consideration.  You will be amazed at how many of these basketball cards have extremely low numbers.So if you are a sports stats junky and you are ready for some interesting and thought-provoking numbers, stay tuned through today's whole video, on the Powers Sports Memorabilia Show!Website: https://www.powerssportsmemorabilia.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/powersautographsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/PowersCollectiblesTwitter: https://twitter.com/powerscoLink To Website Spreadsheet:https://powerssportsmemorabilia.com/blogs/news/top-50-nba-rookie-cards-statisticsWant 20% off Sports Card Investors Market Movers software program?  Use my affiliate link below and code POWERS20https://www.sportscardinvestor.com/plans/?ref=49Need jerseys or photos for my upcoming autograph signings?  Fanatics has you covered.  Affiliate link below.https://fanatics.ncw6.net/vnN0yj0:00 Coming Up0:32 Today's Topic2:20 My Method Of Analysis5:00 Looking At The Teams10:09 Looking At The Players18:41 Conclusion#sportscard #basketballcard #nbacard

The Podcaster's Guide to the Conspiracy
Patrick Ewing and the Frozen Envelope

The Podcaster's Guide to the Conspiracy

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 52:04


In this episode of "What the Conspiracy?" Josh tells M about the NBA, the NBA Draft, and Patrick Ewing and the Frozen Envelope! — Josh is @monkeyfluids and M is @conspiracism on Twitter You can also contact us at: podcastconspiracy@gmail.com You can learn more about M's academic work at: http://mrxdentith.com Why not support The Podcaster's Guide to the Conspiracy by donating to our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/podcastersguidetotheconspiracy or Podbean crowdfunding? http://www.podbean.com/patron/crowdfund/profile/id/muv5b-79

Dunktown
S3E28 -Jon Mackey + Movie Review: Forget Paris (1995)

Dunktown

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 84:27


It should be nice! Jon Mackey (Big Grande, How Ya Been? with Brett DeMott) joins Agata and Anastasia to discuss the hit Billy Crystal film Forget Paris (1995). Jon also shares his love of the 90's Bulls and dressing like Luc Longley for Halloween. The gang also chats Gregg Popovich, Michael Jordan's fax, Bill Gates, how TikTok is fake, kissing feedback, Marge Simpson, David Sanborn, the shape of Patrick Ewing's head, Montell Jordan, diarrhea words, interesting Australians, William Hickey, and jizz mishaps. Will this this movie make the gang think true love doesn't exist? Maybe, but you gotta listen to find out!

Check The Tape
Episode 133: New York Knicks vs Houston Rockets 1994 NBA Finals Game 6

Check The Tape

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021 66:19


The Dan's watch a game that has been called the worst Knicks game ever. The Knickerbockers, lead by Patrick Ewing and John Starks lose a potential clinching game to the Hakeem Olajuwon and Vernon Maxwell lead Houston Rockets before ultimately falling to them again in game 7 of the NBA Finals.

R2C2 with CC Sabathia and Ryan Ruocco
Mark Jackson on Steph, the ’90s Knicks, and His Most Famous Catchphrases

R2C2 with CC Sabathia and Ryan Ruocco

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 68:26


This week, we’re joined by ESPN NBA analyst and former NBA All-Star Mark Jackson to discuss the recent spell of injuries in the NBA, the “New York City point guard," his best Patrick Ewing stories, whether he’ll coach again in the league, and more. Hosts: CC Sabathia and Ryan Ruocco Guest: Mark Jackson Producer: Bobby Wagner Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Back To Back
Shattered: Hope, Heartbreak and the New York Knicks

Back To Back

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2021 6:05


We are excited to announce The Athletic's new podcast series - Shattered: Hope, Heartbreak and the New York Knicks. Hosted by hip-hop legend Chuck D, the series dives deep on the past 20 years of the Knicks. Shattered reveals never-heard-before stories about the Knicks, team owner James Dolan and the NBA, with interviews from dozens of voices including franchise legend Patrick Ewing. This is the first 5 minutes of episode one - a look at how the 90's Knicks team broke apart. To listen to the rest click this link or search Shattered wherever you get your podcasts. A new episode of Shattered will be released every Tuesday. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Glue Guys: A Brooklyn Nets Podcast
Introducing Shattered: The Athletic's new narrative series on the New York Knicks

The Glue Guys: A Brooklyn Nets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2021 8:04


We are excited to announce The Athletic's new podcast series - Shattered: Hope, Heartbreak and the New York Knicks. Hosted by hip-hop legend Chuck D, the series dives deep on the past 20 years of the Knicks. Shattered reveals never-heard-before stories about the Knicks, team owner James Dolan and the NBA, with interviews from dozens of voices including franchise legend Patrick Ewing. This is the first 5 minutes of episode one - a look at how the 90's Knicks team broke apart. To listen to the rest click this link or search Shattered wherever you get your podcasts. A new episode of Shattered will be released every Tuesday. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Buffalo Beat: A show about the Buffalo Bills
Introducing Shattered: The Athletic's new narrative series on the New York Knicks

The Buffalo Beat: A show about the Buffalo Bills

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2021 5:55


We are excited to announce The Athletic's new podcast series - Shattered: Hope, Heartbreak and the New York Knicks. Hosted by hip-hop legend Chuck D, the series dives deep on the past 20 years of the Knicks. Shattered reveals never-heard-before stories about the Knicks, team owner James Dolan and the NBA, with interviews from dozens of voices including franchise legend Patrick Ewing. This is the first 5 minutes of episode one - a look at how the 90's Knicks team broke apart. To listen to the rest click this link or search Shattered wherever you get your podcasts. A new episode of Shattered will be released every Tuesday. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Stephen A. Smith Show
Hour 4: From Wentz He Came

The Stephen A. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2021 45:51


Jay and Alan ask if the Eagles reputation will follow Carson Wentz to Indianapolis and welcome Big East Commissioner Val Ackerman to discuss the Big East, Patrick Ewing, and the idea of NIL. Also, ESPN NFL Draft analyst Matt Miller weighs in on the NFL Draft prospects and what we can expect from the wideout position. Plus, Jay Williams has some strong words for the disparities between the men's and women's NCAA Tournament amenities. 

Golic and Wingo
Hour 4: From Wentz He Came

Golic and Wingo

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2021 45:51


Jay and Alan ask if the Eagles reputation will follow Carson Wentz to Indianapolis and welcome Big East Commissioner Val Ackerman to discuss the Big East, Patrick Ewing, and the idea of NIL. Also, ESPN NFL Draft analyst Matt Miller weighs in on the NFL Draft prospects and what we can expect from the wideout position. Plus, Jay Williams has some strong words for the disparities between the men’s and women’s NCAA Tournament amenities. 

Pull Up with CJ McCollum
Pull Up is BACK! CJ is BACK! And Dame drops 50 in Historic Comeback

Pull Up with CJ McCollum

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2021 41:34


After a long hiatus, Pull Up is officially back! CJ chats about his long road to recovery getting back on the court, and talks through the Blazers’ epic comeback that had Dame dropping 50. Plus, looking ahead to a super condensed 2nd half schedule for the NBA and how Covid protocols complicate things. He chats the hottest teams in the league, if two guys could win Rookie of the Year, and how is MSG gonna do Patrick Ewing like that?? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Colin Cowherd Podcast
19. LeBron's Fenway Play; The Action Network's Chad Millman on March Madness Brackets and NFL Futures

The Colin Cowherd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2021 42:48


On this episode of The Colin Cowherd Podcast, Colin discusses LeBron James becoming a Fenway Group partner and part owner of the Red Sox and Liverpool, and why sports ownership is always a good investment if you can do it. His guest is The Action Network Chief Content Officer Chad Millman. They discuss their plans for The Action Network's recently announced partnership with The Volume (3:00), his NCAA tournament betting philosophy (6:00), if Gonzaga is actually as good as the public thinks (10:00), if Cade Cunningham and Oklahoma State should be on upset alert (14:00), if Patrick Ewing's Georgetown team is more Cinderella or first round bust (16:00), if Villanova should be on upset alert (19:00). In the NFL, the guys discuss the Bears failure to address their QB problem (25:00), and his take on some early NFL division winner futures (27:00). Make sure you follow Colin and The Volume on Twitter for the latest content and updates and check out FanDuel for the best wagering and daily fantasy action! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

First Take
Hour 1: Hey big spender!

First Take

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2021 41:28


Stephen A, Max and Patrick Ewing debate if the Patriots made enough moves to be back on top, if the Knicks got robbed by a bad call and if Georgetown is back after winning the Big East Tournament.

Dirty Sports
EPISODE 711: Patrick Ewing Walks Into MSG...

Dirty Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 107:19


Andy and Joe open with a discussion about the NCAA tournament and MSG employees not recognizing Patrick Ewing. Next they cover NFL Free Agency and Drew Brees retiring. They finish the show with DirtBall calls. www.safishing.com/dirty www.harrys.com/dirty Subscribe on YouTube - www.youtube.com/DirtySports Follow us on Instagram: www.instagram.com/thedirtysports/ Follow us on Twitter - www.twitter.com/thedirtysports Follow Andy Ruther on IG - www.instagram.com/AndyRuther/ Follow Joe Praino on IG - www.instagram.com/JoePraino/

The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne
03/15/21 DPS Best Of

The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 47:32


On today’s Dan Patrick Show, DP and the guys return from the weekend to preview the upcoming NCAA Tournament. ESPN’s Jay Bilas joined the program in the first hour to preview some of the field as well as some of the contingency plans around the tournament. While it is March, the QB carousel continues. PFT’s Mike Florio talked to Dan in the second hour to put a bow on Drew Brees’ legendary career, what’s next for the Saints, along with the Aaron Jones signing for the Packers. Lastly, Knicks legend and current Georgetown coach Patrick Ewing joined the show in the final hour to talk about his team’s run in the Big East tournament and his team’s upcoming game in the NCAA Tournament. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne
03/15/21 DPS Hour 3 Patrick Ewing

The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 49:30


Patrick Ewing talks to Dan about what it felt like to win the Big East Conference Tournament. Patrick says that one time he was stopped in MSG; they were standing beside his picture. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

Stugotz delivers his Weekend Observations and the guys discuss Patrick Ewing and the passing of Marvin Hagler. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Outkick the Coverage with Clay Travis
03/15/2021 - The Best Of Outkick the Coverage

Outkick the Coverage with Clay Travis

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 56:23


Clay Travis is hyped for 'Bracket Monday' as March Madness is here! Clay is talking brackets, strange territory with Duke/Kentucky out, what else COVID may have in store and whether the favorites will hold. Clay ranks Drew Brees in this era of star quarterbacks. FSR's own Doug Gottlieb joins the show to talk everything March Madness and gives you a 1st round lock! Plus, Auburn basketball head coach Bruce Pearl joins the show to talk about his experience in the Tourney a couple years ago, the challenges COVID presents, Gonzaga, what matters most in March, Patrick Ewing, and more.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Outkick the Coverage with Clay Travis
03/15/2021 - Hour 3 - Bruce Pearl Calls Outkick

Outkick the Coverage with Clay Travis

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 42:09


Clay Travis talks NCAA Tournament favorites, what he expects to see this year, and his biggest concern. Auburn basketball head coach Bruce Pearl joins the show to talk about his experience in the Tourney a couple years ago, the challenges COVID presents, Gonzaga, what matters most in March, Patrick Ewing, and more. Plus, Clay goes to the Outkick archives for Governor Stitt's story about being at the infamous Rudy Gobert game 1-year ago. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – March 14, 2021

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 195:36


Soleil Moon Frye's Kid 90, NCAA Tourney time, J-Lo & A-Rod break up, Drew Brees retires, Drew Crime, RIP Marvelous Marvin Hagler, Kirk Franklin v. his son, and Andy Dick tells us he hasn't given up sex.Michigan made it interesting, but falls to OSU in the Big Ten Tourney.We dive deep into Soleil Moon "Vocal" Frye's Kid 90 documentary. Add Punk Brewster to Charlie Sheen's Who's Dated Who.Alice Cooper's 'Detroit Stories' rocks.Paul McCartney got a bunch of famous people to cover McCartney III songs.Beck used to love Scientology, but not anymore.JLo still wants us all to bang her and now she may be single... but A-Rod is in denial. It's all the fault of the very hot Madison LeCroy.'Enough About Me with Shep Rose' is the worst podcast possibly ever. Knock it off, Rose.WATP's latest podcast absolutely destroys Paris Hilton's podcast.Tiny Kevin Connolly explains his feud with a flower shop.Andrew Cuomo has ANOTHER accuser. That makes 7. Turns out Andrew is quite the bully and homophobe.Early Grammy takeaways: People are trying to cancel Bill Burr, Blue Ivy has the same amount of Grammys as Led Zeppelin and The Weeknd is boycotting the Grammys.Drew Brees has called it quits while Tom Brady signs a 4-year extension.We check in with Andy Dick on his relationship with Elisa Jordana and we totally get him laid... or they break upThe Illinois Fighting Illini have won the Big Ten Tournament.Trey Songz spits in people's mouth.Gospel singer, Kirk Franklin, yelled at his adult son... who then leaked the audio online.Drew Crime: 48 Hours covered crazy serial killer Israel Keyes, Charlie Brandt is a bad guy, and Drew loves 'Signs Of A Psychopath' on Investigation ID.Selection Sunday is underway and MSU has a long road ahead of them as Michigan looks to rebound (get it?) from their Big Ten Tournament loss.Patrick Ewing is a good basketball coach with a totally forgettable face.RIP Marvelous Marvin Hagler.A female high school basketball announcer dropped an n-bomb and criticizing girls kneeling for the National Anthem. He blamed his racist comments on his blood sugar.Chicago sportscaster, Mark Giangreco, has been BLOWN OUT for "inappropriate comments" that his show's anchor didn't like.Chris Harrison's suspension has been extended as he's not finished doing the work.Don't share memes because that's "digital blackface".Sharon Osbourne may lose her gig for defending Piers Morgan and saying someone was "too ghetto".Meghan Markle is a liar, but Kate probably did make her cry. How does President Princess Meghan Markle sound?Twitter has determined that Mayor Jim Fouts' latest look is NOT hot.Social media is dumb but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

I AM RAPAPORT: STEREO PODCAST
MINI EP 801 - PATRICK EWING HARASSED IN MSG/MEYERS LEONARD RAMIFICATIONS/TUCKER CARLSON GETS THAT WILLIE HUTCH TREATMENT

I AM RAPAPORT: STEREO PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 16:49


Yes! The Gringo Mandingo is en su casa! Have no fear! The I AM RAPAPORT: STEREO PODCAST is here! His name is Michael Rapaport aka Captain Colitis aka The Flat Footed Phenom aka Mr NY aka Mr. 212 aka The Inflamed Ashkenazi aka Mr. Sunshine & he is here to discuss: Patrick Ewing being harassed by security Madison Square Garden, the double standard of the Meyers Leonard situation, Tucker Carlson Gets That Willie Hutch Treatment & a whole lotta mo'! This episode is not to be missed! Full EP 801 & entire catalog only at Luminary.link/RAPAPORT We drop 2-3 episodes per week for your daily dose of Disruption. Come rock with us Hard Body Karate at Luminary.link/RAPAPORT to signup for the Annual plan that will cost only $2.99 per month after a 7 Day Free Trial. It is also the ONLY place where you can get ALL archived 801 episodes of The Worldwide Phenomenon. The Luminary app is the best in Podcasting & the home of Professional Podcasts! By signing up for full I AM RAPAPORT: STEREO PODCAST Premium Disruption, you get access to 40+ Exclusive podcasts from the likes of: The Trevor Noah Podcast Guys We F****d Hear To Slay The C-Word Under The Skin with Russell Brand and so many more  Come rock with us Rapapack TODAY at Luminary.link/RAPAPORT Brand new Butter Soft T's at www.districtlines.com/iamrapaport www.dbpodcasts.com   Produced by DBPodcasts (also DM for NBA Picks) Follow @dbpodcasts, @iamrapaport, @michaelrapaport & @HearLuminary on Twitter & Instagram Music by Jansport J (Follow @JansportJ) www.JansportJMusic.com

The Stephen A. Smith Show
Hour 1: NFL Free Agency and What Are the Knicks Doing?

The Stephen A. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 41:56


Max Kellerman talks about Cam Newton resigning with the Patriots. Also, what are the Knicks doing? Patrick Ewing wasn't recognized at the Garden? Also, if the Nets are playing like this without KD and Blake Griffen, it's a wrap!

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed
Best Of (Cam & Brady's contracts, Patrick Ewing, Deshaun Watson)

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 35:31


00:00 Are Cam & Brady’s contracts proof Brady has gotten the best of Belichick? 14:28 Does Patrick Ewing have a right to be bothered by security asking for his ID? 22:32 Think Houston has any confidence that Deshaun will stick around long-term? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed
Full Show (Cam Newton's return to New England, Lakers' title chances, Brady's extension, Patrick Ewing)

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 118:57


00:00 Will Cam Newton start for New England all season? 22:00 Bigger threat to stop LeBron from repeating: Brooklyn or Los Angeles? 38:03 Should Chiefs fans be worried for Patrick Mahomes next season? 49:05 Can Baltimore still get free agent WRs to play with Lamar Jackson? 59:25 Is Tom Brady’s team-friendly extension mean he’s about to start a new dynasty in Tampa Bay? 1:10:50 Do you like LeBron James already shifting into a playoff push mindset? 1:23:35 Are Cam & Brady’s contracts proof Brady has gotten the best of Belichick? 1:35:30 Does Patrick Ewing have a right to be bothered by security asking for his ID? 1:43:32 Think Houston has any confidence that Deshaun will stick around long-term? 1:52:45 Shocked Kentucky won’t be going to the NCAA tournament? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne
03/12/21 DPS Best Of Guest Host Ross Tucker

The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 46:05


On today’s Dan Patrick Show, Ross Tucker fills in for DP on this Meat Friday as breaking news flows in across many different sports. Tucker and the guys begin the day talking about Trey Lance and how the North Dakota State quarterback. The Athletics’ Dane Brugler joins the show in the second hour to talk about Lance and how his pro day carries a little more weight than most people’s pro days. Next, Frank Isola, a man of many jobs chats with Ross in the second hour to talk about everything from Patrick Ewing’s mix up at Madison Square Garden, to how the Nets can be the most likable group on the court. Lastly, former Packers executive Andrew Brandt joins the show in the final hour to break down Tom Brady’s new contract and how the Chiefs handled cutting two of their starting offensive lineman. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne
03/12/21 DPS Hour 2 Frank Isola Guest Host Ross Tucker

The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 48:30


Frank Isola talks to Ross about the issues with Patrick Ewing and the Madison Square Garden security. Franks says he thinks Ewing's comments were more tongue and cheek. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Golic and Wingo
Hour 1: End of the Line

Golic and Wingo

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 44:26


Jay Williams shares his disappointment with Duke’s season being over. Plus, he, along with Keyshawn Johnson and Zubin Mehenti doesn’t think Meyers Leonard’s suspension sends the message that it should. Also, the guys weigh in on Texans HC David Culley’s comments about Deshaun Watson and Patrick Ewing being upset about not being recognized at MSG. 

The Stephen A. Smith Show
Hour 1: End of the Line

The Stephen A. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 44:26


Jay Williams shares his disappointment with Duke's season being over. Plus, he, along with Keyshawn Johnson and Zubin Mehenti doesn't think Meyers Leonard's suspension sends the message that it should. Also, the guys weigh in on Texans HC David Culley's comments about Deshaun Watson and Patrick Ewing being upset about not being recognized at MSG. 

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast
First Duke, now Virginia. The ACC tournament is a mess. Plus: Patrick Ewing's amazing rant, bubble talk, favorite league tourney games (College Basketball 03/12)

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 54:58


Busy Friday. You're locked in and we've got you covered on the pod. The guys open on the Virginia situation, then Norlander runs down his top 10 college basketball days of the year (agree? disagree?) before talking Georgetown over Villanova. Patrick Ewing dropped and great rant, too. The pod closes with the Final Four + 1, featuring three Friday games, a Saturday championship matchup and Sunday's A-10 title, too. Selection Sunday is almost here. LET'S GO. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Al Galdi Podcast
Episode 15: Ron Rivera speaks, WFT tenders Kyle Allen and Cam Sims and much more

The Al Galdi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2021 100:16


12:40 - Washington Football Team: thoughts on Kyle Allen off Washington tendering him as an exclusive-rights free agent...and react to Ron Rivera's comments on Washington's search for a quarterback   29:11 - Washington Football Team: analysis of restricted free agent-to-be Cam Sims off Washington deciding to tender him   34:40 - Washington Football Team: how Ron Rivera struck the perfect balance in what he said about Washington's approach to free agency   48:39 - Washington Football Team: how Ron Rivera's first publicly-spoken words on releasing Alex Smith were correct   01:00:37 - Washington Football Team: the undeniable reality off Washington franchise-tagging Brandon Scherff for a second straight offseason...and comments from Ron Rivera that were perhaps very telling about the decision   01:08:23 - Wizards: the Wiz get smashed in the paint and on the glass in a 127-112 loss at the Memphis Grizzlies   01:14:48 - Nationals: Max Scherzer is dominant in his second Grapefruit League start...and Jon Lester opens up about his recent surgery   01:21:08 - Georgetown basketball: the Hoyas keep their season alive - and perhaps save Patrick Ewing's job - with a 68-49 win over Marquette in the Big East Tournament   01:26:08 - Guest: Patrick Stevens, bracketologist for The Washington Post, on Maryland, Virginia and Virginia Tech as they begin play in their conference tournaments