Podcasts about Cape

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Sleeveless outer garment of varying lengths, sometimes attached to a coat

  • 1,855PODCASTS
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  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 1, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Cape

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Latest podcast episodes about Cape

The Meb Faber Show
#373 – Tim Maloney, Roundhill Investments – We Hit The Right Theme At The Right Time

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 55:42


In episode 373, we welcome our guest, Tim Maloney, co-founder and Chief Investment Officer for Roundhill Investments, an ETF sponsor focused on thematic and sector-specific investing. In today's episode, we're getting meta! Tim begins with an overview of Roundhill and the firms' unique strategy around distribution. Then we dive into some of their funds, most notably the fund focused on the metaverse with a ticker I bet Mr. Zuckerberg wish he had. We touch on funds that are focused on e-sports, sports betting and streaming, and even a couple of funds that were launched as a partnership with former podcast guests Tobias Carlisle and Chas Cocke! ----- Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com ----- Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

A Cape Cod Notebook
One way to pass the time on the Cape and Islands

A Cape Cod Notebook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 4:09


On a crisp, sunny, calm afternoon in late October, the Wellfleet Harbor parking lot is one-third full, this despite the fact that Mac's Restaurant and Seafood on the Pier have been closed for weeks.

Fisherman's Post Fishing Podcast
Cold Months on the Cape Lookout Rock Jetty, with Capt. Justin Ragsdale

Fisherman's Post Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 48:21


This episode is a primer for anyone wanting to hit the iconic Cape Lookout jetty to target winter trout, drum, and sheepshead, with conversations on boat positioning, wind and tides, and rigs and tackle. For show sponsorship inquiries contact: billy@fishermanspost.com   

The Meb Faber Show
#372 – Chas Cocke, LB Partners – There Are Lots of Great Businesses…The Hard Part Is Finding Them At A Really Good Price

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 77:13


In episode 372, we welcome our guest Chas Cocke, founder of LB Partners and previously one of the founding partners of Investure, a firm that started the outsourced CIO model that's popular today. In today's episode, we begin by discussing Chas' time at Investure and what it was like to work with the top money managers in the world. He covers some trends he sees in the institutional and hedge fund space around both fees and the convergence of public and private markets. Then we get into Chas' newest venture, which, as he puts it, will invest in anything, anywhere, unconstrained. We get into its unique structure and talk some of the areas he's already put money to work. We even discuss his partnership with this coming Wednesday's guest to launch the IO Digital Infrastructure ETF, ticker BYTE. ----- Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com ----- Today's episode is sponsored by Public.com. Public.com is an investing platform that helps people become better investors. On Public, ownership unlocks an experience of content and education, contextual to your portfolio, created by a million+ strong community of investors, creators and analysts. Start investing with as little as $1 and get a free slice of stock up to $50 when you sign up today at public.com/faber. Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

The Comic Multiverse
Spider-Man No Way Home Trailer | The Comic Multiverse Ep.256

The Comic Multiverse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 107:47


Things are heating up on The Comic Multiverse as we enter the holiday season. We got big new movie trailers and fresh new solicitations to cover. LIKE THE SHOW? BUY SOMETHING - https://amzn.to/3oUPgo5 GET 40% A ESKER WALLET - https://ekster.com/?utm_campaign=Cape... #TheComicMultiverse #Podcast #ComicBook #Superhero #DC #Marvel #Geek #Nerd ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- *Support Me On Patreon https://www.patreon.com/CapedJoel?ty=h *Buy Caped-Joel Merch https://www.teepublic.com/stores/cape... *Follow Me On Twitter: https://twitter.com/CapedJoel *Follow Me On Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/capedjoel/ *Listen To The Weekly Podcast https://soundcloud.com/thecomicmultiv... https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/t... *Amazon Wishlist: https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls... *Cyber Tip Jar https://ko-fi.com/capedjoel *Video Game/ Lets Play Content https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGLV... *Copyright free Music: http://www.purple-planet.com/ *YouTube Outro : http://www.officialmotions.com/

The Meb Faber Show
The Best Investment Writing Volume 5: Laurence Siegel, CFA Institute Research Foundation - Debunking Nine and a Half Myths of Investing

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 28:32


Last year we brought listeners the entire volume of The Best Investment Writing Volume 4, in audio format, right here on the podcast. Listeners loved it, so we're running it back again this year with The Best Investment Writing Volume 5.  You'll hear from some of the most respected money managers and investment researchers from all over the planet.   Enough from me, let's let Laurence take over this special episode.  To read the original piece, click here. ----- Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com ----- Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
David Higgs is planning a Cross Cape Im'possible ride

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 6:21


Guest: David Higgs- South African chef See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Here's What I Don't Get
Episode 261 - 3D Printed Feet

Here's What I Don't Get

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 114:49


Ah, Thanksgiving. The one time of year that you can just engorge yourself and no one minds. Except your pants. Decadent mashed potatoes with a whole stick of butter for garnish, bread that we dried out, then soaked in juice, then dried out again, vegetables covered in cream and cheese and other deep fried vegetables. Not to mention a huge bird, usually relegated to emulsified cold cuts, that cooks unevenly and is 50% bones. But the cherry on top? A can of jellied fruit that we call sauce despite it being sliceable. And don't forget your choice of bread product to sop up all that gravy! So ignore those distant family members as you hoover up your even-larger-than-usual plate, but pace yourself, because next is the GUANTLET OF PIES. Pumpkin, pecan, chocolate peanut butter, cherry, key lime, and not to mention:- People Telling You How To Do Your Job- Modern Shoe Design- Movie Theaters- CGI BudgetingThe best thing about your job? It's yours. Sure, there may be many like it, but this specific one is yours. It is your best friend. It is your life. You must master it as you must master your life. Your job, without you, is useless. Without your job, you am useless. So when some yahoo off the street does a drive-by "here's how you're supposed to do it" or a "last guy did [BLANK] differently", you should have the god given right to shoot them in the face. You don't go to their job and smack the 72 oz Big Gulp of stupid juice out of their hand, do you?Why are shoes so ugly these days? Who needs a neon pink and orange pair of sneakers? With velcro straps? And a waveform of an Aphex Twin song on the soles? What's wrong with you people? I'm not sure but you're not half as loony as the PSYCHOS that put WHITE on shoes. ESPECIALLY THE BOTTOM. THAT'S WHERE YOU STEP ON TO ALL THE OTHER COLORS. Even if you lived in Sackshrink, Scandinavia where there was constant snow on the ground 24/7, 365 days out of the year, your white shoes would still be dirty by the third day. That is if you could find them in your size.Do we need movie theaters anymore? We've got big TVs now. We've got the technology to make popcorn at home and I guarantee you there's a hundred internet articles/video explaining how to get that authentic movie theater taste(hint: it's essence of 16 year old stoner mixed with a spritz of hot dog water). We've got couches and recliners, just like them. We've got nachos that cost one-tenth the price and are twice as good, and candy that doesnt cost a dollar per bite. Not to mention for the price of a large movie drink we can get a 24 pack of our favorite soda. And now we can rent the movie the same weekend it comes out, for about the same price as a ticket and a half. We can pause it to take a leak, pause it to explain to your mom who the bad guy is and why he's doing what he's doing despite the fact that if she would just wait 30 seconds, he's literally about to give the same explanation in the movie. Plus, no strangers. So, you tell me.Gee, I wonder why this new Justice League movie bombed at the box office. Was it the lack of marketing? Online weirdos creating negativity? The director being replaced? Studio demands mucking up the final edit? THe large amount of emergency reshoots that muddle the tone of the film? Gee I wonder how this could've been prevented. Well, let's look at the budget: Big alien bad guy CGI: 2 million dollars. Cape physics: 1.5 million dollars. Aquaman underwater scenes: 8 million dollars. Removing Henry Cavill's moustache from reshoots, giving him weirdmouth: 650 million dollars. Giant war battle scene: 10 bucks.All this and more on this week's episode! Don't forget to join us on DISCORD, support us on PATREON or by BUYING A SHIRT.

The Meb Faber Show
#371 – Frank Holmes, U.S. Global Investors, HIVE Blockchain – JETS, Bitcoin vs. Gold, & How To Play Supply Chain Issues

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 62:45


In episode 371, we welcome our guest, Frank Holmes, the CEO of not one but two companies – U.S. Global Investors, an investment manager with both ETFs and mutual funds, and HIVE Blockchain, the first cryptocurrency mining company to go public. In today's episode, we're talking ETFs and crypto! Frank starts by sharing what piqued his interest in crypto and why he chose to go down the mining path instead of pursuing a Bitcoin ETF. He offers some macro perspective on crypto and how it differs from gold. Then we turn to the ETF space and hear about Frank's hit ETF, JETS, which focuses on the airline industry and caught fire in 2020 after the March decline as retail interest skyrocketed. Be sure to stick around until the end when Frank shares the thesis behind his newest ETF around the marine shipping and air freight industries. ----- Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com ----- Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

Bottle Blondes Wine
Episode 20 - Quick! Call the Cape Doctor! (South Africa Part 2 of 2)

Bottle Blondes Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 58:42


For part two in our series covering the Coastal Region/Western Cape of South Africa, we play an exciting game of South African Jeopardy, look at the Bordeaux blends of Stellenbosch, welcome the comeback of the blind tasting... And of course, play 7 things, in which we are pretty sure Adrien has a new product pitch for Shark Tank for cold single people and Hallie has big carnival plans for some sheep.

The Meb Faber Show
#370 – Ashley Flucas, Flucas Ventures - This Is A Really Opportunistic Time For Someone Who's Not Afraid And New In The Game To Get Started

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 56:35


In episode 370, we welcome our guest, Ashley Flucas, founder of Flucas Ventures and General Counsel and Partner for a real estate finance fund. In today's episode, we hear how someone with a capital markets law background transitioned into venture investing. Ashley walks us through her path to break in to the world of venture capital, first by participating in deals on AngelList, then building out her own syndicate. She shares how COVID accelerated the transition, allowing her to capitalize on both the lack of capital and shift to a remote world. She shares her investment philosophy, why she benefits from a non-tech background, and what it's like writing checks while being based in Florida. ----- Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com ----- Today's episode is sponsored by Public.com. Public.com is an investing platform that helps people become better investors. On Public, ownership unlocks an experience of content and education, contextual to your portfolio, created by a million+ strong community of investors, creators and analysts. Start investing with as little as $1 and get a free slice of stock up to $50 when you sign up today at public.com/faber. Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

The RAG Podcast - Recruitment Agency Growth Podcast
Season 5 | Ep 7 - On why choosing the right business partner is essential to growing your recruitment business!

The RAG Podcast - Recruitment Agency Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:44


On this week's episode of The RAG Podcast Live, I was delighted to be joined by Ishpal Bansal https://www.linkedin.com/in/ACoAAABjgFkBD1ZPo7sUAB4zw5OHoJps6D4BQ8o (Ishpa)l founded https://www.linkedin.com/company/aston-holmes/ (Aston Holmes), a resourcing and talent acquisition consultancy, alongside his business partner Brad Bloom in 2014. Shortly after launching the business, Ishpal was diagnosed with a heart condition and needed open heart surgery!  Thankfully he came through treatment and since then has gone on to grow teams across the UK and Africa (LDN, Cape and J'burg) Approaching 50 people and growing well.  In this episode Ishpal was incredibly honest about the challenges he and his partner have faced in their journey so far and why choosing the right partner is non negotiable! An essential episode for anyone who has a business partner today or is considering launching their agency in future! ---- Thank you again to our friends and sponsor today - http://odro.co.uk (Odro.co.uk) . Have you heard about Odro's up and coming new framework that's launching this week? If you don't follow the guys, you might not have so let me tell you about it.... Based on conversations from the best of the best in the recruitment space, the guys have pulled together a new framework that helps recruiters create more meaningful and longer-lasting connections with clients and candidates at various different touchpoints throughout the process. It's literally a diagram that really just distils all the opportunities throughout the process where video can be used to help to better attract, assess and provide aftercare, for improved relationships. Look it sounds simple, right?  And, actually, it is. But when you see it down on paper like that, it's amazing how many opportunities you realise most businesses are probably missing.  Hit the guys up at http://odro.co.uk/demo (odro.co.uk/demo) and I'm sure they'll be happy to send it on. ---- Thanks also to our second sponsor http://vincere.io/ (Vincere.io) - are officially launching in the US with a new office in Atlanta.. Whilst they have gathered US Clients, they strategically held back from going into the US until they were ready to hire a team and do it in full vinny style! They are ready and looking to work with agencies with 20+ users - as they want to ensure the support is in place to cater for the wider demand of the smaller agencies! If you are in the US or UK and interested in finding out more about Vincere, they offer great discounts for RAG Listeners so use www.vincere.io/rag

Gruesome Magazine - Horror Movie Reviews and Interviews
CHUCKY (2021, SYFY) Reaction & Review | Season 1 Episode 6 “Cape Queer”

Gruesome Magazine - Horror Movie Reviews and Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 39:12


Tonight, we review CHUCKY (2021, SYFY) Season 1 Episode 6. Doc Rotten from Horror News Radio. Jeff Mohr from Decades of Horror: The Classic Era. And Crystal Cleveland, the Livin6Dead6irl from Decades of Horror: 1980s share their thoughts about this week's awesome collection of streaming horror films. Joining the crew is Horror News Radio co-host, Dave Dreher! Special guest-host, award-winning filmmaker, Christopher G. Moore. CHUCKY (2021, SYFY) Season 1 Episode 6 "Cape Queer" Jake and Devon are ready to take their relationship to the next level--but after another gruesome murder at Chucky's far-from-idle hands, who has time for romance? Meanwhile, enemies--and allies--from Chucky's past show up to complicate matters.   Available on USA and SYFY beginning on November 16, 2021 Director: Samir Rehem Writers: Kim Garland Created by: Don Mancini Cast: Zackary Arthur, Devon Sawa, Bjorgvin Arnarson, Alyvia Alyn Lind, Teo Briones, Brad Dourif, Fiona Dourif, Jennifer Tilly, Alex Vincent, Christine Elise ANNOUNCEMENT Decades of Horror The Classic Era is partnering with THE CLASSIC SCI-FI MOVIE CHANNEL which will now include video episodes of The Classic Era! Available on Roku, AppleTV, Amazon FireTV, AndroidTV, Online Website. Across All OTT platforms, as well as mobile, tablet, and desktop. https://classicscifichannel.com/ FOLLOW: YouTube Channel (Subscribe Today!) https://youtube.com/c/gruesomemagazine Instagram https://www.instagram.com/gruesomemagazine/ Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/HorrorNewsRadioOfficial/ Events: http://gruesomemagazine.com/events/list/ Doc, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DocRottenHNR Crystal, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/living6dead6irl Crystal, Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/livin6dead6irl/ Jeff, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jeffmohr9 Dave, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drehershouseofhorrors

The Meb Faber Show
The Best Investment Writing Volume 5: Vineer Bhansali, LongTail Alpha - Diversifying Diversification: Downside Risk Management with Portfolios of Insurance Securities

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 10:31


Last year we brought listeners the entire volume of The Best Investment Writing Volume 4, in audio format, right here on the podcast. Listeners loved it, so we're running it back again this year with The Best Investment Writing Volume 5.    You'll hear from some of the most respected money managers and investment researchers from all over the planet.     Enough from me, let's let Vineer take over this special episode.    To read the original piece, click here.   -----   Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com   -----   Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

My Fishing Cape Cod Chronicles
Late Fall Fishing Opportunities - November 19 Cape Cod Fishing Report

My Fishing Cape Cod Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 28:16


Late November has arrived and the fishing for striped bass has definitely slowed down. Nevertheless some My Fishing Cape Codders are still managing to catch a striper here and there. Giant bluefin tunas are also still roaming not far offshore the Cape's coastline. The freshwater fishing across the board is on fire right now. Fishing for big largemouths, smallmouths and trout is a great bet. We would also like to wish you an early Happy Thanksgiving! I hope you're able to enjoy the holiday with your family and fishing friends. Tight lines

Horror Queers
Chucky S01E06: 'Cape Queer'

Horror Queers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 18:18


We're back with another minisode on Don Mancini's new series, Chucky (2021)! In our spoiler-filled discussion of the sixth episode, we discuss the return of Andy (Alex Vincent) and Kyle (Christine Elise), more Tiffany (Jennifer Tilly) and Nica (Fiona Dourif) shenanigans and those two deaths! Heads up: we recorded this before it was announced Fiona Dourif was playing Charles Lee Ray in flashbacksQuestions? Comments? Snark? Connect with the boys on Twitter, Instagram, Youtube, Letterboxd and/or Facebook, or join the Facebook Group to get in touch with other listeners> Trace: @tracedthurman> Joe: @bstolemyremoteBe sure to support the boys on Patreon! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Articulate Fly
S3, Ep 166: Cape Lookout Fishing Report with Knot the Reel World

The Articulate Fly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 5:50


Capt. Chris Siess of Knot the Reel World updates us on mid-November conditions on Cape Lookout. If you missed our full length interview with Chris, you can check it out here! Have a question for Chris? Send us a message on our Facebook page, and we will read it on the next report. Book at Trip with Knot the Reel World Support the Show Shop on Amazon Become a Patreon Patron All Things Social Media Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Follow Knot the Reel World on Instagram and YouTube. Follow Pretty Fly Designs on Instagram. Subscribe to the Podcast or, Even Better, Download Our App Download our mobile app for free from the Apple App Store, the Google Play Store or the Amazon Android Store. Subscribe to the podcast in the podcatcher of your choice.

Eleven2one with Janice
Helpers of Joy - Great Faith by Wanda Cape

Eleven2one with Janice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 8:40


Helpers of Joy is hosted by Amy Sapp each Wednesday at 12:30 PM Central Time.  Amy shares devotionals written by Christian ladies with the goal to help us help others have joy! You can follow Amy and her blog at Sappsolutely.com. Join the Helpers of Joy (II Corinthians 1:24) Facebook group - https://www.facebook.com/groups/370127033137091

The Meb Faber Show
#369 – Africa Startup Series – Maya Horgan Famodu, Ingressive Capital - Africa Holds The Fastest Growing Consumer Class, Fastest Growing Population & Fastest Growing Middle Class in The World

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 35:57


In episode 369, we welcome our guest, Maya Horgan Famodu, founder of Ingressive Capital, a VC fund focused on early stage African tech, and believed to be the youngest person to launch a tech fund in Sub-Saharan Africa.   In today's episode, we start with Maya's journey to the African tech scene.   She lays out the factors behind the recent explosion in funding that the continent has recently seen - strong demographics, high growth, and rapid tech adoption.  Then we get into some companies she's invested in, specifically a lot of “X for Africa,” the African equivalent of companies like Stripe, Robinhood, Flexport, and Plaid. And we even touch on 54gene, which we highlighted in episode 345.     As we wind down, we hear what lies ahead for Maya now that she just finished raising her second fund of $50 million.      -----   Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com   -----   Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

The Meb Faber Show
#368 – Rodrigo Gordillo & Corey Hoffstein - You Now Get To Have Your Beta Cake While Eating Your Alpha Too

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 75:18


In episode 368, we welcome our guests, Corey Hoffstein, CIO and co-founder of Newfound Research, and Rodrigo Gordillo, President and PM at ReSolve Asset Management In today's episode, we're talking about return stacking! Corey and Rodrigo joined forces to try and tackle the issue of how to generate returns in an environment with stretched equity and fixed income valuations. We hear how using a little bit of leverage to the traditional 60/40 portfolio can provide more than one dollar of exposure for every dollar invested. Our guests then walk us through what strategies investors can stack on top of their 60/40 portfolio, including global systematic macro, trend following, and tail hedging, and what that does to the risk/return profile. Be sure to stick around until the end to hear stories about what life is like for people who have actually lived in an inflationary environment. Please enjoy this episode with Newfound Research's Corey Hoffstein and ReSolve Asset Management's Rodrigo Gordillo. ----- Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com ----- Today's episode is sponsored by Public.com. Public.com is an investing platform that helps people become better investors. On Public, ownership unlocks an experience of content and education, contextual to your portfolio, created by a million+ strong community of investors, creators and analysts. Start investing with as little as $1 and get a free slice of stock up to $50 when you sign up today at public.com/faber.   Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

The Meb Faber Show
The Best Investment Writing Volume 5: David Blitz, Pim van Vliet & Guido Baltussen, Robeco – When Equity Factors Drop Their Shorts

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 12:48


Last year we brought listeners the entire volume of The Best Investment Writing Volume 4, in audio format, right here on the podcast. Listeners loved it, so we're running it back again this year with The Best Investment Writing Volume 5.    You'll hear from some of the most respected money managers and investment researchers from all over the planet.     Enough from me, let's let Erika van der Merwe take over this special episode on behalf of David, Pim & Guido.    To read the original piece, click here   -----   Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, visit mebfaber.com/podcast To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com   -----   Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

Michigan Sportsman - Sportsmen's Nation
Rut Success & How To Prepare Your Buck Cape

Michigan Sportsman - Sportsmen's Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 38:56


The boys are back!  Lee meets up with Carson down at their deer camp in Ohio to discuss Carson's recent buck he got during the rut.  The boys talk about tactics used, what kind of rut activity they are seeing, how to react and Carson walks us through how to cape out your buck for taxidermy.  The rut is still happening right now in Michigan and opening day of rifle is only a few days away.  Now, is the time to hit it as hard as you can before gun shots fill the morning air on November, 15th.  Good luck to all and enjoy the episode.  Michigan Life Outdoors is Powered by Simplecast

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Michigan Life Outdoors - Rut Success & How To Prepare Your Buck Cape

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 38:56


The boys are back!  Lee meets up with Carson down at their deer camp in Ohio to discuss Carson's recent buck he got during the rut.  The boys talk about tactics used, what kind of rut activity they are seeing, how to react and Carson walks us through how to cape out your buck for taxidermy.  The rut is still happening right now in Michigan and opening day of rifle is only a few days away.  Now, is the time to hit it as hard as you can before gun shots fill the morning air on November, 15th.  Good luck to all and enjoy the episode.  Michigan Outdoor Life is Powered by Simplecast

PodcastDX
Throwback Thursday! Travis Mills Veteran/Quad Amputee

PodcastDX

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 44:05


For our very first Throwback Thursday episode we celebrate the bravery of our men and women that have served in the United States Armed Services!   In this episode we will discuss not just continuing life after a horrific injury, but excelling and living life to it's fullest, minus two arms and two legs.  On April 10, 2012, United States Army Staff Sergeant Travis Mills of the 82nd Airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by an IED (improvised explosive device) while on patrol, losing portions of both legs and both arms. In September 2013, Travis and his wife Kelsey founded the Travis Mills Foundation, a nonprofit organization, formed to benefit and assist post 9/11 veterans who have been injured in active duty or as a result of their service to our nation. The veteran and their families receive an all-inclusive, all-expenses paid, barrier-free vacation to Maine where they participate in adaptive activities, bond with other veteran families, and enjoy much-needed rest and relaxation in Maine's great outdoors. If you are in a giving mood this year, the Travis Mills Foundation is a great way to give back to injured Veterans!  (DONATE HERE) TRANSCRIPT PodcastDX-Quad_Amputee   Lita T  00:10 Hello and welcome to another episode of podcast dx. The show that brings you interviews with people just like you whose lives were forever changed by a medical diagnosis. I'm Lita   Ron  00:22 I'm Ron,   Jean  00:23 and I'm a pina colada.   Lita T  00:24 You're not a pina colada she's Jean Marie. Collectively we're the hosts of PodcastDX. On today's show we're speaking with Travis Mills. Travis, if you're not familiar with him by now is the quadruple amputee from an Afghanistan IED and we're going to hear more about his story in a little bit. And he also is running a foundation that provides R&R services more or less for other veterans that have been injured. Is that right Travis?   Travis  00:55 Yeah, absolutely it for physically injured and now we're moving towards all injuries.   Lita T  01:00 Great, great. Well, welcome to the show. Go ahead, Ron   Ron  01:05 Travis. Hi, this is Ron. Again. Thank you for joining us today on our show. First, I would like to start off by saying thank you for your service to our country.   Travis  01:15 Well, no, I appreciate it. Thank you so much. And I'm excited to be here. I'm looking forward to hanging out with you guys for a bit. Yeah!   Ron  01:21  I read a bit about your injuries and your recovery. I gotta say, I am amazed by your determination and your tenacity. It seems like you've overcome a lot of challenges since April of 2012. Could you tell our listeners a little bit about that day? didn't it just start off as a regular day for you.   Travis  01:41 You know, it did we were on our, you know, deployment. I was supposed to be there for nine months as my third deployment. And we had a phone call come in from the village elder that there was some IEDs we had a checkout. So we put our gear on like normal. We went on patrol and try to help them out. And we went, you know, the same routes that we always would take not the same routes, the same general direction. And I had the guy in front of me with the Minesweeper and swept the ground once again, twice like we are protocol. And it just didn't alarm that there's anything under the soil. So I happened to take my backpack off and I put it on the ground. And then the bomb went off. You know it. It shocked my world to be honest with you.   Lita T  02:19 Well that's For sure.   Jean  02:21 Yeah. I can't even imagine what you were going what was going through your mind at that time? Probably. Yeah, shock. What were the next steps after you were evacuated from the site where you were actually injured. For instance, how soon after the attack, were you transferred back stateside? And was there an intermediate location or two for immediate surgical repair?   Travis  02:40 Well, I mean, what they did was, like I hit, my arm right side was completely gone, my right leg was completely gone. They disintegrated and they're found those pieces of me my left leg was snapped to the bone actually. So if you imagine the left ankle bone touching the left thigh, and my left wrist was blown out pretty bad. I hit the ground and rolled over on my back and I saw the aftermath. And in my head, I kept seeing the movie, Saving Private Ryan. And I thought you know about the medic that gets shot stomachs and then he cries out for his mom and ultimately died. I had I said no way like that ever remember me to freaking out or complaining or crying or feeling awful, you know begging not to die basically. Because at the end of the day, it's not my choice and I'm always wanting to exude confidence never showed fear, I led from the front and you know, I just, you never do that as a leader. So I calmed myself down, my medic worked on one side of me my Platoon Sergeant worked on the other side of me, they got four tourniquets on and then I with my left hand that was still left on my body. I reached up and grabbed my microphone and I called my Lieutenant I said, Hey, 6 this is 4 I got guys injured. I need your medic with mine. two of my soldiers got hit. So I you know, I called them and they radio back they sent Doc Voyce over. And Doc Voyce came to work on me, we're working on you know, my other men, and then me. I had to kind of calm him down he was in, stuck on repeat, you know like an old CD we could skip start skipping, he was doing what his training taught him to do so I kept saying "You'll be fine Sgt Mills, you'll be Okay, You'll be fine Sgt Mills, you'll be Okay,  he kept working he just kept saying it. I had to look at Doc Voyce and say "Hey Doc Just do your job. It's fine." And they got me on the helicopter about 10 minutes after Doc Voyce got there so really about 12 to 15 minutes being injured I was on a helicopter and I was transported to Kandahar hospital where I didn't know this then and I'm happy that it's, you know, a known fact now but 99% of patients that make it to Kandahar hospital leave Kandahar hospital alive.   Jean  04:36 That's amazing   Travis  04:36 And yeah, so they started wheeling me right into surgery as 14 hours of surgery took me into and just a wonderful team of nine doctors and seven nurses working for 14 hours straight to put me back to, well not put me back together I guess. that I was laying around with prosthetics but to you know, heal up my wounds and...   Lita T  04:56 Saved your life   Jean  04:57 Stabilize   Lita T  04:58  They saved your life, yeah,   Jean  04:59 yeah.   Travis  05:00 Yeah, absolutely.   Lita T  05:01 I'm guessing that those medics at the at the frontline are really the ones that saved your life. I know this wasn't something we were going to talk about, but do you stay in contact with those guys?   Travis  05:10 Oh, I do. Yeah, actually, um, you know, I know very fast forward but my wife and I had another child fortunately. So we have two now. And my son's name is DAX. Oh, he DAX is for medics, Daniel and Alexander as those who made it possible. Somebody will like name my kid in their honor. So  that was great. My wife kind of came up with the idea of more than I was going for Travis Fieldyen Mills the second but she said no   Lita T  05:29 That's amazing  (laughter)   Travis  05:39  I name everything after myself, my my business, my foundation, you know,   Lita T  05:44 At least everybody knows where they're going.   Jean  05:45 It worked for George Foreman, so why not?   Travis  05:48 Exactly.   Lita T  05:49 According to the Department of Defense, as of January 2018, more than 1500 service members have lost limbs in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, since all of this started in 2001, and an article back in 2018. In July, it pushed the number up to 1900 and 14. So 1914 Have you met any other amputees since you have been injured yourself?   Travis  06:21 Had I, you mean previously or since?   Lita T  06:23 no since then?   Travis  06:25 Oh, yes. At the hospital that we had a bunch of better, everybody at the hospital was an amputee   Lita T  06:30 Okay. Okay. So this is a very common wartime injury currently correct.   Travis  06:37 Oh, yeah. Yeah, but it's common to the hospital. So like, I had no idea like patient things like that. I mean, you figure you lose a leg, your life's over. Like it's gonna be the worst thing ever. And, you know, I got to the hospital and when I find it, they woke me up from a medical sedation. I was kind of like questioning why that person got hate me. What would I do wrong in life, talking to your husband and father and you know, the biggest thing I wonder is, why not just die? Like, how is this better? And in truth, I didn'twant to talk to my wife, my mom and dad at all that my parents didn't want to deal with the situation. But then I got to, you know, wake up, my brother in law was in the room, he was in the Military as well,  a friend of mine, I met his sister, my wife, and my parents, my wife, and I did. And then I didn't really have a conversation with them. It's kind of like, I don't want to talk about this, I want to deal with it. But finally, I got to meet Todd Nicely. He was a quadruple amputee, I'm actually one of five, I'm the fourth one out of five of us, and he walked into my room was like, Hey, man, you're gonna be fine. You're gonna walk again, you're gonna drive again, you're going to feed yourself, you know, you do everything you need to do by yourself. And I know doesn't sound like it, but you're gonna be independent. And I'm sorry. And that was all the, you know, the motivation I needed.   Lita T  07:48 So they kind of turn you around you think?   Travis  07:51 You know, my wife, and I thought she should leave me. Turn me like okay, let's get better. I won't be a burden on anybody. I mean, I'm very demanding husband. Unfortunately, you know that I expect a lot of help things but I'm very lucky my wife stayed. My daughter was six months old when I got hit. So she was there more with me every day. And I actually learned how to walk with my daughter kind of cool. You know, little thing me and her have   Lita T  08:15 That's so cool   Travis  08:16  so and she's eight years old. She goes, and she tells people, you know, I taught my dad how to walk.   Lita T  08:22 So cool, I love that. Yeah, it's gonna be hard to not tear up right now.   Jean  08:27 Yeah, especially after watching the movie with the two of you,   Lita T  08:30 right?   Jean  08:31  Yeah, she was right there for your physical therapy and everything and your wife was right there too. And it's, that's amazing.   Travis  08:36 Oh, absolutely.   Lita T  08:38 After that. They got you back, you know, alive and somewhat functioning. Did they give you the chance to remain in the military in any status like you know, just state side desk side or do they just tell you this is it   Travis  08:53 you know, they did actually General Odierno and the Sergeant Major of the Army at the time came in Chandler came in talking to the hospital about, Hey, you know, we'd love to have you stay in, you can go around and maybe present on behalf of the military and I teared off and I said, Look, I plan on doing 20 years, gentlemen, but not like this. And my time has come to an end. I can't be Infantry anymore. I can't, you know, be airborne anymore. And as sad as it was to come to that realization, it was just, it was time. I think I made jokes and I really don't want to get restationed anywhere. And General Odierno said, I don't think we restation Sergeant Mills. I don't think so either, sir, but I'm going to call it today. I appreciate this conversation, you know, cuz it was emotional. I planned on 20 years at whole career path lined up, but it just didn't work out for me and that's okay. Cuz like, you know, it's gonna play some curveballs and you got to keep pushing forward and do the best you can and I feel like I've taken that curveball, and that's kind of knocked out of the park with everybody that helps.    Lita T  09:53 That's super   Ron  09:55 Travis, I've seen some of your videos on YouTube. Absolutely. Amazing. And I could tell you're a pretty humorous guy. How did your humor and your personality I guess, how did it help you with the recovery process? And how long after the amputations where you fitted for the prosthetic that you wear?   Travis  10:18 Well, the humor that I have came back right to me. I met in fact, one day, I was sitting there in my hospital bed, the hallway from the nurses, and I could see them holding their like change of shift brief and I started yelling, oh, my legs, my arms and legs where did they go?  How did this happen? And I'm just joking to get their attention. And a little 10 year old walked by, and I was like, Oh, I'm just kidding. Sorry. Girls, like I'm so sorry. But, of course, you have the humor. And I think the best compliment and sometimes the worst compliment that I get is that I'm the same person that I was for the injury. So depending on who says it, you know, if you know somebody that's a friend of mine that grew up with says that's awesome, but if it's like a like a Maybe old school teacher from high school. Oh, sorry.   Ron  11:02 Yeah.   Travis  11:05  But as far as my prosthetic, I was able to get fitted after five weeks time, so a relatively short period. And then seven weeks and four days, I was able to start walking again so just shy of two months. I took my very first steps at Walter Reed. I mean, it was a short, legs a very different feel from walking, but I was starting my comeback,   Jean  11:24 right? It's amazingly fast.   Lita T  11:27 Amazing. For sure.   Travis  11:29 Well, I appreciate that. And then Believe it or not, I have no arms and legs like I do. I just made a video this morning. I was at the gym and I was actually running this morning at the gym. It's first time in two years. I took a hiatus because a no excuse, but back running now. So it's good.   Jean  11:45 That's awesone, that's absolutely awesome   Travis  11:47 Well yeah, I mean, I travel I travel the nation motivational speaker and I started every time off by saying I tell jokes disarm situation. Knee slapper if you got it, you know, don't have arms or and I also can't slap my knees. But I think it just makes people look past the injury that I sustained and more at the man that I am   Ron  11:47 . I say I'm work. I work in the disability community. I'm involved in Disabled Sports. And I tell you, it is a very interesting community with the humor so I understand exactly where you're coming from. You know who can say what?   absolutely   Travis  12:22 happy, you know, because I want to break down barriers and walls and people are just at Whole Foods to be honest with you and a little boy walked up, he's like, "what happened to your arms?"  His mom's like. "don't ask that"  like don't ask that to know, I probably have people asking like, then stare and like, kind of shy away from it. So I told him I, you know, had that day at work. And now I'm like Iron Man with, you know, the superheroes. He's all about it. He followed me around for a little bit. So I was like, Hey, man, I really gotta go.   Jean  12:49 Oh, wow. So every day, you're just   Lita T  12:52  inspiring people,   Jean  12:53  inspiring people wherever you go. That's fantastic. And Travis, my mom and I both know that, you know The army is not only a community, it's kind of like a family. But apparently that's really the case for you. As you had said your brother in law is also in that in the military. And that's actually how you met your wife.   Travis  13:12 Oh, yeah.   Jean  13:13  And what role has that played in your recovery?   Travis  13:17 As far as military Brotherhood in my recovery, how's that? Okay, yeah. So at the hospital, I answered the military in general, you have a brotherhood, right? Like I didn't go on my third deployment. I was supposed to go to Fort Hood, Texas, and help build a per day up ticket timeout from the point that so much time but I had all these young guys that came from across the nation that believed in me, I said, Nope, it's not fair to them. They believe me, I'm their leader. My wife understood the calling there at her house with five kids and she knew I had to go.  There is something ingrained in you as a servicemember. So I went overseas, and I got injured, right. So you go from the platoon size brotherhood and then you have the hospital without Todd Nicely coming to talk to me. Shortly after I was injured. I've never know the possibilities that lay the head. So I work properly as motivated when you get down to the military advanced training center, where all the injured guys are at and then we tell you something is just amazing. Because that's a tight knit group, and you're all working together and living together. going through the same thing with the with your spouse will do the same thing or children and having them to lean on. Plus, the staff at Walter Reed are just top notch physical therapists, occupational therapists, you know, in the driving of cyclists, the process everybody, it's just one well oiled machine, the doctors sorry and Walter Reed is a Brotherhood and having everybody that was injured. Like me, or you know, not like me with no arms legs, but like maybe missing the leg missing the arm, spinal cord injury, whatever. It was nice having them there because, you know, you feed off them, they still got the mentality of, you know, being in the service.   Lita T  14:54 Right. Could you please tell us a little bit about the prosthetics that you're using now. And an add on question, I guess. Do you start out like a person that has an amputation? Do they start out with one type of a prosthetic and move on to different ones as they get acclimated to the use? Are there like prosthetic training wheels of sorts?   Travis  15:16 Yeah, absolutely There are so we'll start with the hands the first one that I got called the mile electric I still use things that Dan that I have that but he only went for one hour a day and then it got progressively more and more so without I was on I want so like I've added on 20 hours or whatever, you know, up and up that long working or doing whatever. And they just, you know, it's muscle flex base. So I certain muscles blow it up into flex, but they muscle fat that rotate and download down fast. And it's pretty awesome because I mean, I could eat a sandwich, I can open the door, I could drive my truck, do everything I need to with that one hand that I wear on the left side, the right side. I'm so high up injured. I don't wear prosthetics on it. Unless I'm doing that. activities like downhill mountain biking, or kayaking, and things of that nature. Okay, snowboarding, I do all that stuff, which is pretty awesome, then. Oh yeah. And then as far as the prosthetic legs is definitely a training wheels type session where you start on short legs, so they mold your legs start on really short prosthetics and you got to rebuild everything from 250 pounds when I got injured to 140 pounds. I lost all my muscle mass. I couldn't roll right and left for sit up myself for a while there. So I had to regain all my core muscle and strength. And he started on shorter legs. So when you get stronger on those, it's basically like if you imagine where your kneecap is, there's a foot at the end of it for me it would have been difficult to deal with Sure, yeah. It and then you grow taller and taller to the point where you have straight legs that are like still so you're standing up as high as they're going to make you okay, I was six, three, almost six foot right now. I was you know, so they Currently, Sanchez Blitz offer safety and gravity and whatnot. And then they give you the legs I'm wearing now it's called x threes. And they're the top of the line. They're waterproof. They're Bluetooth, that have like a locking remote, much better angle. They have little computers in each leg. So they're microprocessors fitter. So every time I move over here and adjustments get made to keep me as upright as possible. And then the last thing is they have hydraulic brakes built in so when I go down the ramp, I can slow myself down. I find a lot of airplanes actually good motivational speaker. So when I go down on the jetway, I don't go bowling for people.   Ron  17:36 So yeah, that in the video too. Right, right. Yeah,   Jean  17:39 that's, that's incredible.   Ron  17:42 was funny. One of the other things in the video talked about your prosthetic hand and your daughter's future boyfriend. I thought that was pretty humorous.   Lita T  17:53 Yeah, tell us about that firsthand.   Travis  17:55 Yeah, I got it. Yeah, keeping a Crown Royal bag in my closet. It was 45 pressure, and then 35 pounds of pressure. And the reason I keep in the closet is because when she's 16 her mom lets her go on a date, I'm gonna bring the handout. I'll probably you know, crush his hand, when he's crying I'm going to tell him "no   fingerprints".  But don't mess with me, bro. Let him go   Lita T  18:15 (laughter)   Travis  18:15 To subdue any, you know,   Lita T  18:17 Questions that he might have had   Travis  18:18 Ideas he was thinking about trying?  My wife says I'm not gonna be able to do that. But, you know, we'll see.   Lita T  18:19  Right right That's right, that's right   Travis  18:27  And high school buddies like real good friends of mine are so excited because their kids get old enough they can't wait to  buy me into the same thing. I'm like, I'm coming let's throw a party. That boys to style like Bad Boys 2 with Martin Lawrence, and Will Smith the show that day.   Lita T  18:41 Sure, sure.   Ron  18:42 Yeah, that's too funny. You just mentioned your friends. It's actually leads me into my next question. Your friends and family, including your wife. how supportive as they put you through this little this journey.   Travis  18:58 Oh, I mean, stop that. I I definitely gain and lose friends through this and you know having my wife at my side every day was a reason I kept fighting to get better because she's not leaving me, then I gotta do my best to not be a burden. And you know a lot of places that she goes for other nonprofits maybe they bring up like, you know, the problems that have their husbands or issues they have their husbands. You know, some of the other spouses might say like, we can't do this because of that I felt like was Travis Travis Travis takes boys to gymnastics he runs around does grocery shopping when he when he can and things so I try to be everyday average normal husband, fathers, I can't be but then having you know, my friends, bear with me. And now with the foundation. I've been able to bring up a lot of really cool families that I want to help out. So we help all physically injured, sterilization spinal cord, service families and it's all free to them and it's all about Hey, get out out there be active in community and in your society, because some people aren't as open as me. And I think having support group that I had and having that I, I had  to learn things like, like walking and stuff as I'm fortunately so successful in my everyday life.   Lita T  20:17 Sure, sure.   Ron  20:18  Oh, that's fantastic. That's fantastic.   Lita T  20:20 Definitely. Travis, what do you wish people knew about amputees? I know that you say that, you know, go ahead and ask That's for you personally. But what do you wish people would know about amputees? Like the emotional changes that a person goes to you? So like, in other words, if somebody wanted to ask a question, but they were afraid to ask, you know, pretend like you're asked, answering those questions. What What did you have to go through emotionally?   Jean  20:47 And I would say like, what, what do you wish they knew?   Lita T  20:50 Right?   Jean  20:50  Yeah.   Travis  20:51 Well, I mean, honestly, for me, a lot of my buddies that I know rather than have the conversation than the looks, the stairs, and like the The awkward, you know, oh crap, they're looking at me I'm going to look back, or up at the ceiling or whatever and look back when they're not looking. So, really people they want to be delicate, which I appreciate I understand but, you know, everybody that I know is everyday, regular person, they just had some mishap at work but didn't change them, you know, into being this person that needs to be, you know, you know, babied around or, or ostracized I guess. So, you know, for me, why don't people know is like, have the conversation say Hey, how's it going? People ask me. It's a funny thing. Like, hey, Travis, you know, when I see someone like you, What do I say? I'm like, I usually say hi or hello   Lita T  21:42 Exactly, exactly right, right   Travis  21:45 And, you know, also, I'm trying to change the narrative. I say I'm recalibrate because my voice those out you want those wounded guys, it doesn't feel very good, don't have any more injuries. I have scars. So I'm trying to change the whole life. Word wounded, is that the negative to recalibrated it right?   Lita T  22:03 Okay,   Travis  22:03 based off a little bit. We're good to go. It's good. And then then also, I think that the term veteran in general has become kind of like, oh, you're one of the veterans Do you got that, you know, pts or what's wrong and I'm like, nothing I serve my country had a great time doing it, love my job, had a bad day at work. I gotta move on. So, you know, my foundation, we're actually expanding our program to help people get back on their feet. That may be something for PTS, things like that. Because I really truly feel that you know, you need to get help to get out of your own way to be successful,  I'm fortunate. We're going to talk about that I run I own part owner and two, and I run one with my wife. So three businesses plus nonprofit that's very successful.   Lita T  22:47 That's great.   Jean  22:48 Well, we weren't must be very busy.   Lita T  22:50 Yeah, I would say so. Yeah, well, yes, for sure. I'm getting back to the physical thing that you've been through. How many surgical procedures have have you had?   Travis  23:02 I think 13 they said they   23:06 Yeah, 13 surgical procedures,  maybe more, but I didn't have any. I didn't have any surgeries. Kind of weeks easily get with me What's up, let's go internal. Then I had my eardrum repaired, which was the worst surgery that I can remember. But and then besides for that, nothing too crazy. I was very fortunate and lucky there no infections or anything like that.   Lita T  23:28 Do you think they'd be in the best physical condition that you were in prior to the injuries was what helped your recovery?   Travis  23:36 I think so. I think it did. For sure. I was a weightlifter. I picked anything up that was heavy and put it down. You know, one of those meat is kind of nice. But I also I think it was on the battlefield. The reason I didn't lose my blood out and everything. I remained calm. I didn't get my heart rate up. I didn't freak out. I kept telling myself whatever happens happens. Not my call at the end of the day. So don't freak out. And I think that might have saved my life as well because instead of yelling, I don't want to die and freaking out and panicking, I just like to stay calm and ride this one out. So very fortunate that I'm kind of stuffing it in the best way possible, which are my thing. And the most worst way. Yes. All my family members, maybe.   Jean  24:22 Well, yeah, that's, that is truly amazing. And it says a lot about who you are as a person who you were before, and who you who you have always been, and your injuries were in 2012. Do you still have like phantom limb pain? And is there anything that they can do to help treat that part of the injury?   Travis  24:39 You know, it's great question and I can't reiterate the documentary and I wish I could, because I say that the academy coma I don't think I would do it again, which is I only did that. You know, the documentary was five months after my injury. In truth, the phantom limb pain I would 110% not be the person I am Today if I didn't have the ketamine colon Academy coma, they're doing a case study. And what they did was reset my brain to think that my nerves and where they were blown off and finally beat. And I, I have been absolutely pain medication free since October of 2012. I quit it cold turkey, and no pain medication. No medication whatsoever, actually, which is very unfortunate, but because of my case study they did. It's more of a common use process. And I have no phantom limb pain, no pain to speak up. And I'm very, very lucky. I know that so it's, you know, that's one thing that at the time when I said it in the documentary, I didn't know the results of it and now looking back like it was probably the best thing for me because my life is obstructed by anything, I don't live, you know, any medication and just keep pushing forward with with a pretty worryfree life.   Lita T  25:58 It's amazing.   Jean  25:59 Yeah, that's awesome.   Ron  26:01 Try to watch the video that showed you and your modified truck. Oh, you know you still drive? What about any of your other recreational pursuits? Do you need adaptations? Or how do you how do you do done?   Travis  26:15 Well, you know, luckily with the remote to my truck, and I click My legs are better your angles I can drive my truck No, no no problem and therefore a lot of us like to get into get adapted. I just kind of drove it every day and made it work with a steering wheel handle so I can drive most anything but I have a van that has ankles in it, which is awesome. And that that really helps out a lot too. So it's just a lot of fun that I get to do that and be able to drive again and stuff so I i guess i have a ranger in a golf cart. But there's no adaptions on those. I just kind of drive those.   Jean  26:48 If you're going to be running that day. Is there do you switch out your prosthetics to make running   Travis  26:54  You know what? Yeah, yeah, so I did I forgot to cover that. I went back and training was walking to look at my profit. But in truth, I have bicycle legs I've never used I'm going to set them up one day very excited about this. I'm running late. I have both. I have worked out a little short workout legs. And then I have different hands and attachment. I mean, it's I have a bowling arm. I think I'm going to use this weekend. My daughter's birthday party thing she's doing with all their friends and their, you know, whatever. And I have a pool table arms. I can't wait to get a pool table. I'm telling you what,   Ron  27:26 (laughter)    Travis  27:27 kind of exciting but yeah, there's definitely different adaption,   Lita T  27:30 okay,   Travis  27:31 there are adaptations that they have. And it's kind of like it's weird, but like, just like on Amazon, you go and set the book. You're like, oh, that activity looks fun. And see if I get one of those. I have I have a like a 10 inch butcher knife. So I can carve a turkey to be honest. I haven't covered a lot of turkeys. But it's very sharp. And you got to be very careful on the walking thing because it's like running with scissors.   Lita T  27:52 Oh, yeah.   Travis  27:54 But yeah, we have all that stuff. And I'm so grateful that there's some geniuses and bright minds out there. That put this together to make it possible for   Lita T  28:01  for sure.   Ron  28:02  Well, Travis, if you don't already, if you don't do scuba diving or you haven't done archery and you are interested, let's talk later because I'm involved in both of those activities for people with disabilities.   Travis  28:17  I appreciate that. Yeah,   Ron  28:19 for what I've seen you do a lot, but I wanted to throw that out. There is another. I don't know something else you could add to the resume.   Lita T  28:26 Right, right.   Travis  28:27 Yeah, so I've done archery, and I'm okay with that. You know, it's not something again, knock knock on the arrow part gets me kinda. So like, my biggest stubbornness I have. If I can't do it by myself, then it's like, I don't really want to do it. So I'm getting some, some rifle setup so I can go, I like to skeet shoot you right. It's target shoot. But also, my next goal is already been skydiving a few times I show my airplanes but since I've been injured I've been skydiving twice, my next goal and here's where being you can can collaborate. I'm gonna go you know, cage diving with a great white sharks. I just I'm so afraid of sharks. I face my fears and I cannot wait to jump in that cage with those with sharks all around the but I want the big ones off this, you know the Cape of you know, of South Africa I want   Ron  29:14 certainly that. That's one of my bucket list items. I just say I don't want that to be the last item on my bucket list if you know what I mean   Lita T  29:20 (laughter) okay.   Jean  29:22 Yeah, you two have fun   Travis  29:23  You've got to live a little bit   Lita T  29:25 I'll be up on the boat with the spear gun and I'll be keeping an eye out for you.   Jean  29:30 Wow.   Travis  29:31 Yeah, drinking the rum punch. I love it   Lita T  29:35 Somebody getting on shotgun.   Jean  29:36 Yep.   Travis  29:37 Oh, I get it.   Jean  29:39 That's you guys are hilarious. But yeah, you guys don't have to work that out with Dive. Heart. Travis, what is the future of prosthetics look like and what do you hope to see with future prosthetic devices?   Travis  29:53 You know, the prosthetics are quite amazing. They have prosthetics that your hands that each finger moves instead of just Like the two fingers, like, you know, like he can add a little motor I'm looking for those get more durable, which is exciting, but also then hooking to like, your nerves and all that so that they can, you know, sense what your muscles would would actually be flexing to open your hand and close it. But I think also what I'm excited about a step further than prosthetics is they're doing stuff called osteo integration where they they're hollowing out your humor bone and hooking a rod to it and a rod inside your skin like your feet do. And then you connect your feet on it, and you can take them off. And then kind of lastly is the stem cell stuff, which is so intriguing to me because they're regrowing people's like one guy like regrew his thumb, so that they're saying they're probably able to regrow people's arms and legs in the near future. Like we're talking 5/10 years.   Lita T  30:47 Wow.   Travis  30:48 We're just I mean mind blowing, right?   Lita T  30:50 oh yeah wow,   Travis  30:51 yeah, I'm gonna be the first one to do it. But I'm saying it's just it's just amazing that the progression right when the first guy made a prosthetic Civil War thing or got started, because he lost his leg to a cannon, or infection or a gunshot, something to do with civil war. But now, I mean, bionic stuff is just impressive. So sky's the limit. If I was a Vietnam era veteran on the battlefield medicine or technology that we had have today, very rarely where a guy like me ever make it, very low percentage. And now, because of the wars and because of technology and the time that we live in, I live a pretty normal life. Like, I mean, you know, I, I went down and did a federal meeting today at a building that was like a day to day and I had I went to the gym and ran to the outdoors, the laces running at the gym. Pretty cool, right?   Lita T  31:41 Absolutely.   Jean  31:42 And very inspiring   Travis  31:44 And I think i think i think the big thing is, you know, to stay to stay humble, because I don't want to ask for too much. It's just so fortunate and lucky to have what's out there on the market right now.   Jean  31:55 Sure, sure. But I guess you know, as far as the future of prosthetics, the designer Definitely want to hear from the individuals who will be using them to see what is it that you guys need?   Travis  32:05 Oh, absolutely there for dreams for sure.   Ron  32:09 Travis older veterans day name require amputations due to medical complications, like diabetes, or something like that. Have you interacted with any of these older vets to talk with them and give them an idea of what to expect after amputation?   Travis  32:27 Well, I mean, I get it. I get some conversations, right? A lot of like, one on one counseling like that. But if I go to the VA to do a checkup or something, when I see somebody and ask the questions I answer or someone at the grocery store that, you know, I, you know, have the conversation. So a big thing is people emailing my website, and they'll ask me like, Hey, you know, I got this going on. I was thinking, maybe I should just cut my leg off. What do you think I'm like, I'm not the guy. Like, that's not my Yeah, my expertise, but I'll tell you, that, you know, there's different prothestics out there make your life better if that ends up being the diagnosis or what happened. So, I'll try to get as much information but I want to make it sound like oh, it's Rick, hack that thing off. Let's call it a day. Right? But um, as far as people that are suffering you know, I know people use my use my website TravisMills.org for a lot of inspiration. And they go on my Facebook, which is all like tagged SSG Travis, because when they go to my Facebook page or my Instagram they'll see fun videos of me and my wife children or or meet my buddy or things like that and then they can you know, they can find out Hey, life goes on. That's what this whole podcast about some happen. Keep pushing forward. And that's kind of the message that we always we always project I'm always speak about resiliency and about, you know, overcoming life's obstacles. And it's just, it's a lot of fun for me, so I'll have the conversation, but it's not something I do what I want to accomplish.   Lita T  33:54 Well, speaking of resiliency, you were obviously able to draw on an incredible Internal Strength just to survive that incident. Could you tell us more about your mantra of never give up? never quit? How did you come up with that? And can that work for everyone?   Travis  34:11 Absolutely. It can work for everybody in the way that I kind of started in the hole. Never go never quit was I was working out. I looked all skinny and sickly and their staff say Do you wanna take a break? And I said, I'm never gonna give up I'm never gonna quit. And you know when I say my wife on my side, my daughter being there helped me walk again. In my driving force. My parents my in laws. My father in law, I didn't really know him that well really, right. Like, we talked about the weather, a lot sports but lived near him or was nowhere near him. When I grew up. He moved in the hospital with me, we became really close friends now. I mean, we're best friends. We travel all over the nation together. But it's just it's ingrained in my head that you just keep pushing forward. You can't just let your situation that you're living in now the outcome of your life and let me just Like the military, I always strive for more promotions and higher rank and do better and things like that and the best time of my life. So, you know, I don't want to sit stagnant. You got to keep moving. And that's kind of how I got the slogan. And now I live by it because I know that there's no not one but two children that look up to me every day. And I need to make sure they know like, hey, look, if you fall down, you got to get back up and keep going forward.   Jean  35:24 It's once again, amazing,   Lita T  35:27 Hooah!   Ron  35:30 Could you tell us a little bit more about the movie a soldier's story?   Travis  35:34 Yeah. So this documentary was created because people in Texas saw my story on I think Fox News, one of the new stations, and they thought was pretty cool. And they realized quite early in our conversations to have go room to room and meet people like me and the people that came into the hospital, and they wanted to film and we decided, you know what, let's just go ahead and do a short documentary half hour long and then it turned into an hour long documentary and became a film that that was actually that was done and about seven days, maybe nine days of filming. Yeah, there's a lot of iPhone footage of that cotton edit from Kelsey phone, which was great. But they did reenact with some of the interviews and all that just like in nine days, so.   Lita T  36:16 Oh, yeah, I was, that was a heart wrenching. A heart wrenching movie. We watched it just before we started the interview. We wanted to make sure that we were in the right frame of mind, and I don't know if that helped. Oh,   Jean  36:29 yeah, it was all it was us in a box of tissue. Yeah, but there were a lot of smiles.   Lita T  36:34 Yeah, yeah, I knew how it ended so that was the only reason I said it's got a good ending.   Jean  36:38 Yeah,   Lita T  36:39 it's gonna be a good movie.   Jean  36:40 It's gonna work out it's gonna be okay.   Lita T  36:42 Yeah,   Travis  36:43 I know it kind of sad for the first half hour.   Lita T  36:45  Yeah, it was a it was a it was a rough beginning.   Travis  36:49 And then now I actually unfortunate where we have, or I guess I have a book "AS Tough As They Come" It's a New York Times bestseller. I have a book out, and it might be made into an actual motion. picture, which is exciting, but can't count your chickens before they hatch. So we're playing it day by day and see how it goes.   Lita T  37:07 Sure, sure. Can you tell our listeners about your family now? So you've got two children and how have you adapted to life together as and does this amputee getting away? I mean, are you just a husband and a dad?   Travis  37:26 I mean there's two answers to that I guess it didn't patient or my disability or you want to call it it does give away something like my daughter's in soccer. I'd love to be in the backyard keep the ball around and running. But I did that for the first year when she was like five cheaper soccer but now I can't keep up so I kind of watch her you know, from the side but doesn't really get in my way. I get on the trampoline with my kid but I still do a backflip we get into the floor the lake and swim around so don't really hold me up and I still do daddy daughter dances and things like that    Lita T  37:59 oh that's sweet   Travis  38:00  My wife, you know, she's unsung hero of everything. She doesn't like the limelight as much. But, you know, she's one keeps us all together the glue that holds it and she's been phenomenal. You know, she's taking my side and helped me out like today before we left, I still need help put my legs on. So she had to put my legs on, she doesn't complain about that she just, It's just normal now. So like, when I wake up, you know, my legs go on in my pants or whatever. But it doesn't hold me back from being a father or a parent. You know, I'm the one that takes your gymnastics, and my son and I wrestle around. This is a lot of fun. So I guess we have the same family dynamic that we were always going to have. You know, I'm, you know, active with the kids and my wife and I still do things as a family. It's just different because I'm not able to do as much sports stuff as I'd like to because I used to be very athletic.   Lita T  38:55 But at least you've been there. You know the tips. You know, you know what to tell you kids how to do it. You can train them, you can coach them, you can guide them, because you've already done it. And   Travis  39:08 absolutely, give me excuses. I'm not sure that excuses will work with me, like, really, really fully   Ron  39:19 add here and kind of in the same boat with you a little bit too old, so I can't keep up with my kid. But I've done it before I can talk with them. I can explain to them, but I certainly can't keep up with them. They're young. You know?   Travis  39:33 You're doing better than me, Ron I mean, I fell apart at 25 you know, I got two feet in the grave now. 32 years old. There you go.    Jean  39:40 I don't know if that's quite true   Ron  39:42 I finally heard that, finally caught it. Again, I know the humor in the community can be pretty pretty intense, huh?   Jean  39:50 Yeah, you guys. Yeah. quite quite the comedian there.   Lita T  39:53 I gotta close my mouth now,   Jean  39:55 yeah. Okay.   Ron  39:56 Yeah, hopefully we'll talk afterwards. There. You   Jean  40:01 Do you have any tips hints and helpful advice for our listeners, or someone who's recently had an amputation or waiting to have one or their family members?   Travis  40:10 For you, I don't just sit here with amputations. I'll tell you what I tell all the audiences I speak to. I travel with you know, all over the nation. The two things I leave won't get off stage since the two left crap where because, you know, I went from this athletic six foot three lift weights every day, big, stocky, strong guy to, you know, have no arms and legs, and everything. So the first thing I tell people is don't dwell in the past. I sit in hospital bed and close my eyes and hope we pray that this never happened. And think how I go back in time, how do I change this? And you know, it took what two three weeks then when I finally realized that it does me no good living in the past is never going to change anything. So instead of dwelling on it, I remember this 25 years I have arms and like they're phenomenal and I've had seven amazing times and then I also take it step further and tell people that you can't control your situation. But you can always control your attitude. So for me, my situation is I wake up every morning with no arms, no legs, right then that's how I am. But my attitude, I'm fortunate, my daughter, Chloe to run down with no, if I'm not already awake, I jumped my wheelchair, I throw my arm on, right, we go downstairs, and we have our breakfast. And then I'm able to go ahead and go about my day. So instead of letting my situation dictate how I feel, I just realized that hey, I'm so lucky to be here and so fortunate because I have a lot of guys that make it back home to their families, that I might as well have a great attitude about every day I get to be here because you know, they're no longer with us and their sacrifices so much bear in mind. And I think if you get by those two life life lessons that I've been, you know, that I've learned and I live by pretty, pretty positive, upbeat, average, you know, great day. Hi, everybody. Sorry about the great day   Jean  41:59 Yeah.   Lita T  42:00  good attitude   Jean  42:01  is wonderful.   Ron  42:03 Yeah, attitude is definitely a big factor. Travis, you do have quite the following of people. You want to give a plug for your book or your podcast?   Jean  42:13 I can't believe you also have a podcast Wow.   Travis  42:16 You know, I do but we're just getting it off the ground. We did a little a couple, you know, test episodes and pilots, but now we're going to go ahead and and change out the format to be great. And, you know, I'm really excited about that. So, yeah, if anybody gets bored and want to check it out, check out Travis mills.org. For otter Travis Mills needs and we'll just kind of go from there. Okay, there you go. That's, that's great. That's, that's that's wonderful. And we hope our listeners do check that out. We cannot thank you enough for joining our show today. It's been a pleasure having you on Yes, definitely. Yeah, absolutely appreciate you guys having me. I hope you guys have won frustrated day and excited to be a part of this. You know, this episode. Your phenomenal podcast here.   Lita T  43:01 Thank you Travis for joining our show. And I hope others can find strength by listening to your story because that's the goal of our podcast.   Jean  43:10 Yeah. And it's extremely inspiring,   Lita T  43:12  very   Travis  43:14 Thanks so much, much appreciated.   Lita T  43:15 You're welcome. If our listeners have any questions or comments related to today's show, they can contact us at podcast dx@yahoo.com do our website podcast dx calm and Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest or Instagram.   Jean  43:28 And if you have a moment to spare, please give us a review wherever you get your podcast. As always, keep in mind that this podcast is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider with a any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment in before undertaking a new health care regime and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you've heard on this podcast   Lita T  43:49 till next week.  

The Meb Faber Show
#367 – Robert Lawson, SMU - Initially This Whole Thing Was A Tax Dodge So I Could Go Drink In Cuba

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 57:05


In episode 367, we welcome our guest, Robert Lawson, director of the Bridwell Institute for Economic Freedom at (SMU) and author of Socialism Sucks: Two Economists Drink Their Way Through the Unfree World. In today's episode, we're talking about some of my favorite topics – capitalism, travel, and beer! Robert traveled around the world to visit socialist countries and let's just say the crappy beer wasn't the only thing he didn't like about the trip.   We start by defining what true socialism is, why Sweden isn't actually a socialist country, and look at Venezuela, Cuba, and North Korea to see what true socialism looks like in the world today. Surprise, surprise: it's not good.  Next, we discuss why socialism has a false utopian vision for the world and the reasons why this terrible idea just won't go away. As we wind down, we chat about some current topics in the U.S., including UBI, student-loan forgiveness, and the lack of financial education in schools.   ----- Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com ----- Today's episode is sponsored by Masterworks. Masterworks is opening the doors to top-tier, blue-chip art investments to everyone. Visit masterworks.io/meb to skip their wait list. Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

FIS CASTAWAY
EPISODE 79

FIS CASTAWAY

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 25:53


It's groundhog day on our podcast, as we explore further Iron Ore falls, flatlining Oil, and record Ferts markets, although the Cape market has taken a breather this week. Disclaimer: freightinvestorservices.com/castaway-disclaimer/

The Daily Good
Episode 407: A D-Day vet still raising funds for memorials, a great coffee fact, sea turtles on the rebound in Cape Verde, the splendor of Vienna’s coffeehouses, the brilliant jazz guitarist Russell Malone, and more…

The Daily Good

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 17:31


Good News: One of the last living D-Day veterans in England is still raising money for charities that continue to create memorials to that battle, Link HERE. The Good Word: A great and thoughtful quote for your day. Good To Know: A surprising fact about instant coffee! Good News: Loggerhead Sea Turtle populations in Cape […]

Talking Real Money
New Highs Normal

Talking Real Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 37:02


What are stocks worth today? Too much? Not enough? According to millions of investors, they are about right for the time. Plus, how will you know which "record high" is the last one for awhile? Then, when will stocks start to head for their next record?You can now earn over 7% with no principal risk.A caller finds an old stock certificate.Another worries about the taxation of I-Bonds to an estate.A mortgage-free listeners is considering a new mortgage to increase investments.A listener wonders why we criticize Edward Jones.

The Meb Faber Show
#366 – Darius Dale, 42 Macro - Reflation Is Now The Dominant Market Regime

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 86:12


In episode 366, we welcome our guest, Darius Dale, founder and CEO of 42 Macro, which specializes in macro risk management through the dual lenses of asset allocation and portfolio construction.   In today's episode, we're talking all things macro! Darius walks us through his framework for analyzing macro regimes and then uses it to assess where we stand today. We touch on all the hot macro topics – whether inflation is transitory, the impact of supply chain issues, and how the rise of populism in the U.S. will impact markets.   Be sure to stick around until the end of the episode to hear what Darius says is the most important chart in macro today.   Darius was kind enough to put together a comprehensive deck, so be sure to either check out the episode on YouTube to see him walk through the slides, or click here to follow along yourself.   -----   Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com   ----- Today's episode is sponsored by Public.com. Public.com is an investing platform that helps people become better investors. On Public, ownership unlocks an experience of content and education, contextual to your portfolio, created by a million+ strong community of investors, creators and analysts. Start investing with as little as $1 and get a free slice of stock up to $50 when you sign up today at public.com/faber.   Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

3 Book Girls
EPISODE 269 MOUNTAIN SINGS KIND OF CURSED WEARING THE CAPE TRUTH OF THE DIVINE

3 Book Girls

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 58:58


We welcomed a guest who works at the OKC library, Gwen Lake!

The Meb Faber Show
The Best Investment Writing Volume 5: John Pease, GMO – Value: If Not Now, When?

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 19:11


Last year we brought listeners the entire volume of The Best Investment Writing Volume 4, in audio format, right here on the podcast. Listeners loved it, so we're running it back again this year with The Best Investment Writing Volume 5.    You'll hear from some of the most respected money managers and investment researchers from all over the planet.     Enough from me, let's let John take over this special episode.    To read the original piece, click here.   -----   Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, visit mebfaber.com/podcast To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com   -----   Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

My Fishing Cape Cod Chronicles
Friday November 5th Report - Fishing the Fall on Cape

My Fishing Cape Cod Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 35:57


Learn about the Cape's many fall fishing opportunities in today's new podcast. From November stripers to tuna, mackerel, freshwater and more. Today we are dropping 2 brand new podcasts all about fishing Cape Cod during the month of November. Our first podcast is available to the general public. The second podcast is for My Fishing Cape Cod members-only and is available right now at myfishingcapecod.com/fall-podcast. Both of these podcasts were recorded last night November 4th. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Liquor and Liqueur Connoisseur
Episode 77: Licor 43

Liquor and Liqueur Connoisseur

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 19:23


Episode 77 features Licor 43, Cuarenta Y Tres, a Spanish liqueur. (Why this wasn't episode 43, I don't know, I missed it!) Bottled in 750ml at 31% ABV, or 62 proof, it retails for about $25. Enjoy this episode with Licor 43 neat, or with espresso. Licor 43's official website: https://www.licor43.com/ (https://www.licor43.com/) Brief Historical Timeline: 209 BC - The Roman's conquer a part of southern Spain and encounter "Liqvor Mirabilis" that Licor 43 is said to be based on 1946 - The Zamora family begin bottling Licor 43 themselves 1950s & 60s - Advertising is used to cement the brands position in the Spanish market 1970s - Exports to other parts of Europe and the Americas begin 1980s - The brand builds a sailing ship to sail around the Cape of Good Hope and Cape Horn 2011 - Licor 43 is recognized as the fastest growing premium liqueur in its category 2010s - Investments are made to double production capacity 2015 - New bottle is designed 2016 - Brand extension comes 2020 - Ready-to-Drink (RTD) products featuring Licor 43 are introduced Key Cocktails: Licor 43 has many key cocktails and their own glasses - visit their website for more. The Carajillo is so popular, it's sold as an RTD bottle. But you can easily make your own, here's how: 1 Part Licor 43 1 Shot of Espresso Ice Pour the Licor 43 over ice, top with the hot shot of Espresso. Enjoy! References: https://zamoracompany.com/passionate-people/our-history/ (Zamora Company Website) https://www.liquor.com/licor-43-review-5201500 (Liquor.com Review) https://www.thespruceeats.com/licor-43-spanish-liqueur-3083096 (The Spruce Eats Article on Licor 43) https://www.diffordsguide.com/producer/1093/licor-43/story (Difford's Guide Listing) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlf50xgF2IE (YouTube - Licor 43's Journey) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFRcS8yRANw (YouTube - Experiencia 43) http://www.trends360.nl/iconic-licor-43-bottle-with-a-new-look.html (Press Mention Showing Historic Bottles) https://goldenvisasinspain.com/blogs/licor-43-the-drink-of-cartagena (Golden Visas In Spain - Travel Listing on Licor 43) https://www.thespiritsbusiness.com/2015/02/licor-43-launch-new-packaging-to-support-growth/ (The Spirits Business Article on New Packaging & Growth) Contact Information: Official show website is: https://www.liquorandliqueurconnoisseur.com/ (www.liquorandliqueurconnoisseur.com) Join my mailing list: http://eepurl.com/hfyhHf (http://eepurl.com/hfyhHf) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/liquorandliqueurconnoisseur (https://www.facebook.com/liquorandliqueurconnoisseur) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/LiquorandLiqueurConnoisseur/ (https://www.instagram.com/LiquorandLiqueurConnoisseur/) Twitter: @LLConnoisseur

The Articulate Fly
S3, Ep 159: Cape Lookout Fishing Report with Knot the Reel World

The Articulate Fly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 9:45


Capt. Chris Siess of Knot the Reel World updates us on early November conditions on Cape Lookout. If you missed our full length interview with Chris, you can check it out here! Have a question for Chris? Send us a message on our Facebook page, and we will read it on the next report. Book at Trip with Knot the Reel World Support the Show Shop on Amazon Become a Patreon Patron All Things Social Media Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Follow Knot the Reel World on Instagram and YouTube. Follow Pretty Fly Designs on Instagram. Subscribe to the Podcast or, Even Better, Download Our App Download our mobile app for free from the Apple App Store, the Google Play Store or the Amazon Android Store. Subscribe to the podcast in the podcatcher of your choice.

The Meb Faber Show
#365 – Dr. Bryan Taylor, Global Financial Data - There Are 100 Ways To Beat The Market; You Just Got To Figure Out What Works For You And Stick To That Plan

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 52:54


In episode 365, we welcome our guest, Dr. Bryan Taylor, President and Chief Economist for Global Financial Data, which provides the most comprehensive, historical economic and financial information available anywhere. In today's episode, we put today's market into historical context. We start by looking at the history of interest rates and then hear why the 2020's may be “The COVID Decade.” Then we touch on whether or not the dominance of the U.S. stock market will continue, what Bryan's research shows about seasonality in the stock market, and whether we can learn any lessons from past industries that dominated the way the technology sector has of late.  Please enjoy this episode with Global Financial Data's Bryan Taylor. ----- Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com ----- Today's episode is sponsored by FarmTogether. FarmTogether is a technology-powered investment platform that enables investors to channel funding into natural assets, starting with U.S. farmland. By driving abundant and creative capital to farmers, we're giving investors the opportunity to drive agriculture toward sustainability on a massive scale. Alongside a changing climate, the global population continues to grow, with expectations of reaching 9.7 billion by 2050. This means approximately 70% more food will be required than is consumed today. FarmTogether investors are providing the key financial building blocks for a sustainable future. --- Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

Field Recordings
Tide pool, Oswald West State Park, Arch Cape, Oregon, USA in August 2021 – by Jason Hovatter

Field Recordings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 7:16


“I brought my LOM Geofon and hyrdrophone out to the Oregon coast and spent some time at short sand beach in Oswald West State Park (one of the most beautiful […]

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic
#1416 - OG Breaks out the Cape - Raptors Reaction Podcast

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 20:17


Host Samson Folk details the Raptors win, their 4th in a row, against the Knicks. Reggie Evans Award: Khem Birch Mitchell Robinson Award: Mitchell Robinson QR Comment: peacedawg Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Meb Faber Show
#364 – Nancy Davis, Quadratic Capital Management - Some Women Like To Buy Shoes And I Love To Buy Options

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 60:00


In episode 362, we welcome our guest, Nancy Davis, founder of Quadratic Capital Management and Portfolio Management for the Inflation Hedge ETF.   In today's episode, we're talking all things inflation and options with a self-proclaimed convexity snipper! We start by hearing how a conversation with Cathie Wood opened Nancy's eyes to the benefits of the ETF structure. Then we discuss Nancy's IVOL product, which has over $3.5 billion in assets in less than three years, and how it may serve as a valuable portfolio diversifier.  We hear what she thinks about the recent Fed commentary, what the yield curve is pricing in today, and what her thoughts are around inflation as we wind down 2021.   Please enjoy this episode with Quadratic Capital Management's Nancy Davis.        -----   Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com   -----   Today's episode is sponsored by Public.com. Public.com is an investing platform that helps people become better investors. On Public, ownership unlocks an experience of content and education, contextual to your portfolio, created by a million+ strong community of investors, creators and analysts. Public puts investors first, and don't sell your trades to market makers or take money from Payment for Order Flow. Start investing with as little as $1 and get a free slice of stock up to $50 when you sign up today at public.com/faber.   -----   Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

The Innovative Mindset
Wildlife Photographer Lisa Roberti on Wildlife Conservation

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 64:36


Wildlife photographer, conservationist, and Safari Girl Lisa Roberti on conservation, photography, and how to plan your best safari This episode is brought to you by Brain.fm. I love and use brain.fm every day! It combines music and neuroscience to help me focus, meditate, and even sleep! Because you listen to this show, you can get a free trial.* URL: https://brain.fm/innovativemindset If you love it as much as I do, you can get 20% off with this exclusive coupon code: innovativemindset It's also brought to you by Gloria Chou's PR Starter Pack. If you want to get featured in the media, this is your best first step. I've used these techniques to get featured in magazines, newspapers, and podcasts. They work! https://izoldat.krtra.com/t/so6Aw0yCuva4 Lisa Roberti, the Safari Girl, has been traveling to wildlife-rich areas around the world for over 27 years. While not a professional photographer, her goal is to use her photographs and experiences about her travels to encourage others to travel so that together, we can preserve the wild places for generations to come. Lisa has a wildlife-themed online store, is currently writing her first book, "Safari Tales" and has a self-study course on how to plan your safari to get the trip of a lifetime. Connect with Lisa Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lisamroberti/ See some of Lisa's amazing photos below.         Episode transcript [00:00:00] Lisa Roberti: How often do we just stop and breathe and just be in the moment and play watching lion Cubs playing it. It's just fascinating. They're just, they're totally in the moment. Just like children. [00:00:17] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Hello and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. I'm your host. Izolda Trakhtenberg on the show. I interview peak performing innovators in the creative social impact and earth conservation spaces or working to change the world. This episode is brought to you by brain FM brain FM combines the best of music and neuroscience to help you relax, focus, meditate, and even sleep. [00:00:38] I love it and have been using it to write, create and do some of my deepest work because you're a listener of the show. You can get a free trial head over to brain.fm/innovative mindset. To check it out. If you decide to subscribe, you can get 20% off with the coupon code, innovative mindset, all one word, and now let's get to the show.[00:01:00] [00:01:02] Hey there and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. My name is Izolda Trakhtenberg. I am super happy that you're here and I'm also incredibly honored and thrilled and happy to share with you. This week's guest. She is fabulous. Lisa birdie, the safari girl has been traveling to wildlife rich areas around the world for over 27 years while not a professional photographer. [00:01:24] Her goal is to use her photographs and experiences about her travels to encourage others to travel so that together we can preserve the wild places for generations to come. Lisa has a wildlife themed online store and is currently writing her first book called safari tales. I can't wait to read it. She also has a self study course on how to plan your safari to get the trip of a lifetime. [00:01:44] Lisa, I'm so grateful that you're here. Thanks so much for being. [00:01:48] Lisa Roberti: Izolda thank you so much for having me. It's such an honor to be on your show. Thank you. [00:01:54] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Oh, it's my pleasure. I'm first of all, I, I love ever since somebody gave me, [00:02:00] uh, my parents gave me a codec extra one for my 12th birthday. I have been an avid photographer and I love taking all sorts of photos. [00:02:08] And I'm wondering for you what got you started in photography and, and having photography be your way of getting the message out your message out and the message for animals and the natural model places. [00:02:23] Lisa Roberti: So when I was really young, I was about fifth grade. I've always had a passion for animals. I've always loved animals. [00:02:30] And the camera was just a way to get closer, to like really watch and see and look at there, look at behavior and then also to share it with people. You know, you see, you could tell stories, but they say a picture's worth a thousand words and video also. Um, and it's just, it was just really my way to get closer and to experience. [00:02:54] And remember with detail, everything that I got to experience with [00:02:58] Izolda Trakhtenberg: animals. That's so [00:03:00] amazing. I love that you said that it was a way to experience the animals and, and yet there's this wonderful, uh, sort of quote or meme that says take only photographs, leave only footprints. So the experience doesn't sound like it is diminished at all. [00:03:16] If you don't have any other contact with the animals other than being the photographer. [00:03:22] Lisa Roberti: Oh, I'm so glad you said that, um, wildlife photographers can, can really get a bad name. There's so many out there that. Their main goal is the photograph. Whereas my main goal is the two record to witness and record natural behaviors of the animals. [00:03:46] Um, you see a lot of photographers out there not, and I'm glad to say it's not the majority, but there's a few that they will really harass the animal in order to get quote unquote, the picture. They want to get a [00:04:00] reaction. They want to get whatever. And to me, that's, um, that's just harassment and it's not good clean wildlife photography. [00:04:08] I am there to witness and report. I'm there to see natural behavior. Like what is their life without humans in the way. And to me, that is, what's so beautiful and there's so much to learn from animals, um, and, and watching their behavior and just in, in, in watching them interact with, with other species and within their own species. [00:04:30] It's, it's just, it's amazing [00:04:32] Izolda Trakhtenberg: to watch it. Well, I appreciate you saying that. And that brings me to a question. What have you learned? You say there's so much to learn. I agree with you. I'm I'm sort of, I feel a little bit like I'm going to be like, yes, yes, yes. This whole, this whole chat. And yet you've, you've got obviously a lot more experience than I do photographing wildlife in the wild. [00:04:56] What, what has been the biggest lesson that you've [00:05:00] learned from observing and from having those experiences with animals in the wild? [00:05:07] Lisa Roberti: So I, the biggest experience that's, that's a hard one. I would say that. For me, observing them, you see that they all have personalities. Like we, we tend to put them in a bubble, right? [00:05:22] This is lion behavior. This is elephant behavior. This is, you know, but each animal has its own unique personality and they all have stories. I've been privileged to go back to the same locations, time and time again, where I've been able to see the animals and watch them grow up, if you will, and, and know them by their human, you know, English names. [00:05:44] And, um, and it's just, it's just fascinating to see them have their own personalities living in the moment. Um, you see the tenderness, you see the fierceness, you see them, [00:06:00] um, just being raw and it's, it's such a reminder. We w in our lives as human beings, we're, you know, we have the cell phone being in and we have so much going on and. [00:06:11] How often do we just stop and breathe and just be in the moment and play, or, you know, watching lion Cubs playing it. It's just, it's just fascinating. They're just, they're totally in the moment, just like children, like they don't have the, the phones being, they don't, they don't have the responsibilities to worry about. [00:06:32] And I think as we grow up and as we adults, we lose that and watching animals, I'm just watching them in their natural environments and, and seeing their, their triumphs and their, their failures and, and it, yeah, it's just, it's hard to put into words. I hope I didn't okay. A job there. [00:06:53] Izolda Trakhtenberg: No, you did great. It's it is interesting to me that there are times there was a, I don't know [00:07:00] if you remember the movie, a fish called. [00:07:03] Did you ever see that movie with John Cleese and Jamie Lee Curtis, Kevin Klein. Did you ever see that movie? I do not. I have. Nope, no worries. No worries. Eh, th th the movie itself is it is wonderful, fabulous. Kevin Klein won the Oscar, and there was a sort of a, kind of a sequel using the same actors. Uh, they did another movie and it was called fierce creatures, and it was about a zoo. [00:07:27] And this, uh, this woman came in to sort of make the zoo more efficient and. Uh, she had, there was a gorilla at the zoo and she had this incredible experience of just seeing the gorilla as another being on the planet and, and the, the people who are in the Zuora desperately trying to save the zoo, which was, uh, supposed to be a very sort of humanitarians or whatever, whatever, but they, they looked at each other and they went, ah, she's gotten it. [00:07:56] She understands now that that is something she didn't know before that she couldn't [00:08:00] have known before she had that experience of, of connection. And so that makes me think of what you were talking about. That it's hard to explain that connective moment between us seeing animals in the wild and understanding. [00:08:17] Their inherent value. And I'm wondering if you have any thoughts on how we could increase those experiences or, or make them more accessible to people so that more people understand the inherent value of, of the other beings. We share the planet with [00:08:37] Lisa Roberti: that. Yeah. And that's exactly what, um, my mission is I after COVID, so I've been, you know, traveling to Africa and taking photographs, um, for 20 something years, 27 years. [00:08:51] And I, and I really haven't done anything with them. And after COVID happened and tourism got shut down, um, W w [00:09:00] became aware of all of the problems in the wild places, um, how much poaching increased, how much the land grabbing was happening, um, and how we were losing more and more wild places because without tourism, the value of the land to the locals went down. [00:09:22] Tourism brings jobs to the local, um, people, um, they have jobs and lodges, they have shops, they have mechanics, they have Rangers, they have, and, and, and the, the tourism money also pays for Rangers. So there was a lot more poaching and there was a lot more, um, um, like I said, human wildlife conflict because the value had gone down to the local people. [00:09:46] Um, it wasn't bringing in money anymore. And so as. Uh, safari goers, a person who loves to go to wild places and loves to be with the animals. Um, I've decided [00:10:00] to, I'm using now my photographs and my stories to try and get people, to see how amazing it is to go, whether it's Africa or somewhere closer to home, to these wild places to support them. [00:10:14] Um, it, it has to be sustainable. I mean, we don't want to like destroy them with, with. Thousands and thousands of tourists, it has to be a sustainable practice, but people, tourism brings value to the land and it brings value to the people that are living around these beautiful wild places. And so I've actually, um, I'm actually working right now on a interactive guide to help people plan their safaris. [00:10:42] And, um, and, and, and the reason I'm doing that again is I'm really hoping that if people want to go on safari and they, they can plan a safari that meets their expectations and they go, and they love it in there. They're just so enthralled by it. And they're going to come home and they're going to tell other [00:11:00] people, and that way we can really preserve wild places and preserve the value for everybody. [00:11:09] Um, I can't even imagine a world where there's no wild elephants or wild lions, and we're getting there. We're really getting there. These animals are disappearing at unknown. I mean, just such fast, such as fast space. And I tell everybody, I talked to him like, if you really want to see wild animals in the wild, you have to go and you have to go now. [00:11:34] And the more people I believe, the more people who go and get to experience that amazing, like seeing what it really is like seeing life, how it is for these creatures, that they will gain value and people will understand the incredible value they have on them, the planet, the world, everything. And [00:12:00] I think, you know, there's a lot of really great, um, places out there that are doing a great job. [00:12:05] I mean, there's so many TV channels that you can find beautiful documentaries about these beautiful Sentium beings. And so you can, you can get it, you it's there and people are, are beginning to see it. And there's so much more, um, you know, there's so much more activity going on to save these animals now, which is, which is fabulous. [00:12:29] But me personally, I think actually being there in person is so different than watching it on your TV screen. It's just smelling the smells and hearing the sounds and seeing these creatures and watching their lives unfold before your eyes. It's just, you've been, you know, it's just an experience that stays with you and, and gets into your soul [00:12:55] Izolda Trakhtenberg: for life. [00:12:59] I'm taking all [00:13:00] of that in for a second. Yes. Yes. See that's this is me going. Yes. Yes. Lisa, keep going. Yes, absolutely. Yeah. It, you know, it's fascinating. I remember when I w when I was in South Africa, And we went, we went on a photo safari and we were in this little mini van and we pulled into this little, it, it was almost like a natural driveway. [00:13:24] It was this little natural sort of bordered, uh, drive in if you will, where I guess they took people a lot. And there was a, there were a couple of prides of lions hanging out. And first of all, I found out male lines kind of lazy that's for sure. But, but what was really interesting and, and I'm going to, I have a question in here somewhere, but it was really interesting to see what the lionesses did. [00:13:49] They started walking around our little van, just circling around it and circling around it. And one of them went and laid down behind the [00:14:00] little minivan and there was no way for us to leave and we were all going. And they're thinking you have got to run out of gas sometime, you know, and it was really interesting because we, you know, and the, and our driver was like, it's going to be fine. [00:14:12] She'll move. Everything will be fine. And it, and of course it was, but what it did for me is it really made me go, I am in a different place now and agave me this wonderful moment of awareness of my role. You know what I mean? Because, because I am not the king of the jungle, you know, people are not the Kings of the Jew. [00:14:36] This was very, it was very, eye-opening like, oh yeah, there a, it's sort of like a plate, your place in the universe kind of situation. So I'm wondering when you are out on safari and you're having these incredible experiences, how do you feel? You've said that they're magnificent and amazing, but how do you feel when you are there in that moment, observing and photographing these [00:15:00] incredible beings? [00:15:02] Oh, gosh, [00:15:03] Lisa Roberti: I've had so many incredible experiences. I've seen births, I've seen animals take their first steps. I have seen animals fighting for their lives. I've seen so many things and, and it's every, every moment is just, um, a moment of, of wonder and awe. And, you know, you would think I've been, I I've spent over 40 weeks just in, just in Africa, in Safin, wildlife, rich areas in Africa, plus, you know, all over other places around the world and it I'm still in awe, I'm still in wonder. [00:15:40] Um, I could, you know, I don't get bored and you see different things all the time. You see. Yeah, [00:15:49] Izolda Trakhtenberg: you just, [00:15:51] Lisa Roberti: I feel like I feel so special to be able to witness the, these [00:16:00] lives, you know, to, to actually to be there, to, to see what's happening. I've cried, tears of joy and tears of sorrow. I I've, you know, I've and I'm not going to say I've seen, you've never seen it all right in nature, but I I've just, I've seen so many things and, and, and, you know, even watching, uh, like you said, a PRI a coalition of male lions laying under a tree in the shade, sleeping. [00:16:25] And even that even just, just watching them breathing. I know it sounds crazy, but it's just this, this huge thousand pound animal lane right there, like 10 feet away from you while you're safely in your vehicle. [00:16:45] Izolda Trakhtenberg: That's just [00:16:45] Lisa Roberti: life for them. And, and you wonder you, like what, what does he dream about? What does he think about, you know, and it's crazy, but [00:16:55] Izolda Trakhtenberg: it's, it's [00:16:56] Lisa Roberti: just, it's just amazing. [00:16:57] And, and then when you see, [00:17:00] like, when you see, um, and I don't want to get into the sad stories, but I witnessed something that was incredibly sad. We had been following a very young lion Cub, um, and his pride for days and days and days. And then I witnessed him being killed by a herd of Buffalo. And you see the mother lioness and I mean, there was. [00:17:26] It was a herd of probably a thousand Buffalo. And this lioness was trying so hard to get to her Cub. And the Cub was just too, too small. It couldn't run away in time and to watch this lioness and trying to get in there and trying to, to protect her Cub and, and watching [00:17:46] Izolda Trakhtenberg: this, this defense's [00:17:47] Lisa Roberti: little creature being killed and it's, you know, and it's, it's nature and it's sad and I'm crying. [00:17:53] I'm bawling my eyes out. I couldn't even take pictures because it was like, this was one of my earlier trips and I'm [00:18:00] like, I, I just couldn't do it. And then, and then after finally, you know, the herd of Buffalo finally scattered and the fi the mom lioness, she kept searching and searching and searching for her Cub. [00:18:14] And she finally found the lifeless body. And it, and again, I don't need to get into a sad story, but it's, it's part of [00:18:22] Izolda Trakhtenberg: seeing. That [00:18:24] Lisa Roberti: these animals, and this is probably going to raise a lot of people's hair on the back of their necks. They have emotions, they care. She th the looks on her face, her behavior when she found her dead Cub, it, it was heartbreaking. [00:18:41] It was, um, and, and just to witness that and to see the lives of these animals. And again, this was all nature. It wasn't human impacted at all. And to see that, that the vulnerabilities they have, and then to witness the other side though, too, like I've seen [00:19:00] animals being born. I've seen animals taking their first stops, and it's just, [00:19:06] Izolda Trakhtenberg: it, it it's so [00:19:07] Lisa Roberti: incredible. [00:19:08] I don't even remember what your question was on a tangent, but it, and I'm just so into the moment. And it's just, it's an experience that goes into your soul, that. That stays with you forever. And even if it's just, like I said, lion, sleeping under a treat shade tree or witnessing something so intense like that or witnessing, I know everybody wants to see a, uh, see a kill or a hunt or whatever. [00:19:38] And, um, it doesn't have to be that intense. It's just every part of their lives. You see how every moment it's a life and death moment for these beings. And, you know, as humans, we should say, as humans in America, most of us don't live that way. I know there are some times where, where there is, but, you know, [00:20:00] we, we live sheltered lives. [00:20:01] We don't, we, or I should say I, because I know there are people on the planet, humans on the planet, and especially right now that are fighting for their lives, but there's so many of us that, um, you know, we get up, we go to work, we go to the grocery store and we don't think about life and death. And, and when you're there and you're witnessing it and you're seeing these animals of prey and the predators fighting every moment of their lives for survival, but also having empathy, um, seeing elephants grieving over a lost one and just put morning skulls of long lost elephants that they probably didn't even know. [00:20:44] I mean, there's so many levels of, there's so much [00:20:47] Izolda Trakhtenberg: depth to it, to every [00:20:50] Lisa Roberti: being and you have to see it, I think to really appreciate [00:20:55] Izolda Trakhtenberg: it. [00:20:59] [00:21:00] Thank you for sharing all of that. Wow. Wow. And yes, you shared a sad story, but it was such a profound one and it's, and it's true. I mean, even just looking at my domestic kitties at home, they have emotions. Obviously they have emotions, they are thinking and feeling beings and, and there's no doubt in my mind that every animal has that same level of, of sentients the thing that I, the thing that I personally struggle with is how, how do we raise that? [00:21:37] I know you said. Uh, and by that, by that, I mean, awareness, I know you said you have to experience it, but, but let's, let's face it. Most of us here in the USA, at least, uh, aren't going to go on safari. I, it would be cool if we could, but what else, what innovative ways could we experience this kind of connection that [00:22:00] you're talking about or close to it? [00:22:02] The park go, you know, [00:22:06] Lisa Roberti: watch your animals, watch your pets. Like you said, it all that like, even a lot of people have pets, but a lot of people don't really see their pets. They don't really see, like we are their life. We are their entire life. Like when you leave and you come back and look so excited to see. [00:22:30] You know, it's because we have every, you know, we have phone calls to people and we have all these other things and these and the animals, they just have us. And some people, sometimes we forget that and you can just look at your, your kid or your dog, or go to the park and, and, and just observe, um, birds even. [00:22:51] Um, or if you're lucky enough to live somewhere where there's Fox or, um, some other type of, of wildlife that you can safely [00:23:00] observe. Um, birds are probably the easiest and suburbia. Um, but you could just, I have a bird feeder, and again, that might raise a hair on some people's necks thinking that, you know, some people think that bird feeders are bad, but I have a bird feed of her right outside of my office. [00:23:17] And it's fascinating to watch the behavior at the feeder. And you just can learn so much about. Um, and I can't pick out individual birds. I mean, I know species and stuff, but like, I, I, you know, I wouldn't know, oh, this is the one that was here yesterday. I can't do that. But like watching, just, just watching them and taking a moment to stop all the noise and just breathe and take in nature just really puts you in a different space. [00:23:48] It, it, it brings you peace. It brings you like stopping for a moment, like stop and smell the roses, right. Just stop and be in nature. And you can do [00:24:00] that any almost anywhere in the world. And again, there's a lot of places you can, but you know, in, in the United States, especially, I mean, even, even big cities have parks, [00:24:11] Izolda Trakhtenberg: you know, and you could go to the park, [00:24:14] Lisa Roberti: you know, if you ha if you have, if you're lucky enough to have a backyard, You know, just sit in your backyard and just take a few moments to breathe, to hear, to listen, to smell, you know, listening to the birds, listening to the, the cicadas right now. [00:24:33] But it is it just, it really, if you just breathe it in and take a moment [00:24:39] Izolda Trakhtenberg: to just be, [00:24:42] Lisa Roberti: and forget about all the noise around you, meaning human noise, like meaning like all your to-do list and everything you have to do, and just, [00:24:53] Izolda Trakhtenberg: just enjoy the beautiful beauty of mother nature.[00:25:00] [00:25:02] Yes. See again. Yes, yes, yes, yes, absolutely. Yeah. I, you know, it's funny. I talked to my clients about that when I, when I'm doing coaching, we talk a lot about going for walks. That's a big one, go for walks and don't just look down. Look up. See what else is there? Say hello to the trees, all of those sorts of things. [00:25:21] Yes. It's C were, were, were mutual admiration society lease. I like that. Um, so, so all of that is, is really good. As far as bringing awareness, how do we bring awareness? And it can start small. I agree with you. Go outside, breathe. Look up, look at, look at the critters. Look at the plans. Look at the trees. [00:25:43] Spend some time in nature when we don't anymore. So many of us, I think we pass the tipping point relatively recently, where more of us live in urban areas than live in non-urban areas all over the planet, which is amazing. Cause that's a lot of planet. And so the question that I have for you is [00:26:00] going out for a walk is great. [00:26:02] Build a, starting to build that awareness is terrific. If I am at that place, if I've gone for my walks and I've figured out that this is something I want more of. What happens I noticed with people is that they go, oh, this is cool. I want more. So what's the next step for someone who wants in, in your, in your opinion, since you spent so much time traveling to these wild places, what's the next step for someone who's like, okay, I've got this awareness and now I want to do something else. [00:26:30] They may not have a lot of money, but, but something, what would you suggest someone do if they want to increase that connection? Okay. [00:26:41] Lisa Roberti: So the, so there's, there's a two part answer here. Um, if they want to do it too, for, for their own, for their own enjoyment, um, They're in most places again, around the United States, um, S you know, you could take a Saturday [00:27:00] afternoon and do some, do some, just Google homework about beautiful, um, bigger parks that are around or hiking areas that are around with, within a, you know, take a day trip or half a day trip. [00:27:13] Um, I live, I live in the cornfields and I haven't even seen a squirrel. I've lived here for two years and I've never even seen a squirrel. Um, but within, you know, a couple hour drive, I can get, um, to some, some beautiful areas and, and, and hike, and that doesn't cost any money or, or very little money. If there might be an interest entrance fee for the, for the park, of course, in the United States, we have some beautiful, um, national parks that, uh, people can go to. [00:27:44] And that, you know, if it, if it requires traveling and hotel stays, of course, that's going to add, um, Uh, an expense, but there's a lot of things you can do that, that don't. And that's the one part that's part, one of how do you get enjoyment out of it? Part [00:28:00] two, um, to learn more in everything is to start getting involved, um, and, and be aware of laws that are coming into play, um, that protect animals, um, even, you know, on cold rainy, you know, when, when, when winter comes and it's dark at four o'clock in the afternoon, there's great. [00:28:24] Documentaries about animals and wild places and that you can watch and immerse yourself that way. Um, there's a website that I would love to share. It's called explore.org, where they have live cams from all over the world and you can't, and, and it's not only wildlife. They even have like, um, where they're breeding puppies, um, for service dogs. [00:28:50] And you can see the puppies being bred for service dogs. And it's an amazing, um, non-for-profit, that's trying to help people connect [00:29:00] that, that can't maybe go to Africa or Alaska or Costa Rica, or, you know, any of these beautiful places. Um, and it's, and you can get, you can get lost and you can see it. And, um, and it's, it's amazing, but I, I would say the more you can get outside, just even around your house, Um, the more connected you you'll feel and the more at peace [00:29:26] Izolda Trakhtenberg: to absolutely. [00:29:29] And, you know, it's interesting during COVID times, that was one of the things that saved me was being able to step outside because you do go a little stir crazy when you're, when you're stuck in doors. So, and it doesn't have to be around a lot of people, if you can just go for a solo walk or something like that is amazing. [00:29:47] And, and yet there's, there's so much awareness we can build and so much appreciation we can build. And now, honestly, I want to go to the next step. [00:30:00] So let's say. You've gotten you've you've you've watched all the documentaries. You've read books. You've done. Let's say you want to go on a safari. What is a safari? [00:30:11] What? I know what I did. We went on a day trip, but I was there for work for NASA. So I wasn't on a safari. We just went on a day trip to see lions and hyenas and zebras. So it wasn't quite the same. But what, when someone says a safari, what are they saying? And how, how does one do that? What do you do to go on safari? [00:30:31] And what is it? [00:30:33] Lisa Roberti: So great question. Um, usually people talk about safaris in terms of Africa. Um, you can go to wildlife, rich places, anywhere in the world. Alaska happens to be one of my favorite places, but when people talk about safari, it's usually going to one of nine to 11 countries in Africa, and I've been to seven, um, safari rich, uh, places in Africa. [00:30:57] And I think people would be really surprised to [00:31:00] understand the amount of diversity of things that you can do when you go to Africa. Because a lot of people, and even my sister, I took her on safari and now she is absolutely hooked. She was like, you know, I think it might be boring just to drive around and look at animals. [00:31:16] And then she went and she can't get an off now she's this is. She's leaving in a couple of weeks for her third safari, but you can, um, you can do so. First of all, there's cultural. So you can do cultural visits and learn about the, the, the cultures. You can do conservation, where you learn about human wildlife conflict, and what's being done to help prevent that you can, um, do traditional safari would be where you're in a vehicle and you're driving around and you're stopping. [00:31:47] And you're looking at animals and watching behavior. You can do walking safaris, you can do balloon safaris. You can do horseback safaris. You can do, you can go on in some places. [00:32:00] You can go on ATVs. You can go fishing. You can like if you go to east Africa, you can. Part safari park beach, you can do. Um, whale-watching um, if you're in Southern Africa, you can tie a safari with wineries and, and wine businesses and Cape town. [00:32:18] Um, so I think there's, there's such a diversity of things that you can actually do on safari. And that's actually why I created this, this planner that I've created. I, and it's to help people realize all the opportunities and help them kind of narrow down what they actually really want on safari. The other thing too, is there's so many different places to go and so many different seasons. [00:32:43] And what do you really want to see, um, as far from, as far as animal life, because if you really want to see a rhino, there's certain places you can go where your opportunity is much greater to see a rhino. Then if you go to other places, um, and of course it's nature. So you're never guarantee. [00:33:00] Any citing, but, um, there's places where you can go where you really raise the, the opportunity or the possibility of seeing what, what you want to see. [00:33:10] And so I created this, this planner to kind of talk about all these different things. And, and also the other thing is a lot of people, you know, have a four seasons dream, but they have a best Western budget. And what do you do if, if you have that, if you're upside down and what you really want to do and what you can afford and, and how do you then not be disappointed. [00:33:33] And, um, so just things like that, you know, I, I discussed that. And then what if you have mobility issues or special eating requirements, um, how do you get around that? And then also just right now, traveling during COVID, I I've been on safari multiple times throughout COVID, I've been to Africa, um, Alaska and other places, and it's doable. [00:33:57] It's challenging and you need to know what to look for [00:34:00] to make sure you can navigate through and that you don't get stuck somewhere because you don't have the right tests or you don't have the right documentation. Um, so there's, there's actually a lot to go into it, but it's fun planning. The safari should be exciting and fun and something to look forward to. [00:34:20] Um, it's, it's part of the journey. Obviously the best part is actually being there, but it's part of the journey of, of, of getting to live your dream. I remember I had always dreamed of seeing animals in the wild, like, you know, went to the zoos and everything and I thought, oh my God, how amazing would it be? [00:34:41] And when I first started planning my first safari, it was. Oh, God, it was like the dream finally coming true. And it was so exciting to look at all the different opportunities and to see all the different ideas and the things that you could do. And, um, yeah, so that's, and then, and [00:35:00] then finding reputable companies, um, to work with, um, there, I've heard a lot of disaster stories of people, um, and it's, it's easy when you know what to look for. [00:35:14] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Cool. I want to go on his Fari again. That's cool. Yeah. You know, and it, it is so interesting to me. I love, I love Alaska also. I've been, and it's, it's in many ways. It's like, uh, it's just, uh it's so it's so different than anywhere else I've ever been. And so when I'm looking at this, when I'm thinking about, oh, I want to plan my safari and I want to go travel and I want to see wild places. [00:35:43] How do we do. Consciously, how do we, what, what, what do we need to do to, like I said, you know, take only photographs, leave, leave only footprints. I guess that's like an eco-tourism thing. What are your thoughts on that? What innovative ways could we, as people who [00:36:00] want to go on safari to, to, to commune with nature and to be, and observe these animals and nature, wherever we're, wherever we go, how do we do it? [00:36:11] Responsibly? [00:36:13] Lisa Roberti: Great, great question. And. That all ties into the company and the lodges. Um, there are a lot, there's a lot of choices out there when you go on safari. I, I just, um, picked up, uh, like a safari magazine and it's just pages and pages and pages of advertisements for different companies and different lodges and different everything. [00:36:40] And with the internet, now you can really do a lot of research and find the, the lodges that are eco-friendly, um, that are doing the right thing. Um, you can like there's, there's conservancies out there where they really limit the number of [00:37:00] people to make sure that there's, that there's not so many, um, people in a, in a small area so that the wild places are staying. [00:37:11] Christine. And, um, you can do that. There's, there's a lot of mass tourism, um, places. And then there's the, the eco-friendly places. And one thing that, um, most of these countries in Africa I've done actually better than first rule countries is most of them now have outlawed single use plastic and things like United States is not even talking about doing that. [00:37:36] Right. And, um, so just even supporting these countries and, and, and what they're doing is, is a big, is a big step, but yes, there are eco-friendly lodges that, um, where you, where you go in, or you can, like I said, you can do the research and they tell you about all the steps that they're doing to recycle, reuse, [00:38:00] um, the, the water systems. [00:38:02] They have the purification systems. They have to make, um, the least amount of impact on the land. As possible and those types of places, um, they're becoming more and more and more. It used to be few and far between, but now that people are becoming more aware of the environment, um, they, that's a big selling point for a lot of these places. [00:38:30] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I it's [00:38:30] Lisa Roberti: also, sorry, also, I'm sorry. It's also your, um, like if you do decide to go travel with a group or you decide to go on your own, who, the, the company that you book with, whether you book direct through lodges or you book through, um, uh, Africa specialist, those there's different levels there too, where some of them are more concerned about that. [00:38:54] And then others are more concerned about just pushing lots of people through. And again, you, you can tell. [00:39:00] If you're in, if you're familiar with eco-friendly, anything as you're, as you're reviewing and previewing, you can see, um, what they're doing, um, for eco eco-friendly they'll they'll offer carbon offset. [00:39:16] Um, I know even United airlines is doing carbon offset now. Um, they will, um, yeah. And they'll talk about it because that's a big point for a lot of people. So it's, it's out there. It's a little bit harder to find it's becoming easier and easier to find. Um, but even like I said, these countries even stopping single use plastic, you know, they're, they're, they're, they are trying really hard to preserve and make their countries more beautiful and pristine. [00:39:55] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Oh, that makes me so happy to hear that. It really does. I mean, I, I, cause I worry about [00:40:00] that. Not, not, not, I, you know, I'm not, I'm not trying to insult any, any developing nations or anything like that, but I want to be sure as, as you know, as a vegan, as someone who's, who tries to be very eco-conscious, I want to again, leave the smallest footprint possible. [00:40:18] So, so that's something that we we can do is we can look for these eco-friendly and, uh, environmentally conscious places to stay or trips to take. And I think that that's amazing. So if I what's the number one piece of advice you have for someone going, what, what's the thing that they absolutely either need to know or need to do. [00:40:44] Lisa Roberti: I think they need. I think the biggest thing that I've, I've seen and heard is for them to really understand what they want. What do you really want out of the safari? [00:41:00] What is your dream? What are you when you close your eyes? And you're like, I want to go on safari. I can't wait to go on safari. What does that look like? [00:41:09] And then making sure that what you book matches that or exceeds. Um, and that's where booking with somebody with a lot of Africa experience is critical because you may have these beautiful visions in your mind. Like you, you want, uh, uh, responsible tourism, you, you want minimal impact. Can you imagine if that was what your goal and ideal was? [00:41:38] And then you get there and you're in a lodge, that's got 200 rooms and it's just waste everywhere. Like that would be devastating to you. So really understanding what it is that is important to you, what your dream is, and then making sure that your booking [00:42:00] matches that and exceeds that so that when you go it's everything you've dreamed about and so much more and so much. [00:42:10] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I love that. And I have a tough question for you right now, because that part was great. The part that I'm, that I get concerned about is what we can do. Some, some of the practices that I have read about and, and, and heard about are abusive to the wildlife and, you know, and, and sort of tourists, you know, like elephants painting or, or, you know, or any, they can't, that, that, that can't be real. [00:42:42] That can't be something that is, that is the elephant. When you know what I'm going to grab a paintbrush and I'm going to paint a cat. I cannot imagine that that's something they elephant decided that she wanted to do. So. So how do we, is it, do we vote with our dollars? How do we, how do we [00:43:00] avoid practices that could be abusive to the, to the very animals we want to see and protect. [00:43:07] Lisa Roberti: Awesome. Question. Thank you so much for bringing this up because this is, this is something I talk about all the time. So almost any experience where, and I'm going to say almost because this is not a hundred percent true and I'll explain the caveat. So almost any experience where you can be hands-on with an animal is led with abuse. [00:43:35] Um, so, and I'm, I'm. In South Africa, and this is changing. Thank God that they're changing the laws over there in South Africa, they, they used to have this thing where they would get tourism, tourists to pay big money, to come and raise the orphaned lion Cubs so that they can return them into the wild where what they're actually doing is they're raising these Cubs. [00:43:57] They're getting money income from the tourist [00:44:00] pain to play with these Cubs. And then when the Cubs got big enough, then they would go into canned hunts and they'd be slaughtered. And of course they weren't telling the people that there's also opportunities where you can, um, walk with cheetahs. And again, that these animals are, um, abused and tortured in order to. [00:44:21] Betaine quote, unquote enough to do that paint, brushing with elephants or painting the elephants painting or playing basketball. Um, the pictures I have seen in the stories of the abuse that these animals endure, the whipping, the everything that they go through to learn and to hold a paintbrush and to do these things. [00:44:42] And, and of course there it's being touted as, um, a sanctuary. And it's just not anything that it, if you ever see an, an animal doing something that it is not in its normal repertoire, it's been [00:45:00] abused to do that. And, um, and I say almost always, there are several places that, uh, Where you do have opportunity, um, to, to be a little bit more close, where it truly is a sanctuary and these animals aren't abused. [00:45:17] One is Sheldrick, wildlife trust. Um, routinely also has one in San Bruin is again elephants where they take orphaned baby elephants. And the elephants are orphaned due to poaching, um, human wildlife conflict, or natural deaths. And they raise these babies and then they reintroduce them into the wild and they have this huge success. [00:45:37] And in order to raise money, they do allow people to come and view the babies. And, um, and so there's it in one hand, you're like, oh, is this, is this one of those bad things? Or is this one of those good things? And it's sometimes even for me, I have to do a lot of research. To, to make sure that I'm only supporting the ones that are actually [00:46:00] doing good work and, um, shelter glide, wildlife trust is one in Nairobi, Kenya. [00:46:05] And then, um, drafts center is another one where you can actually feed the giraffes. And again, my normal checklist, that would be an absolute no-no. But because I did the research and I did the homework to know that these are wild drafts, they're accustomed to people. It was it's, um, it's a draft subspecies. [00:46:27] It's very endangered Rothschild giraffe that they had, um, brought in to try and repopulate them. And they do reintroduce them back into the wild. Um, and it's like, what steps are they're taking? What measures are they taking to make sure they're not getting too used to humans? Um, and that we aren't impacting their normal lives. [00:46:45] Like it's not normal for a human to feed a giraffe. So like where is that line? And in some places, the line is a little blurry. Giraffe Centre because they're doing really good work. The animals are not abused [00:47:00] in other places is so it's so crystal clear that this is just bad and such a case as like you pointed out the elephants that are painting, like they are just absolutely abused. [00:47:11] They're performing things. They don't normally perform. Um, when you're feeding the draft giraffe center there they're eating. Like they would normally eat, they're reaching out with their tongue and they're grabbing it as if it were a leaf on a tree, you know? So it's not, they're not doing something that's abnormal taking it out of a human hand. [00:47:28] Yeah. That's abnormal versus an elephant, you know, holding a paintbrush and painting strokes. That's just not normal behavior. So it's it's. Yeah. And I've had to research there's, there's an elephant sanctuary. Um, In Indonesia that I'm interested in and visiting, but I'm still on the fence about whether this is a true sanctuary or not. [00:47:52] And I'm trying to do a lot more research and sometimes it's really hard to know. Um, and, and of course we [00:48:00] don't want to contribute to abuse of any kind. [00:48:05] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Completely and absolutely, totally. And for sure. Yeah, absolutely. I mean, for sure. And it's interesting, uh, many years ago, uh, I was part, uh, I was a volunteer at the national zoo for the golden lion tamarin project and it was reintroducing them into the wild and they weren't in cages. [00:48:24] Right. So, so our job was to, uh, sort of make sure that they're the key where they were was, was okay for them to be, and we would sort of leave food where they might find it, but they weren't in cages. They were above people's heads. Right. And, and sort of running around in, in the trees and along the ropes and things like that to get. [00:48:47] To be used to being outside so that they could be reintroduced back into the wild and south America. What was interesting about that is how much, and I'm not a zoo fan. I will be very honest. I do not. I do [00:49:00] not like zoos animals don't belong in cages. I, that I have to say, but being part of that project for me was eye-opening because the people, the individual people I was working with cared so very much about making sure that these endangered beings would have a real chance at living in the wild. [00:49:21] And that's something that, that we have to remember that that wa as soon as they are, um, in connection with, with human. Beings that that changes. And so I'm wondering, what are your thoughts on rehabilitation or no reintroduction, I guess I would say of animals back into the wild. Can, can that happen in a way that is really safe and good for them? [00:49:51] And, and how do we weigh that if, if not doing the rehabilitation and helping them would just end up in their [00:50:00] deaths? [00:50:01] Lisa Roberti: Yeah. So I'm going to go back to David shelter, wildlife trust out of Nairobi. Um, they have successfully, and I don't know the numbers off the top of my head. I, um, they have successfully reintroduced, I think it's over a hundred elephants. [00:50:20] Um, and. The success stories are incredible because again, they take them when they're babies, they stay in Nairobi national park. When they get, um, Nairobi national park, doesn't have elephants, um, it's too small, but they have these baby elephants that are cared for by humans. And then when they get big, they bring them into, they have three different re-integration units and then it is, they slowly reintegrate themselves into the wild herds. [00:50:49] And again, there's people taking care of them, giving, making sure they're being fed, making sure they're being cared for. And then the wild herds come in and they slowly, um, in some of them can take 10, 15 [00:51:00] year before they, they actually become wild. And it's amazing because now they've had females that have been reintroduced in the wild who have gone off in the wild herds, actually having babies with wild elephants. [00:51:13] And because they supply water sources, a lot of times they will come back. Um, and it's really interesting. And again, this is a huge success story. Um, they've actually had, and again, it goes to the intelligence of wild animals. They've actually had a wild bull who, who was meeting with one of the ex orphan females was speared. [00:51:38] And two of his bull buddies, you know, to show us three male, um, bull elephants actually came into the re-introduction unit looking for help. Wow. [00:51:49] Izolda Trakhtenberg: And, [00:51:49] Lisa Roberti: and of course they were cared for and everything by the veterinarian staff there. Um, so in some cases that, that re-introduction, it's, it it's phenomenal [00:52:00] and they've shown it time and time again, like with elephants it's possible with the monkeys. [00:52:04] I hopefully that, that the tamarins, hopefully that was a success story and that they were able to do that. They've done it with Eagles. They've done it. Um, the, the ones that I've never heard a success story of is, um, predators, because how do you take. And teach it how to hunt. How do you take a Cub and teach it how to hide? [00:52:26] How do you take, you know, and, and I've never heard of a successful, um, re well, actually that's not true. Um, gosh, there's the famous story and I'm, I'm drawing a total blank right now. How can I about the, the man and wife who rescued the three lions? The Cubs? Oh yeah. [00:52:44] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Three. Yes, yes, yes, [00:52:45] Lisa Roberti: yes. And they, and they successfully reintroduced them into the wild and man, it took them a long, long, long time to do that. [00:52:54] Um, so I think it's, I think, gosh, the more wild animals that, that are [00:53:00] impacted by human wildlife conflict that we can save and bring back into the wild, I man, those people, they have hearts of gold and they work their tails off and they're so passionate and I would love, I would, gosh, I would love to be involved with something like. [00:53:19] Did I answer your question? Yes, [00:53:20] Izolda Trakhtenberg: yes, no, you, you, you absolutely did. It's really, you know, that, that, that notion of how, how we, we can participate, but do so in a non invasive way to help these endangered beings that wouldn't be endangered. If not for us anyway, is something that I, I need to. Go further, you know, I need to, personally, I need to, I need to look at that more. [00:53:56] How can we do that in a noninvasive way so that [00:54:00] we're helping and not hurting the wild places and the wild beings that are on those places are in those places. You know? And, and I think it's, I think their names were the, was it the Adamson's Georgia? Yeah. For born free and, and, and there are other, there are other people who spend their lives dedicated to. [00:54:21] You know, preserving these wild places and, and helping animals. So, so it's not, it's not hopeless, but wow. We, we, you know, I think we all could do more to participate in helping, especially since there are people out there who are participating in hurting those places, so, and, and those animals. So we, you know, and, and do you have any recommendations about if somebody wants to get involved and help, uh, do you know of any places that, that someone could go, you know what I would like to get involved in a reputable place that's, that's working to preserve wild places [00:55:00] could be in the USA, could be in other places, doesn't matter. [00:55:02] Where would you send someone? [00:55:05] Lisa Roberti: So a lot of these, um, and this is, this is where it gets really kitschy again, because. A lot of the places, they can't just take regular volunteers, like people, untrained people. Um, there's a lot of reasons for that one day and I'm, and I'm going to use shelter again because they are such a success story. [00:55:31] So they don't want the elephants getting used to people. They get used to their candlers, their keepers, um, and they were specific jackets, specific coats. They all wear the same style and color of coat. They wear the same clothes they wear the same. So the elephants aren't necessarily making a generalization about humans. [00:55:54] So they don't allow. Um, volunteers and, and, and, you know, as a person who wants to, [00:56:00] it's like, oh, come on. But I'm a good person. Just let me come and help. But they, for the safety and the sake of the animals, they can't do that. And there again, there's, there's, there are places that will allow you to volunteer. [00:56:12] Um, and there's, there's a couple companies and I, and I'm sorry, I don't know the name off, off the top of my head. There are a couple of companies that actually set up volunteering, travel, where you actually go and you volunteer. And a lot of them are more for, um, like kids, like schools, like where you can go and volunteer at schools, which is also imperative because the, you know, these children, if they grow up to see the value of the wildlife and the wild places, they're going to help preserve it. [00:56:41] Right. So that's, that part is really also very important, but, um, there's not a lot of hands on true animal volunteering. W really wild places like Africa, Alaska, stuff like that, but that doesn't prevent people from getting involved [00:56:59] Izolda Trakhtenberg: at [00:57:00] home. [00:57:01] Lisa Roberti: Um, you know, there's some great opportunities, like even just like preserving in parks, keeping the parks, clean, volunteering at animal shelters, um, doing that kind of work. [00:57:13] It's hard work and it can be heartbreaking, but it's so rewarding as well. And just, you know, let's start with, and again, I'm a huge Africa. Uh, lover, but, but sometimes we gotta start at home too. Like what can you do at your, your park across the street or across town? Is there something that, that can be done to help preserve that too? [00:57:37] You know, let's do a trash cleanup day. Let's do a, and there's lots of volunteering opportunities at, at animal shelters. Um, but there are a few in, in Africa, um, that, that you can find. Um, but they're, they're not as wide as, as it would be nice if they weren't just because again, for the safety of the animals, they can't just [00:58:00] open it up to. [00:58:02] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Sure. Absolutely. And I think that the notion of I'm going to go volunteer with animals, you know, that that's something that would take a lot of study and you'd, you'd have to spend a long time getting prepared for that, but there are people, if they have a passion for it that do pursue something like that and, and can eventually, and I think you're absolutely right. [00:58:23] And I agree with you wholeheartedly, this notion that we can do something here, you can do something in your, in your backyard. You can do something in the park, you can do something in the animal shelter. There are lots of ways to participate in elevating awareness and in helping that don't necessarily mean you get on a plane and go to another place. [00:58:42] You could do it across town or even across the street. So I, your, your point is well made and well taken. Lisa, I really appreciate you saying that because yeah, I think we can, we can do it. It doesn't have to be a grand gesture to be a really important. Anyway. Well, it's, [00:58:58] Lisa Roberti: it's like they say, you know, [00:59:00] and I don't remember exactly how the proverb goes. [00:59:02] If that's the right word, you know, walking down the beach and you're throwing one starfish in when there's a thousand starfish and it's like, you can't save them all, but that one act is really important to the one that you did save. [00:59:14] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Exactly. And the last line of that story is it made a difference to that one. [00:59:17] Yeah. I love that story. Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. I could keep you here for the next, I don't know how long, because this is fantastic and I really appreciate you taking the time, Lisa and I do know that you have a life to get back to. So I was wondering if you know, you're doing this, this document for all of the, uh, for people who want to plan a safari, what does I think is great, but also if people want to see your photographs and learn more about the work you're doing, would you mind sharing your social channels? [00:59:47] Where could someone who wants to go find you find. [00:59:51] Lisa Roberti: So I'm on Instagram and Facebook. And it's Lisa M as in Mary, just the initial we set em, Roberto, R O B E R T. [01:00:00] I, um, I also have a YouTube channel that I'm just starting out, but I, because I don't have enough followers, I don't have my, my, my pen name yet. [01:00:08] Um, but you can just search for me there. And in there I do a lot of different travel stuff and lodge reviews and, um, things like that. And I'm just starting on, on that. I also have a Facebook group, um, called wildlife travel and con and conservation. Um, and that's a place where I talk about, um, animal conservation laws that are coming up wins. [01:00:29] Um, devastations and also talk all things travel, um, to wildlife, rich places around the world. It's not just Africa, but it's. [01:00:37] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Fabulous. Thank you so much for sharing. And I'm going to put all of that along with some of Lisa's fabulous photographs on the show notes page. You're going to want to check that out for sure. [01:00:47] And, and learn more about the incredible work Lisa's doing and. Just see the photos. They're so beautiful. I love them. You sent them to me and I'm like, these are awesome. So, [01:01:00] and you know, and, and you have a really amazing, I, I really just, you, you, you are able to capture such life and such spirit in, in every photograph that I've seen you take is wonderful. [01:01:14] Thank you so much, my, oh no, thank you. I appreciate it. Cause I can't go necessarily to Africa, but boy, I'm going to watch you guys. So I, I know that's kind of silly cause I'm going to go to Africa again for sure. And I and Costa Rica. And I want to go back to Alaska. There's so many places, you know, so many places to go, but I want to, I'll always try to do it responsibly. [01:01:36] You know, with enough money to actually go, that's always a good thing. Uh, so I have just one question that I ask everybody who listens to the show. You know, the question, the try, you listen to the podcast. So everyone, everyone who comes on the podcast knows this question. Here's this question? So here it is. [01:01:53] If you had one thing that you wanted to say, because you had an airplane C I T, and [01:02:00] because I'm not thinking about it, I said it wrong. If you had an airplane that could sky write anything for the whole world to see, what would you say? You know, [01:02:08] Lisa Roberti: I, I knew this question was coming. I don't like, ah, and I, and I'm like, what's, what's the few words, cause it's behind an airplane. [01:02:15] So, you know, it's gotta be short, it's sustained. And I'm like, okay. So really the quick short spend time in nature. [01:02:26] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I love that it's, it's [01:02:28] Lisa Roberti: simple. It's so important. And it really, I think the more people spend time in nature, the more people will love it. And then people are going to want to preserve it. [01:02:38] Because they're in it and they love it so much. [01:02:41] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Ah, that's a great, yeah, yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. And you will, I mean, the second you spend time breathing chlorophyll, rich air because you're out in your trees, it's going to change you. So I love that. Wow. Thank you so much for that, Lisa. I am so grateful that you took the [01:03:00] time to be here and I'm super excited for people to learn more about you and more about your work. [01:03:05] Thank you so much. Thank [01:03:07] Lisa Roberti: you so much for having me. It was such a pleasure chatting with you and, um, I really appreciate your time. Thank [01:03:12] Izolda Trakhtenberg: you. So it was all my pleasure. This is Izolda Trakhtenberg for the innovative mindset podcast. You obviously need to go check out Lisa birdie and her amazing work and all of the wild places she talked about. [01:03:24] Eventually. I think you should do. You should do that too. If you're liking the show, do me a favor, tell a friend, tell a friend about the show and tell a friend about all of the cool, innovative stuff we're talking about until next time. This is his older Trakhtenberg for the innovative mindset podcast, reminding you to listen, learn, laugh, and. [01:03:43] A whole lot. [01:03:49] thanks so much for joining me today. I really appreciate you being here. Please subscribe to the podcast if you're new and if you like what you're hearing, please review it and rate it and let other people know. [01:04:00] And if you'd like to be a sponsor of the show, I'd love to meet you on patrion.com/innovative mindset. [01:04:07] I also have lots of exclusive goodies to share just with the show supporters there today's episode was produced by Izolda Trakhtenberg and his copyright 2021 as always, please remember, this is for educational and entertainment purposes. Only past performance does not guarantee future results, although we can always hope until next time, keep living in your innovative mindset. * I am a Brain.fm affiliate. If you purchase it through the above links and take the 20% off, I'll get a small commission. I'm also a PR Starter Pack Affiliate. I use Gloria's methods to get featured in the media often. And please remember, I'll never recommend a product or service I don't absolutely love!

The Innovative Mindset
The Innovative Way Lisa Roberti Addresses Wildlife Cosnervation

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 64:36


Wildlife photographer, conservationist, and Safari Girl Lisa Roberti on conservation, photography, and how to plan your best safari This episode is brought to you by Brain.fm. I love and use brain.fm every day! It combines music and neuroscience to help me focus, meditate, and even sleep! Because you listen to this show, you can get a free trial.* URL: https://brain.fm/innovativemindset If you love it as much as I do, you can get 20% off with this exclusive coupon code: innovativemindset It's also brought to you by Gloria Chou's PR Starter Pack. If you want to get featured in the media, this is your best first step. I've used these techniques to get featured in magazines, newspapers, and podcasts. They work! https://izoldat.krtra.com/t/so6Aw0yCuva4 Lisa Roberti, the Safari Girl, has been traveling to wildlife-rich areas around the world for over 27 years. While not a professional photographer, her goal is to use her photographs and experiences about her travels to encourage others to travel so that together, we can preserve the wild places for generations to come. Lisa has a wildlife-themed online store, is currently writing her first book, "Safari Tales" and has a self-study course on how to plan your safari to get the trip of a lifetime. Connect with Lisa Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lisamroberti/ See some of Lisa's amazing photos below.         Episode transcript [00:00:00] Lisa Roberti: How often do we just stop and breathe and just be in the moment and play watching lion Cubs playing it. It's just fascinating. They're just, they're totally in the moment. Just like children. [00:00:17] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Hello and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. I'm your host. Izolda Trakhtenberg on the show. I interview peak performing innovators in the creative social impact and earth conservation spaces or working to change the world. This episode is brought to you by brain FM brain FM combines the best of music and neuroscience to help you relax, focus, meditate, and even sleep. [00:00:38] I love it and have been using it to write, create and do some of my deepest work because you're a listener of the show. You can get a free trial head over to brain.fm/innovative mindset. To check it out. If you decide to subscribe, you can get 20% off with the coupon code, innovative mindset, all one word, and now let's get to the show.[00:01:00] [00:01:02] Hey there and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. My name is Izolda Trakhtenberg. I am super happy that you're here and I'm also incredibly honored and thrilled and happy to share with you. This week's guest. She is fabulous. Lisa birdie, the safari girl has been traveling to wildlife rich areas around the world for over 27 years while not a professional photographer. [00:01:24] Her goal is to use her photographs and experiences about her travels to encourage others to travel so that together we can preserve the wild places for generations to come. Lisa has a wildlife themed online store and is currently writing her first book called safari tales. I can't wait to read it. She also has a self study course on how to plan your safari to get the trip of a lifetime. [00:01:44] Lisa, I'm so grateful that you're here. Thanks so much for being. [00:01:48] Lisa Roberti: Izolda thank you so much for having me. It's such an honor to be on your show. Thank you. [00:01:54] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Oh, it's my pleasure. I'm first of all, I, I love ever since somebody gave me, [00:02:00] uh, my parents gave me a codec extra one for my 12th birthday. I have been an avid photographer and I love taking all sorts of photos. [00:02:08] And I'm wondering for you what got you started in photography and, and having photography be your way of getting the message out your message out and the message for animals and the natural model places. [00:02:23] Lisa Roberti: So when I was really young, I was about fifth grade. I've always had a passion for animals. I've always loved animals. [00:02:30] And the camera was just a way to get closer, to like really watch and see and look at there, look at behavior and then also to share it with people. You know, you see, you could tell stories, but they say a picture's worth a thousand words and video also. Um, and it's just, it was just really my way to get closer and to experience. [00:02:54] And remember with detail, everything that I got to experience with [00:02:58] Izolda Trakhtenberg: animals. That's so [00:03:00] amazing. I love that you said that it was a way to experience the animals and, and yet there's this wonderful, uh, sort of quote or meme that says take only photographs, leave only footprints. So the experience doesn't sound like it is diminished at all. [00:03:16] If you don't have any other contact with the animals other than being the photographer. [00:03:22] Lisa Roberti: Oh, I'm so glad you said that, um, wildlife photographers can, can really get a bad name. There's so many out there that. Their main goal is the photograph. Whereas my main goal is the two record to witness and record natural behaviors of the animals. [00:03:46] Um, you see a lot of photographers out there not, and I'm glad to say it's not the majority, but there's a few that they will really harass the animal in order to get quote unquote, the picture. They want to get a [00:04:00] reaction. They want to get whatever. And to me, that's, um, that's just harassment and it's not good clean wildlife photography. [00:04:08] I am there to witness and report. I'm there to see natural behavior. Like what is their life without humans in the way. And to me, that is, what's so beautiful and there's so much to learn from animals, um, and, and watching their behavior and just in, in, in watching them interact with, with other species and within their own species. [00:04:30] It's, it's just, it's amazing [00:04:32] Izolda Trakhtenberg: to watch it. Well, I appreciate you saying that. And that brings me to a question. What have you learned? You say there's so much to learn. I agree with you. I'm I'm sort of, I feel a little bit like I'm going to be like, yes, yes, yes. This whole, this whole chat. And yet you've, you've got obviously a lot more experience than I do photographing wildlife in the wild. [00:04:56] What, what has been the biggest lesson that you've [00:05:00] learned from observing and from having those experiences with animals in the wild? [00:05:07] Lisa Roberti: So I, the biggest experience that's, that's a hard one. I would say that. For me, observing them, you see that they all have personalities. Like we, we tend to put them in a bubble, right? [00:05:22] This is lion behavior. This is elephant behavior. This is, you know, but each animal has its own unique personality and they all have stories. I've been privileged to go back to the same locations, time and time again, where I've been able to see the animals and watch them grow up, if you will, and, and know them by their human, you know, English names. [00:05:44] And, um, and it's just, it's just fascinating to see them have their own personalities living in the moment. Um, you see the tenderness, you see the fierceness, you see them, [00:06:00] um, just being raw and it's, it's such a reminder. We w in our lives as human beings, we're, you know, we have the cell phone being in and we have so much going on and. [00:06:11] How often do we just stop and breathe and just be in the moment and play, or, you know, watching lion Cubs playing it. It's just, it's just fascinating. They're just, they're totally in the moment, just like children, like they don't have the, the phones being, they don't, they don't have the responsibilities to worry about. [00:06:32] And I think as we grow up and as we adults, we lose that and watching animals, I'm just watching them in their natural environments and, and seeing their, their triumphs and their, their failures and, and it, yeah, it's just, it's hard to put into words. I hope I didn't okay. A job there. [00:06:53] Izolda Trakhtenberg: No, you did great. It's it is interesting to me that there are times there was a, I don't know [00:07:00] if you remember the movie, a fish called. [00:07:03] Did you ever see that movie with John Cleese and Jamie Lee Curtis, Kevin Klein. Did you ever see that movie? I do not. I have. Nope, no worries. No worries. Eh, th th the movie itself is it is wonderful, fabulous. Kevin Klein won the Oscar, and there was a sort of a, kind of a sequel using the same actors. Uh, they did another movie and it was called fierce creatures, and it was about a zoo. [00:07:27] And this, uh, this woman came in to sort of make the zoo more efficient and. Uh, she had, there was a gorilla at the zoo and she had this incredible experience of just seeing the gorilla as another being on the planet and, and the, the people who are in the Zuora desperately trying to save the zoo, which was, uh, supposed to be a very sort of humanitarians or whatever, whatever, but they, they looked at each other and they went, ah, she's gotten it. [00:07:56] She understands now that that is something she didn't know before that she couldn't [00:08:00] have known before she had that experience of, of connection. And so that makes me think of what you were talking about. That it's hard to explain that connective moment between us seeing animals in the wild and understanding. [00:08:17] Their inherent value. And I'm wondering if you have any thoughts on how we could increase those experiences or, or make them more accessible to people so that more people understand the inherent value of, of the other beings. We share the planet with [00:08:37] Lisa Roberti: that. Yeah. And that's exactly what, um, my mission is I after COVID, so I've been, you know, traveling to Africa and taking photographs, um, for 20 something years, 27 years. [00:08:51] And I, and I really haven't done anything with them. And after COVID happened and tourism got shut down, um, W w [00:09:00] became aware of all of the problems in the wild places, um, how much poaching increased, how much the land grabbing was happening, um, and how we were losing more and more wild places because without tourism, the value of the land to the locals went down. [00:09:22] Tourism brings jobs to the local, um, people, um, they have jobs and lodges, they have shops, they have mechanics, they have Rangers, they have, and, and, and the, the tourism money also pays for Rangers. So there was a lot more poaching and there was a lot more, um, um, like I said, human wildlife conflict because the value had gone down to the local people. [00:09:46] Um, it wasn't bringing in money anymore. And so as. Uh, safari goers, a person who loves to go to wild places and loves to be with the animals. Um, I've decided [00:10:00] to, I'm using now my photographs and my stories to try and get people, to see how amazing it is to go, whether it's Africa or somewhere closer to home, to these wild places to support them. [00:10:14] Um, it, it has to be sustainable. I mean, we don't want to like destroy them with, with. Thousands and thousands of tourists, it has to be a sustainable practice, but people, tourism brings value to the land and it brings value to the people that are living around these beautiful wild places. And so I've actually, um, I'm actually working right now on a interactive guide to help people plan their safaris. [00:10:42] And, um, and, and, and the reason I'm doing that again is I'm really hoping that if people want to go on safari and they, they can plan a safari that meets their expectations and they go, and they love it in there. They're just so enthralled by it. And they're going to come home and they're going to tell other [00:11:00] people, and that way we can really preserve wild places and preserve the value for everybody. [00:11:09] Um, I can't even imagine a world where there's no wild elephants or wild lions, and we're getting there. We're really getting there. These animals are disappearing at unknown. I mean, just such fast, such as fast space. And I tell everybody, I talked to him like, if you really want to see wild animals in the wild, you have to go and you have to go now. [00:11:34] And the more people I believe, the more people who go and get to experience that amazing, like seeing what it really is like seeing life, how it is for these creatures, that they will gain value and people will understand the incredible value they have on them, the planet, the world, everything. And [00:12:00] I think, you know, there's a lot of really great, um, places out there that are doing a great job. [00:12:05] I mean, there's so many TV channels that you can find beautiful documentaries about these beautiful Sentium beings. And so you can, you can get it, you it's there and people are, are beginning to see it. And there's so much more, um, you know, there's so much more activity going on to save these animals now, which is, which is fabulous. [00:12:29] But me personally, I think actually being there in person is so different than watching it on your TV screen. It's just smelling the smells and hearing the sounds and seeing these creatures and watching their lives unfold before your eyes. It's just, you've been, you know, it's just an experience that stays with you and, and gets into your soul [00:12:55] Izolda Trakhtenberg: for life. [00:12:59] I'm taking all [00:13:00] of that in for a second. Yes. Yes. See that's this is me going. Yes. Yes. Lisa, keep going. Yes, absolutely. Yeah. It, you know, it's fascinating. I remember when I w when I was in South Africa, And we went, we went on a photo safari and we were in this little mini van and we pulled into this little, it, it was almost like a natural driveway. [00:13:24] It was this little natural sort of bordered, uh, drive in if you will, where I guess they took people a lot. And there was a, there were a couple of prides of lions hanging out. And first of all, I found out male lines kind of lazy that's for sure. But, but what was really interesting and, and I'm going to, I have a question in here somewhere, but it was really interesting to see what the lionesses did. [00:13:49] They started walking around our little van, just circling around it and circling around it. And one of them went and laid down behind the [00:14:00] little minivan and there was no way for us to leave and we were all going. And they're thinking you have got to run out of gas sometime, you know, and it was really interesting because we, you know, and the, and our driver was like, it's going to be fine. [00:14:12] She'll move. Everything will be fine. And it, and of course it was, but what it did for me is it really made me go, I am in a different place now and agave me this wonderful moment of awareness of my role. You know what I mean? Because, because I am not the king of the jungle, you know, people are not the Kings of the Jew. [00:14:36] This was very, it was very, eye-opening like, oh yeah, there a, it's sort of like a plate, your place in the universe kind of situation. So I'm wondering when you are out on safari and you're having these incredible experiences, how do you feel? You've said that they're magnificent and amazing, but how do you feel when you are there in that moment, observing and photographing these [00:15:00] incredible beings? [00:15:02] Oh, gosh, [00:15:03] Lisa Roberti: I've had so many incredible experiences. I've seen births, I've seen animals take their first steps. I have seen animals fighting for their lives. I've seen so many things and, and it's every, every moment is just, um, a moment of, of wonder and awe. And, you know, you would think I've been, I I've spent over 40 weeks just in, just in Africa, in Safin, wildlife, rich areas in Africa, plus, you know, all over other places around the world and it I'm still in awe, I'm still in wonder. [00:15:40] Um, I could, you know, I don't get bored and you see different things all the time. You see. Yeah, [00:15:49] Izolda Trakhtenberg: you just, [00:15:51] Lisa Roberti: I feel like I feel so special to be able to witness the, these [00:16:00] lives, you know, to, to actually to be there, to, to see what's happening. I've cried, tears of joy and tears of sorrow. I I've, you know, I've and I'm not going to say I've seen, you've never seen it all right in nature, but I I've just, I've seen so many things and, and, and, you know, even watching, uh, like you said, a PRI a coalition of male lions laying under a tree in the shade, sleeping. [00:16:25] And even that even just, just watching them breathing. I know it sounds crazy, but it's just this, this huge thousand pound animal lane right there, like 10 feet away from you while you're safely in your vehicle. [00:16:45] Izolda Trakhtenberg: That's just [00:16:45] Lisa Roberti: life for them. And, and you wonder you, like what, what does he dream about? What does he think about, you know, and it's crazy, but [00:16:55] Izolda Trakhtenberg: it's, it's [00:16:56] Lisa Roberti: just, it's just amazing. [00:16:57] And, and then when you see, [00:17:00] like, when you see, um, and I don't want to get into the sad stories, but I witnessed something that was incredibly sad. We had been following a very young lion Cub, um, and his pride for days and days and days. And then I witnessed him being killed by a herd of Buffalo. And you see the mother lioness and I mean, there was. [00:17:26] It was a herd of probably a thousand Buffalo. And this lioness was trying so hard to get to her Cub. And the Cub was just too, too small. It couldn't run away in time and to watch this lioness and trying to get in there and trying to, to protect her Cub and, and watching [00:17:46] Izolda Trakhtenberg: this, this defense's [00:17:47] Lisa Roberti: little creature being killed and it's, you know, and it's, it's nature and it's sad and I'm crying. [00:17:53] I'm bawling my eyes out. I couldn't even take pictures because it was like, this was one of my earlier trips and I'm [00:18:00] like, I, I just couldn't do it. And then, and then after finally, you know, the herd of Buffalo finally scattered and the fi the mom lioness, she kept searching and searching and searching for her Cub. [00:18:14] And she finally found the lifeless body. And it, and again, I don't need to get into a sad story, but it's, it's part of [00:18:22] Izolda Trakhtenberg: seeing. That [00:18:24] Lisa Roberti: these animals, and this is probably going to raise a lot of people's hair on the back of their necks. They have emotions, they care. She th the looks on her face, her behavior when she found her dead Cub, it, it was heartbreaking. [00:18:41] It was, um, and, and just to witness that and to see the lives of these animals. And again, this was all nature. It wasn't human impacted at all. And to see that, that the vulnerabilities they have, and then to witness the other side though, too, like I've seen [00:19:00] animals being born. I've seen animals taking their first stops, and it's just, [00:19:06] Izolda Trakhtenberg: it, it it's so [00:19:07] Lisa Roberti: incredible. [00:19:08] I don't even remember what your question was on a tangent, but it, and I'm just so into the moment. And it's just, it's an experience that goes into your soul, that. That stays with you forever. And even if it's just, like I said, lion, sleeping under a treat shade tree or witnessing something so intense like that or witnessing, I know everybody wants to see a, uh, see a kill or a hunt or whatever. [00:19:38] And, um, it doesn't have to be that intense. It's just every part of their lives. You see how every moment it's a life and death moment for these beings. And, you know, as humans, we should say, as humans in America, most of us don't live that way. I know there are some times where, where there is, but, you know, [00:20:00] we, we live sheltered lives. [00:20:01] We don't, we, or I should say I, because I know there are people on the planet, humans on the planet, and especially right now that are fighting for their lives, but there's so many of us that, um, you know, we get up, we go to work, we go to the grocery store and we don't think about life and death. And, and when you're there and you're witnessing it and you're seeing these animals of prey and the predators fighting every moment of their lives for survival, but also having empathy, um, seeing elephants grieving over a lost one and just put morning skulls of long lost elephants that they probably didn't even know. [00:20:44] I mean, there's so many levels of, there's so much [00:20:47] Izolda Trakhtenberg: depth to it, to every [00:20:50] Lisa Roberti: being and you have to see it, I think to really appreciate [00:20:55] Izolda Trakhtenberg: it. [00:20:59] [00:21:00] Thank you for sharing all of that. Wow. Wow. And yes, you shared a sad story, but it was such a profound one and it's, and it's true. I mean, even just looking at my domestic kitties at home, they have emotions. Obviously they have emotions, they are thinking and feeling beings and, and there's no doubt in my mind that every animal has that same level of, of sentients the thing that I, the thing that I personally struggle with is how, how do we raise that? [00:21:37] I know you said. Uh, and by that, by that, I mean, awareness, I know you said you have to experience it, but, but let's, let's face it. Most of us here in the USA, at least, uh, aren't going to go on safari. I, it would be cool if we could, but what else, what innovative ways could we experience this kind of connection that [00:22:00] you're talking about or close to it? [00:22:02] The park go, you know, [00:22:06] Lisa Roberti: watch your animals, watch your pets. Like you said, it all that like, even a lot of people have pets, but a lot of people don't really see their pets. They don't really see, like we are their life. We are their entire life. Like when you leave and you come back and look so excited to see. [00:22:30] You know, it's because we have every, you know, we have phone calls to people and we have all these other things and these and the animals, they just have us. And some people, sometimes we forget that and you can just look at your, your kid or your dog, or go to the park and, and, and just observe, um, birds even. [00:22:51] Um, or if you're lucky enough to live somewhere where there's Fox or, um, some other type of, of wildlife that you can safely [00:23:00] observe. Um, birds are probably the easiest and suburbia. Um, but you could just, I have a bird feeder, and again, that might raise a hair on some people's necks thinking that, you know, some people think that bird feeders are bad, but I have a bird feed of her right outside of my office. [00:23:17] And it's fascinating to watch the behavior at the feeder. And you just can learn so much about. Um, and I can't pick out individual birds. I mean, I know species and stuff, but like, I, I, you know, I wouldn't know, oh, this is the one that was here yesterday. I can't do that. But like watching, just, just watching them and taking a moment to stop all the noise and just breathe and take in nature just really puts you in a different space. [00:23:48] It, it, it brings you peace. It brings you like stopping for a moment, like stop and smell the roses, right. Just stop and be in nature. And you can do [00:24:00] that any almost anywhere in the world. And again, there's a lot of places you can, but you know, in, in the United States, especially, I mean, even, even big cities have parks, [00:24:11] Izolda Trakhtenberg: you know, and you could go to the park, [00:24:14] Lisa Roberti: you know, if you ha if you have, if you're lucky enough to have a backyard, You know, just sit in your backyard and just take a few moments to breathe, to hear, to listen, to smell, you know, listening to the birds, listening to the, the cicadas right now. [00:24:33] But it is it just, it really, if you just breathe it in and take a moment [00:24:39] Izolda Trakhtenberg: to just be, [00:24:42] Lisa Roberti: and forget about all the noise around you, meaning human noise, like meaning like all your to-do list and everything you have to do, and just, [00:24:53] Izolda Trakhtenberg: just enjoy the beautiful beauty of mother nature.[00:25:00] [00:25:02] Yes. See again. Yes, yes, yes, yes, absolutely. Yeah. I, you know, it's funny. I talked to my clients about that when I, when I'm doing coaching, we talk a lot about going for walks. That's a big one, go for walks and don't just look down. Look up. See what else is there? Say hello to the trees, all of those sorts of things. [00:25:21] Yes. It's C were, were, were mutual admiration society lease. I like that. Um, so, so all of that is, is really good. As far as bringing awareness, how do we bring awareness? And it can start small. I agree with you. Go outside, breathe. Look up, look at, look at the critters. Look at the plans. Look at the trees. [00:25:43] Spend some time in nature when we don't anymore. So many of us, I think we pass the tipping point relatively recently, where more of us live in urban areas than live in non-urban areas all over the planet, which is amazing. Cause that's a lot of planet. And so the question that I have for you is [00:26:00] going out for a walk is great. [00:26:02] Build a, starting to build that awareness is terrific. If I am at that place, if I've gone for my walks and I've figured out that this is something I want more of. What happens I noticed with people is that they go, oh, this is cool. I want more. So what's the next step for someone who wants in, in your, in your opinion, since you spent so much time traveling to these wild places, what's the next step for someone who's like, okay, I've got this awareness and now I want to do something else. [00:26:30] They may not have a lot of money, but, but something, what would you suggest someone do if they want to increase that connection? Okay. [00:26:41] Lisa Roberti: So the, so there's, there's a two part answer here. Um, if they want to do it too, for, for their own, for their own enjoyment, um, They're in most places again, around the United States, um, S you know, you could take a Saturday [00:27:00] afternoon and do some, do some, just Google homework about beautiful, um, bigger parks that are around or hiking areas that are around with, within a, you know, take a day trip or half a day trip. [00:27:13] Um, I live, I live in the cornfields and I haven't even seen a squirrel. I've lived here for two years and I've never even seen a squirrel. Um, but within, you know, a couple hour drive, I can get, um, to some, some beautiful areas and, and, and hike, and that doesn't cost any money or, or very little money. If there might be an interest entrance fee for the, for the park, of course, in the United States, we have some beautiful, um, national parks that, uh, people can go to. [00:27:44] And that, you know, if it, if it requires traveling and hotel stays, of course, that's going to add, um, Uh, an expense, but there's a lot of things you can do that, that don't. And that's the one part that's part, one of how do you get enjoyment out of it? Part [00:28:00] two, um, to learn more in everything is to start getting involved, um, and, and be aware of laws that are coming into play, um, that protect animals, um, even, you know, on cold rainy, you know, when, when, when winter comes and it's dark at four o'clock in the afternoon, there's great. [00:28:24] Documentaries about animals and wild places and that you can watch and immerse yourself that way. Um, there's a website that I would love to share. It's called explore.org, where they have live cams from all over the world and you can't, and, and it's not only wildlife. They even have like, um, where they're breeding puppies, um, for service dogs. [00:28:50] And you can see the puppies being bred for service dogs. And it's an amazing, um, non-for-profit, that's trying to help people connect [00:29:00] that, that can't maybe go to Africa or Alaska or Costa Rica, or, you know, any of these beautiful places. Um, and it's, and you can get, you can get lost and you can see it. And, um, and it's, it's amazing, but I, I would say the more you can get outside, just even around your house, Um, the more connected you you'll feel and the more at peace [00:29:26] Izolda Trakhtenberg: to absolutely. [00:29:29] And, you know, it's interesting during COVID times, that was one of the things that saved me was being able to step outside because you do go a little stir crazy when you're, when you're stuck in doors. So, and it doesn't have to be around a lot of people, if you can just go for a solo walk or something like that is amazing. [00:29:47] And, and yet there's, there's so much awareness we can build and so much appreciation we can build. And now, honestly, I want to go to the next step. [00:30:00] So let's say. You've gotten you've you've you've watched all the documentaries. You've read books. You've done. Let's say you want to go on a safari. What is a safari? [00:30:11] What? I know what I did. We went on a day trip, but I was there for work for NASA. So I wasn't on a safari. We just went on a day trip to see lions and hyenas and zebras. So it wasn't quite the same. But what, when someone says a safari, what are they saying? And how, how does one do that? What do you do to go on safari? [00:30:31] And what is it? [00:30:33] Lisa Roberti: So great question. Um, usually people talk about safaris in terms of Africa. Um, you can go to wildlife, rich places, anywhere in the world. Alaska happens to be one of my favorite places, but when people talk about safari, it's usually going to one of nine to 11 countries in Africa, and I've been to seven, um, safari rich, uh, places in Africa. [00:30:57] And I think people would be really surprised to [00:31:00] understand the amount of diversity of things that you can do when you go to Africa. Because a lot of people, and even my sister, I took her on safari and now she is absolutely hooked. She was like, you know, I think it might be boring just to drive around and look at animals. [00:31:16] And then she went and she can't get an off now she's this is. She's leaving in a couple of weeks for her third safari, but you can, um, you can do so. First of all, there's cultural. So you can do cultural visits and learn about the, the, the cultures. You can do conservation, where you learn about human wildlife conflict, and what's being done to help prevent that you can, um, do traditional safari would be where you're in a vehicle and you're driving around and you're stopping. [00:31:47] And you're looking at animals and watching behavior. You can do walking safaris, you can do balloon safaris. You can do horseback safaris. You can do, you can go on in some places. [00:32:00] You can go on ATVs. You can go fishing. You can like if you go to east Africa, you can. Part safari park beach, you can do. Um, whale-watching um, if you're in Southern Africa, you can tie a safari with wineries and, and wine businesses and Cape town. [00:32:18] Um, so I think there's, there's such a diversity of things that you can actually do on safari. And that's actually why I created this, this planner that I've created. I, and it's to help people realize all the opportunities and help them kind of narrow down what they actually really want on safari. The other thing too, is there's so many different places to go and so many different seasons. [00:32:43] And what do you really want to see, um, as far from, as far as animal life, because if you really want to see a rhino, there's certain places you can go where your opportunity is much greater to see a rhino. Then if you go to other places, um, and of course it's nature. So you're never guarantee. [00:33:00] Any citing, but, um, there's places where you can go where you really raise the, the opportunity or the possibility of seeing what, what you want to see. [00:33:10] And so I created this, this planner to kind of talk about all these different things. And, and also the other thing is a lot of people, you know, have a four seasons dream, but they have a best Western budget. And what do you do if, if you have that, if you're upside down and what you really want to do and what you can afford and, and how do you then not be disappointed. [00:33:33] And, um, so just things like that, you know, I, I discussed that. And then what if you have mobility issues or special eating requirements, um, how do you get around that? And then also just right now, traveling during COVID, I I've been on safari multiple times throughout COVID, I've been to Africa, um, Alaska and other places, and it's doable. [00:33:57] It's challenging and you need to know what to look for [00:34:00] to make sure you can navigate through and that you don't get stuck somewhere because you don't have the right tests or you don't have the right documentation. Um, so there's, there's actually a lot to go into it, but it's fun planning. The safari should be exciting and fun and something to look forward to. [00:34:20] Um, it's, it's part of the journey. Obviously the best part is actually being there, but it's part of the journey of, of, of getting to live your dream. I remember I had always dreamed of seeing animals in the wild, like, you know, went to the zoos and everything and I thought, oh my God, how amazing would it be? [00:34:41] And when I first started planning my first safari, it was. Oh, God, it was like the dream finally coming true. And it was so exciting to look at all the different opportunities and to see all the different ideas and the things that you could do. And, um, yeah, so that's, and then, and [00:35:00] then finding reputable companies, um, to work with, um, there, I've heard a lot of disaster stories of people, um, and it's, it's easy when you know what to look for. [00:35:14] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Cool. I want to go on his Fari again. That's cool. Yeah. You know, and it, it is so interesting to me. I love, I love Alaska also. I've been, and it's, it's in many ways. It's like, uh, it's just, uh it's so it's so different than anywhere else I've ever been. And so when I'm looking at this, when I'm thinking about, oh, I want to plan my safari and I want to go travel and I want to see wild places. [00:35:43] How do we do. Consciously, how do we, what, what, what do we need to do to, like I said, you know, take only photographs, leave, leave only footprints. I guess that's like an eco-tourism thing. What are your thoughts on that? What innovative ways could we, as people who [00:36:00] want to go on safari to, to, to commune with nature and to be, and observe these animals and nature, wherever we're, wherever we go, how do we do it? [00:36:11] Responsibly? [00:36:13] Lisa Roberti: Great, great question. And. That all ties into the company and the lodges. Um, there are a lot, there's a lot of choices out there when you go on safari. I, I just, um, picked up, uh, like a safari magazine and it's just pages and pages and pages of advertisements for different companies and different lodges and different everything. [00:36:40] And with the internet, now you can really do a lot of research and find the, the lodges that are eco-friendly, um, that are doing the right thing. Um, you can like there's, there's conservancies out there where they really limit the number of [00:37:00] people to make sure that there's, that there's not so many, um, people in a, in a small area so that the wild places are staying. [00:37:11] Christine. And, um, you can do that. There's, there's a lot of mass tourism, um, places. And then there's the, the eco-friendly places. And one thing that, um, most of these countries in Africa I've done actually better than first rule countries is most of them now have outlawed single use plastic and things like United States is not even talking about doing that. [00:37:36] Right. And, um, so just even supporting these countries and, and, and what they're doing is, is a big, is a big step, but yes, there are eco-friendly lodges that, um, where you, where you go in, or you can, like I said, you can do the research and they tell you about all the steps that they're doing to recycle, reuse, [00:38:00] um, the, the water systems. [00:38:02] They have the purification systems. They have to make, um, the least amount of impact on the land. As possible and those types of places, um, they're becoming more and more and more. It used to be few and far between, but now that people are becoming more aware of the environment, um, they, that's a big selling point for a lot of these places. [00:38:30] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I it's [00:38:30] Lisa Roberti: also, sorry, also, I'm sorry. It's also your, um, like if you do decide to go travel with a group or you decide to go on your own, who, the, the company that you book with, whether you book direct through lodges or you book through, um, uh, Africa specialist, those there's different levels there too, where some of them are more concerned about that. [00:38:54] And then others are more concerned about just pushing lots of people through. And again, you, you can tell. [00:39:00] If you're in, if you're familiar with eco-friendly, anything as you're, as you're reviewing and previewing, you can see, um, what they're doing, um, for eco eco-friendly they'll they'll offer carbon offset. [00:39:16] Um, I know even United airlines is doing carbon offset now. Um, they will, um, yeah. And they'll talk about it because that's a big point for a lot of people. So it's, it's out there. It's a little bit harder to find it's becoming easier and easier to find. Um, but even like I said, these countries even stopping single use plastic, you know, they're, they're, they're, they are trying really hard to preserve and make their countries more beautiful and pristine. [00:39:55] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Oh, that makes me so happy to hear that. It really does. I mean, I, I, cause I worry about [00:40:00] that. Not, not, not, I, you know, I'm not, I'm not trying to insult any, any developing nations or anything like that, but I want to be sure as, as you know, as a vegan, as someone who's, who tries to be very eco-conscious, I want to again, leave the smallest footprint possible. [00:40:18] So, so that's something that we we can do is we can look for these eco-friendly and, uh, environmentally conscious places to stay or trips to take. And I think that that's amazing. So if I what's the number one piece of advice you have for someone going, what, what's the thing that they absolutely either need to know or need to do. [00:40:44] Lisa Roberti: I think they need. I think the biggest thing that I've, I've seen and heard is for them to really understand what they want. What do you really want out of the safari? [00:41:00] What is your dream? What are you when you close your eyes? And you're like, I want to go on safari. I can't wait to go on safari. What does that look like? [00:41:09] And then making sure that what you book matches that or exceeds. Um, and that's where booking with somebody with a lot of Africa experience is critical because you may have these beautiful visions in your mind. Like you, you want, uh, uh, responsible tourism, you, you want minimal impact. Can you imagine if that was what your goal and ideal was? [00:41:38] And then you get there and you're in a lodge, that's got 200 rooms and it's just waste everywhere. Like that would be devastating to you. So really understanding what it is that is important to you, what your dream is, and then making sure that your booking [00:42:00] matches that and exceeds that so that when you go it's everything you've dreamed about and so much more and so much. [00:42:10] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I love that. And I have a tough question for you right now, because that part was great. The part that I'm, that I get concerned about is what we can do. Some, some of the practices that I have read about and, and, and heard about are abusive to the wildlife and, you know, and, and sort of tourists, you know, like elephants painting or, or, you know, or any, they can't, that, that, that can't be real. [00:42:42] That can't be something that is, that is the elephant. When you know what I'm going to grab a paintbrush and I'm going to paint a cat. I cannot imagine that that's something they elephant decided that she wanted to do. So. So how do we, is it, do we vote with our dollars? How do we, how do we [00:43:00] avoid practices that could be abusive to the, to the very animals we want to see and protect. [00:43:07] Lisa Roberti: Awesome. Question. Thank you so much for bringing this up because this is, this is something I talk about all the time. So almost any experience where, and I'm going to say almost because this is not a hundred percent true and I'll explain the caveat. So almost any experience where you can be hands-on with an animal is led with abuse. [00:43:35] Um, so, and I'm, I'm. In South Africa, and this is changing. Thank God that they're changing the laws over there in South Africa, they, they used to have this thing where they would get tourism, tourists to pay big money, to come and raise the orphaned lion Cubs so that they can return them into the wild where what they're actually doing is they're raising these Cubs. [00:43:57] They're getting money income from the tourist [00:44:00] pain to play with these Cubs. And then when the Cubs got big enough, then they would go into canned hunts and they'd be slaughtered. And of course they weren't telling the people that there's also opportunities where you can, um, walk with cheetahs. And again, that these animals are, um, abused and tortured in order to. [00:44:21] Betaine quote, unquote enough to do that paint, brushing with elephants or painting the elephants painting or playing basketball. Um, the pictures I have seen in the stories of the abuse that these animals endure, the whipping, the everything that they go through to learn and to hold a paintbrush and to do these things. [00:44:42] And, and of course there it's being touted as, um, a sanctuary. And it's just not anything that it, if you ever see an, an animal doing something that it is not in its normal repertoire, it's been [00:45:00] abused to do that. And, um, and I say almost always, there are several places that, uh, Where you do have opportunity, um, to, to be a little bit more close, where it truly is a sanctuary and these animals aren't abused. [00:45:17] One is Sheldrick, wildlife trust. Um, routinely also has one in San Bruin is again elephants where they take orphaned baby elephants. And the elephants are orphaned due to poaching, um, human wildlife conflict, or natural deaths. And they raise these babies and then they reintroduce them into the wild and they have this huge success. [00:45:37] And in order to raise money, they do allow people to come and view the babies. And, um, and so there's it in one hand, you're like, oh, is this, is this one of those bad things? Or is this one of those good things? And it's sometimes even for me, I have to do a lot of research. To, to make sure that I'm only supporting the ones that are actually [00:46:00] doing good work and, um, shelter glide, wildlife trust is one in Nairobi, Kenya. [00:46:05] And then, um, drafts center is another one where you can actually feed the giraffes. And again, my normal checklist, that would be an absolute no-no. But because I did the research and I did the homework to know that these are wild drafts, they're accustomed to people. It was it's, um, it's a draft subspecies. [00:46:27] It's very endangered Rothschild giraffe that they had, um, brought in to try and repopulate them. And they do reintroduce them back into the wild. Um, and it's like, what steps are they're taking? What measures are they taking to make sure they're not getting too used to humans? Um, and that we aren't impacting their normal lives. [00:46:45] Like it's not normal for a human to feed a giraffe. So like where is that line? And in some places, the line is a little blurry. Giraffe Centre because they're doing really good work. The animals are not abused [00:47:00] in other places is so it's so crystal clear that this is just bad and such a case as like you pointed out the elephants that are painting, like they are just absolutely abused. [00:47:11] They're performing things. They don't normally perform. Um, when you're feeding the draft giraffe center there they're eating. Like they would normally eat, they're reaching out with their tongue and they're grabbing it as if it were a leaf on a tree, you know? So it's not, they're not doing something that's abnormal taking it out of a human hand. [00:47:28] Yeah. That's abnormal versus an elephant, you know, holding a paintbrush and painting strokes. That's just not normal behavior. So it's it's. Yeah. And I've had to research there's, there's an elephant sanctuary. Um, In Indonesia that I'm interested in and visiting, but I'm still on the fence about whether this is a true sanctuary or not. [00:47:52] And I'm trying to do a lot more research and sometimes it's really hard to know. Um, and, and of course we [00:48:00] don't want to contribute to abuse of any kind. [00:48:05] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Completely and absolutely, totally. And for sure. Yeah, absolutely. I mean, for sure. And it's interesting, uh, many years ago, uh, I was part, uh, I was a volunteer at the national zoo for the golden lion tamarin project and it was reintroducing them into the wild and they weren't in cages. [00:48:24] Right. So, so our job was to, uh, sort of make sure that they're the key where they were was, was okay for them to be, and we would sort of leave food where they might find it, but they weren't in cages. They were above people's heads. Right. And, and sort of running around in, in the trees and along the ropes and things like that to get. [00:48:47] To be used to being outside so that they could be reintroduced back into the wild and south America. What was interesting about that is how much, and I'm not a zoo fan. I will be very honest. I do not. I do [00:49:00] not like zoos animals don't belong in cages. I, that I have to say, but being part of that project for me was eye-opening because the people, the individual people I was working with cared so very much about making sure that these endangered beings would have a real chance at living in the wild. [00:49:21] And that's something that, that we have to remember that that wa as soon as they are, um, in connection with, with human. Beings that that changes. And so I'm wondering, what are your thoughts on rehabilitation or no reintroduction, I guess I would say of animals back into the wild. Can, can that happen in a way that is really safe and good for them? [00:49:51] And, and how do we weigh that if, if not doing the rehabilitation and helping them would just end up in their [00:50:00] deaths? [00:50:01] Lisa Roberti: Yeah. So I'm going to go back to David shelter, wildlife trust out of Nairobi. Um, they have successfully, and I don't know the numbers off the top of my head. I, um, they have successfully reintroduced, I think it's over a hundred elephants. [00:50:20] Um, and. The success stories are incredible because again, they take them when they're babies, they stay in Nairobi national park. When they get, um, Nairobi national park, doesn't have elephants, um, it's too small, but they have these baby elephants that are cared for by humans. And then when they get big, they bring them into, they have three different re-integration units and then it is, they slowly reintegrate themselves into the wild herds. [00:50:49] And again, there's people taking care of them, giving, making sure they're being fed, making sure they're being cared for. And then the wild herds come in and they slowly, um, in some of them can take 10, 15 [00:51:00] year before they, they actually become wild. And it's amazing because now they've had females that have been reintroduced in the wild who have gone off in the wild herds, actually having babies with wild elephants. [00:51:13] And because they supply water sources, a lot of times they will come back. Um, and it's really interesting. And again, this is a huge success story. Um, they've actually had, and again, it goes to the intelligence of wild animals. They've actually had a wild bull who, who was meeting with one of the ex orphan females was speared. [00:51:38] And two of his bull buddies, you know, to show us three male, um, bull elephants actually came into the re-introduction unit looking for help. Wow. [00:51:49] Izolda Trakhtenberg: And, [00:51:49] Lisa Roberti: and of course they were cared for and everything by the veterinarian staff there. Um, so in some cases that, that re-introduction, it's, it it's phenomenal [00:52:00] and they've shown it time and time again, like with elephants it's possible with the monkeys. [00:52:04] I hopefully that, that the tamarins, hopefully that was a success story and that they were able to do that. They've done it with Eagles. They've done it. Um, the, the ones that I've never heard a success story of is, um, predators, because how do you take. And teach it how to hunt. How do you take a Cub and teach it how to hide? [00:52:26] How do you take, you know, and, and I've never heard of a successful, um, re well, actually that's not true. Um, gosh, there's the famous story and I'm, I'm drawing a total blank right now. How can I about the, the man and wife who rescued the three lions? The Cubs? Oh yeah. [00:52:44] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Three. Yes, yes, yes, [00:52:45] Lisa Roberti: yes. And they, and they successfully reintroduced them into the wild and man, it took them a long, long, long time to do that. [00:52:54] Um, so I think it's, I think, gosh, the more wild animals that, that are [00:53:00] impacted by human wildlife conflict that we can save and bring back into the wild, I man, those people, they have hearts of gold and they work their tails off and they're so passionate and I would love, I would, gosh, I would love to be involved with something like. [00:53:19] Did I answer your question? Yes, [00:53:20] Izolda Trakhtenberg: yes, no, you, you, you absolutely did. It's really, you know, that, that, that notion of how, how we, we can participate, but do so in a non invasive way to help these endangered beings that wouldn't be endangered. If not for us anyway, is something that I, I need to. Go further, you know, I need to, personally, I need to, I need to look at that more. [00:53:56] How can we do that in a noninvasive way so that [00:54:00] we're helping and not hurting the wild places and the wild beings that are on those places are in those places. You know? And, and I think it's, I think their names were the, was it the Adamson's Georgia? Yeah. For born free and, and, and there are other, there are other people who spend their lives dedicated to. [00:54:21] You know, preserving these wild places and, and helping animals. So, so it's not, it's not hopeless, but wow. We, we, you know, I think we all could do more to participate in helping, especially since there are people out there who are participating in hurting those places, so, and, and those animals. So we, you know, and, and do you have any recommendations about if somebody wants to get involved and help, uh, do you know of any places that, that someone could go, you know what I would like to get involved in a reputable place that's, that's working to preserve wild places [00:55:00] could be in the USA, could be in other places, doesn't matter. [00:55:02] Where would you send someone? [00:55:05] Lisa Roberti: So a lot of these, um, and this is, this is where it gets really kitschy again, because. A lot of the places, they can't just take regular volunteers, like people, untrained people. Um, there's a lot of reasons for that one day and I'm, and I'm going to use shelter again because they are such a success story. [00:55:31] So they don't want the elephants getting used to people. They get used to their candlers, their keepers, um, and they were specific jackets, specific coats. They all wear the same style and color of coat. They wear the same clothes they wear the same. So the elephants aren't necessarily making a generalization about humans. [00:55:54] So they don't allow. Um, volunteers and, and, and, you know, as a person who wants to, [00:56:00] it's like, oh, come on. But I'm a good person. Just let me come and help. But they, for the safety and the sake of the animals, they can't do that. And there again, there's, there's, there are places that will allow you to volunteer. [00:56:12] Um, and there's, there's a couple companies and I, and I'm sorry, I don't know the name off, off the top of my head. There are a couple of companies that actually set up volunteering, travel, where you actually go and you volunteer. And a lot of them are more for, um, like kids, like schools, like where you can go and volunteer at schools, which is also imperative because the, you know, these children, if they grow up to see the value of the wildlife and the wild places, they're going to help preserve it. [00:56:41] Right. So that's, that part is really also very important, but, um, there's not a lot of hands on true animal volunteering. W really wild places like Africa, Alaska, stuff like that, but that doesn't prevent people from getting involved [00:56:59] Izolda Trakhtenberg: at [00:57:00] home. [00:57:01] Lisa Roberti: Um, you know, there's some great opportunities, like even just like preserving in parks, keeping the parks, clean, volunteering at animal shelters, um, doing that kind of work. [00:57:13] It's hard work and it can be heartbreaking, but it's so rewarding as well. And just, you know, let's start with, and again, I'm a huge Africa. Uh, lover, but, but sometimes we gotta start at home too. Like what can you do at your, your park across the street or across town? Is there something that, that can be done to help preserve that too? [00:57:37] You know, let's do a trash cleanup day. Let's do a, and there's lots of volunteering opportunities at, at animal shelters. Um, but there are a few in, in Africa, um, that, that you can find. Um, but they're, they're not as wide as, as it would be nice if they weren't just because again, for the safety of the animals, they can't just [00:58:00] open it up to. [00:58:02] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Sure. Absolutely. And I think that the notion of I'm going to go volunteer with animals, you know, that that's something that would take a lot of study and you'd, you'd have to spend a long time getting prepared for that, but there are people, if they have a passion for it that do pursue something like that and, and can eventually, and I think you're absolutely right. [00:58:23] And I agree with you wholeheartedly, this notion that we can do something here, you can do something in your, in your backyard. You can do something in the park, you can do something in the animal shelter. There are lots of ways to participate in elevating awareness and in helping that don't necessarily mean you get on a plane and go to another place. [00:58:42] You could do it across town or even across the street. So I, your, your point is well made and well taken. Lisa, I really appreciate you saying that because yeah, I think we can, we can do it. It doesn't have to be a grand gesture to be a really important. Anyway. Well, it's, [00:58:58] Lisa Roberti: it's like they say, you know, [00:59:00] and I don't remember exactly how the proverb goes. [00:59:02] If that's the right word, you know, walking down the beach and you're throwing one starfish in when there's a thousand starfish and it's like, you can't save them all, but that one act is really important to the one that you did save. [00:59:14] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Exactly. And the last line of that story is it made a difference to that one. [00:59:17] Yeah. I love that story. Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. I could keep you here for the next, I don't know how long, because this is fantastic and I really appreciate you taking the time, Lisa and I do know that you have a life to get back to. So I was wondering if you know, you're doing this, this document for all of the, uh, for people who want to plan a safari, what does I think is great, but also if people want to see your photographs and learn more about the work you're doing, would you mind sharing your social channels? [00:59:47] Where could someone who wants to go find you find. [00:59:51] Lisa Roberti: So I'm on Instagram and Facebook. And it's Lisa M as in Mary, just the initial we set em, Roberto, R O B E R T. [01:00:00] I, um, I also have a YouTube channel that I'm just starting out, but I, because I don't have enough followers, I don't have my, my, my pen name yet. [01:00:08] Um, but you can just search for me there. And in there I do a lot of different travel stuff and lodge reviews and, um, things like that. And I'm just starting on, on that. I also have a Facebook group, um, called wildlife travel and con and conservation. Um, and that's a place where I talk about, um, animal conservation laws that are coming up wins. [01:00:29] Um, devastations and also talk all things travel, um, to wildlife, rich places around the world. It's not just Africa, but it's. [01:00:37] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Fabulous. Thank you so much for sharing. And I'm going to put all of that along with some of Lisa's fabulous photographs on the show notes page. You're going to want to check that out for sure. [01:00:47] And, and learn more about the incredible work Lisa's doing and. Just see the photos. They're so beautiful. I love them. You sent them to me and I'm like, these are awesome. So, [01:01:00] and you know, and, and you have a really amazing, I, I really just, you, you, you are able to capture such life and such spirit in, in every photograph that I've seen you take is wonderful. [01:01:14] Thank you so much, my, oh no, thank you. I appreciate it. Cause I can't go necessarily to Africa, but boy, I'm going to watch you guys. So I, I know that's kind of silly cause I'm going to go to Africa again for sure. And I and Costa Rica. And I want to go back to Alaska. There's so many places, you know, so many places to go, but I want to, I'll always try to do it responsibly. [01:01:36] You know, with enough money to actually go, that's always a good thing. Uh, so I have just one question that I ask everybody who listens to the show. You know, the question, the try, you listen to the podcast. So everyone, everyone who comes on the podcast knows this question. Here's this question? So here it is. [01:01:53] If you had one thing that you wanted to say, because you had an airplane C I T, and [01:02:00] because I'm not thinking about it, I said it wrong. If you had an airplane that could sky write anything for the whole world to see, what would you say? You know, [01:02:08] Lisa Roberti: I, I knew this question was coming. I don't like, ah, and I, and I'm like, what's, what's the few words, cause it's behind an airplane. [01:02:15] So, you know, it's gotta be short, it's sustained. And I'm like, okay. So really the quick short spend time in nature. [01:02:26] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I love that it's, it's [01:02:28] Lisa Roberti: simple. It's so important. And it really, I think the more people spend time in nature, the more people will love it. And then people are going to want to preserve it. [01:02:38] Because they're in it and they love it so much. [01:02:41] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Ah, that's a great, yeah, yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. And you will, I mean, the second you spend time breathing chlorophyll, rich air because you're out in your trees, it's going to change you. So I love that. Wow. Thank you so much for that, Lisa. I am so grateful that you took the [01:03:00] time to be here and I'm super excited for people to learn more about you and more about your work. [01:03:05] Thank you so much. Thank [01:03:07] Lisa Roberti: you so much for having me. It was such a pleasure chatting with you and, um, I really appreciate your time. Thank [01:03:12] Izolda Trakhtenberg: you. So it was all my pleasure. This is Izolda Trakhtenberg for the innovative mindset podcast. You obviously need to go check out Lisa birdie and her amazing work and all of the wild places she talked about. [01:03:24] Eventually. I think you should do. You should do that too. If you're liking the show, do me a favor, tell a friend, tell a friend about the show and tell a friend about all of the cool, innovative stuff we're talking about until next time. This is his older Trakhtenberg for the innovative mindset podcast, reminding you to listen, learn, laugh, and. [01:03:43] A whole lot. [01:03:49] thanks so much for joining me today. I really appreciate you being here. Please subscribe to the podcast if you're new and if you like what you're hearing, please review it and rate it and let other people know. [01:04:00] And if you'd like to be a sponsor of the show, I'd love to meet you on patrion.com/innovative mindset. [01:04:07] I also have lots of exclusive goodies to share just with the show supporters there today's episode was produced by Izolda Trakhtenberg and his copyright 2021 as always, please remember, this is for educational and entertainment purposes. Only past performance does not guarantee future results, although we can always hope until next time, keep living in your innovative mindset. * I am a Brain.fm affiliate. If you purchase it through the above links and take the 20% off, I'll get a small commission. I'm also a PR Starter Pack Affiliate. I use Gloria's methods to get featured in the media often. And please remember, I'll never recommend a product or service I don't absolutely love!

The Meb Faber Show
The Best Investment Writing Volume 5: Greg Obenshain, Verdad Advisers – Sales and Distributions: How revenue growth and distributions drive equity returns

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 14:00


Last year we brought listeners the entire volume of The Best Investment Writing Volume 4, in audio format, right here on the podcast. Listeners loved it, so we're running it back again this year with The Best Investment Writing Volume 5.    You'll hear from some of the most respected money managers and investment researchers from all over the planet.     Enough from me, let's let Greg take over this special episode.    To read the original piece, click here   -----   Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, visit mebfaber.com/podcast To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com   -----   Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

Coast Mornings Podcasts with Blake and Eva
10 - 29 - 21 PT1 MAINE GHOSTS FROM ROXIE (GHOST BRIDE OF CAPE E)

Coast Mornings Podcasts with Blake and Eva

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 4:25


10 - 29 - 21 PT1 MAINE GHOSTS FROM ROXIE (GHOST BRIDE OF CAPE E) by Maine's Coast 93.1

Lead Like a Woman
Take Off Your Hero Cape

Lead Like a Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 30:55


Marina Byezhanova is a Soviet-born, Ukraine-raised, and Canada-based entrepreneur, whose goal is to scale the reach of people's voices. Growing up, she experienced what it was like to not have a voice. Her life's mission is to inspire people to own their narrative. As Co-founder of a personal branding agency called Brand of a Leader, Marina has been quoted and referenced in publications such as Inc., Forbes, Fast Company, Success Magazine, Wall Street Journal, and The Financial Post. She has spoken to audiences of entrepreneurs and business executives in North America, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. Marina is a proud member of Entrepreneurs' Organization (EO) and is presently the Canadian Social Media Expert serving on the regional board of directors. In this episode… Marina Byezhanova, a serial entrepreneur, lives her life and builds her businesses centered around authenticity. She believes in the power of being yourself, being unique, and accepting who you are. However, this was not always the case.  When Marina moved to Canada from Ukraine, she wanted to fit in with the young people in her new environment. She changed her lifestyle, way of dressing, and even her hairstyle just to fit in. However, she later realized that she was unique — and fitting in was not as important as she thought. Marina went on to start and build three companies and always ensured that she focused on authenticity, the companies' culture, and core values, even if at times she lost clients because of that. In this episode of the Lead Like A Woman Show, Andrea Heuston is joined by Marina Byezhanova, the Co-founder of Brand of a Leader, to discuss the importance of being an authentic leader. They also talk about the importance of building a business around a culture, being guided by core values, and why entrepreneurs should understand their 'why' for going into business.

The Howie Carr Radio Network
Charlie Parker's Weather Update - 10.27.21 - Hour 4

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 37:50


This hour Howie plays from Doomy Baker talking about the damage from the local storm on the South Shore and the Cape. Also More from the mess that is Merrick Garland.

The Meb Faber Show
#363 – Rick Bookstaber, Fabric – Risk Is The Other Side Of The Coin From Opportunity

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 65:06


In episode 363, we welcome our guest, Rick Bookstaber, co-founder and Head of Risk for Fabric, which provides factor-based risk management applications for investment advisors.   In today's episode, we're talking all about risk with someone who's held Chief Risk Officer roles at Morgan Stanley, Solomon Brothers, Bridgewater, and the University of California pension, and if that wasn't enough, he also helped write the Volcker Rule while working for the Treasury. Rick begins the episode by walking us through his framework for assessing risk and why the three keys are leverage, liquidity, and concentration. He also shares the lessons he's learned from surviving the 1987 crash, 2000 tech bubble, and 2008 housing crisis.   As we wind down, Rick shares what led him to start his newest venture and how he plans to assist advisors with risk management for client portfolios.   Please enjoy this episode with Fabric's Rick Bookstaber.   -----   Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com   -----   Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

City Cast Denver
#ListenLocal: How Art is Born

City Cast Denver

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 61:24


Berry is back! That's right, our favorite local podcast critic is back with another #listenlocal recommendation for your weekend. Berry's pick this month is How Art is Born, the first-ever podcast from Denver's Museum of Contemporary Art. Also of note, it's hosted by R. Alan Brooks, who local podcast fans will recognize from his show about comics and culture, Motherf**ker in a Cape. How Art is Born features interviews with all kinds of Colorado creatives, from comedians like Janae Burris to photographers like Armando Geneyro, who is featured in the episode Berry recommends you start with. For more podcast news and gossip, we recommend following Berry on Twitter @podcastsincolor. While you're there, say hi to us @citycastdenver!

The Meb Faber Show
The Best Investment Writing Volume 5: Sean Duffin, Cambridge Associates – Benefits of Global Diversification

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 19:31


Last year we brought listeners the entire volume of The Best Investment Writing Volume 4, in audio format, right here on the podcast. Listeners loved it, so we're running it back again this year with The Best Investment Writing Volume 5.    You'll hear from some of the most respected money managers and investment researchers from all over the planet.     Enough from me, let's let Sean take over this special episode.    To read the original piece, click here.   -----   Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com   -----   Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

The Meb Faber Show
#361 – Jeff Hooke, Johns Hopkins - The Buyout Business…Has Not Outperformed The Public Stock Markets For The Last 10 or 15 Years

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 54:13


In episode 361, we welcome our guest, Jeff Hooke, Senior Lecturer at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School and author of The Myth of Private Equity, which is what we focus on today.   In today's episode, Jeff pulls no punches when sharing his thoughts on the private equity industry. He likens the belief that private equity has outperformed the market to believing the tooth fairy is real and compares their reporting process to an 8-year-old girl rating her own homework. We dive deeper into the lack of transparency around fees and returns and then discuss the recent approval to allow 401(k) plans to include private equity investments and why that goes against what the great John Bogle believed.   Please enjoy this episode with John Hopkins' Jeff Hooke.   -----   Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com   -----   Today's episode is sponsored by FarmTogether. FarmTogether is a technology-powered investment platform that enables investors to channel funding into natural assets, starting with U.S. farmland. By driving abundant and creative capital to farmers, we're giving investors the opportunity to drive agriculture toward sustainability on a massive scale. Alongside a changing climate, the global population continues to grow, with expectations of reaching 9.7 billion by 2050. This means approximately 70% more food will be required than is consumed today. FarmTogether investors are providing the key financial building blocks for a sustainable future. --- Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

The Meb Faber Show
#360 – Erin Browne, PIMCO - I Combine Both A Quantitative Approach As A Starting Point…And Then Overlay A Discretionary Point of View

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 58:02


In episode 360, we welcome our guest, Erin Browne, portfolio manager for PIMCO, focusing on asset allocation strategies. She was also named as one of Barron's 100 most influential women in U.S. finance last year.   In today's episode, we're talking all things macro with someone who spent time as a Strategist at Moore Capital, PM at Point72, and most recently Head of Asset Allocation for UBS Asset Management, all of which helped Erin develop a framework for looking at the market through both a quantitative and discretionary approach.  Erin applies that lens to the world today and shares what she sees, notably the risk of a continued rise in energy prices. She walks us through how that may impact different asset classes and commodity prices.    Next, we look at global equity markets and hear how the U.S. market compares to Europe, China, and emerging markets.   As we wind down, we touch on bonds, interest rates, crypto, and much, much more.   Please enjoy this episode with PIMCO's Erin Browne.      -----   Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com   -----   Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

The Tony Kornheiser Show
“The passing down of the cape”

The Tony Kornheiser Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 66:02


Tony opens the show by talking about Kyrie Irving, and the Red Sox' win over the Yankees. Jeff Ma, host of the podcast “Bet The Process” calls in with his weekend picks, Chuck Todd, host of Meet The Press, phones in with his NFL picks, and Tony closes out the show by opening up the Mailbag. Songs : The Riverbreaks “Perfectly Aglow” ; “Stargazer” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices