Podcasts about Trumpism

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Political ideology of Donald Trump

  • 785PODCASTS
  • 1,304EPISODES
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  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 26, 2021LATEST
Trumpism

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Best podcasts about Trumpism

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Latest podcast episodes about Trumpism

Deadline: White House
"That's a very dangerous prospect"

Deadline: White House

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 91:48


Nicolle Wallace discusses reporting that Trump allies set up a command center to try and overturn the 2020 election. Plus, upcoming governors races test Democrats' fight against Trumpism, Florida's governor offers unvaccinated police officers money to relocate to his state, Facebook documents reveal internal dissent over the company's policies, the Renew America movement announces 13 House Republicans it wants to unseat, Charlottesville residents sue white supremacists and hate groups for the deadly rally years ago, and Biden looks to regain his mojo. Joined by: Jackie Alemany, Daniel Goldman, Ben Rhodes, Rep. Ted Lieu, Eddie Glaude, Betsy Woodruff Swan, Miles Taylor, David Jolly, Jacob Ward, Donna Edwards, and David Henderson

The Good Fight
Ross Douthat on the Trouble with Experts

The Good Fight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 66:51


Ross Douthat, a columnist for The New York Times, has long advocated for a brand of reform conservatism that stands in stark contrast to Trumpism. His latest book, The Deep Places: A Memoir of Illness and Discovery, chronicles his long struggle with Lyme disease. In this week's conversation, Ross Douthat and Yascha Mounk discuss why the expert consensus sometimes fails, when to listen to outsiders, and whether the failures of the establishment help to explain the rise of populism. This transcript has been condensed and lightly edited for clarity. Please do listen and spread the word about The Good Fight. If you have not yet signed up for our podcast, please do so now by following this link on your phone. Email: podcast@persuasion.community  Website: http://www.persuasion.community Podcast production by John T. Williams, and Brendan Ruberry Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Connect with us! Spotify | Apple | Google Twitter: @Yascha_Mounk & @joinpersuasion Youtube: Yascha Mounk LinkedIn: Persuasion Community Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Ken Rudin's Political Junkie
Episode #376: Is There Hope For The GOP? Or Democracy?

Ken Rudin's Political Junkie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 53:49


A book by a longtime Republican strategist says his party has become indistinguishable from Donald Trump -- and all that's wrong with Trumpism. We look ahead to next month's historic Boston mayoral race. And we talk to Colin Powell's former chief of staff, who has the inside scoop behind Powell's infamous 2003 UN speech about "weapons of mass destruction." The post Episode #376: Is There Hope For The GOP? Or Democracy? appeared first on Ken Rudin's Political Junkie.

That Trippi Show
How Dems Could Stop Trump From Running, Manchin's Possible Defection, VA Gov Updates

That Trippi Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 35:28


Joe and Alex are back to talk about a ton of big news. Joe Manchin is dangling a possible defection to the GOP caucus if he doesn't get what he wants in the BBB bill. What options do the Dems have? Could he actually do it? And how do we move past the infighting?  Then, the governor's race in Virginia is going to be tight, mostly because the GOP candidate hasn't had to commit to Trumpism or moderate conservatism. Democrats must not take this one lightly -- imagine if a GOP governor had to certify election results in a contested state in '24.  Finally, the GOP is infighting as well -- Mitch McConnell has tried to focus Trump on the future instead of the Big Lie. Will Trump still turn out voters when he's not on the ticket? And how could the results of 2022 affect the prospects of Trump running for president in '24?  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Politics and Polls
#248: Where Can the Center Right Find a Home? (Christine Todd Whitman & Miles Taylor)

Politics and Polls

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 35:02


Pro-Trump extremists seem to have a tight grip on the Republican Party at both state and national levels. With elections around the corner, traditional Republicans are now calling for party officials to move the GOP away from "Trumpism." Some are even wondering whether a new center-right party may be needed — as a last resort.   These concerns were expressed by Gov. Christine Todd Whitman and Miles Taylor in a recent Washington Post op-ed. They join Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang in this week's show.   Todd Whitman is the former governor of New Jersey (1994 to 2001). Taylor served at the Department of Homeland Security from 2017 to 2019, including as chief of staff, and was the anonymous author of a 2018 guest essay for The Times criticizing President Donald Trump's leadership.

Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton
As Texas Goes, So Goes the Nation: Lone Star Candidate Matthew Dowd on How Democrats Can Win in 2022 The veteran political adviser and analyst talks about now running for office himself on Inside the Hive.

Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 51:07


Matthew Dowd, former Bush campaign adviser turned analyst, has spent his career behind the scenes. But now he's running as a Democrat for lieutenant governor of Texas in 2022—with eyes locked on hard-right incumbent Dan Patrick, the man responsible for pushing through the infamous voter-suppression and antiabortion bills that have galvanized Republicans and alarmed Democrats. On this week's Inside the Hive, Dowd analyzes the state of the Democratic Party and makes the case that if Texas can be turned blue (finally), the spread of Trumpism can be stopped nationally too. And even if the Biden administration can't pull out of its current slump, he argues, Democrats can still beat Republicans at the state level. Dowd weighs in on Biden, congressional Democrats, Beto O'Rourke—and his favorite Matthew McConaughey film.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York
Jennifer Rubin on Resistance: How Women Saved Democracy from Donald Trump

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 54:48


(10/14/21) From the first Women's March the day after the 2017 inauguration to the Blue Wave in the 2018 midterms or the flood of female presidential candidates in 2020, women from across the ideological spectrum became energized in a way America had not witnessed in decades in response to the presidency of Donald Trump. They marched, they organized, they donated vast sums of cash and they ran for office. They formed new alliances. And they were a major reason why he was voted out. Featuring exclusive interviews with key figures such as Kamala Harris, Stacey Abrams and Nancy Pelosi, Resistance: How Women Saved Democracy from Donald Trump, the new book from Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin, looks at this recent explosion of female-centered activism and what it means for the future. Join us for a look at women's role in the refutation of Trumpism in this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI.

2020 Politics War Room
108: Paul Begala

2020 Politics War Room

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:39


James and Al are joined by Democratic campaign mastermind Paul Begala for his take on Texas politics and how liberals can start to regain ground there going into 2022.  Then, they look at ways to unite the progressive and moderate wings of the party and the critical need to defeat Trumpism.  Is returning to Clinton era politics the answer? Email your questions to James and Al at politicswarroom@gmail.com or tweet them to @politicon.   Make sure to include your city, we love to hear where you're from! Paul Begala's Recent Article Paul on the need for Democrats to make a deal. The Trevor Project Please Support This Week's Sponsors: Blinkist For a 7 day free trial and 25% off a premium membership go to blinkist.com

Politics Done Right
Republicans urge Republicans to vote for Democrats. Workers taking command. Neoliberalism must die.

Politics Done Right

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 50:23


Republicans Christine Todd Whitman and Miles Taylor has an important message they wrote in their New York Times piece, “We Are Republicans. There's Only One Way to Save Our Party From Pro-Trump Extremists,” stating “Rational Republicans are losing the party civil war. And the only near-term way to battle pro-Trump extremists is for all of us to team up on key races and overarching political goals with our longtime political opponents: the Democrats. This year we joined more than 150 conservatives including former governors, senators, congressmen, cabinet secretaries, and party leaders — in calling for the Republican Party to divorce itself from Trumpism or else lose our support, perhaps with us forming a new political party. Rather than return to founding ideals, Republican leaders in the House and in many states have now turned belief in conspiracy theories and lies about stolen elections into a litmus test for membership and running for office.” The American workers are taking command and demanding what is theirs. It is time to kill neoliberalism. --- If you like what we do please do the following! Most Independent Media outlets continue to struggle to raise the funds they need to operate much like the smaller outlets like Politics Done Right SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube Channel here. LIKE our Facebook Page here. Share our blogs, podcasts, and videos. Get our books here. Become a YouTube PDR Posse Member here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Patreon here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Facebook here. Consider providing a contribution here. Please consider supporting our GoFundMe equipment fund here. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/support

Charter Cities Podcast
Mass Migration with Parag Khanna

Charter Cities Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 46:09


Because of the pervasive media coverage of Trumpism, Brexit, and the like, it is easy to assume that the dominant sentiment around the world is that mass migration is a new and terrifying phenomenon that could upend the world as we know it. However, that couldn't be further from the truth, and we've brought Parag Khanna, founder of FutureMap, to explain why. Not only has most of the world remained pragmatic about the topic, but mass migration has been occurring for decades, and although there are some exceptions, in the majority of cases, societies have absorbed the newcomers and the newcomers have assimilated remarkably well. Parag is an Asian-American who has also lived in Europe, and his personal perspective combined with the in-depth research that he has conducted around migration, sustainability, community, governance, citizenship and more, reveals a lot about what drives us to do the things we do, and offers a glimpse of what our future could look like.   Key Points From This Episode:   •   Parag shares his thoughts on why the US should (hypothetically) buy Greenland. •   The premise of Parag's new book, Move. •   Two megatrends that are currently shaping the world. •   Four potential futures that Parag thinks we are heading for. •   Immigration policies in the UK, US, and Canada, and what these indicate about the future. •   Changes in migration dynamics since Parag's school days, and what is driving those changes. •   The sentiment amongst European politicians about migrants that Parag has picked up through his research. •   How societies have historically dealt with mass migration. •   High volumes of migration that take place in East and South-East Asia. •   Value that lies in having civilizational confidence. •   Parag explains how Germany is breaking open the definition of what German-ness is. •   A brief analysis of the migration situation in the UAE. •   Primary factors which motivate the migration of Western expats. •   The nuanced nature of citizenship. •   Sustainability, mobility, and connectivity from the perspective of the youth of today, and Parag's opinion on where these ideas emerged from. •   How definitions of community have changed, and how they are changing now. •   The important role that cities are going to play in coming migrations. •   Parag explains what the mobile real estate phenomenon is, and what is driving it. •   Why Parag does not think de-urbanization is a major trend, although it is being talked about as if it is. •   Plans that Parag has for the future.   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode:   https://www.paragkhanna.com/ (Parag Khanna) https://futuremap.io/ (Future Map) https://www.chartercitiesinstitute.org/ (Charter Cities Institute) https://www.facebook.com/Charter-Cities-Institute-424204888015721/ (Charter Cities Institute on Facebook) https://twitter.com/CCIdotCity (Charter Cities Institute on Twitter) Support this podcast

theAnalysis.news
The Whole Country is the Reichstag

theAnalysis.news

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 54:56


Adolph Reed says, "The right-wing political alliance anchored by the Republican party and Trumpism coheres around a single concrete objective— taking absolute power in the U.S. as soon and as definitively as possible." Reed joins Paul Jay on theAnalysis.news.

The Bob Cesca Show
Aaron Rupar Goes Rogue

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 56:43


[Explicit Language] At some point in the past several years, you've probably retweeted one of Aaron's videos -- he's been covering Trump and the Red Hat cult for as long as I can remember but now he's starting his own thing at Substack, called Public Notice. He's got an interview with The Washington Post's Brian Klaas up there right now that confirmed much of my pessimism about Trumpism. Meantime, please help support this show by subscribing to our bonus content at bobcescashow.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Nathan Barry Show
050: Dave Pell - Lessons From Two Decades of Publishing Online

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 62:22


Dave Pell has been writing online for almost as long as the internet has existed. His popular newsletter, NextDraft, has over 140,000 subscribers. NextDraft covers the day's ten most fascinating news stories, delivered with a fast and pithy wit.Dave has been a syndicated writer on NPR, Gizmodo, Forbes, and Huffington Post. He earned his bachelor's degree in English from U.C. Berkeley, and his master's in education from Harvard.Besides being a prolific writer, Dave is also the Managing Partner at Arba, LLC. For more than a decade, Arba has been angel investing in companies like Open Table, GrubHub, Marin Software, Hotel Tonight, Joyus, and Liftopia.In this episode, you'll learn: How Dave merged his two writing passions into a successful product The key to building a strong relationship with your audience How Dave dramatically increased signups to NextDraft Links & Resources Flicker Unsplash Fareed Zakaria Jim Rome The Skimm Morning Brew The Hustle Spark Loop Sam Spratt Dave Pell's Links Dave Pell on Twitter NextDraft newsletter Dave's new book: Please Scream Inside Your Heart NextDraft app PleaseScream.com Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Dave:If you have something to say in one way or another, the internet is a great place for people to figure out a way to receive it. So, that's pretty powerful and still excites me. I still press publish with the same enthusiasm now than I did when the internet first launched.[00:00:23] Nathan:In this episode I talk to Dave Pell, who has been writing for basically as long as the internet has been around. He's been an investor since the early days. He's been writing since the.com bust, and even before then. He writes his popular newsletter with 140,000 subscribers called Next Draft.We have this really fun conversation about writing. His writing process. How he grew the newsletter. Bunch of other things that he cares about. Even a few things that I was interested in, like he doesn't have his face in photos on the internet very much. He has his avatar instead. So, just getting into why that is.He also has a book coming out soon. It's called Scream Inside Your Heart, which is a fun reference to some memes from 2020. So, enjoy the episode. There's a lot in there.Dave. Welcome to the show.[00:01:12] Dave:Thanks a lot for having me on.[00:01:14] Nathan:Okay. So you've been doing this for a long time. You've been writing on the internet since the .com era. So, I'm curious maybe just to kick things off, what have you seen—I realize this is a giant question.What have you seen change? What are some of those trends that you've seen, that you either really miss from the early days, or some of those things that you've held onto from the early days of the internet, that you're really still enjoying?[00:01:46] Dave:Yeah, that is a pretty huge question, but I'll give it a shot. The thing I miss from the early days of the internet is that our democracy was not being destroyed by the internet in the early days of the internet. So, everything we thought we were building, basically it turned out to be the opposite of what actually happened.The part about the internet that I still feel is there, although a little bit less so because of the big companies have sort of taken over all the platforms and stuff, is just the idea that someone can have a passion or a creative output that they want to share with the world, and they can mold internet tools to fit their skills, and then use the internet to broadcast that out, and still become sort of pretty popular withour the “OK” of some gatekeeper at a publication, or at a television studio, or whatever.The indie spirit of the internet still lives on. It ebbs and flows, and has a lot of different iterations. But that was the thing that excited me the most when I first played with the internet. And that's the thing that continues to excite me the most now.[00:02:57] Nathan:I always think of the newsletter, and your newsletter in particular, is that indie spirit. Is that what you see most commonly in newsletters? Or are you seeing it in other places as well?[00:03:10] Dave:I see it in podcasts. I see it in newsletters. I see it in people sharing their art, sharing their photography on Flicker, and up through the more modern tools. I go to a site called Unsplash all the time to look at images, and it's just basically regular people sharing their images.Some of them are professional photographers, some aren't, and they're getting their work out there, and then some of them probably get jobs out of it and stuff like that. So, just the idea that you can have some kind of creative output and have a place to share it. And try to get an audience for that is really inspiring.It's a lot harder than it used to be because there's a few billion more people trying to get attention also, and because there are more gatekeepers now. So, you have to, hope that your app meets Apple's guidelines, or that different products you might want to share on the internet have to meet certain classifications now, whereas they might not have in the very early days of the internet. But in general, if you have something to say in one way or another, the internet is a great place for people to figure out a way to receive it.So, that's pretty powerful, and, still excites me. I still press published with the same enthusiasm now that I did when the internet first launched.[00:04:32] Nathan:Yeah. So let's talk about the main project that you have right now, which is Next Draft. Give listeners the 30-second pitch on Next Draft, of what it is.[00:04:46] Dave:Sure. Basically I call myself the managing editor of the internet. What I basically do is a personality-driven news newsletter where I cover the day's most fascinating news. I cover 10 stories. A lot of times in each section there's more than one link. I give my take on the day's news, each individual story, and then I link off to the source for the full story.When I first launched it, I called it Dinner Party Prep. I provided enough information for you to sort of get the gist of the story. And if there's topics you want to dig deeper, you just click and, you know, go get the story yourself. So that's sort of the overview of it.[00:05:27] Nathan:Nice. And you said that you're obsessed with the news maybe in a somewhat, even unhealthy way. why, where did that come from?[00:05:36] Dave:Yeah. Well, nothing, nothing about my relationship with the internet is only somewhat unhealthy. it's all extremely unhealthy, but, both my parents are Holocaust survivors and, when I was growing up, news was just a very big part of our daily lives, especially when my three older sisters moved out and it was just the three of us, that was sort of our mode of communication.We talked about the news. We watched the news together. Fareed Zakaria is basically the sun my parents always wanted. but so I got really into the news and being able to connect the news to, our everyday lives, which of course my parents had experienced as children and teens and Europe during world war II.And also reading between the lines about why certain politicians might be saying something, why stories are getting published a certain way. So I just got really into that and I've always been into a and college, you know, I, I majored in English, but if we had minors at Berkeley, I would have minored in journalism.I took a bunch of journalism courses. I've always been really into the media, but not so much as quite an insider where I go to work for a newspaper, but more observing, the news and providing sort of a lit review of what's happening and what has momentum in the news. So I sorta got addicted to it and, Also as a writer.My favorite thing to do is counter punch. I like to have somebody give me a topic and then I like to be able to quickly share my take, or make a joke or create a funny headline about that content. So I sorta took those two passions of the way I like to write. I like to write on deadline. I like to write fast and I like to counter punch and the content that I like, which is news, and I sort of merged those two things and created a product, and a pretty cool suite of internet tools to support that.[00:07:35] Nathan:Yeah. So that makes sense that you've identified the constraints that match your style and made something exactly that fits it. the deadline, like having, he, you know, coming out with something on a daily basis, is more than a lot of creators want to do. so what's your process there?[00:07:55] Dave:Yeah. I mean, I should emphasize that I do it every day. Not because I think it's some incredible draw for readers to get Daily Content. I do it every day because I'm addicted to it. If my newsletter had five stories in it, instead of 10, it would do better. If my newsletter came out three days a week instead of five days a week, I'm sure it would do better.If it came out once a week, it would do even better then you know, also if I had a more marketable or not marketable, but a more, business-oriented topic that was more narrow, it would do better. I used to write a newsletter that was just on tech and it was. Really popular in the internet professional community back in the first boom, I had about 50,000 subscribers and there were probably about 52,000 internet professionals.So I just like writing about what I want to write about and I'm addicted to pressing the publish button and I'm just addicted to the process. So I do it because of that. I'm not sure that would be my general advice to somebody trying to market or promote a newsletter.[00:09:01] Nathan:Yep. Are there other iterations, either ever before or things that you tried that you realized like, oh, that's not a fit for your personality, your writing style?[00:09:09] Dave:Yeah. When I first started it, I actually, I'm an angel investor also and have been since, probably right after Google and Yahoo launched. so a while, and I used to, my passion has always been writing, so I wanted to mix writing into that, process. So I would send out 10. Daily stories, but they were all tech news related to the CEOs of the companies I worked with and a few of their employees, so that they wouldn't have to spend their time reading the news or worrying about competitors or worry about what the latest trends in tech, where I would give it to them.And they could focus on doing their jobs and that sorta got shared and got out. so I did that for a few years. really, that was my iteration. I should've kept the brand. It was called David Netflix. not that it was a great name, but I've shifted brands about 40 times in my life. Cause I love branding and naming.I that's another, maybe this is more of a cautionary tale than a lesson and newsletter marketing. I would stick with a brand if anybody has the possibility of doing that, that was a big mistake I've made over the years is having multiple brands. But when the bus came, the first internet bust, I basically was writing an obituary column every day and about companies that had failed.So I just decided, I wanted to expand it and I knew I was interested in much broader topics than just tech news. So I expanded it to all news, a critical point that, really changed Next Draft and got it to catch on and become more popular was when I decided to focus on making it more personality driven and less, less overwhelmingly, providing an overwhelming level of coverage.I used to think that I had to provide all the news in the day because people would sort of, depend on me to provide their news. I was sort of selling myself as your trusted news source. So I would include a lot of stories that I didn't have anything to say about because they were huge news, you know, an embassy closed in Iran or whatever.That was huge international news, but I didn't necessarily have anything to say about that that day. So after a while I decided, no, I'm not going to do that. I'm just going to limit it to 10 items. And I'm going to focus that on what I think is the most fascinating and think of it less like a curation tool and more like, a, modern day column.I think if the column newspaper column were invented today, it would look a lot like Next Draft people would sort of share their takes and then provide links off for more information. once I did that, it was a big change. People started signing up much more readily and, once I stopped trying to be exhaustive.[00:11:56] Nathan:That makes a lot of sense to me. I think that that's something you see from a lot of creators is that they're, they're trying to find some model. That's like, this is my idea of what people should want, you know, rather than what they end up doing, eventually it's coming to, it's like, okay, forget all of that.This is what I want. And I'm going to make that. And then people like me can find and follow it. And people who don't can, you know, do their thing. Can you go find one of the other million sources on the internet?[00:12:21] Dave:Yeah. When I think of the people that I like to follow or have followed forever on the internet, all of them are that ladder. They just do it their way. They have a design, they want, they stick to their guns. They say what they feel like saying. they decide. what the personality of the product is.And, they move within that. I always find that to be the most interesting thing, especially when it comes to something like newsletters. I really think newsletters are more like a radio talk shows than they are like other internet content, podcasts to a certain degree as well. But I always feel like I listened to are used to listen a lot to this radio, sports caster named Jim Rome.And whenever he would have a new city that he was launching and he would always give the same speech on the Monday that they launched saying, just give me a week. You might not.Get the vibe of what we're doing today. You might think it's okay, but not great, but just give it a week and listen, and then decide if you like it or not.And I sort of feel like that's how newsletters are your relationship with your readers sort of creates this, sort of insider-y voice and communication that, you, it takes a little while to get into the rhythm of getting it. But once you do, then it's like this familiar voice or this familiar friend that you feel like, even if you didn't read it for a few weeks, you can start a conversation with that person right away easily.That's how I think the voice of a newsletter is most effective. So that's why I've always thought of it. More of what I do is sort of a textual talk radio, more so than a blog or some other format[00:14:01] Nathan:What do you think, or what would you say to someone who maybe had 10 or 20,000 subscribers and felt like their newsletter had gone a bit stale and maybe their relationship to it had gotten a bit stale or they're in this, this position of writing things that no longer have their voice, how would you coach them through like bringing their voice and personality back into it?[00:14:22] Dave:I mean, it's definitely hard. it's hard doing something that you do alone and, something that is often hard to really get off the ground or get to grow, especially when you're on a platform like the internet, where every day, somebody does something and 10 seconds later, they're like internet famous and you're trying day after day.So, I mean, the first thing. Is that you really have to be interested in what you you're passionate about. and focus in on that, because that will alleviate a lot of that stress. Like, do I feel like sending it today? I'm a too burnt out. What's the point? I mean, not that those feelings don't happen. I had those feelings as recently as an hour ago, when I press publish, I have those feelings and disappointments constantly, you know, that's part of being a creator of any kind.Maybe that word is sort of, sort of goofy, but anybody who's putting themselves out there and putting content out, you know, you have that feeling all the time. If you're an indie, and you're doing it all day in front of the computer by yourself, then that's even more powerful because, you know, if you work at a big company or everybody's working on the same goal, or even in a small group, you can sort of support each other and, maybe even bullshit each other at some cases where, oh, no, this really matters.You know, where, if you're by yourself, that has to be pretty self-sustaining or self-sustaining. I do have a friend or two that I always share blurbs with who, one of my friends Rob's, he proves almost all of my blurbs, so it's nice to have that virtual office mate. He's not really officially part of Next Draft, but you know, I don't think I would do it as easily or as, for as long if it weren't for him because he's like my virtual friend on the internet that says, oh, come on, let's get it out today or whatever.So I think that's helpful to have a support team or a couple people you can count on to sort of give you a boost when you need it. But the key really is, is that it's gotta be something that you are passionate about, both in terms of the product and in terms of what you're focusing on, because if you feel strongly about it, then it really.I don't want to say it doesn't matter if people enjoy it, you should take cues from your readers. What are they clicking on? What are they reading? What are they responding to? But at the core, it's gotta be you because that's what gets you through those down points? you know, I had a weird thing because I write about news.The general news, world basically benefited dramatically from the Trump era because everybody was habitually turning on their news, 24, 7, and refreshing and Whitey and Washington post and checking Twitter every two seconds to see what crazy thing happened next. And we're all poor sorta,[00:17:01] Nathan:Wreck to watch.[00:17:02] Dave:So everybody was really into it and it created.Unbelievable platform for people to become media stars. You know, Trump was bad for democracy, but he was great for media. Great for creating new voices out there. whether we like it or not. for me, it was different because I wrote about all news. I wouldn't say I was apolitical, but I wasn't heavily political.The Next Draft had plenty of readers from both sides of the aisle. when Trump came around, it was like one story every day, basically. So it really limited. I would get emails from longtime readers all the time that said, Hey, can't you cover something other than Trump every day?And I say, Hey, if you can find the story for me, I'll cover it. This is what every journalist is on. Now, the people who used to cover the secret service around Trump, the people who used to cover sports are not talking about Trump because of a pandemic relation ship to it. The people who aren't entertainment are talking about Trump because they can't believe that anybody voted for him, whatever the issue was, every dinner party was about Trump.So it was really a bummer for my brand and my product. Actually, it became boring in some ways to me to have the same story every day. And it became, I think frustrating to my readers.But during that era, when it was happening, I had to make a decision. Do I become more political and go full on with this?Or do I sort of try to. Do what I would call a falsely unbiased view or a, you know, false equivalence view that we saw in the media where there's both sides to every story. And you have to pretend they're both accurate, including one guy saying to put disinfectant into your veins. And the other person's saying to wear a mask and take a vaccine, but those things get treated as equal somehow because the president said it.And I really decided, you know, more important than keeping readers is that I'm true to my own sort of ethical standards. In a moment that called for it, at least for me. So I became more political. went into it and I said, what I believe and still believe is the truth, you know, about what was happening with Trump and Trumpism and our slide towards authoritarianism.And I know that this is a podcast more about newsletterish than it is about politics or news, but I'm just sharing that because that's the kind of thing that kept me going. and the people who really cared about what I was writing, appreciated it and would email me and say they got something out of that.And most importantly, my mom would say, yeah, you made the right call. Or my dad would say, yeah, you got that. Right. And ultimately, When it became a sort of a bummer period for me, which I would say 2020 was because of all the horrible news. And, I was writing a book about the year. So I was like living, July of 20, 20, well writing about March of 2020, which I don't recommend for anybody's emotional health.And I just had to think like, what's really important to me. Yes. I want to be funny, which I try to be in my newsletter every day. I want to be read my narcissism is as strong as ever, but ultimately I want to be able to look myself in the reflection of the, darken screen on the rare times that it is dark and say like, yeah, you told the truth and that kept me going there.So I think whatever your brand is, you know, it can be a newsletter about guitars, but if you have that sort of passion, And you have something you want to say, and you think is important to say it sort of gets you through those levels and your motivation. And if it's not getting you through the lows and the motivation, there's nothing wrong with saying, Hey man, this is not worth it.I'm going to go try to make something else. You know, it doesn't have to be, you don't have to beat a dead horse.[00:20:51] Nathan:On the political side. Are there specific things that you felt like it costs you opportunities that it lost you? Because I think a lot of creators, whether they talk about, you know, finance or photography or whatever, I'll see these things. And they're like this either directly relates to me and my audience and I feel like I should take a stand on it.Or it's like a broader macro issue that I feel like we should talk about. And when you do, then there's immediately, you know, somewhere between three and 300 responses of like, we didn't follow you for the politics, you know, or like something like that. And your Instagram, DMS, or newsletter replies or whatever.[00:21:24] Dave:Yeah. it costs me a lot. Definitely it costs me readers or subscribers. It costs me, psychic pain because I was locked into a story that was just overwhelmingly, emotionally painful, really, and shocking and difficult to understand all the things that cause you sort of emotional exhaustion. We're in the Trump story, especially in 2020, when it became a story about our own health and our kids' health.And the frustration level just went through the roof. for me, professionalizing that content actually helps create a bit of a barrier to the feelings about it. Some of my good friends were probably more bummed during 2020 than I was because when the latest crazy story or depressing story would happen, I felt I had to. Ingest that content and then come up with, something cogent to say about it. And maybe hopefully funny to make it a little bit of sugar to take the medicine and then get it out to people. So I've always felt that being able to do that, sorta created a barrier between myself and actually feeling something.So that's another thing I like about the newsletter probably at least unconsciously. but yeah, there was a lot of costs in terms of readers, for sure. Hate mail. but there always is, you know, Today. I would say I get much more hate mail from the far left. If that's what you want to call them. People who feel like every joke is like an incredible triggering a front to their existence or any hint that you mentioned somebody as attractive.I've gotten hate mail because I implied that Beyonce is appearance was part of her brand. I mean, it's totally crazy, but, It's those extremes. You have to be able to turn off. You know, a friend of mine used to work at a major, be the editor of a major American newspaper. And he said every Friday they would get together and they would play the craziest, calls to the editor.They had a call line. In addition to, you could send a letter or you could call, leave a voicemail about something you were upset about in the coverage. And they would just gather around and have drinks on Friday. Listen to this because of course the people who are calling this line are almost self-selecting themselves as a little bit wacko and their takes were usually pretty extreme.The internet, Twitter, social media, Provides, greases the wheels for those people to be more prevalent in our lives. But I think it's really important to know that that's a real minority of people, somebody who sent you a hate mail, that your joke was so offensive, or they can't believe you mentioned that people ever watch pornography on the internet or any of these other things, it's this tiny minority of people.And then it's one step crazier that they felt like they had to contact you. So that's a really hard thing. I think about being split, particularly the newsletter game, because anybody can hit reply and you're going to get many more replies from people with crazy complaints, than you are from people with really thoughtful responses.Not that those don't come and those are valuable and I love getting those, but you get many more from people that just have really bizarre. I mean I could list probably for hours to crazy things that people send me that they're mad about, you know,[00:24:50] Nathan:Is there something specific that you do? Like one thing when I get those replies, if they're just like completely off the wall or abusive or something like that, I just scroll down and then click their unsubscribe link because, you know, they're never going to know, and then I just have to show up in their inbox[00:25:07] Dave:Right.[00:25:08] Nathan:There's something that you do.[00:25:09] Dave:That's not a bad strategy. I like that. I do do that occasionally for sure. occasionally I'll just go to Gmail and just, create a filter for that email to automatically go to my trash. if it's like a hardcore right-winger, that's telling me how stupid I am about ivermectin and that, you know, people should be taking horse dewormer and I'm just not getting the truth.And that Trump is awesome and that, Whatever. I usually just delete, honestly, because I don't see a big benefit to replying to somebody, especially if it's like a rabbit email, you know, they're looking for a reply, they want the conflict. A lot of people sleep easy with conflict. That's one of the lessons of the internet that I learned when I was first starting on the internet, you know, David edix sort sorta became popular because somebody that had a blog with a similar name, that I hadn't heard of, complained that I sort of stole his name because his name was also Dave.And I had got like, probably about three or 400 emails saying, you know, with expletive saying what a horrible person I was. And I also got about 3000 subscribers and at the time I had about 30, so. I didn't know how to respond. I felt like, wow. Number one, I didn't know that guys had the product with the same name.Number two. My name was different enough. Number two or three were both named Dave. I mean, who cares? You know, and plus I don't want to be attacked by anybody. So your first reaction is to respond and a slightly older, although not noticeably these days with my gray beard, slightly older friend of mine who had been in tech a little longer, said, don't respond.This guy lives for conflict. You guys are going to fight. There's going to be this public thing. You're going to be up all night and he's going to never sleep so easy. So, I took that to heart and didn't respond. And I, I think about that a lot when I get rabid emails from people, Mike exception, actually probably my weak point really is from, more my side of the political spectrum, where people who are generally liberal, but are just so extreme for me.In terms of being triggered or having a joke, be every joke, be inappropriate. That those people, I actually do feel like I want to respond to because, I, I don't think I can really motivate or move, somebody who was on the opposite end of the spectrum and is sending me hate aggressive, hate mail, but maybe I can move somebody who's just a little bit different than me, or a little bit more extreme.I will respond to those, although I'm usually sorry. The one other thing I always respond to is if people have been reading, they say, oh, I've been reading you for years. And, I wanted to ask you a couple of questions about this book that you wrote before ordering it. And I'm like, just order the damn book. that's probably my most common email to people these days. It's actually remarkable how many people says, wow, I I've been reading you for years. I share you with all my friends. something, when my sons come home from college where it's always talking about, Dave said this, Dave said that, before I buy your book, I just wanted to ask you a couple of questions to make sure it's going to be for me.I'm like I worked on something for an hour and it's like, your family is talking about it. What, just by the thing I worked on for a year, you know? So those kind of things, personal frustration, I respond.[00:28:37] Nathan:Yeah, that makes sense. okay. I'd love to talk about the book some more, but before we get into that, there's two things I want to talk about. The first one is like, how do you measure success for the newsletter? What's the thing that you'd like to, cause I don't think it's, you're pursuing the monetary side for this.It sounds like the monetary side comes from investing and, and then what's success for the newsletter.[00:28:59] Dave:I mean, I have had right now, I I'm just marketing my, my own stuff. And during the pandemic I marketed non-profits, but, that had to do with either the pandemic or, the democracy issues that we were facing. but I have made decent money from selling straight sponsorships. Year-long sponsorships to people, which I highly recommend.I think some of the ads that people put into his letters that go by clicks or whatever, unless you have a massive audience, it's hard to make much money, but if you pitch to some company that is a like-minded brand, Hey, you're going to be my only brand for a year. And anytime you have special events, I'm going to mention it.Then you can say, okay, you have like, you know, 20,000 readers or a hundred thousand readers that can make a difference to a brand to say, yeah, it's like a rounding air show. We'll give you 20 grand or a hundred grand or wherever it comes in there that you can actually make a decent. Living in terms of writing.So that always worked better for me, but no, my, my internet life is really all about narcissism and, clicks, you know, the dopamine, I just want reads. I'd rather you subscribe to my newsletter than pitch me your startup company. I just, that's what I want the most. So more numbers, more opens, more reads, more subscribers.And unfortunately that's probably the hardest thing to get also, especially in a product that is sort of viral. I think newsletters are sort of viral, but it's better if you have a team and some tools to really get it going. That's, you know, sites like the Skimm morning brew and the hustle. They have teams that are really growth hacking and focusing on that and having rewards programs and ambassador programs.The reason you see that is because.Newsletters themselves are not really inherently that viral. Yes. Somebody can forward it to one person or whatever, but it's not as viral as a lot of other forms of content where you can click a button and share it with all of your followers, like a Facebook post or a tweet.So yeah, the thing that matters to me most is probably the hardest to get in the newsletter game, but that's the truth[00:31:10] Nathan:Yeah. Well, I think the, the point on like newsletters don't have a distribution engine. There's no Facebook newsfeed, YouTube algorithm equivalent for newsletters. And so it really relies on either you posting your content somewhere else, whether it's Twitter or YouTube or medium or something that has an algorithm or your readers saying like, oh, I read Next Draft.You should too. There's not really something else in there. Have you looked at, or I guess if you have thoughts on that, you comments on it, but then also have you looked at launching an ambassador program or, or an actual referral program?[00:31:44] Dave:Yeah, I've thought about him. And now over the last year, there's been a few tools that have come out a few. I think X people from sites like morning view Ru, and some other sites that have sort of perfected some of these marketing programs have, sort of come out with these tools. I've messed around with them a little bit.Some of them still require I find, some technical ones. so I, I have like an engineer who works with me on Next Draft, like as a freelance basis every now and then, but it's not always easy for me to launch stuff that requires a lot of a moment to moment technical support, and management, because it's just me using a lot of, they're customized, but they're over the counter tools.So I've thought about a lot of them, but I really haven't tried it that much.I want to though I do want to do that. I would like to do one of those programs, especially where you get credit for referrals. I think that's the best kind of model. So there's one called spark loop.[00:32:51] Nathan:Yeah, we actually, I invested in spark loops, so we[00:32:54] Dave:Okay.[00:32:55] Nathan:Decent portion of that business, so good.[00:32:58] Dave:Oh, nice. Yeah. That one, if it was just slightly easier, I know that it's probably difficult to make it easier because, there's so many pieces. They have to have your subscribers. I have to have my subscribers, but that is, does seem like a good product. And especially if they can, I think expand into like letting a person sell a product or whatever, get credited for sharing products that can be even bigger.But yeah, that kind of stuff is really powerful for sure. And I, I do want to get into that. it's more just inertia that I it's just a matter of sitting there for the, an amount of hours that it requires to get it going.But I do think that's a great thing for newsletter writers to do, and I'm pretty surprised that more newsletter platforms don't build it right in.I think that'll probably change over time too. Maybe you guys will get acquired by.[00:33:48] Nathan:Yep. No, that makes sense. I know for convert kit, we wanted to build it in, it looks at the amount of time that it would take and then said like let's invest in a , you know, and then roll it into our offering.[00:33:59] Dave:Yeah, it's hard. It's hard not to take that stuff personally, too, you know, for people that do newsletters, you think you're going to put a thing on there and say, Hey, you know, it's just me here and you always read my newsletter and click. I know you love me so much. Can you just do this to get a free whatever?And it's, you know, sometimes not that many people click, you know, or other times like they click just as long as there's the free item. So there's a lot of ways to get depressed. Like I had things where I say, Hey, the first a hundred people who do this, get a free t-shirt or whatever next strap t-shirt.And those hundred people will literally do what I asked them to do in like 34 seconds, you know? And then it like stops after that. The next time you ask them, if there's not a t-shirt. But it's not you, you know, if you go to a baseball game or a lawyer game or whatever, you know, people sit there, they don't even cheer as much for the team as they cheer when the guy comes out with the t-shirt gun.So it's like, people love t-shirts more than they're ever going to love you. And you have to go into these things with that in mind. there's no way, even if it's, even if you're XX large and the t-shirt is, you know, petite, it's still worth more than you are. And the average mind of the average person.So you have to go into all of these things thinking, I hope this works like crazy, but if it doesn't tomorrow, I open up the browser and start writing.[00:35:19] Nathan:Yeah. That's very true. I want to talk about the growth of the newsletter. I was reading something, which I realized later was back in 2014, that you were at around 160,000 subscribers. I imagine it's quite a bit larger than that now. And then I'd love to hear some of the inflection points of growth.[00:35:35] Dave:Yeah, I'm not, I'm not sure. I might've, I don't know if I lied in 2014, but now I have about,[00:35:41] Nathan:Quoted it wrong.[00:35:42] Dave:No, you might've got it right. I might've exaggerated. Maybe that was a including app downloads and a few other things. Yeah. I have about 140,000 or so now, so that would be making that a pretty horrible seven years now.You're depressing me.Your listeners should just stop, stop writing newsletters. It's not worth the depression[00:36:02] Nathan:Just give up now[00:36:03] Dave:Yeah. And by all means if Nathan goals do not pick up. no, yeah, I probably have it 140,000 on newsletter. Made my newsletter. It's hard to believe in this era of newsletters actually, but when I first launched Next Draft, I noticed that even people who would send in testimonials or that I would ask for testimonials would say, basically something to the extent that even though email is horrible, this is the one newsletter I I'd sign up for whatever.And I kept thinking, man, that's a bummer that I'm starting out at this deficit, that people have a negative feeling about the medium. So I, since then I've always made it my goal to. Have the content available wherever people are. So the newsletter is certainly the main way that people get next job, but there's an app for the iPhone and the iPad there.That's the first thing I launched because I wanted to have an alternative for people who just hate email too much. So now you go to the landing page, it's like, Hey, if you don't like email, here's another version. I have a blog version. I have an apple news version. I have an RSS version. I'm lucky enough to have a really good, WordPress custom WordPress install that I just push one button and it pushes it out to all of those things.But I am, I'm a big proponent of just meeting people where they are. even, as an example, I recently launched a sort of a substance. Version of my newsletter under the radar. but when I redo my site, I'm going to make that more clear because if people already subscribed to like 10 sub stacks and they're using their aggregator and they already have their email saved and they can just click a button, it's like, I don't care.You know, it takes me five extra minutes to paste my content into sub stack. So I just want the reads. I don't really care about how they read it or whether they read it.[00:37:55] Nathan:Yeah. That's fascinating. So then let's shift gears a little bit. I want to hear about the book. first I wanna hear about the title. Would you have it on your shirt?[00:38:03] Dave:Yeah. That's pretty embarrassing. I swear. I didn't know it was video today, but I do have a shirt[00:38:06] Nathan:You're good.[00:38:07] Dave:Otherwise I wouldn't have worn. This would have worn my Nathan Barry's shirt.[00:38:12] Nathan:That's right. It's in the mail actually. It's[00:38:15] Dave:Oh, good, good.[00:38:16] Nathan:Big photo of my face.[00:38:17] Dave:Yeah. Convert kit. My wife converted to Judaism before we got married. So I have my own convert kit.[00:38:23] Nathan:There you go. Exactly. so I want to hear like what the book is about and then particularly where the title came from,[00:38:30] Dave:Sure.[00:38:31] Nathan:It made me laugh a lot when I heard it.[00:38:33] Dave:Oh, cool. That's good. That's a good start then. yeah, the title comes from, in July of the, of 2020 when the pandemic was really setting in and becoming a reality for everybody. this amusement park outside of Tokyo in the shadow of Mount Fuji called the Fuji queue. amusement park reopened.And they found that even though everybody w everybody was wearing masks, people were screaming so much on some of the rides, especially the Fujiyama roller coaster, which was their scariest ride, that they were worried about germs spread. So they sort of put signs around the amusement park saying, no screaming, you can come, you can ride and have fun, but keep your mask on adults scream.And it sort of became a little minor social media thing in Japan, where people were sort of making fun of them like, oh, they're telling us not to scream. How can anybody not scream on the Fujiyama roller coaster? So in response, the, park management had to have their executives with perfectly quaffed hair and tie and colored shirts and masks on ride the roller coaster with a webcam facing them the whole time without moving a muscle.Cracking a smile or grimacing or screaming. And then at the end of the ride, when the rollercoaster stops, it says, please Scream Inside Your Heart.And that was always my favorite meme of, 2020. It went really viral. There was like t-shirts. aside from mine, there were posters memes. It sort of went crazy for about a week or two, which by 2020 standards is a pretty long time for a meme to last.And I just thought that made sense as a title for the book, because that's sort of how we felt, all year that I dunno if we were screaming in our heart, but we were certainly screaming into a void. Like no matter what we sat or yelled on social media or complained to our family members or friends, it just kept getting worse.The year just kept getting worse. And, so the idea is that this book sort of, now you're free to sort of let out the scream. And the book is it's about 2020, certainly, but it's really about the issues that led us to 2020. There's a ton about our relationship to media and including my own relationship to media and how that got us into trouble.Some of the stuff we're talking about today, how, technology has impacted our lives stuff. I've been sort of thinking about it, writing about for the last few decades, and a lot of the political hate that emerged. and, but it's all within this time capsule of the craziest year.[00:41:12] Nathan:Yeah. Yeah. And so that's coming out early in November, November 2nd. so you're, it looks like you're just starting the, you know, mentioning the promotion tour and all of that. is there a big, big push that comes with it or are you kind of, I, I'm always curious with people's book launches, what strategy they take.[00:41:30] Dave:Yeah. I mean, I'm a newbie, so it's, the whole process has been interesting to me working with a publisher, working with others, is not my forte. so I got used to that or I'm getting used to that and they're probably getting used to it also because working with grouchy 50 something in these is probably not ideal, but, yeah, I've just been promoting it so far in Next Draft, but I've been doing, I have a PR company that's helping me and I've been doing a ton of podcasts and I'm marketing it to my own readers.And then as it gets a little bit closer to the November 2nd date, I have a lot more stuff planned rut, a lot of influencers have early copies of the book, and hopefully they'll promote it. And, I'll call out a few favors from bloggers and hopefully newsletter writers. I feel like that should be my in theory.That should be my secret weapon because, in addition to being fun and creative, nothing moves traffic, except maybe Facebook, nothing moves traffic more than newsletters. I know a lot of people who run e-commerce companies and newsletters are always second, if not first, in terms of traffic drivers.So, I really think that, if some of my friends out there at morning brew in the hustle and the scam and all these other sites that sort of, have surpassed my size by quite a bit, put the word out that, one of their fellow warriors is, has a book out. That'll probably move the needle even more. The media, I'm hoping to get stuff like that, but I really don't know. I'm trying not to get my hopes up too much because, unlike a newsletter, it's not just one day's work, you know, you like worry about one word or one sentence in a book for like three weeks and then you put it out there and people are like, oh yeah, I'll check it out sometime.Thanks. So, you know, that's, you know, whatever that's life as a, you put yourself out there, that's how it goes. So I'm hoping it sells well. And, the more people that get it, I think some people, their first reaction is, oh my God, 2020. I don't want to relive that again. But, hopefully people who know my brand and those that they share it with, know that it's, you know, there's a lot of humor and there's, it's probably 30 pages before we even get into the first event of 2020.So it's, there's a lot more to it and it's sort of fun and crazy and tries to have the pace of a roller coaster. that was the other thing I took from the Fujiyama roller coaster.[00:43:59] Nathan:Yeah. So one thing that I'm always curious about with people who have like a prolific newsletter, you know, in your case of writing every day, and then like, for a lot of people, that would be a lot to handle of staying on top of a daily newsletter. And then you're writing a book on top of that. How did you schedule your time?Were you blocking off like, oh, these afternoons are specifically for book, book writing. Cause you turned it around relatively fast.[00:44:24] Dave:Yeah. the newsletter is sort of like a full-time job. People always ask me, you know, when do you work on, or how many hours do you spend on it? I mean, I'm, I'm always looking for news, whether it's on Twitter or friends, emailing me stuff or texting me stories, or just in conversations with people to see what they're into or what stories are interesting them or what I'm missing.In terms of actual time spent like where I'm dedicating time. I probably do like about an hour every night, because the story has changed so quick. So I'll do an hour of looking for stories every night. And then the next day I sort of lock in from about nine to one, usually, or nine to 12, where I'm finding stories, saving those stories, choosing what stories I want to go with and then actually writing the newsletter.All of that takes about anywhere from like two and a half to four hours, depending on the day I go pretty fast. When it came to the book, that was tricky. It was actually more emotionally tricky because like I said before, I was like, had to go back and write about, you know, Briana Taylor while I'm living another horrible act, you know, or even more so the Trump, you know, one crazy Trump thing and another crazy Trump thing and seeing the pandemic getting worse and worse.So that was stressful. But I found at the beginning I would try to write a lot at night and that was okay. But I found actually if I just kept going, in the day when I was already rolling and had written the newsletter and I was already in the group just to add on an hour or two to that was actually easier and more effective for me than trying to get going.But that's just me. I mean, I just go by my it's almost like my circadian rhythm or something like that, I almost never eat or consume anything before I'm done with next job except for coffee. I would keep that going, you know, once I would like, sort of have a sandwich or whatever, then it's like, oh, let me just take a quick nap and then whatever.So, yeah, I tried to just keep it going. I always find the more consistently busy I am, the less I procrastinate. And if I take a day off or I take a few hours off, even then, between writing, it just, it takes me longer to get going.[00:46:37] Nathan:Yep. That makes sense. The habit that I'm in right now is starting the day with 45 minutes to an hour of writing and that's working much better for me than like slotting it in somewhere else. So I think like w what I hear you saying is like, experiment and find the thing that works well for you.[00:46:54] Dave:Yeah. I mean, if you're going to start experimenting almost every writer, I know not like newsletter writers, but just general writers, all do what you just described. They sort of pick a time in the morning and they get their output done. then the rest of the day, if ideas come to them or whatever, they jot it down, but they're sort of powering in that morning hours.[00:47:13] Nathan:Yeah.[00:47:14] Dave:That's probably a good one to try. Although, you know, some people just do it better at different hours. I'm sure.[00:47:19] Nathan:Yeah. another thing I realized, I've always you for years, and until we got on this video call, I had no idea what you looked like. and which is kind of an interesting,[00:47:28] Dave:Well, I'm sorry.It's by design. I have a face for Panda.[00:47:32] Nathan:Tell me more about, well, I guess two sides, one, has there ever been an interesting interaction? You know, because you're like, Hey, I'm, I'm Dave and people are like, I wouldn't have ever recognized you. Or has there been any other benefits and thought behind, you know, why it have an avatar?[00:47:49] Dave:If by interesting you mean horrible? Yes. There's been many interesting interactions with people. I mean, before, before I had my current, avatar, which is, pretty awesome, actually, a guy named Brian Molko designed it. I had this incredible drawing of a character that looked like me that, had sort of ether net, Machinery and cord going into his head and it was like me, but my head was actually lifted.The top of my head was lifted off and you could see all this machinery and it was an incredible graphic, by this guy named Sam Spratt. Who's now done, album covers and book covers. He's like a super talent. If you want to follow somebody fun on Instagram, he's just incredible. And it was a drawing, even though it looked photo realistic.And I used that for a while and then I would go places and people would be like, you are so much fatter and grayer than I imagined. And so instead of having Sam sort of ruin his artwork, I went back with the more, cartoonish or animated, avatar. So since then I don't get too much of that, but, that was a good move.Although that's the best thing about avatars and the internet is that your avatar never ages. It always looks the same. It stays the same weight. My avatar never overeats he exercises right here. Angie really gets along well with others and doesn't have any kind of social anxiety either. So he's pretty cool.Yeah, it goes a little downhill with me in person. So[00:49:21] Nathan:Yeah. So is it, that's something that like, it gives you some distance between you and readers, or it gives you some anonymity that, you know, you don't want to be recognized in the streets?[00:49:32] Dave:No, no, it's, it's, basically just what I described. It's like, I literally prefer the, the attractiveness of my avatar versus me, but also actually my avatar is really awesome. my logo, so it's also iconic and scalable. so it looks awesome on t-shirts even people who don't know what Next Draft is when they see, by son wearing his t-shirt, whatever, it just looks awesome.So that that's that's as much of it as anything. I thought your response was going to be mad. You seem perfectly attractive to me. I don't know what the issue is, but no, you went with, am I doing that for some other reason? Yeah. So, I get this all the time.Cause my wife is a very attractive person also. So when people meet me, they're always like, whoa, we were once a very famous celebrity came up to me and I said, oh, I'm Gina's husband. And she was like, wow, you did well. Oh, you know? So I'm like, thanks a lot. That helps. So just gave her a picture of my, my icon and walked away.[00:50:31] Nathan:Then that worked. I'm sure that she has it framed in her office, from now on. it's just interesting to me. You're you're sort of at this intersection between personal brand and, like media brand. And I think the avatar helps push you over into the media brand side. and I don't have any real commentary on it other than I find it interesting.[00:50:53] Dave:Yeah, no, I think there probably is some of that. I I've never really been a fan of using my actual face, or my actual person as a logo. I love the process of designing or working with people to design logos and taglines and all that. But yeah, probably at some point there was a, a goal with Next Draft to make it seem bigger than it is.I know a lot of people that are solo operators. They regularly say we, when they're talking about their brand to make it seem bigger, I actually think that's sort of been flipped on its head though. in the last few years where so many people are coming into the space, it's very clear that what they're doing is leaving a big brand, leaving a we and going to an eye.And I think it's actually a selling point in a lot of ways. So, I mean, I, I still get a lot of emails that say, I don't know if anybody at Next Draft is going to read this email, you know, or if you do, can you get this message to Dave? He's an asshole or whatever. And it's like, I'm the only one here, you know, or the other one I always get is when I email back to people that go, oh, I can't believe you actually emailed back.I didn't think this would get to anybody. It's like, you hit reply. And it had my email, like where else would it go? Exactly. You know? But I think actually having people thinking of you as a person, instead of a brand, Is a benefit today. Whereas if you would ask me when I was younger, I probably would have said, make it seem like you have a big company behind you.[00:52:24] Nathan:Yeah. And I think that that indie shift overall, like people are looking for that.[00:52:29] Dave:Yeah,[00:52:29] Nathan:Want to ask about the intersection between your investing and the newsletter. like, are you still actively investing today and doing author.[00:52:38] Dave:Yeah, yeah, no, I, I still invest a ton. I usually follow along with people who are a little more in tune with today's companies than I am. I don't really go out there and brand myself as an investor much, but I've been really lucky. I have very little intersection actually, if any, with my newsletter and my investing and I definitely want people to. To think of me as a writer first, for sure. Not as an investor who has this hobby, because that's definitely not in terms of time or passion, the reality. but I've been really lucky over the years that, I've invested with people or co-invested with them that were cool with me. branding myself as a writer first, but still looking at deals that came through their brands because they were branded as BCS or investors or angels.That's probably a bigger deal now than when I first started. There were like five angel investors, basically. Nobody really did small, early stage seed deals. you know, I mean, we all knew each other that did it and now there's like thousands of them. So you really have to be either a really pretty well-known entrepreneur or you have to. Sort of attach yourself to our organization or two who are really branding themselves well, getting out there and building a stable of companies,[00:53:58] Nathan:Yeah.[00:53:59] Dave:It's pretty different, more, much more has changed about that than the newsletter game, actually, which is pretty much the same as it was the day I started actually.[00:54:07] Nathan:Are there a few of those I'm curious who are a few of those, people that you would tag along with, you know, when they're investing where like, oh, this person puts money into something I'd like to be right there with them.[00:54:19] Dave:I mean, I have some people that are like entrepreneurs and former entrepreneurs that do it, and if they like it I'll do it. but generally I co-invest with, at any given time, a different group of people, used to be a larger group. When I first started out, my whole investing career, I've co-invested with this guy named Bob zip who's much smarter and much wiser than I am about all things business and.Startup world. So that was really great. And he used to work at a company called venture law group in the first boom, and they represented Google, Hotmail. eGroups all the big, huge, early internet companies, and so he really knew the space well. And when he became, I used to get deals from him.That's how you used to get deals actually was by a couple of law firms that focused on startups. I've been co-investing with him all along and he's been generous enough to, he left the law firm a long, long time ago and became an investor primarily. And he had a fund and was well-known guy and well-respected guy.So I got to sit in when he would hear pitches. and we sort of, we weren't investing together out of the same fund, but we would sort of make our decisions together. And we still do that a lot. these days, I almost always follow along with a guy named run-on barn Cohen and a really good friend of mine.He was for many years at WordPress, basically, most of the things that make money at WordPress, he did. and now he's a investor at a VC called resolute. If anybody's looking for a good VC, he's like incredible, like Bob zip much, much smarter than I am about this stuff. Unbelievably ethical, great business sense.Great technical sense. so I mostly just follow him. So if he does something that's usually good enough for me. And if I see something that I think it's good, I'll pass it along to him, but it's mostly that, but I've been really fortunate. I can't express that enough, that I've been able to invest in companies without having to spend all of my time, branding myself as an investor.That's just been unbelievably lucky. So, I've been able to focus a ton of my energy on my six.[00:56:31] Nathan:That's right. I'm writing a newsletter about the news. I guess, as you're looking to grow and continue on, right? Like the next phase of readers and, and all of that, since we can just say directly that we're all narcissists and we do this for the attention. what's what's sort of that next thing that you're looking for, it's going from 140,000 subscribers to say 200,000 and beyond.[00:56:54] Dave:Yeah, well, I'm, I'm hoping that, I'm not just trying to sell my book here. I'm hoping that the book and the newsletter will sort of have, a coexistence with them because the new the book is really an extension of the brand and the brand is that icon to Next Draft. So I'm hoping that the tricky part about writing about marketing a newsletter, like we discussed earlier, there's not really a natural virality to them.So. You Have this piecemeal growth from people telling each other or their friends or forwarding it to somebody or maybe occasionally tweeting or sharing a Facebook link. Oh, you should check this out. But it's all sort of small little blips. If you get a news story or a big blog story about it, or another newsletter recommending you, that's probably the fastest way people grow these days is by, co-sponsoring each other's newsletters or co-promoting them.Those big hits are more rare and they usually require like, I've had a ton of stories written about Next Draft, but most of them a long time ago, because it's basically a similar product to what it was when they wrote about it the first time. So they're like, Hey, I'd love to write about it, but what's the hook.What's the new thing, you know? so I'm hoping that the book provides that emphasis. It's like, we're doing now a ton of people who may by either been on a podcast in the past, or they've wanted to do a podcast with me say, okay, now's a great time. I'd probably want to move your book and, we can set something up.So it's sort of as an impetus. So I'm hoping that that will be the next big newsletter thing that most, most people who write about the book will also write about the newsletter and the two things can sort of grow together.[00:58:35] Nathan:I think that's spot on.[00:58:36] Dave:That's in terms of, you know, marketing and promotion, otherwise, I do want to try, one of these referral programs because people definitely do like products.And, I am lucky that my icon looks really good on shirts so that people actually really want them. And I have a great designer named Brian Bell who makes all of my shirts.[00:58:58] Nathan:There's something like when creators thinking about products, often if you spread yourself too thin, you're like into the newsletter, the book, the podcast, and like the 14 other things that you could make all at once you sort of hinder the growth of each thing, but then if you really build one of them up to a significant level, then at that point it can start to stall out and by shifting to another medium or have it like launching another product in this case, the newsletter to a book, then that book can have a bunch more momentum that feeds back into it.And so there's just sort of this interesting balance of like, no, When to like, keep pushing on the thing that you have versus when to add the next thing that like, then they feed off of each other and go from there. So I think you're doing it with good timing.[00:59:45] Dave:Hopefully it'll work. All that kind of stuff is the tricky part of doing this stuff. Especially stuff like podcasts and newsletters that are—it's really a ton of word of mouth, unless you get lucky and get some press, and word of mouth is just slow.There's some point where you're going to hit a tipping point where you're going to go from five or 10,000 to like 50,000 much quicker, more quickly because instead of three people going home and saying, “Hey, did you ever hear of this newsletter?” there's like 30 people going home and saying that. But, even with that they hit a plateau, and then you figure out what's the next thing. That's why doing something you're into is so important.And I don't think it's bad to try those other mediums or stretch yourself out, because you never know you might've been writing a newsletter three years, and then you do a podcast and it catches on. For some reason, you're like awesome. Less typing, more talking, let's go. So, but it's tricky. I wish I was better and had better advice for people on promotion and marketing.I'm not awesome at it, and it's not in my nature. So, begging for favors or telling people, even in my own newsletter, to buy my own book is very painful for me. I'm very sensitive to criticism about it. So, if people just all bought it and then made everybody else buy it, that would be a huge relief for me.[01:01:13] Nathan:That would be great. Well, along those lines, where should people go to subscribe to the newsletter, and then follow you on your preferred channel, and then ultimately buy the book?[01:01:24] Dave:I don't want like two or 300,000 people taking my site down. So let's go with if your last name starts between A and M you can start by going to NextDraft.com and sign up for the newsletter there. Or, you can also just go to the App Store and search for Next Draft. If you're N through Z, you can start with the book, and that's at: PleaseScream.com.It has links to all the various audio, and Kindle, and hardcover versions.[01:01:50] Nathan:That's good. I liked how you split the traffic, that way there's no hug of death, and we'll do well there.[01:01:57] Dave:I don't want to get fireballed.[01:01:58] Nathan:That's right.Dave. Thanks for coming on. This was really fun.[01:02:01] Dave:Yeah, thanks a lot for having me.

The Shift with Doug McKenty
The Shift Episode 94: On Racism and Politics with Niko House

The Shift with Doug McKenty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 101:28


Enjoy this 94th episode of The Shift where host Doug McKenty has that "uncomfortable conversation" about race with Niko House, host of the MCSC Network. Listen in as they discuss their different perspectives on race based on lived experience and very different cultural backgrounds. Finally, a mature conversation between persons of disparate racial identities that includes the root causes of racism, its apparent reemergence in the age of Trumpism, diversity vs. assimilation, and posits potential solutions to the problem. Go to www.rokfin.com/niko to find all episodes of Mi Casa Su Casa and the MCSC Network. Find out more about The Shift, sign up for the newsletter and find hours of free content at www.theshiftnow.com Go to https://theshiftnow.com/subscribe/ to gain access to feature-length versions of the episodes for just $6/month. Or click https://bit.ly/3nlIIQl to make a one-time PayPal donation of any amount. Thanks for listening!!

The Radical Secular
64: Trumpism of the '80s in Yonkers, NY

The Radical Secular

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 101:44


Trumpism of the '80s in Yonkers, NY (00:00) Intro and T-shirts. News segment: (05:42) Covid madness. The Herman Cain Award. ICU vigilantes. (15:04) The GOP Arizona "Fraudit" shows an even bigger win for Biden. (26:25) China's crypto ban, and the horror of Chinese authoritarianism. (35:29) David Simon threatens to pull his next series from Texas over the state's abortion law. (41:13) The tragic heroin overdose of Michael K. Williams. A discussion of David Simon's "Show Me A Hero" episodes 3 and 4: (49:41) Spoiler alert! Plot discussion follows. (53:59) A discussion of the characters, the NIMBYism, violent demonstrations and attacks on the Yonkers city council and the Mayor was an early example of 1980's Trumpism. Same arguments, same tactics, same rhetoric. Willingness of the City of Yonkers to shut itself down and harm its white residents, to avoid building low income public housing. (01:03:30) The battle between Mayor Wasicsko and Councilman Spallone mirrors the modern battles with Trumpism. Pandering to white rage. The lack of collegiality between Democrats and Republicans. (01:09:24) The Billie Rowan character. Black people's need to walk on eggshells around white people. (01:19:39) The Mary Dorman character. Her evolution from rabid Trumper-Karen type, to her acceptance of the housing plan and the new residents. (01:27:00) There's some difficult portrayals of the struggles and behavior of the black residents of the projects. Discussion of whether there was any truth to the white Yonkers residents concerns? (01:34:20) Discussion of the ending music montage. (01:38:41) Wrapup and Outro. ________________________________________ Show notes: https://www.hbo.com/show-me-a-hero (Show Me A Hero) _________________________________________ https://www.patreon.com/theradicalsecular (Patreon) https://www.theradicalsecular.com/ (Website) Email: theradicalsecular@gmail.com Instagram: @radical_secular https://www.facebook.com/theradicalsecular (Facebook) Twitter: @RadicalSecular https://the-radical-secular.captivate.fm/ (Podcast) All standard podcast venues: Apple, Google, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon, Gaana, Saavn

Heartland POD
Stuck In The Middle With Blue - w/ @JennaForMO (twitter)Jenna Roberson, Dem. candidate for MO State Senate, Dist. 2

Heartland POD

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 88:31


Opening Statement - 4min 15 secLet's Have A Chat: Jenna Roberson, Dem. candidate for MO State Senate, 2nd Dist. - 8min 50 secTalkin' Politics -40 minTrue or False: Liz Cheney will run for President, in 2024?ACLU of MO steps in on law suit against MO AGArizona “Audit” results are inColorado 3rd Dist. is interesting with Boebert at riskAn interesting Jan. 6th charge comes outDemocratic turmoil on capitol hill with $3.5 Trillion plan and bipartisan bill fightLast Call - 1hr 15 minTrumpism moving forward, good for the GOP or nah?NOTESACLU Steps In On Schmitt Vanity Suithttps://missouriindependent.com/2021/09/24/columbia-schools-ask-judge-to-dismiss-missouri-ag-lawsuit-seeking-to-block-mask-rule/Arizona “audit” results are in - for some reason they were not covered on Foxhttps://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/sep/24/republican-audit-arizona-bigger-lead-bidenhttps://missouriindependent.com/2021/09/24/arizona-audit-finds-joe-biden-won-by-more-votes-no-evidence-of-fraud/https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/sarahmimms/biden-won-arizona-trump-new-auditColorado - Interesting redistricting https://coleg.maps.arcgis.com/apps/View/index.html?appid=0b888c6a81cf455ba5f44251e590fc00Lauren Boebert - Currently the 3rd district in CO - huge district of Western COSprings from no whereLots of finance questionsJust introduced article of impeachment against Biden, sort of her brandhttps://www.denverpost.com/2021/09/22/lauren-boebert-rent-utilities-campaign-finance/An interesting Jan 6th perpetrator chargedhttps://www.cnn.com/2021/09/23/politics/freedomworks-capitol-riot/index.html

The Ezra Klein Show
Opinion Crossover: California Republicans, Facebook and Media Navelgazing

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 34:59


Today, we're doing something a little different. Instead of a normal interview, we wanted to let you in on a special round table discussion I recently had with my fellow Opinion Audio hosts: Jane Coaston of “The Argument” and Kara Swisher of “Sway.” We discuss California's recall election, the future of the Republican Party, the recent “Facebook Files” revelations, the case for and against breaking up Big Tech, why so many Americans distrust the media and much more. So enjoy! And remember to subscribe to “Sway” and “The Argument” wherever you get your podcasts.Mentioned: “Gavin Newsom Is Much More Than the Lesser of Two Evils” by Ezra Klein“How California conservatives became the intellectual engine of Trumpism” by Jane Coaston “The Facebook Files” Book recommendations: The Fall of Berlin 1945 by Anthony BeevorFuzz by Mary RoachThis is Your Mind On Plants by Michael PollanThe Grace of Kings by Ken LiuYou can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld, audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

The David Pakman Show
9/20/21: 2nd Trump Riot Fortunately Fails, But 2022 Ramps Up

The David Pakman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 56:42


--On the Show: --The possible second Trump riot in Washington DC fortunately failed to become much of anything, with only a few dozens protesters showing up, dramatically outnumbered by members of the media covering the event --Is the influence of Trumpism evaporating, as we saw a devastating loss for Trumpist California Gubernatorial recall candidate Larry Elder, and a total failure for almost anyone to show up to the "Justice for J6" rally in Washington DC this weekend? --US CENTCOM Commander General Kenneth McKenzie admits that the recent drone strike in Afghanistan killed civilians, not terrorists, and apologizes --Unhinged Newsmax host Grant Stinchfield melts down when a veteran tries to blame Trump for the chaos in Afghanistan, cutting him off and screaming at the camera --Tucker Carlson praises a deranged anti-vaccine meltdown by his guest, comedian Jim Breuer, who even barked like a seal during the Fox News segment --Radical Republican Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene publishes fascist propaganda as her 2022 campaign ad --Confused radical Trumpist Congressman Madison Cawthorn says it is "illegal" for airlines to require vaccinations --Voicemail caller explains that a fellow social studies teacher in his school was caught playing "Prager U" videos for his classroom, until a student complained --On the Bonus Show: Poverty fell in 2020 thanks to stimulus checks and unemployment assistance, Walmart and Ford team up on self-driving delivery, Beto O'Rourke preparing to run for Texas Governor, much more... ⚕️ Get 50% off your first month of SteadyMD at https://steadymd.com/pakman

The Chauncey DeVega Show
Ep. 342: Donald Trump is Not Going Away -- No Matter How Much You Wish He Would

The Chauncey DeVega Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 77:01


Dr. Mary Trump is a clinical psychologist and businesswomen. She is also Donald Trump's niece. She is the author of the bestselling book Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man. Her new book is The Reckoning: Our Nation's Trauma and Finding a Way to Heal. Mary Trump explains why so many Americans are still in deep denial about Donald Trump's enduring power and his ability to cause destruction and other harm to American society and the world. She warns that such denials and related fantasies about Donald Trump and his fascist movement somehow just “disappearing” or “going away” are a function of naivete and childish thinking rooted in fear, immaturity, and not reality. Mary Trump also details how white privilege and denial and trauma have all come together in this moment to prevent an effective response to Trumpism, the Jim Crow Republicans, and American fascism more generally. She warns that yes, Donald Trump and his followers do indeed want to physically hurt (and worse) those Americans and others they identify as the enemy. Chauncey DeVega explains that America's political elites on both sides of the aisle knew for a long time that Donald Trump represented an existential threat to American society per the “revelations” in Bob Woodward's new book Peril – yet, with few exceptions, they chose to be quiet and not warn the American people and the world. And Chauncey DeVega reviews several new movies including Flag Day, The Eyes of Tammy Faye, The Card Counter, and Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings. SELECTED LINKS OF INTEREST FOR THIS EPISODE OF THE CHAUNCEY DEVEGA SHOW Opinion: The crisis will get worse before it gets better. Are Democrats prepared? Trumpism has Entered Its Final Form Rogue general vs. rogue president: GOP cultists willing to defend Trump destroying the world Robert E. Lee and the Trumpists: Why a Confederate "hero" is still important Wendy Brown on Sheldon Wolin and Inverted Totalitarianism Trump put Milley in an Impossible Position WHERE CAN YOU FIND ME? On Twitter: https://twitter.com/chaunceydevega On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/chauncey.devega My email: chaunceydevega@gmail.com HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT THE CHAUNCEY DEVEGA SHOW? Via Paypal at ChaunceyDeVega.com Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thechaunceydevegashow Music at the end of this week's episode of The Chauncey DeVega Show is by JC Brooks & the Uptown Sound. You can listen to some of their great music on Spotify.  

No Lie with Brian Tyler Cohen
NJ Governor on his viral response to anti-vaxxers

No Lie with Brian Tyler Cohen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 39:38


A small group of centrist Democrats nearly sinks one of the most popular provisions of the Build Back Better plan. Brian interviews the governor of New Jersey, Phil Murphy, who's up for re-election this year, about his approach to COVID and what NJ is doing on voting rights in the face of so many attacks on those rights across the country. And FOX LA host Elex Michaelson joins to debrief on the California recall and what it means for Trumpism moving forward.Donate to the "Don't Be A Mitch" fund: https://secure.actblue.com/donate/dontbeamitchShop merch: https://briantylercohen.com/shopYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/briantylercohenTwitter: https://twitter.com/briantylercohenFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/briantylercohenInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/briantylercohenPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/briantylercohenNewsletter: https://www.briantylercohen.com/sign-upWritten by Brian Tyler CohenProduced by Sam GraberRecorded in Los Angeles, CASee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

5 Things
In Wyoming, Liz Cheney's House race is a bellwether for Trumpism

5 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 30:38


Earlier this month, Donald Trump took direct aim at Rep. Liz Cheney by endorsing Wyoming's Harriet Hageman in her Republican primary bid to unseat the third-term House member who supported impeaching the former president over the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.Now, the battle is on for Republican values in the state that gave Trump his biggest victory margin against Joe Biden in 2020.USA TODAY journalists Hannah Gaber and Ledyard King traveled to Wyoming earlier this summer to speak with constituents about their personal politics. They re-cap their trip for 5 Things listeners in this episode.Episode transcript linked here.Also available at art19.com/shows/5-Things.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Hartmann Report
IS THIS THE DEATH RATTLE OF TRUMPISM?

The Hartmann Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 58:07


Given the recent California election experience, how long before the GOP starts talking about compassionate conservatism again? Why isn't the media talking about the real reason Gen. Milley had to go outside normal policies to prevent Trump from starting a nuclear war? Dr. Michael Mann joins Thom to explain that climate change is coming on fast while Americans are working on it slowly. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Beat with Ari Melber
Trump's "loser mentality": MAGA embrace backfiring in California

The Beat with Ari Melber

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 43:04


MSNBC's Alicia Menendez fills in for Ari Melber and hosts "The Beat" on Wednesday, September 15, and reports on Fox News' hypocritical stance on vaccines, the failure of Trumpism in the California recall, the DOJ's efforts to fight back against Texas as the state wages war against reproductive rights and the Senate hearing on the FBI's failure to act during the Larry Nassar investigation. Civil rights attorney Nancy Erika Smith and Julián Castro join.

Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast
B.J. Novak | Trumpism Rejected in Major Landslide as Newsom Wins California Recall: A Closer Look

Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 22:11


Seth takes a closer look at Trumpism losing badly in California when Governor Gavin Newsom easily beat back a GOP-led recall effort.Then, B. J. Novak talks about The Premise, shares his opinion about short movies vs. short films and discusses his experience working with Ed Asner.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

CrabDiving Radio Podcast
CrabDiving – Wed 091521 – Sanity Won and Trumpism Lost Bigly As Gavin Newsom Easily Beat The GOP Recall

CrabDiving Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 117:11


Sanity won and Trumpism lost bigly as Gavin Newsom easily beat the GOP recall. Olympic gymnast Simone Biles called for the FBI agents who ignored her accusations against vile Larry Nassar to be indicted. North Korea tested a missile. Democrats see Trump-a-los and the unvaccinated as the biggest threat to the nation. Most Americans believe the pandemic has been hard on everyone's mental health. The Crabs reviewed the pervasive and violent gang culture infecting law enforcement, particularly in the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department. Centrist Dems backed big pharma rather than the American people after selling out to lobbyists. Philly must pay out a two million dollar settlement to a woman who was pulled from a vehicle, beaten, and then separated from her child by evil thugs-in-blue. Evangelical snowflake Greg Locke whined of persecution after the bigot was ousted from Twitter. A deviant Florida football coached bragged openly about converting players to Christianity.

All In with Chris Hayes
Why California recall was 'resounding' referendum on Trumpism, Biden

All In with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 48:23


Guests: Cal Perry, Stuart Stevens, Katie Hill, Perry Bacon, Jr., Carol Leonnig, Tonight: A complete and unmitigated disaster for Republicans in California: The recall fails, and Trumpism is defeated. Then, General Milley stands by his actions in the wake of bombshell reporting about the measures he took to protect America from Donald Trump. And we'll go live to Cape Canaveral in Florida where an historic, all civilian SpaceX launch is happening. 

Be Reasonable: with Your Moderator, Chris Paul
High, Noon for Wednesday September 15th 2021

Be Reasonable: with Your Moderator, Chris Paul

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 68:24


In today's episode: The Democrat Communist Party has reached its final form and is showing itself in all its corrupt glory! Gavin Newsom achieves an unbelievable level of support and turnout - only a million fewer votes cast than in the presidential election of 2016 Gavin won a higher percentage of the vote than either Hillary Clinton or the most popular fake president ever, Joe Biden CNN's television map expert, John King, fails to realize that 351,709 votes disappeared from the anti-communist side's total while staring at the very map he is an expert at reading California's total turnout estimate fluctuates wildly and the 'yes' vote shrinks unexplainably, but Gavin just keeps right on truckin'! The treasonous General Mark Milley releases a statement that should've simply said "GFY" The same people cheering Gavin's "win" are the ones who are justifying treason, so long as it increases their political power - very principled! Newsweek declares that Gavin has crushed Trumpism while a communist at CNN declares that Trumpism is a bacterial infection taking over the world, and that the proof is that people in countries whose elections are stolen will state the obvious truth - those bastards! Listen and support the podcast: anchor.fm/imyourmoderator Merch site: www.cancelcouture.com or shop.spreadshirt.com/cancel-couture Writing at: imyourmoderator.substack.com Follow the podcast info stream: t.me/imyourmoderator

The Betches Sup Podcast
#555 You Win Some, You Newsom

The Betches Sup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 34:33


Alise, Amanda, and Kaitlin are back to react to Governor Gavin Newsom's victory and what lessons Democrats can take into 2022. Did anyone “beat back Trumpism” and is COVID still a winning strategy? Then they break down the new voting legislation Democrats are introducing in the Senate to convince Joe Manchin that there is truly no voting rights bill Republicans will vote for.

The Radical Secular
61: Secular Left with Doug Berger

The Radical Secular

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 52:50


Secular Left with Doug Berger Happy Labor Day!! The Radical Secular team is off for the long weekend, so we bring you an encore presentation of Secular Left podcast episode 25 with Doug Berger, featuring an audio interview with The Radical Secular co-hosts Christophe Difo and Sean Prophet. (00:00) Intro. (01:41) What is The Radical Secular podcast? How did you get started? (05:28) Are you atheists, agnostics, or just secular? (07:27) Do you have an overall viewpoint for the show? (11:45) How do you feel that your first year of your show went? (18:59) Discussion and brief synopsis of The Radical Secular episode 52, "The Vile Pseudoscience of Charles Murray." Intellectual dishonesty on the right. Right wing denial that what they say, is actually what they mean. (23:52) Do you both have the same viewpoint on topics? How do you handle disagreements? Example of episode 47 of The Radical Secular, "I am Tim Scott." (30:43) Discussion on black intergroup conflict. Religion obscures power. Trumpism has laid bare that conservatism has nothing to do with small government, or individualism, but rather it's become about justifying the naked abuse of power. (36:32) Republican hypocrisy about the January 6, 2021 insurrection. (39:59) Trumpers just want to be able to get away with bad behavior. They obfuscate the outcomes of their policies. (41:25) Synopsis of the book "The Sum of Us," by Heather McGhee. (46:27) Why you should watch / listen to The Radical Secular. (51:00) Wrapup and Outro. ____________________________ Show notes: https://www.secularleft.us/ (Secular Left, A Podcast supporting strict government secularism and social justice) ____________________________ https://www.patreon.com/theradicalsecular (Patreon) https://www.theradicalsecular.com/ (Website) Email: theradicalsecular@gmail.com Instagram: @radical_secular https://www.facebook.com/theradicalsecular (Facebook) Twitter: @RadicalSecular https://the-radical-secular.captivate.fm/ (Podcast) All standard podcast venues: Apple, Google, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon, Gaana, Saavn

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes
The War on Terror with Spencer Ackerman

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 52:45


Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Spencer Ackerman joins to discuss catalysts for the War on Terror, inflection points, recent developments in Kabul, and the role of U.S. hegemony in continued global combat. Ackerman also talks about his new book, “Reign of Terror: How the 9/11 Era Destabilized America and Produced Trump,” which tells the story of how the weaponized bigotry that fueled the war on terror after 9/11 created the conditions for Trumpism and increased threats to American democracy.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Matters of Policy & Politics: America After The Trump Presidency (#293)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021


Donald Trump's gone (from office) but not forgotten as many of the elements that contributed to his political ascent – immigration, overseas entanglements, cultural divide – are as potent as ever. Victor Davis Hanson, the Hoover Institution's Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow, discusses Trump's presence in the political landscape and the prospects of “Trumpism” […]

Area 45
America After The Trump Presidency

Area 45

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 68:36


Donald Trump's gone (from office) but not forgotten as many of the elements that contributed to his political ascent – immigration, overseas entanglements, cultural divide – are as potent as ever. Victor Davis Hanson, the Hoover Institution's Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow, discusses Trump's presence in the political landscape and the prospects of “Trumpism” beliefs moving forward.

The Bob Cesca Show
Land War In Asia

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 67:11


[Explicit Content] Late start for the show today -- we apologize for the inconvenience. There's a guy threatening to blow up three city blocks in DC today. The suspect is a white Trump supporter who thinks Trump will pardon him. Ron and Jim Watkins and Donald Trump made this. The latest on the Afghanistan withdrawal. Nikki Haley is a soulless automaton. Great news about jobs. Trump's Save America PAC grift continues. Greg Abbott tests positive for COVID. South Carolina Republican dies of COVID after criticizing masks. Trumpism in Arizona. Planet Fitness's mask policy. Ted Cruz bulk-purchases his own book. With Jody Hamilton and David TRex Ferguson. And music by Prehab and Freekbass. And more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton
How Florida Turned American Politics into a Tabloid Nightmare

Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 51:47


This week, Vanity Fair correspondent Gabriel Sherman joins cohost Joe Hagan to discuss the “Floridization” of conservative politics, from the hanging chads of the 2000 election to Trump's “Southern White House” in Palm Beach to Governor Ron DeSantis's ostensible 2024 campaign slogan, “Make America Florida.” The Hive correspondents explore the history of tabloid and conservative media in Florida and the inevitable merger of the two in the form of Trumpism, expanding and riffing on Hagan's feature in the September issue of Vanity Fair, “Postcards from the Edge." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The MeidasTouch Podcast
Defeating Trumpism in California with L.A. County Sheriff Candidate Cecil Rhambo

The MeidasTouch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 73:10


On today's episode, the brothers sit down with a very special guest, Chief Cecil Rhambo. Chief Rhambo is currently the Chief of Police at LAX and a lifelong public servant running for L.A. County Sheriff on a platform to fight for real reform and justice. During the interview, the team discusses a variety of topics including: Chief Rhambo's uniquely credentialed background and experiences, the responsibilities an officer has in 2021 and how to bridge the divide between civilian & officer. Later on, the brothers discuss the radical right's new Dr. Seuss-style attacks on the CDC, an institution trying to protect the health and well-being of Americans. The final topic of the day has the brothers reviewing the true incompetence and hypocrisy of Ron DeSantis, Ted Cruz and the rest of the GQP. If you enjoyed today's episode, please be sure to rate, review and subscribe. As always, thank YOU for listening! Shop Meidas Merch here: store.meidastouch.com

The Muckrake Political Podcast
The World's On Fire and There's Money in the Flames

The Muckrake Political Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 78:12


Jared Yates Sexton and Nick Hauselman dive into a troubling UN climate report and discuss how capitalism prevents humanity from saving itself while undermining democracy. Foreign policy expert and co-host of the American Prestige podcast Daniel Bessner stops by to chat with Jared about American empire, imperial realism, and the longterm effects of the military-industrial complex.   To gain access to the weekly Weekender episode and so much more, become a patron at http://www.patreon.com/muckrakepodcast   Also, Jared's book AMERICAN RULE: HOW A NATION CONQUERED THE WORLD BUT FAILED ITS PEOPLE is being released in paperback this September with an additional chapter analyzing January 6th, Trumpism, and the pandemic. Pre-order today.

Making Sense with Sam Harris
Ask Me Anything #17

Making Sense with Sam Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 24:16


In this episode of the podcast, Sam takes your questions. He begins by addressing the blowback that followed his previous podcast on “vaccine hesitancy” with Eric Topol. And then he answers the following questions: How can I inoculate my biracial children against identity politics? In what way is journalism broken, and how can we fix it? Have you read the research suggesting that the effects of microdosing psychedelics are indistinguishable from taking placebos? Can you comment on the degree to which Leftist political ideas have captured the Buddhist community? What should Democrats do to prevent a resurgence of Trumpism? What are the ingredients for a good life? Is it ever ethical for governments to lie to their citizens? If the present moment is all that matters, how can we plan for the future? Learning how to train your mind is the single greatest investment you can make in life. That's why Sam Harris created the Waking Up app. From rational mindfulness practice to lessons on some of life's most important topics, join Sam as he demystifies the practice of meditation and explores the theory behind it.

CounterPunch Radio
Paul Street

CounterPunch Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 65:29


This week Eric welcomes back to the show CounterPunch regular Paul Street to discuss Bidenism, Trumpism, and other contagious diseases. Paul doesn't hide his contempt for all the right people, so listen today and subscribe to CounterPunch+ where you can read all of Paul's writings. More The post Paul Street appeared first on CounterPunch.org.

CounterPunch Radio
Paul Street

CounterPunch Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 65:29


This week Eric welcomes back to the show CounterPunch regular Paul Street to discuss Bidenism, Trumpism, and other contagious diseases. Paul doesn't hide his contempt for all the right people, so listen today and subscribe to CounterPunch+ where you can read all of Paul's writings. More The post Paul Street appeared first on CounterPunch.org.

PM Mood
Post-Trump, Not Post-Trumpism

PM Mood

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 24:39


Trump may be out of office, but his impact still lingers in Washington. Support Woke AF Daily at Patreon.com/WokeAF.

Straight White American Jesus
Weekly Roundup: This is America

Straight White American Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 59:50


Brad and Dan begin with extended analysis of the testimony of the Capitol Police officers before the 1/6 committee. Their words are shocking and harrowing. They reflect on the words hurled at them that day as they were being attacked, words marked by the racism, xenophobia, Trumpism, and Christianity of the capitol rioters. They then turn to the explicit Christian nationalism of the rioters. This leads Dan to comment on how "religions are what religions do." There is no calling them insurrectionists not real Christians. We have to face up to the fact that some people of faith think their faith teaches them to raise gallows with the words "God Bless America" and attack the Capitol. This leads Brad to reflect on how what is happening is myth making in real time--a revival of the Lost Cause and the denial of reality right in front of us. They finish with a segment on the renewed attempt to overturn Roe v. Wade. Extended Segment: The Delta Variant and Binary Thinking Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Michael Steele Podcast
The Jumbotron Of Truth: With Guest Rick Tyler

The Michael Steele Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 63:09


Michael speaks with Rick Tyler. The pair discuss the Republican party's failure to respond to the January insurrection, the reasons for Trumpism, and more.

The Stuttering John Podcast
The Stuttering John Podcast-July 27th, 2021-Craig Unger Farron Cousins

The Stuttering John Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 126:30


John interviews Author of American Kompromat Craig Unger & Ring Of Fire Host Farron Cousins as we continue to defeat Trumpism. Please donate through Superchats or directly here: paypal.me/JohnMelendezInc.

The Charlie Kirk Show
What the Future of the Conservative Movement Should Look Like—LIVE from the Trump 'Rally for Election Integrity'

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 29:43


Just minutes before President Trump took the stage in his first post-presidency rally in Arizona, Charlie delivered a barnburner of a speech to over 6,000 people packed inside the Arizona Federal Theater in which he laid out the enduring appeal of Trumpism and why it represents the only real path forward for the conservative movement. He makes some bold statements surrounding mandatory vaccinations, masks, and what should be done with Dr. Fauci when it's all said and done. Additionally, in a preview of what the president would go on to cover for over two hours in his own speech, Charlie cites some of the most egregious examples of alleged voter fraud, tampering in our elections, and why the grassroots work of the patriots running the Arizona Audit is so important. Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Chauncey DeVega Show
Ep. 338: Anthea Butler Explains That White Christianity Cannot be Properly Separated From The Realities of White Supremacy

The Chauncey DeVega Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 74:15


Anthea Butler is the author of the new book White Evangelical Racism. She is also Chair of Religious Studies and Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Her essays and other writing have also appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, CNN, NBC, and The Guardian. Professor Butler explains why it is impossible to properly understand White (American) Christianity as something separate and apart from White supremacy. She also details the role of White Christianity (specifically White Evangelicalism) in the horrible events of Jan. 6 and Trumpism more generally. And Professor Butler warns that when White Christians and other elements of the White Right threaten to engage in terrorism and other forms of political violence they should be taken very seriously. Such violence in not “metaphorical”, it is very real. Chauncey DeVega reflects on the new “revelations” from the book “I Alone Can Fix It” about the Trump regime's evil deeds and then offers some advice – one simple and basic truth -- that will help the American people and others who are combating fascism and its associated malignant reality and sadopolitics. SELECTED LINKS OF INTEREST FOR THIS EPISODE OF THE CHAUNCEY DEVEGA SHOW Two men charged in alleged scheme to attack Democratic headquarters in Sacramento inspired by Trump defeat, DOJ says ‘Right-Wing Death Squad': Active-Duty Marine Plotted to Bomb DNC, Murder Black People, Feds Say 'Trump is unique on the right': New study reveals the key features of the ex-president's appeal to his voters Certified Loser Donald Trump Is Rebranding MAGA as a Full-On Cult Why the revelations about Trump and the Kremlin are true (even if the documents are fake) Donald Trump's military coup didn't (quite) happen — but it was much closer than we knew WHERE CAN YOU FIND ME? On Twitter: https://twitter.com/chaunceydevega On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/chauncey.devega My email: chaunceydevega@gmail.com HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT THE CHAUNCEY DEVEGA SHOW? Via Paypal at ChaunceyDeVega.com Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thechaunceydevegashow Music at the end of this week's episode of The Chauncey DeVega Show is by JC Brooks & the Uptown Sound. You can listen to some of their great music on Spotify.

The Bulwark Podcast
David Frum: Should We Call It Fascism?

The Bulwark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 44:01


On today's podcast, David Frum and Charlie Sykes discuss the evolution of Trumpism, COVID disinformation, JD Vance, and the danger of exaggerating the China threat. Special Guest: David Frum.

The Lincoln Project
Encore Presentation: The Seven Pillars of Trumpism

The Lincoln Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 36:46


This episode was originally released on February 26, 2021. In this encore presentation, host Reed Galen is joined by Lincoln Project Senior Advisors Tara Setmayer and Stuart Stevens to discuss Sen. Ron Johnson's peddling of conspiracy theories during the Senate's first Capitol security hearing, Sen. Mitch McConnell's resistance to Speaker Nancy Pelosi's proposal of a 9/11-style commission to study the January 6th insurrection, and CPAC 2021. But first, the panel breaks down "The Seven Pillars of Trumpism" and applies the pillars to the conversation that follows.

The Lincoln Project
Running Trumpism Through the Carwash

The Lincoln Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 43:22


Host Reed Galen is joined by Ari Berman (Senior Reporter, Mother Jones & Author of Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America) to discuss Heritage Action's role in state-level anti-voting legislation, Ron DeSantis' “anti-riot” law in Florida, and the importance of working with those you may not always agree with when it comes to defending democracy.

Chapo Trap House
536 - In The Bunker (6/28/21)

Chapo Trap House

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 101:39


It's a jumbo sized Chapo today, starting with a return of our smash hit segment “Animal Facts” to start off with 20 min of levity and speculation on which of Nature's magnificent creatures are conduits to the spiritual and/or extraterrestrial world. Then, after one of Will's maybe sweatiest ever transitions, we move on to discussing the tragic Miami condo collapse and the narrowing aperture of improvement in American life. Finally, we read from two accounts of the last days of the Trump Administration, confirming a lot of what we suspected, and adding a few more juicy details of what Trump, Rudy and the gang were actually up to on Jan. 6. Also there's a little bonus segment on “Woke Capitalism” and the future of “Trumpism” as a political project at the end.

Politicology
Politicology+ is here

Politicology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2021 3:34


Part master class, part laboratory, part war room. Unlock Politicology+ now at politicology.com/plus Politicology+ members will have access to exclusive content including: Extended Weekly Roundup Episodes  TAPPED conversations with political strategists  Enemies of Democracy exposés and backstories on those keeping Trumpism alive  Round table conversations with leading experts about the most pressing issues we face today in Thought Lab episodes And, occasionally, other unannounced special content…