Podcasts about United Methodist Church

Methodist-Christian denomination that is both mainline Protestant and Evangelical

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Latest podcast episodes about United Methodist Church

Armchair Theology
Episode 108: Hosea 8-14 with Special Guest: Rev. Julie Holly

Armchair Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 47:34


Hosea begins with a somewhat demeaning view of women but ends with with God's love expressed as a mother. Huge thanks to Rev. Julie Holly for joining us today to break down this incredible book.Julie is and ordained elder in the North Alabama Conference of the United Methodist Church serving as the Chaplain and Religious Life Director at Birmingham Southern College. She's a colleague and friend and an amazing person. You can find Julie on Instagram at @JulieBHolly

Holy Conversations: The WCA Podcast
WCA Pathways Webinar: Church Starts and Restarts

Holy Conversations: The WCA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 54:57


Kenny Ott from The River Network, the Global Methodist Church's church planting partner, joined host Bob Kaylor to talk about the process of starting or restarting new GMC churches and how groups of laity and pastors can begin discerning and training for a successful launch in their communities. This is the first in a series of webinars recorded by the WCA Pathways Task Force, whose purpose is to help churches and pastors disaffected by the disaffiliation process in the United Methodist Church.  Contact The River Network for training, coaching, and consulting in planting a church in your area.  Click here to connect with Global Methodist leaders in your area. Learn about the Wesleyan Covenant Association at our website and follow the podcast on Twitter @WCAPod. 

Louisiana Now
Called to Reconciliation: Rev. Donnie Wilkinson

Louisiana Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 34:30


Rev. Donnie Wilkinson is our guest on this episode of the Louisiana NOW podcast. Donnie is a member of the Louisiana Conference Anti-Racism Taskforce. In this episode, we discuss an important book study that we are all invited to participate in.  The online book study will discuss Jonathan Augustine's book, Called to Reconciliation, and the class will meet every Wednesday in February, over Zoom. The class will be held at either 12Noon or 7:00pm.  The Noon class will be taught by Rev. Donnie Wilkinson and the link to register for that class is found here.  The 7:00pm class will be led by Jennifer Rossnagel and the link to register for that class is found here.  Wilkinson is the Senior Pastor at Broadmoor United Methodist Church in Baton Rouge, LA.  If you would like to get in touch with us here at the Louisiana NOW podcast, please send us an email: podcast@la-umc.org     

Cranford Radio
Meet the New Pastor at the Cranford United Methodist Church

Cranford Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 20:21


In July, the Cranford United Methodist Church welcomed a new pastor, Rev. Dr. HyunHui Kim.  Pastor Kim is not only the first woman to serve as pastor of CUMC, but she is also the first person of color.In this episode we learn a bit about her story from her growing up years in a suburb of Seoul to what brought her to New Jersey.

So Much More: Creating Space for God (Lectio Divina and Scripture Meditation)
Why Knowing Yourself is Essential for Rest |James Bryan Smith

So Much More: Creating Space for God (Lectio Divina and Scripture Meditation)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 29:29


You are not an accident. You did not happen by chance.Sadly, many of us believe these heartbreaking lies.The truth is: God was involved in every aspect of your creation. He knew you - and loved you - before you were even born.We need to reframe our thinking about ourselves. When we understand whom God created us to be – and when we start to grasp his love and grace – then we can live the life God is inviting us to. One that is abundant, full, and even restful.In this podcast, James Bryan Smith and I discuss how understanding the good and beautiful you we've been created to be leads to flourishing. James Bryan Smith is the author of the Good and Beautiful Series, which includes: The Good and Beautiful God, The Good and Beautiful Life, The Good and Beautiful Community, and now his new book, The Good and Beautiful You: Discovering the Person Jesus Created You to Be. He is a theology professor at Friends University in Wichita, Kansas, and is the director of the Apprentice Institute for Christian Spiritual Formation.James is also an ordained minister with the United Methodist Church and has served in various capacities in local churches. And he hosts the Things Above Podcast. Great News! You can get 30% off and free shipping on the entire Good and Beautiful series – including The Good and Beautiful You - at the link below with the code MUCHMORE until February 2, 20023https://www.ivpress.com/the-good-and-beautiful-you Some highlights from our conversation:James Bryan Smith previously thought “The Good and Beautiful” series was complete until a friend suggested he needed one more book. Hear how this happened and why James agreed with his friend.James ends each chapter with a soul-training practice. The first one is called Holy Leisure. James and I discuss why he placed this practice first and why it's a foundational practice for the concepts he unpacks in the book.We discuss the false narrative that we are an accident. James tells us what the true and biblical narrative is and why this matters so much when we are seeking to live restful lives.James says, “It's unavoidable and not a sin to want to be wanted, to love to be loved, and to desire to be desired.” We talk about this truth, why it's not narcissistic, and how these deep longings are met through our Triune God.We talk about one of my favorite subjects – the finality of the cross. James unpacks this wonderful truth for us and helps us let go of the false thinking that we must confess each and every one of our sins to be forgiven. If this is a new concept to you – listen to it multiple times. This will give you deep and lasting freedom – and that freedom will release you from much of the anxiety you might feel in your relationship with the Lord.Here's how you can connect with James Bryan Smith and listen to his podcast:Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/Official.JamesBryanSmithTwitter: https://twitter.com/jamesbryansmithPodcast: https://apprenticeinstitute.org/things-above-podcast/

Conversation Again
Hallway Conversation, Local UMC Churches

Conversation Again

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 7:05


Every local United Methodist Church faces the possibility of disaffiliation, being released from denominational ties to become an independent congregation. It wasn't a request from anyone in Charla's local church but now that the possibility exists, conversation ensues. Most of these conversations happen in the hallways as a larger forum has not yet been provided. Charla offers reflection questions at the end of the episode, hoping to contribute to more fruitful hallway conversations. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 93 – Unstoppable Unexpected Loss

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 61:22


On this special episode today, I am being interviewed by Braden Ricketts to discuss the unexpected loss of my wife Karen. After a long battle with a sore on her back, Karen passed away on November 12, 2022. I wanted to put out an episode dedicated to her memory and all the adventures we had in life together.   As I navigate life without Karen by my side, I am grateful to get to look back on all the lessons we learned from each other and all the amazing accomplishments she had in her life. Karen truly embodied the Unstoppable Mindset, and I am going to continue moving forward with her in my thoughts.   Many of you came to know Karen through our book “Thunder Dog” and saw just how important she was to me. Karen wanted a small celebration of life, but for those of you who would like to pay your respects, I will be holding a zoom call on January 28th, 2023 at 11 am (PST).   I share with Braden how Karen and I first met and fell in love, how I am processing the grief of her loss and the fear that comes along with it, and my final words to Karen. I appreciate Braden being there to support me through this conversation.   Zoom link for Karen's service: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/4158274084?pwd=SHFuSDFaamZtdjZVbEZBNEtjWUk3QT09       About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Well, hi there welcome once again to unstoppable mindset where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet and today we are absolutely dealing with unexpected. I'm your host, Mike Hingson. But I'm not doing the interview today. I get to be interviewed, and you'll find out why all that is in just a moment. Our guest interviewer is Braden Ricketts, who is part of the team that helps me in the back deal with podcast editing, and so on. He doesn't mostly do ours, but he's involved with what we do. And I even got him to commit once. And he still hasn't done it yet. But I got him to commit to letting me do a podcast interview with him. So we'll get to that. But today we have something special and a little bit more unexpected and unusual to talk about. So Braden, I'm going to turn this over to you. And thank you for being here. And welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Braden Ricketts  02:11 Michael, it's an absolute honor for me to be here for very many reasons today, especially your legend on the back end at amplify you. We talked about you all the time, you're such a force to be reckoned with. And I'm honored to be on your show with you today.   Michael Hingson  02:27 Well, it's an honor to have you here being a part of this too.   Braden Ricketts  02:31 Thank you. And speaking of honor, today, we're going to talk about a very special person whose life has come to an abrupt end. And we want to spend some time today to revisit your wife, Karen, and what she meant to you and your world and how you were processing her loss.   Michael Hingson  02:50 Well, thank you. Yeah, we lost her on November 12 of 2022. And in a way it was expected to some degree and wasn't really totally expected. She contracted a wound on her backside in July of 2022 that went all the way to the bone and she ended up being in the hospital for a month and came back very much weaker. She also had rheumatoid arthritis, which she's had for several years and she took medications for it. They were infused every month and the doctors, the physicians felt that she could not take the infusions while she had this wound, as I said that went to the bone because the infusions would further lower her immune system's ability to fight infection. And the wound that she had got infected to the bone. So they didn't want her to have any of the infusions, which caused her a lot of pain. And I think other things were going on with her in general. And so from the time she got home in late August until November, she just kept getting weaker, and she wasn't eating much. And we were all concerned and we were afraid of what was going on. And she was too. She wasn't a lot of pain, but then on November 12, that finally kind of all caught up to her and came to a head and at 1125 I remember the time well, in the morning. She she passed so it is what we have to deal with. And unfortunately, I was there with her her sister was there, our niece was there. And three other people were there. Her two caregivers Josie and Dolores were there in Jeanette, who is our housekeeper who comes in once a week. Karen and I between us don't vacuum as well as one would like. So we cheat we get somebody else to do it and Jeanette wanted to be there as well. So we all were there when we got to say goodbye to Karen which we're very grateful about and you know as I can only say the Spirit just moves faster than the body and that's what happened.   Braden Ricketts  04:58 Yeah, and not often do people have the opportunity to really say those goodbyes. So what a benefit to at least know and have the opportunity to bring people together around the unfortunate events? Well,   Michael Hingson  05:10 it was very fortunate to be able to do that. And I'm glad they were all there, they wanted to be there. And we, we had the opportunity. And for me, Karen still here. A lot of people say that about loved ones, and so on. But it's different, we would have been married 40 years on November 27. So we missed 40 years by 15 days. So as far as I'm concerned, Karen will always be here in one way or another. And I started a few times after she passed by ape saying, you know, well, we have to move on. And I realized wrong thing to say we don't move on, we move forward. But I don't want to move on, which I think almost implies, eventually just leaving her behind. And we're not going to do that we'll move forward. And she is where she is. But she will always be with me and will always be part of my memory and the memory of all of the people in our families. And you know, the other thing that that happened for me, the day after she passed, I put a note up on Facebook, just telling people about it, because I knew a lot of people who had known Karen or knew about her. And a number of people who read the Facebook post, had never met Karen, but they read our book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man and his guide dog and the triumph of trust, which was our New York Times bestseller book. And they wrote to me on Facebook, and they said, we never met Karen, but we've really got to know her in Thunder dog. And so one of the things that we're going to do is hold a zoom session on the 28th of January at 11am. Pacific time for anyone who wants to come and listen or participate. Our pastor from our church in San Marcos, California, where we lived in the early 90s is going to be there and David McKinney, my web guy who's also a pastor in San Francisco is going to be there. And anyone who wants to come is welcome to come and participate however they'd like. And the reason we're doing that, in part is that Karen did not want a large service. Her mother died in 2021, we had a good service of the large service, but it was just too sad for Karen. And so she said If anytime she passed, she didn't want a large surplus. So this past Saturday, we held a small family service for her just close members of the family and so on. And we did it at the church where her mom is buried. And we actually put Karen's ashes in with her mom. So the two of them are together because they were extremely close. And we would want to honor that. And so we did.   Braden Ricketts  07:45 I love that. I love the sentiment of moving forward not moving on. It's about developing a new relationship with that individual in a different form.   Michael Hingson  07:54 That's a good point. And you're absolutely right. That's exactly what it is.   Braden Ricketts  07:57 Yeah. Michael, I also didn't get to know Karen very well, would you like sharing a little bit about who she was in your words.   Michael Hingson  08:04 So Karen was born in 1949, and was a paraplegic from birth. So she always used a wheelchair. I think she actually got her first chair at the age of five that that she started to grow up in, but she was always in a chair. And her parents were very much the same as mine, in that they took the position that it didn't matter, that we were different. What mattered was what we learned to do, and what we decided to do with our own lives. And they gave her the opportunity and challenged her to take the opportunity to do whatever she wanted to do. So she went to regular school, there were physical challenges, because a lot of times there were steps and other things. And so she had helped with that. She took like I did, although I only had it for one year, but she was in a special PE class. And they didn't do anything in the special PE class. She played cards with another person who she developed a very close friendship with in high school. And Maria and Karen were friends for their well, for Marie's entire life she passed in I think it was early 2021 I think that Yeah, cuz COVID was was with us. So. And then, of course, Karen passed at the end of 2022. So they're probably up there laughing at us anyway, but playing cards, you got playing playing cards. Yeah, absolutely. But Karen went college at University of California, Riverside, and, again, found physical barriers to getting around and so she started to work, to get Riverside to deal with it and actually became part of the committee dealing with the International Year of the disabled that the United Nations in part sponsored but at Riverside and so on, she became very involved in that and brought about us significant amount of change. She was also very active in Campus Crusade for Christ and then the United Methodist Church. And we got married at the United Methodist Church, Irvine University Methodist Church in 1972. But she was very active in church. And when I met her in 1982, she had been a teacher for 10 years, and decided to move on to doing something else. She did have her master's degree in sociology and taught from that, and, again, helped to break down barriers, but she decided to do something else. And so along the way, she decided to do the work of being a travel agent, which was a part time thing and then became a full time thing for her. And so when I met her, she worked at a travel agency in San Juan Capistrano, California. And within that agency, she started her own small agency dealing with travel for persons with disabilities, the name of the agency was anyone can travel. And I met her through someone who knew her who was out surveying some possible places for a convention for the Society for the advancement travel of the handicapped sath. And so they introduced me to Karen and we kind of hit it off in January, although we didn't really have a whole lot to do with each other for a few months, because I was dating someone and she was dating someone, and neither of those relationships lasted overly long. And then in May of 1982, Karen, I knew was was agenting. And I was working for first well Computer Products, which was the company that Ray Kurzweil began to develop the reading machine for the blind. It was being purchased by Xerox. So I was based out here in California and needed to go see some customers in Hawaii, what a tough job to do. And I decided I take my parents because they had never been, and I called Karen to do the ticket booking. And she did. Then she brought the tickets down. And we chatted for a while. What I didn't know at the time was she was hoping that I'd asked her to go to lunch and being shy, I didn't. But we I walked her out to her car and helped her get in and and put the chair in. I just leaned over and give her a big kiss before she left. And then the neck was that Wednesday, I was going up to the airport to meet my parents. We were staying at a hotel overnight, leaving early the next day. She said I'm gonna come and get you what she did. And she came down got me, we went up and she met my parents. And the next day we went to Hawaii. And I started calling her twice a day from Hawaii, which is kind of where everything really clicked. And then I came back. And the day I came back from Hawaii, she was leaving for some training on some computer systems for TWA, which was around at that time in Kansas City. So we didn't get to see each other from the time I left for Hawaii until four days after she got back or rather until four days after I got back. And then she finally returned. And we just clicked. And so in mid July of 1982, I asked her to marry me. And we we chose a ring. And one of the neat stories I could tell about the ring is that when the jeweler called and said it was ready as we had it made, of course, I went up and got it and brought it down not without telling her. But I had called her boss lady named Joe. And I told Joe I was going to come and give Karen her ring. Joe will do anything for a party. So she immediately got champagne in the office didn't tell Karen but other people found out what was going on, which was great. So I show up around three in the afternoon. And it was a Friday, I think. And Karen was on the phone and I was sitting in front of her desk and just waiting. And finally she kept talking to this client. And I just finally said hey, give me your left hand a second I got up on a hold your hand and so she stuck her left hand out and I put a ring on it. I put a ring on her finger and immediately said, I have to hang up. My fiance just put my engagement ring on my finger. He proposed Oh, I have to go. And she did. And then the next few months went by and we got married. As I said on November 27 1982. She was a an always has been a fun person. And I think in a lot of ways very seriously. She was smarter than I was she she didn't know we show it but she had a great sense of humor and when something popped out That was funny. It really popped out. And she also was very perceptive. And so the two of us, I think really worked well together for 40 years.   Braden Ricketts  14:58 40 years. My goodness What were some of the lessons you learned from 40 years of marriage McCarran   Michael Hingson  15:04 that people can get along, we can fight we did have some sometimes they were pretty serious fights. I remember when I'm working for one company in the early 90s. In 1996, early in 1996, we had talked about relocating to Washington, DC area, the company wanted to open an office there. And so the President said, We want you to move there. And then one day, and we were both excited about that. And one day, he comes into the office, I changed my mind, I want you to open an office in New York, Karen absolutely didn't want to go to New York, she didn't want to do anything there, DC was a lot more fun, I think, and a lot more interesting to her. But it was either take that job or a sales territory in a place like New Mexico, because he said, I already have somebody who will take your place out here working at the company, we will need you back there. So we had to do it. Karen didn't want to do it. But I went back, we rented an apartment. And we had some pretty heavy conversations on the phone. But we worked through it. Because there wasn't another viable job. And one of the things that I and anyone who happens to be fortunate enough to have a job, who happens to also have be a person with a disability knows, the unemployment rate is really high. For us. It's between 60 and 70%, of all employable. My case, blind people are unemployed, because people think we can't work not that we really can't work. And so the result of that was that I didn't want to go into a job search. So we worked through it. And if you communicate, if you keep talking, if you work together and are willing to work together, you can get through stuff. And we did move to New Jersey, we both agreed we didn't want to stay there forever. We didn't know when we would move back to California. But Karen was a native, she would let me call myself a native because I was born in Chicago and moved to California when I was five. So I could never be a native. But she but she always wanted to get back to California. And she said I'll do it if we're going to come back someday. And I said, Hey, I am absolutely in, in sync with that. Then these two teams of terrorists, hijacked a couple of airplanes and flew them into the towers of the World Trade Center. And that led to all the circumstances that did get us the opportunity to move back to California, which we did. And when we moved to New Jersey, we built a home because we wanted it to be wheelchair accessible. And the other issue there was it had to be a two story home because the development where we found property to build I had only two story homes. So we put an elevator in that was a fun thing. This there were some challenges with the engineers in Westfield, New Jersey, where we lived that they tried to make it difficult for us to do it. But we got the elevator ran and we got them to sign off on it. When we move back to California, we found a place to live up near Guide Dogs for the Blind in guide dogs and center fell. We bought a home in Novato. There's no property to build a home, so we had to buy one and modify it. And we always said that if we could build a home, we wanted to do it. Because if you build a home from scratch, it's cheaper than if you buy a home and modify it because if you buy a home, you're gonna tear things out, put things in big changes and cost over $100,000 to do. But we did and loved the area up there. And then for a variety of things, we moved down here to Southern California in 2014, where again, we build a home. And we made it a home. The home was built in 2016. And we moved in on December 17th 2016. And we love it because first of all, it's a brand new home with all the latest codes, the heating and air conditioning bills are a lot less than they might otherwise be. We do have solar. And it was comfortable for Karen. And it was comfortable for me. So one of the things I plan on doing is staying right here. Why would I want to move it's too stressful to move and we've got a good interest rate. And I'm hoping people will continue to hire to hire me to speak. I also work for accessibe, which is a company that makes products that help make internet websites more accessible and inclusive for persons with disabilities. So that is actually how this podcast unstoppable mindset began because they wanted us to do a podcast podcast that would tell the world that we're we're all capable, we're all unstoppable. And so we inspire people. Sometimes we talk about accessibe and the products and the company and we just talked about disabilities, but mostly it's all about inspiration. So between accessibe and continuing to speak, I intend to keep busy and keep moving forward.   Braden Ricketts  19:58 Absolutely. And You should. But it sounds like you and Karen had a life full of adventure together and a wonderful time.   Michael Hingson  20:09 Well, I think so I've always regarded life as an adventure, I think probably as have been a little bit more of a risk taker than she wanted to be at times. But we we did travel to various places, we were on a number of cruises, which was fun. We went with Karen's parents to a couple of timeshares in Spain during the World Expo back in 1992. And had a wonderful time for a couple of weeks over there. And mostly, I think the the important thing, and it goes back to the question you asked before is, we made sure we always enjoyed each other's company. And I wouldn't change the last 40 years for anything. I hope along the way I learned stuff, and then that she learned things as well. And we continue to be very close, we communicated. And over the past few months of her life, I know there were times that she said she was scared about what was happening. And I and her caregivers, Josie and Dolores worked with her and Courtney before them worked with her. And we just tried to keep things as pleasant as we could and as peaceful as we could. So I think eventually, Karen knew that this was what she needed to do was to move on and she did well on to, to go do something else, then whatever it is she's doing, I'm hoping that she's enjoying it. And I get to join her sometime in the future or or see the results of what she does somehow.   Braden Ricketts  21:36 Yeah. Now, Michael, you've been processing this loss for, you know, in anticipation leading up to to the day, but also a few months since then. How have you been addressing the fear and loss? And what are your plans for moving forward?   Michael Hingson  21:55 Thanks for asking that, for a lot of reasons. Because one of the things that I realized, as the pandemic began is that I had talked a lot in the speeches that I've given about my experiences in the World Trade Center, and why wasn't afraid. But I've never taught people how to deal with that. I've never taught people how they can learn to control their own fears and use fear as a positive force to move forward. And so now I have to practice what I preach, right. And I've had to do that before. But now I have to do it again. And you're right, there is fear, there is the fact that I've had a little bit of time to adjust, or I had time before she passed. And I was doing a lot of the cooking and a lot of the other things around the house that she wasn't able to do, although I kept hoping she would get better and be able to take over those things. But I also realized that if the worst or what we didn't want to happen, actually did happen, I would have to continue to function and move forward. As a blind person who has been blind his entire life. I've learned that there are lots of ways of getting jobs accomplished, and I need to keep my wits about me. Even though I'm going to have some fear and some frustrations along the way, I need to keep thinking about how to deal with different tasks. Unfortunately, now we do have a lot more technology than we used to that helps. The process, for example, is a company that I helped bring the products to market from called IRA, a IRA, an IRA is a company that makes what's called a visual interpreter. What it essentially translates to is a product that includes an app that will go on a smartphone. And you can activate the app that calls an IRA agent. Now the agents are not just people who say I want a job and pay me for it, but they are people who have demonstrated the ability to describe to be accurate in their descriptions and to to understand what any of us who happen to be blind need when we ask a question like if I want a label read, I can tell them what I want. Or if I do it enough times, they people take notes in my profile so they know what to read and what I'm not interested in. Or if I'm traveling somewhere and need to get directions how to get from Virgil's barbecue, for example, in New York City, to the United Nations, what the easiest ways to do it are and literally what they do is they use the camera on the on the smartphone. Or they can even use GPS information that's transmitted by the phone through the app. And they can give me whatever information I need to have. They describe they don't editorialize, they don't tell me how to do things. They describe or give me the information I asked for. So when I was assembling something a few years ago, they read the instructions, they don't try to tell me things that you wouldn't want somebody to tell you. Now you got a blade screwdriver and a Phillips screwdriver, do you know the difference, and that's not the thing you want to tell me, if you want to describe it, you want to tell me the instructions say that you need to use the blade screwdriver to tighten the screws or you need to use this particular pipe, we're building a laundry cart and everything was color coded. So they tell me the specific information that I visually would not have access to? Well, as I said, we brought that to market. And I use Ira all the time now, whether it is to read labels, whether it's to get other information, sometimes off of a TV screen, whether it's to read material that my the computer won't scan, or read very well, or whatever it happens to be. They, they literally can provide any visual information I need that didn't exist seven years ago. But it exists today. And so that's something that certainly helps. And there are other kinds of technologies, there's much better optical character recognition than with the original Kurzweil Reading Machine. And so I given you a long explanation. But it's, it's to say, knowing all of that, and knowing how to use the tools that I have, and knowing that I can be creative when I need to and maybe use tools in a different way, then people are possibly not used to ultimately I can continue to move forward and do whatever it is that I want to do. Does that mean I Miss Karen less? No, it doesn't. But it does mean that I can continue to live, which she would want me to do. I can continue to go to the airport, get on airplanes, and go do speeches, which I do. And continue to talk about the lessons we should learn from September 11. And now start to talk about how you could learn to control your fear. And I can speak to that more poignantly now than ever, because it's something that I have to do every day, it was weird. Going to sleep the first night of the Karen wasn't here. Even when she went into the hospital, although I knew she would probably be coming back. And she did. But it was weird going to sleep and there was only me in the house. And then when she did pass, again, it was a strange feeling. And I'm not sure that I'm still used to it. But I'm comfortable enough to recognize that, again, what I need to do is to move forward and not be afraid, or use the fear that I do have to help me be motivated to move on and do whatever I need to do, including doing this interview.   Braden Ricketts  27:56 You know, you are absolutely embodying the unstoppable mindset that you have brought to the world through your podcast and your stories. Because this is something that happens to a lot of people. But it's also seen as you know, the reason people give up or the reason that people struggle with a loss. And what I'm hearing from you, Michael, is that you're taking this opportunity as a new adventure, you're going to try to do things in different ways or learn how to do things more on your own that you may not have done before. Right. And that can be scary for a lot of people. But in your explanation, I hear that there's a little bit of, you know, excitement for what you're going to learn and what you're going to develop what you're going to try and what's going to be new in your experiences going forward.   Michael Hingson  28:42 And it is scary. There's no doubt about it. And it's scary for me. But I'm not going to let the scariness blind me or paralyze me to being able to do whatever needs to be done. My job is to continue to do the things that I've chosen to do. And I think life is all about choices. And choosing not to let fear stop me is part of that process. So it is important to be able to, to work through whatever comes along. I expect even if I live another 100 years, it will be scary doing stuff that I used to do with Karen. And I'm perfectly okay with that. Since I also know I'll be able to do it and work through it. And your life is an adventure and I really look forward to seeing what we're going to see over the next 10 and 20 and 30 years, I think that a lot of things are going to happen. If we would allow ourselves to work together work as a community and stop just deciding that it's just us for ourselves and no one else and if we would just choose to work together and find ways to interact and help each other, that I think we're going to have a much more powerful world. But it's all about an adventure life has been an adventure, from the first time anybody had any conscious thought. And I think that is going to continue. And that's what makes life so much fun. No matter what happens and what gets thrown at us, God, I really do believe doesn't give us anything that we can handle. But having lost Karen, I can see where people can give up. And I can see where that's probably really easy to do. Fortunately, I've made the choice that I won't let that be the way I live my life. And I think that as emotional as it is to have lost Karen after 40 years together. Now, I know that she would want me to continue to treat everything we do as an adventurer, and find ways to do things. I want to take another cruise sometime. I'm not sure how that's going to work because it won't be with her. Physically speaking. I'm not sure that I'm one of those people that would just go on a cruise by myself. I know people who've done it. I don't know, I might, time will tell. That's a question yet to answer. But I'd like to take another cruise or two and do some other traveling outside of business. Excessive B is in Israel, I haven't been there yet. I'm looking forward to doing that and hope that we get to do that soon. And again, that will be an adventure in so many different ways. So it is all about adventure. It is all about working through things as we go. And it's also about recognizing that we're only stoppable if we allow ourselves to be or we are as unstoppable as we want to be.   Braden Ricketts  31:44 Absolutely. Did Karen have some inspiration in your unstoppable mindset? Is there a phrase that she like to use that you're hearing in the back of your mind as you continue on?   Michael Hingson  31:58 I think is absolutely that she and I worked out unstoppable mindset as a title together. And I wanted to try to come up with something a little bit different. And she may have actually been the first one to say why don't you use unstoppable it's I think it's starting to be overused. But it wasn't when we started this whole concept. Excessive he had done a commercial an advertisement last year about the product. And they had people in that a number of people who had happened to have disabilities. And they use the term. But I, I thought about unstoppable and I went to myself and Karen also said, It's really what this is all about. And so you should use it. So it is one of the things that I remember that we talked about one of my favorite times with Karen, in terms of something where she taught me something or else I said I think sometimes she's smarter than I, I was looking for a job in 1989. And I mentioned that I went to work for a company. That's the company that sent me eventually to New York, when I was applying for jobs. And we found this one in the newspaper. I said to Karen, do I say in my cover letter, I'm blind or not? And she said You're a dummy. Only wives can do that. And I said, Well, why do you say that? And she said, You've been a sales manager. Now for a long time, you've hired people and worked with a number of people. You took a Dale Carnegie sales course when you first started in sales, what's the most important thing that you tell every salesperson that you hire? And I wasn't really quite whether I was thinking of a number of things. And I finally said I'd skip up which one and she said, you've always told me that the most important thing you've ever told your people is turn perceived liabilities into assets. And that's absolutely true. What's blindness if not a perceived liability? It's not a liability. People think it is. But you know, something is too expensive. That's a perceived liability if you can make the case for why it is what it is. Well, she said that and I went off and I wrote a cover letter about my desire to work for this company. And the last two paragraphs of the cover letter kind of went something like this. The most important thing that you need to know about me when you're considering me for this job is that I happen to be blind. And I choose by the way, the words happened to be blind because it's just a characteristic like being left handed or male or female or anything else. I want to include politicians in that in that whole characteristic thing because they made that choice which lowers their level, but we won't go there. It's fun to pick on politicians. Anyway, the most important thing that you need to know is that I happen to be blind as a blind person. I've had to sell all of my life just to be able to survive and function. I've had to sell to convince somebody to let Have you buy a house, I've had to sell to convince somebody to let me rent an apartment or take my guide dog into stores. Because this was before the Americans with Disabilities Act, and there was real legislation about all that. I've had to sell to do most anything that I wanted to accomplish. So when you're considering me for this job, and you're looking at other people, think about do you want to hire somebody who just comes in to the office and works for eight or 10 hours a day and then goes home? Because the job is over? Or do you want to hire somebody who truly understands sales for the science and art that it is and sells 24 hours a day as a way of life? Earn, perceive liabilities into assets. And the result of that was? Yeah, and the result was it two weeks later, I got a call from the company and they said, We're having you come in simply because of that letter, and we want to meet you. And we want to talk to you about working for us while I went down and the rest kind of his history. But she was absolutely right. And I didn't catch it. I was too much in the habit of always worrying about do I say I'm blind or I'm not. And she, she was smart enough to recognize what really needed to be done, which is something that she did so often. And I will miss that. But I will also remember all the things that she did do. So hopefully I will work at being better.   Braden Ricketts  36:22 Yeah, that love and support, it just points out some of those pieces that we overlook. Can you tell me a little bit more about what her love and support meant for you?   Michael Hingson  36:32 Really, I can only say I meant everything. We really did not only depend on each other physically, because she could do things I couldn't like she could read and I did think she couldn't like push the wheelchair. So she reads I push. But just we learned each other totally. And we learned what we needed to do at any given time to support each other. There were very, very few times where both of us were down or very unhappy at the same time. I remember once when I got the job working for the company I just talked about. We were moving from Mission Viejo, California to current well to the area of Carlsbad, California, Vista, California, which is down near San Diego about 4550 miles south of where we lived in Mission Viejo. And we decided to find property and build a house. But we didn't want to continue to drive all the way down every morning for me to go to work and then Karen to come back up and go to work. So we decided that we would rent an apartment. And we found an apartment to rent it was actually in a new facility that was going up. And we put our home in Mission Viejo on the market. And the realtor that we first use was doing some pretty shifty sorts of things. And he was letting people come in on their own without being present in looking at the house and giving them keys and other things that we didn't like we caught them out at one day when we were about to move. And we went down to move into the apartment only to find out that they didn't have the certificate of occupancy yet. So we couldn't move in. That was probably one of our saddest days together. Because we were looking forward to being able to move down. And I don't I think we went I don't remember whether we went back home, or what we did, because we had packed most everything up. And physically, we couldn't just go sleep on the floor. But we worked through it. But it was a very sad time. And we've had a couple of those sad times. And of course, I mentioned earlier about me making the decision that we needed to move to New York and then having to work to bring Karen along. And that was was pretty sad. But again, she recognize the value of it. And when she made some decisions at times I recognize the value of it. A her love meant everything to me and I would do anything that she needed me to do. She has been a quilter since 1994. And over the last few years, she needed to replace some sewing machines and some new ones came on the market. And I said you need it. Go get it. She said well, we don't necessarily have a lot of money. I said, but do you need it? Is it going to make your job and your life easier? And she said, yeah, it will I thought about that a lot. They said there's no question, go do it. I wouldn't do anything like that for her. And I wouldn't hesitate at all because I would do whatever she needed. And I knew that she would do the same sort of thing for me. We knew each other that well that we had that deep level of trust that we needed to have. And we never were suspicious of each other. We didn't mislead each other. We didn't lie to each other, which was important.   Braden Ricketts  39:54 You know, I feel called to ask you to use those same words. is on yourself as you go forward. And remember that, you know, she would do anything for you and you should do everything for yourself that she would.   Michael Hingson  40:09 I agree. And I'm doing that at the same time well, so I, for several years went since we moved in, we we have a TV in our living room and we have a Sonos soundbar. And I've always wanted to get a subwoofer because I like bass, not loud, but I still like bass helping to fill the room. And I never wanted to spend the money to get it. And it was only after she passed that I had a bright idea. The credit card I use for business accumulates rewards. And so I called the company that deals with all that, and it turns out, they sold the Sonos subwoofer that I wanted to buy. So I got it for free. Now I have the subwoofer unfortunately carries out here to hear it. And, you know, she said, Do you really need it? And I said, Well, it would be nice. Do I need it? No. Now, my only justification is it didn't cost anything. So I did it. And she would have approved with that. But you're right, I need to do what I need to do to move forward as well. And I will always think, Karen, is this the right decision to make? And I think that's important to do. To really think about any decision that we make, especially major life decision, several people have asked me already Well, are you going to move? Are you going to stay where you are? And one person is even advised that we should sell the wheelchair accessible van that Karen drove? And the answer to moving is absolutely not. Why would I want to the house is probably bigger than I need? Well, it is bigger than I need because two of us lived in it. But at the same time, it's a very comfortable house, the interest rate is great. And I would never find another place that will be as comfortable as this. More important, I'll never find a place that I can move into that would be as comfortable and as inexpensive as this. And even as far as selling the van will explore it. But I'm not deeply in a hurry to sell it. Because if I do, I still want to have access to a vehicle I'll need to own something because as I need to move around, whether it's the people who worked for Karen, as they're her caregivers who now work for me in the business, or other people, I don't want them to have to use their car and they're more reluctant to use their car, if I have a vehicle available. And I learned that in college. So whether it's the van or something else, I want to have a vehicle around. But I don't need to make any urgent decisions. And I am a firm believer that things will happen as they should I believe that God has given us the ability to make choices. And it's given us the ability to hear what the right decision is we just need to learn to listen to that voice and make the right decisions. And then when we do that, things will work out fine.   Braden Ricketts  43:04 Those are beautiful words, they certainly seem to be having a role and an impact in the way you're handling the loss. It's It is remarkable. I know you've been processing for a while but you you seem to be really at ease. With with where things are at. Do you have advice that you would like to share with others on that, in that regard?   Michael Hingson  43:26 I think it's important that people really do think about how to prepare for unexpected life changes. And that's what we'll be talking about an A guy dice Guide to Being brave. One of the things that I learned in college was to step back and think about each day. At the end of the day, how did it go? What went well, what didn't go well? And even with what went well? Could it have gone better? Or the things that didn't go? Well? What do we do so that that won't happen? Again, it took me a long time to get out of the habit of saying I made a mistake, I screwed up and that's all there is to it to saying okay, that didn't work like it should I could even call it a mistake. But the ultimate question is, what do I learn to move on? And not do that same thing again? Or to move forward and not do that same thing again? Or how would I handle the situation the next time it comes up? And a lot of times that happens? Something will happen again, and the question is have I learned to the point where when it does, I went oh, I would go oh, wait a minute. I know what I did wrong on that or I know what I should have done better. And I can make that become part of my life which helps a lot to alleviate the fear. So that's one thing is to be introspective at the end of the day and then be mindful and allow yourself to recognize that there are things that maybe you didn't do as well as you should. I like the concept that failure isn't really failure, it's just a lesson that'll move you to more success and move you to do something better the next time, a mistake is only something that didn't work out quite as well as you want, and you can move forward from it. It's not a mistake, if you did what you felt was the right thing. And it turned out not to be the right thing. If you learn from it. It's absolutely a mistake if you just continue to do the same thing. And you don't learn from the things that that happen in your life. I love Einstein's definition of insanity, which is always do the same thing and expect something different to happen, that doesn't work that way. So we can learn how to change. For me, the first time I think I really use that well was I was the Program Director of our radio station, and K UCI in Irvine. And I heard a lot of DJs on the air. And a lot of them didn't sound as well as they could have I didn't think. And so I came up with this bright idea. I want you all to listen to yourselves, we're going to I want you to make a recording of the times that you talk on the air, and then take it listen to it. And then you can imagine that people just rebelled it that people say we're our own worst critics. And that's really the wrong thing to say we're not our own worst critics, we are our own best evaluators. Because we know all the things that go into a decision that we make. So for me, when I made that suggestion to people, and they resisted, we fixed it. I got our station engineer to put a recorder in a locked cabinet, which we haven't had in all the studios. And whenever the microphone was clicked to on, so they were going to people were going to talk, the recorder would start. And at the end of the week, because we did it once a week, we gave each person here's a term you haven't heard in a while a cassette, with their program on it. We said listen to it. You know what, the people who did it, and we kind of really made everyone do it. I didn't go so far as to embarrass someone in front of other people. But I pushed really hard and got people to listen to it. It was amazing how much better everyone was, by the end of the year, some of the people went on to professional radio. And everyone benefited a lot from it. And I learned that it's all about evaluating yourself. So even today, when I give a speech, I listen to it. When I do a podcast, I go back and listen to the podcast, every time I do an interview one because I want to refresh my mind before making the notes. But two, I want to hear how I sound. And I hope that every time I do that, I improve a little bit so that I sound a little bit better than I did the previous time. I think it's important that we allow ourselves to evaluate ourselves and to grow from that. So it's a lot of fun to do it. I've made some some serious mistakes. Over the years, I did a couple of flubs in radio, that I wouldn't say they were embarrassing, but I've listened to them actually a couple times since and I laugh at them. But I'll never make the same kind of error in judgment. Again, I was gonna say make the same mistake, I suppose you can say it was. But it's all about? Do we learn from life. And my belief is that we have to learn from life. And life may be a great adventure. But it's also a wonderful teacher, if we allow it to be. So for me, I think it's important that we all be very introspective at the end of every day, we need to think about what we did, how did that go? Especially when something happens that makes us afraid. We need to then go back and study. Why are we afraid? What is it that's really fearful? And how do we deal with that? Those are the kinds of things that along the way I learned that helped me not be afraid on September 11. And it really got to the point where I finally said to myself as we were going down the stairs because I was listening for every creaking grown in case the building decided to just suddenly fall. If it's going to fall, it's going to fall. There's nothing I can do about it. I can only do what I can do, and literally went down the stairs with that attitude. So again, I chose not to be afraid I chose to use my concerns to be more observant and to work to help other people and to be positive and upbeat all the way down the stairs. And I think we all can do that. We don't need to let fear blind us as I describe it. We can use it as a very powerful mode. Vader to help guide us and direct us into whatever it is that we need to do. I think that's kind of probably the most important lesson I can give to people.   Braden Ricketts  50:08 Yes, wow. And quite literally in your story, you took control of the one thing you could control, which was one step in front of the other, and got you all the way to safety.   Michael Hingson  50:18 Right. You know, the, the other part about that is you don't worry about the things that you can't control. That happens so much. I mean, we see so much on TV and so much other things in our lives that go on. There's so many things that people want us to worry about. But we have any control over all have it. No, we don't. And so the bottom line is, if we focus on all that stuff, we're going to be scattered. If we worry about what we can control and let the rest of it alone, then we'll be able to move forward in a much more positive way. And we'll be better for it. And so will everyone else. And if the time comes, you know, one of the my favorite examples is the whole political arena right now. Everyone's worried about what's going to happen in our US Congress, and what's going to happen with the country? And what's going to happen with one thing or another? And do we have any control over it? Well, we do when we have elections. And if we really look at all of our politicians, all of our leaders, those who truly are and those who think they are, we can analyze them and see what they're really doing. And not be afraid to make a decision that says I've always been of a particular party, but this guy who's running from my party, isn't going to really benefit us. And so I need to make a different choice and really take the position that our elections are the times that we really do have control. Once they occur, then we are well, we are we are bound by the decisions that are made until the next election. And so we can learn to just control the things that we have control over and then move forward. And anyone who says we don't have any control is just as misguided as the people who think they have to control everything and can't.   Braden Ricketts  52:13 Yeah, we certainly can't control when and how people come in and out of our lives. And I've really heard from you today about honoring and valuing the time you have with people and carrying that value, even in their loss.   Michael Hingson  52:28 I think it's important. And, you know, like I said, Karen will always be in my life. And I hope to get lots of opportunities to talk about her and, and I talked to her. And I will continue to do that. Because it's kind of also my way of thinking about it and figuring out how to solve problems. And I don't have any problem with doing that. As long as I recognize what it really is. I'm thinking and she may be talking back. And I will probably hear some of that as we go forward and probably have already. But it's all about thinking. And it's all about recognizing that we are capable of living meaningful, productive lives. And whether some of us have some sort of disability, whether there were things that go on that we don't have control over. If we don't, then no sense worrying about it, deal with the things that you can influence, and you'll be much stronger and much better for it. And love that you   Braden Ricketts  53:27 still talk to her. Michael, I would like to ask him intimate question. If you don't mind. You said you had the opportunity to say goodbye. I was surrounded by friends and family. If you're willing, did you have words you would share with us that you shared with her in your goodbye?   Michael Hingson  53:45 You know, I was with her for about an hour. And about an hour before she left. She was on life support. She was on medications and actually 1125. They well, before that happened. The doctor came in and was talking with us. And he said she's on full life support. She's not sustaining herself. And so I said if we discontinue the meds, what will happen? And he said she'll probably pass within an hour or two. And I said if we keep the meds going, what will happen? And he said probably a few days, but certainly no more than that. Well, Karen sister also was an intensive care unit nurse and had other positions at the Kaiser hospital system. She worked there basically almost 40 years. And as I said earlier, she was in the room. And so I said, What do you think Vicki? And she says, yeah, absolutely. And so I told the doctor, okay, let's go ahead and discontinue the meds because this isn't helping her or any of us. And before that, I had said, Karen, we're here. We're going to, we're going to support you and whatever you do. It sounds like it's time for you to go well The meds were still being administered, actually her brother called, because I had reached out to try to get him to let him know what was going on. And I think he put it very well. He said, I think she's probably already made the transition. And I said, I agree. But I still said, you know, we're here, you go ahead and go. And we, we bless you, we love you. And I am going to do everything I can to continue to honor you and love you in any way that I can. And I hope that you will always know that. And I think that when 1125 came, and they did discontinue the meds was probably about another 45 or 50 minutes before her last heartbeat took place. But she had left. So it was just the medications kind of going away over time. And then when she left, we all just said goodbye one last time, and there was nothing else that we could do. So we went out and we just talked in the hall a little bit. And then we all went our our separate ways.   Braden Ricketts  56:01 does sound like a beautiful end to a beautiful story together. And one that, as you said will continue.   Michael Hingson  56:08 It will, I believe it was was beautiful. I believe that we're still exploring very beautiful, experiencing very beautiful times with it. I just spent New Years the last three days because, well, not the last few days, but the beginning of the year. Friday the 30th Josie, who now works for me who worked with Karen, her caregiver was there for part of the day. But then Saturday, Sunday and Monday, it was just me my guide, dog Alamo and our cat stitch. And we just all work together in the house. And that that will continue to happen. So at least I have company and they have company and I think that everyone misses Karen. But we all have have recognized that it's now the three of us as a close knit family. And so stitch the cat walks on me at night when I'm in bed. Alamo thinks he's a lap dog and wants to sit in my lap all the time. But he's a great guide dog. And, you know, we are all together and do the things that we need to do as a as a family. And it doesn't matter whether it's a dog of a cat and a person. Or it's more than one person. We're still the family. And that's okay,   Braden Ricketts  57:23 Michael, I am I'm in awe of your big heart and your unstoppable mindset. I am very honored to have been here with you today to hear your stories and learn more about your journey with Karen. Thank you so much for having me and for sharing all of this with us. It's an honor. Thank   Michael Hingson  57:41 you i and thank you. And I really appreciate you being here and being able to talk with us about this. And if people are listening to this, we will put the Zoom link in the podcast notes so that if they want to come and if they knew Karen or just want to come and listen, they're welcome to do that as well. And so we'll we'll have that in there. And I hope that people will go by center dog because they'll learn a lot about Karen from from Thunder dog, it's available wherever books can be found. And that'll be another way that they can also help honor Karen. But I think that they'll they'll learn about a wonderful person, person who's contributed a lot, not necessarily in always the most visible ways on this earth but who in fact, contributed a lot and will continue to do that just by all the things she did in the memory she left us. So I really appreciate you being here, Braden to help with it. And I hope that people will listen to this. And of course, we always ask for a five star rating. And I hope that that will happen. And that the people will recognize that they can be unstoppable too, which is what we really need.   Braden Ricketts  58:57 Beautifully said. Well,   Michael Hingson  58:58 thank you again. And I really appreciate you asking some wonderful questions. And they helped me think and they helped me process which is also important. But most of all, they they give me the opportunity to talk about this. And that's the most important thing that I can do because that will help me live a better life. So thank you   Michael Hingson  59:25 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

The Christian Post Daily
Most Teens View Porn by Age 13, Evangelical Democrat Defends Abortion, Minnesota Forcing Teachers to Affirm LGBT Ideology

The Christian Post Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 9:21


Sponsor: Click here to learn more about Medi-Share, the most trusted name in health care sharing.Nearly three out of every four teenagers have viewed pornography at some point in their lives, with more than half first seeing sexually explicit material by age 13, according to a new study.A freshman Democratic congresswoman who identifies as Evangelical cited a Bible verse often used by pro-lifers when speaking this week against a Republican-sponsored measure mandating medical care for infants born alive after an abortion.The largest United Methodist Church congregation in South Carolina is seriously considering a departure from the mainline Protestant denomination over ongoing debates on homosexuality.A federal court has ruled that Christian colleges and universities can continue to receive funding through Title IX, rejecting LGBT students' efforts to strike down a religious exemption to federal discrimination law.Subscribe to this Podcast Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Overcast Follow Us on Social Media @ChristianPost on Twitter Christian Post on Facebook @ChristianPostIntl on Instagram Subscribe on YouTube Get the Edifi App Download for iPhone Download for Android Subscribe to Our Newsletter Subscribe to the Freedom Post, delivered every Monday and Thursday Click here to get the top headlines delivered to your inbox every morning! Links to the News Most teenagers say they viewed porn by age 13, survey finds | U.S. News Evangelical Democrat cites Jeremiah 1:5 to defend abortion | Politics News South Carolina's largest UMC church may leave denomination | Church & Ministries News Minnesota forcing teachers affirm trans ideology, CRT for license | Politics News Tennessee church ordered to stop ministry for recovering addicts | U.S. News Judge sides with Christian colleges in LGBT discrimination case | U.S. News DOJ seeks to recover money bilked from veterans | U.S. News

TonioTimeDaily
I have been had, been took, bamboozled, hoodwinked, led astray, and run amok by the Christian church

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 46:28


“110) Donations to help the poor and needy Christians can point to their tax returns and claim that they give more to charity than non-Christians. Based on a study of charitable deductions on 1040 tax returns, this is correct. However, when you look under the hood, a different story emerges. The vast majority of the money that Christians donate to their churches never reaches the poor and needy. On the low end of spectrum, out of every $100 that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Mormons) receives, only 70 cents reaches the poor and needy. On the other end of the spectrum, $29 of every $100 that the United Methodist Church receives is so directed. Other churches fall somewhere in between, but tend toward the lower end. Most of the money goes to building costs (capital, operational, maintenance), salaries, staff health care, and proselytizing. On the other hand, $92.10 out of every $100 dollars that the Red Cross receives directly goes to the poor and needy. http://www.escapistmagazine.com/forums/read/528.379571-Religious-Charity-Not-all-its-cracked-up-to-be What this means is that although atheists and non-church-goers donate less money as defined by tax laws, on average they actually give more to help disadvantaged people. This is because they don't give money to churches, but rather to charities that translate their donations much more efficiently to those in need. This does not apply to all Christians, some of whom donate to direct charities as well, but on average the church-going Christians primarily donate to their church. Bill Gates, Warren Buffett and Mark Zuckerburg are atheists and donate several billion dollars every year from their own pockets and they organize a charity of billionaire charity donations. http://fortune.com/2016/06/01/giving-pledge-new-members-2016/ The irony of this situation should not be overlooked. The churches that base their entire existence on a man who had a laser focus on helping the poor actually reduce the amount of assistance that otherwise would be available if they didn't exist.” --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

Sellersburg UMC
SERMON | 1 Corinthians 1:1-9 | GLIMPSES OF THE KIN-DOM - 2. "Not Lacking" by Rev. Joseph Sanford at Sellersburg United Methodist Church in Sellersburg, Indiana.

Sellersburg UMC

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 18:20


SERMON | 1 Corinthians 1:1-9 | GLIMPSES OF THE KIN-DOM - 2. "Not Lacking" by Rev. Joseph Sanford at Sellersburg United Methodist Church in Sellersburg, Indiana. If baptism is our birth, then our childhood (being raised) is our life in the church. We have a family through whom we can learn and grow in this life of being healed/saved/perfected. Let's get to know our family more to see that we already have everything we need.

Building Hope With Purple Thoughts
SPECIAL GUEST: Lataya Simpson

Building Hope With Purple Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 33:44


Since an early age, the Rev. Lataya Simpson defined ministry as serving God by serving others. For nearly 30 years she has been blessed with the various opportunities to live out this paradigm in diverse settings. From the age of 15, Lataya began leading a small group in her High School teaching Bible Study every week for 3 years. During college, she was hungry for ways to get involved in ministry and combined her passion for ministry and academic studies in broadcast journalism to volunteer in ministry media at her church. After graduating with a BA in Broadcast Journalism and a short lived career in journalism, Lataya decided she wanted to do something other than report bad news. She wanted to serve and lead in her community.  In 2006 she founded Christian Networking Group, a diverse organization which connected thousands of people to help in bridging the gap between faith and business. Lataya accepted her call to pastoral ministry in 2011. She was blessed to find a mentor in her own home, following in her husband's footsteps to become an Ordained Elder in Full Connection in The United Methodist Church. She and he attended SMU Perkins School of Theology, earning the Master of Divinity degrees consecutively; he in 2017, she in 2018. Her first appointment as a pastor came in 2016 while still in seminary. From there she spent a year as a hospital Chaplain and for the past 3 years has been serving as the Associate Pastor of Bellaire UMC, located in the city of Bellaire.  In addition to being a servant leader, Lataya is a first a wife, mother and friend. “Faith and family are my top two priorities, but I'm blessed that my calling enables me to enrich both of these.” She and her husband Rev. Johnnie, are parents of three amazing children: Johnnie III, Elle and Layla. Her husband lives out his calling as both pastor and community leader. Lataya has a passion for personal development and social/emotional wellness as well as racial, cultural and cognitive diversity. Her first book, More Than Pretty: 7 Beauty Secrets That Could Change Your Life, which focused on personal development, was self-published in 2014. She has written several children's books on these topics and hopes to publish many more in the future.

Be Encouraged with Bishop Julius C. Trimble
Africa University Leading the World in Refugee Protection with Dr. James Salley of Africa University (Tennessee) Inc.

Be Encouraged with Bishop Julius C. Trimble

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 33:11 Transcription Available


Bishop Julius C. Trimble is the Resident Bishop of the Indiana Area of the United Methodist Church.Bishop Trimble has the personal mission to encourage all people with the love of Jesus Christ to rise to their highest potential. It is his commitment to his personal mission that led Bishop Trimble to create the “To Be Encouraged” Podcast along with co-host Rev.Dr. Brad Miller. Bishop Trimble says, “I am compelled by Jesus to share with you an encouraging word or two about Jesus, theology, the Bible, the pandemic, the environment, racism, voting rights, human sexuality, and the state of the United Methodist Church.” To Be Encouraged with Bishop Julius C. Trimble is to be published weekly and is available at www.tobeencouraged.com and all the podcast directories.https://www.inumc.org/bishop/office-of-the-bishop/On Episode 042 Dr. James Salley the President and CEO of Africa University (Tennessee) Inc. talks to Bishop Trimble about the the social, economic and political impact of Africa University and highlights the universities program to address the refugee crisis in Africa and beyond. This is part 2 of a two part episode with Dr. James Salley. Part one of the interview is at Episode 041 of To Be Encouraged and focuses on the impact and influence of United Methodist Africa University in Zimbabwe upon the the continent of Africa and indeed upon the world since it's founding in 1992.Africa UniversityAfrica University Development

Conversation Again
Hallway Conversation, Local UMC Churches

Conversation Again

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 6:34


Charla Gwartney returns to discuss an ever-present conversation in her local church, disaffiliation. In this first episode, she moves from the initial question of disaffiliation to the consequences of making a decision. She illustrates three prevailing positions toward the LGBTQ community within the United Methodist Church and provides a verse from scripture that focuses the conversation on God's desire for followers to remain unified. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Ask Christian Counseling Associates
Episode 20: The Liberia Mission

Ask Christian Counseling Associates

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 55:23


In this episode of Ask Christian Counseling Associates, we meet with the Rev. Dr. Jerry Kulah from Liberia, West Africa.  Liberia began as a county in the early 19th century as the United States began to send freed slaves seeking a new start to resettle in Africa. Since this time, Liberia has shared a special connection with America. Rev. Kulah is a leader with the African Initiative, an influential group of African faith leaders within the United Methodist Church. Join us as we discuss our connection to Africa in mission, values, and Christian faith. Christian Counseling Associates loves Liberia, and we hope that you will, too, as you get to know Dr. Kulah and the mission that we share together.

St. Stephen's United Methodist Fairfax Sermons
"Renewal", Message from Pastor Spencer at St. Stephen's, Jan 8th 2023

St. Stephen's United Methodist Fairfax Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 20:29


The Mission of St. Stephen's United Methodist Church is to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. To learn more about St. Stephen's or to view our full online service from January 8th, 2023, please visit wwww.ststephensfairfax.org

Sellersburg UMC
SERMON | Matthew 3:11-17 | GLIMPSES OF THE KIN-DOM - 1. "The Water's Fine" by Rev. Joseph Sanford at Sellersburg United Methodist Church in Sellersburg, IN

Sellersburg UMC

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 22:00


SERMON | Matthew 3:11-17 | GLIMPSES OF THE KIN-DOM - 1. "The Water's Fine" by Rev. Joseph Sanford at Sellersburg United Methodist Church in Sellersburg, IN

Faith Radio Podcast from The Meeting House
Intersection Podcast - Top 10 Topics of 2022

Faith Radio Podcast from The Meeting House

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 64:08


10 - Rise of globalism presents challenges for Christians      Jim Garlow - Well Versed9 - Participation of biological males in girls' sports advances, yet challenged      Christiana Kiefer - Alliance Defending Freedom8 - Pro-life centers face violence in light of Dobbs ruling      James Harden - CompassCare Pregnancy Services7 - Christian ministries respond to suffering in Ukraine      Don Parsons - Mission Eurasia6 - New Methodist denomination forms, churches depart United Methodist Church      Lester Spencer - St. James Church (Montgomery, AL)/AL-West FL Chapter of Wesleyan Covenant Association      Keith Boyette - Global Methodist Church5 - Mid-term elections provide clear challenges & choices for Christians      Erick Stakelbeck - The Watchman, Trinity Broadcasting Network4 - Lawmakers affirm “same-sex marriage,” endanger religious freedom      Mary Beth Waddell - Family Research Council3 - Visibility about harm from gender treatment and surgeries grows      Brandon Showalter - The Christian Post2 - Religious freedom victories at SCOTUS include vindication for football coach praying at midfield after games      Stephanie Taub - First Liberty1 - US Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade      Chuck Donovan - Charlotte Lozier Institutemeetinghouseonline.info

MinistryWatch Podcast
Ep. 230: United Methodist Meltdown, And Ministry Executive Salaries

MinistryWatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 25:55


On today's program, Open Doors USA is changing its name and its focus.  We'll have details.  Plus, the Evangelical Council for Abuse Prevention rolls out an accreditation program designed to help ministries protect children.  And it's a new year, and MinistryWatch has published its annual list of Highly Paid Ministry Executives.  We'll have a preview of the list later in the program.  We begin today with more news about the slow-moving breakup of the United Methodist Church. A big thank you to those of you who showed up for us at year end.  We had what was for us an ambitious goal of $81,000 for the months of November and December combined.  We met that goal, with room to spare.  I don't know exactly what the final tally is, since we are still getting checks postmarked Dec. 31 in the mail, I will share with you a final number next week.  But until then, please know that I'm grateful, humbled, and a bit relieved – all at once.  So, again, THANK YOU. Oh, and one final note before we go.  In the past we've done a webinar entitled “How To Find and Read A Form 990.”  This webinar has proven so popular that we've repeated it three or four times over the past two years.  And we're going to do it again.  It will take place on Feb. 1 at 4 pm ET.  Just check the daily MinistryWatch email for a link to the registration page.  It's absolutely free, but you do need to register to get all the links and details. The producers for today's program are Rich Roszel and Jeff McIntosh.  We get database and other technical support from Stephen DuBarry, Emily Kern, Rod Pitzer, and Casey Sudduth. Writers who contributed to today's program include Shannon Cuthrell, Jessica Eturralde, Anne Stych, Steve Rabey, Kathryn Post, Mark Tooley, Emily McFarlan Miller, Christina Darnell—and you, Warren. A special thanks to WORLD Opinions for contributing material for this week's podcast. Until next time, may God bless you.  

Be Encouraged with Bishop Julius C. Trimble
The Impact and Influence of Africa University on Africa and Beyond with Dr. James Salley President and CEO of Africa University (Tennessee) Inc.

Be Encouraged with Bishop Julius C. Trimble

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 35:58 Transcription Available


Bishop Julius C. Trimble is the Resident Bishop of the Indiana Area of the United Methodist Church.Bishop Trimble has the personal mission to encourage all people with the love of Jesus Christ to rise to their highest potential. It is his commitment to his personal mission that led Bishop Trimble to create the “To Be Encouraged” Podcast along with co-host Rev.Dr. Brad Miller. Bishop Trimble says, “I am compelled by Jesus to share with you an encouraging word or two about Jesus, theology, the Bible, the pandemic, the environment, racism, voting rights, human sexuality, and the state of the United Methodist Church.” To Be Encouraged with Bishop Julius C. Trimble is to be published weekly and is available at www.tobeencouraged.com and all the podcast directories.https://www.inumc.org/bishop/office-of-the-bishop/On Episode 041 Dr. James Salley the President and CEO of Africa University (Tennessee) Inc. talks to Bishop Trimble about the impact and influence of United Methodist Africa University in Zimbabwe upon the the continent of Africa and indeed upon the world since it's founding in 1992. This is part 1 of a two part episode with Dr. James Salley. Part two of the interview is at Episode 042 of To Be Encouraged and focuses on the social, economic and political impact of Africa University and highlights the universities program to address the refugee crisis in Africa and beyond.Africa UniversityAfrica University Development

The Wednesday Conversation
Episode 408: The (Ongoing) Decline of the Mainline

The Wednesday Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 27:48


A recent article in World Magazine chronicles the steep decline of the United Methodist Church as a result of that denomination's capitulation on sexual ethics. In this episode, we discuss why mainline Protestant denominations continue to decline, and what we can & should do in our churches to ensure ongoing health & vitality.https://wng.org/opinions/there-go-the-churches-1669902557

Tyler Memorial United Methodist Church
Tyler Memorial United Methodist Church --New Years Day (January 1, 2023)

Tyler Memorial United Methodist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 58:29


TYLER MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH     Worship Service: Sunday 11:00 AMChurch Office Hours: Mon, Wed 9 AM – 12 PMTyler Memorial United Methodist Church260 Mill StreetChillicothe, Ohio 45601(740) 773-1270tylerumcoffice@gmail.comCCLI# 592146CSPL089857

Sellersburg UMC
SERMON | "Happy New Year!" by Mark Ritter at Sellersburg United Methodist Church in Sellersburg, IN

Sellersburg UMC

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 26:26


SERMON | "Happy New Year!" by Mark Ritter at Sellersburg United Methodist Church in Sellersburg, IN

Pastor Brian Podcast
S6:E1B- Personal Update- Saturday, December 31, 2022

Pastor Brian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 6:15


Hey y'all, I told y'all I would be letting y'all know about some exciting personal news and why that caused this Season (Season 6 of the Pastor Brian Podcast) to be delayed. I've written the Board of Ordained Ministry of the Indiana Annual Conference and General Superintendent Trimble, and spoken with my District Superintendents in Indiana and here in Northern Illinois— and (in compliance with ¶353.1 and ¶353.2a of The Book of Discipline of the United Methodist Church 2016) I'm prayerfully requesting a Voluntary Leave of Absence for Personal Leave to begin in the new appointment year of July 2023 . . . . . . As the Jones family we will still be at Gary, we are not leaving. This is where God has called us and where we can live out our call to proclaim the gospel so other's may know Christ's salvation. It is our family's Church home and we love it here and most of all we love God— the one who we have completely trusted and led us here. In many ways it will be much like it was when we first came to Gary Church in 2010, we will attend, but I will be on pastoral leave and have no pastoral duties, except now, I won't have four little ones running around, they are big, but still running around in Gary Youth! I am not giving up my orders or being a pastor. Simply, pastoring will not be my regular 9 to 5 job . . . just like many of you in your walk with Christ Jesus. I will continue my podcast ministry (producing the Gary Church Podcast and the Pastor Brian Podcast) as I feel that is something God has laid upon my heart continue and enlarge. So no worries, no more interruptions or delays with this season of Pastor Brian Podcast. I'm looking forward to what the future holds here! Most of all, I hope to live out the simple truth that God's call of making disciples of Jesus Christ is constant, but it does not always look the same. I want to show that to my children, to you, and live it out with you as well. Thank you . . . you are loved by me!The music you hear is "We're On Our Way" by Purple Planet Music and licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Gwinnett Daily Post Podcast
Free pizza for a year in Buford? Find out how you can get it

Gwinnett Daily Post Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 13:39


People who live in northwest Gwinnett County will have a chance to get a year's worth of free pizza next week. A new Pizza Hut location, which is run by Flynn Restaurant Group, opened at 1550 Buford Highway in Buford on Dec. 23, but it's what the new store has planned for its grand opening festivities next week that will have tongues salivating. The first 25 customers who are in line at the store on Jan. 6 will get free pizza for a year. There are some limits on what pizzas qualify for the free pizza for a year, and what locations the pizzas can be picked up at. The deal is only valid at locations owned by Flynn Restaurant Group — which happens to be Pizza Hut's largest franchisee and which owns 10 other Pizza locations in Gwinnett County. In addition to the Buford location, Flynn Restaurant Group also owns locations in Sugar Hill, Suwanee, Auburn, Dacula, Duluth, Lawrenceville, Lilburn, Loganville, Norcross and Snellville. It also owns 15 other locations in metro Atlanta, including stores nearby cities such as Cumming, Flowery Branch, Hoschton and Alpharetta. Other limitations on the free pizza for a year offer customers only being able to use it to get two complimentary specialty pizzas or up to three topping large pizzas per month for a year, a limit of one pizza per party, it only being valid on carryout orders, and it only being valid on Thin N' Crispy, original pan and hand tossed crusts. The new store is expected to add 15 new jobs to the Buford and Sugar Hill area. Now in its seventh decade of delivering compelling performances all over the world, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre — recognized by Congress as a vital American “Cultural Ambassador to the World” — will make its return to Atlanta's Fabulous Fox Theatre for a series of shows in mid-February. Led by artistic director Robert Battle, the Ailey troupe will showcase premiers, new productions and repertory favorites for five performances February 16-19 as part of a 22-city North American tour. While each performance will feature different choreographed works — including pieces by Kyle Abraham, Jamar Roberts and Twyla Tharp — each presentation will conclude with the stirring Ailey-choregraphed “Revelations,” which made its debut in 1960 and has been seen by more people than any other modern dance work. Ailey's Fox Theatre residency begins at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 16 with Tharp's 1997 piece “Roy's Joys,” a new production of the 1986 production of “Survivors,” Ailey's tribute to Nelson and Winnie Mandela, and “Revelations.  Tickets, starting at $29, are available at the Fox Theatre box office at 660 Peachtree St., or by calling 855-285-8499 or visiting www.alvinailey.org or www.foxatltix.com. The arts in Gwinnett made great strides in 2022 to return to the pre-COVID world, where more than one nonprofit was overjoyed to find their doors still open. As a result, the vitality and pure joy of being back on stage or opening gallery doors was evident in the work art lovers could again absorb. Below are just a few of the highlights that made this writer smile in 2022. There were so many great performances, great exhibitions, great moments that it is hard to choose. Spring was an exciting time for Gwinnett performing arts groups and audiences. ♦ Live Arts Theatre has been nurturing and growing talent for many years. In March, their efforts were enhanced when LAT Actor Rodney Johnson won Best Performer for his work in the play “Sea Wall” at both the Southeastern Theatre Conference and the Georgia Theatre Conference. ♦ The Aurora Theatre was the venue April 2-3 when Atlanta's amazing “Dance Canvas” highlighted the work of seven emerging choreographers. Dance Canvas' Founder and Director, Angela Harris, has a special relationship with the Aurora, having danced in a number of their productions over the years. ♦ Spring was also celebrated by the joining of two of the Southeast's premiere Barber Shop Choruses. Gwinnett's lauded Stone Mountain Chorus and Atlanta Harmony Celebration joined their voices together in a concert at Mountain Park's United Methodist Church on May 21. ♦ Also in May, Duluth photographer Mary Buck traveled to Spain and returned with another treasure trove of images. Buck is known for her extraordinary photos of birds, whether taken in her own backyard or on the other side of the world. Art Beat columns of summer and early fall seemed to be full of young, talented Gwinnett dancers finding success. ♦ Rachael Graham was once a featured performer at Gwinnett Ballet Theatre. Since this summer, she has sported a number of tiaras, dancing and singing as Disney Princesses on their Cruise Line in the Caribbean. ♦ Dreams came true for another ex-Gwinnett Ballet dancer. Runako Campbell is living the dream in New York City where she has performed in a variety of shows, commercials, and with the Metropolitan Opera Ballet. ♦ The Hudgens Center is one of Gwinnett's treasured arts entities, and The Hudgens Prize is a great example of how philanthropy can lift emerging artists into the spotlight. This year's winner is sculptor Olu Amoda who received the Prize with its $50,000 cash gift in October. ♦ “The Lion in Winter” was presented in early December by Lionheart Theatre, directed by Brandi Kilgore. Taking on such a renowned and powerful work is a true artistic test and certainly a highlight of Lionheart's season. As 2022 comes to a close, one more young artist is spreading wings and flying into her future. ♦ By the new year, 10-year-old Lillian Sears, who has trained at Duluth's Atlanta Professional Dance Academy, will begin studying at the Paris Opera Ballet. She is the first North American to be accepted into the POB's six-month audition program. Dreams do come true. Here's to 2023! Grayson's girls basketball team defeated Archbishop Chapelle (La.) 58-22 Thursday in the championship game of the St. Pius Christmas Classic. The Rams went 3-0 in the tournament, improving to 10-4 on the season. Tatum Brown was named tournament MVP, and Samara Saunders earned a spot on the all-tournament team. The Rams are back at home Friday where they'll open the New Year with a game against Brookwood. Georgia saw its population increase by 1.7% between 2020 and 2022, new numbers from the Census Bureau show. As of July 1, Georgia's population stood at more than 10.9 million, up from about 10.7 million at the same time in 2020. The Peach State's neighbor to the south, Florida, saw its population increase at a higher rate of 3% during the same timeframe, Census numbers show. South Carolina (2.9%), North Carolina (2.4%) and Tennessee (1.8%) also grew more than the Peach State, though Georgia has a higher population than the three states. However, Georgia's growth outpaced that of Alabama, which saw its population increase by 0.9%. For more information, visit www.lanierislands.com For advertising inquiries, please email j.southerland@bgadgroup.com For more information be sure to visit www.bgpodcastnetwork.com   https://www.lawrencevillega.org/  https://www.foxtheatre.org/  https://guideinc.org/  https://www.psponline.com/  https://www.kiamallofga.com/  https://www.milb.com/gwinnett  https://www.fernbankmuseum.org/                     See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

St. Stephen's United Methodist Fairfax Sermons
"New Year's Day Epiphany", Message from Pastor Minoo at St. Stephen's, Jan 1 2023

St. Stephen's United Methodist Fairfax Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 16:50


The Mission of St. Stephen's United Methodist Church is to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. To learn more about St. Stephen's or to view our full online service from January 1, 2023, please visit wwww.ststephensfairfax.org

Reclaiming the Garden
2022 Year-in-Review with Couch Communion

Reclaiming the Garden

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 78:36


We're back with our podcast pals Jordyn and Sara for another year-in-review! We talk about Tish Harrison Warren's terrible not-Anglican New York Times takes, God is Grey's problematic treatment of Jo Luehmann that left a bad taste in our mouths, the bureaucratic nightmare that is the United Methodist Church split, the overturning of Roe v. Wade, the amazing anthems of Maddie Zahm for us burnt-out Good Christian Girls, the chaos of Elon Musk buying Twitter, and more. We hope y'all have a Happy New Year and are so excited for what's in store in 2023! We have merch! Get your Bible Dyke Energy Tee and more here: https://www.redbubble.com/people/rtgardenpodcast/shop Our social media: @reclaimingthegarden on Insta, @RtGardenPodcast on Twitter, and Reclaiming the Garden on Facebook. Our personal accounts: @thatpunchabletheaternerd, @April_TheWriter (April is on Twitter and Insta). Also, our podcast account follows a bunch of awesome folks + podcasts in the exvangelical/deconstruction world and progressive Christian world, so if you're looking for more resources, that's a great place to start!

Tyler Memorial United Methodist Church
Tyler Memorial & Springbank United Methodist Church-- Christmas Day Worship (December 25, 2022)

Tyler Memorial United Methodist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 53:25


TYLER MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH     Worship Service: Sunday 11:00 AMChurch Office Hours: Mon, Wed 9 AM – 12 PMTyler Memorial United Methodist Church260 Mill StreetChillicothe, Ohio 45601(740) 773-1270tylerumcoffice@gmail.comCCLI# 592146CSPL089857

Louisiana Now
A Conversation with Bishop Delores Williamston, Part 2

Louisiana Now

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 28:32


Join us for a conversation with Bishop Delores Williamston, who is set to become the new bishop of the Louisiana Conference on January 1. This is the second of two episodes.  In this episode, Todd Rossnagel asks Bishop Williamston about what brings her joy and what sabbath looks like for her. We also get a glimpse of her call story, and we also get to meet her pet dog, a Shih Tzu, who has several names! ______ Bishop Delores J. “Dee” Williamston, a Kansas Army National Guard veteran, and a Methodist church administrator, was assigned to the Louisiana Conference at the South Central Jurisdictional meeting in Houston on November 3, 2022. Bishop Williamston was ordained as an elder in 2010 and previously served in the Great Plains Conference as the superintendent for the Hays, Hutchinson and Salina Districts. She also served as Director of Clergy Excellence and Assistant to the Bishop. Prior to beginning her service with the Great Plains Conference, Williamston served churches in Independence, Salina, Mentor, and Topeka in Kansas. She earned her master's of divinity from Saint Paul School of Theology in Kansas City, Missouri, with a specialty in Black Church ministries and evangelism. She is pursuing a doctorate of ministry from Philips Theological Seminary in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Bishop Williamston's background includes a 22-year military career in the Kansas Army National Guard, where she served as a technician and eventually became chief supervisor of the account and finance operations at the U.S. Property and Fiscal Office in Topeka. Her rank upon retirement from the National Guard was sergeant first class. Bishop Williamston, a breast cancer survivor, has one son, seven grandchildren, and one pet Shih Tzu.

Becoming Bridge Builders
Just A Closer Walk with Jesus Author Alan T. Black

Becoming Bridge Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 42:51


Meet Author Alan T. Black.  Alan was raised and grew up in the United Methodist Church. While He proudly embraced his background and personal history within the United Methodist Church, Alan felt that what is essential is not the denomination you are a part of. What matters most is the relationship that you have with the Lord. Part and parcel of any relationship is the level of commitment that one makes to it. With any and all relationships, they are going to take time to grow.Stories and Strategies Podcast About Public Relations, Marketing, and Human CommunicationListen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Support the show

Sellersburg UMC
SERMON | John 1:1-14 | PREPARE THE WAY FOR THE LORD - 4. "Testifying to the Light" by Rev. Joseph Sanford at Sellersburg United Methodist Church in Sellersburg, IN

Sellersburg UMC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 11:52


SERMON | John 1:1-14 | PREPARE THE WAY FOR THE LORD - 4. "Testifying to the Light" by Rev. Joseph Sanford at Sellersburg United Methodist Church in Sellersburg, IN

Be Encouraged with Bishop Julius C. Trimble
Christmas Insurance and Assurance from Bishop Julius C. Trimble

Be Encouraged with Bishop Julius C. Trimble

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 29:36 Transcription Available


Bishop Julius C. Trimble is the Resident Bishop of the Indiana Area of the United Methodist Church.Bishop Trimble has the personal mission to encourage all people with the love of Jesus Christ to rise to their highest potential. It is his commitment to his personal mission that led Bishop Trimble to create the “To Be Encouraged” Podcast along with co-host Rev.Dr. Brad Miller. Bishop Trimble says, “I am compelled by Jesus to share with you an encouraging word or two about Jesus, theology, the Bible, the pandemic, the environment, racism, voting rights, human sexuality, and the state of the United Methodist Church.” To Be Encouraged with Bishop Julius C. Trimble is to be published weekly and is available at www.tobeencouraged.com and all the podcast directories.https://www.inumc.org/bishop/office-of-the-bishop/

Louisiana Now
A Conversation with Bishop Delores Williamston, Part 1

Louisiana Now

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 25:45


Join us for a conversation with Bishop Delores Williamston, who is set to become the new bishop of the Louisiana Conference on January 1.  This episode is the first of two.   In this episode, Todd Rossnagel asks Bishop Williamston about her family, her background, which includes work inside the church as well as military service. They also discuss the historic nature of her election.  To watch the consecration service from the 2022 South Central Jurisdiction, please head here.  ______ Bishop Delores J. “Dee” Williamston, a Kansas Army National Guard veteran, and a Methodist church administrator, was assigned to the Louisiana Conference at the South Central Jurisdictional meeting in Houston on November 3, 2022. Bishop Williamston was ordained as an elder in 2010 and previously served in the Great Plains Conference as the superintendent for the Hays, Hutchinson and Salina Districts. She also served as Director of Clergy Excellence and Assistant to the Bishop. Prior to beginning her service with the Great Plains Conference, Williamston served churches in Independence, Salina, Mentor, and Topeka in Kansas. She earned her master's of divinity from Saint Paul School of Theology in Kansas City, Missouri, with a specialty in Black Church ministries and evangelism. She is pursuing a doctorate of ministry from Philips Theological Seminary in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Bishop Williamston's background includes a 22-year military career in the Kansas Army National Guard, where she served as a technician and eventually became chief supervisor of the account and finance operations at the U.S. Property and Fiscal Office in Topeka. Her rank upon retirement from the National Guard was sergeant first class. Bishop Williamston, a breast cancer survivor, has one son, seven grandchildren, and one pet Shih Tzu.

St. Stephen's United Methodist Fairfax Sermons
"Voice of The Innkeeper", Message from Pastor Spencer at St. Stephen's, Dec 18 2022

St. Stephen's United Methodist Fairfax Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 18:39


The Mission of St. Stephen's United Methodist Church is to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. To learn more about St. Stephen's or to view our full online service from December 18, 2022, please visit wwww.ststephensfairfax.org

Palsys With Palsies
PWP 58: Why is the United Methodist Church No Longer United?

Palsys With Palsies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 68:26


In this episode, Justin and Bekah discuss the current state of the United Methodist Church. It is splitting due to a disagreement between conservative and progressive factions within the church over whether or not being gay/queer/a member of the LGBTQIA+ community is "compatible with a Christian life." Within the current Methodist Book of Discipline, it isn't. The discussion today is informative for those who want to know more, but may hit a raw nerve for those who are being affected. Take care of yourself. "I will not let a human soul be sacrificed to my own conviction." -Justin HancockFollow us on Twitter and Facebook!Donte to the Julian Way so that they can continue to support those with disabilities Here!Music is  Tekilla Sunrise by Jon Presstone

WallBuilders Live! with David Barton & Rick Green
Conservative Values are Beginning to Resurface – on Good News Friday

WallBuilders Live! with David Barton & Rick Green

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 27:59


Today we cover some recent good news stories- Could ESG be phasing out? Did Representative Lauren Boebert of Colorado win her reelection? Biblical teachings and conservative values are returning to the United Methodist Church, and Governor Larry Hogan of Maryland bans TikTok on government devices. All this and more!

Truth N Love
38: United Methodist Church Split

Truth N Love

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 13:46


The UMC is splitting, but they aren't alone. Join us today as we talk about divisions in the church.

Dangerous Dogma
81. Robin Lovin on Leading the Church in a Polarized Society

Dangerous Dogma

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 49:48


Robin Lovin, an ordained United Methodist minister and a former professor of ethics at Southern Methodist University, talks with Word&Way President Brian Kaylor about his new book What Do We Do When Nobody Is Listening?: Leading the Church in a Polarized Society. He also discusses Dietrich Bonhoeffer, learning to listening, and the current schism in the United Methodist Church. Note: Don't forget to subscribe to our award-winning e-newsletter A Public Witness that helps you make sense of faith, culture, and politics.

Nightmare Success In and Out
Nightmare Success In and Out with Guest Darryl Burton

Nightmare Success In and Out

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 65:41


What would you do if you were picked out of a line up for murder that you didn't commit? Darryl Burton lived that nightmare and finally was exonerated 24 years later. Some hurdles really had to be cleared to make this unbelievable story happen. There were bad jail house snitches who later recanted their story, and eyewitness accounts that did not fit the description of Darryl, and on top of that, Darryl was out of the state when this murder happened. Darryl was sentenced by a jury after 30 minutes of "deliberation" receiving life in prison without parole to a prison what TIME magazine coined "The bloodiest 47 acres in America."...The maximum security Missouri State Penitentiary that has now been shuttered.  The sign read as you entered, "Welcome to the Missouri State Pen. Leave all your hopes, family, and dreams behind.” Darryl was rightly enraged, and angered at the injustice that happened to him, but he used that rage to fuel his passion to be heard and eventually be exonerated. He studied the law and wrote to Presidents, congressman, senators, and organizations that helped free the innocent. He finally was freed after 24 years. He never gave up even when he joked his name should have been Darryl "denied" Burton. His story between those years is gripping and stays with you. Darryl is now a pastor at the The United Methodist Church of the Resurrection, the largest United Methodist Church in the US. He runs an organization that helps people who are released from prison to reenter to society. You can donate to his organization The Miracle of Innocence. Darryl Burton is known as the Miracle Man, and his story is truly disturbing and incredibly inspiring. Look for Darryl's book coming soon Innocent; A Second Look.

Changing Churches: Wisdom for Transformational Leaders
Navigating the Waves of Disaffiliations with Dr. Chris Ritter

Changing Churches: Wisdom for Transformational Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 63:00


Dr. Chris Ritter, publisher, writer, and editor of www.peopleneedjesus.net, shares his thoughts about the wave of disaffiliating churches happening in the United Methodist Church in America. Chris, who is also the Directing Pastor of Geneseo First United Methodist Church in the Illinois Great Rivers Conference, helps explain what is happening in this season of disaffiliation and what it means to the future of Methodism. Chris' Bloghttp://www.peopleneedjesus.net  First United Methodist Church of Geneso, Illinoishttp://peopleneedjesus.orgChrist United Methodist Churchhttp://www.christunited.comDavid Couch, Composer of Podcast Introhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgAK9Pr5685C4ZsmQYKbncg

Igniting Imagination: Leadership Ministry
Formation and the Phygital Space (Bonus Episode)

Igniting Imagination: Leadership Ministry

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 65:27


This is a first for us: we recorded this bonus episode on location at a gathering we hosted in Austin, Texas! You'll hear from eleven amazing leaders and practitioners of physical and digital ministry, or “phygital” as we've now learned to say. These pioneers in digital ministry will share their experiences, questions, and ideas for what the digital space makes possible for formation. From designing apps that reach younger generations to exploring virtual reality in the Metaverse, and so much more, this episode is interesting, informative, and inspiring! In this episode, we discuss: What formation is and what the digital space makes possible? (3:20)Three experiences of digital ministry: worship, an app, and campus ministry (18:38)Experiments in the Metaverse and the possibilities of virtual reality (34:36)Ethics and digital ministry (44:37)Reaching the unchurched or dechurched in digital space (51:54)Quotes:“I think the church is supposed to be the one making that clarion call to adventure for people to accept and then we're supposed to equip them along the way to launch them back into the world they came from so they can awaken others. … All the things that happen along the way take us from walking towards Jesus to walking with Jesus.” -Christian WashingtonThere's an app that you can download that actually wakes you up inside of a homeless person's tent. It starts with 360 degree recording of a real person's tent being arrested and dragged out of her tent. Then it fades to black and then you open up in a virtual environment, it's still her tent, but you can reach out and grab her mug, and then it plays an audio story of where the mug came from. You can pick up her journal and flip through it, or you can pick up her family photo and it flashes back to a memory of her and her family. It's immersive, empathy building storytelling where you take somebody and transport them into somebody else's life, experiencing what other people are going through and building empathy across people groups.” -Dan BrackenBios of GuestsRachel BillupsRachel Billups is a visionary, leader, speaker and author. Currently she serves as Senior Pastor at New Albany United Methodist Church, New Albany/Columbus, Ohio. Rachel draws on her love of people and passion to explore new venues for ministry and mission. Rachel is an ordained Elder within the United Methodist Church and holds a Bachelor's Degree in Bible/Religion and History from Anderson University and a Master of Divinity Degree from Duke Divinity School. Rachel is a popular speaker for national gatherings and has recently authored BE BOLD: Finding Four Fierce published by Abingdon Press. You can find her on social media at: @rlbillups.Dan BrackenDan has been on staff at Ginghamsburg Church since 2006, where he serves as Ginghamsburg's communication director. Dan also leads the Ginghamsburg Design Studio, the church's in-house creative media resourcing team where he practices all aspects of communication – video production, graphic design, social media, website development, app creation, creative storytelling, marketing and wayfinding.Phil DiekePhil is a Deacon in the North Texas Conference, currently serving as the Associate Pastor of Discipleship and Digital Ministry at White Rock UMC in East Dallas. He chairs the Board of Church and Society for the North Texas Conference, is a facilitator for Project Unity's Together We Dine, sits on the Executive Board of Texas Impact and the Leadership Council for Faith Forward Dallas. Phil believes technology, like human nature, has the potential to do good and all kinds of harm in this...

The Fresh Expressions Podcast
Love Languages and Church Remissioning with Michael Beck

The Fresh Expressions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 35:28


What if the key to congregational renewal is knowing their “love language?” Michael Beck, in his efforts to help three different congregations experience renewal, learned that different churches are different. In this episode, Dr. Beck will help you identify your church's “love language” and how that could shape your ministry.Michael Beck is Director of Re-Missioning for Fresh Expressions US. He co-pastors a rural church in Florida and serves in a number of denominational roles for the Florida Conference of the United Methodist Church. He is the author of multiple books including Deep Roots, Wild Branches and Contextual Intelligence.

Makers & Mystics
S10 E13: Learning To Be with Juanita Rasmus

Makers & Mystics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 38:47


Juanita Campbell Rasmus is a speaker, writer, spiritual director, and contemplative teacher. She is the co-pastor of St. John's United Methodist Church in downtown Houston which she founded with her husband, Rudy in 1992.In this episode, Juanita shares with me how a major depressive episode became the catalyst for personal renewal. Following our season ten theme of restoration for the heart of the artist, Juanita's story and her accompanying book Learning To Be: Finding Your Center After The Bottom Falls Out offers a glimpse of hope for the artist to find renewal no matter how dark the night. Patrons of the podcast can enjoy an additional interview segment with Juanita on the key spiritual practices that helped her return to her center and discover new ways of being.

The Naked Sermon
The Magnificat

The Naked Sermon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 23:12


Today Dez and Marshall discuss Luke 1:46-55 - The Song of Mary. Otherwise known as “The Magnificat,” it is the longest dialogue by a woman in the entire New Testament. Together they explore what it might have been like to have been pregnant and giving birth under the control of the empire. Dez sees parallels in Mary and the woman giving birth in Revelation 12 and Marshall reflects on the divine feminine. They talk about mercy and hope during not only this season before Christmas, but for all time.  Dez Valdez is a Seminary Student at Claremont School of Theology and the Youth Ministry Coordinator at Prince of Life Lutheran Church in Oregon City, Oregon. Marshall Wattman-Turner is a Pastor at St. Paul's United Methodist Church in Milwaukie, Oregon.

Radical Grace/The Lutheran Difference
There's Life In The Old Stump Yet

Radical Grace/The Lutheran Difference

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 59:58


The United Methodist Church continues to lose congregations, an after-school Satan Club gets canceled, and children's brains aged fast during covid lockdowns. Afterward, it's revealed that the Stump of Jesse isn't dead yet. Visit Matthew Pancake's Facebook http://www.facebook.com/matthew.pancake Visit Pastor Gary Held's Facebook http://www.facebook.com/garyheld Visit our Website www.RadicalGraceRadio.com Visit Our Youtube Page

Issues, Etc.
3424. A Congregational Exodus from the United Methodist Church – Mark Tooley, 12/8/22

Issues, Etc.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 14:37


Mark Tooley of the Institute on Religion and Democracy There Go the Churches The Institute on Religion and Democracy

CivitasLA
Ep #82: Interfaith Community | Reverend Kathy Cooper Ledesma, Senior Pastor, Hollywood United Methodist Church & Rabbi Mari Chernow, Senior Rabbi, Temple Israel of Hollywood

CivitasLA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 36:22


Author David J. Wolpe, in “Why Faith Matters,” states “On balance, religion increases social stability, enabling people to live happier, more productive and better lives. That does not demonstrate religion's truth. It does remind us, however, that we are creatures designed to flourish – to heal and to help – when we believe.” Exploring the state of our local faith community, CivitasLA is joined by two of our region's most noted faith leaders, Rev. Kathy Cooper Ledesma, Senior Pastor of Hollywood United Methodist Church, described as “…one of the most famous churches on the Pacific Coast” and Rabbi Mari Chernow, Senior Rabbi of Temple Israel of Hollywood, “a historic reform congregation in the heart of Los Angeles that serves as a vibrant hub Jewish life” as we discuss the central role their respective institutions have played in nurturing faith and their engagement in the civic life of the Hollywood community and of our region. To learn more, please visit: https://hollywoodumc.org/; https://www.tioh.org/ And to learn more about CivitasLA, we invite you to visit www.CivitasLA.com. And we hope you'll rate and review our show; and connect with us on Facebook (@CivitasLA), Instagram (@Civitas_LA) and Twitter (@Civitas_LA).

Charlotte Talks
LGBTQ policies divide United Methodist Church

Charlotte Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 49:35


For LGBTQ+ individuals, it seems like one step forward and two steps back. The topic of same-sex marriage has caused a rift in the United Methodist Church. We take a closer look.

The Dallas Morning News
12/5/22: 7 year old girl found dead after abduction...and more news

The Dallas Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 4:17


7 year old girl found dead after abduction; No Black jurors selected for murder case against ex-Fort Worth officer; 439 Texas congregations granted approval to leave the United Methodist Church; Man convicted in Dallas case involving meth concealed in cauliflower;

Theology in the Raw
S2 Ep1027: A Palestinian Christian's Perspecrtive on the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict: Alex Awad

Theology in the Raw

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 56:09


Alex co-founded Bethlehem Bible College in Bethlehem (yes, that one) and served as a professor and dean of students for many years. Alex received his MA in Missiology (1989) from Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore KY; MA in Education (1976) from N. Georgia University in Dahlonega GA; BS in Secondary Education (1973) from Lee University in Cleveland, TN; BA in Biblical Education (1970) from Lee University in Cleveland, TN. He has also been a pastor and missionary for the United Methodist Church. Having lived in Israel from 1946-2015, Alex has seen a LOT! He shares his perspecive about the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, as a palestinian Christian who has lived through much fo the conflict.  Alex said you could email him at alexeawad@yahoo.com if you want him to send you a copy of his brother's book, which he talks about on the podcast. He only asks for a small donation.  If you would like to support Theology in the Raw, please visit patreon.com/theologyintheraw for more information! 

Issues, Etc.
3181. The Progressive Agenda in the United Methodist Church – John Lomparis, 11/14/22

Issues, Etc.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 19:48


John Lomperis of the Institute on Religion and Democracy The Institute on Religion and Democracy