Podcast appearances and mentions of Michael Douglas

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American actor and producer

  • 953PODCASTS
  • 1,227EPISODES
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  • Oct 11, 2021LATEST
Michael Douglas

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Best podcasts about Michael Douglas

Latest podcast episodes about Michael Douglas

The Movie Podcast
Marvel Studios' What If...? Episode 9 Review, Interview with Animation Team, and The Last Duel Press Conference

The Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 42:51


Happy Canadian Thanksgiving! This week on a very special BONUS episode of The Movie Podcast, we're joined by WHAT IF...? Unit Director Anthony Di Ninno and Background Artist Steven Wong of Stellar Creative Lab to discuss their work on Marvel Studios' hit and expectation defying show. Daniel and Anthony also discuss their thoughts on the season finale of WHAT IF...? and cover the press conference for Ridley Scott's THE LAST DUEL. Listen now on all podcast feeds and on TheMoviePodcast.caContact: hello@themoviepodcast.caINTERVIEW WITH MARVEL STUDIOS' WHAT IF? UNIT DIRECTOR ANTHONY DI NINNO [00:21:00]INTERVIEW WITH MARVEL STUDIOS' WHAT IF? BACKGROUND ARIST STEVEN WONG [00:31:50]FOLLOW USFollow Daniel on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow Shahbaz on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow Anthony on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow The Movie Podcast on Twitter, Instagram, TikTok, Discord, and YouTubeThe Movie Podcast is on a mission to hit 200 Apple Podcast reviews before September, click here to head over to our show page on APPLE PODCASTS and leave us a 5 STAR review!ABOUTThe Movie Podcast is one of Canada's top film and review podcasts. Every week you'll hear film lovers Daniel, Shahbaz, and Anthony discuss the biggest movie news, talk trailers, what's coming soon, ponder a unique topic of show, and speak to special guests from across the film industry. Catch a new episode of The Movie Podcast every Monday and watch out for Review episodes on all the latest movies and series.

Futro Hidden Movie Gems

R(Recommend edited) Thriller, David Fincher & Michael Douglas, Nick

The Movie Podcast
Marvel Studios' What If... Ultron Won? Review and Reaction (Episode 8)

The Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 12:36


Daniel, Shahbaz, & Anthony return to an Age of Ultron in their review and reaction to Marvel Studios' What If...? Episode 8. SPOILER WARNING. What If...? is available exclusively on Disney+ with new episodes weekly.Listen now on all podcast feeds and on TheMoviePodcast.caContact: hello@themoviepodcast.ca“What If...?” flips the script on the MCU, reimagining famous events from the films in unexpected ways. Marvel Studios' first animated series focuses on different heroes from the MCU, featuring a voice cast that includes a host of stars who reprise their roles. Directed by Bryan Andrews with AC Bradley as head writer, “What If...?” launches exclusively on Disney+ on August 11, 2021.FOLLOW USFollow Daniel on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow Shahbaz on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow Anthony on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow The Movie Podcast on Twitter, Instagram, TikTok, Discord, and YouTubeThe Movie Podcast is on a mission to hit 200 Apple Podcast reviews, click here to head over to our show page on APPLE PODCASTS and leave us a 5 STAR review!ABOUTThe Movie Podcast is one of Canada's top film and review podcasts. Every week you'll hear film lovers Daniel, Shahbaz, and Anthony discuss the biggest movie news, talk trailers, what's coming soon, ponder a unique topic of show, and speak to special guests from across the film industry. Catch a new episode of The Movie Podcast every Monday and watch out for Review episodes on all the latest movies and series.

Drop Da Mic.
EPISODE 238: FINCHER'S HIDDEN TREASURE (THE GAME 97' film review)

Drop Da Mic.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 121:41


In this special end of September episode, the podcast is once again taken over by our local projectionist, Mr. Chris Pawlak. Join us as he takes the show down the rabbit hole of director, David Fincher's 97' film, ‘THE GAME.' Tune in for updated pop culture news as well as the usual weekly recommendations for both, TV and film.

If Not Now Wen
Interview with Dena Mekawi - Founder of Style & Resilience

If Not Now Wen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 33:25


A driven visionary at the intersection of strategic partnerships, impact, entertainment, & global business development . Dena's work includes working with UHNWI, entertainment space, United Nations, startups, and established brands providing consulting, marketing, PR & communications strategy. Dena brings her resources to appropriate business opportunities. Impact driven communication agency, Style & Resilience works to amplify underrepresented voices by using communication strategies, strategic partnerships, and creativity. Dena works within the entertainment space to leverage influence through social good campaigns, partnerships and more. From playing an integral role at Oprah magazine, to moderating International Day of Peace 2016, Dena was chosen along side notable Goodwill Peace Ambassadors strategizing peace strategies with Leonardo DiCaprio, former Secretary General of the United Nations, Stevie Wonder, and personally recognized by Michael Douglas. Dena advises startups, corporations, family offices, non- profits & high profile clients including Royal Family Office in Dubai. Dena acts as the key liaison & bridge for US & Middle East Markets. The ability to thrive in a multicultural and dynamic environment leads to impact & long term value.

SNOBS ON FILM
Black Rain

SNOBS ON FILM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 61:36


Join us for the season finale of Snobs On Film: Redemption by exploring classic 80s-style action with Ridley Scott's underrated Michael Douglas thriller: Black Rain. When New York City cop Nick Conklin chases a Japanese mob figure to Tokyo, Conklin's demons come along for the ride, quickly derail the investigation, and bury him beneath his own hubris. Soon, Conklin and his partner are outsiders in a world that has no way in, stalking a man who represents the fall of ancient beliefs and the rise of a kingdom without a code. When the unthinkable happens, Conklin must face his failures and make a defining choice between the satisfaction of revenge and the honor of redemption.

AlmostSideways Podcast
CXLV: Dear Evan Hansen, Greatest Musical Numbers

AlmostSideways Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021


 Recorded - 9/25/21On this episode of the Almost Sideways Movie Podcast, we discuss the latest Broadway adaptation to hit theaters before counting down the greatest musical numbers of all time.  Then, for trivia, we examine the careers of a married couple which happened to share the same birthday.  Here are the highlights:What We've Been WatchingZach's Criterion Review: The Vanishing (5:40)Terry's Oscar Anniversary Review: Monsieur Lazhar (8:00)Todd's Matt Dillon Review: Liar's Moon (12:30)Featured Review: Dear Evan Hansen (16:45)Power Rankings: Greatest Musical Numbers in Musicals (45:00)Guessing Adam's List (1:23:20)TriviaZach's Trivia Review: Deadpool (1:28:00)Todd's Trivia Review: Body Heat (1:34:45)Trivia: Filmographies of Michael Douglas & Catherine Zeta-Jones (1:37:50)Quote of the Day (1:47:30)Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, YouTube, or Pandora!If you can't subscribe, listen here.Find AlmostSideways everywhere!Websitealmostsideways.comFacebookhttps://www.facebook.com/AlmostSidewayscom-130953353614569/AlmostSideways Twitter: @almostsidewaysTerry's Twitter: @almostsideterryZach's Twitter: @pro_zach36Adam's Twitter: @adamsidewaysApple Podcastshttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/almostsideways-podcast/id1270959022Spotifyhttps://open.spotify.com/show/7oVcx7Y9U2Bj2dhTECzZ4mStitcherhttps://www.stitcher.com/podcast/almost-sideways-movie-podcastYouTubehttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfEoLqGyjn9M5Mr8umWiktA/featured?view_as=subscriberPandorahttps://pandora.app.link/hfYGimTce8

The Rich Eisen Show
REShow: Jalen Hurts and James Harrison - Hour 2 (09-24-21)

The Rich Eisen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 59:05


Eagles QB Jalen Hurts tells Rich what's different between this year and his rookie season, what new head coach Nick Sirianni brings to the team, how he's preparing to face the Cowboys in Monday Night Football's NFC East showdown, and whys his mindset didn't change once was named Philly's starting QB. Former All-Pro Linebacker James Harrison and Rich discuss his improbable ‘A Football Life' journey from NFL practice-squad player to 2-time Super Bowl champion, why the perceived rift between Bill Belichick and Tom Brady is a media fabrication, and how the Steelers should adjust their offense with Ben Roethlisberger approaching the end of the line. TJ Jefferson lists his Top 5 Spawns of Stars among Kobe Bryant, Barry Bonds, The Rock, Michael Douglas and Peyton Manning. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thirty Twenty Ten
The Fisher King, A Cancer Comedy, and Blue Steel

Thirty Twenty Ten

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 134:36


Sept. 24-30: Scott Bakula is a QB and a captain, Chiklis is the Commish, Michael Douglas won't say a word, Seth Rogan is undeclared, Jennifer Garner goes undercover, hillbilly horror, Michael Shannon builds a bunker, Anthony Hopkins has the shining, Daniel Craig cracks up, Jerry Springer lowers the bar, and the greatest day in modern music history. All that and more this week on Thirty Twenty Ten, your weekly look back on the week that was 30, 20, and 10 years ago.

Motion Picture Meltdown
MPM: Ep. 421 - Police Papa Johns Points

Motion Picture Meltdown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021


 Black Rain | Ricochet - This week, Stephen chooses the films and we go through a couple of lesser-known action flicks, Ridley Scott's Black Rain (1989) and Ricochet (1991). In this episode, we choose whether we'd watch one bad action film every day for the rest of our lives in exchange for $5 million, we talk about smoking in the 90's, and Michael Douglas' Mel Gibson-esque mullet. Enjoy!Check

Watch With Jen
Watch With Jen - S2: E39 - Michael Douglas with Sean Burns

Watch With Jen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 75:02


This week, I was so pleased to welcome back one of the funniest guests I've ever had, the quick-witted, fresh, and very clever Sean Burns. A staff writer at WBUR's The ARTery and contributing writer at North Shore Movies, Sean Burns was Philadelphia Weekly's lead film critic from 1999-2013 and worked as the movie section contributing editor at the Improper Bostonian from 2006-2014. Additionally, a graduate of NYU's Tisch School of the Arts and the recipient of an award for excellence in criticism from The Greater Philadelphia Society of Professional Journalists in 2002, Sean's reviews, interviews, and essays have also appeared in Metro, The Village Voice, The Boston Herald, Nashville Scene, Time Out New York, Philadelphia City Paper, The House Next Door, Movie Mezzanine, RogerEbert.com, and more. Additionally, he's also a projectionist who can tell you exactly what's wrong if you're messing up the presentation of a movie at an AMC Theater.Following up on an impromptu pact we made the last time Sean was a guest where we impossibly discovered that although we were both movie-obsessive teens at the time, neither one of us had ever bothered to see Disclosure, we turned that promise into today's theme. Investigating the sexy, sleazy side of Michael Douglas, in this very funny, adults-only episode, we take a closer look at Fatal Attraction, Basic Instinct, Disclosure, and Solitary Man in order to evaluate the man, the myth, the Michael in Lothario Mode. The ideal soundtrack for your household chores or whatever you decide to do in the kitchen (just please, take the dishes out of the sink first) and the ultimate conversation to hear on your way to dance awkwardly in a deep v-neck sweater in a nightclub on a Saturday night, I know you'll dig this one.Note: Due to content & language - perfectly fitting our subject, of course - this episode is rated E for Explicit.Theme Music: Solo Acoustic Guitar by Jason Shaw, Free Music ArchiveOriginally Posted on Patreon (9/18/21) here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/56321819

The Movie Podcast
Marvel Studios' What If... Killmonger Rescued Tony Stark? Review and Reaction (Episode 6)

The Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 11:21


Daniel, Shahbaz, & Anthony feel things are a little too familiar in their review and reaction to Marvel Studios' What If...? Episode 6. SPOILER WARNING. What If...? is available exclusively on Disney+ with new episodes weekly.Listen now on all podcast feeds and on TheMoviePodcast.caContact: hello@themoviepodcast.ca“What If...?” flips the script on the MCU, reimagining famous events from the films in unexpected ways. Marvel Studios' first animated series focuses on different heroes from the MCU, featuring a voice cast that includes a host of stars who reprise their roles. Directed by Bryan Andrews with AC Bradley as head writer, “What If...?” launches exclusively on Disney+ on August 11, 2021.FOLLOW USFollow Daniel on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow Shahbaz on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow Anthony on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow The Movie Podcast on Twitter, Instagram, TikTok, Discord, and YouTubeThe Movie Podcast is on a mission to hit 200 Apple Podcast reviews, click here to head over to our show page on APPLE PODCASTS and leave us a 5 STAR review!ABOUTThe Movie Podcast is one of Canada's top film and review podcasts. Every week you'll hear film lovers Daniel, Shahbaz, and Anthony discuss the biggest movie news, talk trailers, what's coming soon, ponder a unique topic of show, and speak to special guests from across the film industry. Catch a new episode of The Movie Podcast every Monday and watch out for Review episodes on all the latest movies and series.

Mastering Money
Mastering Money 9/14/21

Mastering Money

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 51:37


When most people hear about insider selling, they think about the infamous Ivan Boesky trading scandal from the 1980s that inspired Michael Douglas' Gordon Gekko character in the movie "Wall Street."   …Or they think about Martha Stewart… selling shares of the biotech company ImClone just days before the FDA announced it wasn't approving a new ImClone drug.    But most insider selling today isn't illegal for that matter. It is something that is tracked and some investors actually make decisions based on whether CEOs are buying or selling shares of the company they manage.  The key lies in WHEN they place the  buy or the sell order, because there are TWO TYPES of insider trading: LEGAL and IL-Legal!  Today, we'll learn more about the difference and it may shock you.   An interesting show you don't want to miss....MASTERING MONEY is on the air!!!

Halloweenies: A Freddy Krueger Podcast
Basic Instinct (1992) - Randy's Recs

Halloweenies: A Freddy Krueger Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 167:16


After surviving the Hollywood horrors within Scream 3, the Halloweenies are heading upstate to San Francisco to solve a string of murderers. Make no mistake, these are grisly crimes, sure, but they're also familiar, especially for readers of crime novelist Catherine Tramell. You guessed it: For September, the gang taking an ice pick to Paul Verhoeven's 1992 erotic thriller Basic Instinct as part of this season's ensuing Randy's Recs series. Together, they discuss the smutty film's curious parallels to Wes Craven's meta franchise, the myriad controversies that surrounded the 1992 thriller, the behind-the-scenes chaos that would go on to fuel the film, the sexual fluidity (or lack thereof) of Michael Douglas, and the blockbuster sex appeal of Sharon Stone. Special guest includes Meagan Navarro.Follow us on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Movie Podcast
Marvel Studios' What If... Zombies? Review and Reaction (Episode 5)

The Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 14:58


Daniel, Shahbaz, & Anthony prepare for the zombie apocalypse in their review and reaction to Marvel Studios' What If...? Episode 5. SPOILER WARNING. What If...? is available exclusively on Disney+ with new episodes weekly.Listen now on all podcast feeds and on TheMoviePodcast.caContact: hello@themoviepodcast.ca“What If...?” flips the script on the MCU, reimagining famous events from the films in unexpected ways. Marvel Studios' first animated series focuses on different heroes from the MCU, featuring a voice cast that includes a host of stars who reprise their roles. Directed by Bryan Andrews with AC Bradley as head writer, “What If...?” launches exclusively on Disney+ on August 11, 2021.FOLLOW USFollow Daniel on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow Shahbaz on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow Anthony on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow The Movie Podcast on Twitter, Instagram, TikTok, Discord, and YouTubeThe Movie Podcast is on a mission to hit 200 Apple Podcast reviews before September, click here to head over to our show page on APPLE PODCASTS and leave us a 5 STAR review!ABOUTThe Movie Podcast is one of Canada's top film and review podcasts. Every week you'll hear film lovers Daniel, Shahbaz, and Anthony discuss the biggest movie news, talk trailers, what's coming soon, ponder a unique topic of show, and speak to special guests from across the film industry. Catch a new episode of The Movie Podcast every Monday and watch out for Review episodes on all the latest movies and series.

Mazan Movie Club
'The Game" MMC

Mazan Movie Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 54:09


Host and Corporate Comic Steve Mazan talks to fellow comedians Tony Dijamco & Jake Daniels about David FIncher's underappreciated thriller "The Game" from 1997. Why doesn't this have a brighter light on it? What would this birthday gift cost? Is it rewatchable? Who was miscast? What's Jodie Forster got to do with it? All these questions and more get answered on this week's Mazan Movie Club Podcast.  "The Game" on IMDb Home of the Mazan Movie Club Steve Mazan on Instagram Home of Corporate Comedian Steve Mazan    

Next Level Nerd Movie Podcast

Paul Rudd stars in this inventive take on the Ant-Man story where our "hero" is a thief and an ex-convict. Once Baskin Robbins finds out, Scott Lang is forced to return to his life of crime. Baskin Robbins always finds out. www.nextlevelnerd.com www.patreon.com/nextlevelnerd

Don't Be Crazy
Falling Down (1993)

Don't Be Crazy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 93:35


Welcome to another episode of Don't Be Crazy! Here we discuss and dissect what makes a film (past or present) absolutely amazing or a pile of rubbish. All that we ask of each other is don't be crazy.   When one man is pushed to the brink, what's the next logical step? On this episode we discuss Joel Schumacher's 1993 somewhat overlooked film Falling Down. Michael Douglas is a tour-de-force as a workin man who has had enough. But.....is he perhaps the bad guy? Take a listen and don't forget to like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Make sure to leave a 5 star rating on Apple Podcasts. Have questions or comments? Shoot an email to info@geeklegacy.com and we will answer them on the next podcast.Please subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Pandora, Amazon Podcasts, TuneIn, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or Stitcher and remember to rate and leave a comment. Your feedback helps us tremendously.

The Last Row: A Pretty Good Movie Podcast

Parental guidance is strongly suggested in perhaps the raunchiest episode in The Last Row Podcast's history, as the guys get in bed with 1992 erotic thriller Basic Instinct. Topics include: love scenes, Michael Douglas's irrational confidence, Sharon Stone deserving an Oscar, spotting "those guys from those things" and finally, Last Row Internal Affairs investigates Michael Douglas' character for police violations. Plus, LOTS of juvenile jokes and innuendo. We'll see you again on Thursday, September 16th. --- Subscribe: Subscribe with Spotify Subscribe with Apple Podcasts

Hollywood & Levine
EP240: Name Dropping Theater

Hollywood & Levine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 33:43


Ken drops names and tells stories about various celebrities he has encountered. Along with some tips for those who come to LA hoping to spot stars. Become a member today by going to https://feals.com/levine & you'll get 50% off your first order with free shipping. More podcasts at WAVE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/artist/wave-podcast-network/1437831426

Uncolonized
S08E05: FallingDown

Uncolonized

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 69:04


This week's episode see's Gavin & Daniel reviewing the 1993 Micheal Douglas film, Falling Down. We were surprised with this one to be honest. Hope you enjoy it. Wikipedia: Falling Down is a 1993 American action film[3] directed by Joel Schumacher, written by Ebbe Roe Smith and released by Warner Bros. in the United States on February 26, 1993.[4] The film stars Michael Douglas in the lead role of William "D-Fens" Foster, a divorced and unemployed former defense engineer. The film centers on Foster as he treks on foot across the city of Los Angeles, trying to reach the house of his estranged ex-wife in time for his daughter's birthday. Along the way, a series of encounters, both trivial and provocative, causes him to react with increasing violence and make sardonic observations on life, poverty, the economy, and commercialism. Robert Duvall co-stars as Martin Prendergast, an aging Los Angeles Police Department sergeant on the day of his retirement, who faces his own frustrations even as he tracks down Foster.

Rogues Gallery
Case File 043: Basic Instinct

Rogues Gallery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 100:58


Basic Instinct was a box office hit in the spring of 1992, but its success was matched by the level of controversy it generated. At the center of it all was a star-making performance by Sharon Stone, who gave us one of cinema's most iconic femme fatales and one of the most famous scenes in movie history. On this episode, we're opening up a case file on Catherine Tramell and investigating the heyday of the erotic thriller. Topics include: why Michael Douglas originally wanted them to cast someone more famous as Catherine, the long list of actresses who passed on the role, the bizarre push and pull the movie has between the sensibilities of its screenwriter vs its director, key differences between the theatrical and unrated versions and how those change shift our perception of Nick, the protests that disrupted shooting and the film's opening weekend, the long delayed sequel, the death of the erotic thriller, and more! Facebook | Twitter | Instagram Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Google Play | Spotify Chris's Instagram & Twitter | Kristen's Instagram Chris & Kristen's Web Series: The Strange Case of Lucy Chandler

More Movies Please!
Wall Street

More Movies Please!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 55:39


On the podcast this week, Steven and Sean are becoming depraved, hollow husks of our normal selves as we sell our souls to the financial devil in Oliver Stone's film from 1987, Wall Street. Bear with us for this one, because we hardly know half of what everyone's talking about. We're but humble podcasting fellows. Not the sort of fast-talking, free-wheeling Wall Street goons that would actually understand all the finer points of what's going on between Michael Douglas and Charlie Sheen. To our credit, we're not completely lost, but at times, enjoying and understanding this movie requires at least a Master's degree in some sort of high finance. Heck, we have filmmaking degrees for crying out loud! What do we know about the trading floor, backroom deals, and cocaine-fueled ‘80s parties? What we do know is great acting, and Michael Douglas delivers like nobody's business with this one. Is it any surprise that he won an Oscar for his performance as the conniving and slimy Gordon Gekko? He elevates a film that would otherwise have had the thrill and pace of a middle-of-the-road documentary. His seduction of Charlie Sheen's character is so well-managed and ultimately so heartless that it's clear why Sheen idolized the man. It's also clear how he amassed as much power as he did. In the end, though, what we witness with this film is a work of prescience. The events fictionalized in this movie may have taken place in the ‘80s, but they're as relevant now as ever. Cast your mind back to the global financial troubles that we all endured in 2008. Look at what's happening these days. While this film may have taken place decades ago, its warnings are as current as ever. (Recorded on June 21, 2021) Links to Stuff We Mentioned: Wall Street - IMDb Wall Street trailer - YouTube The Big Short - IMDb Margot Robbie - IMDb Charlie Sheen - IMDb Michael Douglas - IMDb The Lion King - IMDb Martin Sheen - IMDb The Price Is Right - IMDb Unions at The Ringer and Gimlet Media announce their first contracts. - The New York Times Eric Eddings on Twitter - Twitter (This is a searing and important perspective from someone who worked at Gimlet before and during the time of their Bon Appétit debacle. He was given the short shrift and was devalued as an employee and a person. His story is absolutely worth a read and your time.) You've Got Mail - IMDb Love Actually - IMDb Airplane! - IMDb Casablanca - IMDb Citizen Kane - IMDb Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps - IMDb Daryl Hannah - IMDb Pretty Woman - IMDb Fight Club - IMDb Follow Us: Give us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts! Our Libsyn site! Our Instagram profile! Our Twitter profile!

Promotion Man Podcast
They Call Me Supermensch - Shep Gordon (Season 2 Episode 20)

Promotion Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 54:07


If you can clean this up great otherwise create your own version of ALIVE Enterprise with the fingers peace sign and put in Shep Gordon. Probably one of LA LLoyd's & my favorite episode to date because you might not know his name but he positively affected your life because he was the manager for people like Alice Cooper, Blondie, Groucho Marx, George Clinton, Luther Vandross, Anne Murray, Kenny Loggins, Rick James, Gary Wright, Teddy Pendergrass and many, many more. Mike Myers directed Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon, a documentary on Shep's life, featuring Michael Douglas, Sylvester Stallone, Alice Cooper, Steven Tyler, Willie Nelson and Sammy Hagar in 2013.  Shep has had more careers in this lifetime than most anyone on this planet from films like The Duellists, Kiss of the Spider Woman, and many many more to Culinary world where he single handedly created the celebrity chef's like Emeril Lagasse, Roger Verge, Wolfgang Puck and a dozen more.   Recommended Music: Elvis Presley: Jailhouse Rock John Lennon: Give Peace a Chance Alice Cooper: Eighteen Alice Cooper: Killer

Raw Data By P3
Greg Beaumont

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 82:45


We didn't know what to expect when we sat down with Greg Beaumont, Senior Business Intelligence Specialist at Microsoft specializing in serving Microsoft's Healthcare space customers' technical Power BI issues.  What we got was an insightful, delightful, and impactful conversation with a really cool and smart human! References in this Episode: The Game Azure Health Bot The Future Will Be Decentralized-Charles Hoskinson Spider Goats Episode Timeline: 3:10 - The magic of discovery with the Power Platform, It's all about the customers(and Greg has a LOT of customers!), and Greg's Data Origin Story 21:10 - The IT/Business Gap, Getting good BI and keeping data security is a tricky thing, The COVID Challenge hits Healthcare 43:00 - Power BI-Not just a data visualization tool, a very cool discussion on Genomics and using data to save lives, the importance of Data Modelling 59:10 - The Bitcoin Analogy, The VertiPaq Engine and when is Direct Query the answer 1:08:30 - We get a little personal with Greg, Azure/Power BI integration and Machine Learning, Cognitive Services and Sentiment Analysis Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello, friends. Today's guest is Greg Beaumont from Microsoft. Like one of our previous guests, hopefully, Greg has one of those interface jobs. The place where the broader Microsoft Corporation meets its customers at a very detailed and on the ground level. On one hand, it's one of those impossible jobs. More than 100 customers in the healthcare space look to Greg as their primary point of contact for all things technical, around Power BI. That's a tall order, folks. And at the same time, it's one of those awesome jobs. It's not that dissimilar, really, from our job here at P3. Rob Collie (00:00:45): In a role that, first of all, you get broad exposure to a tremendous number of organizations and their problems, you learn a lot super, super quickly. When you're doing it right, your work day is just nonstop magic. The power platform is magic and not really because of the technology, but instead because of its impact on the people who use it, who interact with it, who benefit from it, whose lives are changed by it. And again, I can't stress this enough, software usually doesn't do this. And as we talked with him, Krissy and I just couldn't stop nodding, because we could hear it, he lives it, just like we do. And I hope that just leaps out of the audio for you like it did for us. Rob Collie (00:01:32): No surprises here, Greg didn't start his life as a data professional. He's our second guest on this show, whose original training was in biology. And so, some familiar themes come back again, that good data professionals come from a wide variety of backgrounds, that the hybrid tweeners between IT and business are really where the value is at today. And I love this about Greg, that we made a point of talking about how much easier it is today to break into the data profession than it's ever been and what an amazing thing that is to celebrate. Rob Collie (00:02:06): We talked about COVID and specifically its impacts on the industry. How that has served as a catalyst for many organizations to rethink their analytic strategy, the implications of remote work, data privacy and security. And of course, it wouldn't be an episode of Raw Data, if we didn't nerd out about at least one thing. So, we get a little bit into genomics and the idea of DNA and RNA as forms of biological computer code. And as you'd expect, and want, Greg is far from a one dimensional data professional, just such an interesting person, authentically human, a real pleasure to speak with, so let's get into it. Announcer (00:02:47): Ladies and gentlemen, could I have your attention, please. Rob Collie (00:02:51): This is the Raw Data by P3 adaptive podcast with your host, Rob Collie. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to p3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:03:13): Welcome to the show, Greg Beaumont. How are you? Greg Beaumont (00:03:17): I'm doing well. How are you all? Rob Collie (00:03:19): I think we're doing pretty well. Greg Beaumont (00:03:19): Awesome. Rob Collie (00:03:20): Business is booming. Data has turned out to be relatively hot field, but I think it's probably got some legs to it. And the Microsoft platform also, well, it's just kind of kicking ass, isn't it? So, business wise, we couldn't be better. I think personally, we're doing well, too. We won't go into all that. What are you up to these days? What's your job title and what's an average day look for you? Greg Beaumont (00:03:39): So, I'm working in Microsoft and my title is Technical Specialist. And I'm a Business Intelligence Technical Specialist, so I focus almost exclusively on Power BI and where it integrates with other products within the Microsoft stack. Now, I'm in the Microsoft field, which is different from a number of guests you've had, who work at corporate and we're working on the product groups, which is that I'm there to help the customers. Greg Beaumont (00:04:01): And you hear a lot of different acronyms with these titles. So, my role is often called the TS. In the past, it was called a TSP. It's just a change in the title. Sometimes you might hear the title, CSA, Cloud Solution Architect. It's very similar to what I do, but a little bit different. But effectively from an overarching standpoint, our goal in the field as Technical Specialists is to engage with customers, so that they understand how and where to use our products, and to ensure that they have a good experience when they succeed. Rob Collie (00:04:29): Your job is literally where the Microsoft organism meets the customers. Greg Beaumont (00:04:34): Yep. Rob Collie (00:04:35): That's not the role I had. I was definitely on the corporate side, back in my days at Microsoft. I think the interaction between the field and corporate has gotten a lot stronger over the years. I think it's a bit more organic, that interplay, that it used to feel like crossing a chasm sort of thing. And I don't think that's really true anymore. Greg Beaumont (00:04:54): At a green, I think that's by design, too. So, with the more frequent release schedules and also kind of how things have changed under Satya, customer feedback drives the roadmap. So when these monthly updates come out, a lot of it is based off of customer demand and what customers are encountering and what they need. So, we're able to pivot and meet the needs of those customers much more quickly. Rob Collie (00:05:15): Yeah, you mentioned the changing acronyms, right? I mean like yes. My gosh, a thousand times yes. It's almost like a deliberate obfuscation strategy. It's like who's what? Why did we need to take the P off of TSP? I mean, I'm sure it was really important in some meeting somewhere, but it's just like, "Oh, yeah, it's really hard to keep track of." It's just a perpetually moving target. But at the same time, so many fundamentals don't change, right? The things that customers need and the things that Microsoft needs to provide. The fundamentals, of course, evolving, but they don't move nearly as fast as the acronym game. Greg Beaumont (00:05:52): Right. I think that acronym game is part of what makes it difficult your first year here, because people have a conversation and you don't know what they're talking about. Right? Rob Collie (00:06:00): Yeah, yeah, yeah. Greg Beaumont (00:06:00): And if they just spelled it out, it would make a lot more sense. Rob Collie (00:06:03): Krissy was talking to me today about, "Am I understanding what Foo means?" There's an internal Microsoft dialect, right? Krissy was like, "Is Foo like X? Is it like a placeholder for variable?" I'm like, "Yes, yes." She's like, "Okay. That's what I thought, but I just want to make sure." Krissy Dyess (00:06:18): That's why there's context clues in grade school really come into play when you're working with Microsoft organization, because you really got to take in all the information and kind of decipher it a bit. And those context clues help out. Greg, how long have you been in that particular role? Has it been your whole time at Microsoft or are have you been in different roles? Greg Beaumont (00:06:36): So, I should add, too, that I'm specifically in the healthcare org, and even within healthcare, we've now subspecialized into sub-verticals within healthcare. So, I work exclusively with healthcare providers, so people who are providing care to patients in a patient care setting. I do help out on a few other accounts, too, but that's my primary area of responsibility. Greg Beaumont (00:06:55): So, I started with Microsoft in 2016. I was actually hired into a regional office as what's called the traditional TSP role and it was data platform TSP. So, it was what used to be the SQL Server TS role. A few months later, the annual realign happened, I got moved over to Modern Workplace because they wanted to have an increased focus on Power BI, and I had some experience in that area. Plus, I was the new guy, so they put me into the experimental role. A year later, that's when they added the industry verticals and that's when I moved into what is kind of the final iteration of my current role. And the titles have changed a few times, but I've effectively been in this role working with healthcare customers for over four years now. Rob Collie (00:07:35): And so, like a double vertical specialization? Greg Beaumont (00:07:37): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:07:37): Healthcare providers, where there's a hierarchy here? Greg Beaumont (00:07:40): Yeah, yeah. Rob Collie (00:07:41): Those are the jaw dropping things for me is sometimes people in roles like yours, even after all that specialization, you end up with a jillion customers that you're theoretically responsible for. Double digits, triple digits, single digits in terms of how many customers you have to cover? Greg Beaumont (00:07:58): I'm triple digits. And that is one of the key differences from that CSA role that you'll see on the Azure team is they tend to be more focused on just a couple of customers and they get more engaged in kind of projects. And I will do that with customers, but it's just, it's a lot more to manage. Rob Collie (00:08:14): Yeah. What a challenging job. If you think about it, the minimum triple digit number is 100, right? So, let's just say, it's 100 for a moment. Well, you've got 52 weeks a year plus PTO, right? So, you're just like, "Okay." It is very, very difficult to juggle. That's a professional skill that is uncommon. I would say that's probably harder than the acronym game. Greg Beaumont (00:08:37): Yeah, there's been times I was on a vacation day and I got a call. I didn't recognize the number. I'm like, "Okay, I'm going to have to route this to somebody because I'm off today." And they're like, "Well, I'm the VP of so and so and we need to do this." And I'm like, "Okay, I got to go back inside and work now, because this is an important call." So, you have to be flexible and you're correct, that it makes it a challenge to have that work-life balance also, but the work is very rewarding, so it's worth it. Rob Collie (00:09:01): Yeah. It's something that vaguely I have a sense of this. I mean, transitioning from corporate Microsoft to, I mean, you can think of my role now as field. I'm much, much closer to the customers than I ever was at corporate. And yes, Brian Jones and I talked about it a little bit. And this is a bit of an artifact of the old release model that it was like every few years, you'd release a product, which isn't the case anymore. But that satisfying feeling of helping people, like even if you build something amazing back at Microsoft in the days that I was there, you were never really around for that victory lap. You would never get that feedback. It even never make it to you. Rob Collie (00:09:37): It was years later muted whereas one of the beautiful things about working closely with customers and our clients with Power BI, and actually the Microsoft platform as a whole, is just how quickly you can deliver these amazingly transformational like light up moments that go beyond just the professional. You can get this emotional, really strong validating emotional feeling of having helped. And that is difficult to get, I think even today, probably, even with their monthly release cycles, et cetera. By definition, you're just further removed from the "Wow" that happens out where the people are. Greg Beaumont (00:10:15): Yep. And I'm sure you all see that, too, with your business is that a lot of work often goes into figuring out what needs to be in these solutions and reports, but when you actually put it in the hands of leaders, and they realize the power of what it can provide for their business, in my case for their patients, for their doctors, for their nurses, it becomes real. They see it's actually possible and it's not just a PowerPoint deck. Rob Collie (00:10:38): And that sense of possibility, that sense of almost child-like wonder that comes back at those moments, you just wouldn't expect from the outside. I had a family member one time say, "Oh, Rob, I could never do what you do." Basically, it was just saying "How boring it must be, right?" It's so boring working with software, working with..." I'm like, "Are you kidding me? This is one of the places in life where you get to create and just an amazingly magical." It's really the only word that comes close to capturing it. You just wouldn't expect that, right? Again, from the outside like, "Oh, you work in data all day. Boring." Greg Beaumont (00:11:17): I'd add to that, that I'd compare it to maybe the satisfaction people get out of when they beat a game or a video game. That when you figure out how to do a solution and it works and you put in that time and that effort and that thought, there's that emotional reward, you get that I built something that that actually did what they wanted it to do. Rob Collie (00:11:35): Yeah. And after you beat the video game, not only did that happen, but other people's lives get better as a result of you beating this game. It's just like it's got all those dynamics, and then some. All these follow on effects. Greg Beaumont (00:11:46): It's like being an athlete and enjoying the sport that you compete in. Rob Collie (00:11:50): Yeah. We're never going to retire. We're going to be the athletes that hang on way too long. Greg Beaumont (00:11:56): Yep. Rob Collie (00:11:58): So, unfortunately, I think our careers can go longer than a professional athletes, so there's that. I can't even really walk up and down stairs anymore without pain, so. So what about before Microsoft? What were you up to beforehand and how did you end up in this line of work in the first place? Greg Beaumont (00:12:15): Sure. And I think that's actually something where listeners can get some value, because the way I got into this line of work, I think today, there's much more opportunity for people all over the world from different socioeconomic backgrounds to be able to break into this field without having to kind of go through the rites of passage that people used to. So, I was actually a Biology major from a small school. Came from a military family. I didn't have corporate contacts or great guidance counseling or anything like that. My first job right out of school was I said, "Oh, I got a Biology major. I got a job at a research institution." They're like, "Okay, you're going to be cleaning out the mouse cages." And it was sort of $10.50 an hour. Greg Beaumont (00:12:53): So, at that point, I said, "Okay, I got to start thinking about a different line of work here." So, I kind of bounced around a little bit. I wanted to get into IT, but if you wanted to learn something like SQL Server, you couldn't do it unless you had a job in IT. As an average person, you couldn't just go buy a SQL Server and put it in your home unless you had the amount of money that you needed to do that. Side projects with Access and Excel. Small businesses did things probably making less than minimum wage and side gigs, in addition to what I was doing for full-time work to pay the bills. Eventually caught on with a hospital where I was doing some interesting projects with data using Access and Excel. They wouldn't even give me access to Crystal Reports when we wanted to do some reporting. That was really where I kind of said , "Data is where I want to focus." Greg Beaumont (00:13:41): We did some projects around things like Radon Awareness, so people who would build a new house now, they're like, "Oh, I have to pay $1500 for that Radon machine down in the basement." But when you talk to a thoracic surgeon and their nursing team and you hear stories about people who are nonsmokers, perfectly healthy, who come in with tumors all over their lungs, you realize the value there and by looking at the data of where there's pockets of radon in the country reaching out to those people has value, right? I think it's that human element where you're actually doing something that makes a difference. So, that kind of opened my eyes. Greg Beaumont (00:14:14): I then after that job, I got on with a small consulting company. I was a Project Manager. It was my first exposure to Microsoft BI. It was actually ProClarity over SQL Server 2005 and we were working with data around HEDIS and Joint Commission healthcare performance measures for one of the VA offices. So, I was the PM and the Data Architect was building the SSIS packages, built out kind of skeleton of an analysis services cube. He asked me to lean in on the dashboarding side, and that's also where I started learning MDX because we were writing some MDX expressions to start doing some calculations that we were then exposing in ProClarity. And at that point, it was like, "This is magic." Greg Beaumont (00:14:57): From a used case perspective, what they were doing traditionally doing was they'd send somebody in from some auditing agency, who would look at, I think it was 30 to 60 patient records, for each metric and then they take a look at where all of the criteria hit for that metric, yes or no. And it would be pass/fail, how good is this institution doing of meeting this particular expectation. So, it would be things like, "Does a patient receive aspirin within a certain amount of time that they've been admitted if they have heart problems?" Something like that. With looking at it from a data perspective, you can look at the whole patient population, and then you could start slicing and dicing it by department, by time of day that they were admitted, by all of these different things. Greg Beaumont (00:15:38): And that's when I kind of said, "This is really cool, really interesting. I think there's a big future here." And I kind of decided to take that route. And from there, I got on with a Microsoft partner, where I stayed for about six years. And that's kind of where I was exposed to a lot of very smart, very gifted people. And I was able to kind of learn from them and then that led to eventually getting a job at Microsoft. But to make a long story short, today, you could go online and get Power BI Desktop for free. There's training resources all over the place, and you could skill up and get started and get a great job. I'd like to tell people take the amount of time you spend every night playing video games and watching television, take half that time and devote it to learning Power BI and you'll be amazed at how far you get in six to 12 months. Rob Collie (00:16:24): That's such good advice. I'm not really allowed to play a lot of video games, so I might need more time than that. But I had my time to do that years ago, learning DAX and everything. A couple of things really jumped out at me there. First of all, you're right, it was almost like a priesthood before. It was so hard to get your foot in the door. Look, you had to climb incrementally, multiple steps in that story to just get to the point where you were sitting next to the thing that was SSIS and MDX which, again, neither of those things had a particularly humane learning curve. Even when you got there, which was a climb, you get to that point and then they're like, "And here's your cliff. Your smooth cliff that you have to scale. If you wanted a piece of this technology," right? Rob Collie (00:17:11): You wanted to learn MDX, you had to get your hands on an SSAS server. The license for it. And then you had to have a machine you could install it on that was beefy enough to handle it. It's just, there's so many barriers to entry. And the data gene, I like to talk about, it does. It cuts across every demographic, as far as I can tell, damn near equally everywhere. Let's call it one in 20. It's probably a little less frequent than that. Let's call it 5% of the population is carrying the data gene and you've got to get exposure. And that's a lot easier to get that exposure today than it was even 10 years ago. Greg Beaumont (00:17:50): I'd completely agree with that. The people in this field tend to be the type of people who likes solving puzzles, who like building things that are complex and have different pieces, but who also enjoy the reward of getting it to work at the end. You've had several guests that have come on the show that come from nontraditional backgrounds. But I'm convinced that 20 years ago, there were a lot of people who would have been great data people, who just never got the opportunity to make it happen. Greg Beaumont (00:18:14): Whereas today, the opportunity is there and I think Microsoft has done a great job with their strategy of letting you learn and try Power BI. You can go download the dashboard in a day content for free and the PDF is pretty self-explanatory and if you've used excel in the past, you can walk through it and teach yourself the tool. I think the power of that from both the perspective of giving people opportunity and also building up a workforce for this field of work is amazing. Rob Collie (00:18:42): Yeah. I mean, all those people that were sort of in a sense like kind of left behind, years ago, they weren't given an avenue. A large number of them did get soaked up by Excel. If they're professionally still active today, there's this tremendous population of Excel people if they were joining the story today, they might be jumping into Power BI almost from the beginning, potentially. And of course, if they were doing that, they'd still be doing Excel. But there's still this huge reservoir of people who are still tomorrow, think about the number of people tomorrow, just tomorrow. Today, they're good at Excel and tomorrow, they will sort of, they'll have their first discovery moment with Power BI. The first moment of DAX or M or whatever, that's a large number of people tomorrow who are about to experience. It's almost like did you see the movie The Game? Greg Beaumont (00:19:36): I have not. Rob Collie (00:19:37): There's this moment early in the movie where Michael Douglas has just found out that his brother or something has bought them a pass to the game. And no one will tell him what it is. He meets this guy at a bar who says, "Oh, I'm so envious that you get to play for the first time." Also, this is really silly, but it's also like the ACDC song For Those About To Rock, We Salute You. For those about to DAX, we salute you, because that's going to happen tomorrow, right? Such a population every day that's lighting up and what an exciting thing to think about. Do you ever get down for any reason, just stop and think, "Oh, what about the 5000 people today who are discovering this stuff for the first time." That is a happy thing. Greg Beaumont (00:20:16): Yeah, I actually had a customer where one of their analysts who turned out to be just a Power BI Rockstar, he said, "I'd been spending 20 years of my life writing V-lookups, and creating giant Excel files. And now, everything I was trying to do is at my fingertips," right? And then within a year, he went from being a lifelong Excel expert to creating these amazing reports that got visibility within the organization and provided a ton of value. Rob Collie (00:20:42): And that same person you're talking about is also incredibly steeped in business decision-making. They've been getting a business training their whole career at the same time. And it's like suddenly, you have this amazingly capable business tech hybrid, that literally, it just like moved mountains. It's crazy. We've talked about that a lot on the show, obviously, the hybrids, just amazing. And a lot of these people have come to work for us. Rob Collie (00:21:09): That's the most common origin story for our consultants. It's not the only one. I mean, we do have some people who came from more traditional IT backgrounds, but they're also hybrids. They understand business incredibly well. And so, they never really quite fit in on the pure IT side, either. It's really kind of interesting. Greg Beaumont (00:21:26): Yeah, I think there's still a gap there between IT and business, even in kind of the way solutions get architected in the field. It's understanding what the business really wants out of the tool is often very different from how IT understands to build it. And I think that's where people like that provide that bridge, to make things that actually work and then provide the value that's needed. Rob Collie (00:21:47): There's such valuable ambassadors. It's just so obvious when IT is going to interact with a business unit to help them achieve some goal. It's so obvious that, of course, who you need to engage with IT. IT thinks, "We need to engage with the leaders of this business unit." They've got the secret weapon, these hybrid people that came up through the ranks with Excel. The word shadow IT is perfect. These people within the business, like they've been Excel people for their entire careers, they have an IT style job. Rob Collie (00:22:22): Almost all the challenges that IT complains about with working with business, you take these Excel people and sort of put them in a room where they feel safe. They'll tell you the same things. They're like, "I had exactly the same problems with my 'users,' the people that I build things for." And yeah, there's such a good translator. And if the communication flows between IT and business sort of through that portal, things go so much better. That's a habit. We're still in the process of developing as a world. Greg Beaumont (00:22:51): Yeah. And in healthcare that actually also provides some unique challenges. With regulation and personal health information, these Excel files have sensitive data in them, and you have to make sure it's protected and that the right people can see it. And how do you give them the power to use their skills to improve your organization, while also making sure that you keep everything safe. So, I think that's a hot topic these days. Rob Collie (00:23:15): Yeah. I mean, it's one of those like a requirement, even of the Hello World equivalent of anything is that you right off the bat have to have things like row level security and object level security in place and sometimes obfuscation. What are some of the... we don't want to get to shop talky, but it is a really fascinating topic, what are the handful of go-to techniques for managing sensitive healthcare information? How do you get good BI, while at the same time protecting identity and sensitivity. So often, you still need to be able to uniquely identify patients to tie them across different systems, can identify them as people. It's really, really, really tricky stuff. Greg Beaumont (00:24:02): And I think just to kind of stress the importance of this, you can actually go search for look up HIPAA wall of shame or HIPAA violation list. When this information gets shared with the wrong people, there's consequences and can result in financial fees and fines. And in addition to that, you lose the trust of people whose personal information may have been violated. So, I think a combination of you said things row level security and object level security as a start, you can also do data masking, but then there's issues of people export to Excel. What do they do with that data afterwards? Greg Beaumont (00:24:37): And then there's going to be tools like Microsoft Information Protection, where when you export sensitive information to Excel, it attaches an encrypted component. I'm not an MIT expert. I know how it works. I don't know the actual technology behind it. But it attaches an encrypted component where only people who are allowed to see that information can then open that file. So, you're protecting the information at the source and in transit, but you're still giving people the flexibility to go build a report or to potentially use data from different sources, but then have it be protected every step of the way. Greg Beaumont (00:25:11): So like you said, without getting too techie, there's ways to do it, but it's not just out of the box easy. There's steps you have to go through, talk to experts, get advice. Whether it's workshops or proof of concepts, there's different ways that customers can figure that out. Rob Collie (00:25:28): Yeah. So because of that sort of mandatory minimum level of sensitivity handling and information security, I would expect, now that we're talking about it, that IT sort of has to be a lot more involved by default in the healthcare space with the solutions than IT would necessarily be in other industries. Another way to say it, it's harder for the business to be 100% in charge of data modeling in healthcare than it is in other industries. Greg Beaumont (00:26:02): Yep. But you can have a hybrid model, which is where the business provides data that's already been vetted and protected and there might be other data that doesn't have any sensitive data in it, where it's game on, supply chain or something like that. But having these layers in between, the old way of doing things was just nobody gets access to it. Then there was kind of canned reporting where everybody gets burst in the reports that contain what they're allowed to see. But now, you can do things in transit, so that the end users can still use filters and build a new report and maybe even share it with other people. And know that whoever they're sharing with will only be able to see what they're allowed to see. It gets pretty complex, but it's definitely doable and the customers that are doing it are finding a lot of value in those capabilities. Rob Collie (00:26:48): That's fundamentally one of the advantages of having a data model. I was listening to a podcast with Jeffrey Wang from Microsoft and he was talking about it. And I thought this was a really crisp and concise summary, which is that the Microsoft Stack Power BI has a model-centric approach to the world whereas basically, all the competitors are report centric. And what does that mean? Why does that even make a difference? Well, when you build a model, you've essentially built all the reports in a way. You've enabled all of the reports. You can build many, many, many, many, many like an infinite number of different reports based on emerging and evolving business needs without having to go back to square one. Rob Collie (00:27:28): In a report-centric model, which is basically what the industry has almost always had, almost everywhere, outside of a few notable examples, Power BI being one of them. When a report centric model, every single change, I remember there being a statistic that was just jaw dropping. I forget what the actual numbers were, but it was something like the average number of business days it took to add a single column to a single existing report. It was like nine business days, when it should just be a click. And that's the difference. And so, preserving that benefit of this model centric approach, while at the same time, still making sure that everyone's playing within the right sandbox that you can't jump the fence and end up with something that's inappropriate. Very challenging, but doable. Greg Beaumont (00:28:15): Yep. That reminded me of an old joke we used to tell in consulting and this was back in the SharePoint Performance Point with Analysis Services days is there be a budget for a project, there'd be change requests along the ways, they discover issues with the data. And at the very end of the project, they rushed the visualization to market. And they're like after six months, with 10 people dedicated on this project, "Here's your line chart." Rob Collie (00:28:39): Yeah. I had a director of IT at a large insurance company one time, looking me in the eye and just brutally confess. Yeah, my team, we spent three months to put a dot on a chart. And that's not what you want. Greg Beaumont (00:28:59): Right, right. Rob Collie (00:29:01): That was unspoken. This was bad. To the extent that you're able to tell, what are some of the interesting things that you've seen in the healthcare space with this platform recently? Anything that we can talk about? Greg Beaumont (00:29:15): Yeah, so I think I'd start with how everything changed with COVID. Just because I think people would be interested in that topic and kind of how it changed everything. I actually had a customer yesterday at a large provider who said, "COVID was the catalyst for us to reconsider our investment in analytics, and that it spurred interest from even an executive level to put more money into analytics because of the things that happened." So obviously, when it hit everybody was, "What in the world is going on here?" Right? "Are we even going to have jobs? Is the whole world going to collapse or is this just going to be kind of fake news that comes and goes?" Everybody was unsure what was going on. Greg Beaumont (00:29:50): At the same time, the healthcare providers, a lot of them were moving people to work from home and these were organizations where they had very strict working conditions because of these data privacy and data security considerations, and all of a sudden, you're in a rush to move people home. So, some of my counterparts who do teams, they have some just amazing stories. They were up all night helping people set up ways to securely get their employees to a work-from-home type experience, so that they only had essential workers interacting with the patients, but then the office workers were able to effectively conduct business from home. Greg Beaumont (00:30:25): Additionally, there were use cases that were amazing. So, Microsoft has now what's called the Cloud for Health where we're effectively taking our technology and trying to make it more targeted towards healthcare customers and their specific needs, because we see the same types of use cases repeat from customer to customer. One of those use cases that came out of COVID was called Virtual Visits. And I actually know the team that built that solution, but because of patients who were on COVID, they didn't know how contagious it was. Greg Beaumont (00:30:56): There were people being put on ventilators, who weren't allowed to see their families and they were setting up a team's application, where people were actually able to talk to their family and see their family before they went under, right? There were chaplains who were reading people their last rites using video conferencing, and things like that. So, it was pretty heavy stuff, but I think from a healthcare perspective, it showed the value technology can provide. Greg Beaumont (00:31:21): And from our perspective in the field, it's like we're not just out there talking about bits and bytes. It kind of hit home that there's real people who are impacted by what we're doing and it adds another kind of layer of gravity, I'd call it, taking what you do seriously, right? I had another customer, they were doing some mapping initiatives with some of the COVID data because they wanted to provide maps for their employees of where the hotspots were. Greg Beaumont (00:31:46): And we were up till I think 11:00 at night one night working through a proof of concept. And they said, "Yeah, what's next is we also want to start mapping areas of social unrest." I said, "Wow, social unrest. Why are you worried about that?" And they said, "Well, we expect because of this lockdown, that eventually there's going to be rioting and issues in all different parts of the world." And at that time, I just kind of didn't really think about that, but then a lot of those things did happen. It was kind of just interesting to be working at night and hearing those stories, and then seeing how everything kind of unfolded. Greg Beaumont (00:32:18): Another example, look it up, there's an Azure COVID Health Bot out there and then there's some information on that, where you can ask questions and walk through your symptoms, and it will kind of give you some instructions on what to do. Another one that is even popular now is looking at employees who are returning to work. So, when people return to work find out vaccination status, "Are you able to come back to work? Are you essential? Are you nonessential?" I don't think a lot of customers were prepared to run through that scenario when it hit. Greg Beaumont (00:32:48): So, having these agile tools where you can go get your list of not only employees, but maybe partners that refer people to your network, because you might not have all the referring doctors in your system. So with Power BI, you can go get extracts, tie it all together and then build out a solution that helps you get those things done. I'd say it was eye opening. I think for customers and also for myself and my peers, that we're not just selling widgets. We're selling things that make a difference and have that human perspective to it. Rob Collie (00:33:20): Yeah, that does bring it home, doesn't it? That statement from an organization that COVID was the catalyst, evaluating and investing in their analytic strategy? Greg Beaumont (00:33:29): Yep. Rob Collie (00:33:30): Being in BI, being an analytics is one of the best ways to future proof one's career because at baseline, it's a healthy industry, there's always value to be created. But then when things get bad, for some reason, whatever crisis hits, it's actually more necessary than ever because when you've been in a groove when a an industry or an organization has been in an operational groove for a long time, any number of years, eventually, you just sort of start to intuitively figure it out. There's a roadmap that emerges slowly over time. Now, even that roadmap probably isn't as good as you think it is. If you really tested your assumptions, you'd find that some of them were flawed and analytics could have helped you be a lot more efficient even then. Rob Collie (00:34:14): But regardless, the perception is that we've got a groove, right? And then when the world completely changes overnight, all of your roadmaps, your travel roadmaps, none of them are valid anymore. And now, you need a replacement and you need it fast. And so, what happens is, is that analytics spending, BI spending, whatever you want to call it, or activity, actually increases during times of crisis. So, you got a healthy baseline business. It's an industry that's not withering and dying in good times, but it actually it's like a hedge against bad times. Rob Collie (00:34:47): When I saw that research years and years ago, when I was working at Microsoft Corporate, we just come out of the dot-com crack up, we'd seen that BI spending it across the IT industry was the only sector that went up during that time where everything else was falling. It's like, "Oh, okay." So, not only do I enjoy this stuff, but I really should never get out of it. It's like one of the best future proofing career moves you can make is the work in this field. And so, I mean, we've seen it, right? The early days of the COVID crisis, you're right when no one knew the range of possible outcomes going forward was incredibly wide. The low end and the high end were exponentially different from one another. Rob Collie (00:35:29): And so, we experienced in our business, sort of a gap in spring and early summer last year. We weren't really seeing a whole lot of new clients, people who are willing to forge a brand new relationship. Again, what happens when a crisis hits? You slam on the brakes. No unnecessary spending first of all. Let's get all the spending under control, because we don't know as a company what's going to happen in the industry, right? You see a lot of vendor spending freezes and of course, to other companies, we're a vendor, right? So, our existing clients, though, doubled down on how much they used us and how much they needed us. Rob Collie (00:36:08): And then later in the year, the new client business returned, and we actually ended up, our business was up last year, despite that Q2 interruption and sort of making new friends. And this year, holy cow like whatever was bottled up last year is coming back big time. And so, yeah. You never really want to be the ghoul that sort of morbidly goes, "Oh, crisis." From a business perspective, yeah, anything that changes, anything that disrupts the status quo tends to lead to an increased focus on the things that we do. Greg Beaumont (00:36:43): Yeah, I think something you said there, too, was when you don't know what's going to happen was when the business intelligence spending increased. I mean, the intelligence and business intelligence, it's not just a slogan. The purpose of these tools is to find out the things you don't know. So when there's uncertainty, that's when BI can provide that catalyst to sort of add some clarity to what you're actually dealing with. Rob Collie (00:37:06): Yeah, I've been using, even though I'm not a pilot, I've never learned to fly a plane or anything. I've been using an aviation metaphor lately, which is windshield is nice and clear. You might not be looking at the instruments on your cockpit very much, right? You know there's not a mountain in front of you, you can see how far away the ground is. And you could sort of intuit your way along, right? But then suddenly, whoosh clouds. And oh, boy, now, you really need those instruments, right? You need the dashboards, you need the altimeter, you need the radar. You need all that stuff so much more. Rob Collie (00:37:37): And so, and our business has kind of always been this. The reason I've been using this metaphor is really for us, it's like given how fast we operate, and I think you can appreciate this having come from a Microsoft partner consulting firm before Microsoft years ago, our business model, we move so fast with projects. We're not on that old model with the original budget and the change orders and all of that. That was all dysfunctional. Rob Collie (00:38:01): It was necessary, because of the way software worked back then, but it was absolutely dysfunctional. It's not the way that you get customer satisfaction. So, we've committed to the high velocity model. But that means seeing the future of our business financially two months in the future is very difficult relative to the old sort of glacial pace, right? If there's a mountain there, we're going to have months to turn around it. Krissy Dyess (00:38:26): To add a bit to your analogy there, Rob. I am married to a pilot and I have gone up in the small tiny airplane. And before the gadgets, there's actually the map. The paper map, right? So, you had the paper map, which my husband now would hand to me. And he'd tell me, "Okay, let me know the elevations of different areas to make sure we're high enough, we're not going to crash into the mountains." Krissy Dyess (00:38:47): What's happened is people just they got used to different ways that they were doing things. They were forced into these more modern ways. And I think even now, this wave of seeing this catalyst we can change and how are other people changing is also driving the people to seek help from others in terms of getting guidance, right? Because even though you've had the change, it doesn't necessarily mean that the changes that you made were 100% the right way and you can learn so much from others in the community and the people that are willing to help. Krissy Dyess (00:39:24): And I think that's one of the things too, that our company provides as a partner, we're able to kind of go alongside. We've seen what's works, what doesn't work, what are some of those pitfalls? What are those mountains approaching? And we're really able to help guide others that want to learn and become better. Rob Collie (00:39:42): Yeah. I mean, this is us getting just a little bit commercial, but you can forgive us, right? That high velocity model also exposes us to a much larger denominator. We see a lot at this business that accumulates. The example I've given before is and this is just a really specific techy, so much of this is qualitative, but there's a quantitative. It's sort of like a hard example of like, "Oh, yeah, that's right. This pattern that we need here for this food spoilage inventory problem is exactly the same as this tax accounting problem we solved over there, right?" As soon as you realize that you don't need to do all the figuring out development work, you just skip to the end. Rob Collie (00:40:22): And really, most of the stuff that Krissy was talking about, I think, is actually it's more of the softer stuff. It's more of the soft wisdom that accumulates over the course of exposure to so many different industries and so many different projects. That's actually really one of the reasons why people come to work here is they want that enrichment. Greg Beaumont (00:40:38): Yeah, that makes sense. Because you see all these different industries and you actually get exposed to customers that are the best in the business for that type of, whether it be a solution or whether it be a product or whether it be like a framework for doing analytics or something like that. So, you get that exposure and you also get to contribute. Rob Collie (00:40:55): Even just speaking for myself, in the early days of this business, when it was really still just me, I got exposure to so many business leaders. Business and IT leaders that, especially given the profile of the people who would take the risk back in 2013, you had to be some kind of exceptional to be leaning into this technology with your own personal and professional reputation eight years ago, right? It was brand new. So, imagine the profile of the people I was getting exposed to, right? Wow, I learned so much from those people in terms of leadership, in terms of business. They were learning data stuff from me, but at the same time, I was taking notes. Greg Beaumont (00:41:33): Everybody was reading your blog, too. I can't count the number of times I included a reference to one of your articles to help answer some questions. And it was the first time I was introduced to the Switch True DAX statement. And then I'd print that. Rob Collie (00:41:47): Which- Greg Beaumont (00:41:48): Sent that link to many people. "Don't do if statements, do this. Just read this article." Rob Collie (00:41:53): And even that was something that I'd saw someone else doing. And I was like, "Oh, my God, what is that?" My head exploded like, "Oh." Yeah, those were interesting days. I think on the Chandu podcast, I talked about how I was writing about this stuff almost violently, couldn't help it. It was just like so fast. Two articles a week. I was doing two a week for years. There was so much to talk about, so many new discoveries. It was just kind of pouring out in a way. Krissy Dyess (00:42:24): Greg, you came in to the role around 2016. And to me 2017 was really that big year with the monthly releases where Power BI just became this phenomenon, right? It just kept getting better and better in terms of capabilities and even the last couple years, all the attention around security has been huge, especially with the health and life science space. And last year, with this catalyst to shift mindsets into other patterns, working patterns using technology, do you feel like you've seen any kind of significant shifts just compared to last year or this year? Greg Beaumont (00:43:05): Yeah. And so something that burns my ears every time I hear it is when people call Power BI a data visualization tool. It does that and it does a great job. Rob Collie (00:43:11): I hate that. Greg Beaumont (00:43:12): But it's become much more than that. When it launched, it was a data visualization tool. But if you think about it at that time, they said, "Well, business users can't understand complex data models, so you have to do that in analysis services." Then they kind of ingested analysis services into Power BI and made it more of a SaaS product where you can scale it. There's Dataflows, the ETL tool, which is within Power BI, which is an iteration of Power Query, which has been around since the Excel days. So, now you have ETL. You have effectively from the old SQL Server world, you have the SSIS layer, you have the SSAS layer. With paginated reports, you have the SSRS layer. And you have all these different layers of the solution now within an easy to use SaaS product. Greg Beaumont (00:43:55): So this evolution has been happening, where it's gobbling up these other products that used to be something that only central IT could do. And now, we're putting that power by making it easier to use in the hands of those analysts who really know what they want from the data. Because if you think about it, the old process was is you go and you give the IT team your requirements, and they interpret how to take what you want, and translate it into computer code. Greg Beaumont (00:44:21): But now, we're giving those analysts the ability to take their requirements and go do it themselves. And there's still a very valid place for central IT because there's so many other things they can do, but it frees up their time to work on higher valued projects and I see that continuing with Power BI, right? But like we're adding AI, ML capabilities and data volumes keep increasing then capabilities I think will continue to expand it. Rob Collie (00:44:46): Greg, I used to really caused a storm when I would go to a conference that was full of BI professionals. And I would say that something like, "What percentage of the time of BI project, traditional BI project was actually spent typing the right code?" The code that stuck, right? And I would make the claim that it was less than 1%. So, it's like less than 1% of the time of a project, right? And everyone would just get so upset at me, right? But I just didn't understand why it was controversial. Rob Collie (00:45:19): Like you describe like yeah, we have these long requirements meetings in the old model. Interminably long, exhausting, and we'd write everything down. We'd come up with this gigantic requirements document that was flawed from the get-go. It was just so painful. It's like the communication cost was everything and the iteration and discovery, there wasn't enough time for that. And when I say that the new way of building these projects is sometimes literally 100 times faster than the old way. Like it sounds like hyperbole. Greg Beaumont (00:45:53): It's not. Yeah. Rob Collie (00:45:54): It can be that fast, but you're better off telling people, it's twice as fast because they'll believe you. If you tell them the truth, they'd go, "Nah, you're a snake oil salesman. Get out of here." Greg Beaumont (00:46:07): Yeah. And I think the speed of being able to develop, too, it's going to basically allow these tools to be able to do things that people didn't even dream of in the past. It's not just going to be traditional business use cases. I know in healthcare, something that's a hot topic is genomics, right? Genomics is incredibly complex then you go beyond Power BI and into Azure at that point, too and Cloud compute and things like that. Greg Beaumont (00:46:31): So, with Genomics, you think about your DNA, right? Your DNA is basically a long strand of computer code. It is base pairs of nucleic acids, adenine, thymine, and guanine, cytosine that effectively form ones and zeros in a really long string. Rob Collie (00:46:46): Did you know it effortlessly he named those base pairs? There's that biology background peeking back out. Greg Beaumont (00:46:52): I did have to go look it up before the meeting. I said, "Just in case this comes up, I need to make sure I pronounce them right," so. Rob Collie (00:46:59): Well, for those of us who listen to podcasts at 1.5x speed, that is going to sound super impressive, that string there. Greg Beaumont (00:47:05): Yeah. I should call out, too, though that I'm not a genomics expert, so some of what I'm saying here, I'm paraphrasing and repeating from people I've talked to who are experts, including physicians and researchers. So, this long string of code, if you sequence your entire genome, the file is about 100 gigabytes for one person, okay? At 100 gigabytes, you can consume that, but if you want to start comparing hundreds of people and thousands of people in different patient cohorts, all of a sudden, it gets to be a lot of information and it gets very complex. Greg Beaumont (00:47:35): If you think of that strand of DNA as being like a book with just two letters that alternate, there's going to be paragraphs and chapters and things like that, which do different things. So, one of the physicians I spoke to worked with Children's Cancer. Here's kind of where the use case comes in. So, you take something breast cancer where there's BRCA1 or BRCA2, BRCA1, BRCA2 genes where if you have it, there's a measurable increased probability that you'll get that type of cancer within a certain age range. There's a lot of other diseases and cancers, where it might be 30 genes. And depending on different combinations of those genes, it changes the risk of getting that specific type of cancer. Greg Beaumont (00:48:17): But this physician told me that there are specific children's cancers, where they know that if they have certain combinations of genes, that they have a very high probability of getting this cancer. And when the child actually feel sick and goes to the doctor, it's already spread and it's too late. So, if you can do this sequencing, basically run it through machine learning algorithms, so it will determine the probability, you could effectively catch it at stage zero. Because these cancers, it's something that could be related to growth hormones and as you're growing up, and as you become an adult, you're then no longer at risk of getting that childhood cancer. So, if they could identify it early and treated at stage zero, instead of stage 4, it sounds sci-fi, but the tools are there to do it. Greg Beaumont (00:49:01): It just never ceases to amaze me that you watch the news and they talk about self-driving cars and identifying when a banana is ripe, and things like that. But it's like, you know what? These same tools could be out there changing people's lives and making a measurable difference in the world. I think just especially post COVID, I'll expect to see a lot more investment in these areas. And also, interest because I think that might be one of the positives that comes out of this whole experience. Rob Collie (00:49:27): I do think that the sort of the worlds of Medicine and Computer Science are on a merging course. Let's not call it collision course. That sounds more dramatic. There is a merging going on. You're right DNA is biologically encoded instructions by an RNA. The mRNA vaccine is essentially injecting the source code that your body then compiles into antibodies. It's crazy and it's new. There's no two ways about it. Rob Collie (00:49:56): mRNA therapies, in general, which of course they were working on originally as anticancer and sort of just like, "Oh, well, we could use it for this, too." And there's all kinds of other things too, right? Gosh, when you go one level up from DNA or some point of abstraction, you get into protein folding. And whoa, is that... Greg Beaumont (00:50:15): Crazy, yeah. Rob Collie (00:50:16): ... computationally. We're all just waiting for quantum computers, I think. Greg Beaumont (00:50:20): Now, I'll have to call out that I'm making a joke here, so people don't take me seriously. But if you think about it, the nucleus in each of your cells contains an important model of that DNA, right? There isn't just a central repository that everything communicates with. You have a cache of that DNA in every cell in your body, except red blood cells, which perform a specific task. There may be more of the power automated the human body. But cheap attempt at a joke there, so. Rob Collie (00:50:44): Well, I like it, I like it. Let's go in with both feet. I've also read that one of the reasons why it's difficult to clone adult animals is because you start off with your original DNA, but then you're actually making firmware updates to certain sections of the DNA throughout your life. And so, those edits that are being made all the time are inappropriate for an embryo. Greg Beaumont (00:51:09): Yep. Rob Collie (00:51:10): And so, if you clone, you create an embryo, right? And now, it's got these weird adult things going on in it. That's why things kind of tend to go sideways. It can all come back to this notion of biological code and it's fascinating. A little terrifying, too, when you start to think of it that way. I've listened to some very scary podcasts about the potential for do-it-yourself bioweapon development. There was this explosion back, in what, in the '90s when the virus and worm writers discovered VVA. Remember that? We call them the script kiddies that would author these viruses that would spread throughout the computer systems of the world. And a lot of them, the people writing these things were not very sophisticated. They weren't world renowned hackers. Greg Beaumont (00:51:53): For every instance where you can use this technology to cure cancer, you're right that there's also the possibility of the Island of Dr. Moreau, right? You go look up CRISPR Technology, C-R-I-S-P-R, where they can start splicing together things from different places and making it viable. And 10 years ago, they had sheep that were producing spider webs in their milk and it's just, there's crazy stuff out there if you kind of dive into the dark depths of Biology. Now that we went down the rabbit hole, how do we correct course, right? Rob Collie (00:52:23): Well, we did go down a rabbit hole, but who cares? That's what we do. Greg Beaumont (00:52:26): Even you kind of step it back up to just kind of easy use cases in healthcare, so one of the ones that we use as a demo a lot came from a customer, and this was pre-COVID. But something as simple as hand washing, you don't think about it much. But when you're in the hospital, how many of those people are washing their hands appropriately when they care for you. And there's some white papers out there, which are showing that basically, there are measurable amounts of infections that happen in hospitals due to people not washing their hands appropriately. So, a lot of healthcare organizations will anonymously kind of observe people periodically to see who's doing a good job of washing their hands. Rob Collie (00:53:04): I was going to ask, how is this data collected? Greg Beaumont (00:53:06): This customer actually had nurses who were using a clipboard and they would write down their notes, fax it somewhere, and then somebody would enter it into Excel. So, there was this long process. And with another TS, who covers teams, we basically put a PLC together in a couple days, where they enter the information into a power app within teams, so they made their observation, entered it in. It did a write back straight to an Azure SQL Database at that time. Now, they might use the data verse. And then from Azure SQL DB, you can immediately report on it and Power BI. It even set up alerts, so that if somebody wasn't doing a good job, you could kind of take care of the situation, rather than wait for two days for the Excel report to get emailed out, and maybe lower the infection rates in the hospital. Greg Beaumont (00:53:53): So, it saved time from the workers who are writing things down and faxing things just from a sheer productivity perspective. But it also hopefully, I don't know if it will be measurable or not, but you'd have some anticipated increase in quality, because you're able to address issues faster. And that's the simplest thing ever, right? You can spend a billion dollars to come up with a new drug or you can just make sure are people washing their hands. Rob Collie (00:54:17): Both data collection and enforcement, they happen to be probably the same thing. There's like, "Oh, I'm being watched." The anonymity is gone. That's a fascinating story. Okay. What kinds of solutions are you seeing these days? What's happening out in the world that you think is worth talking to the audience about? Greg Beaumont (00:54:38): We're seeing this ability to execute better where the tools are easier to use, you can do things faster, but there's still challenges that I see frequently out there. So, I know something that you all are experts in its data modeling and understanding how to take a business problem and translate it into something that's going to perform well. So, not only do you get the logic right, but when somebody pushes a button they don't have to go to lunch and come back, they get a result quickly. That's still a challenge. And it's a challenge, because it's not always easy, right? I mean, it's the reason cubes were created in the first place was because when you have complex logic and you're going against a relational database, the query has to happen somewhere, but like that logic. Greg Beaumont (00:55:19): So take for example, if somebody wants to look at year over year percent change for a metric and they want to be able to slice it by department, maybe by disease group, maybe by weekend versus weekday, and then they want to see that trend over time. If you translate that into a SQL query, it gets really gnarly really fast. And that problem is still real. One of the trends I'm seeing in the industry is there's a big push to do everything in DirectQuery mode, because then you can kind of manage access, manage security, do all of those necessary security things in one place and have it exist in one place. Greg Beaumont (00:56:00): But when you're sending giant gnarly SQL queries back to relational databases, even if they're PDWs with multiple nodes, it gets very expensive from a compute perspective, and kind of when you scale out to large number of users, concurrency is still an issue. So that's something where you look at recently what Power BI has come out with aggregations and composite models. That's some of the technology that I think can mitigate some of those problems. And even if we think about something like Azure synapse, right? You can have your dedicated SQL pools then you can have a materialized view. A materialized view is effectively a cache of data within synapse, but then you can also have your caches in Power BI, and kind of layer everything together in a way that's going to take that logic and distribute it. Greg Beaumont (00:56:46): Does that make sense? Rob Collie (00:56:47): It does. I think this is still a current joke. The majority of cases where we've encountered people who think they want or need DirectQuery, the majority of them are actually perfect poster children case studies for when you should use cash and import mode. Right? It turns out the perceived need for DirectQuery, there is a real percentage of problems out there for which DirectQuery is the appropriate solution and it is the best solution. But it's the number of times people use it is a multiple of that real ideal number. Rob Collie (00:57:17): I think part of it is just familiarity. Still, I've long talked about how we're still experiencing as an industry the hangover from most data professionals being storage professionals. Everyone needed a database, just to make the wheels go round. The first use of data isn't BI. The first use of data is line of business applications. Every line of business application needed a database, right? So, we have minted millions of database professionals. this is also why I think partly why Power BI gets sort of erroneously pigeonholed as a visualization tools, because people are used to that. They're used to, we have a storage layer and reports layer, that's it, right? Rob Collie (00:57:56): Reporting services was Microsoft's runaway successful product in this space. Paginated reports is still around for good reason. And I think that if you're a long-term professional in this space with a long history, even if you're relatively young in the industry, but you've been working with other platforms, this storage layer plus visuals layer is just burned in your brain. And this idea of this like, "Why do you need to import the data? Why do you need a schedule? Why do you need all this stuff?" It's like as soon as people hear that they can skip it, and go to DirectQuery, they just run to

Summers Off
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Summers Off

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 109:35


As the summer winds down, Ty and Rach still have a few movies up their sleeves. Tune in this week to learn about educational films gone wild, why Michael Douglas didn't cast his dad, and what were all of those PTO moms so mad about.

Sunday Pour
Podcasts Don't Count

Sunday Pour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 73:25


Kevin Costner's 15 minutes....Movie presidents' unfair advantage....diagnosing Michael Douglas....definitely not vacation small talk...blackjack tables....SNL movies...the legendary Timothy Stack....Yankees in the post show....

The Outlaw Nation Podcast Network
Marvel's WHAT IF...? REVIEW - EPISODES 1-3 (NON SPOILER) MCU

The Outlaw Nation Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 8:53


The Outlaw John Rocha reviews the first three episodes of Marvel's new animated series WHAT IF...? without revealing any spoilers! The series from creator A.C Bradley and overseen by Kevin Feige features the voice talents of Hayley Atwell, Chadwick Boseman, Samuel L. Jackson, Michael B. Jordan, Sebastian Stan, Josh Brolin as Thanos, Mark Ruffalo as Bruce Banner / Hulk, Tom Hiddleston as Loki, Chris Hemsworth as Party Thor, Karen Gillan as Heist Nebula, Jeremy Renner as Clint Barton, Paul Rudd as Scott Lang, Michael Douglas as Hank Pym, Neal McDonough as Dum Dum Dugan, Dominic Cooper as Howard Stark, Sean Gunn as Kraglin Obfonteri, Natalie Portman as Jane Foster, David Dastmalchian as Kurt, Stanley Tucci as Abraham Erskine, Taika Waititi as Korg, Toby Jones as Arnim Zola, Djimon Hounsou as Korath the Pursuer, Jeff Goldblum as the Grandmaster, Michael Rooker as Yondu, Chris Sullivan as Taserface and Jeffrey Wright as the Watcher. “What If…?” flips the script on the MCU, reimagining famous events from the films in unexpected ways. Marvel Studios' first animated series focuses on different heroes from the MCU, featuring a voice cast that includes a host of stars who reprise their roles. The series is directed by Bryan Andrews; AC Bradley is head writer. Chapters: 0:00 Intro, Synopsis and Social Media Plugs 1:14 What If...? Review 5:54 Issues with the Episodes 6:42 The Outlaw's Rating 7:50 Wrap Up and Social Media Plugs #WhatIf #Marvel #MCU #CaptainCarter #HayleyAtwell #CaptainAmerica #ChadwickBoseman #Starlord #SamuelLJackson #Avengers #MCU Join The Outlaw's Patreon at: https://patreon.com/JohnRocha Follow The Outlaw John Rocha on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheRochaSays Follow The Outlaw John Rocha on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/therochasays/

The Movie Podcast
Marvel Studios' What If...? Review (Episodes 1-3)

The Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 16:33


“What If...?” flips the script on the MCU, reimagining famous events from the films in unexpected ways. Marvel Studios' first animated series focuses on different heroes from the MCU, featuring a voice cast that includes a host of stars who reprise their roles. Directed by Bryan Andrews with AC Bradley as head writer, “What If...?” launches exclusively on Disney+ on August 11, 2021.THE MOVIE PODCAST is one of Canada's top film and review podcasts. Every week you'll hear film lovers Daniel, Shahbaz, and Anthony discuss the biggest movie news, talk trailers, what's coming soon, ponder a unique topic of show, and speak to special guests from across the film industry. Catch a new episode of The Movie Podcast every Monday and watch out for Review episodes on all the latest movies and series. Follow @TheMoviePodcast on Instagram and Twitter, write into the show, and leave a review on Apple Podcasts!FOLLOW USFollow Daniel on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow Shahbaz on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow Anthony on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow The Movie Podcast on Twitter, Instagram,TikTok, Discord, and YouTubeANNOUNCEMENTSNEW EPISODES:113: Interview with Loki Director Kate Herron and The Best Movies and Shows of 2021 So Far112: Cinemas Reopen in Ontario and Remembering Richard Donner111: Interview with Nobody's Billy MacLellan and Independence Day Turns 25110: Interview with Black Widow Cinematographer Gabriel Beristain and Transformers Rise of the Beasts Revealed109: Interview with Tara Strong, Voice Acting Legend and Miss Minutes in Loki108: Interview with Tony Bancroft, Disney Animation Veteran, Director of Mulan, and Creator of Pumbaa from The Lion KingREVIEWS: The Suicide Squad, The Green Knight, Jungle Cruise, Snake Eyes, Roadrunner, Space Jam, A New Legacy, Black Widow, The Tomorrow War, Zola, Fear Street Trilogy, F9, Loki, Luca, Hitman's Wife's Bodyguard, A Quiet Place Part II and more are available now on The Movie Podcast feed! The Movie Podcast is on a mission to hit 200 Apple Podcast reviews before September, click here to head over to our show page on APPLE PODCASTS and leave us a 5 STAR review!

The Nerd Cast
The Nerdcast Episode 110

The Nerd Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 6:04


I talk about Rambo 3 (1988) starring Sylvester Stallone and Fatal Attraction (1987) starring Michael Douglas

We Are the Watchers of Movies

This week Samantha and Lauren discuss the 1997 thriller, The Game starring Michael Douglas. Follow and subscribe for new episodes every week. Look for "We Are The Watchers Of Movies" on Spotify, iTunes, Google play, Stitcher and SoundCloud! For business or movie suggestions please contact us at watchersofmovies@gmail.com Follow us on instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/watchersofmovies/ Follow us on our other instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/thewatcherswhofindthings/ Follow us on facebook at: fb.me/watchersofmovies Check out our website at https://watchersofmovies.weebly.com Thanks to Mike Meyers for our awesome theme music, you can follow him on twitter at @themikeshow42.

Music Makes Me High! Podcast
Go-Go's - Talk Show LP (1984)

Music Makes Me High! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 51:01


Michael Douglas discusses his love-hate relationship with an album from a band whose ambitions with this album just may have lead to its breakup, which could not have happened at a better time.

TV CONFIDENTIAL: A radio talk show about television
Michelle Danner and The Runner

TV CONFIDENTIAL: A radio talk show about television

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 14:50


TVC 547.3: Ed welcomes back Michelle Danner, producer and director of The Runner, an action thriller starring Cameron Douglas (son of Michael Douglas), Eric Balfour (24), and newcomer Edouard Philipponnat about a troubled high school student who, after being arrested, finds himself going undercover to help the police bring down a drug kingpin. The Runner will be released in the fall of 2021. Want to advertise/sponsor our show? TV Confidential has partnered with AdvertiseCast to handle advertising/sponsorship requests for the podcast edition of our program. They're great to work with and will help you advertise on our show. Please email sales@advertisecast.com or click the link below to get started: https://www.advertisecast.com/TVConfidentialAradiotalkshowabout Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Third Row from the Front

We discuss the final film in the 2nd phase of the Infinity Saga starring Paul Rudd, Michael Douglas, and Michael Peña

Illegal Opinions
Ep 78: "It's Never Gonna Stop"

Illegal Opinions

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 90:25


Welcome back to the Illegal Opinions Podcast! (3:41) Old soul singers are keeping their memory alive by singing at backyard BBQs, (12:00) RIP Biz Markie, and bandwagon mourning. (31:00) The guys give a more detailed re-review of Black Widow, (38:00) address all the hating on Space Jam 2, (54:30) and Naomi Osaka poses for the Swimsuit Edition after stepping away from tennis for her mental health. (1:11:12) Is Catherine Zeta-Jones unhappy with the life that Michael Douglas has led? (1:14:35) RIP Eartha Kitt and cancel culture is trying to take down the Godfather of High Values...and we're not gonna take it! Thank you again for listening to Illegal Opinions, the podcast for people that don't like podcasts. Available every Sunday on your favorite streaming platform so check us out, and tell a friend to tell a friend. Be safe. Show love. Peace.

BB Y RONNIE (En pandemia)
Bb y Ronnie 82 VALERIA

BB Y RONNIE (En pandemia)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2021 31:15


Viviana y Luis, "no es orgánico, es agroecológico", La Miel de Ronnie, "como Peluffo", el manguito rotador, la cucaracha, Gustavo Yankelevich y los gajos de naranja, el Gordo Federico Martínez, las luces bajas con cortaniebla, "usted pondría una bomba? sí/no/tal vez", un psicotrópico para el viaje, Michael Landon no es Michael Douglas, "The Game", el encanto personal de Ronnie, el papel higiénico con la mancha de marcador rojo, "a Martita le crecieron", (una larga discusión acerca de que Bb no le recomendó "La Veneno" a Ronnie), Valeria, qué va a pasar con el Gran Premio de la Cocina y con el otro, Laurita y Carina y más.

Keystroke Medium
Ep 6.23 - LIVE! Creating Character Arcs - Part 2

Keystroke Medium

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2021 62:46


Josh, Scott, and Chuck continue their discussion of K. W. Weland's book Creating Character Arcs https://amzn.to/2TaqnJn Hosts: Josh Hayes, Scott Moon, C. Steven Manley 00:00 Opening remarks -Discord server is up! https://discord.com/invite/t96CVRD -Keystroke Coffee is live! https://keystrokemedium.com/product/keystroke-coffee/ -Use Plottr! https://plottr.com?ref=190 05:11 Weekly update—The xx Edition Scott: Close to the end of Orphan Wars #3, and Blue Sun Armada #2. Podium is launching The Last Reaper series on audio. Chuck: Mental breakdown = New desk. Noodling around with the ending of Jack Dark #2. Josh: Listening to the first Tranquility #1 on audio. Wrapping up Tranquilty #2, outlining Tranquility #3, and working on Sentinel #1. Shipping to England. 02:15 Main Event— LIVE! Creating Character Arcs - Part 2 -Touched upon positive character arc in part 1; this episode will be flat and negative. -Josh's character arc types are flat. -Chuck didn't read the book, yet he has opinions! -‘The lie they believe' is ambiguous, but there are examples. -The debate over what arc to use and which one needs an arc. -Plot arcs vs. character arcs and genre dependency. Ex. Die Hard (plot arc) with a flat character arch (McClain) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0095016/ -Flat arcs don't mean their arcs and decisions don't matter. -Book 1 is often a character arc, but later books may not be. Ex. Captain America: The Winter Soldier. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1843866/ -A slight political digression. -The negative character arc. Ex. Star Wars Episode I-III with the caveat that it could've been the best if the writing wasn't so bad. -Arthas from World of Worldcraft https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dpbWpPrTnk -The point of no return. -A rant about Star Wars prequels. Ex. Walter White in Breaking Bad https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0903747/ -Is Breaking Bad a negative change arc or a flat arc with a negative change prologue? -Perhaps just the first episode is the negative character arc? -What about Vic Mackey in The Shield? https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0286486/ -Tea with the Dalai Lama… -What's the most significant negative character arc that you've written? Ex. D Fens in Falling Down https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0106856/ -Segue into Michael Douglas films. -Josh's beard is a negative change arc. -Sandor Clegane isn't a negative character arc, but his motivations and beginnings are negative in George RR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire. -The same with Beth Dutton in Yellowstone. -Writing a negative character arc, you need to be conscientious of the foreshadowing vs. flat or positive character arcs. -The next book is Cheryl St. John's Writing With Emotion, Tension, and Conflict: Techniques for Crafting an Expressive and Compelling Novel https://amzn.to/3dL3UcI 59:54 Closing remarks *** Coffee and Concepts https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRuoHj6opw0 Writer's Journey https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydLaFFntB4Q Storytelling https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYRzwuQeK9Q Become a Medium today! https://keystrokemedium.com/mediums/ *** Don't forget to Like and Subscribe and get involved with the mayhem and shenanigans in the live chat! http://www.youtube.com/c/keystrokemedium If you have any thoughts or ideas for show topics or if you have authors you'd like to see on the show, let us know. Visit our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/KeystrokeMedium For all the latest and greatest KSM Gear, check out our store at: https://keystrokemedium.com/ksm-store/ Also, subscribe to Sci Fi Explorations for the best discounted and free books we come across through our contacts: http://www.scifiexplorations.com *** Keystroke Medium Anthologies Kingdoms of Iron and Stone - https://amzn.to/2GjbE6I Horizons Beyond - https://amzn.to/2SrJ6uX Farthest Reach – https://amzn.to/2UZINeo The Writing Dream – and How to Make it to Happily Ever After – Keystroke Medium's first non-fiction book. https://amzn.to/2UZINeo If you enjoy this podcast, please leave us a review and rate the show on iTunes, Podbean, Stitcher, or wherever else you found us!

Big Money Movie Ideas
Ep 124: The Truth about Cats and Douglas

Big Money Movie Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 71:55


Michael Douglas that is. Join the fan club and know more about him than he ever wanted you to know. Check out ghostpartyparty.com! Have a look at all of our movie posters for all of our episodes! Song Credit: DON'T MAKE TERRY WAIT by Dr Sparkles licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 Artwork by Kelsey Henry and Andrew Santoro Edited, Produced, and Recorded by Andrew Santoro and Kelsey Henry

Revisionary Podcast
Getting Rocky Marciano On Me FT Aaron Ableman

Revisionary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 48:28


After his mother and father met at a Yogananda-inspired spiritual center, they answered an anonymous job ad in the local newspaper to be the head gardener and chef for Michael Douglas' family. Born in Douglas' basement, Aaron was raised between the working-class activism of his parents and the affluent fame of Montecito, California. This is the story about how a Nazi punches Aaron in the face while he was growing up. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/revisionarypodcast/support

No One's Okay
On Screenwriting with Daniel Zucker

No One's Okay

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 62:31


Thanks for listening! This week writer, producer, and director Daniel Zucker joins me to discuss screenwriting. He shares how he first started writing scripts with his former writing partner, he demystifies the elusive writers' room, and shares how he has been able to transition into a solo career as a screenwriter after being a staff writer. We dive into everything giant land tortoises, his love for Japanese cuisine, and why he's feeling hopeful as a creative. As always we concluded with the eternal question, “Are You Okay?” But, spoiler alert… we weren't. xo, Pamela LISTEN/SUBSCRIBE TO THIS PODCAST Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/no-ones-okay/id1495487224 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/71zwoGcKEgZ8FvMVcwPawh?si=85kZIupGTICYMvarnmw0ag Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/no-ones-okay SCHEDULE New Episodes every Tuesday CONNECT WITH US Website- http://www.noonesokay.com SOCIAL MEDIA Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/noonesokay @PamelaPortnoy DANIEL ZUCKER https://www.instagram.com/danielzucker/?hl=en TWITTER https://twitter.com/DirectFromDZ #NoOnesOkayPodcast #DanielZucker #Screenwriting

Bullets, Bourbon, & Karate
Black Rain (September 1989)

Bullets, Bourbon, & Karate

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 79:49


They don't make detectives like Nick Conklin anymore. A divorced NYC dad who loves his Harley and kids and who's being investigated by Internal Affairs. Ok, maybe they do make em' like that still, but Michael Douglas Does it best. Join us as we take a trip to Japan for justice and to smoke anywhere we damn well please in this episode dedicated to the 1989 Ridley Scott directed Back Rain!

From Tailors With Love
128 - The Game | Michael Douglas the Grey-Suited Supremo

From Tailors With Love

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2021 33:54


I speak to Bobby Morelli about one of the more stylish films of the 90s, The Game starring Michael Douglas and Deborah Kara Unger.  The costume designer for The Game was Michael Kaplan.  This podcast is sponsored by MyPostcard be sure to enter TAILORS25 at the checkout to get your 25% discount.  You can also find links to the chat on YouTube and everything else over at ..  https://fromtailorswithlove.co.uk/the-game-michael-douglas-the-grey-suited-supremo-128  

Everything I Learned From Movies
Bonus Episode - The Phantom 1996

Everything I Learned From Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 93:30


Steve & Izzy continue 2021 & the Year of the Character with a month-long celebration of Tarzan Movies, as they discuss 1996's "The Phantom" starring Billy Zane, Kristy Swanson, Treat Williams, Shang Tsung, Raiden 2.0 & Mrs. Michael Douglas!!! What if Tarzan were also Batman? Where's the Devil's Vortex? How would you handle talking to your Ghost Dad on a regular basis? Are the pirates actually bad guys in this movie? Who will bare the next Phantom if the proposed trilogy were completed?!? Let's find out!!! So kick back, grab a few brews, send a message to your loved ones, and enjoy!!! Also, follow us on Twitter, Instagram & Facebook @EILFMovies for details on our FREE upcoming live shows at Brewvie's Theater in Ogden, Utah!!! Our next show will be ... ... ... hopefully on Wednesday, July 14th, 2021!!! This episode is also brought to you by PodcArt Fest which will be coming back again on Saturday, July 10th, 2021!!! We'll be hosting a Virtual Festival celebration of Podcasters & Artists to help raise awareness and money for Artists in need during these times!!! For full details, follow us at @PodcArtFest on Twitter, Facebook & Instagram or you can also see our home page at my.boothcentral.com/v/events/podcart-fest Try it today!!! Twitter - www.twitter.com/eilfmovies Facebook - www.facebook.com/eilfmovies Instagram - www.instagram.com/eilfmovies Etsy - www.untidyvenus.etsy.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Movies I Love That No One Talks About

I know you haven't seen this movie. I know you might think it's old and outdated. It's not. It's stellar. It plays like it could have come out last week. It's THE STAR CHAMBER, a movie about a secret group of judges that mete out justice to criminals who get off on technicalities. Michael Douglas, Yaphet Kotto, Hal Holbrook. It's on Amazon. Joe Aliberti and I explain why it's incredible on this week's episode. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dan-benamor/support

GSMC Movie Podcast
GSMC Movie Podcast Episode 334: Biopics...Who To Pick?

GSMC Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 60:36


In this episode, Melissa reacts to finding out who Michael Douglas would choose to play him in a movie about himself, and goes down a list of well made, and not so well made biopics. These include "Braveheart," "Lady Sings The Blues," "My Left Foot," and "Bohemian Rhapsody." If you enjoyed this episode, follow us and subscribe to the show: you can find us on iTunes or on any app that carries podcasts as well as on YouTube. Please remember to subscribe and give us a nice review. That way you will always be among the first to get the latest GSMC Movie Podcasts. We would like to thank our Sponsor: GSMC Podcast Network Advertise with US: https://gsmcpodcast.com/advertise-with-us Website: https://gsmcpodcast.com/gsmc-movie-podcast Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/gsmc-movie-podcast/id1116274617 GSMC YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tX3_EvbHp08&list=PLF8Qial15ufrmDabMk03LCx49N85Bx v71 Twitter: https://twitter.com/GSMC_Movies Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gsmcmovie/ Disclaimer: The views expressed on the GSMC Movie Podcast are for Movie purposes only. Reproduction, copying or redistribution of The GSMC Movie Podcast without the express written consent of Golden State Media Concepts LLC is prohibited.

Jeff & Jenn Podcasts
E News: The Kardashian Reunion is on the way!

Jeff & Jenn Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 12:49


E News: The Kardashian Reunion is on the way!, Michael Douglas doesn't get upset about this, An Amy Schumer look alike, and Farrah Fawcett's red swimsuit was almost a bust.

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health
A Special Love w/ Shauna + Dan Ahern: Throwing Out The Rules and Finding Joy in Enough

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 21:40


I want to thank you for listening and for subscribing to Faster Than Normal! I also want to tell you that if you're listening to this one, you probably listened to other episodes as well. Because of you all, we are the number one ADHD podcast on the internet!! And if you like us, you can sponsor an episode! Head over to https://rally.io/creator/SHANK/?campaignId=1f99a340-203f-498e-9665-24723a5f8b7a  It is a lot cheaper than you think. You'll reach... about 25k to 30,000 people in an episode and get your name out there, get your brand out there, your company out there, or just say thanks for all the interviews! We've brought you over 230 interviews of CEOs, celebrities, musicians, all kinds of rock stars all around the world from Tony Robbins, Seth Godin, Keith Krach from DocuSign, Danny Meyer, we've had Rachel Cotton, we've had  the band Shinedown, right? Tons and tons of interviews, and we keep bringing in new ones every week so head over to https://rally.io/creator/SHANK/?campaignId=1f99a340-203f-498e-9665-24723a5f8b7a  make it yours, we'd love to have you, thanks so much for listening!  Now to this week's episode, we hope you enjoy it! ——   A little about our joyful couple/team today! Shauna M. Ahern is a writer, teacher, and lifelong believer in people. She loves to help others find their joy. Shauna built a huge online community through her food blog, Gluten-Free Girl. She and her husband, Daniel, taught culinary getaways in a villa in Tuscany, appeared on The Food Network, and won a James Beard award for one of their three much-beloved cookbooks.  After writing Gluten-Free Girl for 14 years, Shauna followed her gut to shift her writing work to something more vulnerable. She wrote a brave book about her childhood trauma and how she unraveled herself from it, to help others.  That book, ENOUGH: Notes from a Woman Who Has Finally Found It  was recommended by Brené Brown, The Washington Post, and thousands of readers who say the book has changed their lives. Shauna is humbled by the many awards she has won for her writing and teaching. But her biggest joy is helping other people to see the best in themselves. She has guided hundreds of people to see their place in the world more clearly, through her writing workshops and coaching. The best of all these experiences was the joy of creating and being in community — Daniel Ahern has spent his life working to give people joy in the belly.  Dan, along with his wife Shauna, created three much-beloved cookbooks. Their first cookbook, Gluten-Free Girl and the Chef, was named one of the best cookbooks of 2010 by The New York Times. Their second cookbook, Gluten-Free Girl Every Day, was awarded the James Beard award in 2014. And their third cookbook, American Classics Reinvented, was nominated for an excellence award in 2016 by the International Association of Culinary Professionals. Before crafting cookbooks, Dan cooked in restaurants around the United States, including Gramercy Tavern in New York and Papillon in Denver, as well as Cassis Bistro and Impromptu Wine Bar in Seattle. When he was 14, he found his passion in the kitchen, which was his place to serve others for decades. Now, Dan is cooking and serving in a new way, with a recipe newsletter called Joy in the Belly. Diagnosed with ADHD at 50, Dan is starting to understand his own mind and his quirks in the kitchen. No longer in the restaurant business, Dan is now sharing what he has learned about his ADHD and how he is working with it joyfully now, instead of worrying he isn't good enough. He shares tips about working in the kitchen with ADHD, being kind to yourself when you forget to do the dishes, and some kickass recipes. Dan lives on Vashon Island, in Washington State, where he is happy and learning, with his wife, his two kids, two cats, and two bunnies. He thinks he might never cook rabbit now. Maybe.       ----------  In this episode Peter, Shauna and Dan discuss:      1:42  -  Intro and welcome Dan and Shauna!!   3:14  -  On being diagnosed with ADHD at 50. Did it all just suddenly make sense? 4:23  -  The writing process when you're ADHD and have a super spouse. 5:11  -  The importance of movement as relates to the creative process 6:00  -  To hell with “The Rules” post-pandemic. On finding the best solutions for what works!   7:00  -  On the importance of FUN / Shauna's newsletter Finding Joy in Enough   9:21  -  On being married, and making the relationship work with living/working together. Do you ever want or need a chance to get away from each other; how does that work?   10:45  -  Their home is not on the same island where Michael Douglas lived in the movie Disclosure   11:05  -  When things get crazy, how do you prioritize and still make it work?  Ref:  Shauna's book “Enough” 12:30  -  Peter is referencing a super interview we had with Chef Jason McKinney Thank you again Jason!! :-) 13:19  -  On dealing with the lure of drugs/alcohol/addiction within the food industry.   15:18  -  On the benefits of living in a neurodivergent household. 16:41 -  What advice would you give your 15yr old self, just starting out in the restaurant business; that might help yourself find the right path? 19:22  -  Thanks Dan and Shauna - how do people find you? Yeah, Danny has a newsletter now, which is all about having ADHD and becoming  a home cook after years of being a chef, and it's called https://joyinthebelly.substack.com/subscribe and mine is https://findingyourjoy.substack.com/s  Soon there'll be a website called Practicing Joy, that's really what I'm working on is reminding each other to find moments in the day to focus on joy, because that's really the whole point of life. You can also find the Ahern's on the Socials Dan is at: @DanAhern68 on Twitter  Shauna is at:  @practicingjoy on Twitter  and at shaunamahern on INSTA 20:00  -  Thank you so much Shauna and Dan! And thank YOU for subscribing, reviewing and listening. Your reviews are working! Even if you've reviewed us before, would you please write even a short one for this episode? Each review that you post helps to ensure that word will continue to spread, and that we will all be able to reach & help more people! You can always reach me via peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterThanNormal on all of the socials. As always, leave us a comment below and please drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse! Do you know of anyone you think should be on the FTN podcast? Shoot us a note, we'd love to hear!   Ref:  Peter references this episode with Siri Dahl  Also- we're pretty sure his last name is still Shankman, not “Shenkins”, but if anything has changed, we'll be sure to tweet about it right away ;-)    20:56  -  Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits TRANSCRIPT:  — Hi guys. My name is Peter Shankman. I'm the host of Faster Than Normal.  I want to thank you for listening, and I also want to tell you that if you've listened to this one, you probably listened to other episodes as well of Faster Than Normal.  We are the number one ADHD podcast on the internet, and if you like us, you can sponsor an episode.  Head over to shank.mn/sponsor  - that's shank.mn/sponsor. It is alot cheaper than you think. You'll reach... God about 25….30,000 people in an episode and get your name out there, get your brand out there, your company out there, or just say, thanks for all the interviews we brought you over 230 interviews of CEOs, celebrities, musicians, all kinds of rock stars all around the world from we've had... God, who have we had...we've had Tony Robbins, Seth Goden, Keith Krach from DocuSign, we've had Rachel Cotton, we've had  the band Shinedown, right? Tons and tons of interviews, and we keep bringing in new ones every week, so head over to shank.mn/sponsor  grab an episode, make it yours, we'd love to have you, thanks for listening.  Here's this week's episode, hope you enjoy it. — You're listening to the Faster Than Normal podcast where we know that having ADD or ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Each week we interview people from all around the globe from every walk of life, in every profession. From rock stars to CEOs, from teachers to politicians who have learned how to unlock the gifts of their ADD and ADHD diagnosis, and use it to their personal and professional advantage.  To build businesses, to become millionaires, or to simply better their lives. And now, here's the host of the Faster Than Normal podcast, the only man who squirrel??? (indistinguishable)  Peter Shankman 1:42 -Yo, yo yo what's up guys? Peter Shankman here, thank you for being here. It is a gorgeous day in May. I don't know how the heck we're in May already, but it's a gorgeous day in May of 2021, where we are producing another podcast for Faster Than Normal, live on the 56th floor in Manhattan with a dog running around, under my legs, everywhere named Waffle.  We have some fun people on the show as always. We're going to talk to Dan and Shauna Ahern.  They've created three hugely great cookbooks. You might know the biggest one, https://www.amazon.com/Gluten-Free-Girl-Chef-Tempting-Recipes/dp/1118383575/ref=pd_lpo_14_t_1/136-2006629-0721943?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=1118383575&pd_rd_r=8e3aaf43-e37c-41e0-ba3c-6b5edaba1cf4&pd_rd_w=J2PrH&pd_rd_wg=jwtLB&pf_rd_p=a0d6e967-6561-454c-84f8-2ce2c92b79a6&pf_rd_r=P2KNSK8NDVM3NCC85XNQ&psc=1&refRID=P2KNSK8NDVM3NCC85XNQ ...which was named one of the best cookbooks, 2010 by the New York Times, excuse me, I live a block from the NY Times, they have never named shit of mine, uh, one of the best of anything, but whatever.  Their second book, https://www.amazon.com/Gluten-Free-Every-Shauna-James-Ahern/dp/111811521X/ref=pd_lpo_14_t_0/136-2006629-0721943?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=111811521X&pd_rd_r=8e3aaf43-e37c-41e0-ba3c-6b5edaba1cf4&pd_rd_w=J2PrH&pd_rd_wg=jwtLB&pf_rd_p=a0d6e967-6561-454c-84f8-2ce2c92b79a6&pf_rd_r=P2KNSK8NDVM3NCC85XNQ&psc=1&refRID=P2KNSK8NDVM3NCC85XNQ ... was awarded the James Beard Award in 2014 and their third cookbook, https://www.amazon.com/Gluten-Free-Girl-American-Classics-Reinvented/dp/0544219880 was nominated for an Excellence Award in 2016, by the https://www.linkedin.com/company/international-association-of-culinary-professionals/ I got up and worked out this morning. so, you know…. hey, we're, we're both great. Anyway, I am thrilled to welcome Dan and Shauna because Dan got diagnosed with ADHD at 50 years old, so we're going to talk about that, and we're going to talk to Shauna about what that was like, to sort of wake up one day and say great, everything I know has changed. Welcome guys.  Thank you, Peter. That's pretty darn accurate actually.    So, you know, obviously having ADHD and being diagnosed at age 50, obviously didn't, uh, didn't really mess you up if you were able to get, uh, three incredible cookbooks, um, you know, and all these accolades for them. So talk about, Dan I mean,  you started off, you were cooking in restaurants all around the US, you were at https://www.gramercytavern.com/...you were athttps://www.papillonbistro.com/  as well as (indistinguishable) to  www.impromptuwinebar.com in Seattle, which I've been to, um, you've been doing this for decades now, right?  So, I mean, when you got diagnosed, was it sort of like, okay, yeah, that makes sense, and that totally clears out why I do what I do, or was it, was it a shock? No, it made total sense. It made me kind of think back, you know, restaurants are full of odd people and there's probably a lot of people in there with ADHD and they don't know it and it just it's an adrenaline fix and then I can really like hyper-focus on what I'm doing with cooking and getting into the whole groove of the bit, the job.  It made total sense. I mean, when I, frankly, the diagnosis, this was the last part we both started researching, I started researching... I'm the researcher, sorry, um, I started thinking right away when he was in restaurants, he made total sense, but as soon as leaving restaurants, like when we started writing our cookbooks, there were parts of his brain that fascinated me, but also puzzled me. Um, in fact, when we wrote our first cookbook, the very first day that we sat down to write a recipe, we had a brand new baby, maybe three months old. Um, I said, okay, sit next to me on the couch with a laptop, and you talk, I'll type... and let's talk about that chicken dish. And he was tongue-tied, and I kept thinking, wait, what, you know what, maybe he's overtired. Um, so let's leave it for tomorrow. And the next day I was working on, we used to write a website called Gluten-Free Girl... for many, many years. So I love those for that and said, Hey, what was that recipe that we yeah, and he was playing the Tiger Woods Golf game on the Wii, so he was moving and I, and he just went okay, ¼ C chuck, da, da, da, da,  immediately all came back and I thought, okay, wait, hope, let me get that recipe from last night, open up that file and said, tell me about... keep playing golf, and he had all of it as muscle memory in his head, and I realized at that point, everything he'd ever done in restaurants, he was moving. So you remember those things, if he was moving. So we wrote entire cookbooks with him, video games or cooking while he was talking.  I love that story. You know, I, I will not take in-person regular, boring meetings anymore.  All my meetings, if I can, if I can help it have to be, um, walking meetings.    Yep.  I joke that I have a very Aaron Sorkin life right. In, in that I have to have a walk and talk at least once a day and they have to be a lot of corners and we have to make a lot of turns. And, you know, it's, it's phenomenal. It's literally the opening scene of the first episode of the West Wing.  And, um, uh, but it works, it works so well, and it's so much more productive than sitting down at a desk and trying to do whatever it is you have to do.  Well, that's been the biggest lesson for both of us and especially for me, and I think special, especially this year of COVID, yeah, we realize now that all the rules that we were so host to follow, were all made up anyway, it all came tumbling down during this, and so the hell with success as is normally defined in America... for both of us, the idea of success is doing work. we love, feeling content while we're doing it.  And that's a completely different model than, you know, you must rise the corporate ladder, or you must do this thing and win these awards.  We love the accolades we got, but it was more that the people who wrote to us and told us we had helped their families and they had joy in their lives because they thought their four year old kid got diagnosed with celiac and he'll never have a normal life, and they started making our recipes and thought, oh, this is no big deal, and we helped them feel better. So for me and for Danny both, it's just what works. My motto is find a solution. I don't care what it looks like, just find a solution, so it works well, and you feel good.  I think that, that you really hit the nail on the head. A lot of, you know, I've been an entrepreneur now for God….24 years and, um, that's really scary and, um, happens literally half of my life, and, um, I find that, that I am a huge fan. Not only professionally, but personally as well. If it's fun, do it. If it's not fun, either figure out how to make it fun or do something else. And I'm never gonna understand people who look at work as something they have to do so they can have fun when they're not doing…. I'm like you should be having fun while you're working as well, and if you're not, there's a problem there.  Absolutely. I mean, a lot of my work now, I don't write Gluten-Free Girl anymore, and I do write, um, this newsletter called Finding Joy in Enough because my work now is all about joy. Especially after this last year, we survived this year. We have a 12yr old and a 7yr old, and we decided early on, like, let's just make sure there's just as much joy in the day as possible.  So we watched all of the Avengers movies, which were absolutely (laughter) we're also, um, you know, we just started eating in the  living room instead of the dining room, because everyone felt more comfortable, whatever tiny thing we could choose, they gave people some joy in this moment. That's what we've chosen now, it's the work I do.  And that's what I see is there's no joy in standard America. It's not a culture built for joy, and especially for those with ADHD or  neuro-divergent minds, you know... you're supposed to try everything you can to be neuro-typical, and this is boring as hell.  Yep, and I think that also in that same vein, that makes it difficult for a lot of people to have personal relationships, you know, I know that that when I was married, it was very tough.. and we're great friends now, probably because we don't see each other every day, but it was, it was very tough, you know, I'd come home and I'd be wackadoodle excited about something I did, right? It was the greatest feeling in the world. Oh my God, that's awesome, and of course the first thing I have to do, um, you know… OMG, I gotta tell her everything about that, oh my God. da-da-da-da-da-da,,,,and, and the ADHD in me, wouldn't let me think about, well, maybe she's had a shit day or maybe she's tired and maybe she's maybe she's feeding the kid or me, you're gonna, maybe she doesn't want to hear me come in and, and, and, you know, explode…..over everything, and that took a long time to learn and it took a long time to learn. And I think that, that…. when you're ADHD, it just seems normal. Why wouldn't everyone want to share everything amazing all at once in the first...brain debit in the first second that you get, you know? And, and no, that's really not how people work, um, not all of them, and so, so there's a lot of learning, I think, in, in the, uh, in the world of, of, of when one person has ADHD and the other person isn't, um, yeah, I think that's really important. And so, and so the fact that, um, that you guys are able to play off of each other's strengths…  yeah.  It's phenomenal. But so here's the thing.  You, you are married,  uh-huh…. you work together… uh-huh….  you live together… uh-huh… Tell me that you're able to get away from each other every once in a while. And how do you do that?   Hotel nights in the city!  (laughter)   We live on an island off of Seattle, about a 20 minute ferry ride and every once in a while, we'll just look at each other and say, I think I need a night.   Yeah…. ….go book on Priceline, a cheap hotel or whatever the app of the day is, and then one of us will go and the other will take the kids.  I love that.  Last time we went, I took three books and I read three books in 24 hours. Really? We've got a 12 year old, a seven year old and there was no time to like, luxuriously read a thing I want to read, so yeah, and we don't care what the hotel is, as long as it's clean, we just do, but yeah, he goes, and then I go…. We order take-out, go back to the room.   Oh, I love that so much. And, and I need to do….I need to do an ADHD segue here, completely unrelated. Do you guys live on the same island? That was, um, that Michael Douglas lived on... in the movie Disclosure. No, no, we live in rural lovely place. It's the same life as Manhattan and two miles wider. And they're 10,000 people here.  Oh my God Yeah, it's pretty awesome.  That must be beautiful, that must be incredible. I'm sure. So tell me about… it can't  all be…. uh, sugar canes and plum ferries,,, there has to be some craziness.  How do you guys deal with it?  Uh, Danny?   (laughter)  Danny, why don't you step into the minefield, go ahead.  I just go into the kitchen and start cooking. (laughter)   I think, I think we, you know, we've been together for 15 years now and I am astonished every day that we get a chance to do this. And for me, really, there are two points of life taking care of each other, and joy, that's it. And so for me, having a chance to really take care of Danny and my kids, while also at the same time taking care of me, I didn't get that as a child. Um, I wrote about it in my book enough, I had a very, very difficult childhood, and so I came out of it as a full grown adult thinking I'm going to do better, I'm going to have boundaries and I'm going to have kindness, and when we fight, which is very rare, it's always about the dishes. (laughter)  Yeah. So I'm so I'm just telling you, like, you know, to putting them in the sink, and calling it good and letting someone else do it.  They're used to handing them off to the dishwasher at the restaurant…. I do….is doing kind of a half-ass job, at cleaning up,,, but   I want to ask you something. Cause I, I interviewed someone yesterday just randomly, because I guess there's like food week on Faster Than Normal, I interviewed someone yesterday with ADHD who worked at French Laundry and, um, and he started his career like tons of small restaurants (da-da-da) . And, um, one of the things that….that we were talking about is the, the, the, the less, uh, top level restaurants, like, but not that, not the Michelin rated ones, the diners or whatever, there is a massive, uh, from what everyone tells me, there's a massive drug problem in the kitchens. And did, I'm curious to know. If that ever affected you, Dan, in the respect of that, when you're ADHD, you tend to be drawn to things like that on occasion, right. Or until you learn about yourself, right.  Oh yeah…. ….anything that gives you Dopamine, and you're like, holy shit, I need this forever, right?  And so... I'm curious if you're comfortable talking about that. If that, if you ever saw that or that or affected you or anything like that?  Um, well, the, one of my first, uh, restaurant kitchen meetings. I, I was 15 years old and I got to the meeting and thought, okay, this is going to be interesting. And the, the manager of the restaurant said, okay, guys, we've really got to cut down on the cocaine use this year.  OMG,,,,,  holy Jesus, here we go… this is going to be interesting. Um, I, I saw a lot of drinking in restaurants and a lot of drug use, but I'd never. And the restaurants…. that was my life, that was what I wanted to do, so I didn't want to affect it like that. right…. You know, I'm, I'm, you know, I'm guilty as the next guy, of… you know, drinking on the job or going into the workroom really fast, but I had not, not to the extent that I've seen a lot of people just destroy themselves with.  Yeah. There's no…. with Danny, I should say how proud I am of him, he's a recovering alcoholic. He has been so screwed up,, God Bless…. Um, so, the willpower, you had to quit that.. and cigarettes, while still being in a restaurant was amazing.  Um, but we've talked about it a lot there. There's definitely a lot of, um, ADHD and Dopamine hits... the being on the line itself is an adrenaline rush. Yeah. Um, when Danny was at Impromptu, it was a very small restaurant in Seattle. And one time his, um, assistant step, you know, she didn't show up for work and he called me and I was pregnant, he was like, I'm sorry, can you step in? Cause I'm totally out of like, of course, and being on the line with him, just like, okay, we needed this and sort of preparing salads, little things, cause I know food, I wanted to have a panic attack. I'm like, but there are like 28 things, orders in, I have never seen him so calm for him.  He was just like, we're going to move here and we're going to do this and he didn't talk, and he just commanded it.  Yeah, well, that's what they say about people with ADHD is that, is that... this is the person with ADHD is the person you want when everything goes to shit, because they will, now that being said on the flip side, you know, they're not necessarily the best at handling taking out the trash on Wednesday on one, on a random Wednesday afternoon. (laughter)  I don't know what you're talking about…. Oh sure, I get the trash out… We, I mean, with, with kids, and knowing Danny's brain as well as I do, and then our daughter is also diagnosed with ADHD. She's 12, um, we think our son is too, but he didn't have enough school this last year….for a teacher to be able to write those evaluations. You know, I just, we just run a neuro-divergent house, and so I'm really good at making the schedules and the structures, and I know how important they are.  Our kids love routine, and so I'll say, okay, at 7:15 we're doing this, and it's 7:30, we're doing this and it's time to get going, and… uh, that helps a lot. Um, and I have friends who say, God, I would never be able to do all that, you do so much for them, but for me, I also know how much I love them, and I want them to feel at ease in the world and whatever his brains to make it muscle memory, so they don't have to think about it.  I would, I would suggest also that, that you guys seem a little more self-aware than, uh, your average parents, so I think that's awesome. I think your kids are very, very lucky in that regard. Um, I will, I will close it with, with one question, cause I want to be respectful of your time, and every episode's only about 20 minutes cause you know, ADHD, but, um, what….exactly…..squirrel, um, If you could tell... 15yr old you... who's just starting work his first time in a restaurant, what it's going to be like, or, or one piece of advice that would benefit him, or you as well.  So if you could give yourself one piece of advice, what would you say, to um,, sort of put them on the right path in the beginning.  Um, stick with  it, if that's something that you really want to do, stick with it, there's going to be ups and down days, and you're just, there's one da  you're going to be feeling like everything is just ticket and everything's on fire, and everything's perfect, and then the next day, you, you, you, your heads so far up your ass, you don't know where you're going.  (laughter)  and….. you …. you have those days... where you look at the clock, like  oh crap, it's only 5:30, good times... but no, you just gotta work at it and stick to it and come up with a plan of how you're going to do things. When you start, when things start falling apart and come up with and just…. cooking is so you get, you get, you get in a tunnel and that's one, one of my problems sometimes, cause I get very hyper-focused profession, but you just got to stick to it and...  follow your dreams  and follow what makes you happy.  And that's what, that's what I would say to my 15…. go ahead, sorry.  No, everybody... I want to have you guys back, um, at some point in the future, because I think that we could do an entire show just on sort of the tips and tricks that you've learned from working the lines and things like that. And, you know, the concept of focus.  There's a, um, I've wanted to do this for a while and I'm actually excited. I finally found someone who's going to allow me to do it. I'm going to shadow, um, a short order cook this summer for a, for a week, um, for no other reason than I just really, I, when I asked the guy, the, the owner of the diner, he goes, uh, son, you have a good career, why the hell would you want to throw it away and become a short-order… I'm like , no, no. I'm like, no, don't I don't want to become a short-order cook, I just want to learn how to do it. And so I'm going to shadow someone for a week and I'm really excited about it. He said, you know, I said, any tips before I get started? And he goes, the one thing, you know, he goes, prep is everything, and so I would love to do an episode with you guys at some point in the future where we talk about, you know, the tips and tricks you've learned that from cooking that you can apply to your life. So we'll get definitely gonna have you guys back, and I really, really appreciate you both taking the time. Absolutely, it's such a joy to talk with you.    Guys let's, uh, give a shout, if it were….. to Dan and Shauna.  Cookbook authors,  chefs, parents, ADHD, neurodiverse, and this is….. it doesn't get any better than this. This was a phenomenal interview, we're definitely gonna have you guys back. Thank you so much.  Real fast, do you guys have a website? How can people find you?  Yeah, Danny has a newsletter now, which is all about having ADHD and becoming  a home cook after years of being a chef, and it's called https://joyinthebelly.substack.com/subscribe and….  awesome…. Mine is https://findingyourjoy.substack.com/s  ...soon there'll be a website called Practicing Joy, that's really what I'm working on is reminding each other to find moments in the day to focus on joy, because that's really the whole point of life.  Very very cool. joy I love it, guys, thank you so much for being here, we're definitely gonna have you back.  Guys, you've been listening to Faster Than Normal, as you know , every week we have a new episode full of really, really, really super cool people like Shauna and Dan and others, um, tune in next week.  If you haven't listened lately and you're just sort of coming back because you were, I don't know, you know, in quarantine for the past year or whatever, um, we had…. last week, we had Siri Dahl who is an adult film star with ADHD, and she's also a powerlifter and she talks about what's going on in her world. I strongly recommend checking that interview out, that was a lot of fun. And ironically, it took an adult film star… my producer let me know that, the adult film star interview was the first interview where I didn't curse once. So I don't know. I don't, I don't know exactly how it happened, but all of a sudden we didn't have to. He's like, yeah, we don't have to put the, uh, the mature themes, uh, logo on this episode. I'm like.. with the porn star, tThat's really strange.  So make sure you check that one out and we will see you guys next week. My name is Peter Shankman, thank you for listening to Faster Than Normal, take care.  ADHD  is a gift, not a curse, we'll see you soon.   —— Credits: You've been listening to the Faster Than Normal podcast. We're available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google play and of course at www.FasterThanNormal.com I'm your host, Peter Shankman and you can find me at petershankman.com and @petershankman on all of the socials. If you like what you've heard, why not head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice and leave us a review, come more people who leave positive reviews, the more the podcast has shown, and the more people we can help understand that ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Opening and closing themes were composed and produced by Steven Byrom who also produces this podcast, and the opening introduction was recorded by Bernie Wagenblast. Thank you so much for listening. We'll see you next week. 

The Rich Eisen Show
REShow: Greg Cosell & Michael Douglas - Hour 3 (05-26-21)

The Rich Eisen Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 56:11


NFL Films’ Greg Cosell tells Rich what the limited game tape reveals about Packers QB Jordan Love, how the 2nd-year quarterback stacks up against the 2021 NFL Draft QB class, when the Green Bay backup could be ready to assume the starting role, and why Trey Lance is the rookie QB poised to have the most successful 2021 season.       Academy Award-winning actor Michael Douglas reveals to Rich that he stole Pat Riley’s hairdo for his Oscar-winning role as Gordon Gekko in ‘Wall Street,’ how Joe Namath caused him to switch his long-time Giants allegiance to the Jets, why comedy is much harder than drama, and reuniting with his old on-screen paramour Kathleen Turner in Netflix’s ‘The Kominsky Method.’    Rich wraps up the hour recapping the eventful day of expert twitter trolling by Tom Brady and Phil Mickelson after they were announced as a team in the next version of ‘The Match’ against Aaron Rodgers and Bryson DeChambeau. And make sure you check out Rich's other podcast: Just Getting Started with Rich Eisen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

The son of a Hollywood icon, Michael Douglas made a name for himself in the 1980s with a string of hit movies, from Wall Street and Fatal Attraction to Romancing the Stone. In this week’s “Sunday Sitdown,” Willie Geist gets together with the Oscar winner to talk about his successful career, including the final season of his award-winning Netflix series The Kominsky Method. 

The Bill Simmons Podcast
The NBA’s Next Generation With Wosny Lambre, Vaccine Hesitancy With Derek Thompson, and Sharon Stone’s First Appearance

The Bill Simmons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 139:27


The Ringer’s Bill Simmons is joined by Wosny Lambre to discuss the new generation of NBA stars, fans of teams vs. fans of players, favorite and least favorite NBA players, and more (2:45). Then Bill talks with The Atlantic’s Derek Thompson about the U.S. COVID-19 vaccine rollout, American vaccine hesitancy, returning to pre-COVID-19 normalcy, the CDC, and more (51:00). Finally Bill talks with legendary actress-producer Sharon Stone about her new book, 'The Beauty of Living Twice'; some of her past films including 'Basic Instinct,' 'Total Recall,' 'The Specialist,' and 'Casino'; working with Hollywood royalty like Sylvester Stallone, Robert De Niro, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Martin Scorsese, and Michael Douglas; making documentary films; and more (1:26:00). Host: Bill Simmons Guest: Sharon Stone, Wosny Lambre, Derek Thompson Producer: Kyle Crichton