Podcasts about Scandinavian

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  • 1,730PODCASTS
  • 2,273EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Scandinavian

Show all podcasts related to scandinavian

Latest podcast episodes about Scandinavian

Bad Table Manners
The Dream of Two Kitchens

Bad Table Manners

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 39:58


This episode presents a micro-history of contemporary Indian kitchen design, as told by Manju Sara Rajan, the editor of a prominent design magazine, and Madhav Raman, an award-winning architect in New Delhi. We look at what lies behind the urban, aspirational dream of two kitchens — one visible and one concealed — which has roots in a historical wet and dry kitchen binary. We also look at what interventions open and modular kitchens have made in this history, and what it means for gender and caste politics that still lie at the heart of Indian kitchen design. How do urban Indians negotiate the waves of aromas and the inevitability of oil splatters that come with making Indian food with their desire to showcase their Scandinavian-inspired kitchens in India all at once? We talk about how in urban India, the aspiration is really to have it all. Learn more about this episode of Bad Table Manners at www.whetstoneradio.com, on IG at @whetstoneradio, Twitter at @whetstone_radio, and YouTube at /WhetstoneRadio. Guests: Manju Sara Rajan (@manjusararajan), Madhav Raman (@anagramarchitects)

The BHHcast
KP Anderson

The BHHcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 27:49


What is the best winning strategy for Monopoly? Can you mess with Scandinavian trolls, and is the Will Farrell and Rachel McAdams classic Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga on the same level as Spinal Tap? If you were to take the mechanical engineering of the perfect joke, how is it built? These and other great lightning round questions are tackled by comedian and producer (but, most importantly, comedian) K.P. Anderson on the BHHcast. Producer, writer (and comedian) K.P. Anderson has produced and written for a long list of successful programs including The Keenan Ivory Wayans Show, Politically Incorrect, The Wayne Brady Show, The Soup, The Joel McHale Show and Norm Macdonald Has a Show.  Want to learn more about what it means to be a showrunner like K.P.? Check out Showrunner School Part 1 available on Medium (Link: https://medium.com/the-haven/showrunner-school-part-1-what-is-a-showrunner-f7c14b166e2e). K.P.'s production company Pygmy Wolf Productions is known for its ability to break new ground in the comedy world.Twitter: https://twitter.com/ikpandersonInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/ikpanderson/IMDB: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1236421/Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/bhhcast)

Hysteria 51
The Kensington Runestone | 268

Hysteria 51

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 48:02


Guy Moves to America. Guy plows a field. Guy finds a Runestone from his ancestral land rewriting history as we know. Yup, that old chestnut. But not so fast… Could it be a fake? That is what Darrell Montgomery helps us figure out as he stops by the show once again to take a crack at this Scandinavian legend. Plus, CBot tried to figure out respect (It goes about how you think it will) and Brent share his affinity for grassy knolls. All that and more on the podcast that doesn't need a runestone to tell us about the past, we have a robot that swears he was there - Hysteria 51 Special thanks to this week's research sources: Books The Vikings and America | Erik Wahlgren Videos 10 Out of Place Artifacts People Took Way Too Seriously - https://youtu.be/v9DOjZObgvQ The Kensington Runestone: a Minnesota Mystery - https://youtu.be/Uo2nHmGcV_U Websites Kensington Runestone Wiki - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kensington_Runestone World's Columbian Exposition - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World%27s_Columbian_Exposition Alchetron - https://alchetron.com/Kensington-Runestone Runestone Museum - https://runestonemuseum.org/runestone/ Aardvarchaeology - https://aardvarchaeology.wordpress.com/2011/11/16/kensington-runestone-fakers-si/ Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/Hysteria51 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Level with Emily Reese
Level 160: Erik Desiderio (Last Epoch)

Level with Emily Reese

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 50:13


Erik Desiderio is composing music for Last Epoch, an action RPG from Eleventh Hour games. Erik just released a music video with the performers from Last Epoch's Main Theme and you can view it here! Last Epoch has been in early access for quite a while, and Erik is busy filling in the music - 4+ hours of music, to be exact. He used the Scandinavian instrument called the tagelharpa (which you see in the video link above!), and he used fretless bass in a great way. You can support Level with Emily on Patreon!

Folk Roots Radio... with Jan Hall
Episode 614 - Christa Couture In Conversation - To Us

Folk Roots Radio... with Jan Hall

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 58:02


We have another wonderful interview to share with you on Episode 614 of Folk Roots Radio. Award-winning singer-songwriter, writer and broadcaster Christa Couture joins us for an in-depth conversation about her career. An artist who describes herself as queer, disabled and proudly indigenous (she's mixed Cree and Scandinavian), Christa Couture has experienced more loss than most people can ever imagine: childhood cancer that led to the amputation of her left leg plus a second bout of cancer - this time of the thyroid (later in life). She's also lived with the tragedies of abortion and the deaths of two sons in infancy, followed by divorce. Her life experience informed her very well-received memoir "How To Lose Everything" which came out in 2020, and has helped many, many people deal with loss and grief. Christa Couture continues to make great art in both music and literature, with a willingness to share her story and inspiring attitude to life through broadcasting, public speaking and now film. We wrap things up with uplifting new single "To Us", a song she describes as 'a toast to resilience and survival', with the hope that things will get better as we move into 2022.

Women Take The Wheel
On location at PRI 2021 in Indy with Champion Scandinavian rider - Ida Zetterström!

Women Take The Wheel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 10:10


Ida Zetterström is a champion drag racer in Europe and her name is popping up more here in U.S. racing circles. She is also a double threat, competing in Super Street Bike and Top Fuel Dragster. Find out how she got to where she is today and her plans for the future. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Turns Out She's Psychic
Global New Year traditions & superstitions.

Turns Out She's Psychic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 124:37


Season three of TOSP ends with a real-life party. In a cross-over episode shared with Turns out she's a Witch,Tracey, Laura and Shannon join together for a drink (or several), and a good chat about various customs and traditions practiced around the globe to celebrate the ending of a year, and entering into a new one.Shannon brings us the unique take that Scotland has, exploring what Hogmanay has to offer, and also has a fresh look at how The Phillipines welcome in the New Year.Tracey covers her husband's Maltese family traditions associated with this time of year, as well as exploring New Years customs unique to many Scandinavian countries, in particular Denmark.Laura has enlisted the help of her family (thanks Milli!), to uncover more information about New Years traditions commonly celebrated in Peru, followed by a brief historical overview of our common (Gregorian) calendar.Thank you to each and every listener who has found their way here, it is an honour to share time and space with you, wherever you are, we all wish you love, health and prosperity in abundance, for the festive season, and for the year ahead. See you all in 2022!!Do you TOSP? Are you a TOSPIE?Have a Story to share, or a question to ask?What are you waiting for? Get in touch!Be honest, we can handle it ;-)tospsychic@gmail.comFollow us on Instagram #turnsout_shespsychicFaceboook @TOSPpodcasthttps://www.turnsoutshespsychic.com/Presented by Tracey Dimech, Laura Turner & Shannon Cotterill. Produced, edited, & music by Matt Turner.Visit Tracey's website hereAustralian Medium, Psychic & Spiritual Alignment Mentorhttps://www.traceydimech.com.auVisit Shannon's website herewww.ashamoon.squarespace.comwww.shannon-cotterill.squarespace.com

The River Rambler
Episode 61 - Topher Brown

The River Rambler

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 97:24


Time to end the year right, with one more River Rambler episode. For the final episode of the year I'm talking with Topher Brown. We go over how he started spin fishing at 5, being a "Child of Graphite," Quebec, steelhead vs Atlantic salmon, Scandinavian style fishing, canoes, bamboo, reels, Atlantic salmon populations, and we get a feline visitor.

KEXP Song of the Day
Takeshi's Cashew - Sterndüne (Kosmodr∞m)

KEXP Song of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 7:30


Takeshi's Cashew - "Sterndüne (Kosmodr∞m)" from the 2021 album Humans In A Pool on Laut & Luise. Takeshi's Cashew will be performing at this year's virtual Eurosonic (ESNS) Music Festival and Conference January 19-22. Blending genres, cultures, and regions into their own sound that they've titled “cosmofunk,” Takeshi's Cashew can be seen taking just as much influence from sunny ‘60s surf as they do flute-filled Scandinavian folk, German krautrock, and Latin cumbia. Formed in 2020, the young band - name after the iconic Japanese game show Takeshi's Castle - unveiled their debut album Humans In A Pool in June of 2021. Recorded in their tiny DIY studio in Vienna, the album weaves a magical tapestry of sounds for something unique and timeless. Our Song of the Day, “Sterndüne (Kosmodr∞m),” represents their lush sound impeccably. Spanning seven-and-a-half minutes of melodic synths, dancing flutes, and bright guitars - just to name a few of the many, many sounds introduced - the song goes on an epic quest in the name of the groove. Probably unsurprisingly, the song is only the second-longest track on the record, following the nearly eleven-minute closer “There Is No Harmony.” Ahead of their virtual performance for Eurosonic (ESNS) Music Festival and Conference on January 19-22, watch a video of them performing “Akihi” at the link below. Read the full post on KEXP.org Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Chasing Bandos Podcast
Urbex Nordic Battle with Nico (kupanik), Marcus (bgo_photo), Andrew Isaksson (drwstate) and Nick Wonder (nick.wander.photography)

Chasing Bandos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 35:32


Xmas Special - Urbex Nordic Battle Quiz with Scandinavian urban explorers. Representing Denmark is Nick Wander (nick.wander.photography), from Finland Nico (kupanik), Sweden's Andrew Isaksson (drwstate) and Norway's Marcus (bgo_photo). Chasing Bandos Podcast is available on chasingbandospodcast.com or your favourite podcasting app. Check out the pictures of our guest on Instagram at chasingbandospod. And if you feel like supporting the podcast check out the Patreon: patreon.com/gregabandoned You can get in contact by email: contact@gregabandoned.com  Intro song is Watcha Gon' Do is performed by Chris Shards [EPIDEMIC SOUND MUSIC LICENSE]. Song used in the episode were 'Jingle Bells 7' by Kevin MacLeod and 'We Wish You A Merry Xmas' by Audionautix.

Meat Sounds
Joulupukki Meat

Meat Sounds

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 2:13


Joulupukki literally means "Christmas goat" or "Yule Goat" in Finnish; the word pukki comes from the Teutonic root bock, which is a cognate of the English "buck", and means "billy-goat". An old Scandinavian custom, the figure is now being eventually conflated with Santa Claus. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/meat-sounds/support

Hearts of Space Promo Podcast
PGM 861R 'NIGHT LIGHT' : dec. 24-31

Hearts of Space Promo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021


The austere folk music of Norway and the Scandinavian countries has a paradox at its heart: in a land of frigid Arctic winters and stark, glacial landscapes, the music overflows with warmth and beauty. And while the winter days are dark, the nights are illuminated with the intoxicating spectacle of the northern lights. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a Nordic winter's journey called NIGHT LIGHT, featuring Norwegian lullabies sung by VIDIA WESENLUND with music by MICHAEL STEARNS, plus selections by ANNBJORG LIEN, LENA WILLEMARK & ALE MOLLER, OYSTEIN SEVAG, and STREIF. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ]

Music Life
Home for the holidays with MØ, Sigrid, Tove Lo and Alma

Music Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 32:55


Nordic pop superstars MØ, Sigrid, Tove Lo and Alma discuss writing songs on your holidays, which elements work best for their songwriting, and why Scandinavians are so good at making pop music. Karen Ørsted, better known as Danish singer and songwriter MØ, is an electro-pop star who blends different genres to make a sound that's uniquely hers. She grew up listening to punk music and this is definitely something that's influenced her most recent work. She's worked with the likes of Iggy Azalea, Major Lazer and DJ Snake, Charli XCX, Justin Bieber and superstar producer Jack Antonoff, and supported artists including Years & Years, AlunaGeorge and Sia on international stages. Sigrid is a Norwegian singer and songwriter who has toured with the likes of Maroon 5 and George Ezra, and her latest single Burning Bridges is a taste of what's to come from her second album. Tove Lo has been dubbed “Sweden's darkest pop export”. Known for her grunge-infused pop sound, she has released four albums and has had global success with tracks like Habits (Stay High), Cool Girl and the Grammy-nominated Glad He's Gone. Alma went from performing on Finnish talent show Idols to achieving platinum-selling singles in just five years. She shot to fame in 2017 with the release of Chasing Highs, released her debut album Have U Seen Her? in 2020, and has collaborated with the likes of Charli XCX, Tove Lo and MØ. Beyond her own music, she has written for pop heavyweights like Miley Cyrus and Ariana Grande.

Entreprendre dans la mode
Ditte & Nicolaj Reffstrup - (Founders of GANNI) How to become one of the most exciting brand of the moment ? (Rediffusion)

Entreprendre dans la mode

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 76:32


POUR TELECHARGER LE FASHION WEEK REPORT DE HEURITECH C'EST PAR ICI : www.heuritech.com/edlm« I think we are a lot smaller that a lot of people think we actually are financially. » Before starting GANNI, Ditte held different position from sales representative to buyers which give her a very good insight of what customers want. Nicolas held technical positions and co-founded several companies, including Oryx Invest and Spleak Media Network Ltd. The high-end brand wants to break the overly minimalist codes of the Scandinavian spirit and wants to seduce fashionable women with strong pieces. The brand represents a strong woman who has confidence in herself, offers everyday pieces, easy to wear, chic and comfortable.The brand has always been very picky at choosing at the retailers they work with. «  We have an accessible product price range (The prices are between 150 and 300$) but with a luxury distribution strategy. » Nicolaj obsession for sustainability coupled gave GANNI a real desire to be environmentally friendly and minimize its energy consumption, chemicals and CO2 emissions in its manufacturing process. However, the brand does not wish to claim or present itself as an "eco responsible brand" but as a brand that does the best it can. «  Sometime the problem is that the topic is so complex that there is no right or wrong answer. » In 2017, a 51% stake in Ganni was sold to L Catterton, the consumer-focused private equity firm whose shareholders include LVMH. In that year, GANNI had sales of approximately $50 million. The following year, Nicolaj resigned as CEO and was replaced by Andrea Baldo de Coccinelle. Nicolaj will now be able to focus on long-term brand strategy.In this episode we are covering a lot of topics, we come back on their  pathway before GANNI, how did everything started at GANNI and what they take from their previous experiences in tech. «  We have a very flat hierarchy, its less about authority and title, it is more about the best skills, the smartest guy on the block, it is also about bringing on board talent when you come across it. We have scrub meetings (10/15 min meeting, 1 min to tell what you did yesterday and what you do today) and so on... » We also cover distribution and communication strategies and they come back on the 2 or 3 things that gave GANNI global awareness. Of course we talk a lot about sustainability, we cover topics such as how to manage the contradiction of being in the fashion business when you are such aware of the climate change issue, how to be a responsible brand, how they use the carbon compensation as a tool to monitor and improve the results of their sustainable strategy, how to aligned design and sustainability when it comes to fabric choices, how to absorbe the extra cost of sustainable fabric. «  We compensate our carbon foot print, but we are very careful not to think of that as a way to kind of paying indulgence, just paying to do bad, we always thought of it as a tax you put on yourself like the carbon tax no politician had the guts to impose on us. To make it tangible, you can navigate toward that, and try to reduce it. » We also talk about their daily organisation, how they see the future of GANNI and we talk about how do they balance their personal and professional life as a couple in charge of such a big organization.This episode full of tips, tricks and the experience of the two fashion entrepreneurs ! I strongly thanks Nicolaj & Ditte Reffstrup for their transparency and generosity, and I invite you to do the same on their social networks, because it is a great gift they are giving us today.I thank Mehrie and Guillaume from DLX who make this episode possible. If you're looking for the episode notes with all the references, it's simple: go to the podcast blog, www.entreprendredanslamode.com.  Also, if you wish to contact me or suggest new guests, you can do so on Instagram under the nickname @entreprendredanslamodeLast but not least: leave me a review on Apple Podcast or iTunes, preferably 5 stars; it helps me to spread the word about the podcast to more people and encourages me to do better interviews!Thank you for supporting this podcast and see you soon for a new episode!Références :GANNI website Higg Index 

TFB Behind the Gun Podcast
TFB B-Side Podcast - Swedish Gun Law & Culture with Hagge Bänke

TFB Behind the Gun Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 52:18


Today on the TFB B-Side Podcast we have our gest Hagge Bänke from the country of Sweden. A dedicated servant of the patron god of firearms Zardoz, Hagge loves all types of shooting and even runs his own shooting club which has seen and continues to see steady growth throughout the years. Although Sweden shares many of hits gun laws and culture with other Scandinavian countries, there are a few intricacies and finer points that Hagge will go over with me in this podcast as he shares his various knowledge and stories with me about the various hoops and hurdles he has had to jump through and over as a gun owner in Sweden. If you want to check out more of Hagge's content including shooting videos, you can check out his social media accounts below: https://www.instagram.com/haggebanke/ https://www.youtube.com/user/heintron https://www.bitchute.com/channel/haggebanke/ https://discord.gg/qy3FCum 

Coaster Kings Radio
S4E46 - CKR Episode 46 - The Scandinavian/Nordic Tour

Coaster Kings Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021


In this episode, Sven talks with European Coaster Kings Member James and former member Alastair about the theme parks in the north of Europe! Learn more about parks in Norway, Finland, Sweden and Denmark to prepare your trip.

Dakota Spotlight Podcast
The Man From Un Part 1 - Sajid Hussain and Karima Baloch

Dakota Spotlight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 49:53


Part 1 of 2 - What do these things have in common: missing Barbara Cotton from Williston, ND, a hitman in Italy, secret agents, international crime and 3,300 pounds of heroin seized in a Dutch port city? I'll tell you. They are all included in this 2-part story about how my Scandinavian vacation became sidetracked by a mysterious drowning and sent me looking for international secrets. Music by Väsen Dakota Spotlight The Vault

what's on tap podcast
Advent 2021 Day 21 - Siren Origin Story - ep425

what's on tap podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 10:19


Advent 2021 Day 21 is from English brewery Siren. A few years ago they were all over the place. Thanks to Brexit and evolving markets, Siren has been missing from Scandinavian shelves and shops for quite some time. Origin Story has more than 20 speciality malts, two separate mashes and three oak varieties. The result is a sweet, brown sugar, cola, maple imperial stout. It's so nice to try Siren again.  

Revival Plan
Testimonies for the Church, Vol. 8, pp. 29-38 Day 417

Revival Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 20:15


Messages would come from lips touched with a live coal from the divine altar. Earnest, purified words would be spoken. Humble, heartbroken intercessions would ascend to heaven. With one hand the workers would take hold of Christ, while with the other they would grasp sinners and draw them to the Saviour. “This gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto all nations; and then shall the end come.” Matthew 24:14. “If thou forbear to deliver them that are drawn unto death, and those that are ready to be slain; if thou sayest, Behold, we knew it not; doth not He that pondereth the heart consider it? and He that keepeth thy soul, doth not He know it? and shall not He render to every man according to his works?” Proverbs 24:11, 12. -30- Chapter 5—The Work at Home and Abroad St. Helena, California, August 7, 1902 “Say not ye, There are yet four months, and then cometh harvest? behold, I say unto you, Lift up your eyes, and look on the fields; for they are white already to harvest. And he that reapeth receiveth wages, and gathered fruit unto life eternal: that both he that soweth and he that reapeth may rejoice together. And herein is that saying true, One soweth, and another reapeth.” John 4:35-37. After sowing the seed, the husbandman is compelled to wait for months for it to germinate and develop into grain ready to be harvested. But in sowing it he is encouraged by the expectation of fruit in the future. His labor is lightened with the hope of good returns in the time of reaping. Not so with the seeds of truth sown by Christ in the mind of the Samaritan woman during His conversation with her at the well. The harvest of His seed sowing was not remote, but immediate. Scarcely were His words spoken, before the seed thus sown sprang up and produced fruit, awakening her understanding, and enabling her to know that she had been conversing with the Lord Jesus Christ. She let the rays of divine light shine into her heart. Forgetting her water pitcher, she hastened away to communicate the good news to her Samaritan brethren. “Come,” she said, “see a man, which told me all the things that ever I did.” Verse 29. And they came out at once to see Him. It was then that He likened the souls of these Samaritans to a field of grain. “Lift up your eyes,” He said to His disciples, and look on the fields; for they are white already to harvest.” “So when the Samaritans were come unto Him, they besought Him that He would tarry with them: and He abode there two days.” And what busy days these were! What is the record of the result? “And many more believed because of His own word; and said unto the woman, Now we believe, not because of thy saying: for we have heard Him ourselves, and know that this is indeed the Christ, the Saviour of the world.” Verses 40-42. -31- Christ, in opening to the minds of the Samaritans the word of life, sowed many seeds of truth and showed the people how they, too, could sow seeds of truth in the minds of others. How much good might be accomplished if all who know the truth would labor for sinners, for those who need so much to know and understand Bible truth and who would respond to it as readily as the Samaritans responded to the words of Christ! How little do we enter into sympathy with God on the point that should be the strongest bond of union between us and Him-compassion for depraved, guilty, suffering souls, dead in trespasses and sins! If men shared the sympathies of Christ, they would have constant sorrow of heart over the condition of many needy fields, so destitute of workers. The work in foreign fields is to be carried forward earnestly and intelligently. And the work in the home field is in no wise to be neglected. Let not the fields lying in the shadow of our doors, such as the great cities in our land, be lightly passed over and neglected. These fields are fully as important as any foreign field. God's encouraging message of mercy should be proclaimed in the cities of America. Men and women living in these cities are rapidly becoming more and still more entangled in their business relations. They are acting wildly in the erection of buildings whose towers reach high into the heavens. Their minds are filled with schemes and ambitious devisings. God is bidding every one of His ministering servants: Cry aloud, spare not, lift up thy voice like a trumpet, and show My people their transgression, and the house of Jacob their sins.” Isaiah 58:1. -32- Let us thank the Lord that there are a few laborers doing everything possible to raise up some memorials for God in our neglected cities. Let us remember that it is our duty to give these workers encouragement. God is displeased with the lack of appreciation and support shown our faithful workers in our large cities by His people in our own land. The work in the home field is a vital problem just now. The present time is the most favorable opportunity that we shall have to work these fields. In a little while the situation will be much more difficult. Jesus wept over Jerusalem because of the guilt and obstinacy of His chosen people. He weeps also over the hardheartedness of those who, professing to be co-workers with Him, are content to do nothing. Are those who should appreciate the value of souls carrying, with Christ, a burden of heaviness and constant sorrow, mingled with tears, for the cities of the earth? The destruction of these cities, almost wholly given up to idolatry, is impending. In the great day of final reckoning what answer can be given for neglecting to enter these cities now? While carrying forward the work in America, may the Lord help us to give to other countries the attention that they ought to have, so that the workers in these fields will not be bound about, unable to leave memorials for God in many places. Let us not allow too many advantages to be absorbed in this country. Let us not continue to neglect our duty toward the millions living in other lands. Let us gain a better understanding of the situation and redeem the past. My brethren and sisters in America, it may be that in lifting up your eyes to see afar off the fields white unto the harvest, you will receive into your own hearts the abundant grace of God. You who through unbelief have been spiritually poor will, through personal labor, become rich in good works. You will no longer starve your souls in the midst of plenty, but will appropriate the good things God has in store for you. When you begin to realize how destitute of means the laborers are to carry forward the work in foreign fields, you will do what you can to help, and your souls will begin to revive, your spiritual appetite will become healthy, and your mind will be refreshed with the word of God, which is a leaf from the tree of life for the healing of the nations. -33- In answer to the Lord's inquiry, “Whom shall I send?” Isaiah responded, “Here am I; send me.” Isaiah 6:8. You, my brother, my sister, may not be able to go into the Lord's vineyard yourself, but you may furnish the means to send others. Thus you will be putting your money out to the exchangers; and when the Master comes, you will be able to return to Him His own with usury. Your means can be used to send forth and sustain the messengers of God, who by voice and by influence will give the message: “Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make His paths straight.” Matthew 3:3. Plans are being made for the advancement of the cause, and now is your time to work. If you work with self-denial, doing what you can to further the advancement of the cause in new fields, the Lord will help and strengthen and bless you. Trust in the assurance of His presence, which sustains you, and which is light and life. Do all for love of Jesus and the precious souls for whom He has died. Work with a pure, divinely inwrought purpose to glorify God. The Lord sees and understands, and He will use you, despite your weakness, if you offer your talent as a consecrated gift to His service; for in active, disinterested service the weak become strong and enjoy His precious commendation. The joy of the Lord is an element of strength. If you are faithful, the peace that passeth all understanding will be your reward in this life, and in the future life you will enter into the joy of your Lord. January 23, 1903. -34- I must write something in regard to the way in which our cities in America have been passed by and neglected, cities in which the truth has not been proclaimed. The message must be given to the thousands of foreigners living in these cities in the home field. I cannot understand why our people have so little burden to take up the work that the Lord has for years been keeping before me, the work of giving the message of present truth in the Southern States. Few have felt that upon them rested the responsibility of taking hold of this work. Our people have failed to enter new territory and to work the cities in the South. Over and over again the Lord has presented the needs of this field, without any special results. I have sometimes felt as if I could no longer bear the burden of this work. I thought that, if men should continue to neglect this work, I would let matters drift and pray that the Lord would have mercy upon the ignorant and those who are out of the way. But the Lord has a controversy with our ministers and people, and I must speak, placing upon them the burden of the Southern work and of the cities of our land. Who feels heavily burdened to see the message proclaimed in Greater New York and in the many other cities as yet unworked? Not all the means that can be gathered up is to be sent from America to distant lands, while in the home field there exist such providential opportunities to present the truth to millions who have never heard it. Among these millions are the representatives of many nations, many of whom are prepared to receive the message. Much remains to be done within the shadow of our doors—in the cities of California, New York, and many other states. -35- God says to His people: “Arise, shine; for thy light is come, and the glory of the Lord is risen upon thee.” Isaiah 60:1. Why, then, do they feel so little burden to plant the standard of truth in new places? Why do they not obey the word: “Sell that ye have, and give alms; provide yourselves bags which wax not old, a treasure in the heavens that faileth not”? Luke 12:33. Why do they not return to the Lord His own, to be invested in heavenly merchandise? Why is there not a more earnest call for volunteers to enter the whitening harvest field? Unless more is done than has been done for the cities of America, ministers and people will have a heavy account to settle with the One who has appointed to every man his work. We repeat the prayer: “Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.” Matthew 6:10. Are we doing our part to answer this prayer? We profess to believe that the commission which Christ gave to His disciples is given also to us. Are we fulfilling it? May God forgive our terrible neglect in not doing the work that as yet we have scarcely touched with the tips of our fingers. When will this work be done? It makes my heart sick and sore to see such blindness on the part of the people of God. There are thousands in America perishing in ignorance and sin. And looking afar off to some distant field, those who know the truth are indifferently passing by the needy fields close to them. Christ says: “Go work today in My vineyard.” “Say not ye, There are yet four months, and then cometh harvest? behold, I say unto you, Lift up your eyes, and look on the fields; for they are white already to harvest.” Matthew 21:28; 4:35. -36- Wake up, wake up, my brethren and sisters, and enter the fields in America that have never been worked. After you have given something for foreign fields, do not think your duty done. There is a work to be done in foreign fields, but there is a work to be done in America that is just as important. In the cities of America there are people of almost every language. These need the light that God has given to His church. The Lord lives and reigns. Soon He will arise in majesty to shake terribly the earth. A special message is now to be borne, a message that will pierce the spiritual darkness and convict and convert souls. “Haste thee, flee for thy life,” is the call to be given to those dwelling in sin. We must now be terribly in earnest. We have not a moment to spend in criticism and accusation. Let those who have done this in the past fall on their knees in prayer, and let them beware how they put their words and their plans in the place of God's words and God's plans. We have no time for dwelling on matters that are of no importance. Our time should be given to proclaiming the last message of mercy to a guilty world. Men are needed who move under the inspiration of the Spirit of God. The sermons preached by some of our ministers will have to be much more powerful than they are now, or many backsliders will carry a tame, pointless message, which lulls people to sleep. Every discourse should be given under a sense of the awful judgments soon to fall on the world. The message of truth is to be proclaimed by lips touched with a live coal from the divine altar. -37- My heart is filled with anguish when I think of the tame messages borne by some of our ministers, when they have a message of life and death to bear. The ministers are asleep; the lay members are asleep; and a world is perishing in sin. May God help His people to arouse and walk and work as men and women on the borders of the eternal world. Soon an awful surprise is coming upon the inhabitants of the world. Suddenly, with power and great glory, Christ will come. Then there will be no time to prepare to meet Him. Now is the time for us to give the warning message. We are stewards, entrusted by our absent Lord with the care of His household and His interests, which He came to this world to serve. He has returned to heaven, leaving us in charge, and He expects us to watch and wait for His appearing. Let us be faithful to our trust, lest coming suddenly He find us sleeping. -38- Chapter 6—The Work in Europe St. Helena, California, December 7, 1902 To My Brethren in Europe I have words to speak to you. The time has come for much to be accomplished in Europe. A large work, such as has been done in America, can be done in Europe. Let sanitariums be established, let hygienic restaurants be started. Let the light of present truth shine forth from the press. Let the work of translating our books go forward. I have been shown that in the European countries lights will be kindled in many places. There are many places where the Lord's work has not a proper showing. Help is needed in Italy, in France, in Scotland, and in many other countries. A larger work should be done in these places. Laborers are needed. There is talent among God's people in Europe, and the Lord desires this talent to be employed in establishing all through Great Britain and the continent, centers from which the light of His truth may shine forth. There is a work to be done in Scandinavia. God is just as willing to work through Scandinavian believers as through American believers. My brethren, bind up with the Lord God of hosts. Let Him be your fear, and let Him be your dread. The time has come for His work to be enlarged. Troublous times are before us, but if we stand together in Christian fellowship, none striving for supremacy, God will work mightily for us. Let us be hopeful and courageous. Despondency in God's service is sinful and unreasonable. He knows our every necessity. He has all power. He can bestow upon His servants the measure of efficiency that their need demands. His infinite love and compassion never weary. With the majesty of omnipotence He unites the gentleness and care of a tender shepherd. We need have no fear that He will not fulfill His promises. He is eternal truth. Never will He change the covenant that He has made with those that love Him. His promises to His church stand fast forever. He will make her an eternal excellence, a joy of many generations. Testimonies for the Church, Vol. 8 pp. 29-38

Design Your Life by Vince Frost
Designing the World's Best Electric Boats with Konrad Bergström

Design Your Life by Vince Frost

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 68:40


When you grow up in a family of inventors, you learn no idea is a bad idea, and anything is possible. With confidence in the knowledge that mistakes are learnings, and the way to make better innovations is to push the boundaries, Konrad Bergstöm is changing the world. Described as one of the most successful entrepreneurs of our time, the Swede is the founder of the multi-billion-dollar company Zound Industries, the makers of the innovative headphones and speakers loved the world over. These days he's focussed on saving the oceans through his electric boating company, X Shore. After turning his life around, switching a fast-paced international career to a life closely connected to his roots in nature, his energy and passion are contagious. Listen in as Vince and Konrad discuss his game-changing electric boats, Scandinavian design culture and how his experience in the Swedish Special Forces shaped his connection to nature.  https://www.xshore.com/  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Japan By River Cruise
Married to Our Research (w/Joy Hendry)

Japan By River Cruise

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 29:33


Author of the new book, "An Affair with a Village" and leading UK expert on Japan, Joy Hendry joins us to discuss a whole variety of things, like MEXT Scholarships, marriage, and other things that end up letting us down.Ollie gets Scandinavian with it.Bobby is surprised to find out there are as many as two.Topics discussed on this episode range from: How the current entry ban is affecting Academia Joy's perspective on the situation as someone who's been doing fieldwork in Japan for 50 years Another historical entry ban and it's effects, and the story of Ron Dore What Joy thinks people can do in the interim Actions people are taking now to deal with it The Twitter response, and the twitter activism The awesome resource share project some Twitter academics are undertaking The network and community building that's occurring The way the internet has changed Japan-research, and what Joy's earliest Japan fieldwork experiences were like Joy's book An Affair With a Village How an anthropologist approaches and analyzes the things that all foreign residents of Japan live with Why Japan thinks we can't sort our rubbish Potential conflicts of interest and how anthropologists avoid moral judgements How Joy chose what village to study Joy's work studying the types of marriages, marriage by introduction and "love marriages" What Japan thinks is an incredibly important thing to do for anyone during research in the field in Japan How LONG AGO was the 1970s in terms of what things were like in Japan Love hotels, and what people who lived in communal family country homes before love hotels The tradition of "night-creeping" and the woman who told her "night-creeping" story to Joy The shift from "introductions" to "love marriages" during the time when Joy was researching it and how the delineations between the two weren't always clear Bobby's strategy in getting his wife's family's permission to marry their daughter How deeply marriage and other life events are tied to the Japanese idea of "continuing the line of the house" and carrying on the family business Marriage as the longest-form of anthropological research This week's extras feature lots more insights from Joy and her years of work. From religion in Japan, to generational change, rules of engagement for anthropologists, and more!Get access to the extras for standard episodes by supporting the podcast for less than $1 an episode by becoming a member at http://buymeacoffee.com. Have something you'd like to say? Send us a fax at japanbyrivercruise.com - it works now.or Tweet to us at @jbrcpodJoy's Book:An Affair With a VillageSocial Media Links:Joy Hendry:  Extremis PublishingOllie Horn: Twitter | InstagramBobby Judo: Twitter | Instagram | YouTubeOther things to click onSome are affiliate links because we're sell-outs We record remotely using Squadcast and the podcast is hosted on Transistor.  Bobby uses a Shure mic and a Scarlet Focusrite. Ollie uses the AT2005USB mic. ★ Support this podcast ★

Who ARTed
Fun Fact Friday - Ugly Christmas Sweaters

Who ARTed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 5:38


In 1921, Edward the Prince of Whales, was seen wearing a sweater with a distinctive pattern. The intricate design was typical of knitwear produced on a small island in the Scottish Shetlands. The Fair Isle is the most remote inhabited island in the UK - it only has about 50 permanent residents, but it's distinctive style is popular around the world. Nobody is entirely certain of the origin of the Fair Isle knitting style. There is a great story of a Spanish ship that wrecked on the Fair Isle in 1588 and the 17 households on the island took the sailors in. That bit is recorded history, and some say that was the incident that sparked the development of the Fair Isle style. While that would make for a tidy origin story, there is no real evidence to support it as the Spanish were not knitting textiles in similar patterns at that time, and the oldest examples of Fair Isle knitting we have come from the middle of the 19th century. The more likely explanation is that the knitting style evolved and was influenced by Scandinavian and Baltic traders as both cultures were known to have similar patterning in their textiles.  Some of the characteristics of the Fair Isle style include: limited colour palette of 5 or so colors, no more than 2 colors in a single row, they are worked in the round and limit how long any individual color runs in the design. Typically we see geometric patterns and often symmetry or mirroring of those geometric design elements.  The early Fair Isle pieces were created using a stranding technique and no individual color would be used for more than 2 or 3 stitches for fear of creating a long strand that would easily catch on a finger or button. The more modern technique employed today is woven Fair Isle. In this method, basically the thread is held in different positions relative to the needles and woven into the fabric. This method allows for greater flexibility in creating a wider range of patterns and larger blocks of colors.  Much like purists will tell you a sparkling wine is not champagne unless it comes from the Champagne region in France, some say knitwear is only a Fair Isle design if it was produced by the skilled weavers on the island. All similarly patterned clothing is simply “stranded colourwork” colour being spelled with a “u” as we are discussing British culture. Of course as I hear Fair Isle designs, my first thought is of feral a term used to describe wild and untamed creatures and today, sweaters woven with blocks of colors and geometric patterns have been lumped into the modern tradition of wild “ugly christmas sweaters” but it is important to recognize the difference between the ornate patterns meticulously rendered by Fair Isle artists, and the excessive ornamentation and loud cluttered designs created by shallow imitators.  I feel on some level there is also a lesson here about appropriation. There is a natural tendency for us to take inspiration from others we see and admire and for that to influence our work and our tastes. That may come in the form of skilled knitters and weavers learning methods from Scandinavian and Baltic travelers then bringing elements of their style into a new form, or a patron like Edward recognizing quality products and bolstering the local economy. Appropriation or rather I suppose I should say misappropriation because I feel taking things in thoughtfully and deliberately is fine. To my mind the problem is misappropriation - when some of the most outwardly visible elements are taken, mimicked and thoughtlessly thrown together or transformed into a costume to be worn and held up for ridicule. That is where the Christmas sweater becomes truly ugly.

Heavy Hops
Upcoming Scorched Tundra Celebrations, Holiday Threads, The Latest On Heavy Hops

Heavy Hops

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 58:04


Ever wonder what to do with the awkward time between Christmas and New Years? Join DJ Alexi Front of Scorched Tundra and Metropolitan Brewing for the Scandinavian tradition of Mellandagen/Romjul (the days in between) at Dmen Tap. Enjoy beers by Metropolitan (Humbucker, Krankshaft and BA Stratotanker), Traditional Scandinavian-inspired food and "Julbords" by Boards by Courtney. Raffle Prizes, cool tunes and Evil! Kicks off at 6pm on Monday 12/27. Merchandise Shop Update + Local Pick Up Options Zombiekrig‘s Levande Efter Döden Live Gatefold Double LP is now for sale in extremely limited quantities on the webshop. This legendary Swedish thrash band played an early role in the development and ideation of Scorched Tundra (you'll recognize vocalist Axel Widén's artwork on the first ten ST posters and merch). This Live, glossy, Gatefold Double LP was recorded at Scorched Tundra II (2012) in Gothenburg Sweden, the band's last show before a 5-year hiatus. This piece of Scorched Tundra history is highly limited and only available on our webshop. Zombiekrig recently released an EP Dödstecken and which features two new studio tracks and live versions of three tracks from the live LP. Guitarist and founding member of Zombiekrig Anders "El Guapo" Gustafsson discusses the new EP at length in this week's episode of Heavy Hops. Give it a listen HERE. I've reactivated the Local Pick Up option on our Webstore for those of you looking to purchase Scorched Tundra Merch and vinyl without paying the shipping fees. You'll be able to pick up the merchandise on 12/27 at DMen Tap. Select the appropriate local pick up option at check out.* *Note: All orders that utilize “Local Pick Up” must be picked up at the date specified. I'll reach out to those that order via this method on e-mail to ensure smooth pick up. All "Local Pick Up" orders are subject to Cook County Tax (applied before checkout). I was recently interviewed on Rock In Chicago podcast - you can enjoy the wide-ranging conversation HERE. We discuss a number of different topics related to the art and craft of podcasting, the undertakings and values for curating an international music festival along with different ways of looking at experiencing new music post-pandemic in different contexts. The tracks featured in this episode are “Clearing the Sand” by Huntsmen and “Twist Ending” by Annihilus. I also curated a playlist that accompanies the episode featuring local talent and performances captured in Chicago spaces. Enjoy the playlist HERE.

Revival Plan
Testimonies for the Church, Vol. 7, pp. 249-258 Day 410

Revival Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 18:38


Truths, precious, vital truths, are bound up with man's eternal well-being both in this life and in the eternity that is opening before us. “Sanctify them through Thy truth: Thy word is truth.” John 17:17. The word of God is to be practiced. It will live and endure forever. While worldly ambitions, worldly projects, and the greatest plans and purposes of men will perish like the grass, “they that be wise shall shine as the brightness of the firmament; and they that turn many to righteousness as the stars for ever and ever.” Daniel 12:3. At this time God's cause is in need of men and women who possess rare qualifications and good administrative powers; men and women who will make patient, thorough investigation of the needs of the work in various fields; those who have a large capacity for work; those who possess warm, kind hearts, cool heads, sound sense, and unbiased judgment; those who are sanctified by the Spirit of God and can fearlessly say, No, or Yea and Amen, to propositions; those who have strong convictions, clear understanding, and pure, sympathetic hearts; those who practice the words, “All ye are brethren;” those who strive to uplift and restore fallen humanity. -250- Chapter 49—Take Time to Talk with God Special instruction has been given me in regard to our ministers. It is not God's will that they should seek to be rich. They should not engage in worldly enterprises, for this disqualifies them for giving their best powers to spiritual things. But they are to receive wages enough to support themselves and their families. They are not to have so many burdens laid upon them that they cannot give proper attention to the church in their own family, for it is their special duty to train their children for the Lord. It is a great mistake to keep a minister constantly at work in business lines, going from place to place, and sitting up late at night in attendance at board meetings and committee meetings. This brings upon him weariness and discouragement. Ministers should have time to rest to obtain from God's word the rich nourishment of the bread of life. They should have time to drink refreshing drafts of consolation from the stream of living water. Let ministers and teachers remember that God holds them accountable to fill their office to the best of their ability, to bring into their work their very best powers. They are not to take up duties that conflict with the work that God has given them. When ministers and teachers, pressed under the burden of financial responsibility, enter the pulpit or the schoolroom with wearied brain and overtaxed nerves, what else can be expected than that common fire will be used instead of the sacred fire of God's kindling? The strained, tattered efforts disappoint the listeners and hurt the speaker. He has had no time to seek the Lord, no time to ask in faith for the unction of the Holy Spirit. -251- That the efforts of God's workers may be successful, they must receive the grace and efficiency that He alone can give. “Ask, and ye shall receive” (John 16:24), is the promise. Then why not take time to ask, to open the mind to the impressions of the Holy Spirit, that the soul may be revived by a fresh supply of life? Christ Himself was much in prayer. Whenever He had opportunity, He went apart to be alone with God. As we bow before God in humble prayer, He places a live coal from His altar upon our lips, sanctifying them to the work of giving Bible truth to the people. I am instructed to say to my fellow workers: If you would have the rich treasures of heaven, you must have secret communion with God. Unless you do this, your soul will be as destitute of the Holy Spirit as were the hills of Gilboa of dew and rain. When you hurry from one thing to another, when you have so much to do that you cannot take time to talk with God, how can you expect power in your work? The reason so many of our ministers preach tame, lifeless discourses is that they allow a variety of things of a worldly nature to take their time and attention. Unless there is constant growth in grace, we shall be wanting in words suitable for the occasion. Commune with your own heart, and then commune with God. Unless you do this, your efforts will be fruitless, made thus by unsanctified hurry and confusion. Ministers and teachers, let your work be fragrant with rich spiritual grace. Do not make it common by mixing it with common things. Move onward and upward. Cleanse yourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and of the spirit, perfecting holiness in the fear of the Lord. We need to be converted daily. Our prayers should be more fervent; then they will be more effectual. Stronger and stronger should be our confidence that God's Spirit will be with us, making us pure and holy, as upright and fragrant as the cedar of Lebanon. -252- Gospel ministers are to keep their office free from all things secular or political, employing all their time and talents in lines of Christian effort. To fasten a minister to one place by giving him the oversight of business matters connected with the work of the church is not conducive to his spirituality. To do this is not in accordance with the Bible plan as outlined in the sixth chapter of Acts. Study this plan, for it is approved of God. Follow the word. He who holds forth the word of life is not to allow too many burdens to be placed upon him. He must take time to study the word and to examine self. If he closely searches his own heart, and gives himself to the Lord, he will better understand how to grasp the hidden things of God. Instead of choosing the work most pleasing to us, and refusing to do something that our brethren think we should do, we are to inquire: “Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do?” Instead of marking out the way that natural inclination prompts us to follow, we are to pray: “Teach me Thy way, O Lord, and lead me in a plain path.” Psalm 27:11. Our ministers should learn to let business and financial matters alone. Over and over again I have been instructed that this is not the work of the ministry. They are not to be heavily burdened with the business details even of city work, but are to be in readiness to visit places where an interest in the message has been awakened, and especially to attend our camp meetings. When these meetings are in progress, our workers are not to think that they must remain in the cities to attend to business matters connected with various lines of city work; nor are they to hurry away from the camp meetings in order to do this kind of work. -253- Those in charge of our conferences should find businessmen to look after the financial details of city work. If such men cannot be found, let facilities be provided for training men to bear these burdens. The Scandinavian institutions need not have been in the position in which they are, and they would not be in this position had our brethren in America, years ago, done what they should have done. A man of experience in business lines, with a practical knowledge of bookkeeping, should have been sent to Europe to superintend the keeping of the accounts in our institutions there. And if this work demanded more than one man, more than one should have been sent. Thus thousands and thousands of dollars would have been saved. Such men should be employed in our work in America, men who are devoted to God, men who know what the principles of heaven are, men who have learned what it means to walk with God. If such men had superintended the financial affairs of our conferences and institutions, there would today be plenty of money in the treasury; and our institutions would now stand as God has declared they should stand, helping the work by self-denial and self-sacrifice. -254- Chapter 50—The Work of the Ministry Many fields ripe for the harvest have not yet been entered because of our lack of self-sacrificing helpers. These fields must be entered, and many laborers should go to them with the expectation of bearing their own expenses. But some of our ministers are little disposed to take upon them the burden of this work, little disposed to labor with the wholehearted benevolence that characterized the life of our Lord. God is grieved as He sees the lack of self-denial and perseverance in His servants. Angels are amazed at the spectacle. Let workers for Christ study His life of self-sacrifice. He is our example. Can the ministers of today expect to be called on to endure less hardship than did the early Christians, the Waldenses, and reformers in every age in their efforts to carry the gospel to every land? God has entrusted to His ministers the work of proclaiming His last message of mercy to the world. He is displeased with those who do not throw their whole energies into this all-important work. Unfaithfulness on the part of the appointed watchmen on the walls of Zion endangers the cause of truth and exposes it to the ridicule of the enemy. It is time for our ministers to understand the responsibility and sacredness of their mission. There is a woe upon them, if they fail of performing the work which they themselves acknowledge that God has placed in their hands. Not a few ministers are neglecting the very work that they have been appointed to do. Why are those who are set apart for the work of the ministry placed on committees and boards? Why are they called upon to attend so many business meetings, many times at great distance from their fields of labor? Why are not business matters placed in the hands of businessmen? The ministers have not been set apart to do this work. The finances of the cause are to be properly managed by men of ability, but ministers are set apart for another line of work. Let the management of financial matters rest on others than those ordained to the ministry. -255- Ministers are not to be called hither and thither to attend board meetings for the purpose of deciding common business questions. Many of our ministers have done this work in the past, but it is not the work in which the Lord wishes them to engage. Too many financial burdens have been placed on them. When they try to carry these burdens, they neglect to fulfill the gospel commission. God looks upon this as a dishonor to His name. The Lord's great vineyard demands from His servants that which it has not yet received—earnest, persevering labor for souls. The ministry is becoming weak and enfeebled, and under its tame service the churches also are becoming weak. As the result of their labors the ministers have but little to show in the conversion of souls. The truth is not carried into the barren places of the earth. These things are depriving God of the glory that belongs to Him. He calls for workers who will be producers as well as consumers. The world is to be warned. Ministers should work earnestly and devotedly, opening new fields and engaging in personal labor for souls, instead of hovering over the churches that already have great light and many advantages. -256- Chapter 51—Committee Meetings Let those who attend committee meetings remember that they are meeting with God, who has given them their work. Let them come together with reverence and consecration of heart. They meet to consider important matters connected with the Lord's cause. In every particular their actions are to show that they are desirous of understanding His will in regard to the plans to be laid for the advancement of His work. Let them not waste a moment in unimportant conversation; for the Lord's business should be conducted in a businesslike, perfect way. If some member of a committee is careless and irreverent, let him be reminded that he is in the presence of a Witness by whom all actions are weighed. I have been instructed that committee meetings are not always pleasing to God. Some have come to these meetings with a cold, hard, critical, loveless spirit. Such may do great harm; for with them is the presence of the evil one, that keeps them on the wrong side. Not infrequently their unfeeling attitude toward measures under consideration brings in perplexity, delaying decisions that should be made. God's servants, in need of rest of mind, and sleep, have been greatly distressed and burdened over these matters. In the hope of reaching a decision, they continue their meetings far into the night. But life is too precious to be imperiled in this way. Let the Lord carry the burden. Wait for Him to adjust the difficulties. Give the weary brain a rest. Unreasonable hours are destructive to the physical, the mental, and the moral powers. If the brain were given proper periods of rest, the thoughts would be clear and sharp, and business would be expedited. -257- The Relation of Diet to Board Meetings Before our brethren assemble in council or board meetings, each one should present himself before God, carefully searching the heart and critically examining the motives. Pray that the Lord may reveal self to you so that you may not unwisely criticize or condemn propositions. At bountiful tables men often eat much more than can be easily digested. The overburdened stomach cannot do its work properly. The result is a disagreeable feeling of dullness in the brain, and the mind does not act quickly. Disturbance is created by improper combinations of food; fermentation sets in; the blood is contaminated and the brain confused. The habit of overeating, or of eating too many kinds of food at one meal, frequently causes dyspepsia. Serious injury is thus done to the delicate digestive organs. In vain the stomach protests and appeals to the brain to reason from cause to effect. The excessive amount of food eaten, or the improper combination, does its injurious work. In vain do disagreeable premonitions give warning. Suffering is the consequence. Disease takes the place of health. Some may ask, What has this to do with board meetings? Very much. The effects of wrong eating are brought into council and board meetings. The brain is affected by the condition of the stomach. A disordered stomach is productive of a disordered, uncertain state of mind. A diseased stomach produces a diseased condition of the brain and often makes one obstinate in maintaining erroneous opinions. The supposed wisdom of such a one is foolishness with God. -258- I present this as the cause of the situation in many council and board meetings, where questions demanding careful study have been given but little consideration, and decisions of the greatest importance have been hurriedly made. Often when there should have been unanimity of sentiment in the affirmative, decided negatives have entirely changed the atmosphere pervading a meeting. These results have been presented to me again and again. I present these matters now because I am instructed to say to my brethren in the ministry: By intemperance in eating you disqualify yourselves for seeing clearly the difference between sacred and common fire. And by this intemperance you also reveal your disregard for the warnings that the Lord has given you. His word to you is: “Who is among you that feareth the Lord, that obeyeth the voice of His servant, that walketh in darkness, and hath no light? let him trust in the name of the Lord, and stay upon his God. Behold, all ye that kindle a fire, that compass yourselves about with sparks: walk in the light of your fire, and in the sparks that ye have kindled. This shall ye have of Mine hand; ye shall lie down in sorrow.” Isaiah 50:10, 11. Shall we not draw near to the Lord, that He may save us from all intemperance in eating and drinking, from all unholy, lustful passion, all wickedness? Shall we not humble ourselves before God, putting away everything that corrupts the flesh and the spirit, that in His fear we may perfect holiness of character? Let everyone who sits in council and committee meetings write in his heart the words: I am working for time and for eternity; and I am accountable to God for the motives that prompt me to action. Let this be his motto. Let the prayer of the psalmist be his prayer: “Set a watch, O Lord, before my mouth; keep the door of my lips. Incline not my heart to any evil thing.” Psalm 141:3, 4. Testimonies for the Church, Vol. 7 pp. 249-258

Poddy Break with Tim Hawkins
132 - Boilin Dem Cabbage Down

Poddy Break with Tim Hawkins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 83:23


The Gang ponders the mysterious world of life before the internet. Livy confesses to not knowing the difference between the metaverse and matrix, and recounts getting sexually harassed by an elderly lady. Luke reads a particularly vicious Amazon review of a disappointed hot sauce user. Tim develops dad-envy at the golf course. Plus, everyone's favorite Norwegian rocker, Ulf Nerfgun, rings in the show with some classic Scandinavian holiday cheer! (Beware of Krampus).  Thank you to our sponsors! Butcherbox: New members can get free bacon for life and up to $100 off! Sign up at butcherbox.com/TIMHAWKINS Mack Weldon: For 20% off your first order, visit mackweldon.com/HAWKINS and enter promo code HAWKINS    

Mondo Jazz
Sarah Vaughan, Petter Eldh, Artifacts, Immanuel Wilkins and More New Releases [Mondo Jazz 180-1]

Mondo Jazz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 65:33


A lil' dive in the 1970's world of soul- or funk-tinged jazz, then some adventurous large ensembles; a focus on Scandinavian artists and the first single from Immanuel Wilkins' sophomore release, for a set with lots of interesting facets. The playlist features also Sarah Vaughan; Julien Lourau; Artifacts; Jazz Station Big Band; Trondheim Jazz Orchestra, Ole Morten Vågan; Remy Le Boeuf; Petter Eldh; and Koma Saxo. Detailed playlist at https://spinitron.com/RFB/pl/14766743/Mondo-Jazz (up to "Emanation"). Happy listening!

Daily Devotions from Confident.Faith
13 Dec 2021 (3rd Monday in Advent)

Daily Devotions from Confident.Faith

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 18:24


Readings* Psalm 89* Psalm 143* Isaiah 29:15—30:14* Revelation 1:1–20* Large Catechism, I, 103–111CommemorationToday we commemorate Lucia, Martyr. Born into a wealthy family, Lucia gave away her dowry to the poor. When this came to the attention of the Roman governor, he ordered Lucia to burn a sacrifice to the emperor. Upon her refusal, the governor commanded that she be condemned to a brothel; Lucia was martyred by the soldiers who came to execute the governor's sentence. As the name “Lucia” means light, many European nations have long held festivals in her memory involving lanterns or lights; such festivals have been particularly popular in the Scandinavian countries, where this time of year is quite short on daylight.ReaderCorey J. MahlerCopyright NoticesUnless otherwise indicated, all Scripture quotations are from the Holy Bible, English Standard Version®, copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. Used by permission. All rights reserved.Unless otherwise indicated, all quotations from the Lutheran Confessions are from Concordia: The Lutheran Confessions, copyright © 2005, 2006 by Concordia Publishing House. Used by permission. All rights reserved. To purchase a copy of Concordia, call 800-325-3040.Support the show (https://confident.faith/donate/)

Monument Techno Podcast
MNMT Records: Atomic Moog - Chasing Blue (Anthony Linell Alkaloid Mix)

Monument Techno Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 11:56


To complete The Hesperian City's A-side, Monument has entrusted @AnthonyLinell to revisit ‘Chasing Blue'. The Scandinavian legend dived into his laboratory to concoct a truly mind-blowing, extended ambient mixture, taking the original track to a whole new level. Again, visual artist Melissa F. Larsen gifts us with very fitting video interpretation that you can stream fully at https://youtu.be/bYPnQtz9MgU

¡Qué Golazo! A Daily CBS Soccer Podcast
Weekend Recap: Real Madrid dominate El Derbi, Inter return to the Serie A summit & NYCFC claim the Cup (Soccer 12/12)

¡Qué Golazo! A Daily CBS Soccer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 61:03


Karim Benzema and Marco Asensio were on target as Los Blancos put more distance between themselves and cross-town rivals Atletico Madrid. Luis Miguel Echegaray, Jimmy Conrad and Heath Pearce discuss what the result means for a LaLiga title race that definitely won't involve Barcelona. Plus, the defending Serie A champions climbed top of the table, penalty decisions played a major role for four Premier League powerhouses, and Providence Park endured a bitter defeat and a Scandinavian striptease as the Timbers fell short in the MLS Cup. Qué Golazo' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts.  Follow the Qué Golazo team on  Twitter: @quegolazopod, @lmechegaray, @JimmyConrad, @FabrizioRomano, @Jon_LeGossip, @jamesbenge, @heathpearce, @LRoman32, @PartidoPooper Watch Qué Golazo on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/QueGolazo For more soccer coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/soccer/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Software Social
Using Atomic Habits to Get Through Burnout

Software Social

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 36:07


Every doctor is concerned about your vital signs, but a good doctor cares about your overall health. Your website deserves the same care, and Hey Check It is here to help- Hey Check It is a website performance monitoring and optimization tool- Goes beyond just core web vitals to give you a full picture on how to optimize your website to give your users an optimal, happy experience- Includes AI-generated SEO data, accessibility scanning and site speed checks with suggestions on how to optimize, spelling and grammar checking, custom sitemaps, and a number of various tools to help youStart a free trial today at heycheckit.comMichele Hansen Hey, Colleen, Colleen Schnettlergood morning, Michelle.Michele Hansen  0:45  How are you?Colleen Schnettler  0:47  I'm doing great. How are you?Michele Hansen  0:49  I am I'm working working through stuff.Colleen Schnettler  0:52  Okay, can I start with the funny story? Sure. Our listeners. Okay. So if you listen to our podcast about Michelle's burnout, you might remember that I suggested some very dramatic things, like quit your job or move to a different country. So the next morning, Michelle texted me and told me she went for a walk. I made me laugh, because I was like, yes, you know, that's a good first step going for a walk.Michele Hansen  1:22  Yes, I actually, I did go for a walk that day, because it was sunny for once in Scandinavia in the wintertime. So you got to take advantage of that. So yeah, so I, I just want to start by saying I like I've gotten so much support from so many people and so many stories from people about their burnout, or their spouses burnout, or just feeling really, really supported and appreciating it. So much. How much other people have been sharing with me and how vulnerable they have been with me. It's been, it's been kind of amazing, I guess I didn't really know what to expect, going going into it, like recorded that episode. And I was kind of like, ah, like, I don't have any advice for people like is, right, is that going to be like useful for people. And it turns out, I guess, sort of just feeling seen, and knowing that other people go through it was helpful. And I think for me, like, just saying, like, sort of raising my hand and saying I have a problem, like, for me is often the first step in getting through it. Like, absolutely, um, so so that was really helpful for me. And just being open about it, and then all of the support from people. As has kind of given me like a little bit of motion on it. I mean, so many people reached out to me offering to, like, have a phone call or something about it. And, um, I haven't taken anyone, because, like, I don't have enough time. But I really appreciate it. And I'm just kind of like, I don't know, I'm like marinating and everyone's stories, like, like, I kind of feel like, I don't know if you ever do this, but like, you know, you get like a steak and then you put it in the fridge with salt on it, and for a couple of days, and then it gets really tender. And I feel like I'm just a piece of steak sitting in the fridge. And like every story and and sort of encouraging word people have sent to me as sort of, you know, their each one little piece of Maldon salt that's just kind of working its way in and tenderizing me and this is a little bit of a weird metaphor, but like people who take their seriously know what I'm talking about. Like, I'm just kind of, you know, I'm sort of like, yeah, I don't know, something marinating is like totally the wrong word for that. But you know, I'm just kind of absorbing, I guess all of that. Okay. Um, that's great. And yes, I have started to try to try to make some changes, but I think something that really helps crystallize for me, in hearing so many stories about burnout was like, there's kind of it feels like there's kind of like two different categories of burnout. There's like, work burnout, and then there's life burnouts. Okay. And work burnout is, you know, that's like your, your burnout from your work situation, right. And then life is like, you know, everything else going on, right? I have life burnout. It turns out and so that has been helpful for me in framing this because then it's kind of like a sort of, like, it feels like sort of like the first direction sign. You know, it's like, do I turn left? Do I turn right? Is it work burnout, is it life burnout, okay, now we know which way to go. Okay. And then that's like a, you know, sort of like another step to go down. like researching how people get through this. So I think that that was really key and helped me start, I think start even just like thinking about changes to make, because it's one, it's like everything possibly that you have going on that you might need to change. Like, that's a little bit overwhelming. But at least knowing which domain to think about is helpful, I think.Colleen Schnettler  5:27  So how do you know it's life burnout and not work burnout, what's the distinguishing characteristics?Michele Hansen  5:32  So I think it's that, you know, for me, like, like, I really enjoy work to the point where, like, you know, most of my life, I have found work easier than life, quite frankly, like, I tend to escape into work or school or, you know, whatever that is. And I think actually, the, the fact that I was like, one of my initial stressors couple weeks ago was like, I don't have enough time to work was not actually a sign that I was burning out from work, it was a sign that I was going into one of my oldest tried and true stress responses, which is trying to disappear into work. And then the fact that I didn't have enough time to do so was stressing me out. And that like that that outlet was not available. So it's not that I didn't have enough time to work. It's that like, I didn't have enough time to neglect the rest of my life and just disappear into work.Colleen Schnettler  6:40  Okay, I understand, I think, did weMichele Hansen  6:43  did we ever talk about like the four archetypes of like, stress and trauma responses, we were talking about that. Okay, so we're talking about that. So there's like four main categories of these. And it's just worth sort of noting and it's like, not any of them are better or worse than others. It's just intended to be descriptive, and like, help you understand how you respond to stressful situations. And so the first one is anger, which is, you know, respond with anger, whether that's verbally or physically, you know, with violence against yourself against other people, against objects, right. And so like, if something really stressful happens, and you really want to punch a pillow, or a punching bag, like anger might be one of your primary stress, or trauma responses, most people are a combination of a couple. The next one is flight, which is you are leaving the situation that can that that can be physically or it can also be sort of mentally, but that often takes the form of workaholism so disappearing into work. Hello, me raising hand. Um, that can be exercise, like, so I was a competitive gymnast growing up. So that's also in the flight response. You know, it can be physically moving places, like, you know, like, when, like, COVID got really bad, I decided to move country. So that is also a flight response. Like, hello, all the bells are going off here. Right? Um, so that's like the flight response. I think especially like, in our community, like, I come across a lot of people with the like, workaholic flight response. And the thing like, is like, though, the thing about flight responses is that like, they can often be sort of extreme versions of healthy behaviors, or like socially rewarded behaviors, which makes them really hard to identify. Because, of course, you should exercise a lot like, oh, like having a good career and being ambitious. Like, that's a good thing. Right? So, like it kind of, yep, but at least you know, everything is bad and extremes, right? You know, even you know, anger is healthy. But having too much of it and hurting other people is not working is you know, we all need to work but like doing it to the point where it's how you deal with life is not there's a freeze response, which is I sort of think of that as the like hiding under a blanket watching Netflix for 12 hours and just being unable to move kind of a response. Like this is a reaction I heard from actually quite a few friends after January 6, they were like I was just like frozen for days. Like, like you just use completely like withdraw. And so maybe that's like, you get home from work and you just play video games for eight hours and you can't do anything else like playing video games is healthy. Everybody loves watching Netflix, including me. Okay, I know that I seem like totally like Little Miss, like Type A overachiever, but I do watch Netflix. Thank you very much. I'm currently rewatching our way through Parks and Rec and it is such a delight. Okay. So there's the freeze response. And then there's also the fawn response, which is basically when things are really bad for you, you go into the mode of like trying to rescue or help other people. And also that you try to like appease other people. So it's very much like the people pleasing response. So fights, flights, freeze, and fawn. Those are these four main stress and trauma responses. And I think it's really helpful to understand those like four main categories, because when we're talking about burnout, like how you experience the burnout seems like, like those kind of those themes come through quite a bit. And also how you deal with burnout is very different. And so like, for me, like, as a sort of person who's sort of primarily in that flight response category, like, for me, trying to all of a sudden start exercising and like signing up for a 10k like, would not actually really be very healthy or productive for me, because that's just furthering myself in that stress response category. And, and like that would just lend itself to more extremism in that same type of thing, if that makes sense. And so that was really how I identified like, this is actually, this is not a work problem, but the existence of me being like, I don't have enough time to work and like feeling stressed about that. And like, wanting to work like this is a sign that I'm falling into one of my, my oldest stress reaction paths. Like that was those that was really helpful for me. Um, and then so kind of taking some time tothink about things and made a couple of like, really small changes you had recommended to me atomic habits, like probably a bunch of times, and it's one of those books, I feel like everybody is like, oh my god, it's so amazing. And like, so then I didn't read it, because like, I felt like I'd read it because of everybody else had told me about it's kind of like, it's not the same way I feel about avatar. Like, I feel like everybody raved about avatar. And then I was like, I feel like I've seen this movie. Everybody's talking about it. Like, can we just please stop talking about this thing? Because like, all I've heard about is this is avatar. I don't know. Did you ever see Avatar? Do you know what I mean?Colleen Schnettler  12:08  I did I know exactly what you mean. I was not impressed. I didn't see it till later till everyone was talking about it. So I agree. By the time I saw it, I was like,Michele Hansen  12:17  so I kind of like had that. I was like, okay, everyone's been raving about atomic habits. Like, you know, I've read so many like blog posts to talk about it. And people do these homework essays. And I like felt like I had the gist of it. Um, but you recommended it. So I was like, Okay, fine. I'll get it. I think I bought it like a couple of months ago. And it was just sitting on my shelf collecting dust. And then we started like, getting kind of like tightening things up a little bit for like, getting ready to put Christmas stuff out. And I like saw it in my pile of books to be read, which, well, there's actually multiple of those piles in my house. But um, I was like, You know what, Colleen recommended that book to me. I should like, I should really read it. And I'm so glad I did. Like I am eating my previous words about No, I was so glad to read it. Kind of interesting, because I feel like you have said how you don't read self help books. But this is totally a self help book. It's like a self help book for people who don't read self help books.Colleen Schnettler  13:12  I know. And that's the only book I've ever recommended to you. It was so good. It's like a self help book. But it's like so practical. Like some of the things you're just like, oh, this is like a practical thing. Like the habit chaining is so obvious in retrospect, but like, had never occurred to me how I could, you know, change the habit chaining and the identity stuff I really enjoyed too. So I'm glad that I'm glad that you're Are you finished? Did you read? Oh,Michele Hansen  13:37  yeah. Yeah, I finished it today. I'm glad you enjoy me when I sink my teeth into a book. I finished it in like three days. Like, yeah, you just read it. I just Yeah, I just Yeah. So um, so one thing that I really enjoyed from it was this. And I'm going to see if I can find the exact phrasing here. He has his I think it's action versus motion.Colleen Schnettler  14:02  Yeah, I think I remember that. Yeah. And actually,Michele Hansen  14:04  I thought of you as I was reading that. So let me just find the exact. You're like, oh, I have done it. I'mColleen Schnettler  14:10  like, so excited. Well, I read it. It's one of those books that I actually like, bought on Kindle and then bought the freaking book because I liked it so much.Michele Hansen  14:17  Oh my god. So I'm reading another book on burnout. It's called what is it called by yourself? The effing lilies, which is like, yeah, no, that's actually a title. And it's like so is this woman like talking about her her path through burnout and her like her burnout is very different. Like the beginning of the book, like starts with her, like, you know, waking up hungover after her 25th birthday and like, kind of, you know, she's smoking too much and going out too much and like drunk dialing her therapist and I'm like, Okay, we're in very different parts of our lives and like I had a two year old at that point in my life and was definitely not doing that. But I think her her ways of going through are actually really similar. Like her tactics like They both like both her and James clear want you to journal and I'm like, I don't journal. I know, your journal this morning pages thing. I'm like maybe like I bought my journal, I don't know. But anyway, it's actually been really good, but I was reading it on Kindle and I was like, I need the paper version of this book so I can like highlight it. So. Okay, so James clear on motion versus action from atomic habits. So, quote, I refer to this as the difference between being in motion and taking action. The two ideas sound similar, but they're not the same. When you're in motion, you're planning and strategizing, and learning. Those are all good things, but they don't produce a result. Action, on the other hand, is the type of behavior that will deliver an outcome. If I outlined 20 ideas for articles I want to write that's motion. If I actually sit down and write an article, that's action. So attendees, yeah, sometimes motion is useful, but it will never produce an outcome by itself. It doesn't matter how many times you talk to the personal trainer, that motion itself will never get you in shape. So I think like as I was thinking about this, and he has a really great story in here, too, about like photography students, and how there was this professor who said, Okay, this group, you have to take as many pictures as possible by the end of the semester, and your grade is based on how many pictures you take. And this other group is you only have to take one perfect picture and turn that in the end of the semester. And the group that produced the best work was the group that just produced a ton of pictures, because they just kept doing things like they were constantly in action of doing things. And as you know, as I say, as somebody who feels like they have been marinating for the past two weeks, and you know, covered in salt,Colleen Schnettler  16:50  salt.Michele Hansen  16:54  I'm, like, I actually, so I was like you don't I have to start doing this as I read this book, because I can't just like wait until I'm done to start doing and I think this is what I really liked about this book is it's like, do a really small thing, if, you know, we talked about how, like I have allowed my physical health to deteriorate with all this. And it's like, okay, it's not I want to start working out or I want to work or join a gym or whatever that is, it's like, you have to switch the identity, as you mentioned from I want to start doing this to I am someone who does this. And then how can you do really small things every day, that prove to yourself that you do that, so that you build that identity. So he's like, just do a two minute habit, every day of whatever that thing is. But then also do the thing that you really uniquely enjoy and is easy for you that isn't for other people. And so for me, that was like, Okay, it's not that, like I want to start working out again, it's like, so that identity should have to do has to be I am a fit person, I guess. Or like I am a person who works out every day. And then so like I you know, I did a handstand for like, two minutes earlier today. And like, that's something that's very easy and fun for me, but makes me feel like oh, yeah, I guess I did some sort of workout today, even if it was really short. Um, so I've like started on these little habits. And I feel like I'm probably still in burnout. But at least now I'm doing things. You know, like, it just sort of got me it was reading atomic habits really helped me kind of like, okay, what are like small things I can do. As he says that, they're not going to make me 100% better, they're not going to take me from burnout to not burn out or whatever the opposite of burnout is. But they're going to make me 1% better. So like doing a handstand that makes me 1% better. That really probably only applies to me, you know, and everybody else that's going to be something different. Um, I've also started like plugging in my phone after dinner, downstairs in the office and making it unavailable so that I can't end up like aimlessly like scrolling Twitter or Instagram or whatever, like later on at night and like staying up too late at night. Um, my phone is still accessible to me, but it's downstairs in the office and stays plugged in. Like because I don't need it as an alarm clock because we got one of those like, Sun lamps that like wakes you up with sunlight because you know, hashtag Scandinavian winter you don't have this problem in California. We don't have enough IColleen Schnettler  19:37  don't wake up without an alarm. Because there's so much sunlight. ThatMichele Hansen  19:41  sounds just lovely. Um, yes, we get, you know, just a little sprinkling of sunlight if that a day. Sometimes it's just gray. So I also got better D vitamins. Apparently they're more effective if you take vitamin K too with them or something and not better medical advice. That's just what I read on the internet. So I started doing that, too. I'm just like, you know, lots of little things. Um, I also like I got permission from my, my Danish school to only go into the class once a week and do self study at home the other day of the week. Ooh, that sounds like a big one. Yeah, so like, I was really nervous to talk to the head, the head of the school. And that's also something that like, you know, for anyone else, listening who's going through burnout, like, you're probably not feeling burned out with Danish school being a contributor to it, if you are, though, seriously, reach out to me, because we probably want to comment. Um, but yeah, just like reducing that to like, one day a week. And I was, like, Look, I've proven that I'm a good student, like, it's so much easier for me to like, if this is a six hour or five, six hour class, like, I would rather do one hour, every night. And I have my eight year old correct my spelling and pronunciation, like what she loves, then, like, have to be here in a class all day, like it just for my schedule, like, then I have four days, one day of class, and, and decided that I'm going to book a massage for myself after I go to the class to nice, um, which is, I think something else from atomic habits is like, if you have to do something you don't enjoy, like, schedule in a reward afterwards, so you know, and it took me like, a lot of research to actually like, find like to get a massage, because when you're, I don't know, expat, or in a new place. Like, everything is just, you know, you don't have those go twos for anything. So I'm just trying to make and that's not like a huge difference, because I was like, What should I drop out of that? Like, you know, like, do I take all these things? And do I get rid of them, right, like, and you know, because some people are, like, I was burned out. And so I went to Bali for three months. And then like, that sounds like it really worked for you. And it was awesome. And sitting on a beach for three months. Sounds amazing. But like, I have a family, I have a life like I like I like that's just that's just not an option for me. Um, and so there were some people I was kind of, like, DMing, with who were kind of like, you know, here's how I worked through it. Like, I didn't quit my job, like I, you know, I didn't move I didn't, you know, change anything about my life. I just kind of got through it with the existing structure of my life, that was really helpful for me to hear that, like, you don't have to just kind of walk away from everything in your life in order to burnout because, like, especially like, I feel like you read like burnout stories from like, for lack of a better way of putting it like San Francisco types that's like, I, you know, sold my company quit my job, and like, you know, lived in a camper van for six months. And I'm like, That's awesome. That That sounds like that was amazing, and helped you. That's just not my life. Like, I just like, That also sounds like flight response to me, which as we have discussed, probably not something I should do more, I need to do like, a moderate, like moderate things like going for a walk and yeah, getting sunlight. And, you know, kind of pulling back on things where I can and also like, recognizing, like, when am I falling into patterns that are not good for me and and whether that's like big things like throwing myself way too much into work or like small things like being on my phone way too much. I haven't done the habit inventory that I read a long time ago, I haven't done that. It's like you have to like list out all of the habits that you do and whether they're a good habit, a neutral habit or a negative one. So like, for me, like a bad habit is like waking up in the morning and, you know, checking my email and Twitter and intercom and everything else for like 20 minutes before I get out of bed. That was a bad habit. Like, maybe for some people, it's neutral. But like for me, like that was kind of just like the note I started my day out on. And it's probably better for my mental health. If I start the day with like five minutes of like, cuddling with my dog, right, like, right, that's probably much better than seeing, you know, whatever is waiting for me in my inbox. And so it's like going through all of those, um, I had kind of like, that feels this feels like a slippery slope into journaling. SoColleen Schnettler  24:41  I mean, I cannot get I can't get soMichele Hansen  24:43  resistant to journaling.Colleen Schnettler  24:46  Like our job is in my nightstand. Like by my bed. I have like eight journals. They all have like three pages filled in. Because every year I'm like, Oh, this is the year I'm going to start journaling. Yeah, I've just accepted that about myself that it's just not my jam. I loveMichele Hansen  25:02  buying journals. And I know they're like, especially like the rifle paper ones like I'm a little bit obsessed.Colleen Schnettler  25:09  Really nice but not Yeah,Michele Hansen  25:12  so I but of course I have bought more journals and I don't have any morning pages thing like if there's anybody listening who does morning pages, which is the thing it's like you're supposed to like write when you wake up in the morning, you're supposed to write three pages. Now James clear is like, you should just write a sentence or like just write like anything and mourning pages is like you get up write three pages. Is there anyone with kids? Who does that? And like, how do you fit it into your life, like, and some people like to wake up at 530. And that's what I turned on them. Like, again, that sounds lovely. But like, every hour of sleep, I can get like, I'm going to take it like I am not going to like get up at 530 and light a candle and do yoga and don't like I'm sorry, that is just not me.Colleen Schnettler  26:01  What is the benefit? What is the purported benefit of these morning pages?Michele Hansen  26:04  So the by the I think Lily's book talks a lot about, okay, um, which is that it's sort of like a space to completely let your mind empty out. And it's kind of, you know, you know, how I talked about, like, customer interviews are where you're just there to listen to them without any judgement, and whatever they want to say, you know, you know, sort of on the topic, you know, is welcome, and you're not, you're just not judging anything they say, and it's just about their experience, and you're kind of you're holding space for them. And their experience is basically like doing that for yourself. Oh, my God, I have to do this. I can't like preach that you should do that to other people. And then not even. And that self empathy is important than than not hold space for myself. Goddamnit Ah,Colleen Schnettler  26:56  let me know how it goes. I probably don'tMichele Hansen  26:57  want to turn it. Well, I have to wait at least like a week or a week and a half for all these pretty new journals. I ordered to arrive. Right, right.Colleen Schnettler  27:06  Yeah, right. Yeah. Like,Michele Hansen  27:08  yeah, report, and then I'm going away for Christmas. So like, realistically? Oh, my goodness. Yeah.Colleen Schnettler  27:16  So Okay, but seriously,Michele Hansen  27:18  if you journal, and you're listening, and you have to somehow make this work in your life, like, I want to know, like details. Not that like I do it every day. Like when, like, how do you fit in? Yes, I need specifics and logistics and details. Okay, sorry. You're gonna say something galling.Colleen Schnettler  27:35  Okay, so let's go back to this and your burnout. So all of the stories, the majority of the stories I have heard are also those I couldn't work for six months after burnout. So do you feel with with the small steps that you're taking to try and kind of recover from burnout within the construct of your life? How are you feeling? It's been what, two weeks? I mean,Michele Hansen  27:57  yeah, I still feel like I'm just kind of, I still feel like I'm in it. I feel like I have a little bit of motion because of the book. Okay, but, um, I don't know, I still feel like there's a lot of stuff that is not working. And you know, like so like that founder summit thing, for example, like that, that wheel thing we talked about where it's like, you rate your life for, you know, career and spiritual and physical, social emotional, there was like some other category there of like, how your life is going and all those different areas. And it was like, if there's anything below, like a four, you really need to focus on that. So I gave myself you know, I think physical was pretty low. But then also social was pretty low. Like, my family is wonderful. And I love them. I don't have any friends here, though. And like, so I think I also gave that one a pretty low rating, but like, I'm in another country. It's COVID. II, Europe is like terrible with COVID right now, I don't know if you've heard like, so that one almost like I didn't even like, it really occurred to me that I could do something about that. Because it's like, at least like physical it's like, okay, I can like do handstands and like workout every day. But like, I can't, like, go out and somehow, like, have all of my best friends here. Like, right, like, that doesn't really happen. So I think that is part of it. Like not having like a, as much of a support system as I used to, like, you know, can't just roll up to your house and like, hang out, right, like so I think that, that that that's going to be a bigger challenge that I need to work through. I mean, I think the social part is a challenge for a lot of people right now and like not feeling supported, like even if you are in your community like I think just With the pandemic, like so many people are burned out for various reasons. And I think something I have been thinking through, like, why did it get to this point, and I think part of me, like didn't really feel entitled to burnout. You know, like, you're still, you know, knowing people in the medical field, like with everything they have dealt with over the past two years, like, there is serious burnout in the medical field right now. And I think seeing that, and and, you know, being very close to people in that field, who are burned out from that, like, I guess I just, I didn't feel entitled to it. Or like, you know, there's people who scaled companies to like, 1000s of employees and billions of dollars in revenue, and like, they get burned out. And it was like, This feels like something that is for other people. And part of it was like, Yes, I'm special. It's not gonna happen to me, but also part of that feeling was, Who am I to think that I get to say that I'm feeling this way? Right? Like, does that make sense? Like, is this a feeling I am entitled to is this like, like, have I earned this title of being burned out? Which is kind of a ridiculous thing to say, now that I've actually verbalized it. But yeah, I think that was contributing to it too, because I kept denying that it was going on, because I didn't feel like I deserved it. Interesting. And so I think kind of the last two weeks has been really important for me, and that not only accepting that I have burnout, but also accepting thatColleen Schnettler  31:32  it'sMichele Hansen  31:35  it's something that I'm allowed to feel or allowed to describe myself as I guess, if that makes any sense. I think that's when it makes total sense. Sort of. Yeah. Yeah.Colleen Schnettler  31:46  It's like, and I think that's, you know, that goes to a lot of other things. But like, You were absolutely entitled, you have, you know, to feel to feel that and to have your own problems. It's kind of like when your kid breaks his arm. Are you supposed to say Oh, it's fine, because other kids have cancer? Right? Like it's, it's Yeah, cuz daddy upset because your kid broke his arm, like it's, it's, it's relative. Sure. And it helps you keep it in perspective. But again, it is still a very real and very pressing problem.Michele Hansen  32:14  I heard this very, in articulately if amusingly phrased once as someone else's suck does not make your suck, suck any less.Colleen Schnettler  32:25  That's terrible. But yes, exactly.Michele Hansen  32:28  Right. All problems are valid.Colleen Schnettler  32:31  And all problems are valid. Yeah, see, we can again, but yeah, absolutely real, and you're feeling it? And you're in it?Michele Hansen  32:39  Yeah. So I think that's the, I guess that's kind of how I'm feeling. I still, I still feel like a steak sitting in the fridge covered in salt. Just kind of kind of absorbing and tenderizing and whatnot. But I think atomic habits is like, it's helping me with it just just kind of giving I think the idea that I you know, I tend to do think everything like, you know, totally balls to the wall, right? Like the idea of doing something and doing it 1% better. Like I tend to do things like okay, how do I do this is like significantly better. And that was also part of that activity. We did it founder Summit, it wasn't trying to go from two to 10. In the next 90 days, it's tried to go to two to four. Right? Like, how do you get slightly marginally better? And I guess allowing myself to adjust my expectations down and say, and it just give me like ideas of okay, what can I What are little things I can do 1% Better that are, you know, are gonna are going to help me through this.Colleen Schnettler  33:56  Okay, yeah, great. Sounds like a good, a good way to approach it with everything you have going on. Yeah, I'veMichele Hansen  34:03  gotten a ton of other book recommendations, but haven't gotten to any of them except this one. So I'm gonna, you know, I'm gonna keep reading. But again, you know, I think talking about that motion versus action, like, it's important that I don't just like sit here and read and write, don't be stressed out and still be burned out. Like, I need to do stuff and just do lots of stuff. And maybe some of its gonna work and maybe some of it isn't, but it's all, you know, action. It's all, you know, maybe helping, it's better than nothing. So and I think that applies a lot to like, business. I just feel like it's really similar to the situation you were in a year and a half ago, where you were just reading about starting a software company and reading and researching and talking to people but not doing a lot of action on doingColleen Schnettler  34:56  it. That park that part have the book really spoke to me and I think I don't regret the path I took at all. Because even though when I finally when I launched something I kind of did it wrong, because I just launched it to launch it that motion or wait, that would be action. That was that was me moving from motion to action. And it was awesome. So I mean for me that I totally agree. And I love that, that distinction he makes between motion and action.Michele Hansen  35:24  Did you read atomic habits around that time that you made that mental shift?Colleen Schnettler  35:28  Maybe? I mean, I read it a couple years ago, so it might that that might have been part of it. Yeah, that might have been then. Interesting.Michele Hansen  35:41  Well, I think that will wrap us up for today. I will continue working on these these 1% habits andif anyone journals or also if you've used atomic habits to you know get through burnout or stress. Definitely would love to talk to you. Thanks for listening

Rabbi Daniel Lapin
Ep 135 | Discover the Roots of the Destructive Social Pathologies That Secular Socialism is Imposing Upon Us

Rabbi Daniel Lapin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 76:45


Socialism equals failure. It always has and always will. American socialists don't like talking about Venezuela or Cuba but they love describing Scandinavian countries as successful socialistic societies. They lie. Stop trying to improve the world. Please. Just improve your 5Fs and give ten percent of your enterprise to individuals with less and you will be benefiting everyone around you. Join your Happy Warrior community in order to connect, communicate, collaborate, cooperate and create https://www.wehappywarriors.com/happy-warriors-basic Who said that this is why communism killed a hundred million people in the 20th century, “Men have forgotten God; that's why all this has happened”? Resist the culture and try to own things in your life. Happy Warriors are NOT tennis balls floating down the gutter of life. You really can change; learn how. Take a good risk and finally acquire a Bible you can count upon in your life. My only recommended Bible: https://rabbidaniellapin.com/product/koren-jerusalem-bible-hardcover/  What happens to a society that faces the future with fear. I will be teaching at this Passover retreat in April 2022: https://youtu.be/UZCholtO2u8 . How the secular socialists of the Left found inspiration to defund the police and disparage law enforcement. Look for Ruchi Koval's book “Soul Connection” here: https://rabbidaniellapin.com/product/soul-construction/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rabbi Daniel Lapin's podcast
Discover the Roots of the Destructive Social Pathologies That Secular Socialism Imposes On Us

Rabbi Daniel Lapin's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 75:24


Socialism equals failure.  It always has and always will.   American socialists don't like talking about Venezuela or Cuba but they love describing Scandinavian countries as successful socialistic societies.  They lie.   Stop trying to improve the world.  Please.  Just improve your 5Fs and give ten percent of your enterprise to individuals with less and you will be benefiting everyone around you.   Join your Happy Warrior community in order to connect, communicate, collaborate, cooperate and create https://www.wehappywarriors.com/happy-warriors-basic   Who said that this is why communism killed a hundred million people in the 20th century,  “Men have forgotten God; that's why all this has happened”? Resist the culture and try to own things in your life. Happy Warriors are NOT tennis balls floating down the gutter of life. You really can change; learn how.  Take a good risk and finally acquire a Bible you can count upon in your life, my only recommended Bible https://rabbidaniellapin.com/product/koren-jerusalem-bible-hardcover/   What happens to a society that faces the future with fear.  I will be teaching at this Passover retreat in April 2022 https://youtu.be/UZCholtO2u8   How the secular socialists of the Left found inspiration to defund the police and disparage law enforcement.   Look for Ruchi Koval's book “Soul Connection” here  https://rabbidaniellapin.com/product/soul-construction/  

Kindred Conversations
054: There's No Such Thing as Bad Weather by Linda Mcgurk

Kindred Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 40:12


Today's episode is coming at a much needed time as the weather gets colder and the days get darker! This episode is inspired by the book “There's No Such Thing as Bad Weather” by Linda McGurk (a Scandinavian born mother). Throughout the book McGurk makes the argument for kids spending time outside- regardless of “bad” weather- and it gave us just the motivation we needed to shift our mindsets and get outside throughout the winter months. We hope it's helpful for you and your family throughout this season as well! If you enjoyed this episode of Kindred Conversations please share with your friends by word of mouth and on social media! You can join in the conversation @kindred_conversations, @paris.tews, and @brittanywestoverfrye on Instagram.

Drink the Halls
"A Boy Called Christmas" with Traditional Scandinavian Glogg

Drink the Halls

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 36:08


This week Paige and Donna talk about "A Boy Called Christmas" streaming on Netflix!Best when paired with the traditional Scandinavian holiday drink called Glogg. This particular recipe is by Ben Myhre on ramshacklepantry.comThis title can be streamed now on Netflix!Like what you hear? New episodes posted every Wednesday during the holiday season. Be sure to rate and subscribe on your favorite podcast platform:Apple Podcasts Google PodcastsStitcherSpotifyVisit us online at:DrinktheHalls.comand on Social Media via:Facebook- Drink the HallsInstagram- @DrinktheHallsPod

The Leading Voices in Food
What Food Policy Advocates Can Learn from Tobacco Industry Strategies

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 41:43


This is "The Leading Voices in Food" podcast but today we're speaking with a leading voice in tobacco control. "How come," you might ask, "why?" So I believe for many years that the parallels between the tobacco industry and food industry practices are nothing short of stunning, and that our field would do very well to learn lessons learned from the pioneers in the tobacco wars. Our guest today is Dr. Kenneth Warner, Distinguished Emeritus Professor and former Dean of the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan. Ken's research focuses on the economic and policy aspects of tobacco and health. Interview Summary   So Ken, you and I have a long history, and I thought it might be instructive to mention just a little bit of it because you really helped shape some of the ways I think about addressing food policy. So I first became familiar with your work long before I met you in person, when I was teaching classes at Yale. I was assigning papers you wrote on tobacco control and I was especially interested in work that you'd done on tobacco taxes. It really gave me the idea of pushing ahead with food-related taxes. Then finally I got a chance to meet you in person at a meeting that was hosted by the first President George Bush in Kennebunkport, Maine, on cancer control. You and I got to talking about similarities between the tobacco industry behavior and the way the food industry was behaving. We were both struck by the similarities. That led us to write a paper together that was published in 2009 in "The Milbank Quarterly." And I have to say, of all the papers I've published over my career, this was one of my favorites because I really enjoyed working with you. I learned a ton from it, and it really, I thought, made some very important points. And I'd just like to mention the title of that paper because it pretty much summarizes what it found. So the title was, "The Perils of Ignoring History: Big Tobacco Played Dirty and Millions Died. How Similar Is Big Food?" In my mind, the playbooks are still very similar, and that's why it's really interesting to talk to you today, get a little sense of what's happening more recently, and importantly, think about what lessons are learned from tobacco control. I wanted to bring up one thing from that paper that I always found fascinating, which was the discussion about something called "The Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers." Could you describe what that was and what role you think it played in history?   Sure. Just to give you some context for it, the first two major papers that implicated smoking in lung cancer were published in major medical journals in 1950. In December of 1952 there was an article in the "Reader's Digest," which incidentally was the only major magazine that did not accept cigarette advertising, that was entitled, "Cancer by the Carton." And this was the American public's first real exposure to the risks associated with smoking, and it led to a two-year decline in cigarette smoking, a very sharp decline, something that was unprecedented in the history of the cigarette. Following that there was some research published on mice and cancer. And needless to say, the tobacco industry was getting pretty nervous about this. So the executives of all the major tobacco firms met in New York City in December of 1953, and they collaborated on what became a public relations strategy, which drove their behavior for many years thereafter. The first thing they did was to publish "A Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers" in January of 1954. This "Frank Statement" was published in over 400 magazines and newspapers, and it reached an estimated audience of some 80 million Americans, which would be a very good percentage of all Americans in those years. And they talked about the fact that there was this evidence out there, but they said, "We feel it is in the public interest," this is a quote, "to call attention to the fact that eminent doctors and research scientists have publicly questioned the claimed significance of this research." Then they went on to say, and I quote again, "We accept an interest in people's health as a basic responsibility, paramount to every other consideration in our business. We believe the products we make are not injurious to health and," and this is the kicker, "we always have and always will cooperate closely with those whose task it is to safeguard the public health," end quote. They went on to say that they would support research on smoking and health, and, of course, that they would always be the good guys in this story. This was designed as part of a strategy to obfuscate, to deceive the public, basically, to lie about what they already knew about the health hazards associated with smoking. And it was essentially a first very public step in a campaign that, one could argue, in many ways has persisted ever since, although, obviously, now the tobacco companies admit that they're killing their customers and they admit that smoking causes cancer and heart disease and lung disease and so on. But that was kind of the beginning of the strategy that drove their behavior for decades.   You know, that was one of the issues we raised in our paper. How similar were the big food companies in talking about concern for the health of their customers, planting doubt with the science, pledging to make changes that were in the interest of public health, agreeing to collaborate with public health officials? All those things played out in the food arena as well. And that's just one of many places where the food industry behave very, very similar to what the tobacco industry has done. But boy, is it interesting to hear that particular anecdote and to learn of the cynical behavior of the industry. So fast forward from there, and you think about the tobacco industry executives testifying before Congress that nicotine wasn't addictive, and you have that same process playing out many years later. These similarities are really remarkable.   So let's talk about your work and some of the issues that I think apply to the food area, and let's talk about taxes at the beginning. So I worked for years on the issue of soda taxes, and these taxes now exist in more than 50 countries around the world and in a number of major cities in the US, including San Francisco, Philadelphia, Seattle, and Oakland. And these taxes have been shown to have really positive effects, and they seem to be growing around the world. And I'd like to understand what you see as the overall findings from the work on tobacco taxes. But before we do that, you have a very interesting story to tell about how the tobacco control community responded when you first began speaking about taxes. It turns out to be taxes on tobacco have had whopping effects. But what was the initial reaction to people in that field?   Yeah, it is kind of an interesting story. So around 1980, when I first started writing and talking about tobacco taxation as a method of reducing smoking, I used to have public health audiences booing me. If they had rotten tomatoes with them, they would have been throwing them.   You know, Ken, it's hard to imagine because now these taxes are completely routine and accepted.   Yes, they're not only routine and accepted, they are a first principle of tobacco control. They are enshrined in the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. So they really are kind of the first thing we turn to because we know that they work. We know that they reduce smoking.   But let me give you a story about how I learned that this is not only a phenomenon with people smoking. It's a phenomenon with people using all other drugs, and it turns out it's a trans-species law, the Law of Demand. And that law says, basically, that if you increase price, the demand for the commodity will decrease. Well, in the beginning, the public health audiences believed two things. They believed that smokers were so addicted that they would not be affected by price, so it was ridiculous to even think about it. And they said, you have to have intrinsic motivators to get people to quit smoking. They have to care about their kids. They want to see their kids grow up, their spouses, and so on, and not extrinsic forces like a tax. So those were their two objections. So the story that I think is really kind of fun. I was on a plane flying to a small conference in Kansas City. This is sometime in the early '80s. And I happened to be seated next to Jack Henningfield, who is probably the preeminent psychopharmacologist dealing with nicotine, maybe in the world. And we were talking about price response, the fact that cigarette taxes work. And he said, "You know, I've got something I want to show you here." And he pulled out some what are called response cost curves from the psychology literature. And this is where you take a laboratory animal, in this instance addicted to narcotics or other addictive substances, and you give them a challenge to get their drugs. So first, I should note that these animals are so addicted that if they're given the choice between food and their drug, they will choose their drug, and they will in fact end up dying because they place a preference for the drug over food. But it turns out that when you increase the price of the drug to them, they decrease the amount that they consume. So what do I mean by that? If they have to push a lever, a bar, a certain number of times to get a dose of their drug, and you raise the number of bar pushes per dose, they will dose themselves with fewer doses. I took a look at these curves, and basically, a response cost curve for these lab animals is essentially a demand curve as we economists see it. And I calculated the price elasticity of demand, which is our standard measure of the responsiveness to price. And it turns out that addicted laboratory rats have essentially the same price elasticity of demand, the same price responsiveness that human beings do to cigarettes.   That's an absolutely fascinating story. And, you know, I know Jack, and have admired his work, as you have, and it's amazing to think about that conversation on a plane, and what sort of scientific work it led to, and how that, in turn, found its way into policies that exist around the world. So tell us then about tobacco taxes, and how high do they have to be in order to affect consumption in an appreciable way, and have they worked in reducing tobacco use, and what's your overall take on that?   So we have, quite literally, hundreds of studies in countries around the world, and we know a lot but we don't know everything. So we don't know, for example, if there's a particular price above which, you know, nobody will use the product. We don't have even really good data suggesting of, you know, what's the minimum increase in price that you have to have to have a noticeable impact. Overall, the literature suggests that if you increase the price of cigarettes by 10%, you will decrease the quantity demanded by 3 to 4%. Now, what this means is that roughly half of that decreased demand reflects decreases in the number of cigarettes that continuing smokers use, while the other half represents decreases in smoking, people quitting or kids not starting. So the demand is what we call price inelastic. The price change itself is larger, proportionately, than the decrease in consumption. But that decrease in consumption is still substantial and it's enough to have a large impact.   Now, cigarette prices vary all over the world, and cigarette prices vary primarily because of taxation differences. So if you go to the Scandinavian countries, you'll find that a pack of cigarettes will run $15 or more. If you go to Australia, you're looking at $30 or more a pack. In the US, currently, we're looking at an average price in the range of about 7 to $8. In some jurisdictions, like New York City, it's $10 or more. But the prices in the US are actually relatively low among the more developed nations in the world. Any tax increase will have an impact but obviously the larger tax increases will have larger impacts. And there's some good and bad news in tobacco taxation, particularly in a country like ours, and this is, again, true for most of the developed world. Smoking is now concentrated in marginalized populations. I'm talking about low socioeconomic groups, the LGBTQ community, and racial minorities, in particular. If you think of this as an economic phenomenon, when you raise the price on cigarettes, you're going to hit the worst-off economically segments of the population hard. That's the bad news. The good news is that those people, precisely because they are poor, tend to be much more price responsive than high-income smokers, and more of them will quit. So we have this problem that the tax is regressive, it imposes a larger burden on the poor, but the health effect is progressive. It will reduce the gap between the rich and poor in terms of smoking rates. And of great importance, there's an enormous gap between the rich and poor in this country in life expectancy, and as much as half of that may be differences in smoking rates.   Ken, there's a hundred follow-up questions I could ask, and I find this discussion absolutely fascinating. One thing that came into my mind was that some years ago I looked at the relationship of taxes, state by state in the US, and rates of disease like lung cancer and heart disease. And there was plenty of data because there was a huge range in tobacco taxes. Places like New York and Rhode Island had very high taxes, and the tobacco Southern states, like North Carolina, had very low taxes. But what's the sort of recent take on that, and the relationship between taxes and actual disease?   Well, it's still true. And there are, in fact, what you suggest, the southeastern block of tobacco states have unusually low rates of taxation. And I haven't seen any recent data but one presumes that they are suffering more from smoking-related diseases because their smoking rates are higher. I mean, that has to be true. So I don't know that we have any particularly good data recently, but there have been studies that clearly relate tobacco or cigarette prices to health outcomes associated with smoking.   I'm assuming US scientists have played a prominent role in producing the literature showing the negative health consequences of using cigarettes, and yet you said the United States has relatively low taxes compared to other developed countries. Why, do you think?   I think we're going to get into a very philosophical discussion about the US right here. It has to do with individual responsibility. We know for sure that the initial reason the taxes were so low was that the tobacco block was so influential in the Senate, particularly in the days when Jesse Helms, the senator from North Carolina, was in the Senate. He was the most feared senator by the other senators, and if you wanted to get anything done for your cause, you had to go along with his cause, which was keeping cigarette prices low and doing everything they could to support smoking. So there's clearly been a built-in bias in the Senate, and basically in the Congress as a whole, against tobacco policy. You see a huge variation from state to state in tobacco policies, and it's reflective of basically their political leanings in general.   You brought up this issue of personal responsibility, and boy, does that apply in the food area. You know, the food companies are saying: if you have one sugar beverage every once in a while, it's not going to be harmful. And it's not use of the products but it is overuse of the products. Thereby saying, it's not corporate responsibility we're talking about here, it's personal responsibility. That same argument was made by the tobacco industry, wasn't it?   It was. They would be less inclined to do that today, for a couple of reasons. One is that we know that even low levels of smoking are harmful and indeed cause many of the diseases that we were referring to earlier. And I think all the companies have now admitted publicly that smoking does cause all of these diseases that we've long known it causes. And all of them are claiming that they would like to move away from a society with smoking to one that has alternative products that would give people choices and ways to get their nicotine without exposing themselves to so much risk. I mean, we have to remember, the fact that cigarettes kill their consumers is a real drawback as far as the industry is concerned because they're losing a lot of their consumers, you know, 10, 20 years before they normally would, and they have to deal with all these lawsuits. So it's unfortunate for them. Having said that, cigarettes are the goose that lays the golden egg. They cost very little to manufacture. The industry is sufficiently oligopolistic that the profits are enormous, and their profitability has continued even while smoking has dropped rather precipitously ever since the mid-1960s.   Is that because the markets outside the US have been growing?   They certainly have helped. Although now, and this is only true within the last few years, the aggregate cigarette sales in the world are declining. They've actually started dropping. So we were seeing a relatively stable situation as smoking decreased in the developed world and was rising in the developing world. The only place now where we're seeing increases in smoking are areas in Africa, which, by the way, is the one place in the world where we might be able to forego the tobacco epidemic because smoking rates are still quite low in most of the countries, not all of them, and also parts of the Middle East. But elsewhere we've been seeing smoking declining all over the world. That doesn't mean the profits have to drop because one thing that the companies can do, is, they can raise their prices. Now, if prices go up because of taxes that hurts the companies. But if they raise their own prices because demand is inelastic, what that means is that the percentage increase in the price is larger than the percentage decline in the demand for cigarettes. So they're actually adding to their profitability by doing that. They've always played this very interesting game for years of keeping price below what we would think to be the profit-maximizing price. And I think the reason for that has to do with addiction because they know that they have to have what are called replacement smokers, kids coming in to take the place of the smokers who are dying or quitting. And for years, I think, they kept their prices down because they didn't want to discourage young people from smoking. Now, I think they see the writing on the wall. Smoking is declining very rapidly. Smoking prevalence, which was 45% in the mid, early-1960s, is now a little over 12% in the US, and I think they're raising their prices with the understanding that they want to take as much advantage of the opportunity with the addicted smokers, the adults, as they possibly can, even though smoking among kids is becoming vanishingly small.   I think of so many parallels with the soda taxes that now exists in a number of places, and the companies have responded somewhat differently. And perhaps it's the level of addiction issue that kicks in here, and the need to have replacement customers. Maybe that's another key difference. But with the soda taxes, the companies have not increased prices beyond the level of the tax. You know, to delight of public health experts, the companies have tended to pass along the entire tax so the companies are not eating that difference in order to keep prices the same. Higher tax gets reflected in the ultimate price that they charge, but they're not increasing prices beyond that. Do you think it might be the addiction issue that's different here?   I don't know. I mean, that certainly could be an element of it. The other thing is that they're manufacturing other drinks that are being used in place of some of the sodas. So they've got waters, they've got juices. I mean, obviously these sugary juices are no better, but they do make other products. They make the diet drinks. And to the extent that they can find substitutes for those products within their own companies, it may be that they're content to allow people to make those substitutions.   Interesting comment. The results so far on the soda tax suggest that the most common substitution as people drink less soda, is water, which is of course better than a lot of the alternatives that people might be consuming, so that's a bit of really good news. Even though the companies do sell water, Coke and Pepsi have Aquafina and Dasani, for example, they face a basic problem. Number one is that these companies are the biggest sellers of sugary beverages but not bottled water. That happens to be Nestle. So if people migrate to bottled water, they're likely to migrate from the big companies, like Coke and Pepsi, to Nestle. Also, people tend not to be very brand-loyal to water. They tend to buy whatever is on sale or whatever they find available to them, and that creates a problem for these companies like Coke and Pepsi that do rely on brand loyalty for their marketing. So it's very interesting. And also, I wonder, based on the research on food and addiction, if the companies don't take a hit if people switch from full sugar beverages even to diet beverages that they might sell because there wouldn't be as much addictive potential, and therefore the customers wouldn't have to have as much just to keep the habit going. So it's really interesting to think this through.   That's certainly very plausible. The whole thing would also depend on the price elasticity of demand for sodas, and specifically for the brands that they're concerned about. If there is greater elasticity there than what we observe for cigarettes, then raising those prices aren't necessarily going to help them all that much.   You mentioned that the elasticity estimates for tobacco suggested that a 10% increase in price led to a 3 to 4% reduction in consumption, and the numbers are even more positive in the case of the sugar beverages, where if you get a 10%, 15% increase in price, you end up with 10, 15% reduction in consumption. So that's good news in the food arena.   That's good news but it also means that they can't do as easily what the tobacco industry can do, which is to raise their prices and expect to see profits rise. Because if they're losing as much in sales as they're gaining in price, it's no win.   So Ken, let's talk about product formulation because you mentioned that earlier, and this is a really interesting issue that, again, connects tobacco and food products. So you think about the tobacco companies mainly selling cigarettes, but now there's vaping, there's cigarettes with things like menthol and other flavors, or low-fat foods, or artificial sweeteners. The list of product reformulations in order to attract customers goes on and on and on. So I know a controversial topic in your field has been e-cigarettes. Can you explain what these are?   E-cigarettes have been around now for about a decade, let's say. Basically, they're devices that allow people to inhale nicotine and other substances, but the purpose is to give them their nicotine without combustion. And we know that the major problem associated with smoking is the products of combustion. There's 7,000 chemical compounds in cigarette smoke. 70 of them are known human carcinogens, causes of cancer in humans. Many of them are cardiotoxic. They cause lung disease and so on. The e-cigarettes have about two orders of magnitude fewer toxins in their emissions than do cigarettes. And it turns out that the amount of the comparable toxins, when they are in fact comparable, that you find in the e-cigarette emissions is much lower, usually a 10th to a 400th, of what you find in cigarette smoke.   So logically, and based on a fair body of evidence at this point, vaping, use of e-cigarettes to get nicotine, is substantially less dangerous than is cigarette smoking. However, the controversy here is incredible. This is the most divisive issue that I have witnessed in my 45 years of working in the tobacco control field. It has torn the field asunder. The mainstream of public health, and by that I'm including governmental agencies, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, the Truth Initiative, the American Cancer Society, heart and lung associations, all of mainstream public health is strongly opposed to e-cigarettes, and for one reason. They're concerned about kids' uptake of e-cigarettes, which has been substantial. It's been decreasing the last couple of years, but it has been substantial. And there are a number of things they're concerned about in that regard, and they're completely ignoring the fact that there's pretty good evidence that e-cigarettes are increasing smoking cessation for a subset of smokers. And a number of us on the science side of this, believe that the net effect of e-cigarettes is beneficial, that it's actually, possibly, a tool to add to the armamentarium of things like cigarette taxation, like smoke-free workplaces, like restrictions on advertising, and that it will help a group of inveterate smokers, those who either can't quit nicotine or don't want to, to move to a less dangerous alternative to smoking. I am not saying that e-cigarettes have no risk associated with them. They almost certainly do. But it is substantially lower.   Now, historically, this is divisive within the field in part because all of the earlier attempts at, quote-unquote, tobacco harm reduction have been produced by the major cigarette companies, and they've been fraudulent. So cigarette filters were manufactured and sold, starting in the 1950s, in response to the scare that I referred to earlier about cancer. And they were sold with a message that the filters block the dangerous stuff but let the flavor through. And people bought this. That decrease in smoking in the early 1950s reversed, smoking went up sharply, as sales of filtered cigarettes went up. By the way, the first successful filtered cigarette was Kent, and it used what it referred to as the miracle Micronite filter. Well, that miracle Micronite filter turns out to have been made of asbestos. And there are lawsuits continuing to the present day by workers in the factories that made the filter tips for Kent cigarettes, who themselves ended up with lung cancer or other diseases due to the asbestos. Then came low-tar and nicotine cigarettes, and we actually have ample evidence from the documents that had been revealed by lawsuits, that the industry knew that this was a public relations device. It was not a harm reduction device. And in fact, because people believed that low-tar and nicotine cigarettes were less dangerous, it's likely that it actually increased the toll of smoking because people who would have quit, switched to low-tar and nicotine cigarettes instead. So there's some pretty awful history here that makes people legitimately concerned about alternative products. A critical element of this story is that the alternative products, in this case, the e-cigarettes were introduced by non-cigarette, non-tobacco companies, and their goal was to replace smoking. Now the major companies are all making their own e-cigarettes as well because they have to do it from a defensive point of view, but basically they don't have any great interest in slowing up the sale of cigarettes. They want to benefit from that as long as they can.   So I should know the answer to this but I don't, but are e-cigarettes taxed? And wouldn't it be optimal to tax e-cigarettes but less than regular cigarettes so you discourage use of both but discourage the use of regular cigarettes more?   That is very insightful. Two colleagues and I actually published a paper saying that in 2015 in "The New England Journal of Medicine," that we should be taxing e-cigarettes modestly, the reason being that we want to discourage kids from using them, and kids are far more price-sensitive than our adults. Kids have a very elastic response to cigarette prices. Adults do not, and in particular, older adults have even lower price responsiveness. So yes, there should be some taxation of e-cigarettes to discourage youth use of it but that taxation should be dramatically lower than the taxation of cigarettes. Some states are now taxing e-cigarettes. Not all of them. The federal government is actually looking into a proposal to double the tax, the federal tax, on cigarettes, which would take it up to $2.01 a pack, and at the same time, to establish an equivalent tax, similar to the $2 tax, on all vaping products. This would be a disaster because it would definitely discourage kids from vaping, but it would also discourage adults from using e-cigarettes as an alternative to smoking, and the most addicted, the inveterate smokers, those are the ones that need these alternatives. So that's a bad policy proposal. A much better one would be to increase the cigarette tax by more than a dollar, raise it to 3 or $4 or something, and impose a modest tax on e-cigarettes. This would discourage people from smoking, both adults and kids, but especially kids. It would discourage kids from using e-cigarettes but it would create a price differential that would encourage the inveterate smokers to switch to e-cigarettes. Now, part of the problem, and this has gotten worse over time, is that the American public believes that e-cigarettes, that vaping, is as dangerous and even maybe more dangerous than cigarette smoking. Nothing could be further from the truth but so far the mainstream of public health has sold that message to the public, and the public, including smokers, believe it.   That's a fascinating story about how the public health field might be getting in its own way with this.   And maybe doing damage to public health.   So let's loop back a little bit to the behavior of the tobacco industry. So in 2017, the Phillip Morris Company funded and launched an organization called Foundation for a Smoke-Free World. So I think, hmm, a tobacco company saying they want less smoking, and one could view this with pretty high cynicism but what do you think about it?   I've always shared your sense of cynicism about it. There's an interesting anecdote related to this. The individual who negotiated the deal by which Phillip Morris offered $1 billion over a 12-year period to establish this foundation, that individual was the main actor in the World Health Organization during the development of the global treaty on tobacco control, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. He also became director of the organization and served in that capacity until just the other day. He has stepped down from being director. But let me give you a little context for it. Philip Morris International that needs to be distinguished from Altria and Philip Morris Domestic, but Philip Morris International sells the leading brand of what is known as heated tobacco products, HTPs. These are products that actually have tobacco in them. E-cigarettes have no tobacco in them but these products actually have tobacco in them. But instead of burning the tobacco, they heat it. They volatilize it, and the nicotine is inhaled. Like e-cigarettes, they appear to be substantially less dangerous than smoking, although it's not clear that they're as less dangerous as, than, e-cigarettes. But they're produced only by the major cigarette companies. Philip Morris is now selling these products successfully in many countries, many cities around the world. While they actually have the authorization to sell an older version of the product in the US, it's not very popular at this point. But in Japan, over the last four years there's been a drop in cigarettes sold of about a third at the same time that there's been this great increase in the use of these heated tobacco products manufactured by Philip Morris International and by Japan Tobacco. They have a product called Ploom. Philip Morris' product is called IQOS, I-Q-O-S, which, I was told, originally stood for I Quit Ordinary Smoking. So they are the leader of the theme song that the industry is singing these days about how they want a smoke-free world and they want to move toward one. But the only way they're ever going to do that, willingly, is if they can sell other products like these heated tobacco products and make large sums of money on them. Philip Morris has a good start at that. They claim that about a third of their revenue now is coming from IQOS, this heated tobacco product.   So whether that foundation ultimately has beneficial effects or not, forget corporate beneficial effects but on the public good, would pretty much depend on who's choosing to use these e-cigarettes, I'm imagining. That if it's people switching from normal cigarettes to them, or using them instead of normal cigarettes, it's one thing. But if they're recruiting new people who otherwise wouldn't smoke, then it would be a bad thing. So how do you think that'll all play out?   That's actually a critically important question, Kelly. And one of the great concerns that the opposition to e-cigarettes has, is that they're addicting lots of kids to nicotine, and that many of them will go on to smoke, and that that will reverse the progress that we made on smoking. Now, it turns out that there is no evidence to support the latter contention. And in fact, there's evidence to the contrary. I think it's entirely possible that some kids who would not have touched a cigarette otherwise are vaping and then trying cigarettes in the future. Whether they become regular smokers, remains to be seen. But I think there certainly are some kids like that. But what we do know is that the rate of smoking among kids, what we call current smoking, and smoking among kids means that they've had at least one puff on a cigarette in the last 30 days, that number has plummeted over the last quarter century, and, and this is the interesting thing, it has gone down at its fastest rate precisely during the period in which vaping has been popular among kids.   So one theory is that vaping is displacing smoking to some extent. That kids who would've smoked are vaping instead. It's a very complicated area and we don't know the answer. Among adults who vape, and they are relatively few in number except for very young adults, we observe mostly dual use, but the question is how much of this is a transition to vaping only, and then, maybe, a transition to nothing after that. In the UK, where vaping has been advertised by the health organizations as a way to quit smoking, and they have encouraged its use, and they use it in their smoking cessation clinics, and you'll even find it in hospitals, in the UK we have seen that more than half of the people who have quit smoking by using e-cigarettes have also quit vaping. So it is no longer the case in the UK that a majority of the people who vape are also currently smoking.   In the US, the data have been moving in that direction but it's still a majority who are dual users rather than vaping only. But we have evidence of four or five completely different kinds of studies, commercial data, other products in other countries, that all lead to the conclusion that vaping is already increasing the rate of smoking cessation in the US and in the UK by probably 10 to 15%. That's a hard thing to see in the data but it is something that, if you dig into the data, you will see it, and as I say, we see it all over the place. Let me give you one example of the tobacco harm reduction story that's fabulous. 40 to 50 years ago, large numbers of Swedish males started using a smokeless tobacco product called snus, S-N-U-S. It's a relatively low nitrosamine product, nitrosamine being a carcinogenic element, and they substituted it for cigarettes largely because cigarette taxes were going way up and there weren't any significant taxes on snus. So what you observe today, some three, four decades or more later, is that Swedish males have the lowest male smoking rate of any country in Europe, and maybe in the world. They do not have a low tobacco use rate. Their tobacco use rate is pretty typical but it consists mostly of snus. And they also have by far the lowest rate of tobacco-related diseases, like lung cancer, of men in all of the European Union countries, and the second lowest is typically a rate twice or more that of what you see in the Swedish males. Swedish females, who did not quit smoking in large numbers and did not take up snus until fairly recently, have rates of lung cancer and other diseases that are average or above-average for the European Union. So that's a great example of tobacco harm reduction in action, and it's one that's been around now, as I say, for decades.   Ken, this is a remarkable history and you're just bringing it alive beautifully. But let me ask you one final question. So given that you've been working in this field for more than four decades now, and have really been a pioneer, a leader, a warrior, and a hero, all those things could be applied to you and your work, if I asked you to sum up what's been learned from all these decades of work on tobacco, what would you say?   There are a lot of lesson. Certainly, we have learned specific kinds of interventions that really matter. You and I spoke about tax at some length. That's the preeminent one. Smoke-free workplaces, including smoke-free restaurants and bars, have not only themselves had a direct impact on health but have also set the tone for a more smoke-free society. So we have seen quite dramatic changes. I mentioned we're going from a 45% rate of smoking for the nation as a whole down to a little over 12%. That, however, has taken us six to seven decades. So it's kind of a good news, bad news story. It's a very complicated area. Tobacco control was ranked by CDC as one of the 10 most important public health measures of the 20th century, and also the first decade of the 21st century. And I think that's completely legitimate, and it is something about which all of us who care about public health can feel very proud about. The problem still remains. It is an enormous problem, as you alluded earlier, in many parts of the developing world, the low- and middle-income countries, and it's a growing problem in some of those countries, and it's just not going to disappear real fast. The lesson that I've taken most recently has been a discouraging one, and that's how divisive our field has become. We really have a chasm between the people who are opposed to tobacco harm reduction and those who are supportive of it. They're good people on both sides, they believe what they're saying, but they can't talk to each other civilly at this point. I hope that that will not become the case for those of you who are fighting the good fight in dealing with unhealthy foods.   Bio   Kenneth E. Warner is the Avedis Donabedian Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Public Health and Dean Emeritus at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. A member of the faculty from 1972-2017, he served as Dean from 2005-2010. Presented in over 275 professional publications, Dr. Warner's research has focused on economic and policy aspects of tobacco and health. Dr. Warner served as the World Bank's representative to negotiations on the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, WHO's first global health treaty. He also served as the Senior Scientific Editor of the 25th anniversary Surgeon General's report on smoking and health. From 2004-2005 he was President of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (SRNT). He currently serves on the FDA's Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. In 1996 Dr. Warner was elected to the National Academy of Medicine. He is a recipient of the Surgeon General's Medallion, the Luther Terry Award for Exemplary Achievement in Tobacco Control, and the Doll-Wynder Award from SRNT. Dr. Warner earned his AB from Dartmouth College and MPhil and PhD in economics from Yale University.  

MPR News with Angela Davis
Homemade and heartfelt gifts cheer both giver and receiver

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 47:49


Handmade gifts come from the heart. If we take time to make something for someone else, there's love knitted into that scarf and affection baked into every box of cookies.   Making gifts for the holidays is a long tradition for some people. Others are making homemade gifts for the first time, maybe after they discovered a craft or hobby during the pandemic as an antidote to stress and digital fatigue.  MPR News guest host Stephanie Curtis talks with crafters and listeners about why people make gifts and how homemade presents can bring joy to both giver and receiver.   Plus, MPR News senior economics contributor Chris Farrell shares the latest on the economy and Cyber Monday.  Guests:  Ingrid Nyholm-Lange is director of experience at the American Swedish Institute in Minneapolis where she oversees classes in traditional handcrafts. She's also a paper cut and paper fold artist in the Scandinavian tradition.  Lisa MacMartin is the owner of Heartfelt, a toy and craft shop in Minneapolis that offers craft classes for children and families.  Jess Hirsch is a woodworker and founder of Fireweed Community Woodshop in Minneapolis, which offers space, equipment and instruction for women and nonbinary people interested in woodworking.  Subscribe to the MPR News with Angela Davis podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS. Use the audio player above to listen to the full conversation.

The Sons Of History
The Viking Heart and the Influence of the Norse with Arthur Herman

The Sons Of History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 70:42


Arthur Herman has written another tremendous book entitled The Viking Heart. Herman joined the podcast to discuss his work and how the Scandinavians conquered the world through Viking conquest and later through trade, exploration, and sheer heart and brilliance. Herman's new book takes the reader on a journey of approximately 1,200 years, discussing the many historical figures from the lands of the north that impacted the world then and as we know it today. Learn about the myths and facts of the Vikings and how they helped create the Scandinavians as they are known today. Be sure to subscribe to our podcast, and if you enjoy the show, leave a rating and a review! WEBSITE: https://www.thesonsofhistory.com/

Interview Under Fire Podcast
S.10 E.17 – Niklas Lykke of Livløs

Interview Under Fire Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 28:16


New band, new chapter, new year, new album. Why not all at once? Frontman Niklas Lykke of Danish metal band Livløs joins IUF today to talk about the newest album, “And Then There Were None”. Though it is his first offering with the band, and being the newest member, it feels as if Niklas was meant to be here all along. He's found his place. Perhaps there was a sense of pressure when taking over as the lead vocalist of a heavy metal group, but Niklas was ready for the task as he and his newest bandmates have come together to release some of the finest Scandinavian melodic metal you will ever hear. Combining elements of American-rooted death metal and groove metal have been a mixture that Livløs have conquered, and now to be able to translate their skill into this album will have many ears turned in their direction. Niklas talks about how they derive their influences from other notable metal acts like At The Gates, Carcass, Death, and The Black Dahlia Murder. And now with a twist of everything they are, it's their own established sound and it's here to stay. Tune in now and be sure to buy and stream the highly-anticipated 2nd album “And Then There Were None”, from Denmark's Livløs, out now worldwide via Napalm Records.Stay connected with Livløs, visit: https://livloesband.com/, https://www.facebook.com/livloesband, and https://www.instagram.com/livloesband/Stay connected with IUF, visit: https://interviewunderfire.com/

Rock & Metal Combat Podcast
Episode 291 Turbonegro Scandinavian Leather For Brian Rosenquist

Rock & Metal Combat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 105:59


Turbonegro Scandinavian Leather For Brian Rosenquist

Talking Out Your Glass podcast
Sonja Blomdahl: Queen of Symmetry

Talking Out Your Glass podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 59:18


Strong. Calm. Serene. So are the vessels of Sonja Blomdahl. In an industrial neighborhood near Seattle's Lake Union, the artist turned loose her vivid colors into the unsuspecting gray of her spacious cinderblock and cement studio. If a Scandinavian flavor is detected in the hue of her celestial orbs, it is by chance as she credits rainy Seattle as her primary inspiration. But Blomdahl is in fact of Swedish descent, leaving some collectors of her work to wonder if the Scandinavian sense of style and design is in her blood.  After graduating from Massachusetts College of Art with a BFA in ceramics, Blomdahl studied at Orrefors Glass School in Sweden for six months, providing her with a solid background in efficiently handling her material. Upon arrival at the glass factory in 1976, she had $300 in her pocket. When her apprenticeship was over and in need of cash, Blomdahl went to work as a cleaning woman in a Swedish hospital to finance trips to Italy and the British Isles. Back in Massachusetts, she blew glass in a New Hampshire studio for nine months until Dan Dailey, a former teacher at Mass Art, invited her to be his teaching assistant at Pilchuck.  Three weeks at Pilchuck in the summer of 1978 proved to be a pivotal time in Blomdahl's career, for it was there that she viewed the Italian master Checco Ongaro demonstrate the double bubble or incalmo technique. She honed this process over the next two years while working at the Glass Eye Studio in Seattle and teaching glassblowing at Pratt Fine Arts Center. After her first exhibition at Traver in 1981, Blomdahl stopped working at the Glass Eye, bought a three-month Euro Rail pass and traveled around Europe. There, she had the opportunity to produce new work in Ann Wolff's studio in Sweden – a wonderful experience that further entrenched Blomdahl's desire to establish her own hotshop. She shipped the work made there back to Seattle and had a second sell-out show at Traver, allowing her to build a studio in 1982, where she worked for the next 25 years. Currently on view in Venice and American Studio Glass, curated by Tina Oldknow and William Warmus, Blomdahl's work was the focus of solo exhibitions at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Art, Montgomery, Alabama; Martha's Vineyard Glassworks, West Tisbury, Massachusetts; and the William Traver Gallery, Tacoma, Washington. Permanent installations and collections include American Craft Museum, New York, New York; Clinton Presidential Library and Museum, Little Rock, Arkansas; Museum of Decorative Art, Prague, Czech Republic; Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York; and Kitazawa Contemporary Glass Museum, Kitazawa, Japan, to name a few. She has held teaching positions at Pratt Fine Arts Center, Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Deer Isle, Maine, and the Appalachian Center in Smithville, Tennessee.  Blomdahl's focus has been the vessel. She states: “In the vessel, I find the form to be of primary importance. It holds the space. In a sense, the vessel is a history of my breath: It contains the volume within. If I have done things correctly, the profile of the piece is a continuous curve; the shape is full, and the opening confident. Color is often the joy in making a piece. I want the colors to glow and react with each other. The clear band between the colors acts as an optic lens; it moves the color around and allows you to see into the piece. The relationship between form, color, proportion, and process intrigued me.”  

Wine & Crime
Ep246 Scandinavian Scandals

Wine & Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 130:20


This week, the gals embrace their Nordic roots to chat about some naughty Northern Europeans. Topics include a casual submarine cruise, one very manipulative alleged cannibal, and why they're so damn happy. Mix up some blåbærsuppe, look for the Northern Lights, and tune in for Scandinavian Scandals. For a full list of show sponsors, visit https://wineandcrimepodcast.com/sponsors/

Plan B is a Sugar Daddy
52: 8voatico via Founder Isabella Soto

Plan B is a Sugar Daddy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 63:05


Founder and Creative Director, Isabella Soto of 8voatico, is gracing the PBSD pod today. Isabella is originally from Venezuela, now based in Miami, and channels focused curations into her ecomm behind the '8' designers highlighted each season. 8vo Ático is a modern and curated space with a one of a kind "rotating" strategy. With current focus towards Scandinavian fashion, 8voatico is a GO-TO for modern day 'it girls'. We learned so much from this episode and Isabella offers so many take aways for a new age entrepreneur. We hope you find as much value as we did!  Find 8voatico: https://shop.8voatico.com , IG: @8voatico

And She Spoke
Pricing & The Patriarchy

And She Spoke

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 44:06


We often define our limits by what we think we're capable of. And for many women in business, structural barriers—both internal and external—play a big role in how we create these fences for ourselves.For centuries, we've been taught that we need to rely on other members of society to make financial decisions for us, and that our value comes from our bodies rather than our minds. This reflects in how much money we think we deserve in exchange for our services. But, that's where the beauty of owning our own businesses lies. Why? Because we're the ones in charge. We're the ones making the calls, setting our prices, and running the show. In this week's episode, we're getting into the nitty-gritty of how the prevailing system dictates our money-mindsets as women, why the culture of undercharging is detrimental to the entrepreneurial landscape, and why we should rethink our capabilities with reference to money.Here's what you can expect from this episode: The difference between your worth and the worth of your programs and offerings 4 subconscious patriarchal beliefs that affect the way we price things How being a business owner helps you minimize the structural financial barriers  The undercharging-culture, and why it needs to change Why many women don't even trust themselves with money The need to understand what your service is worth What happens when you quit playing the people-pleasing game Why it's important to charge honest rates even if you don't “need” the money We've got some real-talk and super staggering statistics in store for you with this one. And we're also extremely excited to be unveiling our new project, 8333!If you're as interested in seeing a shift in the culture of pricing as we are, you're going to love this talk. So get comfy, and tune in!RESOURCES Theposterclub.com Seth Godin's Blog Post “Superfamous” This Week's Joy:Sandy's current joy is theposterclub.com! It's a website that features beautiful, eclectic art pieces from artists in Denmark who take inspiration from Scandinavian and minimalist concepts.This Week's Hustle: What's fueling Jenni's hustle these days is Seth Godin's latest blog post,“Superfamous”. It dives into the true purpose of transformative work, and how it's slowly being marred by the creator's desire to achieve fame.This podcast is brought to you by the Marvelous online teaching platform.Marvelous is an easy-to-use platform that helps you build and sell your own courses memberships and live-streamed programs. Go from idea to open for business in just minutes. Unlike other startups, Marvelous was created by women for women. If you're looking for a simple, streamlined way to build and grow an online business. You can learn more at Marvelous.

Discography Discussion
Episode 246: Antestor - Discography Discussion

Discography Discussion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 61:22


Antestor is one of the most important Christian metal bands to come out of the 90s Scandinavian metal scene.  With their own brand of “sorrow metal,” Antestor paved the way for other Christian extreme metal bands to come, and is still putting out records to this day.  What is it that makes this band special?  Is it ok to call Christian bands black metal?  We attempt to tackle those questions and more on this cold and sorrow filled episode. Enjoy. #discussmetal #Antestor Join our Patreon: Discography Discussion on Patreon - http://bit.ly/discussmetalpatreon Discography Discussion Podcast Homepage - http://bit.ly/DiscographyDiscussion Subscribe to RSS - https://podcast.discussmetal.com/feed Buy a Shirt on Teespring! - http://bit.ly/DDTeeSpring Join the conversation on Discord - http://bit.ly/discussmetalDiscord Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Discographydiscussion Twitter - https://twitter.com/discussmetal Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/discussmetal Listen to Discography Discussion on Spotify - http://bit.ly/discussmetalspotify Discography Discussion on Apple Podcasts/iTunes - http://bit.ly/discussmetalitunes Discography Discussion on Google Play - http://bit.ly/discussmetalgoogleplay Listen on Stitcher - http://bit.ly/discussmetalstitcher Listen on iHeartRadio - http://bit.ly/DDiHeartRadio Watch/Listen on Youtube - http://bit.ly/discussmetalyoutube Listen on TuneIn - http://bit.ly/discussmetaltunein Questions? Comments? Suggestions?  Submit a band request Here - http://bit.ly/DDBandSuggestions Email: danandjoeshow@gmail.com www.discussmetal.com Album of the week Dan - Darkthrone “Transilvanian Hunger” Joe - Oysterhead “The Grand Pecking Order” Geoff - Carcass “Torn Arteries”  Media Mentioned In This Episode: Antestor - Last Season [02] Det Tapted Liv - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_U4Z-G5QL4

Earth Ancients
Maja D'Aoust: Halloween, Familiars and the Spirit World

Earth Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 87:11


A comprehensive exploration of familiars and their many forms and powers• Explores witch's familiars in folklore, shamanic, and magical traditions around the world, including Africa, India, Scandinavia, ancient Greece, and China• Explains how familiars are related to shamanic power animals and how the witch draws on her personal sexual energy to give this creature its power• Examines the familiar in alchemical, Hermetic, and Egyptian magical literature, including instructions for procuring a supernatural assistantExploring the history and creation of a “witch's familiar,” also known as a spirit double or guardian spirit, Maja D'Aoust shows how there is much more to these supernatural servant spirits and guardians than meets the eye. She reveals how witches are not the only ones to lay claim to this magician's “assistant” and examines how the many forms of witch's familiars are well known in folklore throughout Europe and America as well as in shamanic and magical traditions around the world, including Africa, India, and China.The author explains how familiars are connected with shapeshifting and how the classic familiars of medieval witchcraft tradition are related to the power animals and allies of shamanic practices worldwide, including animal guardian spirits of Native American traditions and the daimons of the ancient Greeks and Romans. She examines the fetch spirit, also known as the fylgia in Scandinavian tradition, and how the witch or sorcerer draws on their personal sexual energy to give this creature its power to magnetize and attract what it was sent to retrieve. She looks at incubus, succubus, doubles, doppelgangers, and soul mates, showing how familiars can also adopt human forms and sometimes form romantic or erotic attachments with the witch or shaman.Reviewing alchemical, Hermetic, and Egyptian magical literature, including the nearly forgotten alchemical works of Anna Kingsford, D'Aoust explores their instructions for procuring the attention of a supernatural assistant as well as an extensive description of the alchemical wedding and how this ritual joins the magician and familiar spirit into a single unified consciousness. Exploring fairy familiars, she reveals how a practitioner can establish a “marriage” with a totemic plant or tree spirit, who, in return, would offer teachings about its medicinal and visionary powers.Delving deeply into the intimate relations of humanity with the spirit world, D'Aoust shows how forming connections with living forces other than human enables us to move beyond the ego, expand our magical abilities, as well as evolve our conscious awareness.Maja D'Aoust, known as the Witch of the Dawn, is a practicing witch and scholar of alchemy and occult lore. After completing her bachelor's degree in biochemistry, she studied Oriental medicine and acupuncture and later earned her master's degree in transformational psychology with a focus on shamanism, the I Ching, and ancestors. She is the author of A Witch's Bestiary: Visions of Supernatural Creatures, coauthor of The Secret Source, and creator of a Tarot deck, The White Witch Tarot. She lives in Los Angeles.

Bringin' it Backwards
Interview with Blanks

Bringin' it Backwards

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 38:19


We had the pleasure of interviewing Blanks over Zoom video! Netherlands-hailed indie-pop artist and effervescent rising star, Blanks, has “Nothing Lasts Forever And That's OK”, his shimmering debut album, alongside new single “Dance Like This”. Having long felt a strong connection between music and his own memories, the concept behind his new album came innately to the “rising songwriting force” (CLASH).  Across ten tracks, Blanks draws inspiration from the bittersweet nostalgia of his past, like finding first love and unforgettable summers spent with friends. The pop maverick intricately weaves vulnerable storytelling amidst an endless spectrum of moods and sonic influences. From the synth-driven riffs of the 80s, to the sounds of popular music from Blanks' youth, “Nothing Lasts Forever And That's OK”, will instantly carry you away to another time and place.The first half of the album, comprised of the project's five official singles, sees Blanks unfurling a classic tale of summertime love. From its feverish beginnings on high-energy bops like “What You Do To Me” and “Classic Armstrong”, to the moment it all comes crashing down on the sombre piano-driven ballad, “I'm Sorry”. To bring the story to life, Blanks also rolled out a five part visual series that channels a much loved nostalgia of teen movie cliches.In the latter half, Blanks reminisces on the summer gone by with an underlying sense of melancholy. Though the memories will always remain, he realizes that all experiences are truly once in a lifetime. Latest single “Dance Like This” accurately illustrates this feeling, “the instrumental builds on the notion of time that seems to keep unconditionally going (clock sound), while the lyrics explain the concept of realizing from the bottom of your heart it's about to be over” - Blanks. It's a feeling that Blanks knows all too well after losing his best friend at a young age. With a fervent approach to making music, Blanks hopes to encourage his listeners to cherish every experience and make the most of their time on earth. Having spent the last few years releasing a steady stream of songs, as well as being a hugely popular music production content creator, Blanks knew it was time for his next challenge. Writing for “Nothing Lasts Forever And That's OK”, began during the height of the pandemic, with many production sessions taking place over Zoom, often from remote and inspiring locations, like the Maldives or a cabin in the depths of the woods. As Executive Producer and a seasoned multi-instrumentalist, Blanks wrote, composed and produced much of the album himself, whilst enlisting the assist of others on “Turn Around”, “Never Have I Ever”, and “I'm Sorry”. With creative energy abound, Blanks was able to explore new ideas and showcase the breadth of his immense music talents. Looking back on the process, he shares “I guess it was a combination of Scandinavian music magic, Maldives good vibes and excitement.We want to hear from you! Please email Tera@BringinitBackwards.com.www.BringinitBackwards.com#podcast #interview #bringinbackpod #Blanks #zoomListen & Subscribe to BiBFollow our podcast on Instagram and Twitter! 

Invest Like the Best
Universal Music Group: The Gatekeepers of Music - [Business Breakdowns, EP. 32]

Invest Like the Best

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 76:19


Today, we are running a special episode of Business Breakdowns on our Invest Like the Best feed. When we launched Breakdowns, we hoped to cover industries and businesses that we were “well known but poorly understood.” This deep-dive on UMG and the music industry is just that - you will walk away with a whole new appreciation for artists, labels, and what streaming technology has done for a historic industry. If you enjoy this episode, please be sure to subscribe on your preferred podcast player and check out our growing catalog of episodes.   Today we're breaking down Universal Music Group. As one of the largest music businesses in the world, UMG is home to many of the world's greatest artists, including Taylor Swift, U2, and The Beatles catalog. A discussion on UMG requires a deep dive into the history of music itself, how it was historically monetized, the shift from physical to digital, and what streaming has meant for the various pieces of the ecosystem. Our guest, Arman Gokgol-Kline, a partner and investor at Ruane, Cunniff & Goldfarb, walks us through that evolution of the music industry before we dive in on UMG.   In our discussion, we first break down the industry pre and post Napster, looking at the ways music was sold historically, and how that led to both record profits and a consumer revolution. We then assess streaming's impact on the industry and how, contrary to what you might think, labels may be more important in a marketplace where it's easier than ever for creators to record and release music. Finally, we finish with UMG's place in the ecosystem. The primary drivers of the business, how they're able to attract the world's superstars, and how they think about deploying dollars to acquire new artists and timeless catalogs.   Please enjoy this fantastic breakdown of Universal Music Group.   For the full show notes, transcript, and links to the best content to learn more, check out the episode page here.   -----   This episode is brought to you by Quartr. With Quartr, you can access conference calls, investor presentations, transcripts, and earnings reports – straight from your pocket. Quartr is 100% free and includes companies from 12 markets including the US, the UK, Canada, India, and all the Scandinavian countries. Quartr is available for both iOS and Android, so check out the app today.   -----   This episode is brought to you by Brex. Brex began as the first corporate card for startups and now offers a full financial stack built for scale. Get 10-20x higher credit limits, uncapped rewards, easy deposits and payments, and expense management all in one. Grow your business faster with Brex.   -----   Business Breakdowns is a property of Colossus, LLC. For more episodes of Business Breakdowns, visit joincolossus.com/episodes.   Stay up to date on all our podcasts by signing up to Colossus Weekly, our quick dive every Sunday highlighting the top business and investing concepts from our podcasts and the best of what we read that week. Sign up here.   Follow us on Twitter: @JoinColossus | @patrick_oshag | @jspujji | @zbfuss   Show Notes [00:04:01] - [First question] - How technology disrupted the music business and it's evolving history [00:12:44] - What the industry of music labels looks like from the 90s to today [00:21:19] - How it feels as a high-tier artist to engage with a label directly today [00:28:20] - The revenue and business model of an artist akin to Taylor Swift [00:30:44] - The differences between UMG's main sources of revenue; music publishing and recording [00:35:08] - General margins and trends for music publishing [00:36:22] - Ownership and mechanics of monetizing an artist's Intellectual Property  [00:40:57] - How streaming revenues are divided among stakeholders [00:46:23] - History of the bargaining power of labels and streaming platforms [00:51:25] - Capital allocation, ROI, and acquiring IP and catalogs [00:57:39] - Thoughts on the growth profile of the industry as an investor [01:02:23] - Potential risks to UMG in emerging technology and new creator trends  [01:08:50] - Reasons why an artist would pick UMG over other major labels [01:12:42] - Diversity and how artists are sometimes treated by labels [01:14:02] - A growing increase in music consumption across the world

The Football Ramble
The Preview Show: A Glimt in his eye

The Football Ramble

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 51:57


Kate, Vish and Luke react to last night's changing of the European guard, with West Ham strutting their stuff and José Mourinho's Roma the victims in a brutal Scandinavian crime drama.We also look ahead to some tasty Premier League ties, as Leeds look to rediscover some form and Man United find themselves in Liverpool's crosshairs - all on today's Preview Show, sponsored by Betway!Search ‘Football Ramble' on social media to find us, and email us here: show@footballramble.com.***Please take the time to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your pods. It means a great deal to the show and will make it easier for other potential listeners to find us. Thanks!*** See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Jesse Kelly Show
The Sign of a National Decline

The Jesse Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 122:45


A dangerous precedent has just been set. Joe Biden is still not a functional adult. Advice for the younger generation; the right is the new counterculture. Education is playing a huge role in making America more left than the Scandinavian countries. Jesse's world-famous burgers. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Right Time with Bomani Jones
Guilty of Association

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 52:48


Bomani Jones weighs in on a story in Rolling Stone about the perception that the NBA has a problem with vaccine detractors ahead of the start of their season, which centers around star Kyrie Irving of the Brooklyn Nets. Plus, why Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger looks "finished", an IYHH including a reunion tour for The Fugees and your voicemails from when the game "was cheatin'"! IYHH Stories @gabriels_geiger shares that young Scandinavians are sticking nicotine pouches up their asses: https://bit.ly/3kIi2Yi @jemaswad shares that The Fugees have reunited for a “The Score” 25th Anniversary Tour: https://bit.ly/3CVWkq1 @kamilakudelska says media fascination with Petito Mystery looks like racism to Native Americans: https://n.pr/3kIi8z8