Podcasts about Scandinavian

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Best podcasts about Scandinavian

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Latest podcast episodes about Scandinavian

Gone Medieval
The Danelaw

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 32:43


The Danelaw was the part of England where large numbers of Scandinavians settled between the 9th and 11th centuries, and where Danish rather than English law was followed. Its set of legal terms and definitions was created in the treaties between Alfred the Great and the Danish warlord, Guthrum.In this episode of Gone Medieval, Dr. Cat Jarman talks to Jake Stattel, a PhD candidate in Medieval History at Cambridge, whose research is teasing out new evidence about the political and social shifts in early Medieval Britain.This episode was mixed and edited by Annie Coloe and produced by Rob Weinberg.If you're enjoying this podcast and are looking for more fascinating Medieval content then subscribe to our Medieval Monday newsletter here > If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android > or Apple store > Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience
How NY Times Bestselling Horror Writer Grady Hendrix Writes

The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 36:21


Award-winning, New York Times bestselling author and screenwriter, Grady Hendrix, spoke with me about getting serious about horror, turning genre tropes on their head, and his latest “How to Sell a Haunted House.” Grady Hendrix is an award-winning novelist, screenwriter, and journalist best known for My Best Friend's Exorcism (adapted into a feature film by Amazon Studios), and the New York Times bestsellers The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires, and The Final Girl Support Group. His latest is How to Sell a Haunted House, an #1 Indie Next List pick, described as a “...novel that explores the way your past—and your family—can haunt you like nothing else.” The New York Times called it a “…gripping, wildly entertaining exploration of childhood horrors,” and Esquire called it “... an authentically frightening, genuinely funny reconfiguration of what a haunted house can be.” New York Times bestselling author Chuck Wendig said of the book, “A spirited nightmare story about death, but also, what comes after: grief, guilt, family secrets, and estate administration. Oh, also, did I mention the evil puppets?”  Grady Hendrix's work is currently in multiple phases of adaptation at HBO and others, for both feature film and streaming. [Discover The Writer Files Extra: Get 'The Writer Files' Podcast Delivered Straight to Your Inbox at writerfiles.fm] [If you're a fan of The Writer Files, please click FOLLOW to automatically see new interviews. And drop us a rating or a review wherever you listen] In this file Grady Hendrix and I discussed: How his novel about a haunted Scandinavian furniture store launched his fiction career Perseverance and writing what you know Stripping down the horror genre to its core The importance of sucky drafts  Why haunted house stories are always about families And a lot more! Show Notes: How to Sell a Haunted House by Grady Hendrix (Amazon) Grady Hendrix Amazon Author Page Gradyhendrix.com The Smell of Fear - How To Sell A Haunted House Candle Grady Hendrix on Facebook Grady Hendrix on Twitter Kelton Reid on Twitter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Xena Warrior Business
S6E7 - Sealed with a Kiss

Xena Warrior Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 43:14


What do a German opera, a Scandinavian myth and an Old English epic poem have in common? They're all heavily featured in this New Zealand fantasy story about a ring that grants its wearer incredible power! Sound familiar? We talk about Xena Warrior Princess Season 6 Episode 7: The Rheingold Follow us on twitter: @XenaWarriorBiz This podcast is the spinoff/sister podcast of SAILOR BUSINESS. Art by @barelysushi. Podcast edited by @allyspock. Support us on patreon at www.patreon.com/sailorbusiness Quick LinksGet Embed PlayerDownload Audio File  

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 25, 2023 is: marginalia • mahr-juh-NAY-lee-uh • noun Marginalia is a plural noun that refers to notes or other marks written in the margins of a text, and to nonessential matters or items. // The students loved flipping through their literature textbooks to find the marginalia left behind by former students. // She found the book's treatment of not only the major events but also the marginalia of Scandinavian history fascinating. See the entry > Examples: “The last time I wrote about culling books—six years ago—nostalgia was my biggest obstacle. Just about every book I opened contained some sort of ephemera that stopped me: a bookmark from a long-gone bookstore, a scribble from a mostly-forgotten college class, an old photograph or letter, or, most nostalgic of all, my late father's signature and marginalia.” — Laurie Hertzel, The Star Tribune (Minneapolis, Minnesota), 14 Aug. 2020 Did you know? In the introduction to his essay titled “Marginalia,” Edgar Allan Poe wrote: “In getting my books, I have always been solicitous of an ample margin; this not so much through any love of the thing in itself, however agreeable, as for the facility it affords me of penciling suggested thoughts, agreements and differences of opinion, or brief critical comments in general.” At the time “Marginalia” was first published in 1844, marginalia was only a few decades old despite describing something—notes in the margin of a text—that had existed for centuries. An older word, apostille (or apostil), refers to a single annotation made in a margin, but that word is rarely used today. Even if you are not, like Poe, simply ravenous for scribbling in your own books, you likely know marginalia as a telltale sign that someone has read a particular volume before you.

Rogues Gallery Uncovered
Beer Monster 1866

Rogues Gallery Uncovered

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 21:07


Enjoy a spectacular night on the lash in Victorian London with one of the 19th century's most prolific party animals, Henry Weysford Charles Plantagenet Rawdon-Hastings.It's a convivial tale of drinking, rat baiting, dancing girls, drinking, outrageous pranks,  and menacing Scandinavians....... and drinking.Why should you always dance with a pocketful of coins?Who looked like "a giant blancmange"?What is so dangerous about Ratcliffe Highway?How much booze can four gentlemen of quality put away in a night?All will be revealed in episode 30 of Rogues Gallery Uncovered - The podcast of bad behaviour in period costume. Email:  simon@roguesgalleryonline.comSupport the gallery on Patreon  HEREVisit the website and exclusive store HERESign up for the newsletter and become “A Lovable Rogue” HERESupport the show

Watch What Crappens
Below Deck Adventure: Can't Hardly Wait

Watch What Crappens

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 89:52


On this week's Below Deck Adventure (S1 E12), Jess reaches her breaking point after having to wait two hours for guests to sit down for dinner. Also, small horses with Scandinavian gaits!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 25, 2023 is: marginalia • mahr-juh-NAY-lee-uh • noun Marginalia is a plural noun that refers to notes or other marks written in the margins of a text, and to nonessential matters or items. // The students loved flipping through their literature textbooks to find the marginalia left behind by former students. // She found the book's treatment of not only the major events but also the marginalia of Scandinavian history fascinating. See the entry > Examples: “The last time I wrote about culling books—six years ago—nostalgia was my biggest obstacle. Just about every book I opened contained some sort of ephemera that stopped me: a bookmark from a long-gone bookstore, a scribble from a mostly-forgotten college class, an old photograph or letter, or, most nostalgic of all, my late father's signature and marginalia.” — Laurie Hertzel, The Star Tribune (Minneapolis, Minnesota), 14 Aug. 2020 Did you know? In the introduction to his essay titled “Marginalia,” Edgar Allan Poe wrote: “In getting my books, I have always been solicitous of an ample margin; this not so much through any love of the thing in itself, however agreeable, as for the facility it affords me of penciling suggested thoughts, agreements and differences of opinion, or brief critical comments in general.” At the time “Marginalia” was first published in 1844, marginalia was only a few decades old despite describing something—notes in the margin of a text—that had existed for centuries. An older word, apostille (or apostil), refers to a single annotation made in a margin, but that word is rarely used today. Even if you are not, like Poe, simply ravenous for scribbling in your own books, you likely know marginalia as a telltale sign that someone has read a particular volume before you.

Women of the Northwest
Life as a mortician, dairy farmer, Scandinavian Festival president and Grange event organizer

Women of the Northwest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 25:58 Transcription Available


Amanda Rohne has lived in Brownsmead, Oregon since  2005when she married Dirk Rohne and became a dairy farmer's wife.She is the mother of two.She spent the first two years of her life living in her parents' mortuary and later became a mortician.She organized the Scandinavian festivalShe is currently coordinating all events at the Brownsmead Grange.

Using the Whole Whale Podcast
AmazonSmile Turned Upside Down Cutting $449m CSR Program (news)

Using the Whole Whale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 24:30


  Amazon Sunsets AmazonSmile Amid Cost-Cutting  The AmazonSmile will be ending by February 20th, according to a statement from the company, as reported by NPR and others. While the program dispersed nearly $449 million to nonprofits globally, the company says that the donations were spread too thin, minimizing impact. Amazon pointed to other efforts, such as its Housing Equity Fund, which supports affordable housing efforts near its headquarters, as an example of a social impact program receiving investment. However, smaller nonprofits that received AmazonSmile donations say that the donation were helpful and would be missed. The move comes after Amazon announced 18,000 layoffs, amid a winter defined by tech layoffs across the industry. Read more ➝   Summary Time's Up to halt operations, shift resources to legal fund | ABC News  People are only just realising what happens to the money IKEA makes - and it's blowing their minds | The US Sun Founder of Seattle West African immigrant nonprofit accused of embezzling millions | king5.com  What if school was all outside, every day? N.J. ‘nature schools' take class outdoors, rain or shine.  NJ.com The Eagles thought their Christmas album would fund a toy drive. It ended up doing much more. | https://www.inquirer.com     Rough Transcript [00:00:00] George: This week on the nonprofit news feed. Well, we are talking about turning that Amazon smile upside down. I was first off, really happy to be able to come up with that subject line. Um, not as happy that this program is ending. Uh, Nick, how's it going? [00:00:42] Nick: It's going good. George, this is, I think, gonna be one of those weeks where we are just focused on, on one-liners and, and puns. But alas, I'll take us into the top story, which you alluded to, which is that Amazon Smile. The program that donated a PORs, uh, portion of the proceeds from purchases on Amazon to nonprofits will be coming to a close on February 20th. [00:01:07] This comes via reporting from NPR and other outlets. And in the history of the program, it dispersed nearly 449 million to nonprofits globally. However, the company says that the donations were spread too thin, minimizing impact. That's in quotes. Um, Amazon pointed in their statement to other efforts such as its Housing equity fund to support affordable housing. [00:01:34] Here its headquarters as an example. Of a social impact program it was investing in. However, in the articles, smaller nonprofits said that Amazon SMILE donations were helpful and would be missed. And this comes amid broader economic headwinds that the industry is facing. Amazon has announced 18,000 layoffs. [00:01:57] Tech layoffs are now commonplace across the board. Amazon Smile more like a frown these days. [00:02:06] George: I'm sad to see a CSR corporate social responsibility program of this magnitude get sunset in this way in short order. I've been looking on LinkedIn, um, the reactions, and some folks are saying, you know, good riddens, this was a distraction for nonprofits because it sort of baits an organization into becoming an affiliate marketer. [00:02:30] Meaning you get a portion of the sales based on a trackable link and you're pushing product as opposed to your purpose. , I hear that. I also see 449 million, uh, across nonprofits being something meaningful now. Yeah. You spread peanut butter too thin and it turns into nothing. Right. If I were to donate that, but like, that's still just, that's a lot of money. [00:02:55] You know, there's, um, 1.5 ish million nonprofits, so I don't, I don't know that I buy that full narrative of like, it was too small to make a difference. , it was part of, for some organizations, a balanced fiscal diet. It was a diversification of revenue streams. You know, it was something that they, they got and ideally didn't have to push too hard for. [00:03:19] So bad thing too bad. You know, I, I, I don't think that, I'm curious why, and, and I'll maybe never know the reason of like the actual, like, is this a cost cutting? Is there just a change in csr? Did they not get enough, uh, from it? Because on the same token, it actually served them as well because guess what? [00:03:42] Somebody was buying something from them. You know, it was the affiliate marketing strategy. It was actually pretty darn clever, and it worked so sad to see it. And hopefully there'll be a, another solution that arises, an opportunity that shows up for, for those organizations. [00:04:02] Nick: I agree. I. It can't have cost them that much money to run though. Like that's the thing, right. [00:04:11] George: Well, the the other thing is like you can just sign up for an affiliate link and sell things, but I think the difference also with Amazon Smile is that, You could have your supporters put Amazon Smile on their purchasing. So I had it for, for my nonprofit, and it was just, anytime I buy, I had something on Amazon. [00:04:27] A point went that way. So I, I, maybe you need to backtrack on like affiliate marketing versus actually it was adding a layer that said, for these customers, a portion of your proceeds go back to this organization. So that is uniquely different. [00:04:43] Nick: That's fair. That's fair. We'll continue to see if we hear more about this, maybe they'll roll out something different or new. Alas, we move along to our next story, and this one is from a ABC News and others that the Times Up organization, the Me Too, the organization born out of the Me Too movement, particularly the that one in Hollywood, um, has Hal. [00:05:13] Operations and is shifting remaining financial resources to the Legal Defense fund. So Times Out has had a. Go of it. Fallout from associations with Andrew Cuomo and that scandal, um, and has been something of an EM battered, uh, embattled organization rather, um, over the past couple years and is now closing doors and, and shifting that money to the legal defense fund, which does, uh, provide, uh, resources for women in, in specific industries. This is kind of a weird one because it's such a high profile organization that came up very quickly. I think there's probably some lessons to be learned here. George, what are those lessons and what is your take on this? [00:06:03] George: I wish I was smart enough to actually understand the, the full implications of of this. The different narratives that I see here, one, are the types of organizations that pop up in these. Cultural moments have a lot of headwinds. Later they start off with a disproportionate amount of attention and funding upfront, which certainly times updated and they did remarkable work, certainly around if we're looking at victims of Harvey Weinstein, and then the way that they were able to, I'd say, update the way that victims were dealt with. [00:06:44] In these cases from a legal standpoint and a lot of achievements there, but there's a certain type of what feels like immutable. What goes up must come down type of physics here, where the speed at which with which you rise to fame. also seems to all but guarantee the fall from Grace. That is kind of like the inverse Lindy effect. [00:07:15] The Lindy effect is if you have been here for this long, you'll probably continue to be here. Uh, coming from the. Run of show for Broadway, uh, productions that if a Broadway production had been on, you know, it's a, it's a wonder that cats ever stopped being on Broadway. Cause cats had been forever on Broadway. [00:07:32] And it was this, this joke of like, once you're in the line cafe, you'll sort of never be removed. Um, I've gone far from the topic, I'm gonna come back to it. So the first thought, the speed with which something rises probably dictates the speed with which it falls the next. Looking at organizations that need to sort of spin up with all of the overhead, with all of the infrastructure and hiring staffing, like to create a new organization takes a lot of, of work and wealth. [00:08:08] And the fact that now at the end of it, you know, they, they talk about, and even in this quote, very simply, the Legal defense Fund really reflects who we were, not only at our inception, but really at our core. And that's a quote from, uh, Schultzer. And that's why, you know, the, the remaining 1.7 million, which is, is quite small, uh, in the grand scheme of the size of the organization, uh, is going back to that fund. [00:08:33] And the question I guess in my mind is, you know, the fund administered by the National Women's Law Center in Washington? Which has provided and provides legal administration help to, to workers that identify as low income and 40% of people of color. I, I'm, I'm curious as to what the world would've looked like, had times Up simply been a branch of that organization, how much more could have been applied to it and the, the learnings and the staff and that ability rolled into an existing organization rather than saying, we need a new organization. [00:09:08] You know, could this have. A campaign or a program of that legal defense fund. Those are just questions in my mind, and it's, it's tough with an organization under this level of scrutiny. I, I have a hard time getting behind some of those decisions they made with, you know, Andrew, Andrew Cuomo and, and consulting, allegedly consulting with them behind closed doors that was then later revealed by reports. [00:09:33] Uh, It's tough. I think nonprofits are under, uh, a much, much greater microscope and it doesn't take much to set the, set the tide in the wrong direction because you exist at the public's. Will you rely on funding and funders and if those funders are then effectively being shown. as public donors because nine 90 s are all public. [00:09:59] We can see donors and donations. Are you then saying, oh, a large donor has to then reconsider like, wait a minute, am I supporting an organization that supported Andrew Cuomo? Not saying that that is a direct line, but all things being equal, it doesn't take much to hurt in that reputation, and it's tough for organizations that are in that frontline type of work. [00:10:17] Nick: George, I, I think that's, that's a great point. You bring up a lot of different nuances and the threads there, and it makes me think that your nonprofits have to play by different rules than businesses, right. [00:10:33] George: They do. You can't just go on an apology tour being like, Hey, sorry, we fired him. We're all back to normal. Like, nevermind that our news station. Maybe let this kind of go by the wayside. [00:10:44] Nick: Yeah. Yeah. Um. Yeah, I guess we'll, we'll continue to keep an eye on this story. It'll be interesting to see how that legal defense portion of it, which is still administered by, um, that, uh, the other organization, the, the woman's um, uh, legal organization, how that all pans out. Um, so we'll keep our listeners updated, but to that end, I will take us to our next story. [00:11:12] And this one comes. From King five.com and the founder of a Seattle West African immigrant nonprofit is accused of embezzling millions. Um, so. Uh, the, the gentleman in, in question, Issa I apologize cause I know I'm mispronouncing. That was the founder and longtime executive director of the West African Community Council or W A C C, which is based in Seattle. [00:11:44] Um, and after decade of service, um, he was ousted, uh, on December 16th. Accused of embezzling, which is, which is, you know, terrible, terrible, um, especially, you know, people who really, really need help. And then this long article kind of goes into it, it goes into, uh, in DA's started of the story, um, as well side of the story rather, and it kind of a complicated one. [00:12:11] But, uh, George, what's your takeaway on. [00:12:16] George: I look. Board members for this, and this is a reminder for the fiscal responsibilities that your board members take on. And I'm not saying send this article to your board members, but if you are on a board, if you are building a board, fiscal stewardship and hiring and firing the c e o, those the primary jobs and roles of a board. [00:12:38] And so I see this and I don't look at, you know, in the D and say, oh, what a bad actor. Like there are bad actors. One out of a thousand people, one out of 10,000 people are not the, you know, folks that you should be trusting. The job of the board is to hire and fire and make sure the right people are in there. [00:12:56] And the fact that this was an extra bank account started in 2014, like a secret bank account, and like hundreds of thousands of dollars going through there, you know, I'm looking at auditors, I'm looking at board members looking at that, and so paying attention to those things like, oh, it can't happen. . Um, it, it is just a function of odds and, uh, again, I wouldn't have put this in here actually if it had not been for the size of the, the embezzlement. [00:13:25] We have millions of dollars. It's, it's brutal. Uh, so it's a reminder to, to board members out there that, uh, while those finance meetings may be boring, and also the people preparing them, like, here's, here's what you're actually doing. Um, you're making sure money gets to the. The right places and you're avoiding, um, tragedies like. [00:13:45] Nick: Absolutely. I think that's a fantastic point and we always like to keep our listeners on their toes to protect themselves from this happening at their organization. I have our next story is an interesting one. Um, Georgia. Did you know that IKEA is owned by a nonprofit? [00:14:11] George: Here's the thing. I didn't know that Ike. Was owned by a nonprofit. Frankly, this is like a non-story story, but it's fascinating because, uh, you know, in the , the rep reputable, the US Sun , and this title says no Ikea, uh, people are only just realizing what happens to the money IKEA makes, and it's blowing their minds. [00:14:32] I mean, first off, a plus on a hook title. But it's funny because there is a nonprofit involved and owner of the main entity. So IKEA is actually a nonprofit organization. So the money made from those, uh, you know, fund to assemble wardrobes, uh, you know, beyond paying is, is put away into, um, a nonprofit. And the charity's big mission is to further the advancement of interior design. [00:15:01] Nick: Novo, Novo. [00:15:03] George: uh, They're putting it out there further, the advancement of interior design. I mean, you've gotta believe in that mission, I suppose. Um, I did. I didn't have anything else here. Just I thought it was funny. [00:15:17] Nick: it's really funny. So the detail is I e Ikea store stores are franchised by a company called, Inga Holdings, which is fully owned by a nonprofit organization called Stitching Inga Foundation. Um, yeah, I , it's kind of funny. I wanna do a deep dive on this. We need like a little mini documentary on what the hell's happening, but. [00:15:45] Uh, I am willing to bet there is some criticism in the wonderful Scandinavian world about, uh, whether this is truly because people are passionate about, um, easy to assemble interior design pieces, or whether this is some kind of, uh, super duper clever, uh, tax loophole that is being taken advantage of. [00:16:09] George: Yeah, I mean, look, there's some definitive, like this is a tax play very clearly. They pay according to online mba, 33 times less taxes than the average business. The Economist, the overall setup of IKEA minimizes taxes and disclosure handsomely, rewards the founding camra Cam Prad family, and makes IKEA immune to takeover. [00:16:32] So it's interesting. That when you're saying like, this is a strategic reason, like frankly as a business owner, now you have me thinking, should a nonprofit own whole whale and suddenly we don't have to pay taxes. We have, I'm gonna go ahead and say a loftier mission then to improve, I'm sorry, I want to get it accurately to, uh, to further advance, uh, the advancement of interior. [00:17:00] Further the advancement of interior design. So I would say ours has built a healthier, more just and sustainable world as an agency. I, uh, I don't know. One of the funnier quotes here is, uh, no wonder why you gotta put everything together yourself at Al Okaya, because they rely on a bunch of volunteers to put their stuff together. [00:17:20] So, you know, they have a lot of volun, big volun. I have volunteered for Ikea on more than one occasion, [00:17:29] Nick: Volunteering on for IKEA is a, a family pastime. Um, That's funny. Here's another one for you, another light story. We're, this is a good week. There's nothing too traumatic in [00:17:42] George: I mean, just, you know, massive embezzlement, half a billion dollars of CSR stopping at Amazon. This is a good week, [00:17:49] Nick: Yeah, this is, [00:17:50] George: on [00:17:51] Nick: this is a good week for [00:17:53] George: this. Okay, you're classifying Good week on this. Okay. [00:17:55] Nick: I, you know, maybe it's just because it's sunny out. But that is a perfect segue into our next story, where one New Jersey school asked What if school was outside all the time? Every day. So New Jersey Nature schools are taking class outdoors, rain or shine. Um, and this article talks about bundled up kindergarten students at a Star Child Nature School in Medford, New Jersey, outside collecting tree sap to make glue. [00:18:28] Four handmade ornaments. So this is an immersive, you are outside, you are learning, you are one with nature type situation at this school. And that brings us to, uh, the relevant question of making, uh, the question of nature versus nurture ever. The more salient. [00:18:46] George: Wow. It's, it's all, it's all nature school here. Uh, and I know some are nonprofits, some are for-profits, but there's a number of them, and I'll call out one quote here From the South Mountain Nature School, our programs promote social and emotional development and instill confidence and foster independence. [00:19:01] Said Mary Claire Solomon. Who also in other news happens to be my sister. And so I'm incredibly proud of my sister for starting one of these nature schools, pushing through the pandemic and growing to the size that they have, uh, in New Jersey. And, you know, I get to see the, the pictures and the approach that they take in. [00:19:23] There's, you know, that question that comes up, well, what about when it snows? And it's like, you know, there's no bad weather, just bad apparel. So they, they are out there, rain or shine. I think this is a, a really healthy way for, for young people who are inevitably going to wander into the world of screen first learning and engagement and work to realize that, you know, food comes from the ground. [00:19:52] SAP is fun and it's, uh, it's great to see. I'm very proud of my sister, though. In other news, [00:20:00] Nick: That's super. George did you know that's mine, hometown, A South Mountain Reservations with in walking distance from where I grew up. [00:20:07] George: He can go over and say hi. [00:20:09] Nick: Go over, say hi. Maybe a little too old for, uh, the Nature School thing, [00:20:14] George: you could volunteer perhaps. [00:20:17] Nick: love it. All right. How about a feel good story? [00:20:21] George: Yeah. What do we. [00:20:22] Nick: This one comes from the Philadelphia Inquirer, uh, and it's about the eagle. The team, not the group, uh, thought that their Christmas album would fund a toy drive and it ended up doing so much more. So the Philadelphia Eagles of a football and. Sports fame can tell. [00:20:44] I follow football. Uh, thought that they were just raising a mere $30,000, um, for this charity toy drive, when in fact they raised [00:20:59] George: Quarter million 250,000 I believe. [00:21:02] Nick: million. Wow. Wow. Good for. [00:21:07] George: Yeah. What it's nice is also going to be funding not just one, but two toy drives and a summer camp, uh, which. Objectively I, while I respect toy drives and I like those moments, it's great to also say, what about dealing with, uh, the summer learning gap and supporting communities when, um, when you are needing a potentially even more. [00:21:29] So, uh, congratulations. Also, full disclosure here. Nick thought that this wasn't the team, the Eagles, but the band, uh, the Eagles. And it took him a couple of reads to realize that it was a fact about the sports ball. So Nick, I think we all learned something today. [00:21:49] Nick: We've learned a lot. [00:21:51] George: Have we, well, before I give you a terrible joke, I have a bit of a sponsored post here and it. A note that we are opening up our, as far as I know, we only do it once a year and it's the ad grant cohort and we're teaching. Organizations how to run the ad grant, the Google Ad grant, the thing that you get 10 K a month in in-kind ads for placing ads that drive traffic and value to your organization. [00:22:20] We're doing a five week live cohort. This isn't pre-recorded. This is hands-on and we're sharing exactly how we run this ad grant to maximize the ROI for your organization. And so we're gonna help, uh, only I think it's limited, 25 organizations. It always sells out. Registration is now open. Uh, and you can find that link in the show notes or wander around whole whale.com/university and you'll find it there. [00:22:47] Alrighty, question Nick, for you. [00:22:52] Nick: Uh oh. [00:22:53] George: Why, why did the clown donate his salary? [00:22:57] Nick: Hmm. I don't know about the clown thing, but why did the clown donate his salary? [00:23:02] George: Uh, it was a nice gesture. [00:23:05] Nick: Ah, ah, ah. [00:23:09] George: He, he laughs sometimes he doesn't know. And then we like, go off, Nick, did you actually get this one or is this gonna be the one where you like pause and you're like, I didn't get it. Explain it to [00:23:17] Nick: I, I got this one. I'm a huge Shakespeare Stan. I, I'm very familiar with a court gesture and this was, yes, but offering to explain was as well a nice gesture. Um, cuz [00:23:30] George: I just wanted to do it cause I feel like I cut off. I'm like, this would've been much funnier if he didn't understand it. He was like, I laugh, I don't get it. Alright. Thanks for humoring me and this is what you get for staying to the end of the podcast. Leave us a review. Thank you. Bye. [00:23:46] Nick: Bye.

Your Biggest Breakthrough
Episode 98: How to Hear the Voice of God on an Intimate Level with Edward John Hughes

Your Biggest Breakthrough

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 39:45


"Life can't possibly be better than walking with the Lord," says our guest Edward John Hughes. Edward John's first encounter with hearing the voice of God occurred on a soccer field while in college at Oral Roberts University. "It was as though my mother was calling me in for supper," recalls Edward John about the familiarity and comfort level he felt as he heard that still small voice.Now Edward John has mastered the art of being attuned to the Holy Spirit, so much so that even mafia bosses can sense the Lord within Edward John!Tune in to this episode to hear the story of surrender, obedience and overcoming trials to be a witness for the gospel.In this interview with Edward John, you'll learn:-Edward John's childhood and early encounters with the Lord...04:35-Hearing the voice of God on the soccer field and beyond...11:40-There's nothing to fear in walking with God on a personal level...17:05-Favor with God doesn't mean everything in this life will be perfect. Quite the opposite!...19:30-The beginning of John Edward's musical ministry goes horribly wrong...25:10-Fear is NOT the biggest obstacle to Christian's relationship with God...31:00-A vibrant relationship with God will not just happen; it requires effort to maintain...35:05-Edward John's vision for the future of his ministry...36:00Resources mentioned:Edward John's websiteGuest's bio and social handles:FacebookInstagramEdward John is an accomplished musical artist, seasoned speaker, television host and personality, creative pastor, published author, and columnist who has dedicated his life to spreading the Gospel on a global scale.Branded as “Training Souls to Win,” Edward John possesses a rare gift of captivating an audience – from leaders of nations, to everyday people. Using his strengths in music, creative leadership, outreach ministries, and media, Edward John has become an internationally recognized and sought-after Christian minister. He has served both large and small groups in venues, churches, conferences, seminars, and on TV programs worldwide.Born in Oslo, Norway to Scottish and Norwegian parents, Edward John journeyed to the United States of America at sixteen to attend school on a sports scholarship. While passionately pursuing a professional career in soccer, Edward John had an encounter with God during a soccer match. He knew God was calling him into a life of ministry.A graduate of Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Edward John majored in Film & Television Production, receiving his Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Journalism. His DVD series Fearless Living and Real Living have been featured on various international television shows.Edward John is the visionary and host of the primetime Christian program Scandinavian Liv, currently aired in Norway and Sweden on Kanal 10. Also, in production is an English version, soon to be viewed in Asia, the Middle East, India, Germany, and Sri Lanka. Scandinavia Live engages culture with the Gospel – inspiring, influencing, and impacting the Scandinavian culture by introducing God's principles through testimonies, discussions, and real-life stories. The show aims to help viewers awaken to their best selves in God and discover a deeper connection to the world around them, while seeking and putting God first in their lives. Scandinavia Live features exclusive interviews and conversations between Edward John and top thinkers, authors, filmmakers, artists, spiritual leaders, etc. It explores themes and issues including purpose,...

Historiansplaining: A historian tells you why everything you know is wrong
The Vikings, pt. 1 -- In the Norsemen's World

Historiansplaining: A historian tells you why everything you know is wrong

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 110:27


We have all seen images of axe-wielding Vikings raining destruction upon the shores of medieval Europe -- but who were these berserking Norsemen and where did they come from? What society produced them? How did the Scandinavians of the Viking age understand the world and their place in it? We examine the Norsemen's complex and mysterious cosmos described in the poems and prophesies of the Eddas, and compare it to the realities of survival, trade, kingship, politics, warfare, art, gender, and the family in Scandinavia from the eight to eleventh centuries, as reconstructed from surviving documents and the latest archaeology. Image: top section of the Hunninge picture stone, island of Gotland, Sweden, 8th century. Music: "In the Hall of the Mountain King," from Peer Gynt suite, composed by Edvard Grieg, performed by Czech National Symphony Orchestra, published by Musopen. Suggested further readings: Neil Price, "Children of Ash and Elm"; Else Roesdahl, "The Vikings" Please sign up as a patron to hear all patron-only materials, including "Myth of the Month 20: Conspiracy Theories" -- https://www.patreon.com/user?u=5530632

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 106: Post Lean with Frode Odegaard

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 43:56


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is "Post Lean." Our guest is Frode Odegaard, Chairman and CEO at the Post-Industrial Institute (https://post-industrial.institute/). In this conversation, we talk about the post-industrial enterprise going beyond digital and higher-order organizations. If you like this show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/). If you like this episode, you might also like Episode 102 on Lean Manufacturing with Michel Baudin (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/102). Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim (https://trondundheim.com/) and presented by Tulip (https://tulip.co/). Follow the podcast on Twitter (https://twitter.com/AugmentedPod) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/75424477/). Trond's Takeaway: Lean is a fundamental perspective on human organizations, but clearly, there were things not foreseen in the lean paradigm, both in terms of human and in terms of machine behavior. What are those things? How do they evolve? We have to start speculating now; otherwise, we will be unprepared for the future. One of the true questions is job stability. Will the assumptions made by early factory jobs ever become true again? And if not, how do you retain motivation in a workforce that's transient? Will future organizational forms perfect this task? Transcript: TROND: Welcome to another episode of the Augmented Podcast. Augmented brings industrial conversations that matter, serving up the most relevant conversations on industrial tech. Our vision is a world where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is Post Lean. Our guest is Frode Odegard, Chairman and CEO at the Post-Industrial Institute. In this conversation, we talk about the post-industrial enterprise going beyond digital and higher-order organizations. Augmented is a podcast for industrial leaders, process engineers, and for shop floor operators hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim and presented by Tulip. Frode, welcome to Augmented. How are you? FRODE: Pretty good. TROND: Yeah. Well, look, talking to Norwegians living abroad that's become a sport of mine. You were born in Norway, software design from there, became an entrepreneur, moved to Silicon Valley. I also know you have an Aikido black belt; we talked about this. This could have become its own podcast, right? There's a long story here. FRODE: [laughs] Absolutely, yeah. TROND: But you're also the CEO of the Post-Industrial Institute, which I guess used to be called the Post-Lean Institute. But in any case, there's a big connection here to lean, which is a global community for leaders that are driving transition towards something post-lean, post-industrial, post-something. So with that context, tell me a little about your background and how you ended up doing what you're doing. FRODE: Born in Norway, as you pointed out. My folks had a process control company, so that was kind of the industry I was born into was industrial controls, which included visiting factories as a child and installing process control systems. So I was doing, you know, circuit board assembly at age eight because when you grow up in a family business, that's what you get to do. And I quickly gravitated towards software. I think I was 13 when I was working on my first compiler. So my first passion was really programming and language, design, implementation, and that sort of got me interested in theoretical computer science. So very far from what I do today, in some ways, but I think theoretical computer science, especially as a software architecture and all that, teaches you how to think and sort of connect the dots, and that's a good life skill. At 17, I started a software company in high school. And when I was 22, I immigrated to the United States after some trips here. I was on a Standards Committee. I was on the Sun User Group board of directors as a European representative. It was a weird story in itself, how that happened. So yeah, 1990, 1991, I'm in Silicon Valley. TROND: So you jumped ship, essentially. Because, I mean, I've heard a lot of people who come to the U.S. and are inspired, but you just basically jumped off the airplane. FRODE: Yeah, I like to say I was here as an entrepreneurial refugee. Things are different now in Norway, but for a long time, they had strange taxation rules, and very difficult to start companies and scale them. But also, they didn't really have the fancy French word. They didn't really have the milieu. They didn't have a community of people trying to build companies in tech. So tech was very much focused on either military applications, that was its own little industry and community, or the energy industry, the oil industry in particular. TROND: All of that seems to have changed quite a bit. I mean, not that you or I, I guess, are experts on that. As ex-pats, we're outside, so we're looking in, which is a whole other story, I guess. But I'm curious about one more thing in your background so Aikido, which, to me, is endlessly fascinating, perhaps because I only ever attended one Aikido training and, for some reason, decided I wasn't going to do it that year, and then I didn't get back to it. But the little I understand of Aikido it has this very interesting principle of using the opponent's force instead of attacking. That's at least what some people conceptualize around it. But you told me something different. You said there are several schools of Aikido, and one of them is slightly more aggressive, and you belong to that school. I found that quite interesting. FRODE: [laughs] Now I'm wondering about my own depiction of this, but the Aikido that I study is known as Iwama-style Aikido, and it's called that because there was an old town in Japan, which has been absorbed by a neighboring city now, but it was called Iwama, and that's where the founder of Aikido moved during the Second World War, and that's where he sort of completed the art. And that's a long technical story, but he included a fairly large weapons curriculum as well. So it's not just unarmed techniques; it's sword-knife stuff. And it's a really beautiful art in that all of the movements with or without weapons are the same, like, they will follow the same principles. In terms of not attacking, of course, on a philosophical level, it calls itself the art of peace. In a practical sense, you can use it offensively to, for example, if you have someone who is grabbing your child or something like that, this person is not attacking you, but you have to step in and address the situation, and you can use it offensively for sure. TROND: Very interesting. I was going to jump straight to what you're up to now, then, which is, I guess, charting this path towards a different kind of industrial enterprise. And you said that you earlier called your efforts post-lean, and now you're calling them post-industrial. It's this continuity in industry, Frode. Tell me a little bit more about that. FRODE: I think a good way to think about approaches to management and understanding the world around us is that various management practices, and philosophies, and ideas, and so on, have been developed in response to circumstances that were there at the time. So if you think about Frederick Taylor and the problems that he was trying to solve, they initially had a lot to do with just getting work organized and standardized. And then, in 1930s, you start seeing the use of statistical methods. Then you start seeing more of an interest in the psychology of work and so on. And lean kind of melts all of these things together. A great contribution from Toyota is you have a socio-technical system and organizational design where you have a new kind of culture that emphasizes continuous learning, continuous problem solving using some of these ideas and tools that were developed much earlier. Now, in the post-war years, what we see is information technology making business more scalable, also contributing to complexity, but certainly making large companies more scalable than they would have been otherwise. And what we see in the mid-1990s leading up to the mid-2000s is the commercial internet, and then we get smartphones. That's the beginning of a new kind of industrial landscape. And what we see then is instead of an increasing tendency towards centralization in firms and business models, you start seeing this decoupling and decentralization. And what I discovered was that's actually a new thing for the human species. Ever since the invention of agriculture 10,000 years ago and then cities in the Bronze Age a little over 5,000 years ago, and then the industrial revolutions, we've seen a culmination of improved mastery of the world, adapting the world to our needs, which is technology and increasing centralization. You had to move to where the work was, and now we're sort of coming out of the pandemic (Let's hope it doesn't come back.) that has accelerated in the pandemic, so you have this decentralization, decoupling. And this continuity and the way I started using the term post-lean, and we can jump back and forth as you'd like, it was just because a lot of the assumptions behind the lean practices and how those practices were implemented were based on the idea that you had organizations that lasted a long time. You had long employee tenures. You had a certain kind of a...I don't like this term, but a social contract between the firm and workers and managers and workers. And they would come and do their work on-site in person at the factory, and this world is kind of disappearing now. And so there's all of this work now being done. I think manufacturing labor forces peaked at a third of the workforce some decades ago. But now it's down to about 11%, even though manufacturing as a share of the economy has remained fairly constant since the 1940s. It's gotten more productive. So there are also all these new jobs that have been created with people doing different kinds of work, and much of that work is knowledge work. And a lot of these industrial-era management practices and ideas have to be changed for knowledge work. And so that was sort of my initial discovery. That happened in the early 2000s. I started a company in 2004, which was called initially Lean Software Institute. I wanted to basically take these ideas and adapt them to software development. And that was generalized for knowledge work in general. And because we have big clients like Lockheed Martin in the aerospace defense sector, we rebranded the company to the Lean Systems Institute. And so for ten years, myself and a small team, we did organizational redesign work looking at not just workflow but also a bunch of these other factors, which we can talk about, that you have to take into consideration like knowledge management and so on. And then it was about 2014, 2015, when I discovered, hey, even though we kind of extended lean to look at all these other things, there's this decentralization happening. And maybe we should fundamentally revisit what firms should look like and how the external landscape outside the organization changes the way we think about designing companies. TROND: Yeah. I found it interesting, obviously, that you started from the software angle. And you told me earlier that, in some ways, your kind of Lean efforts are almost in parallel to, I guess, what could be called the lean movement, although there's such a variety of lean practitioners out there. They're obviously not all in the manufacturing industry. That's the whole point. Toyota managed to inspire a whole host of other companies that had nothing to do with automotive and nothing to do even with any kind of basic manufacturing. And I guess the software industry is no different; you know, the industry as such was inspired by it. And as you said, Lockheed Martin, and perhaps not only for their manufacturing side, were inspired by it when running their software or other types of maybe even office-based knowledge work. So as you're coming to these realizations, what sorts of things is it that you then start to think about that are the same and that are different in terms of the classic assumptions of lean, as you know, reducing waste or improving a process in a specific way with all the assumptions, so stable labor force like you said. FRODE: In that initial period from 2004 to 2014, that's when I really worked on adapting lean to knowledge work. And so you could see some people were trying to reduce knowledge work to kind of a simplified version of itself. They were trying...and so I call that the reductionist approach where they then could count documents as inventory, and they could have a Kanban system and all of that. And the agile movement in software became very enthused about doing just that. And I think what we did was we went the opposite route, so we took an expansionist approach. So we said, well, we got to keep adding practices and models to the original lean to deal with not just the value stream architecture of an organization but also its structure, so organization architecture, how it manages information, and the shape of that information, where it's stored, and how it's designed. And it's also that's information architecture. And, of course, what we know from wonderful people like Melvin Conway, who discovered that there's a direct relationship between your technology architecture and the shape of the organization, is we really need to also take into consideration what we then called product architecture. Because if your product architecture, and your organization architecture, and your workflow, your value stream architecture is mismatched in product development as well as in manufacturing, that leads to huge misalignment. And that's a cause of massive inventory problems and so on. And then the last of the five dimensions that we have in this model, which we call the lean systems framework, was a way to look at an organization's culture. So there are values that you explicitly promote, so we call them the organizational ideals. And then you have the actual behaviors that don't always live up to the ideals. And then you have people's beliefs about the past, the present, and the future, so we call all of that social architecture. And I think the last bit of work we did in this model, which is a pretty rich model or a metamodel of organizations, is we added the way to look at leadership styles and leadership effectiveness as a function of character and competence of perceived effectiveness. So this was used in a bunch of mostly large organizations over a period of 10 years, and Lockheed was able to get a 72, 73 production in lead time, largest subcontractor in the Future Combat Systems. I think that's the biggest defense project in the history of the United States. [laughs] It was canceled by Congress in the end, but yeah, they got some great results. And a lot of that was because workflow bottlenecks were caused by these other problems in these other four dimensions that had to be addressed, so that was kind of our initial realization. And then there's that big break where we look at decentralization, and how is that causing us to revisit the assumptions about organizational design? So it's not like we get new dimensions of organizational design as much as starting to think about what's the ideal design. And those answers turn out to be very different than they have been up till now. TROND: So that's interesting. So both...you were kind of discovering some...maybe not weaknesses, just, you know, some social change that was happening that is affecting organizations nowadays, you know, in America or anywhere else trying to implement lean principles. But also, what you were saying about the agile movement and what's happening in software industrial organizations that it doesn't reflect what needs to be happening in industries across the board and perhaps not even in their own organizations because it is, I guess, if I paraphrase you a little bit, the agile principles they are very valid for achieving a very smooth software development process. But they're not so valid for a lot of other aspects having to do with social and organizational phenomena that you also need to take into account eventually. So, I mean, if that's correct, it's interesting, right? Because everybody obviously focuses on what they are doing. So the agilists, I guess, they're optimizing a software development process. The lean folks, the classic lean folks, are optimizing a production line. But today's knowledge work is, I guess, over these years also, Frode, it has changed a bit. FRODE: It has changed, and there is more machine systems, software systems. We have more tools, although we're still in the early stages of what's going to come with the use of AI to make knowledge work more productive and so on. But I think one thing that's important, because I don't want to throw anyone under the bus here, is practitioners. There's a lot to be learned from practitioners. Often, they're kind of apologetic, "Oh, I'm not doing the pure X, Y, Z method. We have to adapt it a little bit." Well, guess what? That's what Toyota did. And so what happened is a lot of western companies they were just trying to copy what Toyota did without understanding why those things work there. And it's when you can adopt it, so that's also sort of martial arts. -- TROND: That's actually a fantastic point, Frode, because if you're very, very diehard lean, some people would say, "Well, lean is whatever Toyota does." But on the other hand, for Toyota, lean is whatever Toyota does, right? And it seems to have worked for them. That does not even mean that Toyota would tell you to do exactly what they are doing because they will tell you what makes sense for your organization. In a nutshell, that seems to be – FRODE: And I was there. I mean, I was, you know, I remember one time I was really thinking about standardizing work. And I was reading about the history of all this and reading about Frederick Taylor and the very early days of all of this. And I was coming up with a checklist for housework. I was trying to implement standard work for housework. And guess what? It didn't really work. My girlfriend was upset. [laughter] TROND: Implementing standards for housework. I like it. FRODE: Yeah. I mean, if you see something that needs to be cleaned, just clean it. I was like, "No, no, we need a checklist. We need your exit and entry conditions." [laughter] TROND: You should work at ISS, you know, the big cleaning professionals company. FRODE: There you go. And people have done that, right? But I like to tell this joke about how do you know the difference between a terrorist and a methodologist? And the answer is you can negotiate with a terrorist. TROND: Yeah, that's right. FRODE: So the methodologist believes that his or her methodology is the answer to all things. And so what we were trying to do with the Lean Systems Framework was not to say, "Ah, you know, all this lean stuff is invalid." We were trying to say, "Well, the methods that they had and the practices that they had that were available to us via the literature...because we never went to visit Toyota. We talked to a bunch of companies that were doing a lot of these things, and we were familiar with the literature. But we realized there's a whole bunch of other things that are not being addressed, so we have to add those. And that's why I called it the expansionist approach as opposed to the folks taking the reductionist approach, which is we have to shoehorn everything into making it look like manufacturing. But, you know, product development is not manufacturing. And Toyota's product development practices look nothing like their manufacturing processes. It's completely different. And that's a much less well-known area of lean...although the Lean Enterprise Institute has published good stuff on this book. Lean product development is completely different from lean production. And that was not as well-known and certainly not known by the people in the agile world. Our attitude was always, well, the circumstances change or even from one company to another, the tools might have to change. And so the skill you want to develop in our case as researchers, and advisors, and teachers, or in the case of practitioners, as leaders, or implementers, is keep learning about what other people are doing and what works for them and try to understand what the deeper principles are that you then use to construct a solution that's appropriate for that situation. That's really all it is. TROND: That's fabulous. So tell me then, apart from Lockheed Martin, what are some of the other organizations that you've worked with? How have they thought about these things? I mean, how does your community work? Is it essentially, I mean, before COVID at least, you met, and you discuss these things, and you sort of reflect on how they show up in your organizations and discuss best practices. Or do you kind of write papers together? How does this knowledge evolve in your approach? FRODE: It's important to point out here, like in the history of the company, which has been around now for (I'm feeling old.) 18 years, so after the first ten years, there was a big break because that's when we started working on okay, well, what comes after even the expansionist version of lean that we were doing, which was called the Lean Systems Framework? And that's when we started working on all of this post-lean stuff. And so the companies we worked with in the first decade were the likes of AT&T, and Sony, and Lockheed, and Honeywell, and mostly large companies, a few smaller ones too. But they had a lot of problems with complexity. And often, they were doing a combination of hardware and software. And they were in industries that had a lot of complexity. So in 2014, 2015, there was a big shift where I'd spent about six months to a year reading, talking to a bunch of people, trying to come up with what was going to be the next new thing. And that was kind of the journey for me as a founder as well because I felt like I'd done all this organizational redesign work, soup to nuts. And it wasn't just Kaizen. We did Kaikaku, which is much less known in the lean world, and that's radical redesign, basically. And we did this working on a board C-level with a lot of companies. TROND: Tell me more about Kaikaku. Because, like you said, it's not a vernacular that's really well-known outside of the inner circle of lean, I guess. FRODE: Yeah. So Kaikaku is where you look at an organization, and basically, instead of thinking about how do we put in mechanisms to start improving it incrementally, you say, "Well, there's so much low-hanging fruit here. And there's a breakthrough needed in a very short time. And we're just going to put together a design team, basically, a joint design team, and essentially redesign the whole thing and implement it. So it is a radical redesign. It hasn't been; at least, at the time we were doing it, there were not a lot of details available in the literature. And you heard stories like Ohno-san would walk into a factory and just say, "Well, this is completely unacceptable. Move this machine over here, and this machine over here. And can't you guys see..." So we didn't do it that way. We didn't tell the clients what the answer should be. We taught them. We had the executive spend a week with us learning about the Lean Systems Framework, and they mapped out the organization they had. And then, basically, we facilitated them through a process that could take sometimes a few weeks designing the organization the way it should be. And then there was an implementation project, and they put it in place, so... TROND: But Kaikaku basically is a bit more drastic than Kaizen. FRODE: Very much so. TROND: Yeah. So it's like a discontinuous sort of break. It's not necessarily that you tell people to do things differently, but you make it clear that things have to be different maybe in your own way. But you're certainly not going for continuous improvement without any kind of disruption. There will be disruption in Kaikaku. FRODE: I mean, it is disruption. And if you think of the Fremont Factory Toyota took over, that was a reboot. [laughs] And so now -- TROND: Right. So it's almost as if that's where you can use the software analogy because you're essentially rebooting a system. And rebooting, of course, you sometimes you're still stuck with the same system, but you are rebooting it. So you're presumably getting the original characteristics back. FRODE: So I think of it as sort of a reconfiguration. And in the case of the Fremont factory, of course, there were a bunch of people who were there before who were hired back but also some that weren't that we tend now to avoid just because the knowledge people had was valuable. And in most cases, the issue wasn't that people were malicious or completely incompetent. It was just that the design of the organization was just so wrong in so many ways. [laughs] And what we had to do, it was more of a gradual reboot in the sense that you had to keep the existing organization running. It had customers. It had obligations. And so it wasn't a shutdown of the factory, the proverbial factory, it wasn't that. But yeah, after I started looking at the effects of decentralization and starting to question these assumptions behind lean practices the way they had appeared in the mainstream, that was around the time, early 2015, I started to use the term post-lean. It wasn't because I thought I had all the answers yet or certainly, and still, I don't think I do. But it was clear that there was an inheritance from lean thinking in terms of engaging people in the organization to do things better. But the definition of better I thought would change, and the methods I thought would change. And the assumptions behind the methods, such as long-lasting organizations, long employee tenures, tight coupling between people in organizations, organizations taking a long time to grow to a large size, and human problem solving, which already was being eaten by software back then or elevated, I should say, by software, all of these assumptions needed to be revisited so... TROND: They did. But I have to say, what a gutsy kind of concept to call it post-lean. I mean, I co-wrote a book this year, and we're calling things Augmented Lean for the specific reason maybe that we actually agree with you that there are some things of lean that are really still relevant but also because it takes an enormous confidence, almost a hubris, to announce something post a very, very successful management principle. FRODE: It was the theoretical computer scientist in me. TROND: [laughs] FRODE: So I thought that surely from first principles, we could figure this out and not that it would be the same answer in every situation. But I think it was also, at that point, we had a decade of field experience behind us in doing customized organizational redesign with clients in many different industries. So we knew already that the answer wasn't going to be the same every time. And in a lot of the lean Literature, the assumption was that you weren't really going to dramatically change the organizational structure, for example, which we had a lot of experience with doing. And we already had experience with teams of teams, and just-in-time changes, and reconfigurations, and so on because we thought of organizations the way software people think of organizations which are, you know, they're computational objects that have humans, and then there are social, technical objects. And they're reconfigurable. And I think if you grew up in a manufacturing world, the shape of the organization is sort of attached to... there are physical buildings and equipment and all of that. So -- TROND: And this is so essential to discuss, Frode, because you're so right. And that's a real thing. And that's something we write about in our book as well. There is a very real sense that I think, honestly, the whole manufacturing sector but certainly the first automation efforts and, indeed, a lot of the digital efforts that have been implemented in manufacturing they took for granted that we cannot change this fact that we have infrastructure. We have people; we have machines; we have factories; we have shop floors. All of these things are fixed. Now we just got to figure out how to fit the humans in between, which is how they then interpreted waste, being let's reduce the physical waste so that humans can move around. But really, the overall paradigm seems to have been, and you correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems to have been that the machines and the infrastructure was given, and the humans were the ones that had to adapt and reduce all this waste. And no one considered for a second that it could be that the machines were actually wasteful themselves [laughs] or put in the wrong place or in the wrong order or sequence or whatever you have. But with other types of organizations, this is obviously much easier to see it and much easier to change, I mean, also. FRODE: Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And software is an example of this because now we take for granted that a large percentage of the population works from home and don't want to go back. But if you are part of that 10%, 11% of the population working in a factory and you have to show up at the factory because that's where the machine is that goes ding, that, you know, [laughs] it's not work that requires only a low level of education of course. That hasn't been the case for a while. And these are people with master's degrees. And they're making sure all of this equipment runs. This is fancy equipment. So what we learned in that 10-year period was this is not just about workflow. It's a five-dimensional model, so there's workflow, organization structure, and knowledge management, the technology, architecture, the product you're making, and the culture. And all of these are five axes if you will, So 5D coordinate system and you can reconfigure. You can make organizations into anything you want. Now, the right answer might be different in different industries at different lifecycle stages of companies. And basically, our thinking was that we weren't going to just teach our clients or even help our clients. We certainly weren't going to just tell them the answer because I always thought that was a terrible idea. We were going to help them redesign themselves for their emerging landscape, their emerging situation, but also help them think about things, or learn to think about these things in general, so that if their landscape changed again, or if they merged with another company, then they had the thinking skills, and they understood what these different dimensions were to be able to redesign themselves again. TROND: That makes a lot of sense. FRODE: That's kind of the whole – TROND: I just want to insert here one thing that happened throughout, well, I mean, it was before your time, I guess. But remember, in the '70s, there was this concept among futurists, Toffler, and others that, oh, we are moving into a service economy. Manufacturing the real value now is in services. Well, that was a short-lasting fad, right? I mean, turns out we are still producing things. We're making things, and even the decentralization that you're talking about is not the end of the production economy. You produce, and you are, I mean, human beings produce. FRODE: No, I never thought that we would see the end of manufacturing. And the term post-industrial, he was not the person that coined it, I think. It was coined 10 or 20 years earlier. But there's a book by Daniel Bell, which is called The Coming of Post-industrial Society, where he talks about both the sociological challenges and the changes in the economy moving to a more service-based knowledge-based economy. Of course, what happened is manufacturing itself became more knowledge-based, but that was kind of the whole idea of what Toyota was doing. MID-ROLL AD: In the new book from Wiley, Augmented Lean: A Human-Centric Framework for Managing Frontline Operations, serial startup founder Dr. Natan Linder and futurist podcaster Dr. Trond Arne Undheim deliver an urgent and incisive exploration of when, how, and why to augment your workforce with technology, and how to do it in a way that scales, maintains innovation, and allows the organization to thrive. The key thing is to prioritize humans over machines. Here's what Klaus Schwab, Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum, says about the book: "Augmented Lean is an important puzzle piece in the fourth industrial revolution." Find out more on www.augmentedlean.com, and pick up the book in a bookstore near you. TROND: So, Frode, tell me a little bit about the future outlook. What are we looking at here in the lean post-industrial world? What will factories look like? What is knowledge work going to look like? FRODE: Yeah, so I think what we're going to see is that companies that do manufacturing are slowly but surely going to start to look like other kinds of companies or companies that do knowledge work. The content of manufacturing work has become more and more filled with knowledge work already. That's a process that's been going on for decades. As manufacturing technology improves, I think after many, many generations of new technology platforms, we are going to end up in a world where basically any product that you order is going to be either printed atom by atom in your home or in a microfactory, if it's a big bulky thing, in your neighborhood where you can rent capacity in a just-in-time basis. That's not going to happen overnight. This is going to take a few decades. But you can easily see how this kind of mirrors what happened to old chains like Kinko's and so on where if you needed something to be printed, I mean, I remember there were printers. [laughs] And then you had to go to the equivalent of a Kinko's, and you could, you know, if you wanted to print 100 copies of a manual back in the day when we still did that, you could get that done, and that was surely more efficient than doing it at home. And in your home office or at your office, you would have a laser printer. And now we have a $99 inkjet printer, or you just might get it included when you order your laptop, or you may not even care anymore because you have a tablet, and you're just looking at it on the tablet. So there's this phenomenon of some of the things getting smaller and almost disappearing. Now what has happened...this was underway for a while, but the relationship between people and companies has increasingly become more loosely coupled. So a big part of the post-industrial transition is that individuals are empowered, and organizations now become more of a means. They're not institutions that are supposed to last for a long time. I think that ideal is fading. And so they're in a means to an end to produce economic value. And every investor will agree it's just that they're going to be much more reconfigurable, a lot of management work. There's managing resources, tracking progress, tracking inventory, communicating with customers. A lot of that stuff is going to be eaten by software and powered by AI. That doesn't mean people go away. But I think that a lot of the repetitive management administrative work, much more than we can imagine today, will be eaten by software and AIs. TROND: But one of the consequences of that surely, Frode, is somewhat risky because there was a certain safety in the bureaucracy of any large organization, whether government or private, because you knew that, yes, they might be somewhat stiflingly and boring, I guess, or predictable, whatever you might want to call it, but at least they were around, and you could count on them being around. And if you wanted to know what approach was being applied, if you had experienced it once, you knew it. And if you were a government, you knew that this is the GE Way or this is the whatever way, and it was stable. But what you're charting here is something where the only stability might be in the configuration of machines but even that, of course, you know, evolves really rapidly. And even the algorithms and the AIs and whatever is put into the system will evolve. And then, the humans will move around between different organizational units a little quicker than before. So where do you control [laughs] what's happening here? FRODE: So one of the things to keep in mind...I'll answer this from a technical perspective but also from a sociological perspective. So I'll take the latter first. So we are used to a world of hierarchies. So from the invention of agriculture, that's when silos were invented. The first organizational silos were actually centered around corn silos [laughs] and so a shared resource, right? And we need governance for that, you know, who gets the corn and how much your family's already had enough this week and so on. And then, in the Bronze Age, you see more specialization of labor and more hierarchies. So the pyramids were built by determined organizations. [laughs] so just like Melvin Conway would tell us. And the same happened with The Industrial Revolution. So you had management; you had oversight. And then as we are thinking about this matured, you know, we developed this notion of organizational values. So that had to do with the day-to-day behavior so people, including managers, and how they should treat their people and what the employee experience should be like. And then kind of management is about organizing people or organizing people and resources to pursue short or long-term objectives. So, what happens if the AI goes crazy? What happens if there's a bug in the software if there is a flaw? On the technical side of this, what I would say is just like we have people who are concerned about safety with robots, industrial robots in factories, you're going to have people who look at the same kind of thing in organizations. You're also going to have AI watching AIs. So you're going to have a lot of software mechanisms that are there for safety. People also have the option to leave. The threshold for quitting your job now and you log out from your current employer if you're sitting in your home in the Caribbean somewhere [laughs] because you can live wherever you want and logging in somewhere else and taking a job, that threshold is lower than ever. So organizations have an incentive to treat their people well. TROND: Well, the interesting thing, though, is that Silicon Valley has been like that for years. I mean, that was the joke about Silicon Valley that you changed your job faster than you changed your parking space. FRODE: [laughs] TROND: Because your parking space is like really valued territory. It's like, okay, here's where I park. But you might go into a different part of the office building or in a different office building. So this has been part of some part of high tech for the industry for a while. But now I guess you're saying it's becoming globalized and generalized. FRODE: Yeah. And part of it it's the nature of those kinds of jobs, you know, of doing knowledge work that's where you're not tied to equipment or location as much. Now, of course, in Silicon Valley, you've had people go back and forth about, and not just here but in other innovation hubs too, about the importance of being together in the room. You're doing brainstorming. You are talking to potential customers. You're prototyping things with Post-it Notes. People have to be there. And I think there's an added incentive because of the pandemic and people wanting to work from home more to develop better collaboration tools than Post-it Notes on whiteboards. But the last data we have on this is pre-pandemic, so I can't tell you exactly what they are today. But the employee tenures for startups in Silicon Valley when we looked last was 10.8 months average tenure. And for the larger tech companies, you know, the Apples and the Googles and so on, was a little bit more than two years so between two and three years, basically. And so because more jobs in the economy are moving into that category of job where there's a lower threshold for switching, and there's a high demand for people who can do knowledge work, you're going to see average employee tenders going down just like average organization lifespans have been going down because of innovation. TROND: Which presumably, Frode, also means that productivity has to go up because you have to ramp up these people really fast. So your incentive is Frode started yesterday. He's already contributing to a sprint today, and on Thursday, he is launching a product with his team. Because otherwise, I mean, these are expensive workers, and they're only going to be around for a year. When is your first innovation? FRODE: It depends on where the company focuses its innovation. And this will not be the common case, but let's say that you are developing a whole new kind of computing device and a whole new operating system that's going to be very different. You have to learn about everything that's been done so far, and it takes a lot to get started. If what you are doing is more sort of applied, so you're developing apps to be used internally in an insurance company, and you're an app developer, and you know all of the same platforms and tools that they're already using because that was one of the criteria for getting the job, yeah, then you ramp up time is going to be much shorter. All of these companies they will accept the fact, have had to accept the fact, that people just don't stay as long in their jobs. That also gives some added incentive to get them up and running quickly and to be good to people. And I think that's good. I think it's nice that employers have to compete for talent. They have to have to treat their people well. I think it's a much better solution than unions, where you would basically try to have a stranglehold on employers on behalf of all the workers. And the less commoditized work is, the less standardized the work is in that sense. The less business models like those of unions, whether they're voluntarily or involuntarily, because the government sort of makes it easier for them to set up that relationship and sort themselves. The thing that surprised me is that now and as we're coming out of COVID, unions in the United States are making somewhat of a comeback. And I'm sort of scratching my head. Maybe this means that there are a lot of companies where they have scaled because of IT, Amazon being an example. They wouldn't have been able to scale the way they have without information technology. But they haven't yet gotten to the point where they have automated a bunch of these jobs. So they've hired so many people doing soul-sucking repetitive work, and they're doing their best to treat them well. But the whole mentality of the people who have designed this part of the organization is very Taylorist. And so people are complaining, and they're having mental health problems and so on. And then yeah, then there's going to be room for someone to come and say, "Well, hey, we can do a better job negotiating for you." But gradually, over time, fewer and fewer jobs will be like that. One of the sort of interesting aspects of the post-industrial transition is that you have industries...well, some industries, like online retail on the historical scales, is still a young industry. But you have industries that when IT was young, you know, I think the oldest software company in the U.S. was started in 1958. So in the aftermath of that, when you started seeing software on mainframes and so on, what software made possible was scaling up management operations for companies. So they made them more scalable. You could open more plants. You could open more offices, whether it was manufacturing or service businesses. And this happened before people started using software to automate tasks, which is a more advanced use. And the more complex the job is, and the more dexterity is required, physically moving things, the higher the R&D investment is required to automate those jobs. The technology that's involved in that is going to become commoditized. And it's going to spread. And so what you're going to see is even though more people have been hired to do those kinds of jobs because the management operations have scaled, fewer people are going to be needed in the next 10-20 years because the R&D investment is going to pay off for automating all of those tasks. And so then we're going to get back to eventually...I like to think of Amazon as just like it's a layer in the business stack or technology stack. So if I need something shipped from A to B or I need to have some sort of a virtual shopping facility, [laughs] I'm not going to reinvent Amazon, but Amazon has to become more efficient. And so the way they become more efficient is drone delivery of packages and then just-in-time production. And then, they take over everything except for the physical specifications for the product to be manufactured. TROND: It's interesting you say that because I guess if you are Amazon right now, you're thinking of yourself in much wider terms than you just said. But what I'm thinking, Frode is that I'm finding your resident Scandinavian. I'm seeing your Scandinavianhood here. The way you talk about meaningful work, and knowledge work, and how workers should have dignity and companies should treat people well, I found that very interesting. And I think if that aspect of the Scandinavian workplace was to start to be reflected globally, that would be a good thing. There are some other aspects perhaps in Scandinavia which you left behind, and I left behind, that we perhaps should take more inspiration from many other places in the world that have done far better in terms of either manufacturing, or knowledge work, or innovation, or many other things. But that aspect, you know -- FRODE: It's a big discussion itself. I mean, I was kind of a philosophical refugee from Norway. I was a tech-oriented, free-market person. I didn't like unions. I didn't like the government. TROND: [laughs] FRODE: But at the same time, that didn't mean I thought that people should not be treated well that worked into the ground. I thought people should just have healthy voluntary sort of collaborative relationships in business or otherwise. And I've seen technology as a means of making that happen. And I have no sympathy with employers that have trouble with employees because they treat people like crap. I think it's well deserved. But I also have no sympathy with unions that are strong-arming employers. TROND: You have just listened to another episode of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was Post Lean, and our guest was Frode Odegard, Chairman, and CEO at the Post-Industrial Institute. In this conversation, we talked about the post-industrial enterprise. My takeaway is that lean is a fundamental perspective on human organizations, but clearly, there were things not foreseen in the lean paradigm, both in terms of human and in terms of machine behavior. What are those things? How do they evolve? We have to start speculating now; otherwise, we will be unprepared for the future. One of the true questions is job stability. Will the assumptions made by early factory jobs ever become true again? And if not, how do you retain motivation in a workforce that's transient? Will future organizational forms perfect this task? Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. And if you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 102 on Lean Manufacturing with Michel Baudin. Hopefully, you'll find something awesome in these or in other episodes, and if so, do let us know by messaging us; we would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. The Augmented Podcast is created in association with Tulip, the frontline operation platform that connects people, machines, devices, and systems in a production or logistics process in a physical location. Tulip is democratizing technology and empowering those closest to operations to solve problems. Tulip is also hiring, and you can find Tulip at tulip.co. Please go ahead and share this show with colleagues who care about where industrial tech is heading. To find us on social media is easy; we are Augmented Pod on LinkedIn and Twitter and Augmented Podcast on Facebook and YouTube. Augmented — industrial conversations that matter. See you next time. Special Guest: Frode Odegaard.

Anglo-Saxon England
King Alfred, before He was Great

Anglo-Saxon England

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 30:30


It's probably no exaggeration to say the Alfred the Great is one of the most, if not the most, famous Anglo-Saxon of them all. The only British monarch given the epithet ‘the Great', the traditional account of his life is one of a scholar forced into the role of a war leader who defied the odds to save and unite not just his people, but all the English. Indeed, Alfred is usually cast as the man who saved England, without whom all of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms would have fallen to Scandinavian invasion. However, it is not just for his military successes that Alfred is remembered. He was also celebrated as a wise king who cared deeply for law, religion, and learning. The revival of Latin and Old English learning that is called by scholars the ‘Alfredian Renaissance' is usually attributed to Alfred's vision of a just and pious English nation which he sought to realise by gathering to himself the learned man of Britain, Ireland, and the Continent. It is important to be wary, though, of mythmaking and the ‘great man' interpretation of history. While Alfred was without question a great leader, we must take a step back and look at his life with dispassionate eyes so that we can cut through the layers of legend to reach the core of the man who saved England. Credits –  Music: 'Wælheall' by Hrōðmund Wōdening https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQfdqIyqJ4g&list=LL&index=5&ab_channel=Hr%C5%8D%C3%B0mundW%C5%8Ddening Social Media -  Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/anglosaxonengland Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Anglo-Saxon-England-Podcast-110529958048053 Twitter: https://twitter.com/EnglandAnglo Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/anglosaxonenglandpodcast/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzyGUvYZCstptNQeWTwfQuA  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Letters From A 2020 Senior
Life in Denmark

Letters From A 2020 Senior

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 30:45


Kelsey spent this fall studying abroad in Copenhagen and had an amazing time creating memories, going on adventures, traveling through Europe, and falling in love with a new city. In this episode, Kelsey discusses what life was like in Denmark and the differences between American and Scandinavian life including politics, fashion, and food.

Naturally Savvy
BONUS HP EP #1164: Discover the Nordic Art of Friluftsliv and Embrace Nature Every Day with Linda Åkeson McGurk

Naturally Savvy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 43:06


Hi, Lisa here. I just got home from walking the dogs on this beautiful winter day with a few inches of snow on the ground and I was inspired to add this episode even though today's already went up earlier.  I am joined by Linda Åkeson McGurk the author of The Open-Air Life: Discover the Nordic Art of Friluftsliv and Embrace Nature Every Day.Linda Åkeson McGurk is a Swedish American writer and author of the bestselling parenting memoir There's No Such Thing as Bad Weather: A Scandinavian Mom's Secrets for Raising Healthy, Resilient, and Confident Kids (from Friluftsliv to Hygge) as well as The Open-Air Life: Discover the Nordic Art of Friluftsliv and Connect with Nature Every Day. McGurk has been featured in several leading American magazines, newspapers, and online sites, including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, New York Post, HuffPost, Psychology Today, Slate, TreeHugger, ScaryMommy, and many more. Her own writings about Scandinavian parenting have appeared in publications across the world, including Time and Parents. McGurk is a passionate advocate for the Nordic outdoor tradition friluftsliv and believes that the best childhood memories are created outside, while jumping in puddles, digging in dirt, catching bugs, and climbing trees. She is also the founder of the blog Rain or Shine Mamma, a resource where parents and other caregivers find tips and inspiration for outdoor play every day, regardless of the weather. McGurk lives in Sweden with her two daughters, husband, and two bonus daughters.Book description:A complete guide to Friluftsliv, the Nordic secret to unplugging and connecting more deeply with nature.In The Open-Air Life, Swedish-American writer Linda McGurk introduces readers to a wide array of Nordic customs and practices that focus on slowing down and spending more and more of ones' time outdoors. An outdoorsy cousin of hygge, friluftsliv is what Nordic people do outside all day before they cozy up in front of the fireplace with their wool socks on and a cup of hot cocoa. From the pleasures of foraging for wild berries and birding to how to stay warm and cozy outside in the middle of winter, this charmingly illustrated, inspirational guide shows readers how to harness the power-of-nature to improve their physical and mental health, as well as their relationships with both other people and Mother Nature. Readers will learn: Why and how they should spend more time outsideHow to use friluftsliv to combat stress, anxiety disorders, depression, and burnoutPractical skills like making fire, cooking outdoors and cleaning water on the go.  For country and city lovers alike, this book will serve as an essential guide to slowing down in this modern, fast paced society and connecting with the natural world.

Be a Better Leader
The Ambiguity Trap

Be a Better Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 19:43


A major barrier to executing your goals as a leader is ambiguity. Keeping your goals vague and flexible may minimize risk and create safety, but this often leads to inaction. Achieving results requires clear direction, actions, and behaviors. Join FranklinCovey national practice leader Scott Thele as he talks with UK practice leader Ray McGrath and Scandinavian execution practitioner Carsten Lingaard about the ambiguity trap and how to go from misalignment to measurable execution.

Monocle 24: Monocle on Design
Holzweiler, ArClab, Unifor, Scandinavian design

Monocle 24: Monocle on Design

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 30:00


We visit the Holzweiler clothing store in Copenhagen, and explore the Architectural Conservation Laboratory in Singapore. Plus, we visit an exhibition in Los Angeles that examines the influence of Scandinavian design in the US.

New Books in Film
The Sámi in "Frozen" (Part 2)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 34:31


The traditional folklore and animistic beliefs of the Sámi, the Indigenous nomadic peoples of northern Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Russia, are under-studied and their cultural significance rarely acknowledged, even in the Scandinavian countries where Sámi traditions have intermingled with mainstream ones. The spread of Christianity and the influence of Christian missionaries in the Scandinavian north have especially distorted and shaped the reception and transmission of Sámi religious beliefs and practices in the modern era. The traditional Sámi religion recently gained widespread attention and reconsideration from a somewhat unexpected source, however, thanks to the incorporation of elements of Sámi folklore in Walt Disney Animation Studios' Frozen movie series. In this episode, artist and folklorist Niina Niskanen joins me to discuss her research into Sámi religious systems, folklore and oral culture, the cultural impacts of Sámi beliefs on mainstream Scandinavian society, how Sámi folklore traditions are represented in mass media, and how pop culture artifacts like Disney's Frozen have prompted a resurgence of interest in Sámi folklore and introduced Sámi culture to a new audience. This episode is part two of a two-part series looking at the Sámi in Disney's Frozen movies; part one, focusing on the making of Frozen II, can be listened to here. Music in this episode: Desert City by Kevin MacLeod. License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

New Books Network
The Sámi in "Frozen" (Part 2)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 34:31


The traditional folklore and animistic beliefs of the Sámi, the Indigenous nomadic peoples of northern Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Russia, are under-studied and their cultural significance rarely acknowledged, even in the Scandinavian countries where Sámi traditions have intermingled with mainstream ones. The spread of Christianity and the influence of Christian missionaries in the Scandinavian north have especially distorted and shaped the reception and transmission of Sámi religious beliefs and practices in the modern era. The traditional Sámi religion recently gained widespread attention and reconsideration from a somewhat unexpected source, however, thanks to the incorporation of elements of Sámi folklore in Walt Disney Animation Studios' Frozen movie series. In this episode, artist and folklorist Niina Niskanen joins me to discuss her research into Sámi religious systems, folklore and oral culture, the cultural impacts of Sámi beliefs on mainstream Scandinavian society, how Sámi folklore traditions are represented in mass media, and how pop culture artifacts like Disney's Frozen have prompted a resurgence of interest in Sámi folklore and introduced Sámi culture to a new audience. This episode is part two of a two-part series looking at the Sámi in Disney's Frozen movies; part one, focusing on the making of Frozen II, can be listened to here. Music in this episode: Desert City by Kevin MacLeod. License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Get Sleepy
A Winter's Eve at a Scandinavian Sauna

Get Sleepy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 42:30 Very Popular


WideOpenSpaces Podcast
Season 3: TheJourney: Episode 97: Do You Live a Hygge (Huug-ah) Life?

WideOpenSpaces Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 32:52


Do you have the Winter Blues or are you longing for those long Summer Days? Our brain has a natural Circadian Rhythm.  This means our brains love 12 hours of daylight and 12 hours of darkness.  Depending on the time of year we don't always get the natural Circadian Rhythm.  Scandinavians created what is called a Hygge (Huug-ah) environment to combat the long dark days.  Join me on how you can incorporate Hygge (Huug-ah) into your daily routines and you might just feel very cozy and warm. Wishing you all a Happy and Healthy New Year and I am excited to spend 2023 with all of you.

The Luke and Pete Show
What's a walrus doing in that bin?

The Luke and Pete Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 33:15


A walrus ended Scarborough's new year celebrations in a shockingly explicit way. Not a good omen for the year ahead.To start 2023 off on a better note, the Battery Daddies kick off another year of reviewing cells by reading out our Christmas day submissions! Pete also goes to war with all Scandinavian bands from the 90s.Want to contact the show? Email: hello@lukeandpeteshow.com or you can get in touch on Twitter or Instagram: @lukeandpeteshow. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Anglo-Saxon England
Three Royal Brothers

Anglo-Saxon England

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 29:39


Æthelwulf's will attests to his desire that upon his death Wessex would pass into the hands of his sons. This desire was fulfilled when his eldest surviving son Æthelbald became king following his father's death in 858. The years that passed between this accession and the rise of the youngest son, Alfred, to the throne in 871 would see a complex detente form between the four brothers as Wessex rapidly passed from one to another. Histories of Wessex tend to overlook the years between Æthelwulf and Alfred, preferring to focus instead of Alfred, his father, and his grandfather to give the sense of a simple progression of a united Wessex developing into a united kingdom of England. However the reigns of Alfred's three older brothers deserve to be discussed in detail since it is under them that several key factors in Alfred's reign fully emerge into West Saxon history such as the transition from Scandinavian raiding into Scandinavian conquest and the alliance with Mercia, both of which would bear fruit in Alfred's reign and shape the earliest form of the kingdom of England. Credits –  Music: 'Wælheall' by Hrōðmund Wōdening https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQfdqIyqJ4g&list=LL&index=5&ab_channel=Hr%C5%8D%C3%B0mundW%C5%8Ddening Social Media -  Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/anglosaxonengland Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Anglo-Saxon-England-Podcast-110529958048053 Twitter: https://twitter.com/EnglandAnglo Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/anglosaxonenglandpodcast/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzyGUvYZCstptNQeWTwfQuA  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Digging Up Ancient Aliens
Aliens and mysterious rituals

Digging Up Ancient Aliens

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 50:38 Transcription Available


In Digging up Ancient Aliens, our host Fredrik uses his background in archaeology to discover what is genuine, fake, and somewhere in between on the TV show Ancient Aliens. This week we dive into the fascinating world of ancient rituals and their possible connections to extraterrestrial visitors.First, we'll explore the history and archeology of human sacrifice in Mesoamerica and consider whether these practices were influenced by extraterrestrials or not.Next, we'll venture to Britain to investigate the mysterious Stone of Destiny and ask whether the tradition of monarchy and regalia may have been an invention of extraterrestrials.We'll also take a look at the Bep Kororoti, a ceremony and god some believe are evidence of astronauts visiting our planet.Finally, we'll look at the intriguing possibility that ancient Egyptian and Viking funerary ships were designed to resemble spaceships.This episode is based on episode five from season three (S03E05), Aliens and Mysterious Rituals.As usual, you find all sources, resources, and further reading suggestions on the episodes' webpage.In this episode:Mayan blood sacrifices 3:10El Castillo 15:30White Gods 19:00Beltane Festival 24:04Bep Kororoti 25:16Is the monarchy alien? 30:36Olmec rituals 35:40Electroscope and the power of prayer 35:53Egyptian and Scandinavian funerary ships 42:47-----------------------------------------You find all of 2am Brainz stuff right here on this link.-----------------------------------------Music“Folie hatt” by Trallskruv Lily of the woods by Sandra Marteleur

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 178 Part 1: How Michele Cottler-Fox Combines Medicine and Jewelry

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 23:22


What you'll learn in this episode: How dyscalculia changed Michele's path in jewelry for the better Why Michele lets her hands guide her artistic process, and how she embraced her style of working Why jewelry artists don't need to make their work smaller or more palatable to find a customer base How the Little Rock, Arkansas art scene compares to the rest of the country How Michele uses her jewelry to connect with patients About Michele Cottler-Fox Michele Cottler-Fox is a physician jeweler, with a studio practice focusing on translating fiber techniques to metal, primarily crochet, knitting, and twining, and often incorporating found objects to tell a story. She was one of four metal artists chosen for the Heavy Metal exhibit by the Arkansas committee for the National Museum of Women in the Arts. Additional Resources: Instagram Photos available on TheJeweleryJourney.com Transcript:   Physician-jeweler Michele Cottler-Fox struggled with dyscalculia—a math learning disability—as a child. When she began to study jewelry, she found math-heavy jewelry fabrication methods and measurements nearly impossible to understand. But instead of stopping her jewelry career in its tracks, this disadvantage pushed Michele to make her freeform crocheted metal designs. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how she embraced her creative process; where her career as a physician and her career as a jewelry artist intersect; and why she loves crocheted designs.   Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is the first part of a two-part episode. Please make sure you subscribe so you can hear part two as soon as it's released later this week.    I am pleased to welcome Michele Fox to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. I've gotten to know Michele through several of the trips we've taken as part of Art Jewelry Forum. In addition to making very unusual jewelry, Michele is a physician who now works part time at the University of Arkansas Medical Center. We'll learn all about her jewelry journey today. Michele, welcome to the program.   Michele: Thank you for having me, Sharon.   Sharon: I'm so glad. It's great to have a chance to talk to you uninterrupted. Tell us about your jewelry journey. Were you artistic as a child? Did you know you wanted to be a doctor?   Michele: I come from a family where women didn't sit with idle hands. My grandmother taught me to crochet and knit before I was six years old. I can remember very clearly her saying to me, “Don't ever crochet. You do not know how to count properly.” I put the crochet hook away at an early age, picked up the needles and never looked back. I taught myself to embroider and to do needlepoint, but my family, for the most part, never thought about me as being a creative type. I did have a great aunt, very much an Auntie Mame type of person, who was a dress designer. She thought I was creative and tried very hard to encourage me, but the rest of the family, being engineers and physicians, they won.   Sharon: So, your family was more science oriented.   Michele: Very much.   Sharon: Can you tell us about your jewelry education? Did you go to GIA? What did your jewelry education entail?   Michele: I was self-taught from the beginning almost to the end. I grew up in a family where jewelry was the gift of preference for all special events. My father had worked as a teenager in an import/export business, so he knew many of the people involved in stone cutting and stone selling in New York City. I would tag along with him as a kid when he went to say hi. One of my favorite experiences was meeting a man who sold opals and being allowed to choose my own gift from everything in the case. It was overwhelming. While being seven or eight years old, there was a little glass bubble filled with opal chips and liquid that hung from a pendant. I still have it.    Sharon: Wow! And you still have it. Do you wear it? I haven't seen it, I don't think.   Michele: I pretty much stopped wearing anything around my neck when I began working in the hospital full time. Necklaces have a tendency to go straight down into patient's faces which when you are trying to listen to their lungs or their heart.   Sharon: Were you attracted to glittery things besides this case?   Michele: I loved stones. I loved the color and the shape and the light when you move them. In fact, after graduate school, I took a class learning to cut stones and to polish them. I ran up against the fact that I'm both dyslexic and dyscalculic, which means measuring and numbers are very difficult for me. Although I could polish stones beautifully and evenly, I could never figure out the faceting machine. So, I gave that up.    Sharon: Did you want to be a maker after school?   Michele: I thought for many years that I wanted to be a maker of some sort, but there was really no time to go to school. So, I started designing jewelry and trying to find people to make it for me. There were a lot of gold and silversmiths in the Baltimore/ Washington area. I would look at what was available at the ACC Baltimore Craft Show and try to find a maker from my area who was showing there and talk them into making something for me. I rather rapidly learned that describing what you want to someone when you don't understand what's involved leads to some major disasters.   Sharon: That's a really interesting idea. I never thought of that. It seems like on this side of the country, there's not much going on.   I met you through Art Jewelry Forum, so I've only seen you be attracted to what I would call avant garde jewelry. What attracted you to that?   Michele: It was a very slow shift from classic jewelry onwards. I had exposure to good design from makers sold by Tiffany and Georg Jensen as a child and teenager. I didn't know at the time that I was seeing Georg's work and very famous Scandinavian gold and silversmiths. My husband and I lived in Sweden after I had a degree in research biology and before I went to medical school, and I discovered that all the things I liked best were Scandinavian. So, I started learning about classic Scandinavian jewelry while we lived there.    When I came back to the States after medical school, I started looking for galleries and more modern makers in the Baltimore/Washington area. I was very fortunate in meeting a gallerist who had a gallery at the time in Baltimore called Oxoxo, which no longer exists. The gallerist retired many years ago, but I would stop in on my way home after a Saturday on call at the hospital and she'd let me play. I would try everything on in the gallery. I would always find the one thing that wasn't properly made. I'd say, “How does this work?” and then it would break in my hands, to the point where I felt I was a disaster. But the gallerist had a different take on it. She said, “You need to come the night before I open a show and try everything because then I'll find the one thing that isn't going to work. I wouldn't have it in the show to scare people.” We got to be good friends, and she helped educate me about what I was looking at and the makers. One day she said, “You have such good ideas about what you're looking at. You really need to learn how to make something like this,” but there was no time. The Maryland Institute College of Art, MICA, was literally visible from my office window in the hospital, but there was no time to go, which was very frustrating.   Then I was offered a job in Little Rock and took it. I suddenly discovered I had three hours a day in my life that I never had before because I was no longer commuting. There was a night school attached to the art center, and I started to take classes. Again, I came head-to-head with the fact that I'm dyscalculic, which means I can't measure worth a darn and I can't count, so fabrication drove me crazy. I couldn't stand it. So, I stopped taking classes and I thought, “All right, I'm just going to figure this out on my own.”   I was home sick one weekend. I had a spool of wire I had bought for something that didn't work, and I had crochet hooks and knitting needles at the side of the bed because that's what I did when I was home alone. I thought, “I wonder,” and I picked up the spool of wire, which was silver. I threaded on some random beads and started to crochet, and the necklace self-assembled. I had no idea what I was doing, but my hands made something that was beautiful and wearable, and I thought, “O.K., I've got to do more of this.” I still have that necklace, which is amethyst beads on silver wire.   Sharon: You thought it was so beautiful. Did you consider selling it? What happened?   Michele: Absolutely. Selling started as an accident, as most good things in my life have been. I walked into a local gallery, and the gal behind the counter—who was the owner, it turned it out—looked at what I was wearing, my own work, and said, “Do you sell your work?” I said, “Well, I'd like to. Why?” She said, “I want to carry it.” So, I gave her some earrings and a couple of necklaces. Being very young at the business, I said to her, “Here's my beeper number. I'm a physician. I'm always on call. If somebody actually buys one of these, please let me know.” She laughed, and I'll be darned if two days later I didn't get a beep saying, “Your earrings sold.”   Sharon: Did you make more?   Michele: Of course. I was hooked. It was a novel experience, that I could suddenly make somebody happy. I'm trained as a hematologist/oncologist, and most of what I have to tell patients does not make them happy.    Sharon: I can believe that.    Michele: This sense of joy that people got from picking up and trying my stuff on was an overwhelmingly positive experience that I wanted to continue.   Sharon: Did you consider yourself a salesperson?   Michele: No. I'm bad at it. The gallerist is now one of my best friends. She grew up in a retail family, and she shakes her head every time we do a show together. She knows how to present her work. She knows how to sell her work. I just tell people what I made, why I made it and how I did it. It's good enough. They take my stuff home anyway.   Sharon: So, you don't have to sell it; it sells itself.   Michele: It's a very tactile form of jewelry, and it is very different from what most people are accustomed to seeing. I learned that there are some people who look at it and say, “Well, it looks like a Brillo pad. Why would I pay money for that?” and that's O.K. I have no ego about it, none. I want my pieces to go to someone who loves it. I prefer that people who are not enthusiastic about it not have it.   Sharon: I have to stop here and say even though we show images on the website, we're not showing what you're talking about. Everything you have is crocheted or knitted wire. It's all, like you said, the Brillo pad look. I never thought of a Brillo pad, but it's wire crochet. It's very interesting and freeform, much of it. What do you do?   Michele: My hands figure out what to make. For many years I thought that meant I wasn't really an artist, until I started reading what artists I admired said about their own manner of working. I read an essay by Becky Kessler, who is a Dutch artist I love, and she said exactly the same thing I've been saying. Her hands decide what to make and she just goes along with it. As her hands work, she has many different options, but the choice of what to make is her hands' choice.   Sharon: Do you have wire next to your chair or your bed and you just decide to do it?   Michele: That's exactly right. The spools of wire are in a basket at bedside. The crochet hooks are in a copper bowl at bedside.   Sharon: Are you knitting or crocheting? I know the difference, but looking at it, I can't tell.   Michele: Most of the time these days, I'm crocheting. Knitting is a little bit more difficult physically for me. I have to do it around the needle or it falls off continuously. The stitches don't slip off the way they would if they were yarn, so it's easy to recover, but it was more frustrating, I think. With the crocheted pieces, my hand can make round things or flat things. I noticed a long time ago that the hook is in my right hand, but my left hand actually forms what I'm making as I move. So, even when I teach someone to make exactly what I make, it never looks the same because their hand forms it differently.   Sharon: That's interesting. Michele, there are two things I remember about you. One is that you didn't speak any Swedish before you went to Sweden to medical school there, right?    Michele: That's absolutely correct.   Sharon: That is amazing to me. And now you say you don't know numbers or fractions. What you did is really amazing.    Michele: There are workarounds for everything if you're determined. I think “determined” ought to have been my first name rather than Michele.   Sharon: Were you determined to be a doctor, a physician, a scientist, a bio-researcher? What were you going to be?   Michele: At the age of 12, having read science fiction hidden in my physician uncle's library, I decided I wanted to go to space, but I knew even back then that, as a woman, I was going to have difficulty getting into an official program for space. I decided that if I were a physician and I had gone through a psychology major in college, I might have a better shot at it. I was thinking, “Be a surgeon. Have a backup plan as psychologist, and maybe there will be a position for me on a space station or a colony on the moon.”   Sharon: Where you can crochet.    Michele: I wasn't even thinking about that. My grandmother had said, “Put it away. You don't know how to count.” Once I decided that's what I was going to do, I just walked in a straight line. I applied to colleges that had strong psychology programs. I ended up going to Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts, which was the only school that Sigmund Freud had visited. It was also a college where Robert Goddard, the father of rocketry in this country, had worked. I had exactly what I wanted all in one place. Of course, taking the introduction to psychology class disabused me completely of the notion of being a psychologist. I ended up a biology major with a minor in English.   Sharon: That's an interesting combination. I bet you're the only one who has a biology major and a minor in English. What would your grandmother say now that you crochet and that people want the things you make?   Michele: I think about that often. I see her shaking her head or rolling her eyes. The English major put me in very good stead because I've been a language editor for all my working life. I primarily help people who do not have English as a first language but need to write in English.   Sharon: Do you read what they've written and say, “This is what you really meant to say,” or “This is how you'd say it in English”?   Michele: I fix it for them.   Sharon: I know you still work part time, but when you decided to retire, was your plan that you would have more time to make jewelry?   Michele: That was exactly what I had planned. I thought it would be a very easy segue from full-time physician to full-time artist. My initial plan was that I'd take the first year after retirement and go to school to learn better techniques. Of course, I chose to retire in July 2019, which meant I found myself confronting the pandemic.    Sharon: So, you had a lot of time on your own.   Michele: I had two straight years at home. I focused on making things that were much bigger than I had the time to make beforehand. As I was thinking about all the changes the pandemic was inflicting on us, I started to work in series. My first series I called “Social Distancing is Awkward.” As the pandemic progressed, I made a series called “Controlled, Constrained and Confined.”   Sharon: Was that just the name you gave it, or did you form it around the name?   Michele: In that case, I actually had the name first and I was thinking about how I could represent it. My hands gave me a way. I've always worked in series to some extent because as I make one thing, I see a different way I could have done it, and I need to make that in order to see if it works. After “Controlled, Constrained and Confined,” I made one called “What Galaxy Do You Live In?”   Sharon: When you said you made them larger, did you mean you wanted to bring them to a gallery? Were they too large to wear?   Michele: Very few of my things are too large to wear, particularly since I have a good friend and fellow member of AJF in Little Rock who says it's not big enough. I have a couple of galleries in Little Rock that take my work. They've never shied away from any of the things I bring them, and I have brought several big things. People aren't nearly as frightened of them as I always thought they would be, which has been a pleasant surprise. This year I've been working on a series called “Broken People” because of what I see around me.   Sharon: That's a good name. I have to say I was very impressed with how creative Little Rock was. I never thought I'd ever be in Little Rock, but it was a very creative town.    We will have photos posted on the website. Please head to TheJewelryJourney.com to check them out.

Werewolf Radar
Year Walkers, Baba Vanga 2023 Predictions, The Kikiyaon - EP 233

Werewolf Radar

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 67:52


Happy New Year! The boys are starting the new year right by talking about the Scandinavian tradition of Year Walking (or Årsgång), Baba Vanga and her predictions for 2023, and the Cannibal Owl of The Gambia known as the Kikiyaon.   Join our Discord of like-minded pingos!

Camp Kaiju: Monster Movie Talk & Reviews
Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio, MST3K & Scandinavian Kaiju (Patreon Preview)

Camp Kaiju: Monster Movie Talk & Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 5:06


The party continues! We preview the next episode and chat about the year of Pinocchio, memories of Mystery Science Theater 3000, and a potential project featuring Ingmar Bergman, trolls, and witches. Thanks for all your support and have a happy New Year! For $5/month become a Camp Kaiju Patreon member for more film banter and monster movie content. Check out campkaijumoviereviews.com & Instagram as well. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/camp-kaiju/support

Shadow Warrior by Rajeev Srinivasan
Ep. 82: Hindus, the diaspora and the Rishi Sunak phenomenon

Shadow Warrior by Rajeev Srinivasan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 9:51


This essay was published by the indianaffairs.com at https://theindianaffairs.com/en/hindus-the-diaspora-and-the-rishi-sunak-phenomenon/Now that the euphoria over the ascent of Rishi Sunak to the position of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom has died down a little, it is worthwhile to consider the implications. On the one hand, there is understandable pride that someone in the diaspora has done well: I remember how delighted all of us were when V S Naipaul got his Nobel Prize in literature. On the other hand, what is the tangible value to India of Sunak's rapid rise to the leadership of what is, let us be honest, a racist, white-supremacist, imperial nation that is staring at the edge of an economic precipice? I was personally relieved a month or so ago when Sunak lost the leadership race to Liz Truss, simply because the rot is so bad in Britain that not even superhuman efforts are going to save the country from ruin.My argument was that Sunak had dodged a bullet: whoever ended up as PM would inherit such an impossible mess, such a tar baby, that they would forever be blamed for it, even if they were innocent bystanders. So why not let someone else, like Liz Truss, fall on the sword? If it were Sunak, not only would he be blamed individually, but also, in priority order a) Hindus, b) Indians, c) brown people, d) Stanford MBAs. It was best all around, I said at the time, to let some white woman be the fall guy, as it were. And we saw exactly what happened to her in 44 days: humiliated, disgraced, kicked out of office, her political career probably ruined forever. The sad thing is that nothing has changed now. After Brexit, the UK is merely a small “tribal”, “bad-toothed”, “flavour-starved” “sub-Scandinavian archipelago” as a hilarious critic on Twitter, @gathara, calls it. His/her “breaking news” about the West is a cheeky microscope turned back on the US, the UK etc by a Kenyan using the same demeaning language Western media uses for the rest of the world. Janan Ganesh, a columnist at the FT, had a good insight: Britain is laboring under the illusion that it is the US, which can wield its currency as a weapon; failing which, it has its military with which to quell challengers. Britain has none of the above. It has also been living beyond its means. Now it is forced to sell its family silver just to survive. As an example, there was a recent accusation that British Air Force pilots were sent to train Chinese pilots; which would likely mean American military secrets were dished out as they went ‘open-kimono'.There is a fair chance that Sunak, too, will go down the same way Truss did, and indeed Boris Johnson did: resigning in disgrace. But in any case, everybody will find their expectations of him will be unfulfilled. Indians naively believe Sunak will be nice to India. On the contrary, his job is to look out for Britain's interests. And he has many constraints on him.For example, Sunak has brought back Suella Braverman, who had been sacked as Home Minister. She  irritated Indians by being an arch-imperialist saying there were too many Indians overstaying their visas in the UK. Surely, he did to ensure domestic support and avoid schisms in his own party. And yes, Braverman is of Indian origin, too. Remember that Rishi Sunak is a Briton and not an Indian, even though he is a practicing and devout Hindu. His personal faith cannot get in the way of his doing his job as PM. In fact, he may even have to be particularly harsh on India to fend off allegations of dual loyalties. I remember Indian managers in Silicon Valley doing the same thing: they were especially hard on their Indian employees just to appear ‘neutral': over-compensation. I am by no means saying that there's nothing to celebrate in Sunak's rise. I am also delighted when Indian-origin people do well in other countries, against the odds. Maybe it is an irrational bout of ethnic pride. And it is true that Indians, especially Hindus, are now becoming more visible in their countries of residence, through hard work and the efforts of ‘Tiger Mothers'. I was reminded of this the other day when searching through my usual podcasts: I came across two Indian-Americans, although based on their accents they are both immigrants. One is the Pulitzer-winning oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee speaking of his new book The Song of the Cell; the other is Nick Santhanam, a Silicon Valley investor and former McKinsey consultant, talking about his new book The Titanium Economy. Then there's the articulate Balaji Srinivasan, a visionary and crypto-evangelist who foresees the rise of distributed ‘network states'. And Saagar Enjeti, who runs an interesting podcast channel.In a sense, Indians are following in the footsteps of Jews: they, too, leveraged their smarts, especially in medicine, finance and cinema, to rise to the top of the heap in the US. Indians are, interestingly, using medicine, finance and technology in their rise to wealth. Incidentally, the only other ethnic-minority PM ever in the UK was Benjamin Disraeli, a Jew. I used to think there would be a natural alliance between Jews and Hindus, especially as both have been under relentless attack by the same Abrahamic groups. India was the only country to never to oppress Jewish residents, too. But now I am not so sure. Maybe it's because Jews are, after all, Abrahamics themselves. And maybe they find themselves in competition with Hindus.I am reminded of various Jews who are not exactly pro Hindu: Wendy Doniger, Sheldon Pollock, Amy Wax (a law professor), Amy Kazmin (former FT bureau chief in India). Kazmin, whom I befriended on Twitter, once gave me the generic equivalent of “But my best friend is a Jew” when I complained about her unsympathetic stance towards Hindus: “But I check my articles with a Hindu Kayastha”. The irony was apparently lost on her. Similarly, Hindus are singularly unfortunate to not have allies, even though we are the last pagans standing. Some Buddhists are strongly anti-Hindu, as in the case of the Rev Zenji Nio, a Japanese. And we know about the Sikh diaspora and its Khalistan obsession. Yes, divide and rule has worked all too well. Be that as it may, personally, I am irrationally happy when fellow-paisanos do well. I celebrated when Sundar Pichai and Satya Nadella rose in tech; I was a big fan of the late C K Prahalad. But let us be very clear: while they will do what they can for the mother country, the diaspora are not Indians, and their success is not tied to India. To them, India is increasingly remote, a distant memory. Their reality is America, or wherever they have chosen to make their home. They have no skin in India's game. India will rise mostly based on the efforts of those who live in the country. Rishi Sunak, ironically, has a stake in India because he's married to Infosys Narayana Murthy's daughter Akshata, and she owns about 1% of the company. Sunak is independently wealthy, though, having made his fortune on Wall Street and private equity. But that's about it: we can all be proud of Rishi Sunak, whose Hindu values have enabled him to prosper in a hostile white world, and he is unapologetic about his religion. But his rise to the top of the Anglosphere is not particularly a win for India. India will have to rise based on its own efforts, not because of any favors from anybody. Permanent interests, not permanent friends.1270 words, 6 Nov 2022 This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit rajeevsrinivasan.substack.com

The Kings of Punk
Intro to Black Metal (Part 1)

The Kings of Punk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 117:00


The Kings lay down their souls to talk about the often maligned and misunderstood genre of black metal. They talk about the roots of the genre from its foundation in dreary England with NWOBHM, to Europe and America with the formation of thrash metal, to the rest of the world with the Scandinavian peninsula and South America. Go to kingsofpunk.com for more info, and tell us what you feel. What unknown band that put out 15 copies of their demo to give to their friends did we forget to mention? And of course dont forget to go to shirleyroadrecords.com and use promo code KOPPOD10 for a discount. IG: @KOPPODofficial Twitter: @kingsofpunkpodcast Shirleyroadrecords.com

Cracked with Chevonne Ariss
School's Out with Nik Sanders of Hepzibar Button

Cracked with Chevonne Ariss

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 63:42


Hello and welcome back to Cracked with Chevonne Ariss!Today's very sweet and lovely guest is Nik Sanders of Hepzibar Button. Her botanical Scandinavian inspired leaded glass work also incorporates very detailed glass painting. Like many of us, stained glass is something she came too after having children and a whole other long career. Before she was a full time glass artist, for over fifteen years she was a Primary School Teacher. Now Nic has been doing glass for over ten years now with no signs of slowing down anytime soon. Nik's work is personally one of my favorites - definitely on my top 10 list - and I'm so glad I got to meet the sweet woman behind the glass. Let's get into it :)Join me as I crack it all wide open! To see more of Nik's work, her instagram is @hepzibarbutton.For our Cracked Patreon page members, Nik is giving away one of her Painted bird sun catchers in a surprise color! It's going to look so gorgeous hanging in someone's window and I'll be doing a drawing for that piece on my instagram on January 8th, 2023. After I do these drawings I always reach out to the winner personally as well to let them know, so don't worry if you miss it but if you remember to, I would turn on your notifications for my instagram stories! @runaglassworksHonorable mentions from this episode:The Complete Stained Glass Courseabebooks.com/TheComplete-Stained-Glass-CourseFlora Jameson Domestika Coursehttps://www.domestika.org/en/courses/3547-stained-glass-art-explore-the-leaded-technique/fmjstainedglassBooks:How To Kill Your Family goodreads.comGirl Woman Othergoodreads.comDesign 44 design44.co.ukMuseum of Making derbymuseums.orgFavorite artists:Amedeo Modiglianiwikipedia.org/wiki/Amedeo_ModiglianiHenri Matisse wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_MatisseWassily Kandinskywikipedia.org/wiki/Wassily_KandinskyGlass artists:@enchantedlightuk @hilaryholmesglass@loveharriet@leadedglassstudios @unified_vision_studiosFor episodic sponsorship opportunities please email hello@runaglassworks.com.Thank you to this episode's sponsors:Canfield Technologies Canfield sets the standard for the Stained Glass industry. Sasha's International Inc. Clean-All Heavy Metals® SoapSupport the show

Unleashed with The Dingo and Danny Podcast Fueled by Monster Energy
Petter Solberg and ‘Oli' Solberg, Scandinavian Racing Dynasty – UNLEASHED Podcast S2 EP48

Unleashed with The Dingo and Danny Podcast Fueled by Monster Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 52:45


 Two generations, one legendary racing family! UNLEASHED is proud to welcome racing icon Petter Solberg and pro racer son Oliver ‘Oli' Solberg from Scandinavia. In this unique episode, the 47-year-old trailblazer and his 21-year-old offspring share their need for speed in conversation with The Dingo and Danny. The Solberg family has become synonymous with pro racing across the globe. Petter Solberg is the 2003 World Rally Champion, while son Oliver is the 2020 FIA ERC1 Junior Champion. It runs in his blood: Oliver's mother happens to be former rally driver Pernilla Solberg and he began attending world-class race events before the age of 1. By age 6, Oli was already competing as a race driver. Discover how Petter and Oli experience the changing sport of racing in their individual careers and what drives them to keep upping the ante – only on UNLEASHED. Want to hear it directly from this inspiring racing family? Press the play button (and hit Like) on the new episode of UNLEASHED with The Dingo and Danny Podcast. Make sure to subscribe and stay tuned for more UNLEASHED episodes. Regular editions of the show are recorded live inside Studio M at Monster Energy headquarters in Corona, California and published bi-weekly. Also follow @monsterenergy for updates.

A Woman's Brew
120 - Christmas Beers 2022

A Woman's Brew

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 39:28


Welcome to A Woman's Brew, where women talk about beer!A Christmas Eve bonus episode for you! We sample 3 Christmas themed beers from Cloudwater, Leffe and Lervig. All traditional in their own right, we have a nutty brown ale, a Belgian Winter beer and a Scandinavian style Christmas lager.What beers will be on your holiday table? Let us know in the comments!Get in Touch:Email: lovebeerlearning@gmail.comWebsite: http://www.lovebeerlearning.co.ukInstagram: http://www.instagram.com/lovebeerlearningFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/lovebeerlearningTori: @adventures_in_hoptimismJoanne: @awomansbrew.Facebook Group: Women's Pint ClubJoin the mailing list: https://www.subscribepage.com/v5c0a7Support us on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/lovebeerlearningEtsy Shop: http://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/LoveBeerLearningSubscribe:· iTunes· Spotify· Sounder· Google· Stitcher· TuneInWatch:YouTubeMusic: Higher Up by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Scandinavian MIND
KONST: The Art of Making Business in Art (with Carl ”The Art Reporter” Larsson)

Scandinavian MIND

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 39:58


In this episode of KONST, our host Roland-Philippe Kretzschmar talks with LA-based Swedish art dealer Carl Larsson about how to do art business. Larsson is not only an acclaimed art advisor running one of the most inspiring art accounts on Instagram The Art Reporter — but he's also a very nice and humble guy. Talking points are:Running an art dealership for three generations.Helping Tim ”Avicii” Bergling build his art collection.The difference between Scandinavian and international collectors.How to build a presence on social media.A roundup of our favourite art events in 2022, and what we're looking forward to in 2023.KONST is a show by Scandinavian MIND about contemporary and future art; the interconnection with society, culture, technology, finance and lifestyle. The outlook is primarily at the art world from a Scandinavian perspective, although taking into account the global arena of artists, exhibitions, trade fairs and other current events. The host of KONST is Roland-Philippe Kretzschmar, Editor-at-large at Scandinavian MIND. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Arabic with Sam
Simon's Arabic journey: Sweden, Cairo, Dubai @SimonSaysSquat on the Arabic in 60 Steps Podcast!

Arabic with Sam

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 53:53


Simon and I have quite a lot in common. We both became Muslims at a relatively young age, learned Sign Language, married into the Somali community and love the Arabic language... So please feel free to skip to the parts which interest you the most: 00:22 - Simon Says Squat 01:55 - Sam of Somalia 04:46 - Life in Dubai 06:48 - Tolerance vs coexistence 10:51 - Sign Language 16:42 - Simon's Arabic language journey From Sweden to Egypt. 26:46 - Do all Scandinavians speak perfect English? 30:10 - Difference between studying Arabic in Dubai and Egypt? 35:25 - In between Egypt and Dubai. 38:33 - How Simon Ended up in Dubai 44:52 - Islamic studies in Dubai 49:12 - Simon's final advice Simon is personal trainer originally from Sweden but living in Dubai. On top of being a gifted linguist as we cover in this episode, Simon runs an online fitness business and is active in creating content. All of his links are here: Website: https://simonsayssquat.se/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/simonsayssquat/ TikTik: https://www.tiktok.com/@simonsayssquatFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/simon.wallgren _____________________________________________ Join Arabic in 60 Steps.

Family Plot
Episode 125 Yule Love Our Christmas Show

Family Plot

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 35:17


Thiis week, Laura, Krysta and Dean broadcast from their new location back in Independence Missouri. Krysta shares with us some December Holidays that aren't Christmas. From Saint Lucy's Day to Ominsuka to Festivus, she drops some special celebrations and Dean wants to adopt Festivus just for the airing of grievances. Then they share 7 Christmas tales of wonder, imagination, humor and a bit of effed up. Plus we have Holiday wishes from friends and familhy in this oh so special edition of the Family Plot Podcast!!!

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
454: The Global Collective with Stacy Kehren Idema

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 35:50


Stacy Kehren Idema is the Founder and Managing Director of Global Collective, which is revolutionizing how men and women do business. Chad talks to Stacy about the work Global Collective does, starting a company based in France, and the differences between doing business in the U.S. and the U.K. The Global Collective (https://www.globalcollective.global/) Follow The Global Collective on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/global-collective-global/). Follow Stacy on Twitter (https://twitter.com/stacyidema) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/stacykehrenidema/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel. And with me today is Stacy Kehren Idema, the Founder and Managing Director of Global Collective, which is revolutionizing how men and women do business. Stacy, thank you for joining me. STACY: Chad, it is a pleasure. How are you today? CHAD: I'm well. I'm well. [laughs] I wasn't going to bring it up, but since you asked, I feel like whenever someone asks that question, I feel like I need to give an honest answer. STACY: Of course. CHAD: Because I think, so often, we don't answer honestly. We just sort of...so what's going on in my life right now is, unfortunately, even though we got our fourth boosters three weeks ago, my wife tested positive for COVID yesterday. STACY: Oh no. CHAD: And so she feels fine. She feels mostly fine. But we have kids and everything, so it throws a huge wrench into life right now. We're very fortunate that we've got vaccines, and it'll be mild and everything, but it is a big wrench in our life. STACY: It is. CHAD: Today, tomorrow, for the next week, so... STACY: I'm sorry. CHAD: Yeah, so she's in a different part of the house, quarantining away from all of us, and we're hoping for the best. STACY: Me too. CHAD: We could probably do a whole hour around how life is for all of us right now, coming in this different stage of the pandemic. I hesitate now to ask you, how are you today? [laughs] STACY: I'm here in London, so, for me, it's the end of my day. And fortunately, I haven't had COVID in a few months. But I know that experience and being even alone was enough to put a wrench in everything. So I get it. CHAD: Yeah. Yeah. Well, let's get back to Global Collective. I gave just a brief snippet. But can you tell people a little bit more about what it is you're actually doing? STACY: Yes, I would be honored. So the mission of The Global Collective is to revolutionize really how investment companies invest in female-founded and led businesses, and there are three key areas of that. It's really about changing gender perceptions by actually connecting the unique strengths of each gender. And if you were to even remove the gender piece, it's really talking about the core masculine and the feminine energies of how and what resides in all of us. How can we bring more of the flow and the creativity into business? The mission is also designed to eliminate the diversity gap. How can we make things better, more equitable, easier both for the men and the women, you know, going back to the genders? And something that's very near and dear to my heart is really about increasing the financial benefit and, frankly, the mental well-being in business because one thing that we don't talk enough about is the impact that mental health can have not only on our personal life but on business and vice versa. And I think it's starting to come out more and more. But with founders, with entrepreneurs, and with executives, that mental illness journey has actually increased, and there are some really interesting statistics on it. So, how can we make it a non-shaming conversation? And how can we actually help each other in this area? So the mission is really about transforming business into something different that I think we're all feeling the need for. And how it actually came about was from my 50 years of business and personal experience. I was born into business owners, into a family of business basically. My first husband was a generational business owner and had the hard position to be in, and he had to choose family over business. And then I, in my corporate career, had a really long tenured corporate career. I worked 26 years in companies as small as 40 as well as at Fortune 7 companies where we even did new initiatives, new businesses, startups within those. And modestly, most of my time was actually spent with male executives. And I'm a woman in business. I've been in business a really long time. So that's a little bit about the mission and how The Global Collective came about. CHAD: You're not the first guest we've had on the show that's talked about these issues. But I'm curious because it is more of a conversation right now. It's something that we've been talking about on the show. Is there something that people in that environment that maybe people still don't realize or that you need to just reiterate over and over again here are the challenges, here are the differences, here's what's happening in the real world right now? STACY: Specific to the mental health piece? CHAD: Either the mental health piece or just women in business and what it's like for them. STACY: Well, I think this is where I love to talk a little bit about the extremes and where those extremes are actually very similar. I believe that men feel like there's this weight of the world on their shoulders and that they have to provide, and serve, and do. And I also believe women do as well, you know, provide for their family, protect for their family. For many women, they may even be a single parent, and with that, they want to be able to go out and provide for themselves and do. So you have this desire, this deep desire to do both of those things differently, yet, we're going at it both parallel. And at some point, I think the convergence and really where things start to explode in a beautiful way is when we get to come together. Because if we go about it in a very myopic fashion, we often miss the things that are going on around us that could be a benefit. So from a very specific where I'm very focused on in the venture capital and investment space, so much of what has happened over the course of business time, if you will, and when venture capital investments started, which is, you know, I would imagine hundreds and hundreds of years, it has been mostly men that have done that investment. And when you look at the world as it exists today, it is mostly men that...I don't want to say control the money, but they're the ones in that business. So when you continue on doing the same thing that you've always done and you don't do anything new, that's telling us a couple of things: you don't know how, or you're afraid. And women, on the other hand, are going about doing their thing, working really, really hard. They're probably even more so working harder because it takes longer for them to earn just as much as a man. If they get funded, it takes longer to get funded, and then they actually get less, but they get to that point. And in the meantime, they've had to either endure additional risks to their family by not spending time with their family, or giving up their family and focusing on the business, or focusing solely on their family and giving up the business. So we don't have to do things the way that we're doing them now. And the other element, and where the mental health piece comes in, is this thought that we still have to do these things in these linear ways when we can actually come together and learn the beauty of what men do well in business and the beauty of what women do well in business, and figure out how to do it differently. CHAD: You mentioned you have a lot of experience working for other companies. So I'm curious, when did you start to feel like you needed to do something to solve this problem and potentially create a new company around it? STACY: I've always had a deep desire to do business differently. And what I didn't know at the time in my corporate career was why I didn't feel like I fit in. Having grown up in that business world and knowing what it was like before cell phones and you still had your landline, and a Sunday evening, the telephone rings, and you're sitting at dinner, and your parents dare not answer the phone because the phone will keep ringing until somebody answers. That's just how it happened in the small town I grew up in. Knowing that stress and that pain and watching them go through that to being married to a small business owner, and then being in the rooms and the spaces of the people and hearing the stress and the pain, there was this thing that followed me all the way through that knew that business had to be done differently. And I attempted to insert it a lot in my corporate career, and for most, because I wasn't a box-checker, I didn't fit in. But the deep desire to finally do it differently was in 2019 when I was made redundant. I had been working and doing coaching on the side, and it was my goal to finally go into business for myself. But in 2020, I divorced myself and decided to take myself on a journey. My children are a little older; they're in their early 20s. And I decided to just kind of come back to myself and understand what did I need to do this business for me and to do with what was deeply passionate within me. And could I do it in another country? So in 2021, I spent six months in London and, as part of that journey, did some work for a woman who owns a diversity, & inclusion, and belonging company. And through that experience and listening to her, along with a few other women, talk about that journey to get invested, there was something inside of me that just clicked. It was as if I was reliving sitting in front of capitol committees in my corporate world and listening to the same stories. I'm like, you know, that's just not how things have to happen. It was that moment that I knew it wasn't for me just about helping the women in business and helping them scale their business; it was something bigger than that because, in order to do that, to make that change, and to really make a meaningful change, you have to bring the men along for the journey. You have to help them. I know there are many men out there that are all for women-owned businesses, co-founded businesses, women-led businesses, and many of them come to me privately and talk to me about it. And my response is I need you not to tell me; I need you to show me. And with that, I've also learned that many of them are afraid. They're afraid to do something different, which tells me that we have to create a space for both the men and the women to thrive. Otherwise, we'll just keep spinning our wheels and doing the same thing over and over again. And it will be far more difficult to get to where we need to get to than how we can get to where we want to go doing it a different way. CHAD: So, what does the work Global Collective does look like? Is it coaching? Is it more than that? Is it different than that? STACY: My end vision, the bigger vision, is really this end-to-end ecosystem. So there are roughly five elements or five stages of a business idea: start, sustain, scale, and exit. The focus right now is on the scale and working through pilots with investors and with women in business to learn what and how we do it differently. Coaching will be a component of it, the mental health journey and navigating how that works for the founder and the business owner executive also becomes part of it. But it also is extensive external networks and communities that we bring into that ecosystem that can support both the investors and their journey and the women in business and their journey. Because the other elements that I have learned along the way is when these investors invest in these all-male-led firms, they don't even know how to help those businesses diversify. They themselves even know and have that challenge. Let's take, for example, a woman founder who would like to go on maternity leave. It's more often that she will leave that business because the pressure from the investors to stay in the business and choose business over family is great. Wouldn't it be fantastic if there was a collection of fractional C-suite individuals that get to come in and help that business along on that journey? And not only does the female founder get to be part of deciding who and what will be taken on and for how long, but the investor and the business. And then that way, everyone is along on that journey and is in agreement of what's going to happen. So there isn't that pressure to have to choose between business and family for anyone. CHAD: I guess that's part of where the collective idea and name comes from. STACY: Yeah. CHAD: That's great. You mentioned you moved to the UK as part of this journey. Are you working with companies primarily focused on the UK, or are you doing it globally? STACY: My focus right now is the U.S. and the UK. So I actually started a brand new business. I secured my own visa. And as part of that visa, I had to start a new business, which was this business. So yeah, the primary locations right now have been UK and U.S. If an opportunity came up in a different country, that would be fantastic, exciting, but that's where I've been focused are in those two areas. CHAD: When thoughtbot was getting started in Europe, like most locations that started for us, it was driven by someone who was from there originally and wanted to go back. So when we were getting started, me and my family...my wife was working for a company based in France at the time, and so we were able to go over for the summer. The kids were out of school for the summer. And so we spent several months there, and we loved it. And we're fully remote now, but when we had an office there, I would go about once a month. There's probably a small list of places where I could see myself living [laughs], and that's at the top of the list. Was that the case for you? Did something particularly resonate for you? STACY: You know, I had never been to Europe. And when I was looking at where I would go, I wanted a place that would be culturally diverse. I wanted a place where I could learn, just even be more immersed in history, and feel safe as a single woman in a foreign country. I'm grateful for my family. They're always very concerned about me, and frankly, so are my boys. Having two young adult men, I worried about them, but now they worry about me has started to come into play. For me, it was really about where can I be that would be safe, culturally diverse, and allow me the ability to travel, and to your point, to just go explore new things, really to take a different perspective even outside of the gender diversity piece, the cultural, the language, all of those things? And so this place is home, and I didn't know that when I set off. I thought it just would be; I'll go see how it is for three months. And then I wasn't even here a week, and I said three months wouldn't be enough and stayed six. And it was about five weeks into that journey that I said six months won't be enough; I need to be here longer. And then that's when I did more due diligence from the visa standpoint. MID-ROLL AD: Now that you have funding, it's time to design, build, and ship the most impactful MVP that wows customers now and can scale in the future. thoughtbot Liftoff brings you the most reliable cross-functional team of product experts to mitigate risk and set you up for long-term success. As your trusted, experienced technical partner, we'll help launch your new product and guide you into a future-forward business that takes advantage of today's new technologies and agile best practices. Make the right decisions for tomorrow today. Get in touch at thoughtbot.com/liftoff. CHAD: Is there anything that either has stood out to you or surprised you about differences between business in the U.S. and the UK? STACY: It's fascinating to see how much they complain. The U.S. and the UK complain about each other and their work standards, yet how much they like what each other does. So I would say some of the biggest differences is that the city truly never seems to sleep, yet they definitely take time away from work and business and are very family-focused. That's probably some of the biggest things that I have learned as part of it, and especially having grown up in the culture that I grew up in, in corporate, where it was very much the grind of the nine-to-five plus. So there are some slight differences. I think, if anything, there's just so much more culture and people here that have come from so many other different parts of the world that that's probably the thing that I noticed the most. CHAD: Do you think that the work you're doing is ready to be received more or less in either of the places? STACY: I think different parts of it are more ready to be received in different parts in each country. CHAD: Can you tell me more about that? STACY: Yeah, there's probably more heavy gender influences here in the UK, especially with Scandinavian countries that are much more gender equitable. So I think that piece is very much a belief here. And there are other elements that support both sets of parents from a family standpoint in this country. So I think that is more readily received. I also do know that women-owned businesses are significantly less here and certainly less from getting funded. I think that's where the U.S. is further ahead in that game. However, the number of businesses that are started by women are significantly more than what they are here. It becomes more about who's louder with certain pieces. I think the U.S. is louder in that area. I think the UK is more open and receptive. CHAD: One of the things that I learned about investment in general between the U.S. and the UK is there's not, I mean, it's just not as big of a place as the U.S. The amounts are often less. And I'll say, speaking a little bit more generally, I would say people in the UK, investors in the UK, are a little bit focused on different things. They're maybe a little bit more risk-averse, or they're focused on different markets. So the investment community is a little bit different between the two different places. Does that make the opportunity for founders, particularly women founders, any different between the two different places? STACY: From the research that I've done through some interviewing with investors and then the research I've done on my own, there's a lot of little, smaller type of investment for female founders in the U.S. than there is in the UK. But that said, one thing that seems to be very prevalent is how much Europe, in general, talks about London being the epicenter for Europe and investment. You're asking a great question that I hadn't thought about in that framework. CHAD: Yeah, and I don't know the answer either [laughs], so... STACY: What I do know is in the U.S., there are more female-founded investment companies and female-led. However, I do know many of them are very much sticking to U.S. companies. But what I do know is that the UK is starting to leverage more and work in more partnership with U.S. investment companies. CHAD: So if I am an investment firm, chances are that my entire, especially the leaders in the firm, are probably all men, maybe not, but if not all men, then the majority. So if I was sitting in that seat, how do we get started on this journey? Contact you? [laughter] STACY: Yeah, contact me. [laughs] Honestly, it begins with a conversation. This is the really interesting piece that I don't think that we've yet talked about is women believe that men have control of all the money. And while they may be the ones that are leading more of these investment firms, it's not just up to them, if you will. There is this piece of the puzzle that, yes, we have these male-led investment firms, and they have repeatedly invested in mostly male-led businesses. But we have these women who have these beautiful businesses. Women are known for going to market with products and services that have fewer competitors in the market because 70% to 90% of consumer buying decisions around the globe are made by women. And so when they're out there buying and they see a gap, that's where a lot of these women start these businesses is based off of this gap that they see in the market, but they do have the power. How can I, as part of this...and even the men because I know I wouldn't be where I am today without the male mentors and influencers in my life encouraging me to be bolder and to be better. And they could see in me some things I wasn't yet willing to acknowledge. We, women, have to do the same for each other. We have to help each other be bolder, be braver, not assume that we are at the mercy of somebody else; we're not. We get to be in partnership with each other as women, and we get to go have these conversations with these men. So I think that's the part that's missing in that. So back to your question about if men want to get started in this, what do they do? Contact me, yeah, because let's start to have a conversation. There are so many men that know that they want to do different; they just don't know how. And when they do even see a woman come through the door, it's most often as a co-founder. They're not even sure what to do different to attract more of that. So that's when we get to talk about what is it that they're doing today? Where are they going to look? Who are they calling in? And how does that change their business? Because, at the end of the day, it's not as easy as just investing in women-owned businesses. And I get this question a lot; the question is, "Hey, Stace, are you going to bring us a list of women-owned businesses that we can invest in?" And my response is always with a smile. However, what I say is "No," or "You would have already done that because the list is already available to you." How they do business will transform. And that's the part that they get to go on this journey with The Global Collective is how do they transform their business as part of that? And that's scary to think. You've done something for so long. You do it really well. You make a lot of money doing it. Yes, there's risk, and as part of this, there's something even greater that would transform how you do business. So it becomes a longer conversation. It's not just about contacting me; I think that's the point I'm trying to get out. [laughter] It's a long-term relationship, and most don't consider that. And I certainly know that women don't either. CHAD: So, speaking of that, what is the flip side of this if I'm a woman thinking about doing something new or already working on something? What do I do to get started with this and position myself differently or better? STACY: It's A, building your network. And this is where it gets really uncomfortable for women because the fear of asking for money from men it's a real fear with this perception that they have control. But it's really our own mindset around money and the fact that there's enough of it available. So how do we create diversity in who we talk with, who we talk to? What is it that we are looking to bring to market? Doing some research but not doing so much that you get caught in your own bubble if you will. I would imagine, Chad, that especially those that you've interviewed and even on your own journey doing this as a founder or even being an executive, it can get kind of lonely. And sometimes we get into that I'm just going to do it, and I'm just going to do it. And I'm going to do it until it's perfect and kind of forget that along the way; we need checkpoints. So for women, it's the mindset factor of going in and doing something different, which means doing things that they've never done before: getting help, getting a coach, getting a mentor, putting together an advisory board, people that will hold you accountable, maybe even see your blind spots. It also is understanding that if you go pitch to one investment company, or one investment firm, or one investor and they say "No," okay, that doesn't mean that it's the end of the world. They just may not be for you at that time. And there's plenty more out there. So keep refining. Keep doing your thing. Continue to build your community. Continue to build your voice. And with that, also know that...and this is even part of my journey. You have to be confident in what it is that you're doing. You don't have to be confident in everything that you have to do to get it done, but you have to be grounded in what it is that you're bringing and what it is that you offer. Because the one thing that isn't talked about enough, and I've heard this enough with investors, is they're actually investing in the person. Yes, they're investing in a business, but they're investing in a person at the end of the day. And that part is overlooked. It's not just bringing something to market to bring it to market if you will. CHAD: I hear that a lot. I think you're absolutely right. And I think that that gets too close, maybe, to what one of the core problems is. I think if investors are used to investing in people rather than the product and the stream of people that they're used to investing in looks a certain way or behaves a certain way, they're making decisions heuristically, oh, this makes a successful co-founding pair, or this makes us successful founder. And when something shows up that doesn't match the rest of what they see or the heuristic that they have, they really aren't able to think that that will be successful. STACY: I know myself even being in the rooms that I've been in and doing the work that I did; this journey has been nothing short of a beautiful journey of learning. And the craziest things have happened, as in, they're more difficult than I would have ever imagined mostly because I got in my own way. Or it has required me to learn the nomenclature that's applicable to the investor world, that's very similar to working with capital committees and finance and corporate. However, they use the word slightly. They use either slightly different words or they use them in a different way. So I've been very lucky. One of my advisors is actually a serial tech entrepreneur who has gone for funding alone half a dozen times, and so even when he and I will sit and talk about things, I continue to learn from him every single time. I said it this way. It would resonate more in this way. Which when you think about that, that doesn't mean I change my story, and my belief, and my confidence, and my grounding, and what it is that I'm bringing; it just means that I'm learning to speak different languages, and/or to be able to assimilate in an easier way. If what I say doesn't resonate with one investor, I can find another way to describe what it is that I'm attempting to describe in a language that might resonate more with him. It's not just about here's my business. Here's how we're going to make money, and the bottom line number says I'm making revenue. It's about the bigger pieces of it. It's about being confident in your story, what it is that you're offering, what it is that your strengths are, frankly. And I think there's a disconnect there. Wow, this could be a whole topic of its own, the perception that the founder has to know how to do everything or that we believe that we have to do everything. And then, what's your staying power in all of this? And I think that's even lost on itself. It's not for the faint at heart. And you learn not to take things personal, and you develop a thicker skin. But you still have to remain rooted in your core values. CHAD: On that note of the misconception or the perception that founders need to know or do everything, there's something that I'm curious about that's sort of an extension of that for you. I've had other guests on the show where they're coming at it from a perspective of a lot of the same issues, but they're focused on getting more founders of color access to investment on both sides of that equation. The language you use is around gender and men and women, but we know there are people that don't fit into those boxes specifically, either. So how have you chosen what you've decided to focus on? And how do you not get overwhelmed from all the sorts of the landscape and how big this problem is? STACY: That's a great question because you're right, and I think about that often. I speak more in the norm, the heterosexual norm, genders. I am starting to talk more about the energies that really take away from the men and the women and really speak more about the masculine and the feminine. For me, that piece of it is where I'm staying focused because it's where I know I can do and make the most impact. However, I believe that when we start to make traction in this way, we also get to make traction from a race and a color...and this is where the corporate culture is starting, I think, to understand and become more well-versed in the masculine and feminine energies. And when you can speak more in that language about the benefits that every single person has regardless of gender, when we get to speak in that language that is more inclusive, then I also believe that we get to include more people, more humans because, at the end of the day, we're all human. That's the one thing that we all [laughs] have in common. We get to speak in that language. But I think the fact that my end vision...the end goal is so big that to your question about how do I not get lost in the rest of it, I know that will come along as part of it. Even though it may not be the language that I use, I know deep in my heart that creating this opportunity and the shift for people to see those perspectives and for me as a founder to also ensure that within my values, I look to have inclusivity in other ways other than gender myself will be of value. And in the meantime, those external...the business partnerships, the other elements of my business and who I get to work with or who we get to work with as a collective will include those that are more well-rounded into the language, and I can learn from them. And we get to do these things together, so I do believe that it comes together. I've really led with that so that I don't get so overwhelmed in attempting to accomplish everything. CHAD: Yeah. And I think the things you're working on feel different than just creating another business or another product like a SaaS product or that kind of thing, but I think a lot of the same principles still apply. And if you come out with something that is meant to be everything to everybody and you're not building from your experience, chances are good you're not going to be as successful as if you could focus and build from your experience and find your niche, and find the people who can help you do what you want to do and have the impact you want to have and then grow from there, as opposed to doing everything all at once. STACY: Yeah, I agree. CHAD: But it's tough because it's hard to say, "No, I'm not working on that now," because it is still important. STACY: It is. The one thing I did, unknowing that this was going to happen but almost three years ago, while in my former life and in my corporate career, I led global teams and worked with different teams across the globe and had a little bit more of that cultural experience. The one thing that I really got hung up on when I first started was figuring out what my niche was because I've had all of that experience. But what I do know is that you get to create your own niche. That was something that took me a really long time to figure out. I was so centered on conforming to what everyone else told me would be my niche. And I knew that there was something missing. And so part of what I do now, which is the beauty of living where I live now because there's so many different pockets of the culture pieces of it, race, religion, and ethnic backgrounds, I get to continue to build my network and my community with that thought in mind of being able to look for partnerships and have conversations, whether I'm here, whether it's those that are in the U.S. now that I have the attention of. It's all those things, and that just makes it better. CHAD: Yeah. Well, if this has resonated with people and they want to find out more, they want to get in touch with you, they want to start that conversation, where should they go to do that? STACY: They will find me...website is globalcollective.global. You will also find me on LinkedIn under Stacy Kehren Idema, as well as on Instagram under stacykehrenidema. CHAD: Stacy, I really appreciate you joining the show and sharing with us. I appreciate the impact that Global Collective seeks to have. And I wish you all the best, I really do. So, thank you so much. STACY: Thank you. It's been a pleasure. Thanks, Chad. CHAD: You can subscribe to the show and find notes along with a complete transcript for this episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. And you can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks so much for listening, and I'll see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Stacy Kehren Idema.

In Pursuit of Development
Just copy us! Why can't the rest of the world be more like Scandinavia? — Harald Eia

In Pursuit of Development

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 51:50


Scandinavian countries are well-known for high standards of living and many people wonder about the origins of the welfare state model in Scandinavia and why it has worked so well. The features of the welfare state in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden typically include high state spending, strong universal public services, and relatively high equality in gender roles.But what explains the success of this model of development and how did these countries get to where they are today? These are some of the questions my guest – Harald Eia – tries to answer in a recent book co-authored with Ole-Martin Ihle. The book – The Mystery of Norway – discusses how Norway became one of the most prosperous countries in the world. It focuses on the relationship between wealth and happiness, and the power of civil society and trade unions in negotiating wages and a range of benefits. The book also highlights the important role played by The Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration – popularly known in Norway by its acronym – NAV, which administers a third of the national budget through schemes such as unemployment benefit, work assessment allowance, sickness benefit, pensions, child benefit and cash-for-care benefit.Harald Eia is a sociologist and became a household name in Norway in the mid-1990s having starred in several hit comedy shows. He has since then been one of the country's most popular and well-known comedians. Key highlights Introduction - 00:52Is there a Norwegian model of development? - 03:18Origins and functions of the welfare state in Norway: 06:22Can money make you happy? 20:20Relative poverty in one of the world's wealthiest countries: 28:30Immigration: 35:13Host:Professor Dan Banik, University of Oslo, Twitter: @danbanik  @GlobalDevPodApple Google Spotify YouTubehttps://in-pursuit-of-development.simplecast.com/

The Jungle Jim's Podcast
What's a julbord? Christmas in Scandinavia

The Jungle Jim's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 61:23


We're joined again by Sebastian, our favorite Swedish import, to learn all about how Christmas is celebrated in Scandinavia. Sebastian was kind enough teach us about the julbord, a Scandinavian feast or banquet during the Christmas season where traditional Christmas food and alcoholic beverages are served, all made out of products sold here at Jungle Jim's International Market. It's a slow dive into their culture but we get some great information about other modern traditions as well. We're joined by Ozzy from our international department who chimes in to compare some of the Swedish holiday traditions with his own from Mexico. Grab yourself a mug of glogg and enjoy with us!

flavors unknown podcast
How imposter syndrome creeps up by Leia Gaccione

flavors unknown podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 42:05


In today's episode, I talk to chef Leia Gaccione of South and Pine, a restaurant located in Morristown, New Jersey. She has appeared on several popular cooking shows, including Iron Chef America, Beat Bobby Flay, and Top Chef.  You'll hear about her cooking competition experiences, her food concepts at South and Pine, and how she goes about her creative process. She also shares some recipe guidelines for cooking the perfect pork chop. What you'll learn with chef Leia Gaccione The smell that reminds chef Leia Gacione of her childhood (2:45) Why food became so central to her life (4:06) Chef Leia Gaccione's first on-camera accident (5:17) Why she loves cooking on television (6:56) The obscure Scandinavian ingredient that gave Leia Gaccione PTSD (8:38) Two major career influences she's worked with (10:16) Her spontaneous first sous chef role (10:46) The business skills she learned from Bobby Flay and his team (12:41) Her seasonal food supplier (13:49) The food concept at South and Pine (16:27) How she's using seasonal ingredients right now (17:33) Her top priority when she travels  (19:07) How the pandemic is still affecting the restaurant business (21:09) Staff mistreatment since the pandemic (22:56) New menu inspiration to watch out for on her menu (26:00) Exciting collaborations with other local restaurants (26:52) Her goal for the upcoming year (28:32) A classic pork chop and apple dish you can make at home (29:20) One of her best career experiences so far (31:09) How imposter syndrome creeps up (32:30) Where to eat and drink in Morristown (33:59) Guilty pleasure foods she loves (35:49) Cookbook recommendations (36:49) Kitchen pet peeves (38:10) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes in New Jersey Conversation with Chef Sam Freund from White Birch Conversation with chef Ehren Ryan from Common Lot Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Chef Sheldon Simeon Chef Andy Doubrava Chef Chris Kajioka Chef Suzanne Goin #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Morristown – South and Pine Seasonal salad at South and Pine South and Pine restaurant Lamb meatballs from chef Leia Gaccione Click to tweet Watching cooking shows is really what started my love affair with food and I was always very enamored with watching people cook on television.
 Click To Tweet I love doing cooking competitions. They are a lot of fun and a big adrenaline rush, and very nerve-wracking. I feel this industry today prepares you for that. Every day is like Iron Chef. Click To Tweet Through the pandemic, we have seen such a divide in this country. And to see the way some people have treated my staff is sickening. Just such a level of entitlement. Some people are so rude, I can never imagine walking into a business and speaking the way that some of these people do. Click To Tweet Imposter syndrome is a real thing. When you sit down with six other chefs who feel the same way that you feel and who have experienced the same things that you have, and are struggling with the same things that you do, it feels really warm, like you're a part of something bigger than what you're doing by yourself. Click To Tweet Social media Chef Leia Gaccione Instagram Facebook Social media Restaurant South + Pine Instagram Facebook Links mentioned in this episode

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history
Season 4, Ep. 7: Brandon Plewe on the 1900 Utah Census

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 59:28


Date: March 7, 2022 (Season 4, Episode 7: 59 min. & 28 sec. long). Click here for the Utah Dept. of Culture and Community Engagement version of this Speak Your Piece episode. Are you interested in other episodes of Speak Your Piece? Click Here.  This episode was co-produced by Brad Westwood and Chelsey Zamir. This episode is an interview with Dr. Brandon Plewe, BYU geographer and cartographer, with SYP host Brad Westwood. It involves a discussion about Plewe's 2022 Utah Historical Quarterly article entitled “Placing Immigrants in Salt Lake City, 1900,” Utah Historical Quarterly, (Winter, 2022: Vol. 90, No. 1), which explores the research discovered from mapping out data from the 1900 US Census on the distribution of immigrants in Salt Lake City.Why use geography and cartography to tell this story?  Plewe describes that geography, particularly spatial data or mapping of locations, offer researchers entirely different ways of seeing and thinking about history.  In this case, Plewe and his BYU students mapped the exact addresses of those picked up in 1900 Census data. In mapping these addresses, they discovered a pattern of immigration across downtown SLC. In order to discover the larger picture that this data would tell, they examined the distribution of immigrants, the different countries they emigrated from, and where exactly in SLC they settled. This geographical data renders an otherwise undetected picture that shows Mormons were seen through a racial lens. This research fits into that which was pioneered by Dr. Paul Reeve – Mormons, at this time, were seen as different from other Americans. The Mormon Church was successful in bringing many immigrants from Great Britain, Western Europe and Scandinavia, and assimilating them into Utah's existing dominant culture. Less effective were their attempts to assimilate immigrants from Italy, Spain, Ireland, Poland, etc., into Utah society. The latter group of immigrants were considered “less white,” and Mormons were viewed by many Americans as “less American.” Obsessed with their national image, the members of the Mormon Church aspired to be seen as equally American and concurrently predominantly white. Unknowingly or at times knowingly, SLC society segregated certain “less white” groups to specific areas, so as to differentiate themselves from these communities.  Plewe concludes in this discussion that religion, race, economics, and the way each population of immigrants had different influences on SLC. English, German, and Scandinavian immigrants primarily migrated for religious purposes and were actively assimilated into the culture and, therefore, spatially distributed. Whereas, non-English speaking and Irish immigrants emigrated not for religious purposes, but for economic and labor reasons and for cheaper housing.Bio: Dr. Brandon S. Plewe, an associate professor of geography at BYU (Provo), has been teaching there since 1997. Plewe is a committed trail preservationist and his research focuses on mapmaking and map uses related to Mormonism and the American West. To experience Plewe's most recent mapping ideas go to #30DayMapChallenge on his Twitter feed. Do you have a question? Write askahistorian@utah.gov

Curious Minnesota
Why did Finnish immigrants come to Minnesota? (And no, they're not Scandinavian)

Curious Minnesota

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 18:21


Minnesota has more residents of Finnish ancestry than any other state. That's the result of mass immigration from Finland that occurred in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The story of Finns immigrating to Minnesota is distinct from the Swedes and Norwegians. Eric Roper, who wrote a story on this topic, discusses the reasons why with Ash Miller. LINKS: Why did Finnish immigrants come to Minnesota? (And no, they're not Scandinavian)

Ancient History Fangirl
RE-RELEASE: You Don't Know Yule

Ancient History Fangirl

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 89:19


What do you know about Yule? Maybe a lot. The holiday is widely celebrated in Scandinavian countries, and it's an important part of Wiccan and Pagan tradition. But for many of us, the version that's come down through history is strongly associated with Christmas--and heavily sanitized. When we scratched the surface, however, we found that the origins of Yule were older and darker and weirder than we ever imagined. Get ad-free episodes here: https://www.patreon.com/ancienthistoryfangirl Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Protrusive Dental Podcast
Chrome Partial Dentures Guide – The Scandinavian Way – PDP134

Protrusive Dental Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 45:42


I admit it. I have relied FAR too much on my lab technicians to help design my chrome partial dentures. This needs to change! I realised that I want to take control of the denture design process - who better than the King of Removable Prosthodontics education Dr Finlay Sutton to help us 'Make Dentures Great Again'! In this episode, Dr. Finlay Sutton clarifies the philosophy behind Scandinavian Chrome Dentures. He also explains what each appointment entails to help those earlier in their career. https://youtu.be/3aS7kZZUM_0 Download Protrusive App on iOS and Android and Claim your Verifiable CPD/CE by answering a few questions + You can get EARLY ACCESS to the episode + EXCLUSIVE content The Protrusive Dental Pearl: DENTURE DESIGN CHEAT SHEET! Dr. Finlay came up with a Universal Design Sheet. It covers all aspects of missing teeth - all