Podcasts about East Village

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  • 544PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about East Village

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Latest podcast episodes about East Village

The BadChristian Podcast
Dr. Jacqui Lewis

The BadChristian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 66:25


Dr. Lewis is the first female and first Black Senior Minister in her church's history. Located in the East Village, Middle Collegiate Church is a multiracial, welcoming, and inclusive congregation. Dr. Lewis has a new book called Fierce Love that tells deeply personal stories of abuse, love, overcoming prejudice and how Dr. Lewis wants to see religion as a healing force as opposed to a divisive tool. Buy a copy of Rev. Dr. Jacqui Lewis' book - Fierce Love https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/671314/fierce-love-by-rev-dr-jacqui-lewis/ Join the BC Club for two bonus episodes! Go to thebcclub.com to join! Give your love life it's own soundtrack. Buy a custom song now! Quantity is limited! https://bit.ly/3rb1hXB Get 10% off at Marriage Supply with code BCPOD! https://bit.ly/3tlRfpk

The Brian Lehrer Show
East Village Councilmember Wants Permanent Open Streets

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 24:17


The majority of the New York City Council members are new and are part of a class that is the most diverse and progressive in city history. Over the next year Brian Lehrer will get to know all 51 members. This week we hear from Councilmember Carlina Rivera on her priorities for District 2, which reaches from parts of the Lower East Side and through the East Village to Murray Hill.

School For The Dogs Podcast
Best Pet Ever: Writer/Producer Jessica Vitkus talks about Cookie and Coffee, her Guinea Pigs

School For The Dogs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 28:24


Introducing a new series: Best Pet Ever! Wherein Annie talks to interesting people about their interesting pets. Inspired by Betty White's 1970s show, The Pet Set, Annie interviews one of her closest friends, Jessica Vitkus. Jessica is an East-Village based writer and TV producer — she was Annie's boss ten years ago on the Animal Planet show, Too Cute: Puppies and Kittens. Jessica, her kids and her partner Stephen recently got a pair of Guinea Pigs. Jessica talks about the world of Guinea Pig rescue, Guinea Pig Pavlovian Conditioning, and about how rodents may be an underused tool in couples therapy. Like this podcast? You can support us by leaving a review on iTunes and/or shopping at StoreForTheDogs.com  Follow us on Instagram:  @schoolforthedogs @annie.grossman --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/dogs/message

House of Mystery True Crime History
Straight Up - Cathi Stoler

House of Mystery True Crime History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 56:43


Jude Dillane, owner of The Corner Lounge in Manhattan's East Village, knows she will never be safe until The New Year's Eve Serial Killer, Art Bevins, is behind bars. Still on the loose, he continues to taunt her. Blaming Jude for all his troubles, Bevins is determined to make her pay. With the FBI investigation at a stand-still Jude knows it's up to her to bring him to justice. With all this swirling around her, Thomas “Sully” Sullivan, her friend and landlord, becomes enamored of his new tenant, Dolores Castel. Jude instantly distrusts Sully's new love and believes Dolores is weaving a dangerous web. As she continues her pursuit of Bevins, Jude looks into Dolores's past, uncovering a series of deadly coincidences. Can Jude stop Bevins from his deadly pursuit and protect her friend from ruin?Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/houseofmysteryradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Books and the City
THROWBACK: Meet Your New Favorite Book Club!

Books and the City

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 76:18


OUR FIRST EVER EPISODE!! Pop some champagne because we're kicking off Books and the City with some exciting convos about how we met, what we're reading right now and what we want to read next! Plus, are we ALL Charlotte York or does someone have to be the Samantha?! Here are the books we discussed and the bar that matches it in NYC -------------> Kayla Read: The Words I Never Wrote by Jane Thynne https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/557329/the-words-i-never-wrote-by-jane-thynne/ Read this one while you have a cozy hot toddy and type away at your own history-making novel on the vintage typewriters at The High Line Hotel's Lobby Bar in Chelsea. Up next: Before and After by Judy Christie Becky Read: City of Flickering Light by Juliette Fay https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/City-of-Flickering-Light/Juliette-Fay/9781501192937 Read this while you sip a latte or an old fashioned at the art deco themed Five and Dime in the Financial District. Go at night for happy hour and you might find a silent film (or should we say flicker!) projected on the wall. Up next: Ninety-Nine Glimpses of Princess Margaret by Craig Brown Emily Read: Catch and Kill by Ronan Farrow https://www.littlebrown.com/titles/ronan-farrow/catch-and-kill/9780316486637/ Because of the sensitive subject matter of this book we do not have a location recommendation to go along with it. Read this book in the place that makes you feel most comfortable.

All Of It
25 Years of 'Rent'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 22:19


[REBROADCAST FROM March 1, 2021] The musical, "Rent," was first performed in January of 1996 at the New York Theater Workshop in the East Village. This year marks the production's 25th anniversary and the New York Theatre Workshop is honoring the musical by making it the centerpiece of its annual gala -- 25 Years of Rent: Measured in Love. Original cast members Daphne Rubin-Vega and Adam Pascal and New York Theatre Workshop artistic director, Jim Nicola, join us to talk about the gala as well as the musical's legacy.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Holiday Best: Connecting Across the Divide

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 107:57


This Christmas Eve, enjoy catching up with these recent conversations about connecting: Rev. Dr. Jacqueline Lewis, senior minister at Middle Collegiate Church in the East Village and the author of Fierce Love: A Bold Path to Ferocious Courage and Rule-Breaking Kindness That Can Heal the World (Harmony, 2021), offers a guide for getting past today's tribalism and competition to see that we are all in this together. Katharine Hayhoe, climate scientist at Texas Tech University, chief scientist of The Nature Conservancy, lead author for the Second, Third, and Fourth US National Climate Assessment, host of the PBS digital series Global Weirding and the author of Saving Us: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World (Atria/One Signal Publishers, 2021), talks about how to avoid letting political polarization derail actions, big and small, to address climate change. As families gather to celebrate the holidays, many singles and unmarried couples might face questions from family members about their relationship status. Katherine Hertlein, relationship therapist and professor in the couple and family therapy program at Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine at University of Nevada Las Vegas, offers advice for responding to their intrusive questions. Before we gather with folks with different media diets, WNYC's The United States of Anxiety host Kai Wright and senior digital producer Kousha Navidar offer an experiment to get past the filter bubbles that define what information gets to us. Anna Sale, host of the WNYC Studios podcast Death, Sex & Money and author of the book Let's Talk About Hard Things (Simon & Schuster, 2021), shares her tips for how to have conversations about tough subjects, and why she thinks it's beneficial to talk it out.   These interviews were lightly edited to fit the format; the original web versions are available here: Rev. Dr. Jacqui Lewis on Coming Together (Nov. 9, 2021) Climate Science for All (Sept. 23, 2021) How to Respond to Meddling Family Members (Dec. 6, 2021) My Bubble, Your Bubble (Nov. 23, 2021) Hard Conversations Can Be the Best Conversations (May 4, 2021)

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Rock's Backpages 117: Holly George Warren on Janis Joplin + The Monkees + Michael Nesmith

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 81:19


In this episode we invite Holly George-Warren — beamed in from upstate New York — to tell us about her long and distinguished career as a journalist, author and editor. Holly revisits her North Carolina childhood and early infatuation with pop radio, then talks about her move to New York City in the early '80s, her East Village bands Clambake and Das Furlines, and her long tenure at Rolling Stone Press. Barney, Mark and Jasper ask her about the latest of her many books — her acclaimed 2019 biography of Janis Joplin — and tie this in with two clips from a 1984 audio interview with Peter Albin of Big Brother & the Holding Company, including his account of Joplin's impact on the band in 1966. Conversation turns to the passing of Michael Nesmith, the Monkee who walked away from pop fame to commence life as an eccentric country singer-songwriter. We hear a clip of the lugubrious Texan speaking about the Monkees in 1974, then discuss "America's Beatles" [sic] and Nesmith's own singular musical legacy. Mark and Jasper talk us out with their reflections on new library pieces about John Peel (1969), the Cockettes (1971), Daft Punk (1997) and artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (2000). Many thanks to special guest Holly George-Warren; please visit her website hollygeorgewarren.com for details about her books, including Janis: Her Life and Music. Pieces discussed: Janis Joplin, Peter Albin audio, The Monkees, Michael Nesmith, Mike Nesmith audio, Marc Bölan, John Peel, The Cockettes, Ronnie Scott, The Sex Pistols, The Life and Work of Basquiat and Christmas singles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

FAQ NYC
Episode 179: Park Wars

FAQ NYC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 35:41


Katie Honan and Harry Siegel take stock of an ominous moment in New York, with big changes looming, and Alex Lynn talks with East Village resident Kirsten Theodos about the ongoing demolition of East River Park, and community member's fight to save it.

Rock's Backpages
E117: Holly George Warren on Janis Joplin + The Monkees + Michael Nesmith

Rock's Backpages

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 80:19


In this episode we invite Holly George-Warren — beamed in from upstate New York — to tell us about her long and distinguished career as a journalist, author and editor. Holly revisits her North Carolina childhood and early infatuation with pop radio, then talks about her move to New York City in the early '80s, her East Village bands Clambake and Das Furlines, and her long tenure at Rolling Stone Press. Barney, Mark and Jasper ask her about the latest of her many books — her acclaimed 2019 biography of Janis Joplin — and tie this in with two clips from a 1984 audio interview with Peter Albin of Big Brother & the Holding Company, including his account of Joplin's impact on the band in 1966. Conversation turns to the passing of Michael Nesmith, the Monkee who walked away from pop fame to commence life as an eccentric country singer-songwriter. We hear a clip of the lugubrious Texan speaking about the Monkees in 1974, then discuss "America's Beatles" [sic] and Nesmith's own singular musical legacy. Mark and Jasper talk us out with their reflections on new library pieces about John Peel (1969), the Cockettes (1971), Daft Punk (1997) and artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (2000). Many thanks to special guest Holly George-Warren; please visit her website hollygeorgewarren.com for details about her books, including Janis: Her Life and Music. Pieces discussed: Janis Joplin, Peter Albin audio, The Monkees, Michael Nesmith, Mike Nesmith audio, Marc Bölan, John Peel, The Cockettes, Ronnie Scott, The Sex Pistols, The Life and Work of Basquiat and Christmas singles.

Oldie But A Goodie
#155: Batteries Not Included

Oldie But A Goodie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 68:19


*batteries not included, released December 18th, 1987, is a science-fiction tale about friendly UFO-shaped aliens who help the tenants of a building fight back against land developers. It's sometimes wholesome, sometimes dark, but regularly messy and frustrating... Particularly for one of us! Which one? Well, you'll have to listen to find out. Join the Bad Porridge Club on Patreon for TWO bonus episodes each month! https://www.patreon.com/oldiebutagoodiepod Follow Skorn! Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/skorngaming/  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYfesFDSMmrIy0OWB4_U3MQ/  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skorngaming/  Twitter: https://twitter.com/skorngaming/ Follow the show! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oldiebutagoodiepod/  Facebook: https://fb.me/oldiebutagoodiepod Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjfdXHxK_rIUsOEoFSx-hGA  Podcast Platforms: https://linktr.ee/oldiebutagoodiepod  Got feedback? Send us an email at oldiebutagoodiepod@gmail.com Follow the hosts! Sandro Falce - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sandrofalce/ - Twitter: https://twitter.com/sandrofalce - Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/SandroFalce/ - Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/kegelandgregmusic  - Nerd-Out Podcast: https://anchor.fm/nerd-out-podcast  Zach Adams - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zach4dams/ - Twitter: https://twitter.com/ZackoCaveWizard Donations: https://paypal.me/oldiebutagoodiepod Please do not feel like you have to contribute anything but any donations are greatly appreciated! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Insight On Business the News Hour
The Business News Headlines 17 December 2021

Insight On Business the News Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 10:35


It was another rough day on Wall Street and we'll share that story and click ahead for Stuff to DO in the Greater Des Moines Metro with Jeff Pitts from Cityview. But, first the news: Stocks fell again today and why; No more "cooking with gas" in NYC; The "Never Ending Pasta Bowl" may be ending; Oregon grocery store chains to replace striking workers; Episodes of The Apprentice and legal issues in the news; The Wall Street Report; The December we didn't want to...remember. Those stories and Stuff to Do in the Greater Des Moines Metro with Jeff Pitts from Cityview Magazine. We've got ballet, music, light shows the East Village event and so much more.  Click here to listen! Thanks for listening! The award winning Insight on Business the News Hour with Michael Libbie is the only weekday business news podcast in the Midwest. The national, regional and some local business news along with long-form business interviews can be heard Monday - Friday. You can subscribe on PlayerFM, Podbean, iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher or TuneIn Radio. And you can catch The Business News Hour Week in Review each Sunday Noon on News/Talk 1540 KXEL. The Business News Hour is a production of Insight Advertising, Marketing & Communications. You can follow us on Twitter @IoB_NewsHour.

Sprawlcast
Sprawlcast - Episode December 8, 2021

Sprawlcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021


Cultivating Neighbourliness in East Village Jeremy Klaszus sits down with Lisa Murphy Lamb, director of Loft 112, to explore how she has welcomed—and been welcomed by—her neighbours in East Village.

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Mayor Bill de Blasio urges the importance of getting boosters shots amid rising COVID-19 positivity rates...1010 WINS gets a look a strategic session...A big fire in the East Village leaves one individual dead...A Christmas Story pop-up will be opening up

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 7:31


Evening All Local for December 16, 2021 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Conrad Life Report
Episode 76

Conrad Life Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 27:17


Welcome to Episode 76! Topics: neighborhood report, friends in town, Hiss Golden Messenger at Webster Hall, McSorley's Ale House in the East Village, annual eye checkup, I GET WILD at with The Hold Steady at Brooklyn Bowl, Genesis at Madison Square Garden, Tom and Jerry's bar in Nolita, dentist visit, office visit, Bilt Bar in Prospect Heights, F&F Pizza, Taqueria Al Pastor in Brooklyn Heights, Drew's Fender P-bass, East One Coffee Shop, stoop find cassettes, No Medium by Rosali, Leftovers by Le Ren, Chart For The Solution by Writhing Squares, Windless Day by Scott Hirsch, Barn by Neil Young and Crazy Horse, Live In Brighton 1975 by Can, Far In by Helado Negro, 3 by Mapache, Tiddly by Fox Farm Brewery.

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie
Episode 2223: La La Brooks ~ The Original "Crystals" Vocal Legend.... GRAMMY® Hall of Fame Inducted Hit "Santa Claus is Coming to Town"!!

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 43:35


 The House of Blues, The Late Show w David Letterman American Bandstand, PBS~ Those are just SOME of the place you have seen "La La" Dolores Brooks, the original lead singer of top hits of the girl group the Crystals and Broadway & Film actress. She is best known as the lead vocalist on the Crystals' hits "Then He Kissed Me" and "Da Doo Ron Ron", "Santa Claus is Coming to Town" & many others. Ms. Brooks also sang lead on three songs on the album A Christmas Gift for You, one of only two Christmas albums inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 1968, she appeared in the original Broadway production of the musical Hair, where she performed the song "Aquarius". She would later appear in the Broadway show Two Gentlemen of Verona in 1971. She also toured with and recorded for various artists (such as the Neville Brothers, Bobby Womack and Isaac Hayes); made short appearances in films; and contributed songs to different movie soundtracks (including the 1970 film Cotton Comes to Harlem). In 1983, she and her family moved to London, England, where she and Idris continued their careers in music. In 1990, they moved to Vienna, Austria where she continued singing and writing songs with her husband Idris Muhammad and also hosted a local radio show; they lived in Vienna until 1997. Andrew Edge sang backing vocals on her BMG (Austria) CD LaLa Brooks & Friends in 1994. Brooks moved back to the United States at the turn of the century and resides in the East Village. She is now a grandmother of three, has her own band and is still performing. Her music compilation's is called "All or Nothing!! © 2021 All Rights Reserved © 2021 Building Abundant Success!! Join Me on ~ iHeart Radio @ https://tinyurl.com/iHeartBAS Spot Me on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/yxuy23ba Amazon Music ~ https://tinyurl.com/AmzBAS  

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Suny's Board of Trustees standing behind Chancellor James Malatras despite growing calls of concern for his resignation...East Village suffers problems with outdoor dining structures...Police looking for a gunman who shot two men on the 4 train in East H

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 2:20


All Local for 2pm. 12/4/21 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Laura Flanders Show
How Radical Self-Love Can Heal the World

The Laura Flanders Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 29:20


We do not accept advertisements or government funding.  We are independent movement media for the people, and funded by the people!  Become a member by making a one time donation or make it a monthly contribution at https://LauraFlanders.org/donate It's that time of year when we all need resilience: elections, holidays, the change of seasons. Many of us need fortitude to get through. Reverend Dr. Jacqui Lewis would add that we need Fierce Love too. Reverend Jacqui is senior minister of Middle Collegiate Church in Manhattan's East Village. A year ago, the building burnt to the ground, but the story didn't stop there. In this far-ranging conversation, Laura and Rev. Jacqui talk about mutual aid, colonial baggage, and the Reverend's new book, Fierce Love: A Bold Path to Ferocious Courage and Rule-Breaking Kindness that Can Heal the World. Rev. Jacqui also shares what it took for her to emerge from a “bad touch” experience -- and how truth helps us move from fear to power in our relationship with ourselves, one another, and to making justice in the world.  Full Episode Notes are posted at Patreon.com/theLFShow for members and non-members.  Support the show by becoming a member as a monthly supporter at Patreon. 

The Rob Burgess Show
Ep. 206 - Howie Statland

The Rob Burgess Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 39:47


Hello and welcome to The Rob Burgess Show. I am, of course, your host, Rob Burgess. On this our 206th episode, our guest is Howie Statland. Here is how he describes himself and his store, Rivington Guitars: “This year we are celebrating 23 years of business – 23 years of finding guitar players the guitar of their dreams. Located at 73 E. 4th St., our store is right in the heart of the East Village of Manhattan. We like to keep our prices low and our customers delighted. We buy, sell, trade and repair all vintage guitars, amps, keyboards and more. Our expert repair shop features quick, reasonable prices and reliable service. Since we opened in 1998, Rivington Guitars has come to be known as 'The Best Little Guitar Store in New York City,' and this is a reputation we have earned. Rivington Guitars specializes in vintage guitars, and we know vintage guitars. It's what we do best. We have over 350 vintage guitars in stock at all times -- Fender, Gibson, Gretsch, Martin, Rickenbacker, Silvertone and Harmony as well as many other more unusual brands. Owner and proprietor Howie Statland is a featured survey participant for the 'Vintage Guitar Price Guide.' He is one of 25 select guitar dealers throughout the USA who helps determine the values set forth in the 'Vintage Guitar Price Guide.' He has been dealing guitars for over 20 years. A list of some of our satisfied clients include Paul Simon, The Killers, The Strokes, Courtney Love and Hole, Elvis Costello, Jeff Tweedy and Wilco, The Black Keys, Cults, Green Day, Arcade Fire, Brian Jonestown Massacre, Vampire Weekend, Motley Crue, Jonathan Richman, Mumford & Sons, J Mascis and Dinosaur Jr., the Smashing Pumpkins, Norah Jones, Peter Bjorn and John and many other local New York City working musicians. Our store began in 1998 on Rivington Street, hence our name, and expanded to a larger location on East 4th Street in 2008. We have since opened an acoustic store called Rivington Guitars Unplugged on the same street as our main store. Besides selling fine vintage guitars, we also offer guitar lessons at affordable rates, rental services and appraisal services. Our website is updated daily and all our inventory is on our website. There is always something new at Rivington Guitars, so come in today.” Join The Rob Burgess Show mailing list! Go to tinyletter.com/therobburgessshow and type in your email address. Then, respond to the automatic message. Also please make sure to comment, follow, like, subscribe, share, rate and review everywhere the podcast is available, including iTunes, YouTube, SoundCloud, Stitcher, Google Play Music, Twitter, Internet Archive, TuneIn, RSS, and, now, Spotify. The official website for the podcast is www.therobburgessshow.com. You can find more about me by visiting my website, www.thisburgess.com.If you have something to say, record a voice memo on your smartphone and send it to therobburgessshow@gmail.com. Include “voice memo” in the subject line of the email. Also, if you want to call or text the show for any reason, the number is: 317-674-3547.

Sound & Vision
Alannah Farrell

Sound & Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 83:56


Alannah Farrell (b.1988, Kingston, NY) is a queer transmasculine painter who lives and works in the East Village, New York, NY. They grew up in a rural hamlet in upstate NY, raised by two outside-the-system creative parents. They began undergraduate studies at The Cooper Union, New York, NY, receiving their BFA in 2011. Their work was previously exhibited at Anat Ebgi Gallery, Los Angeles, CA (solo), The Painting Center, New York, NY (solo); Thierry Goldberg Gallery, New York, NY; Harper's, East Hampton, NY, Harper's, Los Angeles, CA, Richard Heller Gallery, Los Angeles, CA, and UTA Artist Space, Los Angeles, CA. They have a forthcoming solo exhibition at Harper's new location in Chelsea at 512 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 2022. They are represented by Harper's Gallery, New York, and Anat Ebgi Gallery, Los Angeles. Their work centers around a humanistic celebration of the individuals in their community, a predominantly queer creative community in NYC, by exposing the personal struggles, uncertainties, intimate moments, and triumphs they face.

LET IT OUT
Squishy Hearts, "Rejection as Protection", Inner Teenagers, Dating and Breakups with Mari Andrew, Author and Illustrator [UPDATED REPOST]

LET IT OUT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 86:59


This is a rerun of a 2019 episode from the archives with author and illustrator Mari Andrew. She is a present observer of her world and has the impressive talent to take her keen observations and translate them into relatable art. Fittingly enough, we ran into each other in the East Village, the neighborhood we both lived at the time, and soon she came over to record. In this conversation, we cover “rejection as protection”, creative routines, money in NYC, feeling raw after breakups, transitions and how they make us fertile for growth, her specific practice of gratitude, and her useful body image advice. Show notes:- Find Mari on all platforms: https://linktr.ee/bymariandrew- Original episode show notes page- Check out Katie's one-on-one Creative Clinic- You can book a free consultation with Katie here, and if you don't see a time that works for you please email her at katie@letitouttt.com- Listen to Episode 337 to learn more about working one-on-one with Katie- Subscribe to our newsletter to get show notes sent straight to your inbox- Follow @letitouttt on Instagram This episode is brought to you by Let It Out Kits, workshops for growing. All of our kits, including the WRITE kit and Katie's holiday workshops, are 22% off with the code "cosmic"!

Just Relationships
Janet Luongo - Rebellion, 1967: A Memoir - Part 1

Just Relationships

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 27:58


Dr. Duffy talks with her sister, Janet Luongo, author of Rebellion, 1967 - A Memoir, about a review of the significant events of 1967… the year of The Summer of Love… intertwined with an idealistic 17-year-old girl who rebelled by living in the East Village.

House of Mystery True Crime History
Cathi Stoler - Straight Up

House of Mystery True Crime History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 56:43


Jude Dillane, owner of The Corner Lounge in Manhattan's East Village, knows she will never be safe until The New Year's Eve Serial Killer, Art Bevins, is behind bars. Still on the loose, he continues to taunt her. Blaming Jude for all his troubles, Bevins is determined to make her pay. With the FBI investigation at a stand-still Jude knows it's up to her to bring him to justice. With all this swirling around her, Thomas “Sully” Sullivan, her friend and landlord, becomes enamored of his new tenant, Dolores Castel. Jude instantly distrusts Sully's new love and believes Dolores is weaving a dangerous web. As she continues her pursuit of Bevins, Jude looks into Dolores's past, uncovering a series of deadly coincidences. Can Jude stop Bevins from his deadly pursuit and protect her friend from ruin?Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/houseofmysteryradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Rundown on WNYU 89.1 FM
The Rundown | November 3

The Rundown on WNYU 89.1 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 32:08


All new Rundown! The annual New York City Village Halloween Parade was able to march again this year after its disappointing cancellation due to the pandemic last year. Ruby Naylor and Trevor Johnson have the story. The lightpost mosaic sculptures along St. Marks Place and Astor Place have been iconic East Village landmarks for decades, but artist Jim Powers needs support to keep them around. Adelaide Miller has the story. In October, New York City mayor Bill de Blasio announced that he would be ending the city's controversial Gifted and Talented program for accelerated learning. But mayor-elect Eric Adams has said he would keep and expand the program, leaving G&T's future uncertain. Jack Peterson and Grace Symes have the story. The East Side Coastal Resiliency plan is now underway and the battle over the East River Park continues. Grace Wanebo has the story. Around the world today, the state of journalism continues to fight against repression. Rundown reporter, Izzy McMahon, has an exclusive interview with Finlay Muratova, whose father, Dmityry Muratova, was awarded the Nobel peace prize for his work as editor-in-chief of Russia's Novaya Gazeta newspaper, just last month. The NYC elections took place; Jack Peterson discusses the results. Hosted by Grace Wanebo.

The Tim Ferriss Show
#545: Marco Canora — The Art of Food, Eating, Nutrition, and Life

The Tim Ferriss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 122:01


Marco Canora — The Art of Food, Eating, Nutrition, and Life | Brought to you by Vuori comfortable and durable performance apparel, Eight Sleep's Pod Pro Cover sleeping solution for dynamic cooling and heating, and Athletic Greens all-in-one nutritional supplement. More on all three below.After years working with and training under Danny Meyer and Tom Colicchio at Gramercy Tavern and Craft, Chef Marco Canora (@marcocanora) opened Hearth in the East Village in 2003, before the neighborhood was a culinary destination. In 2014, Marco kicked off America's embrace of bone broth with Brodo, serving bone broth in coffee cups out of a side window at Hearth. Over the years, Brodo has been recognized consistently as a bone broth pioneer in outlets such as The New York Times, Time, and Good Morning America. Visit Brodo.com to order some bone broth for yourself, or visit one of their several locations in New York City.Marco's first cookbook, Salt to Taste: The Key to Confident, Delicious Cooking was nominated for a James Beard Award. He is also the author of A Good Food Day and Brodo: a Bone Broth Cookbook.Marco has been profiled in The New York Times, Serious Eats, and Food & Wine. He was a finalist on The Next Iron Chef, a judge on Chopped and Top Chef, and he has appeared on Today, The Chew, Good Morning America, Martha Stewart, and Nightline. In May 2017, Marco won the James Beard Award for Best Chef: New York City.He lives, cooks, and gardens with his wife and two children in Yonkers, NY.Please enjoy!This episode is brought to you by Vuori clothing! Vuori is a new and fresh perspective on performance apparel, perfect if you are sick and tired of traditional, old workout gear. Everything is designed for maximum comfort and versatility so that you look and feel as good in everyday life as you do working out.Get yourself some of the most comfortable and versatile clothing on the planet at VuoriClothing.com/Tim. Not only will you receive 20% off your first purchase, but you'll also enjoy free shipping on any US orders over $75 and free returns.*This episode is also brought to you by Athletic Greens. I get asked all the time, “If you could only use one supplement, what would it be?” My answer is usually Athletic Greens, my all-in-one nutritional insurance. I recommended it in The 4-Hour Body in 2010 and did not get paid to do so. I do my best with nutrient-dense meals, of course, but AG further covers my bases with vitamins, minerals, and whole-food-sourced micronutrients that support gut health and the immune system. Right now, Athletic Greens is offering you their Vitamin D Liquid Formula free with your first subscription purchase—a vital nutrient for a strong immune system and strong bones. Visit AthleticGreens.com/Tim to claim this special offer today and receive the free Vitamin D Liquid Formula (and five free travel packs) with your first subscription purchase! That's up to a one-year supply of Vitamin D as added value when you try their delicious and comprehensive all-in-one daily greens product.*This episode is also brought to you by Eight Sleep! Eight Sleep's Pod Pro Cover is the easiest and fastest way to sleep at the perfect temperature. It pairs dynamic cooling and heating with biometric tracking to offer the most advanced (and user-friendly) solution on the market. Simply add the Pod Pro Cover to your current mattress and start sleeping as cool as 55°F or as hot as 110°F. It also splits your bed in half, so your partner can choose a totally different temperature.And now, my dear listeners—that's you—can get $250 off the Pod Pro Cover. Simply go to EightSleep.com/Tim or use code TIM. *For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim's email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Discover Tim's books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferrissPast guests on The Tim Ferriss Show include Jerry Seinfeld, Hugh Jackman, Dr. Jane Goodall, LeBron James, Kevin Hart, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Jamie Foxx, Matthew McConaughey, Esther Perel, Elizabeth Gilbert, Terry Crews, Sia, Yuval Noah Harari, Malcolm Gladwell, Madeleine Albright, Cheryl Strayed, Jim Collins, Mary Karr, Maria Popova, Sam Harris, Michael Phelps, Bob Iger, Edward Norton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Neil Strauss, Ken Burns, Maria Sharapova, Marc Andreessen, Neil Gaiman, Neil de Grasse Tyson, Jocko Willink, Daniel Ek, Kelly Slater, Dr. Peter Attia, Seth Godin, Howard Marks, Dr. Brené Brown, Eric Schmidt, Michael Lewis, Joe Gebbia, Michael Pollan, Dr. Jordan Peterson, Vince Vaughn, Brian Koppelman, Ramit Sethi, Dax Shepard, Tony Robbins, Jim Dethmer, Dan Harris, Ray Dalio, Naval Ravikant, Vitalik Buterin, Elizabeth Lesser, Amanda Palmer, Katie Haun, Sir Richard Branson, Chuck Palahniuk, Arianna Huffington, Reid Hoffman, Bill Burr, Whitney Cummings, Rick Rubin, Dr. Vivek Murthy, Darren Aronofsky, and many more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Rev. Dr. Jacqui Lewis on Coming Together

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 26:59


Rev. Dr. Jacqueline Lewis, senior minister at Middle Collegiate Church in the East Village and the author of Fierce Love: A Bold Path to Ferocious Courage and Rule-Breaking Kindness That Can Heal the World (Harmony, 2021), offers a guide for getting past today's tribalism through teachings of philosophy and faith by recognizing common humanity.

Laporan VOA - Voice of America | Bahasa Indonesia
Layanan Tanpa Kontak di Restoran Dumpling di New York - November 05, 2021

Laporan VOA - Voice of America | Bahasa Indonesia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 2:09


Sebuah restoran dumpling, yakni sejenis pangsit, di wilayah East Village, di kota New York memberikan layanan tanpa kontak bagi para pelanggannya. Layanan ini makin diminati di era pandemi karena pembeli bisa mengambil sendiri pesanannya tanpa harus bertemu pegawai restoran. Berikut laporan tim VOA.

How I Built This with Guy Raz
Live Episode! Milk Bar: Christina Tosi (2019)

How I Built This with Guy Raz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 67:05


For Christina Tosi, baking wasn't just a delicious childhood hobby—it was a daily creative outlet and a way to blow off steam. After college, she went to culinary school and honed her pastry technique at high-end restaurants in NYC. But she also craved the opportunity to make unfussy, nostalgic desserts like the ones she grew up eating. So in 2008, Christina opened her first Milk Bar bakery in the East Village, with the help of her mentor, Momofuku chef David Chang. Soon, people from around the country were calling her up, begging for her gooey pies, confetti birthday cakes, and pretzel-potato-chip cookies. Today, Milk Bar has spread to 15 locations, and reportedly brings in tens of millions of dollars a year. This show was recorded live at The Town Hall in New York City.

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Early voting in New York and New Jersey has begun, Four shootings occur overnight in the Bronx, Dogs compete for best costume in East Village.

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 3:21


All local for 10/23/21. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Digging in the Dome
DITD Presents: Mark "Jiggy" Jigjarjian

Digging in the Dome

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 70:32


We sit down with comedian and international headline act, Jiggy, to discuss his career, how he became a member of the Impractical Jokers family and how a buffet full of prime rib at a comedy show is the harbinger of doom. Grab your melon balls and avoid the golf course! Jiggy will be at The Moxy Hotel in the East Village on Thursday October 21st, The New York Comedy Club at the Gramercy Theater on October 26th and with James "Murr" Murray at the Stress Factory in Bridgeport, CT on October 28th. Check out his podcast Taste's Funny wherever you get podcasts, follow him on all socials @jiggycomedy and go to www.jiggycomedy.com for all your Jiggy needs. DITD is sponsored by smoothmyballs.com. Enter promo code DITD to get $10 off your purchase and you too can experience the glory of a smooth sack. Check us out at our new website www.digginginthedome.com Sub to our YT channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX0m8DVfmuQ-RJPTXmImxiQ Follow, like, subscribe, like again to all of our social media. Twitter: @diggingdome FB/IG: @digginginthedome --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Stephanie and Stephanie Talk Tunes: "Halloween," The Misfits

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 43:50


Get in the spooky spirit of the Halloween season by joining us as we talk about our memories and stories around The Misfits' classic "Halloween"! Hear all about Halloween in NYC, the East Village parade (including Lou Reed's classic "Halloween Parade"), and of course, what it was like to see The Misfits play a Halloween show in Times Square. Also hear all about Glenn Danzig's occasional diva-ish behavior though the years. We'll also talk about hearing from the songwriter/singer of a previous episode(!). Happy Halloween, Talk Tuners! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Get Your Rocks Off
Tuesday October 19th, 2021 * LIVE From Bowery Electric in NYC

Get Your Rocks Off

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 94:58


This week was the first ever Live Recording of the podcast, from the heart of NYC's East Village. I ramble about my departure from and return back to New York City for the first time in 16 months, the longest stretch Ive ever been away from the city. And how I ended up in the relatively tiny town of McCall, Idaho and how I've now moved to the completely tiny town of Yellow Pine, Idaho. Population 24. Plus an audience Q&A to cap it off!

Get Connected
The YinOva Institute on Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

Get Connected

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 17:03


Noah Rubeinstein, Clinic Director of the YinOva Institute in the East Village, discusses the basics of acupuncture, how Chinese Medicine can compliment conventional treatments, and discussing alternative therapies with your doctor. For more, visit yinovacenter.com.

Terror Cerca de Ti Podcast
Ep 130 - Fantasmas de East Village 2

Terror Cerca de Ti Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:44


En este episodio les traigo más historias que formaron parte del recorrido en East Village, NYC de Boroughs of the Dead.    Pagina con los audios grabados en Merchant's House - http://www.sturgesparanormal.com/wordpress_site/evidence/audio/  https://boroughsofthedead.com/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/terrorcerca/  Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/terrorcerca/  GoodReads - https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/130049089-terror-cerca-de-ti  Twitter - https://twitter.com/terrorcerca

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 132: Every Box Tells a Story: Marc Cohen's Box Art Jewelry with Art Jeweler, Marc Cohen- Part 1

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:47


What you'll learn in this episode: Why Marc's box art jewelry was inspired by his time working in the theater industry How Marc went from selling his work on the streets of New York City to selling them to Hollywood's biggest celebrities Why artists have always borrowed from each other's work Why box art is a conversation starter that breaks down barriers How every box tells a story Additional Resources: Instagram Photos: Museum of Israel Exhibition  Currently on view at SFO Airport  Marc Cohen and Lisa Berman (no relation)  About Marc Cohen: Marc Cohen is a highly regarded artist known for his wearable box art. As a former actor, stage manager and set designer, Cohen's two-inch-square boxes resemble stage sets with three-dimensional figures and images. His one-of-a-kind pieces sit on the shelves of numerous celebrities and can be worn like a brooch or pin. The archive of Cohen's work is housed at California art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear. Transcript: Inspired by his time in theater and created to resemble a stage, Marc Cohen's box art pieces are well-known among rare jewelry lovers and Hollywood's most famous artists, actors and producers. Part three-dimensional art, part jewelry, the two-by-two boxes feature images and tiny figures that reflect our world. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about his process for creating box art; what it was like to work with theater greats like Tom O'Horgan and Paula Wagner; and why his pieces are more than just shadow boxes. Read the episode transcript for part 1 below.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Marc Cohen. Marc is a former actor, set designer and stage manager. He is a highly regarded artist recognized for his box art, which graces the shelves of many celebrities. The box art pieces are often worn as brooches. We'll hear all about his jewelry journey today, but before we do that, I want to thank Lisa Berman of Sculpture to Wear for making it possible for Marc to be with us today. Marc, so glad to have you. Marc: As am I. Thank you for inviting me. Sharon: Great to be with you. Tell us about your jewelry journey. It started with you traveling around the world from what you've said. Tell us about that and how everything worked from there. Marc: I was a 20-year-old young man and I left America, basically, on a freight ship. That's how I started the journey. I have a saying now, which is “Every box art tells a story.” The irony of that is that when I travel, because I was on the road for a very long time, going all over the world, I liked collecting things but I had no place to put them. I found these little, tiny boxes that I used to take candy out of, and when they were empty, I went, “Oh, this is a great thing to put little things inside of.” I already was starting the idea of collecting little objects that I might go back to at some point and use it as a part of the art. But I traveled; I went around the world all the way to India until 1970. Then in 1970, I decided to return to America and relocate myself within the country. Prior to that, I had left in 1966. It was during the Vietnam War.  I was raised in Southern California, so I came back to America and went back to my roots. I have a stepsister, and she had a friend named Tom O'Horgan. Tom O'Horgan is actually very famous in the theater world, primarily because he directed the show on Broadway called “Hair.” He directed many other shows after that, but that is the one he's most known for. In meeting each other for the first time, he asked me about myself, and I said, “I traveled around the world and I don't have any real direction about what I want to do next.” He said, “Well, I need a driver because I'm working on these film projects. Do you drive?” and I said, “Yeah, I drive.” So, he hired me as a driver.  During that period, which was in the mid-70s, I drove him around Los Angeles. I knew Los Angeles like the back of my hand, and we went to all these different studios and met all these different, incredibly famous people; directors, writers and the like, actors and so on and so forth. I was getting a little bit of a background, but what I didn't know at the time, not until many years later, was how I ended up becoming a curator and jewelry maker. I was influenced by the work of Tom O'Horgan. Being a set director, he did plays. The things he worked on in LA ended up getting finished, and he said, “I'm going back to New York. Keep in touch with me. Maybe there's some work for you in New York.”  About six months later, I called him on the phone. He said, “Marc, we're doing this show on Broadway. It's about Lenny Bruce and I have a great job. I'd love you to come and work on it.” I said, “Well, I've never lived in New York, but I do know who Lenny Bruce is. So yeah, I'm coming.” I went to New York and got a room at the Chelsea Hotel. It was during the time of Andy Warhol and a lot of other people living in the Chelsea Hotel. So here I am, in the middle of this incredible epicenter of activity; there was so much different art on the walls of the Chelsea Hotel back in those days, and all these Warhol people and other characters from the avant garde world in New York City. That's the background of how I got to where I got. What I mean is that as a young guy, I didn't know a lot, and I didn't have a lot of background in art per se. I was more like a young guy who was just wandering on the planet, as I said earlier.  So, here I am in New York. I'm in the middle of an epicenter of activity, and Tom says to me, “Well, we're in pre-production for the show, and there are a lot of other things I would like you to do for me.” He gave me a lot of different jobs, and I went around and did that for a while until the show went into production. During those pre-production meetings, he would meet with all these different designers. One of those designers is now a very famous set designer by the name of Robin Wagner. Robin Wagner went on to design “A Chorus Line” and a lot of other incredible Broadway productions. Robin, over the years, became one of my closest friends. The reason I bring him up is because we used to go his studio, which at the time was in a building called 890 Studios, which is owned by Michael Bennett, who was the director of “A Chorus Line.” I'd go to his studio with Tom, and he would have models of shows. I was picking up the incredibly creative process of how you put together an idea for a show and a stage. He would have little characters he would use to put on models of shows. I took note of those little figures, but I kept it hidden in the back of my brain, not knowing anything, nothing preplanned about what I was doing other than being Tom's assistant. We eventually went to Broadway with “Lenny.” “Lenny” opened. It was a big success and for about 30 years, I worked primarily with Tom O'Horgan in theater.  Sharon: Is it Tom O'Horgan? Marc: Yes, it's spelled O-‘-H-o-r-g-a-n. He was an artist. He always considered himself to be one of those people that didn't do things that are the typical Broadway. I mean, when you think about “Hair”—I didn't work on the original. I worked on a later production with Tom, but by that point, I had already worked on “Lenny Bruce,” “Jesus Christ Superstar” and so many other amazing things. We did opera. Tom did a lot of things, and Tom's influences and Robin's influences are guides to what I eventually ended up becoming, which is an artist who creates wearable art.  When you think about jewelry, for me, typically jewelry would be semiprecious stones, silver, gold, pearls, all that kind of stuff. I'm not the kind of creator or designer that would even know where to start to put those things together. I love beads. In the 60s, I made my own beads and necklaces, but I didn't see that as where I wanted to go. Because of my memory of the stage and theater and stories—when I told you earlier about the boxes, during the period I was living in New York, I collected a lot of things in my little East Village apartment.  I happened to be downtown in the Soho area; I was down on Canal Street. I was walking along the street, and all the shops had things out in front of them for sale. I walked by, and there were empty boxes and lots of other things. I was just motivated to buy them, so I bought them. I brought them back to my apartment and I was sitting at my little worktable looking at all these objects. I'm thinking, “Maybe I could make something out of this. I know that this coming year, Tom has this big Christmas party, and usually he's the guy who gives everybody something unique for a present.” There I was, looking at all these things, and I looked at the little box and glued a little figure I had inside the box. For example, this is a box. It's an empty one. Sharon: Like an acrylic, plastic box. Marc: A plastic box, an acrylic plastic box. Most people would take this box. It has a lid. They would put anything in it, but they didn't think they could put a whole story together. When I put the little figures in the box like that, and it has a lid and I put it like that, then I have a box with people standing in front of it, but they're sort of looking through. What are they looking at? I started to figure out I needed to have an image to tell the story. This is the World Trade Center. Sharon: So, you're creating little worlds inside the box. Marc: Right. Since I started the idea in 1985, I have made thousands, and out of those thousands, many of them are one-of-a-kind. How I can I put it? Because of my traveling and because I'm a very sentimental guy—with these boxes, the little characters can't talk; they're little plastic figures. They only way you could tell the story, as jewelry tells a story, is by what you put behind them. So, in this case, I put the World Trade Center. I had a little character standing there looking at it. I actually made this before the World Trade Center fell down.  My meaning of all of this is that it was something in the beginning I was aware of. The one I'm wearing on my lapel—this one is a door. There's a woman standing, looking not at us; she's looking towards the doorway. Anybody who would come up and look at my work, they would say, “Wow, that is amazing! Where did you get that?” This is how it started and how I got into fashion. “Where did you get that?” and I said, “Well, I made it.” And they said, “Really? Where can I get one?” And I said, “You can buy this one.” In the beginning, I used to sell right off my lapel. I love dressing. Double-breasted suits are my favorite attire, so I would have a box on my lapel. As I said, I would go all over New York City to openings, plays and the like. At openings and galleries and museums or wherever I went, people from across the gallery, they would see me dressed and see this thing on my lapel, curious to what it is. They would walk up to me. They wouldn't even look at me; they would look right at the box and go, “Oh my god, what is that?” When I said, “Well, it's a box and I made it,” they would go, “Wow! I want it.”  It got me to the point where—this is the most interesting thing—many years later, after traveling and having lived in Israel—one of the places I did live—after about 25 years, I decided to go back there for a visit. I had friends that had immigrated to Israel, and some of my friends were there to stay. I went to visit them, and they all are in the arts. When I was there, one day they said, “Why don't we go to the Israel Museum up in Jerusalem?” I was in Tel Aviv staying with them. We go up to Jerusalem. I was wearing a box. I'm walking around the Israel Museum—this is so amazing to me—and a woman from across the room, a very tiny lady, walks up to me. She says the same thing many other people said: “Wow! What is that? Where did you get that?” I said, “Well, I made it,” as I said earlier.  The point of it is that these boxes have a story in them. For me, every story leads into another. How I mean that is that a person who I don't even know comes up to me, looks at my work; they're inspired by it; they talk about it; they tell me things about it that I've never myself, as the creator of it, imagined how significant it was or what it meant to them. As in theater, as in my relationship to Tom O'Horgan—who broke the fourth wall when he did “Hair” on Broadway—during the period I was creating these, people in New York and probably everywhere else didn't exactly walk up to each other and start a conversation with strangers. I had the object that changed all that, and I had not realized that until I started going out and wearing them.  Getting back to Israel, this woman, who I later found out was named Tammy Schatz, she was the curator of one of the wings in the Israel Museum. She invites me the next day to come and sit and talk with them, because they were planning this show and exhibition the following year called “Heroes.” So, I went back the next day. I sat with her and bunch of other people and they started telling me what they were planning. They said, “Well, you're an American, and you must know a lot about American pop culture. You know Superman and Batman and all the stuff like that,” and I said, “Yeah, I do.” Once they learned I worked in theater and designed sets—because by this point, I was not only making little box sets, I was also making large set pieces for shows. I have also done installations and the like. So, they invited me based on an illustration I sent to them. The next year, I went back to Israel, and I did this 10-feet-high, 25-feet-long three-dimensional cityscape. It was boxes, another version of boxes. It goes on and on from there, Sharon. It's always been fascinating me, how these boxes have gotten me into all kinds of great trouble. As I continue to say, every box tells a story. Sharon: We'll have pictures of the boxes when we post the podcast, but I want to describe it to people. These are small. What, two by two?  Marc: Two-inch square, three quarters of an inch deep. When you buy them, they're empty; they don't have anything except the lid and the box. I basically invented an idea; up to that point, I never saw anybody else doing what I was doing. Later on, I found that I inspired other people's creativity. There was these little boxes, and every picture tells a story. A picture's worth a thousand words. Sharon: Marc, before all this happened, before you befriended Tom and he befriended you, did you consider yourself artistic or creative? Was that a field you wanted to pursue? Marc: Kind of. I didn't literally say, “Wow, I'm an artist! I'm going to create.” When I was a young guy growing up—I grew up in Philadelphia until I was about 13. My father and mother were in the beauty business. My father was a very well-known women's hairdresser. He had his own beauty parlor. My parents were beatniks back in the 50s in Philadelphia. They were very artistic people, and all their friends were very artistic. When you're a 13, 14-year-old, it doesn't register, “Oh, I'm going to grow up to be like my parents,” but they are influences. They all wore black all the time, and as I was growing up, that was my look; I wear all black. I'm going to high school during the 60s, and it's all surfers and bleach blond hair, and here comes me with skin-tight black pants and Beatle boots and cravats. Kids who were friends, they would come up and say, “Who are you? What do you think you're doing? You must be an artist.” The idea stuck, but as I said about journeys through life, the fascinating thing for me is that I could go around the world, have all these different things happening in my 20s, return to New York and be on this journey where I'm still at.  I know your podcast has to do with why we're here: to talk about jewelry. I came up with a way for people to wear jewelry that has a story in it and it isn't just a beautiful necklace. Most of my clients over the years have been women, and women know something much more than men know about wearing an object that attracts attention. Women know how to find beautiful objects and adorn themselves, whether it's a necklace or earrings or the like. What I also found was interesting—and this actually happened; I neglected to mention this, but at one point when I stopped doing theater with Tom and only focused on making box art, I ended up becoming a street artist.  I was selling in the beginning to every major department store, and I was getting orders for thousands of boxes that I had to come up with. I was a one-man factory, so I was pulling my hair out of my head thinking, “How the hell am I going to get all these boxes out?” Eventually I discovered there's no way I can be a manufacturer of these things; they're all one-of-a-kind. I'm not going to make 12 of the same thing. A friend of my said, “There's a street fair down on Broadway. Maybe you should go there and sell on the street.” That opened a doorway, like this doorway that's on my lapel, into a world that I have never been able to look back on. What I mean by that is that once I discovered going to Soho, which was in the early stages of its evolution to become an epicenter for artists, many of them very famous—Keith Haring, David Hockney, the list is incredible of the people that were living in Soho during this period.  I went down there; on West Broadway there were very few artists, and I was one of them. I would be standing there all dressed, and people would be walking up and down the street. It was the most incredible way for them to find out if I was marketing what I had on my lapel. People would walk by, they'd see this guy with a fedora all in black, wearing a box, and they'd be curious. “What's he wearing?” They'd come up. They wanted to ask me a about them and how much they were. They would say, “I'll take that one, that one and that one,” and that used to happen to me constantly. I never could make enough. The thousands I had made that never got sold in department stores were being sold like crazy on the streets of Soho. I started to get a reputation as the box man. One of the clients that bought from me called me the box man. There were times I would go down to Soho in the early morning on Saturday or Sunday, and there were people milling around where I would stand, waiting for me. They would go, “Here comes the box man.” It was crazy.  Among all those people, some of the people that stopped and looked at my work were people like David Hockney. David Hockney actually came up to me one day, after a lot of people walked away buying my stuff, and he was looking at them real close up. He started talking to me and giving me suggestions about what I could do with them and how I could display them. He said, “You've got this little box. Where are you going to put it? Maybe you should put it in something, like a frame?” That was the most incredibly brilliant selling idea for my boxes. What I did with the frame idea, when I figured out how to do it—there are many of them behind me; they're all frames. The idea was that you can wear it, but you can also put it on your wall, and your wall can wear your art. I made it so the frame had an opening in it that the box sat inside of. If you're going out to an opening or a fashion show or something like that, “I think tonight I'll wear one of the Marc Cohens.” That was the idea, and that took off like crazy from there.  I have to also tell you I didn't have any agents. I didn't have a rep or anything like that. The only rep I had was Marc Cohen. So, it was a cool journey through art. I evolved the idea of being an artist selling on the street, where I just had an easel, to having a pushcart. It was like immigrants coming to America way, way back, my family being some of them that went to Philadelphia. My great, great grandmother, she had a pushcart on South Street in Philadelphia. It's another part of the story of jewelry. It bridged into me getting even more known.  I went back to California where I grew up. I found that in Santa Monica, they had a promenade they were developing. They actually had people with carts they rented they would put out on the promenade. I found out I could rent carts, so I rented one and came up with this idea. It actually came from people on the street. People would walk by and say, “Wow, you're like a tiny gallery with all your art.” I came up with this name, the World's Smallest Art Gallery. I took the cart and turned it into a miniature to scale, like if you went into a gallery, but it was open to the people to see it from all different sides. I had walls and characters that were larger than the ones in my boxes. They were standing looking at the art. It was all on that level; it was very interactive. People would walk by, and there would be a lot of celebrities all the time on the street. Suddenly, not only was it regular people buying work, not only David Hockney, but very famous people in Hollywood. Along the way, I reconnected with a friend of mine who was very famous, Paula Wagner. She's now very famous for being a producer with Tom Cruise; they had a company called Cruise Wagner. She's a friend of mine from all the way back to the “Lenny” days. We rekindled our friendship in LA. She knows everybody in Hollywood, and once she saw my work, she flipped out and said, “We've got to do something with this.” She hired me, and the first thing I did for her was wearable box art in a frame. It was for Oliver Stone.  Sharon: I'm sorry, who it was for? I didn't hear. Marc: Oliver Stone the director. Sharon: Oliver Stone, oh wow!  Marc: She also represented Val Kilmer and Tom Cruise and Demi Moore. Before you know it, she's asking me if I can make a box for this person, on and on. The biggest thing for me at the time was Madonna. I knew Madonna from a long time ago. When I say I knew her, I lived in New York in the early 70s and 80s, and I used to go to all these clubs. I would go to this one called Danceteria. At the time, Madonna was a coat check girl there, and eventually she did a show there, which I saw with a bunch of my friends. Then she went on to do whatever she wanted on her own.  Somehow or another, a friend of hers bought one my pieces to give to her as a gift, but this is the best part of it. I didn't know this until much later on. One night in LA, I went to this private photo exhibition; it was a photographer who had done all the photography for Rudi Gernreich, the fashion designer with those bathing suits. I'm going to the exhibition with friends. I had my box on my lapel. I'm walking around and it's a tiny, little gallery, so people don't follow each other—everybody goes wherever they're going. A bunch of people are coming that way and we're walking, walking, walking. We come to this one, most famous photograph of a topless model. I'm looking at photograph, and standing next to me is Madonna. I turn and right away, she looks at me and goes, “I have one of those boxes.” I said, “I'm the artist. I made it,” and she said to me, “I Iove that box and I have it right by my bed,” and I said, “Oh, how cool.” She asked me a few questions and I filled her in on my background. I didn't bring up the fact that I remember her from Danceteria.  Then it was like an avalanche. I got picked up by Maxfield's Clothing Store in LA when I started the frames. Everybody saw how cool it is as an art piece, but you can wear it. Maxfield loved what I was doing, and he took me on and carried my stuff in his store. This is another amazing thing: the dresser for Arsenio Hall was in the store one day buying things for him to wear on the show. I don't know whether it was a man or a woman, but they bought an outfit for Arsenio, and the salesperson said, “We just got this new wearable art piece in. You've got to see this.” They looked at it and bought one. That night on the Arsenio Hall Show—if you ever watch his talk show, there's intro music, and then the curtain goes away and he stands there; it's Arsenio Hall. On that particular night, he's standing there, wearing a collarless Armani suit, and on his jacket is a square.  From a distance you can't tell what it is. I found out this afterwards. I got the tape. It was amazing; he didn't himself know what it really was, but he came out and the camera zooms up on him. When I saw what the box was, I got a chill. It was a period where I started to not just do people standing in the box, looking at the image or looking out away from the image; it was a period where I was putting images up against the face, so it would be a three-dimensional idea. In this particular one, it was Martin Luther King. I had done part of his face in profile in the foreground, and then I had done some backdrop. It had something to do about racial issues.  I didn't just make cutesy box art. I really am not about cutesy box art. I'm very passionate about a lot of things in life. I'm very political about certain things, and I want people to have an opportunity to talk with each other about things that are meaningful, particularly where we live these days. It's important to have that doorway of how people get through it and interact with each other without being sensitive and thinking you're going to be judged by whatever they say or do. We are in a period where people have to be careful about that. So, it amazes me that this tool—because it is a tool—is, in a way, much different than things made by other jewelry designers that Lisa Berman curates or represents. That is mostly what Lisa represents, like Robert Lee Morris. I knew Robert Lee Morris personally. He's a genius and he's a friend. Thomas Mann is one of my closest friends. I'm friends with others as well because of how we interact with each other.  The image is what it's about. It's how the characters are placed within the box. Along the way, I started thinking, “I want to get out even more than what I've done. I want to try to make work even more original.” We live in a period where they have this thing called a 3D printer. It prints pretty much anything. I can create a series of my own characters, which is something I always wanted to do. I've only just started doing this. I started developing this idea, where I custom make three-dimensional boxes on this scale and a much larger scale. That's where I'm headed. I have lots of collectors. They would be more than happy if I started making little box art again. My newest work is much larger. I make boxes now that are 20 feet big, installation pieces.  Sharon: They're hard to wear. Marc: They're hard to wear, right? I know your program is primarily about jewelry. The thing about that, though, is what I am planning to do. When I do have that exhibition, the large-scale Marc Cohen box art exhibition, I will have miniatures of that exhibition, like many other people do when they market things. The Van Gogh Experience—I don't know if you've seen this, but there's a thing on the road right now that's video mapping Van Gogh's paintings on a building. When you go to the gift shop, they've marketed Van Gogh's work to death. I would do something similar as a collectable.  I had Sotheby's in London; they heard about me through our people in Israel. I was invited to do this big exhibition at Sotheby's. It's a big auction and a silent auction. I got commissioned to make three boxes with lights. There weren't any more wearable, but I did that, and it sold for the equivalent to $10,000. Suddenly, my prices are changing. The people that bought my boxes on the street from the beginning—it's embarrassing to say—but when I first started selling them, my boxes were $20. They're no longer $20. They have been selling at auction for a lot more than $20. Now there's talk about me in way that I never, ever imagined, and it's joyful. After 40 years of doing nothing but making boxes, I don't know what— This is part 1 of a 2 part episode please subscribe so you can get part 2 as soon as its released later this week! Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

Terror Cerca de Ti Podcast
Ep 129 - Fantasmas de East Village

Terror Cerca de Ti Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 23:25


En esta ocasión, les cuento algunas de las historias de fantasmas del barrio conocido como East Village, en Manhattan, ciudad de Nueva York. Estas historias forman parte de un recorrido que asistí, brindado por la empresa Boroughs of the Dead. Visiten su página para más información.    https://boroughsofthedead.com/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/terrorcerca/  Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/terrorcerca/  GoodReads - https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/130049089-terror-cerca-de-ti  Twitter - https://twitter.com/terrorcerca

The Bowery Boys: New York City History
#373 New York Underground: The Story of Cemeteries

The Bowery Boys: New York City History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 62:17


The following podcast may look like the history of New York City cemeteries -- from the early churchyards of the Colonial era to the monument-filled rural cemeteries of Brooklyn and Queens. But it's much more than that! This is a story about New York City itself, a tale of real estate, urban growth, class and racial disparity, superstition and architecture. Cemeteries and burial grounds in New York City are everywhere -- although by design we often don't see them or interact with them in daily life. You see them while strolling late night through the East Village or out your taxi window headed to LaGuardia Airport. Some of your favorite parks were even developed upon the sites of old potter's fields. Why are there so many cemeteries on the border of the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens? Why are 19th century mausoleums and tombstones so fabulously ornate? And why are there so many old burial grounds next to tenements and apartment buildings in Greenwich Village?  Featuring four tales from New York City history, illustrating the unusual relationship between cemeteries and urban areas. -- The Doctor's Riot of 1788 -- The tragic monument of Charlotte Canda -- The shocking grave robbery of a prominent New Yorker -- The remarkable discovery in 1991 of a long-forgotten burial ground boweryboyshistory.com If you like the show, please rate and review on Apple Podcasts. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/boweryboys See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Breaking the Wall Podcast
Emerging as a Curator with Georgia Usborne

Breaking the Wall Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 50:21


I took a trip to Brooklyn last week to chat with Georgia Usborne about her life as a dancer and curator here in NYC. In our discussion, we dive into what it's like to transition into roles outside of just being a dancer, and why it's important for dancers to be open to more than just performance opportunities. Georgia continues to dive into her career and unveil more opportunities that align with her natural gifts and interests. Through our discussion, Georgia shows us why "success" is a relative term and why it is important for dancers to find jobs where their talents can shine through.  Georgia Usborne is a British born dance artist performing, creating and teaching out of Brooklyn, New York.  She is the Founding and Director of CreateART, performance and residency platform building community and supporting artists in New York City.   Following her training at Central School of Ballet in London, Georgia danced with contemporary repertory company Bern Ballet in Switzerland under the direction of Cathy Marston. In Bern she had the pleasure of working with choreographers including Orjan Andersson, Alexander Ekman, Adonis Foniadakis, Johan Inger, Didy Veldman and Noa Zuk. In 2014 she joined Andrea Miller's Gallim Dance in Brooklyn, New York, with whom she continues to work as a guest artist, teacher and assistant to the choreographer. From 2018 - 2019 Georgia worked as Gallim's programming coordinator, launching and managing performance events, residencies and classes at Gallim's Brooklyn studio.  She is currently Event Curator for women led non profit East Village based Arts on Site, and a teaching artist with Arts By The People.As a freelance dancer Georgia has worked most recently with Annie Rigney, Bare Opera and Hivewild. Learn more about Georgia and her work HEREFollow Georgia and CreateArt:@GeorgiaUsborne@CreateArtInterested in working with Brandon?  SIGN-UP for a FREE Coaching Consultation HEREBrandon helps pre-professional dancers find their voice as they navigate their careers and helps them stay accountable  when pursuing their goals.Through coaching, Brandon helps dancers define whats important for them and redefine what a successful life/career looks like.Learn more here: http://www.brandoncolemandance.com/career-coachingConnect with Brandon!Instagram: @itsBrandonColeman | @BreakingTheWallPodcastWebsite: www.BrandonColemanDance.com/BTWP

Gourmand
Ep. 23: Chi Sum Ngai and Kaleena Teoh (Coffee Project NY)

Gourmand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 41:40


Chi Sum Ngai and Kaleena Teoh are the co-owners of Coffee Project New York, the award-winning coffee brand, roastery and training center. Based in New York City with cafes in the East Village, Chelsea, and Brooklyn, and a roastery and training center in Long Island City, Coffee Project New York aims to promote an inclusive and sustainable coffee culture by prioritizing thoughtful sourcing practices, the welfare of their employees and communities, and increased access to educational opportunities for people to pursue careers in the coffee industry.

How Long Gone
237. - Touré

How Long Gone

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 76:51


Touré is a writer, journalist, cultural critic, TV host, and hosts the Toure Show podcast. We chat about swollen testicles, witchcraft, Din Tai Fung, why Toure believes he should be asking the questions and not answering them, what makes a good question asker, too many people getting podcasts, Toure shames us for not having college degrees, the stand-up comedy greats, Toure tells us multiple Borscht Belt style jokes, the US Open recap, keeping the calves loose, Fort Greene vs East Village, and we end on a rap battle. twitter.com/Toure twitter.com/donetodeath twitter.com/themjeans --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/howlonggone/support

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast
Innovating with Imagination and Intelligence

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 33:31


Paul McDowall and Catherine Clark were neighbors when they founded ClarkMcDowall, a 21-year-old agency that with “intelligence and imagination” architects growth for “visionary companies.” Originally starting with big clients Catherine “inherited” from her previous employer, the agency had to put in effort to bring on the startups and mid-size companies that keep an agency nimble, fresh, and entrepreneurial – where there is a higher chance of “getting stuff done.”  Paul says the agency's most productive relationships come with clients that want to think ahead and think differently, make changes and do something different, and push boundaries – that these companies have a “sophistication in the way they think, but also a progressive way of thinking about their own industry or their own business.” Catherine notes that the human side is important to the mix and that today's clients are far more savvy about marketing and innovation than they were even six years ago. Brand-architecting involves broad-scope innovation in such activities as creating new brands, amplifying “rising star brands,” and transforming legacy brands for visionary clients by changing brand strategy, purpose, or positioning. The agency's brand expression work covers verbal expression (naming/ messaging) and visual expression (visual ID, packaging, design across the whole ecosystem, and web, video, and social components). Catherine says, “Architecting a brand is really about getting into what it stands for and then really thinking about how that impacts in all the ways it expresses itself.” As an example of client work, Catherine talks about the agency's multi-year effort with the Oklahoma City Thunder NBA team; addressing such issues as – What is their purpose? Why do they exist? How do they uniquely do things? What is it they actually do? – and then thinking how that manifests in the organization's operations – a campaign, a tagline, player experience, how a new player is greeted . . . or about the arena itself and the experience of the arena. Paul extends the scope by mentioning that these things include the internal culture as well, “how they talk to each other” and “how they hire.” Although ClarkMcDowall is based in New York City, the 2020 Covid lockdown forced the agency to rethink its organization. Catherine talks about the tension that comes with change . . . and the agency's decision to “Just go hybrid and start building it.” Today, the agency uses different systems, different ways of hiring, and different ways of working than in the past . . . and has a strong focus on creating a work environment that is less transactional and more about people's lives. About 25% of the agency's 25 employees work remotely – across the country.  Catherine says all this change has come with some nice surprises (and these are quotes): The more we allow people to try to find their own rhythm and their own environment, the more we're able to retain them and get the best out of them. I feel like we're even truer to ourselves in our values. We've really doubled down on the way that we treat people, the way that we integrate into our community, some of the pro bono stuff that we're doing.  There's this weird thing that the more you innovate, in a way, the easier it is to be true to yourself. You have to change a lot in order to really notice that anchor that you have. Catherine and Paul can be reached on their agency's website at:  clarkmcdowall.com or on LinkedIn. Transcript Follows: ROB: Welcome to the Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast. I'm your host, Rob Kischuk, and I am joined today by a duo, Paul McDowall and Catherine Clark. They're both Founding Partners at ClarkMcDowall, based in New York City. Welcome to the podcast. PAUL: Thank you. CATHERINE: Thanks for having us. We're very excited to be here. ROB: It's very excellent to have you here. Maybe you could start off by telling us about ClarkMcDowall and about what it is that makes the firm unique. CATHERINE: We call ourselves brand architects. I guess we'll start there with the unique piece. Just to be tangible for everybody who might be listening in, that means we do a bunch of things. We create new brands, we amplify what we would call “rising star brands,” and then we transform legacy brands for clients that we would consider to be visionary clients who are really looking for some change. What does that mean? It means we offer services like brand strategy, brand purpose, positioning, architecture. We also do a lot of innovation work, as that is also part of architecting those brands. Finally, we do brand expression work, whether that's verbal expression like naming/messaging or visual expression like vis ID packaging, designing across the whole ecosystem, web, video, social. There's about 25 people in our agency. Our roots and our base are in New York City, but we are hybrid. We also have talent across the country. I think what makes us unique is – we phrase it as “intelligence and imagination,” and I'm sure Paul will jump in and add to that, but it's really born from the partnership that Paul and I have. I'm a strategist originally and Paul is a creative originally, and we both own 50% of this business. It's very much about the fusion of two sides of our business that are usually not seen in equal partnership very much in the agency landscape. PAUL: Yeah. We got to the intelligence and imagination – for a while we were talking about “we have strategy brains and creative brains working together,” and it sounded a little clunky. It also felt quite limiting as well. It feels as though creatives can't think and then strategists don't have a creative thought. It's just not true. The idea of intelligence and imagination is something that we do collectively as a team. It's not one team, one person owns that. It's everybody, whether it's the strategists, whether it's the creatives, but also whether it's our client experience team, whether it's our marketing team, ops team, whoever it is. That's how we think and how we approach life. It's a broader philosophy which has stood us in good stead for the last, gosh, 21 years, Catherine. CATHERINE: It's been a journey. PAUL: Yeah. Awesome journey. ROB: Congratulations on that alone. That's quite a journey. You mentioned building brand architecture. When someone goes to your website and looks at the range of brands that are on there, we see quite an array of impressive top-level name brands. How does that play out? I imagine you can talk about some of those brands that are on the site. What does brand architecture look like for one of those examples that we might see looking at the firm? CATHERINE: I could pick a couple of examples. Architecting a brand is really about getting into what it stands for and then really thinking about how that impacts in all the ways it expresses itself. One client we like to talk about a lot is the Oklahoma City Thunder NBA team. We worked with them for a number of years, really helping define their purpose, why they exist, how they uniquely do things, what it is they actually do, and then thinking about how that manifests in all kinds of ways. It could be a campaign, a tagline, some visuals. It could also be the player experience. How do you greet a new player when they show up at your team? Or it could be about the arena itself and what the experience is like. PAUL: Even their internal culture as well, how they talk to each other, how they hire. It's from the inside out. Sorry, Catherine. CATHERINE: No, no problem, Paul. This is our two heads thinking together, like we do. [laughter] So that's how we would talk about being brand architects. It's actually a little bit like an architect thinks about creating a building that is influencing the way people live their lives, the way they interact with each other, the way that building leaves a mark on the landscape. It's really bringing a lot of things together. Another manifestation of our work might be some work we did with Starbucks, restaging Evolution Fresh, which is their juice brand that was doing really well. They had this incredible, beautiful design, actually, that won some awards. But then the whole landscape changed around them. That's what happens when we get brought in to do brand transformation. It's like, “Hey, we've got this thing. It was doing great and now it's hit a wall.” We would help them from the get-go in terms of understanding, what is the problem? Who is your audience? How do we change the way you position yourself and tell your story? Then we're able to bring it to life. In that particular instance, it was mainly packaging. The packaging was their main source of communication; they didn't have any advertising. So that's where we applied all our efforts, into the visual expression, and it turned their business around. They went from major decline to double-digit growth. PAUL: They were getting delisted. Even from their own Starbucks stores, they were getting delisted. That's how dire the situation was. Through the work we launched, they were doing double-digit growth. They had the biggest growth I think they'd seen in the brand itself, and actually outpacing the category itself. So a pretty dramatic transformation. ROB: What was the timing of your engagement with Oklahoma City? Were you there right when they were moving and that transition? Was part of the brand design around the new team name? Or was it downstream from there? CATHERINE: Downstream. We came in at the Kevin Durant free agency time. I can't say too much about all of that, but you can imagine that that team was going through a lot of soul-searching in terms of what they stood for, and if that player was going to leave – which he ended up leaving – how do you make sure you define that team so that it has a real sense of purpose, regardless of the outcome they can't control? So we came in at that point and really helped them articulate what makes them different. And as Paul was saying, impacting their culture internally. They made this incredible bounce-back as soon as he left. And they're always changing and there's always players coming in, coming out. How, with a brand like that, do you help them to find what they stand for, agnostic of the players that might be there, knowing that the players are actually a huge part of the experience? So trying to create some stability and a sense of agency, if you like, for themselves outside of wins and losses and players. PAUL: I think it's interesting. They have a very progressive team way of thinking. I'm impressed with the GM, who we worked closely with and Catherine has a very good relationship with. He's super thoughtful about everything, not wanting to be just another sports team or thinking like another sports team. I think they're the folks that we do really well with, those clients that really want to push the boundary, thinking ahead – not just reflecting the status quo – and wanting to do something different, wanting to make a change, wanting to think differently, wanting to think fresh. There's a sophistication in the way they think, but also a progressive way of thinking about their own industry or their own business. We create wonderful, productive relationships with folks that are wired that way just because we're wired that way as well. CATHERINE: Just to build on that, a lot of agencies in our business are used to helping their clients narrow down their bull's-eye, target audience and all those good things. We've had to do the same thing over the years and say, “Hey, what kind of clients do we work best with?” Because you can't be everything to everyone. That's really been the thread: people who we consider to be visionary, who really want to do something different, transcend their category, push the boundaries, but at the same time have this very human side to them. We're a very casual agency in terms of how we present ourselves and how we work with people. So there's a real human side. We know we do better with clients that want that very personal, intimate relationship versus clients who are maybe looking for a big agency with lots of fancy style of working. We're in a category where there's lots of different people doing different things, and if you can really define your niche, you're more likely to be successful and be able to focus on that. ROB: Right. There's a big piece of the story there that I would like to come back to, because I think you look at a lot of the brands you've worked with, and I think a lot of agencies would look at the overall top-level brand and say that that brand is untouchable, that you really have to be a big holding company shop to engage with them. But I'm going to put a pin in that for a moment. I want to get back to the origin story a little bit. Clearly, you two teamed up and you're combining worlds of your own strengths. But how did ClarkMcDowall come to be in the first place? What's the origin story? PAUL: [laughs] This is a story that we actually didn't tell from the get-go because I think it would've scared our clients, but we were literally next-door neighbors, literally over the garden fence. Catherine was running the UK side of a London branding company and I was doing my own thing with somebody else. I was very dissatisfied; I was on the creative side/design side, very limited. Wasn't really allowed to ask a lot of questions. I'd inherit a brief and then respond to that brief. Catherine was on the flipside, doing all this incredible thinking with innovation thinking, strategic thinking, and then it would be mistranslated or turned into – just lost, just melt into the ether and never see what happened to it. We had a conversation one day – I think our spouse and partners were like, “The person next door, you should talk! They do what you do!”, whatever. And eventually we did. I remember Catherine sharing her insights. Catherine is extremely eloquent, as you can tell already. Very intelligent, bang-on. I just exploded and was like, “This is incredible.” It opened my mind to things. Likewise, Catherine, different side, “Here's a creative that thinks differently about the industry and is dissatisfied and doesn't just want to be a designer,” all those sorts of things. It was literally a meeting of the minds. It was happenstance. It was one of those magic moments in your life that is transformational. And I mean that in the biggest sense of the word “transformational.” Then we built the business from there and basically shared thoughts and insights. We started in the East Village because that's where we lived. As your audience will know, running an agency is a 24/7/365 job. We had babies at the time, or babies to come, so we wanted to stay close to our families. The human side, as Catherine touched upon, is super important to us, and recognizing that and trying to make it work for people. By the way, Catherine, jump in at any time. You've heard this story a thousand times. You don't need to hear me warbling on. CATHERINE: But you tell it so romantically. It's amazing. [laughter] I think what Paul's saying is incredible because we ended up having two girls, two boys, they were the same ages, they all went to school together. It became kind of like a family thing. The company never felt like a family business, but there was definitely a sense of community. We were very proud to have an office open on E 11th Street between A and 1st back in 1999. It was a complete scary neighborhood, and we were like, “This is where we live. We love it. We're doing it.” Our clients were a little freaked out at first, and then as soon as they got into our office, or past the front door, they were like, “This is awesome. I feel energized. I feel like I'm part of something.” I think we really stuck to who we were, and that's carried us all the way through. Then we ended up in various spaces on the same block. We couldn't really expand the space. At one point we had an apartment, we had a storefront, we had a studio, all literally on the same block. We called it our little village. That's how we grew. We started with some big clients that I'd inherited from my previous employer, Unilever – that then turned into Mars that then turned into other companies – just literally following people around. So we started really having what I would call big clients right from the get-go, and then over time actually had to work to try to get smaller clients – which is the opposite of maybe the journey a lot of other agencies take. They start with the smallest startups and then make their way up. We started literally with the big corporations and had to make an effort to go and acquire startups or mid-size companies that are actually really important to work with also, because they keep you nimble, they keep you fresh, they keep you entrepreneurial, and you have a higher chance of getting stuff out the door and published and all of those things. But it's been definitely a very organic journey for us. PAUL: Yeah. And it's not being afraid to evolve, I think. It's interesting because even after 21 years, we'll stop and do a brand refresh or want to choose our narrative or whatever it is, and we go back to those original core tenets, those values. Maybe the language around them changes, but the essence of those things, what we believe in, is still really true to who we are – this idea of being original, this idea of evolving and problem-solving and going with the times, this idea of having an optimistic outlook, because you have to in order to keep in business and keep going. The idea of community, the idea of taking care of people, nurturing people. Those things were baked in from the start. They weren't things that we made up. They're just true to who we are as people. I think that's something, if any of your audience are new business owners as well, really doubling down on what you believe in and your values and being brave and sticking to them. When you start off, you're a bit insecure. You think you need to be something else than you actually are. We had that, right, Catherine? We said, “Oh, we need to be like this agency,” and in the end it took a couple of years to be like, “No, people are buying ClarkMcDowall. They're not buying the other agency.” Then it was like, “Oh, we are who we are.” You embrace it more and you really go with it. That quirky little storefront we used to have or whatever it might be, it becomes part of you, and then that's what you build upon. ROB: It's really a key point. Maybe since you've made it through 21 years and probably continue to actually refine your authenticity – sometimes you think about building up layers; it seems like it's almost the opposite sometimes. It's peeling away the layers of what people made you think you were supposed to be and finding who you can authentically be. How have you figured some of those moments out? Because it's really, really hard when you think about the expectations that people have upon you when you say, “This is us, this is what we do. We're in the market.” CATHERINE: There's something about knowing your values. I think it was helpful that Paul and I met as people and shared values, so it's easy for us to return to, if you like, as opposed to maybe people meeting through a business lens. We just genuinely wanted to do work together and respected each other's ways of thinking. So there's a human side. I will say the tension comes when you want to change. For example, when 2020 hit, we were really quick to say – I think it was like April or something, a month or two after lockdown – “You know what? Just go hybrid and start building it. Whatever that means, we'll define as we go, but let's commit to that.” So we've changed in the last year and a half probably more ways of working than we've ever changed. Basically moving everything to Google, using different systems, different ways of working, having maybe 25% of the company remote. But somehow, I feel like we're even truer to ourselves in our values. We've really doubled down on the way that we treat people, the way that we integrate into our community, some of the pro bono stuff that we're doing. So there's this weird thing that the more you innovate, in a way, the easier it is to be true to yourself. You have to change a lot in order to really notice that anchor that you have. ROB: Have you hired in a particular secondary location, or has it really been anywhere, everywhere, or maybe just North American time zones? What's the range? CATHERINE: We're in North American time zones. We have had some team members go abroad for a month or so, and that's fine, as long as it doesn't exceed let's say the 5- or 6-hour time range. But in general, it's across the U.S. We have some people on the West Coast, which is great because we have some business over there as well. But there are some other people in places where we don't have clients. What we're noticing, though, is there's a fair amount of movement. Everybody's like, “Do I want to move?”, or they move and then they miss New York and they come back. I think what's been nice for people is that they've felt that they had the freedom to go and explore and not feel like, “I have to not move because we're going to have to go in the office next month” or something. We've allowed people to also discover what works best for them, and I think it's going to take a while to settle, because we're still in this very unexpected, volatile time. The more we allow people to try to find their own rhythm and their own environment, the more we're able to retain them and get the best out of them. That's our attitude. ROB: It's been an exciting opportunity. To your overall point, I think it can almost help when you're not trying to choose “Who's the best person we can find that wants to commute into the East Village?”, and instead you say, “Who's the best person that aligns to our values and needs who wants to work remotely?” It's a different question, and I think the numbers are bigger. The candidate pool is bigger. In our experience, at least, you can hire faster in a lot of cases. CATHERINE: Absolutely. We've also experimented with different hiring models, getting people on short-term contracts so that they're more willing to say, “I'm usually freelance, but I'm going to try to have this full-time experience for a period of time, but I'm not fully committed,” or people working part-time. I don't know that we've cracked the code yet, but we're very much in an open mindset around different ways to engage people, and that's been super successful for us. We've been able to attract people and retain people that maybe in the past it would've been like, they're not local, they don't want to work on these hours, and we might've passed them by. And actually, they've contributed tremendously to the business. PAUL: It's like constantly learning. Same with the space as well, like Catherine said. We gave up our lease. The timing worked out. We've got other pals who are big agencies who are locked into leases and they're like, “Gosh, what do I do with this now?” I guess we were in a fortunate position of being able to give that up, which means that we can experiment and we can learn and beta test. We keep saying we could never imagine – if you were to create an office from the get-go, there's no way you would put people in desks side by side, 9:00 to 6:00. You just wouldn't build it that way. So we're thinking about if and when we have the space – don't even want to call it an office, but what would that space be? What's its role, what's its function? How do we design around people? How do we design around the team? How do we design around people's lives? Because it's not just about work. It's not a transaction. I think work can often become, or has been in the past, a transactional relationship. We want to make it much more integrated and thoughtful in that sense. So that's the sort of experimentation. Do we have the answers? No, not at all. The same way Catherine said we don't have the answers on the hiring. But we're super open. We're not afraid of testing things, and we're not trying to be rigid because “That's the way it was.” It's, “What could it be?” And then we'll try to figure that out. ROB: It's fascinating that you were able after 20 years to hold the office lease even somewhat loosely. But I'm sure maybe because you've moved around so much, it's been possible to recognize that there will always be someone who will let you sign a lease when you show up with a signature in hand. But this moment is unique in what you can learn from it. We talked a little bit about some other lessons along the way around peeling those layers back, but Catherine and Paul, what are some other key lessons you'd say you've learned along the way that if you were rewinding 21 years, you'd tell yourself to consider doing differently on this journey? CATHERINE: Maybe I won't answer fully the doing things differently, but one thing that has been a big thing is how much brands have changed and how much our clients' needs have changed. For a long time – I would say for at least 10-15 years – I remember we used to do some work for a client, a big corporation, and you'd be educating them on this innovation process. They'd never done it before. Then six months later, you work with somebody else in the same company and they also don't know anything. The years would go by. I'm like, when are they going to figure out that they keep learning the same stuff? And suddenly, all of a sudden, I would say maybe five to six years ago, we started to see a shift where a lot of our clients became very sophisticated. They in-housed a lot more things, and all this stuff that we tended to have to educate them on, they know. What it means is you really have to make sure that you're adding value on top of what is basic 101 for everybody now. So the level of sophistication has really increased in the industry – which is great, actually. Different agencies are going to bring different things. For us, it's really about joining the dots. I think having a company that's owned both by somebody that comes from a creative background as well as someone who's coming from a business and strategy background has meant that we've created this culture where one doesn't trump the other. We don't have a design-led culture where strategists are post-rationalizing, or the opposite. That confluence of thinking, of different minds, is really, really rich. We find that harder to replicate in-house for clients just because they're not built that way. They're coming from a business perspective. So we're able to maybe crack things, join dots between things in ways that really add value, and we understand that process really well. But every agency is going to need to be finding how they add value over and above clients being much more educated. So if you ask me what we would do differently, I don't know if I have an answer to that other than just keep staying ahead and making sure that we're always attuned to what our clients really need and where the gaps are for them. PAUL: Yeah. I think about doing differently, maybe things to avoid is avoid limitations. Don't feel as though one has to behave and operate within a box. You can define that box yourself. I think there's more – well, not just you're able to do it; there's more need to do it, to really redefine what those parameters are. I think that is super important, whether you want to call it evolution or whatever it might be. And not just talking about services. That's a part of it, but how you do business is really important as well. And then going back to the transactional nature of business – and we see it with other agencies. I know great agencies. I'm not going to name anybody. They do fantastic work. But what we hear is they're still in a transaction with those folks. They have slots, they have people, they do the job, they go, they quit, they stay, whatever it is. They do great work. We believe that's really shifting and it's really putting the human being first. You need to craft a different kind of relationship with the folks that work for you and work with you, and putting those at the center, and then how do we build around those needs and how do we support those needs? Because if they're doing well and they're feeling fulfilled and they're feeling really good and energized, then your work product, what you do, your clients and your experience, is better as well. I think that's how we think about our business tool. ROB: It's healthy. Definitely, as you get the team in there and aligned, it really lightens the load as well as they become more capable. You don't have to always fill every hat that you've been wearing since the year 2000 or 1999. CATHERINE: Yes, that's definitely – and that's probably been our biggest challenge, getting to a team that is really empowered and that works well together. I look back over the years; we've had incredible talent, but it takes a lot of time and effort to get to a place where you can look at your leadership team and the rest of your talent pool and go, “Whoa, what an amazing bunch of people, and they work really well together.” Actually, we have an all-female leadership team at the moment, which is amazing, and they're really empowered. We have a Head of Client Services, a Head of Creative, a Head of Strategy, a Head of Operations, and a Head of Growth, and they have incredible relationships with each other. A number of those people have been with us a long time and some of them are newer. I think what's been really amazing is exactly what you just said, finding ourselves not having to wear absolutely every hat every day. I think when you do that for too long, it's hard to have big ideas when you're running around basically taking care of millions of different things. As an agency owner, allowing a team to grow under you that can really take some of the responsibility and ownership is huge. I think Paul and I spent a good 10 years running around like headless chickens. [laughter] Suddenly we hit a wall and it's like, “We have to have a reorg,” all these kinds of things that we had to do 10 years ago. But we've really managed to build this incredible team under us, which enables us to do things like this and reflect and think about where we want to take the business. PAUL: It's an old adage, but hiring people that are really good at what they do and in certain things are better at you. There are certain disciplines where I'm happy to hand that over because you're really good at that thing, and you're going to make us better and up our game. Advice to anyone starting a new business is don't be afraid of that. As business owners, your ego – you say, “Oh my God, I've got to be the best at absolutely every single little thing.” You can't. Nobody's that good. Nobody can do that. A lot of it is just trust and support and letting those people do what they do, and letting them shine as best they can. Like Catherine said, we have an awesome leadership team as well, a bunch of very intelligent, motivated, lovely human beings that I think have really helped us think about our business and move our business forward about the way we do things. Right, Catherine? And brought ideas to the table that we said, “Wow, we never thought of that” or “That really helps,” or building on ideas that we have and going with it. We call it “yes, and-ing.” That really energizes you, and it pushes us all forward. It's exciting when that happens. You get off one of those calls, those sessions, like “We just did something really good. I feel as though we've made steps forward here. I feel really good about this.” Those are great moments. ROB: Gosh, all sorts of lessons in there. I'm grateful to have you both on the podcast here. Paul, Catherine, when folks want to get in touch with you and when they want to connect with the firm, ClarkMcDowall, where should they go to find you? PAUL: If you go to our website, clarkmcdowall.com – that's “McDowall” with an “A,” not an “E” – you'll have contact details there if you want to get in touch, for talent. And then there's also LinkedIn as well. We're happy to connect with people. ROB: That's excellent. Paul McDowall, Catherine Clark, congratulations on what you've accomplished together, at the meeting of the minds known as ClarkMcDowall. Thank you for sharing your journey, and I wish you all the best moving forward with this new hybrid adventure as well. CATHERINE: Thank you for having us. It was a great conversation. We also appreciate the forum that you have for other agency owners and talents to hear about agencies and get a little bit of an insight into the underbelly of these different companies. Really appreciate that focus on the industry. PAUL: Totally agree. Thank you so much. ROB: That's wonderful. We all need each other. Thank you, and be well. CATHERINE: Take care. PAUL: Awesome. Thank you so much. Take care. Bye. CATHERINE: Bye. ROB: Bye. Thank you for listening. The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast is presented by Converge. Converge helps digital marketing agencies and brands automate their reporting so they can be more profitable, accurate, and responsive. To learn more about how Converge can automate your marketing reporting, email info@convergehq.com, or visit us on the web at convergehq.com.

The Black Wine Guy Experience
Manifesto! The Life and Times of Paul Greico

The Black Wine Guy Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 90:49


MJ's guest is acclaimed sommelier, restaurateur, entrepreneur and owner of Terroir Tribeca Wine Bar in New York City, Paul Greico. Originally from Toronto, his family owned and operated the iconic La Tosca restaurant, which Paul worked at for many years alongside his father and grandfather. In 1991 he arrived in New York City and began his restaurant career. By 1994, he was working at Gramercy Tavern and by 1997 he had taken over the wine list and beverage program. In 2003, Paul and Chef-partner Marco Canora opened Hearth in the East Village; Insieme followed in 2007. The duo's first and second wine bars, Terroir, opened in 2008 and 2010. Today, Paul runs Terroir Tribeca, which has been described “As much an outpost for wine lovers to experience terroir-driven wines as they are platforms for Paul to preach the attributes of his carefully curated wine list.” Described as “Sommelier Punk,” influenced by: villains and heathens and revolutionaries and indigenous peoples,” Paul Greico is not your everyday fine dining Somm. His passion for a Summer of Riesling and a sharp wit and tongue to match, get ready to be schooled not just on Riesling but the world of wine.MJ and Paul have an exhilarating and thought-provoking discussion on what “Riesling ain't,” how Paul is first and foremost a restaurateur, his life-changing experience at Gramercy Tavern, his infamous Summer of Riesling and more! You aren't ready for this one! Grab a Trocken and let's go! A huge thank you to Paul Greico!Follow him on IG @spitpaulFollow Terroir Tribeca on IG @terroirnyThis episode's in studio wines:2013 Melsheimer 'Lentum' Riesling______________________________________________________________Until next time, cheers to the mavericks, philosophers, deep thinkers and wine drinkers! Don't forget to subscribe and be sure to give The Black Wine Guy Experience a five-star review on whichever platform you listen to.For insider info from MJ and exclusive content from the show sign up at Blackwineguy.comFollow MJ @blackwineguy Thank you to our sponsor Skurnik Wine and Spirits, one of the most trusted names in wine for the past 30 plus years. Check them out: https://www.skurnik.com/ Love this podcast? Love the cool content? Get a producer like mine by reaching out to the badass team at Necessary Media. www.necessarymediaproductions.com@necessary_media_ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

MTV’s Behind the Music

Her desire to "rule the world" drew the dancer and fledgling musician from Detroit to New York's East Village where Madonna became a fixture on the early '80s punk scene. She turned heads with a sexy ragamuffin look that would eventually spawn a world of wannabes. Always leading the pop zeitgeist, Madonna's music has evolved from dance-pop to earthy R&B to balladry to techno. From club scenester to cultural icon to mother (her most satisfying role yet), Madonna's moves are endlessly fascinating. She talks about the price of fame, the great love of her life, and the one "m" word she never wants to hear again. Hear that and more about Madonna's life behind the music.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Write On: A Screenwriting Podcast
Write On with ‘American Crime Story: Impeachment' Writer-Producer Sarah Burgess

Write On: A Screenwriting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 30:06


The playwright turned screenwriter talks about what it's like to write material based on real people for the FX TV series. "My job was to adopt 20-something Monica [Lewinsky]'s point of view… and so I wrote based on Monica's story, and then I had the incredible asset of Monica Lewinsky herself reading my scripts and giving me feedback, so I basically trusted that in the writing of it, the scripts would reflect on how Monica experienced it."   Sarah talks about her beginnings as a writer and how it doesn't matter where you're from. "You need something that's good on the page; that's all you need. You can live in Idaho, you can live in Ottawa, you don't have to live in The East Village or Santa Monica… if you are in any position to be able to write, I do think that having faith in what you put on the page is really what matters."   Don't forget to subscribe to the Write On Podcast on iTunes!   Now available on Google Podcasts!  

Opening Weekend
Episode 59: The Wicker Man - Crank - Idiocracy: September 1, 2006

Opening Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 112:31


Nic Cage walks into a forest dressed like a bear and punches a woman. No, you're not having a bad fever dream; you're just watching one of the movies that opened on September 1, 2006: a week filled with mystery, mayhem, and most of all, misogyny. THE WICKER MAN, CRANK, and IDIOCRACY are being pumped full of adrenaline and then burned alive on Episode 59 of Opening Weekend! (Brought to you by Carl's Jr).“I wish I could quit you.” “You complete me.” “I'll have what she's having.” No, the boys aren't discussing any movies this week REMOTELY related to romance. These are just a few of the things Jason screamed to the rafters in the fall of 2006 as he desperately tried to keep Dan from moving out of their Astoria apartment.  To which Dan replied, ““AH, MY LEGS! NOT THE BEES!!! YOU BITCHES!!!!” Or was that Nic Cage? It's hard to tell, since they were both wearing bear costumes at the time. Also in September 2006: While Jason Statham was desperately trying to keep his heart beating performing scenes of chaos throughout Los Angeles, Jason and Dan were desperately trying to keep audiences' hearts beating performing scenes of Chekhov in the basement of a bar in the East Village. And while Fred was spending the last days of summer soaking up the Tuscan sun, the cast of “Idiocracy” was showing us how we're all going to be soaking up Gatorade and fast-food during the last days of humanity.  And speaking of Gatorade: Fred shows his commitment to non-stop podcasting magic this week….while completely stopping pod-cast magic cold with his own brand of idiocracy. Now leave me alone, I'm ‘batin'….to Episode 59 of Opening Weekend!

Lit Up
Parker Posey on her friendship with Nora Ephron, acting with integrity and the past lives of dogs.

Lit Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 55:08


Angie misses New York. Yes, she still lives there, but she's missing the beautiful chaos of life before the pandemic in New York. Maybe that's why she decided to share one of her favorite episodes with the quintessential New Yorker Parker Posey. If you're a lucky New Yorker, you saw her walking in the East Village, crossing the street in a turban or with her little dog Gracie. Back in 2019, before the pandemic, Angie and Parker got together at an energetic New York spot to talk about her memoir, You're on an Airplane, A Self-Mythologizing Memoir. They talk about Parker's upbringing, her artistic process, how she prepares for roles in films like Waiting For Guffman, Best In Show, and a lot more.

Rich and Daily
Channing Tatum and Zoë Kravitz Are Too Hot To Be A Couple

Rich and Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 9:18


It's the summer romance we didn't know we wanted, but oh-so needed! Channing Tatum & Zoë Kravitz are a thing... maybe. And forget the Bennifer-style yacht vacations and ocean-side Malibu dinners. These two are casual-cool cruising on a shared bike and meeting for iced coffees in NYC. So with Magic Mike and Lenny's chic daughter cozying up in their own summer rom-com, we have to ask: Is it love or just a little movie magic?Listen ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Raw & Real NYC
58: Become a morning person with us

Raw & Real NYC

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 29:50


Today's episode we talk about Sam's big weekend in NYC, seeing A$AP (lol), trying new small businesses in the East Village and how to become a morning person. TO FOLLOW US @meghancaseyloftus @samijenkins @rawandrealnyc MUSIC -- Southern Soul by Vendredi https://soundcloud.com/vendrediduo Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0 Free Download / Stream: https://bit.ly/3aYg1BJ Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/LGehqE2fko0

Kush Chat
Half Baked & Vaxxed

Kush Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 54:12


This week for the 70th Episode of Kush Chat the guys are Kush Chatting about Keon taking his first Covid-19 Vaccine Dose, Jason asking question of the year, Making A Murderer: Monster Energy Can Man, Eminem to guest star on 50 Cent's new show “BMF” as White Boy Rick, Is Mayor Bill De Blasio Hip Hop? New Zealand announces Locking down the entire country because of one Covid case, Escort steals $13,000 Rolex from East Village apartment & more! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Three B Zine Podcast! Presents: Beer Night in San Diego!
Episode 317: Episode 317 - Beer City San Diego

Three B Zine Podcast! Presents: Beer Night in San Diego!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 104:25


We are so excited this week to sit down with the one and only Aubree Miller - Creative Director for Amplified Ales and the creator of the upcoming documentary Beer City San Diego. Tune in as we sample some killer Amplified beers from their new Acid Vault in East Village. While we sample we learn all about Aubree from her beer journey and how she found her place in the world of beer, her history in the world of art and so much more. Plus, hear all about the upcoming movie Beer City San Diego from how the idea became a reality, some of the key points and guests showcased in the film and how you can see and support the movie. Plus, get some behind the scenes stories from the making of the movie. Also, hear about whats new with Amplified from beer, to canning to the amazing Acid Vault venue in East Village. All this plus so much more including a surprise special guest, band and beer collaborations including a fresh announcement of Amplified's next, how band collabs happen, Groot being a bodyguard, barleywine enters the mix, Amplified scavenger hunt, the future for the Beer City San Diego team, we discuss the spirit of community, steam masks, using cheese as ransom, hip hop songs and tons more. Tune in for a great - and in person! - BNISD adventure.