Podcasts about scouts

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World-wide movement for the education of youth

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  • Dec 6, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about scouts

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Latest podcast episodes about scouts

The Do One Better! Podcast – Philanthropy, Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship
Matt Hyde, CEO of the Scouts UK, and volunteer Andrew Bollington join Alberto Lidji to discuss ‘the Squirrels' — a new Early Years provision for 4 and 5 year olds

The Do One Better! Podcast – Philanthropy, Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 39:09


  Get a behind-the-scenes look at how ‘the Squirrels' came about and how the programme is providing 4 and 5 year olds with skills for life when it matters most by promoting key skills like working together, communication and language, as well as creativity and community awareness. Gain insight from an in-depth conversation covering the entire journey of how the Squirrels went from initial concept to successful funding, evidence-based piloting, execution and meaningful scale.  We hear of the many challenges that had to be overcome, the funding sources that were tapped and the diverse stakeholders who were brought on board to make this initiative a success. Thank you for downloading this episode. For information on nearly 150 interviews with remarkable thought-leaders in philanthropy, sustainability and social entrepreneurship visit our website at Lidji.org  

Off The Charts Football Podcast
Home-Field Advantage, Colts Passing, plus NFL Week 13 Preview

Off The Charts Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 39:37


On this week's episode of the Off The Charts Football Podcast, Mark Simon (@markasimonsays) welcomes Alex Vigderman (@vigmanoncampus) and John Todd (@therealjohntodd) to the show to discuss home-field advantage in the NFL (2:25) and the Colts' pass-heavy strategy in the second half of last week's loss (7:37). The group then previews the top games of NFL Week 13, including Patriots-Bills (15:57), Broncos-Chiefs (20:28), Washington-Raiders (25:15), and Giants-Dolphins (29:08), before closing with Scouts vs. Stats on the most improved players in the NFL (31:37). Thanks for listening. You can email the show with feedback at offthecharts@sportsinfosolutions.com and don't forget to follow on Twitter @SportsInfo_SIS and Instagram @sportsinfosolutions. For more, check out: sportsinfosolutions.com sportsinfosolutionsblog.com SISDataHub.com

Fantasy Scouts Podcast
Ep 36: Injuries Galore + Dynasty Risers & Fallers

Fantasy Scouts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 73:21


The Fantasy Scouts are back with a new episode! In today's episode, the Scouts continue with their in-season reactions and react to some of the bigger storylines from around the NFL. Today's show topics include: Injury updates for CMC, Dalvin Cook, and AJ Brown. The Ram's offense continues to struggle. Dynasty risers and fallers mid-season report. For more inside info, check out patreon.com/fantasyscouts !

Incomparable Radio Theater
3.4: Galaxy Scouts: Starcross'd

Incomparable Radio Theater

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 10:47


A cat burglar. An interview. And what does all this have to do with Scoutmaster Greene? This is the second Galaxy Scouts Prelude, a series of short episodes setting the scene for the upcoming miniseries, Galaxy Scouts’ Greene. You may think you know the Scouts, but this is a whole new Galaxy… David J. Loehr with Gillian Shelly Lawler, Tom McGrath and Monty Ashley.

Superfeed! from The Incomparable
Incomparable Radio Theater 3.4: Galaxy Scouts: Starcross'd

Superfeed! from The Incomparable

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 10:47


A cat burglar. An interview. And what does all this have to do with Scoutmaster Greene? This is the second Galaxy Scouts Prelude, a series of short episodes setting the scene for the upcoming miniseries, Galaxy Scouts’ Greene. You may think you know the Scouts, but this is a whole new Galaxy… Host David J. Loehr with Gillian Shelly Lawler, Tom McGrath and Monty Ashley.

Off The Charts Football Podcast
Serving Total Points, the AFC Leaders, and Thanksgiving Food in Proper Portions

Off The Charts Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 46:03


On this episode, Mark Simon (@markasimonsays), SIS VP of Football Matt Manocherian (@MattMano) and Lead Football Analyst Alex Vigderman (@VigManonCampus) preview some of the key games in Week 12. But before they do … they first do quick takes on the key goings on in Week 11 and do a full-fledged walkthrough on how Total Points are dispersed among players, using a Derek Carr fumble as an example. You can learn more about Total Points in this primer. They then preview Titans-Patriots, Rams-Packers, and Browns-Ravens and pick the most watchable elements of each game.   They close the show with “Scouts versus Stats” evaluating what you look for in a good Thanksgiving meal.   Thank you to all our listeners. We hope you have a great holiday. You can sign up for the SIS Football Newsletter here and the SIS Total Points Statpack here or e-mail offthecharts@sportsinfosolutions.com.

Ordway, Merloni & Fauria
M&F - NBA execs, scouts and coaches rip the play of Tatum and Brown in ESPN story

Ordway, Merloni & Fauria

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 13:39


M&F - NBA execs, scouts and coaches rip the play of Tatum and Brown in ESPN story written by Tim Bontemps See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ordway, Merloni & Fauria
M&F - Man in the Arena Ep2 + NBA coaches, scouts rip Tatum, Brown and underachieving Celtics

Ordway, Merloni & Fauria

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 41:12


HOUR 2: Lou Merloni and Christian Fauria discuss what they saw in "Man in the Arena" Episode 2. NBA coaches, scouts and executives rip Jayson Tatum, Jaylen Brown and the underachieving Celtics See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Little Bit Weebish
022: Attack on Titan S3E15-16 Connie's Dark Humor + The Truth About Marco

Little Bit Weebish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 54:21


We appreciate Connie's dark humor despite the fact that humanity's victory looks very slim. Megan and Sam discuss the metaphorical descent of Reiner as we learn the truth about Marco's death and the determination of both sides - the Scouts vs the Titans - to win and conquer. In this episode, we cover: Episode 15: Descent Episode 16: Perfect Game If you'd like to support the podcast in another way, please consider joining our Patreon for additional, exclusive content and discussions. https://www.patreon.com/littlebitweebish We'd love to connect with you. Email us at littlebitweebish@gmail.com with your thoughts and follow us on Instagram and TikTok @littlebitweebish

The Latke Room
Episode 98: Dave Brown, Winning the Stanley Cup, Funny Chirps, Memorable Fights, What Scouts Look For, Old Era vs. New Era

The Latke Room

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 60:59


Episode 98 of The Latke Room, your favorite Jews talk about thanksgiving and the Islanders new arena. Then, Dave Brown, former NHL player and current head scout for the Philadelphia Flyers (17:13) joins the show to talk about his playing career as well as his experience as a scout.

Wolf and Owl
Episode 51

Wolf and Owl

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 63:26


We're talking… camouflage fashion, dealing with unruly pupils, sixth form proms, Tom's calamitous time in the Scouts, an embarrassing fall for Rom and Mustaffa the lion. Then a few of your emails, this week about a revelatory hack to reduce phone use, advice on helping out a nephew and comparing morning routines.For any feedback, questions or comments please email us at wolfowlpod@gmail.com - we'd love to hear from you. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Movies, Films and Flix
Episode 398 (Predators, Walton Goggins, and Yautja Scouts)

Movies, Films and Flix

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 72:49


Mark and Nathan discuss the 2010 film Predators. Directed by Nimród Antal, and starring Adrien Brody, Alice Braga, Walton Goggins, and several large alien hunters, the movie focuses on what happens when a group of violent people are hunted by a group of violent aliens. In this episode, they talk about Yautja scouts, John Wick, and Adrien Brody's gravelly voice.

Off The Charts Football Podcast
Uncertainty for Contenders, ROY Leaders, and an NFL Week 11 Preview

Off The Charts Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 41:46


On this week's episode, Mark Simon (@markasimonsays) welcomes Alex Vigderman (@vigmanoncampus) and Nathan Cooper (@ncoopdraft) to the show to talk about some uncertainty for the top NFL contenders (0:21) before moving to a discussion about the Offensive (3:36) and Defensive Rookie of the Year candidates (9:29). They also discuss whether Kirk Cousins is elite (25:12). Then comes a Week 11 preview featuring the Cowboys-Chiefs (30:48) and Steelers-Chargers (35:29) before finishing with a Scouts vs. Stats on a few Big Ten prospects (38:02). Thanks for listening. You can email the show with feedback at offthecharts@sportsinfosolutions.com and don't forget to follow on Twitter @SportsInfo_SIS and Instagram @sportsinfosolutions. For more, check out: sportsinfosolutions.com sportsinfosolutionsblog.com SISDataHub.com

Bliss of the Abyss
72 (ft. Carpet Martin) - King F**ing Prawns

Bliss of the Abyss

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 80:43


Welcome back to TBOTA! This week is the man with the record as most returning guest, Carpet Martin. On this frankly rambling and shambolic escapade, we blather on about... Bloody fingers, Scouts, Sailing, Poker, Las Vegas, Weighted minibars, and of course the endless anecdote of the Dubai trip! Support the show: Give us a rating & review Become a patron and help me make this show Like and follow us on Facebook or Instagram Rent the award-winning One Jewish Boy © Robert Neumark Jones

Pets Who Thrive!
What Is Dog Scouts of America? Listen to Tammy and a few of her fellow Dog Scout's to learn more.

Pets Who Thrive!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 24:19


Hello! I'm so glad you're here with me! Today is going to be so much fun! In this episode, I'm joined by a few of my friends and fellow dog scouts, and we're giving you a glimpse into this amazing organization, our experiences, and what we've learned!Find out more about Dog Scouts!http://dogscouts.org/base

Fantasy Scouts Podcast
Ep 35: Redrafting The 2020 & 2021 Classes

Fantasy Scouts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 80:37


The Fantasy Scouts are back with a new episode! In today's episode, the Scouts continue with their in-season reactions and react to some of the bigger storylines from around the NFL. Today's show topics include: The Scouts sat down and drafted a starting lineup built of only players from the 2020 and 2021 classes and discussed why they like certain players and why they don't like others. Also discussed was the dynasty values of each. For more inside info, check out patreon.com/fantasyscouts !

Con Las Bases Llenas Podcast de Beisbol
SABERMETRÍA y los SCOUTS trabajan juntos en el BEISBOL MODERNO

Con Las Bases Llenas Podcast de Beisbol

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 38:15


Nuestro invitado de hoy en Amor Beisbolero, nos cuenta de su carrera y su amor por este deporte y nos habla de como coexisten las analíticas y la vieja escuela en el mundo de las Grandes Ligas en la actualidad.

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast
Cobb Life: Tracy Techau - Boy Scouts of America

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 32:05


Tracy Techau is the CEO of the Atlanta Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America. He joins the podcast to share the impact Scouts are having on our local community here in Cobb County.  #BoyScouts #BSA #CobbLife   #CobbCounty #Georgia #LocalNews    -            -            -            -            The Marietta Daily Journal Podcast is local news for Marietta, Kennesaw, Smyrna, and all of Cobb County.             Subscribe today, so you don't miss an episode! MDJOnline             Register Here for your essential digital news.              Find additional episodes of the MDJ Podcast here.         This Podcast was produced and published for the Marietta Daily Journal and MDJ Online by BG Ad Group on 11-13-2021 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lake Forest Illinois
Scouts 22 Prairie Ridge 21 Special Post Game Show

Lake Forest Illinois

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 18:45


Wow-what a game Final 4 here we come Have an idea for a topic or guest? pete@lakeforestpodcast.com Thanks to our Patreon Supporters Church of the Holy Spirit, Reverend Luke Back, and MATT A https://www.patreon.com/LakeForestPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lakeforestpodcast/message

AdamCast
283 - Soy Scouts, The LGBTQ Pandemic, Oxygen on the Moon

AdamCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 124:03


https://www.adamcrigler.com

Dukes & Bell
Brett McMurphy scouts the DAWGS!

Dukes & Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 12:46


Action Network HQ's Brett McMurphy joins the show to talk all things college football! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lake Forest Illinois
Best Burger In Lake Forest!

Lake Forest Illinois

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 61:52


Skoo Walker and Pete Jansons announce the winner of their scientific poll of who makes the Best Burger in Lake Forest. They also artfully cover such topics as: Scouts play Prairie ridge at Home tickets 7 dollars online only See you at the Scouts Pep Rally....uh never mind Lock Down at LFHS Another block the box? LF Hospital drops a grade BEST BURGER RESULTS Have an idea for a topic or guest? pete@lakeforestpodcast.com Thanks to our Patreon Supporters Church of the Holy Spirit, Reverend Luke Back, and MATT A https://www.patreon.com/LakeForestPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lakeforestpodcast/message

Off The Charts Football Podcast
Week 9 Upsets, Pressures Above Expectation, and Week 10 Preview

Off The Charts Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 35:20


On today's episode, Matt Manocherian (@mattmano) and Mark Simon (@markasimonsays) welcome Bryce Rossler (@btrossler) to the show. The group looks at the major NFL Week 9 upsets (0:19), gives their thoughts on some of the performances by young QBs (3:55), discusses the SIS Pressures Above Expectation stat (10:33), and previews the best games of Week 10: Saints-Titans (14:57), Chiefs-Raiders (18:49), Browns-Patriots (23:06), and Bills-Jets (27:13). The show closes with a Scouts vs. Stats looking at the NFL Draft (31:50). Thanks for listening. You can email the show with feedback at offthecharts@sportsinfosolutions.com and don't forget to follow on Twitter @SportsInfo_SIS and Instagram @sportsinfosolutions. For more, check out: sportsinfosolutions.com sportsinfosolutionsblog.com SISDataHub.com

Fantasy Scouts Podcast
Ep 34: Javonte Williams or Najee Harris?

Fantasy Scouts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 72:29


The Fantasy Scouts are back with a new episode! In today's episode, the Scouts continue with their in-season reactions and react to some of the bigger storylines from around the NFL. Today's show topics include: Dalvin Cook. Odell Beckham Jr. Reactions to Jordan Love's first start. Mahomes and the Chief's regression. Javonte or Najee in dynasty? A fun game of keep-trade-cut. For more inside info, check out patreon.com/fantasyscouts !

Cornquest: A D&D Podcast
TDW Ep 2 - Multiverse confirmed?: The World Champ Scouts Her Competition

Cornquest: A D&D Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 66:27


“We hear from Tiny Duck World Champion Brenda Boutman Charles McLawrence McTriceps v Clandestine Stanley Yelnats and ??? v The Steamroller Becky Stevens v The Ring Queen (c) for the River Streaming Championship”

Little Bit Weebish
020: Attack on Titan S3E11-12 Commandant Sadis Pulls A Severus Snape

Little Bit Weebish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 50:19


Yes, another Harry Potter reference – but how could you not with the retelling of Commandant Sadis's life?! Megan and Sam discuss what it means to be a bystander in the world of AOT, which was heavily referenced in the retelling of when Sadis met Grisha Yaeger, and also the hopeful look to the future as the Scouts prepare to retake Wall Maria from the titans. In this episode, we discuss: Episode 11: Bystander Episode 12: Night of the Battle to Retake the Wall If you like what you heard, please leave us a 5-star review or share with your friends! Follow us on Instagram and TikTok with the handle: @littlebitweebish. If you'd like to support the podcast in an additional way, head over to Patreon and pledge to a tier. There you will find additional polls and exclusive mini weeb episodes and other content: https://www.patreon.com/littlebitweebish

I Survived Theatre School
Molly Smith Metzler

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 62:10


Intro: Gina is co-hostless and doing her best. PLEASE SUBSCRIBE, RATE, and REVIEW you beautiful Survivors!Interview: SUNY Geneseo, Boston University, Tisch, Juilliard, Playwriting MFAs, competition in writing programs, Marsha Norman, Cry It Out, MAID on Netflix, Hollywood sea changes, female-centered shows, domestic violence, emotional abuse, Hulu, theatre is behind, denial, making mistakes, bad reviews.COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT (unedited):1 (10s):And I'm Gina Polizzi. We went to theater school2 (12s):Together. We survived it.1 (14s):We didn't quite understand it. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all2 (21s):Survived theater school. And you will too. Are we famous yet?1 (34s):Hello? Hello. Hello survivors. This is Gina. This week. We are sons' cohost, just one host today. I'm missing my better half BAAs. His boss is actually attending to a friend who got terrible health news this week. And she is in her very boss like way being there for her friend and being the amazing person and friend that she is, which is why everybody loves buzz. Anyway, she'll be back next week if you're not. But today we have, honestly, you guys, this is the interview I have been waiting for.1 (1m 19s):Molly Smith. Metzler is a writer extraordinaire. You may have heard of her latest project made number three on Netflix entering its 28th day online, which has some very special meaning for Netflix that I hope to know more about one day and previous to me being the showrunner for maid, she also worked on shameless and several other successful television shows. And before that she was a playwright. And actually I got to know her work because I directed a play of hers called cry it out.1 (1m 59s):And it was a fantastic experience. And I started communicating with her over email when I was directing. And I was so impressed with the way that she responded to me. I mean, a that she responded to me at all that she was available to me at all. And not something you always get with a playwright and B that she really took her time with her responses and see that her responses ended up being pretty impactful for me, just not necessarily related to the play, but as a person. And I'm a little embarrassed that when I talked to her and I told her the way that she had impacted me, I just started seriously just crying, crying, crying.1 (2m 45s):And I was having this thought like, I, this is not a moment I want to be crying. And I'm generally in life. I, I welcomed here as, as a person who struggles to access their emotions. I do. I welcome a good cry, but it not want to be crying to Molly Smith Metzler in this great interview. But you know, it is what it is. If I'm going to be honest, I have to be honest. I can't be choicy about when I'm being myself. That's my, that's my mantra. Recently you have to be yourself in all the ways. Some of those ways are ugly and disgusting and you know, unsavory, and some of them are fine and some of them are be even beautiful.1 (3m 31s):So I'm working on embracing the, a mess that I am, but I really think you're going to enjoy this interview with Molly. She's fantastic. Even without the always wonderful presidents, presidents presence, maybe she should be president even without the always wonderful presence of BAAs. We still managed to have a great conversation and actually that whole experience of her at the last minute, not being able to do this and this being the first time we're doing this with one host, turns out to have been a good thing for us to go through, to learn that.1 (4m 14s):Yeah, sometimes we're not both going to be available and sometimes when I'm not available, she'll be doing an episode on her own. So, you know, whatever we're growing, changing learning, Hey, we're in 22 countries. Now, if you have a, not a subscribed to this podcast, please do. If you have not rated this podcast or given it a review, please, please, please, please, please, please do it seriously. Please do it, please. I'm begging you. Please do it, but okay. Anyway, here's Molly Smith message.0 (4m 53s):Well,1 (5m 0s):No problem whatsoever. Fortunately, my partner is Jen. Her very good friend just got diagnosed with cancer yesterday and she's with her right now helping. So she's not going to be able to join us. This is actually the first time we're doing an interview with just me. So we'll see how it goes.3 (5m 23s):Yeah,1 (5m 24s):It is. And she just, she has a lot of experience with, with cancer. So she's sort of like the first people, first person people call, which is like,3 (5m 38s):Yeah,1 (5m 38s):Exactly, exactly. But anyway, congratulations, Molly Smith. Metso you survived theater school and you're going to have to clarify for me because it looks like you went to four schools, but you didn't go to four theater schools. Did you?3 (5m 52s):I went to four schools. I did. They're not all theater schools, but I went to undergrad, SUNY Geneseo in Western New York and I was an English major. And then I went to Boston university and got a master's in creative writing with a concentration in playwriting. And then I went to Tisch and got an MFA in playwriting dramatic writing. And then I went to Juilliard, which is, you don't really get a degree there. It's called an artist diploma, but it's just finishing school basically.1 (6m 20s):Oh, okay. So the decision to, to do the MFA, were you thinking at that time that you, maybe you were going to be a teacher, I'm always curious about MFA's and writing because you know, if you learned what you needed to know and you know, why not just put yourself out there and be a writer?3 (6m 40s):I think it's very scary to take that jump. The thing about school that I got addicted to is that I'm actually way too social to be a writer. I like being around other writers and every, and every time you get a graduate program, you're with a bunch of writers and you have deadlines and you kind of, you know, it's a really public way to study writing versus alone in your apartment while way to say, you know, and I kept getting academic support to attend the programs. And so that was part of it. I'm not sure I would have gone deep into debt to get all those degrees, but I think giving me aid, I kept going. Yeah.1 (7m 16s):Okay, fantastic. And did you always know from day one that you, I mean, since you were in high school anyway, that you wanted to be a writer that you wanted to write dramatically?3 (7m 26s):I always loved writing. I had journals and I'm from a very young age. I love to write, but I had a sort of more academic feeling about it. I thought I was going to get a PhD in English and join the academy and be a professor. And I didn't know, I was creative in the sense of dramatic writing until my senior year of college. When I took a playwriting class, I didn't know I was a playwright. And I also didn't know. I was funny. Those two things emerged at the same time. Wow.1 (7m 54s):Oh, so you didn't have experience with theater before then?3 (7m 58s):Well, I grew up a ballerina, so I had a great sense of the stage and the relationship between an audience and someone onstage. I really like, I understood light and the power of an audience, but I, no, I didn't grow up a theater nerd at all. I grew up a nerd nerd, like an actual,1 (8m 18s):So that must've been like just a whole new, exciting world. Did you decide pretty much right away that you were going to be getting your MFA when you discovered that you liked to play with?3 (8m 27s):Yeah, I did. I took this introduction to play right in class and it was one of those things. People talk about this, like in a romantic relationship where you're just like, it changes your whole life. And I didn't have that in a romantic relationship, but I had that with playwriting. One-on-one where, you know, I just, I, it came, I don't want to say easily to me cause it was really easy to play it, but it came, it was like a big release in my life that I arrived at playwriting and loved doing it. And it's like a big jigsaw and you can stay up all night doing it. And I knew from the very first, basically from the first act of a play that I wrote that it's what I wanted to do. I'm very lucky. It was very clear.1 (9m 5s):Yeah. Yeah. That is really lucky. So we have talked to almost 60 people now, the majority of them have been actors. So we've really delved deep into like everything about being an actor, especially at the age of undergrad and what that's like to be growing up, you know, just growing up and then trying to figure out yourself well enough to be an actor and all the stuff that comes along with that, including, you know, the competitive best with your cohort. But I imagine that's what it, well, I don't want to imagine what it's like, what is it like with your cohort when you're all writers and you're presumably reading each other's work critiquing each other's work, does it get really competitive?3 (9m 55s):I suspect that it can, you know, I feel very lucky cause I have never experienced that directly in a graduate program situation. Part of it is I think I went to really great places where everyone had gotten in was incredibly talented and brought such a unique point of view and voice that none of us were trying to raise the same place. So it was really easy to just support each other. And also it's fun, you know, you're reading it aloud. So if something's in the south, you're trying an accent and it's super bad cause you're a playwright. So I found it, you know, I became close with the other writers and I mean, I'm married. One of them, I call him my husband, he and I were in the same graduate program at Tisch. And there is something beautiful about meeting someone in a writing workshop because you're just sort of naked.3 (10m 41s):It's all, you know, I imagine it's like, I understand my actors fall in love too. It's like, you're just so vulnerable and you know, each other in a deep way. But my experience has been that writers are pretty, pretty darn supportive of each other. And if you're not, you kind of don't fit in, like if you're a jerk, if you're competitive jerk, like you're not meant to be a playwright, playwrights need to love people. Cause that's what we do, you know? Yeah.1 (11m 1s):Yeah. That's a very good point. Actually, we talked to CISA Hutchinson yesterday and basically said, yeah, isn't she awesome?3 (11m 8s):She's in a beautiful inside and out like just, but yeah.1 (11m 12s):Yeah. She, and she echoed the same thing in what you're saying. So I guess we're going to stop asking this question about competition. It's just that it's so much of a part of like the act. And I think it's part of just how the program is structured. I mean, you're literally up for the same parts against each other and they PO posted on a wall and everybody shows up to3 (11m 35s):Absolutely. And you know, I was at Juilliard where they still cut people. You know, that system has changed a little bit, but I was at the, the version of Juilliard that was structured to drop 10% of the class out. And I feel like you don't get, I don't know. I learned a lot about that cause they cut playwrights as well. And I feel like that doesn't, that doesn't bring forth good creative work from anybody that pressure of, you know, is Sally going to get cut instead of me that's that's, that's not good skills. I don't think1 (12m 5s):It's true. And at the same time, like a lot of the people who were cut from our program went on to have better careers than the majority of us. So it's just like not a lot of rhyme or reason to it.3 (12m 15s):It's like SNL. Yeah. I mean, yes. It's not a predictor. You got it. Right.1 (12m 20s):Exactly. Okay. So you graduated or you've finally finished school with Julliard after doing it for, for a number of years then what happened next? You were, you were married or you're in a relationship and w how did, how do two writers figure out what their next steps are going to be when school's over?3 (12m 40s):Well, I don't know how to writers in general would do, but I can tell you how Colin and I did it, which is that we we've never been competitive because we write really different plays. Like I am talking to, you know, especially as a playwright, my, my work tends to, I mean, I've written Boulevard, comedy. It's like, I really like to laugh. My husband's play is everyone's on meth and they're an Appalachian. It's like, we are, we are really young and yang. And, but I think being, I really recommend being married to, or spending your life with another writer, if you are a writer because they get it and they get you in like a deep, deep way. So if you have to stay up to four o'clock in the morning, cause you're inspired and you have to finish the scene, you know, there's, there's just a, there's no jealousy about that.3 (13m 25s):There's an acceptance. And our, it really, I think I often say, I don't think I'd be a playwright. Certainly won't be any of the things that I am a mother, you know, like everything is because it's all. And I, I had someone who believed in me more than I believed in myself and at points that is everything because, you know, your play opens in New York, you get just the worst reviews in the world and you take, you know, you'd take to the bed and you don't think you're ever going to write again. And it's so important who you decided to spend your life with because, you know, con only saw me as a writer first and foremost. And you know, it's like at the same goes for him. So we, yeah, but just technically do we have money? You know, we lived in a apartment in Brooklyn that we got to kind of like a hookup.3 (14m 9s):My husband was, he managed the bar downstairs, so he knew the guy. And so we got this apartment that we could actually afford, but we both worked full time waiting tables and bartending. And then if I get into the O'Neil, for instance, he would do extra bartending support me being at the O'Neil. And you know, he went up to LA for a few months and did a bunch of meetings and screenwriting stuff. And I supported him with the Juilliard money. Like we just have always worked it out. And for the last handful of years, when we finally don't have to, we can both be working in. It's great.1 (14m 39s):Yeah. That's nice that, by the way, that makes so much sense about the difference in your writing because in watching made, you know, I remember getting to the end of the first episode that he wrote and not, not having known throughout the episode that he wrote it and being like, wow, this is really, really different than Molly's writing. And of course it, it was his, and I kind of tend towards that darker stuff too. So yeah. And by the way, the series is fantastic. It is so good. And how you were having such a moment, you're getting great reviews. People are loving. I saw even today, it's number three on Netflix. How are you doing with success? Because people assume that it's all great, but I'm guessing it's not.1 (15m 23s):And I'm guessing it's kind of scary too.3 (15m 27s):Oh, well this is all pretty, just great. You know, like I think there's probably two things that are tricky about it, which I'll tell you in a second, but the fact is, it's just, it's great. Especially because it's made, you know, made is the closest to play writing. I've done for the screen. I see the show as 10 individual plays and it's really just about cleaning and feelings. It's the most character driven thing I've seen on TV in a long time. There's no murder. There's no cool accents. We're not in Hawaii. It's just about one woman's cleaning and feelings. And every time we turned in an episode, I thought Netflix would call and be like, you know, this is too weird.3 (16m 9s):Like the couch can't eat her. That's just too weird, you know, but they let me make this like, you know, artistic, I think like they're beautiful thing. And I didn't really believe that they were going to air it. And then I didn't really believe that people were going, gonna watch it. And so the fact that the fact that it is exactly what I wanted it to be and people love it. It's very, I don't really, I think it's really exciting just as a writer, it's exciting. It's like, oh, maybe we can return to doing harder things on the screen and on the stage again, you know, I think audiences weren't deterred by the fact that it was difficult, you know, they leaned in. And so I feel like it's really, it's mostly just fantastic.3 (16m 49s):I am surprised that people love it this much, but no, I'm just, I'm so proud of it. So it feels great. That's all there is. Do it.1 (16m 57s):What were the, you said there you'll tell me about the two things that have been challenging.3 (17m 1s):Yes, it is challenging. I, and I know you'll relate to this, but coming up in the theater, there are so many of us that, that are just working hard and waiting tables and waiting for a break. And that was me as well. And you want to help every single one of those people and you want to help every single one of those people whose cousin is also in LA. So like, that's the part that's really hard for me is that I can't, I can't do for everyone. And I want to, and especially theater people, like if you, if someone sends me a cold email that the subject is like a MF playwright, like I read it and then I, you know, I, I can't help it.3 (17m 42s):So that's a little hard cause I want to be good to everyone. And, and can't so that's, that's hard for me. And the other thing that's just hard is, you know, I spend my life in sweatpants and now suddenly have to do a bunch of stuff where I look, I have to look very, you know, Like, you know, writers or writers were writers for a reason. And so, so suddenly I have to like I to buy lipstick. And so that part of it is a little being articulate. Like next to Margot, Robbie is very difficult for me, but1 (18m 14s):I didn't realize until just today that she was the producer. So she's, she's the person who optioned the book.3 (18m 20s):So she and John Wells got the book together. John Wells is a very famous producer. He did west wing ER, and shameless, which is how I know him. I worked in my last four seasons of shameless is a writer on the show. So when he and Margo got the book, LA had just done cry it out, it was cried out, was up like, like had just closed when they got the book and it's a play about moms. And I think they were like, oh, we know a person who writes about moms and they handed me the book. It was so kismet.1 (18m 49s):Wow. That's fantastic. And, but you had to, I mean, I read the book too. You had to create a whole narrative. That's not in the book. So how does that, I'm curious about that process and how it works. Is it that you kind of sit down as the show runner and hatch a basic idea that you, that you then have some writers help you with or do you have to outline all of the stories and everybody else just writes them? Or how does it work?3 (19m 20s):Well, it's a, it's a little bit different with every project. Oh, I'm with a story like made, you know, whenever the memoir I learned so much, like it was, it's really an educational tool and I didn't want to sacrifice any of that. On the other hand, when you go and sit down with your husband or wife and Saturday night to watch Netflix, you don't want to lecture and you don't want to like TV, shouldn't taste like TV, shouldn't taste like broccoli, right. It should taste like it should be a sneak attack. Kind of like my plate is like, I like to sneak people into learning something. So I knew kind of off the bat that that made was an incredible engine, the memoir, and that I wanted all the takeaway to be the same. But I also knew that we were going to have to create a lot of story to do that.3 (20m 1s):So to answer your question, when I first said I would do the book and when we were taking out and pitching it to Netflix, pitching it to HBO, you know, all the places I would have to say, this is what I'm going to do. You know, we're gonna, we're going to do 10 episodes. Her mom's going to be a huge character. Her dad's got a huge character. We're going to really build up. Sean. We're going to get to know some of the people in the houses we're going to get to know Regina, she's an invented character, but this is how she'll structure in the plot. And you really have to know the nuts and bolts of what you're going to do. And the tone of it, like it's kinda like giving a 45 minute presentation on what the show will be. And then hopefully someone like Netflix is like, okay, great. Here's, here's a green light and get your writer's room. So then you hire a handful.3 (20m 42s):If you're lucky, you know, I could, I didn't have any, no one told me what to do. I got to hire whoever I wanted. And I hired only four writers, three of whom are playwrights, three of whom. I'm sure. You know, cause it's Colin, Becca bronzer, Marcus Garley so really accomplished playwrights. And then Michelle, Denise Jackson, who is not a playwright, but should be like, she's an honorary playwright, you know? And so w and then the five of us sit down and we take what I've said, you know, about the show, the 45 minute presentation, and we flush it out. What are we doing in every episode? What does this look like? And that, that process in the writer's room is the closest, you'll get to a table read in the theater, you know, where you're just at the table, you're reading that play.3 (21m 24s):And then you talk about it for, you know, nine days. That's a writer's room is that every day. So it's very, very, very cool experience and everyone's sharing secrets and, and we disagree sometimes and we do puzzles and there's a lot of talk about lunch.1 (21m 43s):That's what everybody says.3 (21m 47s):But also what was cool that mean is that these five, these four writers and me, the five of us, we all really connected to different things in the memoir. And we also, all of us come from all of us can relate to the memoir in different ways. And so you get five different perspectives on something. And I think, you know, Becca brown center did so much of the writing of Regina, and I think she could really connect to Regina. And, you know, that character would not feel quite as beautifully drawn if Becca weren't in the writers room. Like, so, so much of it is it's a dinner party. And the result of that dinner party is character. You know? So it's really, it's the most important thing you do is those writers.1 (22m 26s):That is okay. So I also just learned that today that you didn't write that Regina monologue, because, and this is about my own projection that when I'm watching it, I'm going, oh my God, this is so similar to Claire, Claire. Is that the name of the character and cry it out. That lives up high, up on the hill.3 (22m 45s):Oh, Adrian. Adrian.1 (22m 47s):Yeah. Thank you. Sorry. I was thinking, I was thinking, it sounded like an Adrian, my likes. So that's fascinating that, that,3 (22m 53s):Well, let me explain one further thing, which is, so that's how the show gets written. And yes, Becca brown said, I wrote that monologue, but the other thing that the show runner does is it is my job to then go through all 10 episodes and make sure it sounds like one person wrote them. And, and so the showroom, so you kind of divide the writing in the room and then all funnels back to me and I rewrite it or fix things. Or sometimes, you know, sometimes you're doing a major rewrite sometimes you're just like with Regina monologue, it was so beautiful. You know, we, we had to cut a couple of things for production, but like, it's, it's back as work. And, but it's, that's what TV writing is. It's like, there'll be stuff that Becca wrote in episode seven that she didn't write, or, you know, like TV is very collaborative and then it all funnels through the showrunner who does a pass to make sure it's, it's up to the standard that I want.3 (23m 44s):It's totally what I want. You know, it is, it is a writing job as a group, and then it is ultimately one person's writing job it's book. Does that make sense?1 (23m 51s):Yeah, it does. And thank you so much for answering that question because I have always wondered. And also even on television shows that have, have a different director, every episode, I'm always thinking, how are they keeping true to the tone, but not now, now I understand it. Well, I have so many things to ask you. I want to talk to you about just one thing is that you have said that you love writing about class, which is a big part of made and your, and your place. But, so I want to talk a little bit about that, but I also kind of want to talk maybe first about the thing that you said you were surprised that people like to made, and I've heard a lot of female writers express, something like that.1 (24m 36s):I'm surprised. And maybe people just say it in a way as, as you know, not, not trying to try to be humble. Right. Okay. But I believe that you are surprised by it because it does seem like a kind of recent thing that the universe is allowing us to tell women's stories and having them at the forefront. I mean, it seems really pretty recent. And so are you, do you feel like this is you're part of a big sea change in terms of what's being represented on screen?3 (25m 7s):You know, absolutely. I was talking to Netflix yesterday and they said last year it was Bridgford, you know, these are a lot of things, but they were saying last year, people, the surprise was everyone loved Britain and love Queens gambit. And this year one loves squid game and loves made, which cracks me up. But, but they think to be in the same sentence as Queens gambit as the limited series. I mean, I think that's so exciting as a female writer, because she was an alcoholic kind of like piece of crap who was amazing at chess and went on this like beautiful arc that was not traditionally feminine. It was usually that's a man, like that's usually a male going through that and were riveted by his addiction and his dysfunction and made his, you know, I think we're continuing what Queens gambit did as well.3 (25m 50s):Like it's, you know, Alex has a lot of things, but she's not a woman. She is a character going through an arc and she makes a ton of mistakes and she, you know, is a product of where she comes from. And that is enough to carry a show. And I feel like that is it you're right. It's so recent. And I therefore assumed it would be treated like a, you know, like a niche, you know, maybe 500,000 people will watch it kind of like, cause we don't show up for those shows, but all of a sudden we really show up for those shows and we want to see a multidimensional and rich and layered woman at the story of her own dance story. It's really like exciting.3 (26m 31s):It's exciting.1 (26m 33s):That's what I think about stuff like this. I just imagine, you know, the people who are traditionally in charge of these things, I just mentioned it, but I imagine a bunch of guys sitting around being like, can you imagine people really want to hear about these dang? I mean, I feel like it must be a surprise to, to sort of the old guard that, you know, because of course everything does have to be motivated about what's going to be a return on your investment. And that, that that's understandable. It's I'm not saying anybody's bad for that, but it is curious to me that there was just this, there was an assumption that if you made a female centered show, nobody would want to watch it.1 (27m 16s):Except for every time they make a female centered, anything people want to watch it. Why is this keep being a surprise?3 (27m 24s):I think it's going to stopping a surprise pretty soon because this cracked me up. But my friend was doing a pitch yesterday at Hulu. And I guess like the conversation kind of organically came up with like, well, what's our main, you know, like what's the, you know, the producer was in it, but like, you know, people are starting to look for the, the queen scam, but you know, trying to look for the female, you know, the unconventional sort of what's the would be a surprising female story. We're starting to like, not only are we starting to have it at the table, that the market is the, market's starting to recognize that we're going to get eyes on the screen and it's, you know, I shouldn't be so surprised by made.1 (28m 5s):Right. Right. And it helps that we have people like Margot, Robbie and Reese Witherspoon and females who are having more of a say about what gets produced, you know, with what, what books get optioned and then what gets produced.3 (28m 17s):Absolutely. And, and more and more women are taking those jobs and taking those positions. And it's a good, it's a sea change. I also dare say, I think TV and film has ahead of it than theater. I have to say, I think1 (28m 29s):Girl, that's another thing I was going to say. Cause you had a quote in something I read theater is behind theater is so behind and this is, unfortunately it came as a surprise to me. Like when I woke up to the fact that theater is so behind, it was sad and it also doesn't make sense. It also, you know, it should be it's, it was 40 years ago. It was the most progressive part of art, I think.3 (28m 55s):Yeah. Well the theater doesn't treat women as, as minority voices and they have, and like that's, what's so crazy is we've, you know, I think we've carved out space for there's so much equality and, and like, it's exciting to see the programming in theaters change. And like it's not just white men anymore. That's all, that's very, very exciting. But heterosexual women stories that mother's stories about our struggles stories about, you know, me and my friends, there's no space for us on the New York stage. There's no space for my friends and I on the New York stage. And I feel like, and then, you know, you don't go up in New York, then you don't go all across the regions.3 (29m 36s):And I think a great example is actually cried out because that had a huge regional presence because I think people are starved for players like that, that are about women and just, you know, and not women on Mars and not, not necessarily, you know, like it just normal women, women having, you know, the Wendy Wasserstein plays of today are not produced in New York. And it's, it's a, it's a huge issue I think.1 (30m 0s):Yeah, yeah, it is. So, okay. So the other thing is that you love to write about class, which I find fascinating. I love to read about it in any case, what is your personal connection to your fascination with that issue?3 (30m 17s):Well, I think I grew a group of the Hudson valley, the daughter of two teachers. So, you know, I, I, I can't relate to made, for instance, in the sense of, I always had food and I always had a certain amount of like structure and S and security, but I, my parents were incredibly well educated and they kind of like my dad went to Cornell and it was sort of something we heard a lot about, even though we didn't kind of grow up in a moneyed area or money to house, there was a sense of, there was a sense of you could scholarship your way into the next strata. And I think that I find that fascinating because it's just not true. I, it's almost impossible.3 (30m 59s):It's almost impossible to change your class in America. And it's, it's, I feel like those walls are getting higher, not lower. And I watch people through everything they have at, at, at those chances to change, you know, change their stripes. And I just think the way we, we work in this country is we it's, we've made that harder and harder. There is no bootstrap narrative there. It does. There's no bootstraps it doesn't, it's not a thing in this country. So I find that fascinating because I felt very jipped. You know, I felt like I worked very, very hard and like I was always getting A's and being sophisticated and like, I couldn't graduate and get a, you know, a little studio in New York and intern at a publishing house.3 (31m 42s):You know, like a lot of my friends who came from money could, and there's just, it's so ingrained in our culture and it makes me mad and it's not, you know, it's not fair. Especially when I had a child and started thinking about cried out and just the way we treat that money directly affects maternity leave in this country too. And like, I can't compete with somebody who has a trust fund, you know, I had to put queer where I could afford her. And it's just bullshit that you can claw your way out of the class that you're born into. It's it's extremely rare. So I love that1 (32m 16s):It's bullshit and it's really dangerous cause it makes people feel so inadequate when they can't, you know, and that, that's also a great scene. I think it's in the first episode. Yeah. It's in the first episode when she goes and she's talking to the social worker and she's saying, so I can't get a job because I don't have a daycare and I can't get daycare cause I don't have a job. So I have to get a dog to prove that I didn't deserve daycare. I mean, it's, it's also3 (32m 40s):Backwards. Yeah. You're at a humongous disadvantage. If you are born into, you know, if you're born into poverty, you're at a humongous disadvantage in this country and it's like getting worse. That's the other thing is it's not, I mean, I have to leave. That's part of why made is, is touching so many people's sense of justice too. It's like, oh yeah, it's getting worse. Like, why aren't we talking about this? It's you know, Alex and I are, are not facing the same problems. And it's just by where I was born and where she was born and you know, you what family, your brand and who dictates so much of your struggle.1 (33m 17s):Yeah. And, and that, that the sort of historical narratives would have you believe that it's, it's the opposite of that and that, and that everybody left England to get away from that. But then yeah, just creative things I think here. So another thing that I heard or read that you said that really took my breath away is you said that when you became a mother, your, you didn't say your resolve for your career. You, the phrase that I that's sticking out to me, as you said, I went from being the secretary of my own company to the CEO. And it just, that just really like hit me in the center of my chest.1 (33m 58s):Can you just say a little bit more about it? What, what you meant by that?3 (34m 3s):Sure. I think that we'll probably like probably like many women when they become moms. I, I was frustrated that I had, I had this thing that I was good at, that I had studied for so many years that I've given so much time and love to my playwriting career and that it did not love me back in the sense that I could not afford to take core to a music class, you know? And it made me very, it made me very frustrated that, you know, I, I had devoted my, my self to this, this field that I had a passive relationship with. Like I was waiting for someone to call and tell me they were going to do a reading or, you know, or I was waiting for my career to start.3 (34m 50s):And I think what happened when I had, when I had Cora was I, I wanted to provide for her. And I also wanted to, I wanted to show her that you could be tough and you could be an active participant in your career like that. I didn't have to wait for it to happen. And so part of it was, I was, I just kind of said the things we all want to say out loud as a women, but I actually said them, which was like, Hey agents, what the F I am funny and talented. I want to work in TV. I want to take a music class with my daughter. What do I have to do to do that? And I you'd be shocked. I think how freeing and wonderful it is to just stand up for yourself and to make demands. And, you know, and I wanted to, I wanted to take an expensive music class with my daughter and I wanted to have a career.3 (35m 32s):And I was like, I'm not going to wait for it to happen because I know if someone gives me a chance I'm going to do, I'm going to go far in this field. Like, cause I don't know. Does that make sense? So I kind of like, wait, I said, waiting for the phone to ring and started making the calls.1 (35m 45s):Yeah. And also what I'm hearing is you stopped just blindly participating in the myth that everything can only work a certain way, which I feel like is something that we can all relate. I mean, it's something that boss and I talk a lot on this podcast about like just making so many assumptions about what, what we're definitely not entitled to have and what we're, you know, let's definitely for other people and not for us without ever once actually saying that out loud or asking for what we want. And actually yesterday chiefs have said the exact same thing. She said she, she was trying to be humble and say it's because she doesn't know how the system works. So she didn't know, she couldn't ask which you know. Okay. Maybe, but it's very inspiring to hear that.1 (36m 29s):Now you could just decide what you want to do with your life and your career. You could decide that you want to have a work-life balance and then have it.3 (36m 37s):Yeah. And you know, I think actors have this too. We are always waiting for the phone to ring. And at a certain point, I think that's a really tough way to be a mom because you can't count on anything and you're spread so thin. And I'm just kinda like, no, I'm going to generate, I'm going to generate this. And I can't really define the moment, but I will say for me it was emotional. I, I stopped, I stopped letting theater. Tell me how to feel about myself a little bit theater. I mean, it's a little bit like the terrible boyfriend that you just can't leave. Right. Like I would be like, I would be like, here's my new play. Do you love it? And they'd be like, maybe, you know, maybe we'll do a reading of it.3 (37m 19s):And I'd be like, let's my full heart. And I love you. And then, you know, and I finally like kind of broke up with that boyfriend in the sense that like, no, I'm really good at this. And like, I'm going to go where the love is. And I'm going to figure out how to pay my bills doing this and maybe you'll miss me and come back. You know, you know, it's hard as an artist, you can't let someone else tell you what your worth is. And theater is very conducive to that.1 (37m 40s):Yeah. Oh my God. That's so true. And that's, by the way, like a big part of the character of Alex, she does that too. I mean, she, with not that much to leverage did still find a way to just be very active about asking for what she wants. And I can see what you're saying about how, how having a kid makes that very clear. Whereas maybe you don't feel so I'm entitled to ask for what you want when it's just you, but when you know that it's somebody else who's depending on you, then it's that it doesn't feel like you're asking for yourself. It feels like you're asking for your family.3 (38m 15s):Yeah. And you see injustice with fresh eyes when you have a child, you know, because I don't know. I feel, I feel like certainly in my case, I w I would, I was so focused on being a good collaborator, being polite, being like, you know, you know, being grateful for the breadcrumbs that I got, you know, in my life. And I mean, honestly, it was a professional change, but it was primarily an emotional change. I was like, yeah, I don't want breadcrumbs anymore because my daughter deserves better than breadcrumbs. And so it just sort of filtered across all the fields, but yeah, another had does that.1 (38m 50s):Yeah, it does. It does well. So I don't know if I ever told you this, the reason I was looking through our emails earlier, as I wanted to see if I, I was sure I had said this thing to you, that I can not find in my email. So I'm going to say it to you now, which is that when I was directing your play, I wrote to you just about some things that I wondered if we could change. And you gave me the most thoughtful responses, which was, is to say you didn't invalidate that I was asking you, but you still stood up for what you, for the integrity of the play. I feel like I'm going to cry. I never saw anybody do that before.1 (39m 36s):And it was a really great, I wish I wasn't crying as I started to say this to you, but it was a great thing to, it was a, you were a great role model for me in that moment. And I always appreciate that. So thank you.3 (39m 52s):Oh, Tina, thank you. Well, you know what, thank you for wanting to have a conversation with me about it. Cause like I also think that's the sign of a fantastic director that you let me into your process and your thoughts about it. And I know you did a fantastic job with the play cause I had Scouts in that area who saw it and you know, so whatever you were, whatever you were working with, you artistically, you certainly landed that ship for you. You know, landed that plan beautifully.1 (40m 15s):Thank you. I had, and I had so much fun doing it. So tell me about some of your mentors. We had a nice discussion the other day about the power of mentors and some people go kind of through their whole training and never really feel like they connect with a mentor. Did you have mentors along the way?3 (40m 35s):Yes. I'm very lucky. Actually. I'm very lucky. I'm sure most people who go to Julliard and say this, but I, in my case, it's, it's really, really true that Marsha Norman was a wonderful mentor to me. I met her at Tisch and Tisha's a funny place because it's a larger program. You know, you don't have that. One-on-one with your professors that you do with Juilliard where there's just a handful of you, but, and I didn't stand out at Tisch. I sort of, my husband was, you know, my husband's sort of the star over player at, in class and I hadn't found my voice and I was sort of, I just wasn't like the star student and she was, she saw something in me and I don't think she saw like a Polish playwright yet, but she saw, I think there's just, she saw a way to help me find my voice.3 (41m 18s):And she hired me as her assistant coming out of that MFA program. And I always think like it was sort of charity work because she didn't need an assistant. She was so on top of her life. But I think she wanted to let me hang out with her and see how she conducted her business. So she was working on law and criminal intent. Yeah. Yeah. And so I was on set with her. I get to do research with her, for the scripts. She was doing the color purple and I got to go to rehearsal usually just to bring a coffee that I could watch. And it was, you know, she's also a mother and I don't know it was really, it, it was so generous of her because I got, I just got to see that you, what a woman in power looks like and, and a woman on her voice.3 (41m 59s):And she also says no a lot. And I grew to really respect that. Especially later when I became a mom, but you don't F with Marsha. I mean, she'll shut stuff down. She's really, I mean, she's such a generous person here. She did this thing for me, I'm a total stranger, but she's also like she knows her worth. So I was very grateful. It's been those years with her. And then, and then she invited me to Julliard. And then when I was ready really gave me, I mean, Juilliard is so much pressure. And the thing about Julia is you have to know what your voice is to go there. And so it's almost like she was helping me find my voice. And then when I found it gave me this incredible opportunity to go to Julliard. So sh honestly like very, very good to me in such a mentor in a very lucky.3 (42m 41s):And then on the west coast, I've had a wonderful mentor in John Wells because he, he's just one of the most terrific showrunners and producers, but it's funny cause I, everybody knows that that's not a secret in LA, but to work for him as a writer and to be in his writer's room. I learned so much from him about how to empower the people around you. How did it become like, you know, there's so many toxic writing rooms and toxic jobs with my friends, tell me, and it sounds terrible, but everyone at a John Wells show is thrilled to be there and very lucky to have that job. And they know it and like just that there's a way to do things gracefully. So he, and, and then he got this book and handed it to me and gave me my first chance to be a show runner.3 (43m 23s):So I had a, I've been very lucky to have him as a mentor on this coast1 (43m 28s):And the toxic. I've heard a lot of stories too, about toxic writers' rooms. And maybe that's also something that's going to get phased out because like so many of these things, you just, you just need more samples. You need, you know, you need more samples in your dataset so that, you know, I mean, if 99% of everything is run in one certain way, then there's little, there's little chance that it's going to change. But when, when the tide starts to shift, maybe there's a little, few more samples in your dataset that show, well, you can just be a regular nice person and still get the same, you know, get the same job done. That's that's nice to hear.3 (44m 9s):Yeah. Yeah.1 (44m 12s):So dah, dah, dah, oh, one, another favorite line from made is when Alex is talking to her dad about, I think this is, might be at the last episode or near then. And she says, she's trying to tell him that her or her, whatever boyfriend abused her and her, father's not taking it in. And she says, do you hear the words that are coming out of my mouth right now? That was another thing that really hit me because, you know, denial is really not a passive thing. Like you have to work pretty hard at defending your denial on something.1 (44m 56s):And I'm really familiar with saying something that feels, you know, that's a truth for me to people who, I mean, act as if you're, you know, like you're invisible and that turns out to be a really shaping force in a lot of people's lives. And you know, so anyway, I'm just curious about your own relationship and experience with denial.3 (45m 22s):Well, I love that you love that moment because I remember with that scene feeling like something was missing. And I remember, you know, I know a lot of it denial, but what I really know a lot about is gaslighting and denial is a form of gaslighting where you're just like, I'm, I'm not going to acknowledge a reality. And you know, I learned this tool a few years ago from a fantastic therapist that like, it's okay to just pause and be like, but you actually are hearing me, right? Like this is English. And you understand these words like, and I've, I've actually tried that tool in my life and steal at someone, not, not like, not be able to confirm that they're hearing the words.3 (46m 3s):And so it was when I, and then when I put it in the scene that it felt like, oh, that's what was missing is just this, like, how far are you going to take this denial? And he still can't write. I mean, I think Billy might nod, but he doesn't say anything. Like, I think gaslighting in denial and emotional abuse, I mean, I could write 40 Marsha was about this. I am fascinated by it. And the thing we don't talk about it as a form of abuse. And we should, it's like weirdly I think as well as violent, if not more violent than physical abuse, because you don't realize it's happening like Alex in the pilot, she doesn't know she's a victim of abuse and she is such an, a victim of abuse, which I hope we demonstrate in the show that you have to go on that ride with her, but you know, it's so corrosive and there's nothing worse than having someone tell you what what's real is not real day after day, year after year.3 (46m 56s):Like this is an area that I know a lot about I sent you do to1 (47m 1s):Yes. And actually my kind of where I put my energy in terms of recovery is with codependency and denial and codependency, or just, I mean, that's, that's the it's denial is the perfume of codependency. It's just, it's everywhere. And what I think really gets triggered for people who want to keep pretending, like they hear the words you're saying is because I find this in my family, like the way that denial really shows up in my family is if I acknowledge a truth, that's too true. I think what happens to other people is they feel that if they even just validate that that's my truth, that that somehow means that they have to acknowledge it for their own selves and their own lives.1 (47m 51s):And that's really like the forbidden thing that, you know, that people who don't want to go there can't do, they can't, it's like the Pandora's box. If I start to look at, you know, if I acknowledge that, what you're saying about this is true, then I can't help, but start to acknowledge all of the other things as well.3 (48m 9s):I think what you just said is, is brilliant because I think people think denial is just inactive, but it's aggressive. It's so aggressive. It's really violent, you know, intense denial that gaslighting of like, I will not even acknowledge. I hear the words you're saying it's, it's, it's so active. It's I mean, it's so aggressive. What you said was really, really smart really. Right. Yeah. And I love the people. I love the people are flipping out about Hank with me. Like how does he just sit there and let Sean treat her like that? And like, you know, and that's what I mean, I think she's mistreated throughout the show, but I think what Hank does to her in that moment with the denial is, is I think a lot of us recognize that.1 (48m 49s):Yeah. And I really appreciate the w the way you rolled out this whole concept of emotional abuse, because even I who feel like I've spent so much time working on this stuff, and I was a therapist, even I was found myself being like, oh, he didn't hit her. You know, she left, he didn't hit her. Hmm. I really had to check that in myself. And I was because one of the things that denial, I mean, in the absence of act, you know, saying you're wrong or whatever, and it's just, I don't hear you. You just assume that what you're saying, isn't valid, it's it becomes this thing that you do to yourself where you, you know, if somebody invalidates you enough, you start to invalidate yourself.1 (49m 38s):So I loved how you rolled that out in the series that are people talking to you a lot about that.3 (49m 45s):Yes they are. And how about in episode eight, where you are like, oh, Sean's changed and he's turned around and he's going to be a carpenter, you know? And like you it's in you, you find yourself. Or at least I did. And I assume it seems like audiences to just kind of like, oh, maybe this is a happy, love story. Like maybe he like, you know, and, and that, you know, that is all by calculated manipulative writing that I like my secret agenda with me. It was, you know, and I claimed 10 hours cause I wanted, I wanted the audience to go on the actual experience of that cycle and to get thrown off by it and caught up in it like, oh my gosh, I'm back, I'm back. And I'm in the pit, how did this happen?3 (50m 26s):And I wanted to show you how it happened. I also was like, I dare you to wash made and tell me that that's not domestic violence because it is emotional abuse is violent. It, what happens to her is violent. So that was like my secret mustache totally goal with the show.1 (50m 43s):Yeah, no, it, it hit, it totally played. And, and I think the other thing that's great about that is that when we have seen depictions of violence against women in film, I mean the best we could entail television, the best we could have hoped for is some woman who's abused who isn't a total idiot, because mostly what it is, how it's portrayed is some dumb person who doesn't, who's too dumb to know she's being abused. So therefore she goes back and also the various, the subtle, wow. I don't know if it's settled, but the, the subplot with the first roommate that she has when she goes to the, not roommate, but you know, the woman who lives in the shelter with her who introduces her to, you know, how, how to do life there.1 (51m 31s):I love I, that was heartbreaking her story of, because it is that you, you, you, yes, in the audience were saying, yeah, maybe sh maybe Sean is a good guy. Maybe, maybe all he really needed was to sober up and become the good person he was meant to team.3 (51m 50s):Yep. I mean, it's funny. I did an interview yesterday where this gentleman was like, is Sean okay? Like, does he end up okay. In life? And, and I, and I found myself sort of being like, I've never really thought of that cause he, you know, he's fictional, but I, I don't know. I'm not sure that that guy is ever going to make it out of that trailer, you know? And I'm not sure that he's going to get sober and be a great dad. I'm not. But I do feel like when he says at the end, I'm going to get sober and come see her all the time. I don't believe him. And, and I think that's his TV show, right? That's his cycle that he has to break. But my goal was to show that he's caught in his own cycle too.3 (52m 29s):Like, we are all kind of caught in our own cycles and it's so hard to break, you know, an Alex barely makes it out. And most women and men in her situation, the show ends in episode eight under the, in the pit. Most people don't get out of the pit and she is so smart and driven that she can, but she's the exception and not, she's a great exception. Yeah.1 (52m 53s):Yeah. Yeah. So we're, I want to be honoring your time. I told you we're only going to talk for an hour, but, but before we begin to wrap up, I just want to ask you, so since we've spent a lot of time talking about your success, let's hear about some of your failures. What have been some mistakes that you've made, maybe, maybe you maybe even like when you, when you made first, the transition from playwriting to writing and Hollywood, what were some of the mistakes that you made along the way?3 (53m 23s):Well, I, I think the, one of the great learning opportunities I've had as a human being, not just as a writer, was my first big production as a playwright in New York. And it was, you know, I was barely out of school and I felt I'm just so grateful for the opportunity. You know, it was a big production with stars in it and fancy director and everyone there was fancy except me and the process I have to say kind of went that way, like, like, huh, there's this element of it's actually, it's when I play close up space is about a dad and a daughter. It's about grief and pain and there's a lot of magical realism and I'm sure it's far from the perfect play, but it got obliterated by the press and squarely blamed on me the most inexperienced person in the production.3 (54m 11s):But what I learned from it is that I knew things about it were wrong. I knew immediately things about the production were wrong and I didn't use my voice. I didn't, you know, what happened with the play is my fault. I didn't, I didn't ring the bell. I didn't say, well, I didn't refuse the rewrites. Like I, you know, and everybody there had good intentions. Everybody wants to have a hit play, but people saw it a different way than I did. And, and it was wonderful people. There was no reason why I couldn't have said, Hey, yo, this isn't what I wrote. And I really, it was a crushing blow to have that play go so badly and to, to get such her, I mean, if you went for that and just Google it, it's the worst reviews. It's like, one of the, one of the reviews was like, is she sleeping with the director?3 (54m 53s):Like, why did she even get this product? You know, it's just straight on misogyny. I mean, it was, it was so mean, but what it taught me was I, since that moment I've really listened to my gut. And if my gut says this isn't right, I say it, and I don't worry about how it's going to come across. It sounds like I did that with you, but I have my sense of like, no, and, and it, and I learned the hard way in that moment that nothing is more important than your own gut. And so, and, you know, kind of re I had like a, kind of, a lot of momentum as a playwright really stop that momentum. It sent me into a deep depression. I mean, the, I lost so much because I didn't listen to my voice.3 (55m 36s):So that was my big theater lesson, which is applied to everything. But the big mistake I've made in TV to film, I've actually been really, really, really lucky and worked with fantastic people. But I think that stuff can go sideways here. It's a, it's a funny town, you know, and I've worked with wonderful people, but once in a while, you know, something's happening and then it just disappears. And so, you know, like that, you're gonna, you know, I, right before me and I came so close to having another job that I really wanted and was passionate about, it would have been my first time kosher running something, show running something, and, you know, we were all but celebrating.3 (56m 21s):And then the whole thing fell apart because the actress wanted her friend to write it and like bull, bull, crap. Like that happens all the time in LA. And so it's a hard time. It's a hard lesson the first time, you know, where I was like, oh, people don't, you know, like my agent sent me champagne. Like it was, it was happening. And then it very suddenly wasn't. And so I think it made me realize that don't pop the champagne until the contract is signed1 (56m 51s):And put that on a t-shirt.3 (56m 57s):That was a tough lesson to learn though, because I was like, wait, oh my God. Like, I went from like sky high to, and you know, nobody really, nobody apart, it was just very sobering. So,1 (57m 7s):And writing is so personal that it's really hard not to take both the criticisms to heart and then the, the opposite of the criticisms. And, you know, it's, it's hard not to make it. It's hard to stop making it about personal validation. You know, when, when somebody likes or doesn't like your stuff. Yeah. That's the journey I'm on right now. Not making it about, you know, like if somebody didn't like my play doesn't mean they don't, it doesn't have anything to do with whether or not they like me.3 (57m 40s):Yeah. You know, that's, I'm glad you're learning that because I also can tell you, I just staffed a writing room for the first time. And so that experience was really opening because I read unbelievably fantastic things and I didn't meet with them because, you know, you're designing a dinner party with five people and you kind of have to, and like you, the truth is, like I said, I passed on a lot of wonderful writers whose work I freaking loved. And like, can't wait to read for the next thing and have mentioned and recommended to other people. And that's part of it is like, you don't know how people are experiencing your work and the fans that you're building along the way. And I think we quickly assume the worst. Right? I know I do. But like, but the fact is like, you don't, you don't know how close you got it.3 (58m 24s):My guess is you're getting close to stuff and you don't know. And aren't able to know that1 (58m 29s):At the end of the day, the only thing you have control over is whether or not you go back to your computer later that day and just keep writing.3 (58m 36s):Yeah. You got to run, run your own race, which is so hard to do. I mean, listen, it really, really is. But yeah. The only thing you, the only thing you can control is your output true. Which is horrible. I mean, I, I, for the first time, in two years that don't have anyone calling me today to be like, where are the pages? You know? Like, I mean, part of it too is it's, it's helpful when you have deadlines and pressure. That's why I love to grad school because I'm the second Monday of October, I was reading my play out loud. And so I had to go right. You know, make sure I write it. So I also feel like that's, without that, it's also, that's a hard thing about feeling like you're not moving forward too, is that lack of deadlines.3 (59m 19s):But again, you don't, you don't, you don't know how far your work is going and how who's reading it and what it will lead to the next time. And I mean, I've gotten, I've gotten rejected on so many things that have led to a meeting later, you know, like so many things that, so many jobs I wanted that I didn't get, but then later someone's like, oh, we read her for that. We should meet her for this. And I didn't get that job either, but, but it's like, it's just funny. So yeah,1 (59m 48s):Like leaving a whole blanket of your career and you never know, you know, w where this, where the threads are going to end up.3 (59m 55s):Absolutely. And every time I get bummed out, which is a lot, because I'm a writer, all writers gets on debt. I, I try to think about and visualize the stack of things. I'm going to write in my life. And when I get terrible notes or when I get clobbered with notes and I feel depressed, I also think about the stack of work that I'm going to do in my life and how this piece that I'm writing right now is just one of them, you know? And that, that's my, that's my real tombstone like that pile, you know?1 (1h 0m 22s):Oh, I love that. What a great image and what a great note to end on.4 (1h 0m 37s):If you liked what you heard today, please give us a positive five star review and subscribe and tell your friends. I survived. Theater school is an undeniable Inc production. Jen Bosworth, Ramirez, and Gina plegia are the co-hosts. This episode was produced, edited, and sound mixed by Gina for more information about this podcast or other goings on of undeniable, Inc. Please visit our website@undeniablewriters.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Thank you.

Off The Charts Football Podcast
Backup QB Revolution and NFL Week 9 Preview

Off The Charts Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 37:39


On today's episode, Matt Manocherian (@mattmano) and Mark Simon (@markasimonsays) welcome Corey March (@corey_march1) back to the show to give a fantasy and gambling perspective on Week 9 of the NFL season. The group opens by looking at the success of backup QBs in Week 8 (0:25) before shifting to a recap of the Trade Deadline's biggest moves (4:59). They then preview the top games of NFL Week 9: Packers-Chiefs (13:54), Titans-Rams (22:38), and Vikings-Ravens (26:41) before closing with Scouts vs. Stats on Aaron Rodgers (32:58). Thanks for listening. You can email the show with feedback at offthecharts@sportsinfosolutions.com and don't forget to follow on Twitter @SportsInfo_SIS and Instagram @sportsinfosolutions. For more, check out: sportsinfosolutions.com footballoutsiders.com sportsinfosolutionsblog.com SISDataHub.com

Fantasy Scouts Podcast
Ep 33: Midseason Buy, Sell, Hold

Fantasy Scouts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 72:12


The Fantasy Scouts are back with a new episode! In today's episode, the Scouts continue with their in-season reactions and react to some of the bigger storylines from around the NFL. Today's show topics include: Henry Ruggs, Derek Carr, and the Raiders offense moving forward. The new-look Saints offense with Jameis Winston out for the year. What to do with AJB, Chase Claypool, Tee Higgins, and Allen Robinson. Is Antonio Gibson a sell candidate? Bust? For more inside info, check out patreon.com/fantasyscouts !

Lake Forest Illinois
Skoo and Pete Chattin' Halloween, Library Board, Scouts Football, Basketball and Caucus

Lake Forest Illinois

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 43:20


Skoo and Pete going over the past couple of weeks events: Halloween was insane! Library Board, City Manager and Skoo and Pete Job Performance Best Burger in Town Poll Scouts Football on a Roll Scouts Basketball starting soon Scouts Girls Field Hockey Caucus Committee looking for Ward 1 Alderman, HPC and Audit Committee Kiddles Tree Lighting "Stop Your Bitchin' and Pitchin' Best Burger Survey https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/sv/HmujLvr/BestBurgerLakeForest Have an idea for a topic or guest? pete@lakeforestpodcast.com Thanks to our Patreon Supporters Church of the Holy Spirit, Reverend Luke Back and MATT A https://www.patreon.com/LakeForestPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lakeforestpodcast/message

Bo McNally scouts Stanford and previews the Utes trip to The Farm

"The Drive" with Spence Checketts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 20:21


Stanford alum Bo McNally joins The Drive to discuss the up-and-down Cardinal, establishing the run vital against Utah, David Shaw, Jim Harbaugh + more 

More Than Velocity
What Pro & College Scouts Look For in a Player

More Than Velocity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 46:14


Pro scouts and college scouts are evaluating more than velocity when it comes to who gets offers and who does not. Ryan and Jordan go into detail about what they look for and why. Show Notes: 3:10 What besides velocity matters? 8:30 The importance of sustainable velo/biomechanics 15:25 Peaked vs Potential 21:30 Rotational Speed 23:45 Drafting High School Players vs College Players 28:50 Professional Player Development 32:45 Self Evaluation and Data 38:45. College Scouts look for this.   Get more at armcare.com/blog

Little Bit Weebish
019: Attack on Titan S3E9-10 Rod Attacks Orvud District

Little Bit Weebish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 47:07


The visual of Rod's Reiss's abnormal titan is not for the faint of heart. Megan and Sam pick back up again with Rod making his way toward Orvud. The Scouts discover the best option is to keep the Orvud citizens in place in hopes that Rod won't change direction. Eren's "coordinate" ability doesn't work on Rod, so their next hope is to work with the Garrison to take him down and get Historia on the throne to finalize their coup de'tat. In this episode, we cover: Episode 9: Ruler of the Walls Episode 10: Friends If you like what you heard, feel free to pass this on to a friend or give a five-star review! This helps more weebish friends find each other. Follow us on Instragram and TikTok at "littlebitweebish" or email us at littlebitweebish@gmail.com. If you'd like to support the show in another way, consider joining our patreon! https://www.patreon.com/littlebitweebish

Tough Girl Podcast
Clare Rutter - Paddlesports & outdoors enthusiast. A traumatic brain injury survivor and was the 2020/21 British Canoeing #ShePaddles Ambassador for Canoe Wales.

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 46:46


Clare Rutter grew up in rural, coastal west Wales with childhood days often spent with her brother playing and exploring in nature, climbing trees, jumping hay bales, cycling the green and lush country lanes and time spent on the beaches exploring rockpools, playing in the sand and swimming in the sea. Everyday was a mini-adventure in Clare's eyes which was only added to by joining the Brownies, the Guides and later the Scouts when girls were (finally!) permitted to join across all age sections. At age 6 and continuing through her participation in these youth organisations, Clare began her journey in paddlesport thoroughly enjoying kayaking and canoeing.    Now, after more than 25 years spent in the Scouts, Clare has many ‘on the water' hours paddling and has been on many Scouting adventures including working at a large, commercial Scout summer camp and activity centre, expeditioning in Africa, multi-day tall ship sailing, led the Welsh Contingent at a Boy Scouts of America National Jamboree and volunteered as a staff member at two World Scout Jamborees in both England and Japan.    As studying for a degree, worklife and life in general took over; paddlesport unfortunately had to take a back seat. In 2016, Clare fulfilled one of her lifelong goals and moved abroad to Gran Canaria which in itself was an almighty adventure. Unfortunately, Clare experienced some kind of a medical episode whilst on her way home from work, passed out, hit the deck and entered a 30 minute unconscious seizure state. This episode resulted in a life changing traumatic brain injury.    After several months with no signs of recovery from the resulting symptoms which included headaches/migraines, severe fatigue, insomnia, tics and balance and cognitive issues and declining mental health; Clare decided to give up her home in the sun and return to Wales for further neurological investigation and treatment and to have the support of her family and friends. Clare, at this point was mostly bed bound and used a stick to aid walking but returned to Scouting as illness allowed.    Clare's Brain Injury Team Occupational Therapist encouraged her into some further volunteering which, returning to her childhood roots, she undertook at a local outdoor activities centre offering land and water adventures including canoeing, kayaking and stand up paddleboarding.    A change in medication tackled Clare's condition to the point where she could function better on a daily basis, could ditch the walking stick and experience better mental health. After a season at the centre, Clare was offered a full-time position which she gladly accepted and begun her journey towards training and qualifications to be a paddlesports Instructor on a permanent basis.    A short time after the first Covid-19 lockdown, Clare was informed that she had been selected from multiple applications to be the first ever women's paddling ambassador for Wales, a #ShePaddles Ambassador; a role to tackle the low numbers of females getting into and staying in paddlesport. Despite the lockdowns, Clare threw herself into the voluntary role and together with Canoe Wales and British Canoeing had an incredibly successful first year providing an online Welsh women's friendly and welcoming paddling networking hub and providing paddlesport taster sessions to hundreds of females at #ShePaddles ‘On Tour' events across Wales.    Whilst still battling illness, known as Post-Concussion Syndrome, with her symptoms mostly masked, Clare is now a full time, qualified Paddlesports Instructor & Leader and regularly supports clients with neurological conditions, mental health issues and a range of disabilities enabling participation, enjoyment and progression in paddlesports utilising the outdoors as therapy and rehabilitation as she did.    She's also a guest speaker speaking at events sharing her motivational and inspirational brain injury story and is still heavily involved in #ShePaddles and #ShePaddlesCymru (in Wales). Clare is passionate about paddlesport and you'll usually find her on the water in her spare time, committed to relearning, redefining and challenging herself and her abilities to prove that given some adaptations and self-belief that almost anything can be achieved. Aside from paddlesport, Clare also enjoys writing, camping, geocaching, photography and videography and enjoys sharing her experiences, challenges and adventures across her social media channels.   New episodes of the Tough Girl Podcast go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Make sure you hit the subscribe button so you don't miss out.    The Tough Girl Podcast is sponsorship and ad free thanks to the monthly financial support of patrons. To find out more about supporting your favourite podcast and becoming a patron please check out www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast.   Show notes Who is Clare Growing up in Wales by the coast Being a paddlesports instructor and a scout leader Getting into swimming at a young age Going into Brownies and then joining the scouts when girls were allowed in Collecting all the interest badges Wanting to join the police force and wanting to help people Getting into paddlesports Going to university as a mature student Getting her level 2 youth work qualification What it was like going back to university as a mature student Her twenties working as a chef and in security Her lifelong goal to live and work abroad in a hot sunny place Starting to learn Spanish Moving to Spain! The reality of living and working abroad Making friends Having a medical episode in 2017 Being taken to the hospital Finally getting to see a doctor and getting a CT scan done Being housebound for 6 weeks Not knowing what to do and thinking she was going to die Struggling on for 9 months Deciding to move back to Wales Getting the support she needed Using a walking stick to help her walk Trying new medication and starting to feel better within 48hrs Being encouraged to get into volunteering Being encouraged and supported  Being offered a full time job Lessons from having a brain injury Being back in the outdoors and spending time in the sea and river Getting qualifications in paddlesports Learning how to manage her fatigue Wanting to encourage other women to get into paddlesports #ShePaddles why it was created and what it does Getting her life back together  Trying to encourage more women and girls to get into paddlesports thinking creatively and being supported by Canoe Wales Creating a FB Group for women  Getting into paddle boarding (SUP - Stand Up Paddle board) Needing something to look forward to  Supporting women who don't have gear but still want to have ago Having a supportive boss - www.adventurebeyond.co.uk  Practical tips and advice for women and girls to get into paddlesports The She Paddles Effect Final words of advice - why there is always an opportunity you can create or take advantage of   Social Media   Personal Website: www.clarerutter.com    Instagram: @clare_rutter.ba.hons    Facebook: @clarerutter.DBA    Facebook groups: Women's Paddling Community and #ShePaddlesCymru     Hashtags: #ShePaddles #ShePaddlesCymru   Twitter: @clare_rutter    Other Resources:   www.britishcanoeing.org.uk   www.canoewales.com  

Get After It with Nashy
Episode 192 – ALDO KANE – LESSONS FROM THE EDGE

Get After It with Nashy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 53:28


From the face of El Cap to the depths of our Oceans. Meetings with Narcos Hitmen to investigating Tiger Trafficking in Thailand Aldo Kane has lead an extraordinary life. A former Sniper in the Royal Marines now adventurer, extreme environment safety expert and presenter Aldo takes Nashy on a journey through his life from the boy Scouts to author detailing his epic adventures around the world and how things have changed having become a father.Hope you enjoy and please do check out our other Podcasts and videos on YouTube which include Nashy's family adventures.This Podcast is brought to you by ACE Property - Management and Sales - Edinburgh.Contact Nashy for Podcast Sponsorship opportunities and get you brand / business in the ears of thousands of listeners. Insta - @the_getafterit_familyYouTube - GET AFTER IT with NashyFollow Nashy...Twitter - @GetAfterItNashyInstagram - @getafterit_nashyFacebook - GET AFTER IT with Nashy

Fantasy Scouts Podcast
Ep 32: Midseason Mailbag #1

Fantasy Scouts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 69:48


The Fantasy Scouts are back with a new episode! In today's episode, the Scouts continue with their in-season reactions and react to some of the bigger storylines from around the NFL. Today's show is our first of two mailbag episodes this season! We asked the listeners to send us some questions regarding their teams, player outlooks, or anything under the sun. For more inside info, check out patreon.com/fantasyscouts !

The Full Go with Jason Goff
Matt Nagy on the Hot Seat, Rob Schaefer on the Bulls' 4-0 Start, and Matt Miller Scouts Justin Fields

The Full Go with Jason Goff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 75:53


Jason opens the show by sharing a couple of former NFL players' thoughts on what Matt Nagy is doing wrong and why he should be gone (0:10). Rob Schaefer (NBC Sports Chicago) shares his keys to the Bulls' 4-0 start, and what concerns Bulls fans should have going forward (10:00). Matt Miller (ESPN/NFLDratScout.com) tells us how he evaluates a rookie quarterback who may or may not be utilized properly. Matt has some ideas on how to give Justin Fields help as he navigates his way through his first NFL season (30:00). Plus, our crossover with 'New York, New York' is on the horizon, so we try to take you inside the mindset of Knicks fans (1:06:00). Host: Jason Goff Guests: Rob Schaefer and Matt Miller Producers: Steve Ceruti and Chris Tannehill Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Panjwai Podcast
Bonus Episode 1 - Scouts Out!

The Panjwai Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 73:46


Our very first Bonus Episode is a LIVE interview with author Ryan Robicheaux discussing his Book "Scouts Out!" a memoir of his times as a Scout Helicopter pilot in Afghanistan in 2009 and 2013. Ryan flew the OH-58D Kiowa Warrior over Panjwai in 2013 and he talks to us about that experience, plus the journey towards writing a book.    https://buff.ly/3vFOrTa Follow the link above to order your exclusive The Panjwai Podcast/Scouts Out! Book combo! Use discount code "PANJWAIPOD" to get 5% off the price of a author-signed hardback, PLUS get a free Koozie and Sticker ($15 value!) Absolutely free!   Limited edition green "Spring Break Kandahar" koozies will ONLY be available if you buy the book. Blue koozies of the same design are available in our store now!   ---------------------------------   The views expressed by the guests and hosts of this podcast do not represent the views of the Department of Defense or United States Government.   ——————————————— Also Available on:   Apple: https://buff.ly/3gTXet9 Spotify: https://buff.ly/2Kx6cjR Google: https://buff.ly/3b29R4z Podbean: https://buff.ly/2WoN0aF iHeartRadio: https://buff.ly/3nc5Wo1   Check out the video version of the podcast at : https://www.youtube.com/thepanjwaipodcast   For maps, photos and more information about Panjwai go to : https://www.thepanjwaipodcast.com/about-panjwai   You can donate and support the podcast on Patreon for as little as $3.00 a month. visit www.patreon.com/thepanjwaipodcast to learn more.   Direct donations can also be sent via venmo @thepanjwaipodcast Be sure to like, follow, and/or subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, iHeartRadio, Youtube, TuneIn, Amazon Music and many more. visit www.thepanjwaipodcast.com/listen for more information.    Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thepanjwaipodcast Instagram: @thepanjwaipodcast Twitter: @panjwaipodcast --------------------------------

Discover Lafayette
Girl Scouts – Pines to the Gulf’s Rachel Broussard and Keesha Buteau

Discover Lafayette

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 53:27


Rachel Broussard and Keesha Buteau of the Girls Scouts of Louisiana – Pines to the Gulf, join us today. We've invited Rachel and Keesha to share the Girl Scout story. And, as many diehard fans know, it's almost time for the annual cookie sale.  Rachel Broussard serves as CEO of Pines to the Gulf and has over 20 years of service with the organization. A Kaplan native, she graduated from UL-Lafayette. Her background in the military afforded her the opportunity to attend college as her tuition was covered. She first worked for Acadiana Youth, and then joined the Girl Scouts in what was then known as Bayou Girl Scout Council covering 13 parishes in the Acadiana region. Keesha Buteau serves as Chief Operating Officer and began her service with the Scouts in January 2006.  A Lafayette native, she graduated from Acadiana High School and was inspired by participating in Girls State. While she originally thought she wanted to go into law and had the opportunity to work with the District Attorney's office in the Juvenile Division, her heart broke as she saw the "kids in shackles, little kid chain gangs." She realized that she wanted to help young people before they got into trouble. While her parents were originally a bit dismayed by her shifted career focus, she has never regretted her commitment to serving youth and believes the Girl Scouts is a perfect fit. Today, Girl Scouts of Louisiana - Pines to the Gulf serves girls in the 42 parishes west of the Mississippi River. Participants can be as young as Kindergarten and go through 12th grade. While COVID has been tough on everyone, both agreed that incorporating technology such as Zoom has been a godsend in helping organizations learn how to communicate more effectively. The Girl Scouts members are all female, and focus solely on girls and its activities are only participated in by girls. While there is a place for the Boy Scouts, the Girl Scout organization stands firm that single-sex programming is beneficial to young girls who are fighting to find their way in the world. "Although your daughter likely goes to school with boys, and might play Saturday morning sports and share the local playground with them, the realities of her day-to-day life are anything but the same as those of her male peers. In fact, studies show that in coed learning environments, boys receive more praise than girls when they call out in class, making girls less likely to raise their hands. Furthermore, boys are allowed to problem solve on their own during class time, which fosters independence, whereas teachers tend to step in and “help” girls, leading girls to question their own abilities." Learn more at https://www.girlscouts.org/en/raising-girls/happy-and-healthy/happy/girls-only-single-gender-empowering-girls.html The Girl Scouts were founded in Savannah, Georgia by Juliette Gordon Low in 1912. The programming has consistently focused on service and the Girl Scout Promise rings true of what you expect from young leaders: "On my honor, I will try: To serve God and my country, To help people at all times, to live by the Girl Scout." The goal of the Scouts is to help the girls grow as they learn positive values, to take their skills into their communities, and make a positive difference. "That is at the core of who we are as Girls Scouts", according to Rachel Broussard. "to make lasting and respectful connections, and to go out and solve problems in their communities." Keesha's daughter is a Girl Scout Cadet at 11 years of age, having started the scouts in kindergarten. As her mom, Keesha limits outside activities to 2 or 3 to preserve family time, and her daughter always puts Scouts at the top of the list of what she wants to participate in. The interaction with her daughters' troop continually inspires Keesha to see the value of scouting. "Be a Friend First" is a valued program that teaches self-confidence, how to have healthy habits and relationships.

Off The Charts Football Podcast
NFL Week 7 - What Has the Most Watchability?

Off The Charts Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 38:49


On today's episode, Matt Manocherian (@mattmano) and Alex Vigderman (@vigmanoncampus) do a thorough review of NFL Week 6 and look ahead to Week 7. First up on the topics list is a Total Points Power Ranking (0:41), followed by a closer look at the go-for-it approach of the Bills against the Titans (2:53). Matt and Alex then discuss the staying power of the Cardinals, Bengals, and Raiders (13:14). The guys then preview Ravens-Bengals (24:05), Titans-Chiefs (26:35), Eagles-Raiders (30:47), and Saints-Seahawks (32:42), with a focus on the game elements with the highest watchability factor. We close with another Scouts vs Stats take on which NFL broadcasters provide the most interesting insight in each area (35:53).

ScouterStan
Messengers of Peace - MOP

ScouterStan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 4:12


Messengers of Peace is a flagship initiative of World Scouting that inspires Scouts around the world to take action in their communities by contributing to peace and sustainable development. Since 2010, Messengers of Peace has involved nearly all 172 National Scout Organizations of WOSM and inspired more than 16 million projects and actions totaling over 2.3 billion hours of community service.

Fantasy Scouts Podcast
Ep 31: All Hail King Henry

Fantasy Scouts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 79:29


The Fantasy Scouts are back with a new episode! In today's episode, the Scouts continue with their in-season reactions and react to some of the bigger storylines from around the NFL. Today's show includes: Discussing the Zach Ertz trade to Arizona and how it impacts his value as well as Dallas Goedert's value, Derrick Henry is showing no signs of slowing down, are NFL teams shifting to more of an RBBC approach, the QB landscape across the league, and a fun game of would you rather! For more inside info, check out patreon.com/fantasyscouts !

28 Summers
LIVE at the Armchair Adventure Festival with the Banwell Scouts

28 Summers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 29:50


This is the LIVE recording of my chat around the campfire with the @BanwellScouts.  When I signed up to do live podcasting around a campfire in a field in Cornwall with ZERO production or audio experience I knew I was taking a huge risk.  I also knew that I might just capture genuine, honest and meaningful chats like this one with these wonderful young people.  As a father of four I've learned first-hand that when we stop to listen to our children and trust them, amazing things can happen.  I hope you enjoy this chat as much as I did!  Huge thanks to the Armchair Adventure Fesitval (@armchairadventurefest) for trusting me to do this!

Climate Connections
Scouts can earn patches for learning about solar energy

Climate Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 1:31


They complete activities such as building solar ovens out of pizza boxes. Learn more at https://www.yaleclimateconnections.org/

MY CHILD'S HEALTHY LIFE RADIO SHOW
THE DAILY DROP. EPISODE # 141. Is this the reason for The New Science of Physical Health? Joeys, Cubs and Scouts.

MY CHILD'S HEALTHY LIFE RADIO SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 10:17


In the New Science of Physical Health, the goal is simple - how do we bring two groups together. Those people that are completely disengages with their personal physical health status, and those that are already in love with improving their personal physical health status? The first group is the overwhelming majority. It's up to the second group to help inspire all of those who have not yet lowered their risk of disease so they can feel amazing.Today's episode is all the reason for The New Science of Physical Health? Joeys, Cubs and Scouts. A  personal story about why some people might become motivated to leave the group of adults who do zero physical activity per week and start down the path of achieving the correct dose of physical activity to create the exact health adaptions that drive down their risk of the # 1 cause of sickness and death. To access our brand new book and a special offer for to access The Experts Health Blueprint : click this link.https://expert62e801.clickfunnels.com/new-home-page1632958755227To access the six courses please click this link.https://newscience.podia.com/the-experts-health-blueprint-full-course

Japan Experts
#23 Japanese Buddhism and Jodo Shinshu with Shin Buddhist Priest Kenneth Tanaka

Japan Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 28:56


Join Japan Experts PRIVATE Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/japanexperts ---------------- This is a sutra that's often recited by Shin Buddhists, which accounts for the largest population of all Buddhism followers in Japan. Let's listen to the end…. Please listen carefully to the very last after the bell sound. You get it? Most Japanese have probably heard of it somewhere, even if they are not a follower of Shin Buddhism. But what does it mean? And why do Japanese people recite it? Before that, do you know anything about Shin Buddhism? Don't worry… even if you have no idea! Since you are here already, let's learn it together from scratch, shall we? Buddhism has greatly influenced Japanese society and culture, so it's definitely a good idea to know the basics! To dive into the topic, I would like to invite Kenneth Tanaka who is an ordained Jodo Shinshu priest. With his unique academic and professional backgrounds in Japan and the US, he has played a major role in enlightening people in Japan and elsewhere about the teachings of Buddhism through his books and other activities. His books include Ocean and Jewels, which are available online for free of charge. More information about Shin Buddhism priest Kenneth Tanaka and his work can be found in the following sites: Ocean: An Introduction to Jodo-Shinshu Buddhism in America: http://www.yamadera.info/ocean/ocean-index.htm - A related article: https://tricycle.org/magazine/buddhist-diversity-in-america/ - A video about the Ocean story: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iymiZIqvOwQ Jewels: An Introduction to American Buddhism for Youth, Scouts and the Young at Heart: https://www.bdkamerica.org/book/jewels-introduction-buddhism-youth-scouts-and-young-heart ----------------- Join Japan Experts EXCLUSIVE dojo community: patreon.com/japanexperts The Japan Experts dojo community is a place for you to get access to the secrets, mysteries and everything else that even the Japanese cannot explain in detail, for less than the money you pay for a single cup of coffee! So, save the money today and invest it into your learning! I can promise you that you will gain so much knowledge on how to explore, appreciate and understand Japan. Here is the link: patreon.com/japanexperts Extra bonuses are also available if you want to take your learning to a deeper level. Please make sure you check out the page carefully and choose what would benefit you the most. I look forward to meeting you inside the dojo community! ------------------ Please follow Japan Experts social media channels to receive the latest updates! Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/jpexperts Twitter: https://twitter.com/Japan_Experts Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/japan.experts/ YouTube: bit.ly/JpExperts

Fantasy Scouts Podcast
Ep 30: Risers & Fallers

Fantasy Scouts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 69:33


The Fantasy Scouts are back with a new episode! In today's episode, the Scouts continue with their in-season reactions and react to some of the bigger storylines from around the NFL. Today's show includes: Discussing the Chiefs and Chargers offense. What can we expect from the Raiders now that Jon Gruden is gone? We play a fun game of 'Risers & Fallers' and discuss some players who are on the rise and others who are trending downward. For more inside info, check out patreon.com/fantasyscouts !

Locked On Utes
Aaron Lowe Laid To Rest, Utah Wins Player of the Week Honors x 2, and Scouts On Devin Lloyd

Locked On Utes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:04


The Locked On Utes Podcast for October 12, 2021 Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. PrizePicks Don't hesitate, check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “LOCKEDON” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Skiffy and Fanty Show
439. Kung Fu (2021; Season 1) w/ Michi Trota — Screen Scouts

The Skiffy and Fanty Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 65:20


Magic weapons, kicks to the face, and Chinatown, oh my! Shaun Duke and Brandon O'Brien are joined by the incredible heist magician Michi Trota for another in-depth conversation about a totally different television show: CW's 2021 adaptation of Kung Fu. Together, our crew explores the show's treatment of its Chinese-centered narrative, its perspectives on romance, […]

Fantasy Scouts Podcast
Ep 29: How 'Bout Them Cowboys

Fantasy Scouts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 75:01


The Fantasy Scouts are back with a new episode! In today's episode, the Scouts continue with their in-season reactions and react to some of the bigger storylines from around the NFL. Today's show includes: How 'Bout Them, Cowboys! The Rookie QB landscape, what we've seen so far, and what we hope to see moving forward. Cardinals high flying offense + a fun game of fact or fiction. For more inside info, check out patreon.com/fantasyscouts !