Podcasts about East River

Navigable tidal strait in New York City connecting New York Bay, the Harlem River, and the Long Island Sound

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East River

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Best podcasts about East River

Latest podcast episodes about East River

Crime Capsule
George Washington's Long Island Spy Ring: An Interview w/ author Bill Bleyer PT 2

Crime Capsule

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 60:33


In 1778, two years after the British forced the Continental Army out of New York City, George Washington and his subordinates organized a secret spy network to gather intelligence in Manhattan and Long Island. Known today as the “Culper Spy Ring,” Patriots like Abraham Woodhull and Robert Townsend risked their lives to report on British military operations in the region. Vital reports clandestinely traveled from New York City across the East River to Setauket and were rowed on whaleboats across the Long Island Sound to the Connecticut shore. Using ciphers, codes and invisible ink, the spy ring exposed British plans to attack French forces at Newport and a plot to counterfeit American currency. Author Bill Bleyer corrects the record, examines the impact of George Washington's Long Island spy ring and identifies Revolutionary War sites that remain today. Bill Bleyer was a prize-winning staff writer for Newsday, the Long Island daily newspaper, for thirty-three years before retiring in 2014 to write books and freelance for the newspaper and magazines. He is coauthor, with Harrison Hunt, of Long Island and the Civil War (The History Press, 2015). He is the author of Sagamore Hill: Theodore Roosevelt's Summer White House (The History Press, 2016), The Fire Island Lighthouse: Long Island's Welcoming Beacon (The History Press, 2017) and Long Island and the Sea: A Maritime History (The History Press, 2019). The Long Island native has written extensively about history for newspapers and magazines. In 1997–98, he was one of four Newsday staff writers assigned full time to “Long Island: Our Story,” a year-long daily history of Long Island that resulted in three books and filled hundreds of pages in the newspaper. His work has been published in Civil War News, Naval History, Sea History, Lighthouse Digest and numerous other magazines, as well as in the New York Times, Chicago Sun-Times, Toronto Star and other newspapers. Bleyer graduated Phi Beta Kappa with highest honors in economics from Hofstra University, where he has been an adjunct professor teaching journalism and economics. He earned a master's degree in urban studies at Queens College of the City University of New York. An avid sailor, diver and kayaker, he lives in Bayville, Long Island. PURCHASE HERE

The Landscape Architecture Podcast

Thomas Balsley is a renowned designer whose New York City-based practice is best known for its fusion of landscape and urbanism in public parks, waterfronts, and plazas throughout the US and abroad. For over 35 years, Tom's work has reshaped social and cultural spaces with robust sustainable landscapes that teem with public life. In New York City alone, he has completed more than 100 parks and plazas, including the 2014 ASLA Honor Award-winning Hunter's Point South Waterfront Park and Gantry Plaza Park, across the East River from the UN; Riverside Park South; Chelsea Waterside Park; Peggy Rockefeller Plaza; Capitol Plaza; and the recently completed 51 Astor Place plaza, across from Cooper Union. In an unprecedented gesture, a small park on 57th Street was named Balsley Park in recognition of his design contributions to the city. Spacemaker Press devoted a monograph to Thomas Balsley Associates' work: “Thomas Balsley: The Urban Landscape.” In 2015, Mr. Balsley received ASLA's highest design honor, the Design Medal. ORO Editions has just released his firm's second monograph, “Thomas Balsley: Uncommon Ground,” with foreword by James Corner and an essay by Ian Volner.

Bar Crawl Radio
Brooklyn Bridge Restored & Stories

Bar Crawl Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 66:22


Shortly after the American North won the Civil War, construction on the East River bridge was started. Tammany Hall and graft controlled NY City and State, Ulysses S. Grant had just been elected President, and the German-immigrant and bridge designer/builder, who conceived the plan for the bridge, had died. Work on the Bridge took 13 years and up to 40 men died -- mostly immigrants. The cathedral-sized, wooden caissons which allowed workers to dig out the bottom of the East River used pressurized air, resulting in debilitating Caisson Disease-- otherwise known as the "bends." The Brooklyn Bridge was opened in 1883 and quickly became an American icon--a towering structure reflecting a sense of national pride and progress -- a reality, in part, built on greed and death. We spoke with Sarah Rosenblatt, an Architectural Conservationist who is working on restoring the original look of the Brooklyn Bridge -- and with Prof. Richard Haw who has written several books on the Bridge. His most recent book -- Engineering America: The Life and Times of John A. Roebling.Recording at Gebhard's Beer Culture Bar in Manhattan. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Crime Capsule
50th Episode: George Washington's Long Island Spy Ring: An Interview w/ author Bill Bleyer

Crime Capsule

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 66:09


In 1778, two years after the British forced the Continental Army out of New York City, George Washington and his subordinates organized a secret spy network to gather intelligence in Manhattan and Long Island. Known today as the “Culper Spy Ring,” Patriots like Abraham Woodhull and Robert Townsend risked their lives to report on British military operations in the region. Vital reports clandestinely traveled from New York City across the East River to Setauket and were rowed on whaleboats across the Long Island Sound to the Connecticut shore. Using ciphers, codes and invisible ink, the spy ring exposed British plans to attack French forces at Newport and a plot to counterfeit American currency. Author Bill Bleyer corrects the record, examines the impact of George Washington's Long Island spy ring and identifies Revolutionary War sites that remain today. Bill Bleyer was a prize-winning staff writer for Newsday, the Long Island daily newspaper, for thirty-three years before retiring in 2014 to write books and freelance for the newspaper and magazines. He is coauthor, with Harrison Hunt, of Long Island and the Civil War (The History Press, 2015). He is the author of Sagamore Hill: Theodore Roosevelt's Summer White House (The History Press, 2016), The Fire Island Lighthouse: Long Island's Welcoming Beacon (The History Press, 2017) and Long Island and the Sea: A Maritime History (The History Press, 2019). The Long Island native has written extensively about history for newspapers and magazines. In 1997–98, he was one of four Newsday staff writers assigned full time to “Long Island: Our Story,” a year-long daily history of Long Island that resulted in three books and filled hundreds of pages in the newspaper. His work has been published in Civil War News, Naval History, Sea History, Lighthouse Digest and numerous other magazines, as well as in the New York Times, Chicago Sun-Times, Toronto Star and other newspapers. Bleyer graduated Phi Beta Kappa with highest honors in economics from Hofstra University, where he has been an adjunct professor teaching journalism and economics. He earned a master's degree in urban studies at Queens College of the City University of New York. An avid sailor, diver and kayaker, he lives in Bayville, Long Island. PURCHASE HERE

The John Batchelor Show
5/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by Patrick K. O'Donnell (Author)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 11:30


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 5/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by  Patrick K. O'Donnell  (Author) https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy.

The John Batchelor Show
8/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by Patrick K. O'Donnell (Author)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 8:50


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. 1776 @Batchelorshow 8/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by  Patrick K. O'Donnell  (Author) https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy.

The John Batchelor Show
6/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by Patrick K. O'Donnell (Author)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 7:20


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 6/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by  Patrick K. O'Donnell  (Author) https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy.

The John Batchelor Show
7/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by Patrick K. O'Donnell (Author)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 11:50


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 7/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by  Patrick K. O'Donnell  (Author) https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy.

The John Batchelor Show
4/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by Patrick K. O'Donnell (Author)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 9:35


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. 1729 @Batchelorshow 4/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by  Patrick K. O'Donnell  (Author) https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy.

The John Batchelor Show
3/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by Patrick K. O'Donnell (Author)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 11:05


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. Battle of Long Island 1870 @Batchelorshow 3/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by  Patrick K. O'Donnell  (Author) https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy.

The John Batchelor Show
2/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by Patrick K. O'Donnell (Author)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 9:25


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 2/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by  Patrick K. O'Donnell  (Author) https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy.

The John Batchelor Show
1/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by Patrick K. O'Donnell (Author)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 9:25


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 1/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware by  Patrick K. O'Donnell  (Author) https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy.

Joe Benigno and Evan Roberts
Jets OC search; how were tunnels built & Tusks in the East River

Joe Benigno and Evan Roberts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 37:53


Hour 2: The guys talk about possible candidates to be the Jets offensive coordinator going forward. Craig and Evan are both baffled by how tunnels were built. And Craig blew all our minds with something he heard on a podcast. 

Macrodosing: Arian Foster and PFT Commenter
NANODOSE: Billy and The Wonton Don Find Mammoth Bones

Macrodosing: Arian Foster and PFT Commenter

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 138:46 Very Popular


On today's episode of Nanodosing, Billy and The Wonton Don share their stories from the East River expedition they went on to find Mammoth bones. You'll hear it all and you won't want to miss it. Make sure to tune into MACRODOSING, every Thursday at 12am EST.You can find every episode of this show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or YouTube. Prime Members can listen ad-free on Amazon Music. For more, visit barstool.link/macrodosing

Pardon My Take
Week 18, Fastest 2 Minutes, The Packers Are Dead, Jags Win The South, Who's Back And Billy Went To The Bottom Of The East River

Pardon My Take

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 144:29 Very Popular


Week 18 and we recap every game starting with Fastest 2 Minutes (00:00:00-00:12:32:09). We taped the first half before Sunday Night Football so the Packers died halfway through the show. Jaguars 20, Titans 16 (00:12:32-00:22:55) Chiefs 31, Raiders 13 (00:22:55-00:31:10) Dolphins 11, Jets 6 (00:31:10-00:39:45) Bills 35, Patriots 23 (00:39:45-00:47:29) Bengals 27, Ravens 16 (00:47:29-00:55:23) Steelers 28, Browns 14 (00:55:23-01:00:03) Texans 32, Colts 31 (01:00:03-01:04:50) Vikings 29, Bears 13 (01:04:50-01:11:24) Panthers 10, Saints 7 (01:11:24-01:14:51) Falcons 30, Bucs 17 (01:14:51-01:17:10) Lions 20, Packers 16 (01:17:10-01:25:34) Seahawks 19, Rams 6 (01:25:34-01:32:54) Broncos 31, Chargers 28 (01:32:54-01:36:14) Eagles 22, Giants 16 (01:36:14-01:41:59) 49ers 38, Cardinals 13 (01:41:59-01:47:22) Commanders 26, Cowboys 6 (01:47:22-01:54:41) We finish with who's back of the week and we wrap up with Billy going to the bottom of the East River. (01:54:41-02:21:22)You can find every episode of this show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or YouTube. Prime Members can listen ad-free on Amazon Music. For more, visit barstool.link/PardonMyTake

The Why Files. Operation: PODCAST
The Brooklyn Bridge UFO Abduction | The Weirdest Story You'll Ever Hear

The Why Files. Operation: PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 34:33


Nov 30, 1989, just after 3 AM. New York City. Janet Kimball was driving over the Brooklyn Bridge when her car stalled and slowly rolled to a stop. After a couple of failed attempts to get the car started, Janet was hit by a bright light. Bright enough that she had to shield her eyes. The light was coming from an apartment building. Janet thought maybe someone was shooting a movie. Not unusual in New York City. Then she saw that the light was coming from a saucer-shaped craft hovering *above* the building. OK, it's a science fiction movie, Janet thought. But it wasn't a movie. This was happening for real. As Janet's eyes adjusted to the brightness, she saw something levitating in the light. Objects floating up to the saucer. When she focused, she realized they weren't objects. They were people. Well, one of them was. In an instant, the light went out, and the saucer plunged into the East River. There were 23 eyewitnesses to this event, including one of the highest-ranking politicians in the world. And people being transported to a UFO by a beam of light in the middle of New York City? That isn't the weirdest part of the story. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thewhyfiles/support

The Sports Junkies
Bret is at the Cakes Classic, Sam Howell named starter, Treasure in NYC

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 43:25


1/5 Hour 1   3:00 Bret meets Cakes and JP for the Cakes Classic 22:00 Sam Howell named starter for Week 18 35:00 Woolly Mammoth tusks at the bottom of East River

Armchair MBA
Rita Gigante | The Godfathers Daughter | Exclusive Interview

Armchair MBA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 46:56


Vincent Gigante was born on March 29, 1928 in Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA. He was previously married to Olympia Grippa. He died on December 19, 2005 in Springfield, Missouri, USA. The current "family" was founded by Charles "Lucky" Luciano and was known as the Luciano crime family from 1931 to 1957, when it was renamed after boss Vito Genovese. Originally in control of the waterfront on the West Side of Manhattan as well as the docks and the Fulton Fish Market on the East River waterfront, the family was run for years by "The Oddfather", Vincent "The Chin" Gigante, who feigned insanity by shuffling unshaven through New York's Greenwich Village wearing a tattered bath robe and muttering to himself incoherently to avoid prosecution. The Genovese family is the oldest and the largest of the "Five Families". Finding new ways to make money in the 21st century, the family took advantage of lax due diligence by banks during the housing bubble with a wave of mortgage frauds. Prosecutors say loan shark victims obtained home equity loans to pay off debts to their mob bankers. The family found ways to use new technology to improve on illegal gambling, with customers placing bets through offshore sites via the Internet. Join this channel to get access to perks: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgPw... Tom chats with Rita about growing up as Vincent "the Chin" Gigante's daughter. Learn more about Rita here: https://www.ritagigante.net/ Get a copy of Rita's Book: https://www.amazon.com/Godfathers-Dau... Day 1 of the 30 for 30 series. #RitaGigante #armchairmba #mobstersinc #mafia #genovese #truecrime #spirituality

The Poisoners' Cabinet
Ep 139 - Who killed William Guldenseppe?

The Poisoners' Cabinet

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 66:31


Ep 139 is loose and there's a torso in New York's East River...We look at the case of the scattered (not) Dutchman, and the bizarre love triangle that made the papers.Why was William Guldenseppe killed? What secrets did his hands hold? And what would you do for a good story?The secret ingredient is...cherries!Join us on Patreon to get extra historical true crime episodes every week, and come and follow us on Instagram Twitter and FacebookSources this week include The Murder of the Century: The Gilded Age Crime That Scandalized a City & Sparked the Tabloid Wars by Paul Collins, The New Yorker, Medium, Vanity Fair, Historical Crime Detective Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

ARTLAWS
Kiki Smith

ARTLAWS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 50:17


KIKI SMITH is one of the most influential visual artists in the contemporary world.  Since the 1980s, Smith has created a prolific and provocative body of work that explores embodiment and the natural world.  Utilizing a broad variety of materials and mediums – including sculpture, printmaking, photography, drawing and textiles – Smith's unique style draws on mythology, folklore, fairytales and religious iconography, while also exploring the human form in all of its frailty and mystery.We had the privilege of speaking with Kiki Smith on the eve of the unveiling of her rare and momentous public work  – a monumental mosaic installation inside the new Grand Central Madison train station in New York City, commissioned by the MTA . This work includes five individual large scale mosaics depicting several Long Island landscape scenes including River Light, inspired by the way the sunlight hits the East River; The Water's Way rendered in stunning shades of indigo; The Presence, which shows a deer among striking  gold reeds; The Spring featuring  fowl surrounded by forest during  springtime growth;  and The Sound which showcases Long Island's waterway in a magnificent 28-foot wide mural.Smith has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions worldwide including over 25 museum exhibitions. Her work has been featured at five Venice Biennales and in 2017 was awarded the title of Honorary Royal Academician by the Royal Adademy of Arts in London.  In 2006, Smith was recognized by TIME Magazine as one of the “TIME 100: The People Who Shape Our World.” Her numerous awards include the Skowhegan Medal for Sculpture (2000), the Nelson A. Rockefeller Award (2010), the U.S. Department of State Medal of Arts (2013), and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the @intsculpturectr (2016).  Kiki is also an adjunct professor at NYU and Columbia University. We join the artist as she walks through the Lower East Side of Manhattan on a late afternoon.Follow our official Instagram account @artlawspod

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan
S2 Ep30: Roosevelt Island's Harrowing History

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 42:53


The New York Lunatic Asylum opened its doors in 1839 with a mission to humanely treat the mentally ill of NYC from the tranquil isolation of an island on the East River. However, as the years unfolded, cracks showed, trouble ensued and an intrepid reporter found herself within the institution's walls, reporting its downfall for the world to see. Here's the story of Roosevelt Island. OBSESSED FEST YEAR 2 IS OFFICIALLY HAPPENING October 20th-22nd 2023 in Dallas, Texas. Tickets are on sale NOW at obsessedfest.com. This week's sponsors: Lumi Labs - To learn more about microdosing THC go to Microdose.com and use code STRANGE to get free shipping and 30% off your first order. BetterHelp - This episode is sponsored by BetterHelp. Learn more and save 10% off your first month of therapy at BetterHelp.com/DAISY. Miracle Brand - Go to TryMiracle.com/STRANGE and use code STRANGE at checkout to get over 40% off and a 3-piece towel set. Lomi - Head to Lomi.com/strange and use the promo code STRANGE at checkout for $50 off your purchase of an electric composter.

The Wow Factor
Brad Freels: Chairman of Midway | Building Relationships with Your Team

The Wow Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 45:03


Brad Freels joined Midway in May 1983, became a partner in 1990, and currently serves as the Chairman. Brad is a member of Midway's leadership team and investment committee. Under his leadership, Midway has prospered and become one of the most active developer/investment owners in the greater Houston area. Brad received both his BBA and MBA from Texas A&M University. He is involved with numerous national and local businesses, educational, Christian, and charitable organizations.   Brad joins me on the show this week to talk about what happens when vision and resources come together. He shares his journey as a leader, how he has honed his skills at Midway, and why it's so crucial to appreciate and respect those around you. Brad also describes some of the projects he is involved with, including one on the riverfront in Houston designed to bring the community together by giving them a beautiful leisure space.   “It's just being intentional and having some level of care in your heart.” - Brad Freels   “We have such an incredible group of people around here with big hearts.” - Brad Freels   “Making money should never be your goal.” - Brad Freels   This Week on The Wow Factor: Brad's family background and his achievements growing up How having a mentor helped Brad in his business Why initiative is the key to success How to use the wisdom of wise people as a motivator What happened when Brad took the reins at Midway and why he moved the company HQ to Houston Why it is so vital to pour love and encouragement into your team and the people around you as a leader Why every opportunity we have is given to us by God, and why it's so essential for Brad to acknowledge that The East River project and why it's going to be a game changer for the Houston community How Brad has built great strategic relationships with other extremely talented people to help them achieve their creative vision Some of the trials Brad has gone through that have helped move him forward   Brad Freels' Word of Wisdom: Making money should never be your goal because if that's your goal, you're going to compromise yourself and your integrity. Just do what you do well, and the money is a byproduct of success for what you do.   Connect with Brad Freels: Midway   Connect with The WOW Factor: The WOW Factor Website Connect with Brad Formsma via email Brad Formsma on LinkedIn Brad Formsma on Instagram Brad Formsma on Facebook Brad Formsma on Twitter

Light Hearted
Light Hearted ep 202 – Bob Muller and Bob Lincoln: Stepping Stones, New York

Light Hearted

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 56:45


According to an old Native American legend, there was a giant devil who caused much mayhem in a region that included parts of what is now Westchester County and the Bronx, New York, and portions of southeastern Connecticut. The giant was chased from the area by warriors, but he threw huge rocks at them across Long Island Sound. Some of the boulders landed in the sound and he used them as stepping stones to make an escape. Early maps noted the reefs in Long Island Sound as the “Devil's Stepping Stones” after the Native American legend. Bob Muller Stepping Stones Lighthouse was built in 1876 to warn mariners of the dangerous rocks and also to serve as a guide into the East River. The light was automated in 1964, and the lighthouse was awarded to the Town of North Hempstead in 2008 under the guidelines of the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act. The Town of North Hempstead, the Great Neck Park District, and the Great Neck Historical Society have forged a public/private partnership to work for the restoration of the lighthouse. Bob Lincoln The lighthouse is in poor condition and is in desperate need of repair.  If it decays any further, there is a probability that it will be demolished, and a modern automated navigational beacon erected in its place. Bob Muller is the president of the Long Island Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society and author of the book Long Island's Lighthouses: Past and Present. Bob Lincoln was the longtime commissioner of the Great Neck Parks District and is the committee chairperson of the Stepping Stones Lighthouse Restoration Committee. Great Neck Historical Society page for the lighthouse

Looped In
Buffalo Bayou East will transform East End. Why affordable housing is the first step.

Looped In

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 32:20


An ambitious $310 million transformation of the eastern side of Buffalo Bayou gets underway this week as Buffalo Bayou Partnership -- which developed the 160-acre Buffalo Bayou Park between Allen Parkway and Memorial Drive -- breaks ground on the first piece of its decade-long plan to transform the stretch of the bayou east of downtown.But the groundbreaking isn't for a project normally associated with parks and trails, for which the Buffalo Bayou Partnership is best known. The partnership on Saturday will begin the construction of an affordable housing development, called Lockwood on Buffalo Bayou. In this episode of Looped In, Rebecca Schuetz interviews Buffalo Bayou Partnership's president Anne Olson about the nonprofit's transformative plan and talks with Marissa Luck about the broader changes taking place in the East End. Read more: Buffalo Bayou East breaks ground with affordable housing project. Kinder Foundation gives $100 million to fast track Buffalo Bayou East. Concept Neighborhood's 17-acre East End project could make cars obsolete with walkable, ‘micro' living Midway's non-fussy take on golf gives Houstonians first glimpse of game-changing East End project. Triten Partners' trendy 6-acre mixed-use project could transform key entrance to East End After years of attempts, redevelopment of former St. Elizabeth's Hospital begins More on Community Land Trusts in Houston Whether Fifth Ward residents want it or not, East River is comingSupport the show: https://offers.houstonchronicle.com/?offerid=125&origin=newsroom&ipid=podcastSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Oral Arguments from the Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals
22-1884: Dakota Energy Coop, Inc. vs East River Electric Power Coop., Inc.

Oral Arguments from the Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022


Oral argument argued before the Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals on or about 11/15/2022

The Wheelhouse with Jake Asman, Cody Stoots, & Brad Kellner
1213: 11/10/2022 The Wheelhouse Hour 1

The Wheelhouse with Jake Asman, Cody Stoots, & Brad Kellner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 50:13


On the road at the grand opening of East River 9, in the opening hour of the show the guys debate who they believe will be the Astros biggest competitors for JV's signature, discuss an absolutely insane potential coaching move for the Texans, dissect Brandin Cooks's first public comments since not getting a trade, and they go through some of the day's biggest NFL headlines during Around the League.

The Wheelhouse with Jake Asman, Cody Stoots, & Brad Kellner
1214: 11/10/2022 The Wheelhouse Hour 2

The Wheelhouse with Jake Asman, Cody Stoots, & Brad Kellner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 53:02


Out on the road at the grand opening of East River 9, in the 2nd hour of the show Jake goes through his Astros free agent wishlist, the guys explain why they're already worried about how the Texans are handling Dameon Pierce, discuss their concern on if there are any other "Brandin Cooks" type guys in the locker room, and have their weekly chat with Paramount Sports Handicapper Lee Sterling to get some his favorite CFB and NFL plays.

The Wheelhouse with Jake Asman, Cody Stoots, & Brad Kellner
1215: 11/10/2022 The Wheelhouse Hour 3

The Wheelhouse with Jake Asman, Cody Stoots, & Brad Kellner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 49:50


Out on the road at the grand opening of East River 9, in the 3rd hour of the show the guys discuss the teams they're most worried about making a run at Justin Verlander, the case for the Texans trying to get Sean Payton as their next HC, BK shares his Astros Free Agency wish list, and the crew go through some more of the day's biggest NFL stories during Around the League. 

The Wheelhouse with Jake Asman, Cody Stoots, & Brad Kellner
1215: 11/04/2022 The Wheelhouse Hour 4

The Wheelhouse with Jake Asman, Cody Stoots, & Brad Kellner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 46:20


On the road out at the grand opening of East River 9, in the final hour of the show Cody shares his Astros Free Agent wish list, the guys have some fun with 'Scott Borasisms" to pitch every host on 97.5, they dive into a viral birthday scandal during Quick Hits, and as always close the show by naming a new Champ of the Day.

Looped In
A behind-the-scenes look at East River, one of Houston's most highly-anticipated projects now

Looped In

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 34:46


Houston's East End is in the midst of massive change as the neighborhood once dominated by industrial buildings and small bungalows is turning into a hub for mixed-use developments, apartments and adaptive reuse projects. A major catalyst of the East End's transformation was sparked by East River, the 150-acre mixed-use development by Midway rising along Buffalo Bayou waterway. We sit down with Midway vice president Anna Deans to discuss how Midway's game-changing project will start to transform how Houstonians interact with this part of Buffalo Bayou and how the project could spark further changes in the East End. Deans also gives us all the updates and details on what's next for East River, one of the most highly-anticipated real estate developments underway in Houston now.Support the show: https://offers.houstonchronicle.com/?offerid=125&origin=newsroom&ipid=podcastSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Impact Report
#602: Roger Bason

The Impact Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 34:42


Bio-Design, Seaweed & Nature-Based Solutions: A Conversation with Roger Bason – CEO and Founder of Atlantic Ocean Aquaculture (AOA) The goal of Atlantic Ocean Aquaculture (AOA) is scaling production to reduce Ag sector GHGs in the US and abroad.  CEO, Roger Bason was trained in ocean science at Colgate University and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. This included a research cruise to the Galapagos Islands and early seabed measurements of the East Pacific Rise. He is a certified Energy Engineer with experience in ocean energy development in the US and internationally that deployed the first US tidal energy system in New York City's East River and an innovative wave energy system in Bermuda in cooperation with the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Science. Bason was part of an expert team that initiated coral reef recovery efforts in the Republic of the Marshall Islands using innovative BioRock technology in 2010. He developed and directed the US AmeriCorps program on the Island of Hawaii with a focus on sustainable development including projects in reforestation, aquaculture, solar energy and community food forests. For the past five years Roger has focused on climate action, installing several offshore seaweed farms and wild seaweed harvests in New England. Present work focuses on the harvest of Asparagopsis in Europe, a red seaweed that reduces methane in cattle when used as a feed supplement. Bard MBA's Hung Tran speaks with Roger for this episode of the Impact Report.   ImpactReportPodcast.com

Getting Through This with Tom and Scott

As he walked down tony Park Avenue the other day, a doorman from a high end building said to Scott, “How are you, Sir” Did this greeting mean that the word has gotten out about Scott being The Great Pedestrian? Tom revisits his proposal for a gigantic statue honoring pedestrians that would span the East River. And we also bring back our plan for a Pedestrian Sidewalk that spans the country from New York to California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tom-saunders9/support

Method and Madness
Episode 51: Princess Doe Has A Name

Method and Madness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 46:44


She was unknown to those who loved her, for 40 years. It's 1982 in Blairstown, NJ - a quaint town with an old-timey feel, its residents were rocked upon the discovery of a murder victim in the local cemetery. The lead investigator Eric Kranz said “I'll worry about the murder later on. My main concern is finding out who she is.” He was tired of writing “Jane Doe”, so, she was named “Princess Doe”. Her autopsy revealed she was between 14 and 18 years old, and she put up a fight. The residents came together, helped fund Princess Doe's funeral, and had a gravestone made for her. For 40 years, they left flowers and searched for her family, praying they'd learn her name. And then, in 2022, they finally got answers. Thank you to Anne, for sharing your story. _______________________________ If you have any information about Dawn Olanick, please contact: Warren County Prosecutors Office 908-475-6274 coldcase@co.warren.nj.us If you have any information about the following cases, please click the link or call the # provided. Correction: It is Suffolk County Jane Doe, not Sussex County Jane Doe- murdered by Arthur Kinlaw in 1983, was a black female, between the age of 25 and 45- 5 foot 7 and 300 pounds. 1542UFNY (doenetwork.org) “Linda”- met the Kinlaws at the Blackberry Jam Club in Bayshore NY. Her body was found in the East River off Hunts Point on May 3, 1984. She was dressed in a blouse and jeans and had short black hair. She was probably of Italian-American origin and may have lived with her grandmother in either Brentwood or Bayshore, Long Island. Hunts Point Police: (718) 542-4771 Missing Person Diane Dye ran away from her home in San Jose California in 1979, at age 13. Diane Genice Dye – The Charley Project ___________________________ Promo: Love and Murder https://linktr.ee/loveandmurder ___________________________ Method & Madness is researched, written, hosted, and produced by Dawn Gandhi Sound Editing by moInspo Music by Tymur Khakimov from Pixabay REACH OUT: methodandmadnesspod@gmail.com FOLLOW: Instagram.com/MethodAndMadnessPod Twitter.com/MethodPod _____________________________ This podcast is sponsored by BetterHelp. Special offer to Method and Madness listeners; you can get 10% off your first month of professional therapy at BetterHelp.com/methodandmadness ___________________________________________________________ For a list of sources used, visit the podcast website: Method & Madness Podcast Methodandmadnesspodcast.com Thank you for listening!

What'd You Do This Weekend?
Episode 20: What'd You Do This Weekend? with Jason Chatfield

What'd You Do This Weekend?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 85:15


This week! With New Yorker cartoonist and comedian Jason Chatfield, Hilary and Derek cover important topics like: Restaurant delivery fees, Hocus Pocus 2, cold plunges, dogs in the East River, BravoCon and getting stuck on rollercoasters. Find Jason Chatfield's wonderful work here on Substack at New York Cartoons! This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit cartoonsbyhilary.substack.com/subscribe

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2366: Hell Gate

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 3:50


Episode: 2366 Remembering when Hell Gate in the East River really was daunting.  Today, Hell Gate in the East River.

Un minuto en Nueva York
Brooklyn Bridge o la saga familiar que unió a dos ciudades

Un minuto en Nueva York

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 49:00


Completando la serie "Puentes de Nueva York" traemos al podcast el que probáblemente sea el más renombrado de todos ellos: el puente de Brooklyn y a la saga familiar de los Roebling, John, Washington y Emily, técnicos y gestores del diseño, que sobreponiéndose a inesperados avatares, lograron finalmente completar su constructión uniendo sobre las aguas del East River, las entonces separadas ciudades de Nueva York y Brooklyn.Feed para suscribirse al podcast: http://www.spreaker.com/user/7494944/episodes/feedGoogle Podcasts:https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuc3ByZWFrZXIuY29tL3Nob3cvMTIxNzk3OS9lcGlzb2Rlcy9mZWVkEscucha el programa por streaming:Radio Viajera https://www.radioviajera.com/Para donativos para el mantenimiento del podcastPaypal: https://paypal.me/unminutoennuevayorkKo-Fi: https://ko-fi.com/V7V16TP6ZMétodos de contacto:email: unminutoennuevayork@gmail.comWeb: http://unminutoennuevayork.comTumblr: http://un-minuto-en-nueva-york.tumblr.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/unminutoennuevayorkpodcastTwitter: @unminutoenNYInstagram: @unminutoennuevayork

The Takeaway
Disturbing Photos Reveal Poor Conditions at Rikers

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 13:16


Rikers Island, sits in the East River just across from LaGuardia Airport and its 10 jail campus is the main carceral complex for New York City. For decades, advocates and journalists have documented the dysfunction, violence, and deteriorating conditions at Rikers.   Now, new photos obtained through a public information request by Gothamist, reveal just how bad the conditions are, and the extreme neglect of some of the defendants held there. The disturbing photos were shown to hundreds of prosecutors in an August presentation prepared by the Board of Correction, which oversees and regulates the Department of Correction. According to a person who attended the presentation, it appears that the District Attorney's Office requested this look inside the jail to make prosecutors consider the conditions at Rikers before making decisions on charges or requests for bail. And it's important to remember, that a majority of the people detained at Rikers are waiting for trial, and haven't been convicted of a crime. Defendants wait months, and sometimes years, for their court hearings.We speak with Matt Katz, the reporter for WNYC and Gothamist who requested and wrote about these photos.

Stuff You Missed in History Class
SYMHC Classics: General Slocum Disaster

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 30:36 Very Popular


This 2019 episode covers the burning of the P.S. General Slocum in the East River in New York on June 15, 1904. It had been chartered for a group outing that suddenly became a deadly maritime disaster.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Batchelor Show
1/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 1/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 11:49


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 1/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 1/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
2/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 2/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 11:30


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 2/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 2/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
3/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 3/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 11:04


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 3/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 3/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
4/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 4/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 10:10


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 4/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 4/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
5/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 5/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 9:34


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 5/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 5/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
6/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 6/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 9:24


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 6/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 6/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
7/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 7/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 8:49


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 7/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 7/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
8/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 8/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 7:19


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 8/8: The miracle escape from Long Island: 8/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
5/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 5/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 11:30


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 5/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 5/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.