Podcast appearances and mentions of Dean Martin

American actor, singer, and comedian

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360 Vegas
360 Vegas Reviews - Wayne Newton

360 Vegas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 27:23


So before I get into this review, a few disclaimers:  If you told me a few years ago that I would actually make an effort and spend my own money to see Wayne Newton perform, I would have laughed at you. A lot. If you told me even a few months ago that I would not only see Wayne Newton perform, but also (spoiler alert!) enjoy it enough that I would recommend that others go see it, I would wonder what you were on.       Now, to be fair, I like crooners. But when I say that, I mean that I like the Rat Pack. To me, a pleasant evening is cooking dinner with Sinatra and Martin on the stereo and a glass of bourbon within reach. If I could see any concert ever in history, it would be Sinatra and the rest of the Rat Pack performing one of the Summit shows in the Copa Room at the Sands while they filmed the original Ocean's 11. But I have never considered myself a Wayne Newton fan. What brought me to see Wayne Newton recently was what the kids call the FOMO, the Fear Of Missing Out. Like it or not, Vegas is synonymous with change, and like it or not, the legacy of Wayne Newton is inextricably woven into Vegas forever. So even if I did not consider myself a fan of Wayne Newton, I had to admit that he was a living Las Vegas legend, and someday (maybe sooner than we would like) the chance to see that legend perform in the flesh might be gone. As a fan of Vegas and a frequent patron of Vegas entertainment, I almost felt what can best be described as an obligation to see Wayne Newton perform.     "To my left is where we keep the TV."       If you've been living under a proverbial Las Vegas rock and don't know who Wayne Newton is, he is also known as Mr. Las Vegas, and has been performing on Las Vegas stages and throughout the rest of the world for more that 60 years, beginning in the late 50s at the Fremont Hotel. He's the guy that tried to woo Helen Griswold away from Clark in Vegas Vacation. When I first started making regular trips to Vegas, Newton was performing at the Cleopatra's Barge theater at Caesars Palace. When El Dorado took over Caesars Entertainment, they closed several shows and moved Wayne over to Bugsy's Cabaret at the Flamingo. As shows began to open up post-pandemic, Wayne Newton's production was delayed; first due to back surgery last year, and again due to a positive COVID diagnosis later on. Since the man is now 80 years old, I was really beginning to feel like I needed to make an effort to see him as soon as possible.          As I mentioned before, Wayne Newton, Up Close and Personal is now performing at Bugsy's Cabernet, which is a small venue located in the center of the Flamingo gaming floor. The venue is also used for X-Burlesque, but you enter the theater through different doors for the different productions, making it seem like they are different venues and that the tuxedo-wearing, living legend isn't sharing a performance space with a titty show. The size of the theater was a plus for me, because the small room ensured that we could see him well. It truly was “Up Close and Personal.”        As we waited in line to get into the theater, we couldn't help but wonder what we were getting into. We're in our mid-forties, but we were by far the youngest people in line. Was everyone here for Wayne Newton, or had we accidentally stumbled across the Matlock Fan Convention? Ha ha! Old people…        When most of the audience was seated, a woman stood up in front and introduced herself as the hostess. She essentially instructed us to stand up and applaud when Wayne sang his final song of the evening. I've seen a lot of shows, but I've never been told that I need to give a standing ovation. This irritated me, but it was quickly forgotten. The curtains opened, the 3-piece band began to play, and the man himself stepped out and began to sing.        Okay, so I'm just going to cut to the chase here. His voice is not great right now. Don't get me wrong; he sings better than I do. It's not awful to hear, but we're a long way from the gravel mixed with maple syrup sounds he had in the past (for example, in Vegas Vacation). I was actually fine with this, because he's still an incredible showman. You can tell when you see him live that he has cultivated the art of interacting with the audience. He was pointing at people in the audience he recognized, smiling and waving hello between lines of his songs. This is what I wanted! This is what I paid to see: that old school, still a small town, anyone-can-show-up feeling of old Vegas lounge and dinner shows. At one point, he stops the show to acknowledge his friend in the audience, impressionist Rich Little, who currently performs at the Tropicana. Newton reminisces about their long friendship, and times performing together decades ago at the Frontier. It reminds me of Dean Martin saying hello to Lucille Ball in the crowd at the Copa Room. It's not the same level of celebrity, but it's the same kind of warmth and familiarity that's tough to find in live entertainment.         The show itself is structured like VH1 Storytellers. Newton sings a song, then tells a story. He plays a video of himself playing an instrument at age 15, then demonstrates that he can still deftly play the same instrument. Fun fact: Wayne Newton can play 13 different instruments, but cannot read music. He plays by sound.     Wayne Newton: Original Blue Man Group member       It's pretty clear that the “questions from the audience” are pre-arranged, and that's okay. It keeps the show on rails. Newton's stories include a confrontation with Elvis when it turned out they were dating the same girl, a last-minute recording session with Glen Campbell of the legendary “Wrecking Crew” when they both happened to be in England, a prank played on Dean Martin, and the warmest memories of his friendship with Frank Sinatra. It seemed like Newton regarded Sinatra as not only a great friend, but also a mentor and father figure. I couldn't help but think of the “you shook Sinatra's hand” lines from Ocean's 13. Here, standing in front of me on the stage, was a man who really had “shook Sinatra's hand.” I began to see Wayne Newton not only as a living Vegas legend, but also as a link to these other Vegas legends that were so important to me and this town that we love. There is also a really cool semi-live duet with a Rat-Pack member that I won't spoil here. As I said before, I entered the room under a sense of obligation, but I was now absolutely enthralled.          Speaking of enthralled, the number of elderly women collectively but only figuratively losing their shit because they were getting to see Wayne Newton was both hilarious and fascinating. If I should end up at a Justin Timberlake concert in my late 70's, will there be women of my generation going insane and throwing their Depends at him on the stage? We can only hope… I honestly was not mentally prepared for the women who were going nuts because he sang a certain song. Picture all these geriatric groupies, eyes closed and hands waving slowly in the air like members of a mega-church, and this is all because Wayne Newton is singing “Red Roses for a Blue Lady.”        Something else I want to mention is the cool montage at the beginning of the show which showed all the Vegas marquees over the years with Wayne Newton's name on them. Newton began his Vegas career at the age of 15, performing 5 shows a night at the Fremont. He had to leave the property between sets, because as a minor he wasn't allowed to hang out there. Since then, he has headlined at the Stardust, the Desert Inn, both MGM Grands, the Frontier, the Sands, Caesars Palace, and was even an owner of the original Aladdin. Over the years, he has performed over 30,000 shows in Vegas and released more than 100 albums.        I've started including the A.F.F., or Audience Fuckery Factor in these reviews. That is where we discuss how much you need to worry about being accidentally included in the show. I think I can safely say that unless you know Wayne Newton personally, or unless you count being asked to take part in a standing ovation, the A.F.F. for Wayne Newton, Up Close and Personal is minimal. He's not going to Ellen Griswold you, people.        To sum up our experience, I still don't think of myself as a Wayne Newton fan per se, but I definitely have a much greater appreciation and respect for him. He shook Sinatra's hand, he's a Las Vegas treasure, and absolutely deserves a standing ovation; no prompting necessary.        At the time of this review, Wayne Newton, Up Close and Personal is live at Bugsy's Cabaret at the Flamingo at 7:00 pm on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays. Tickets start at $86, and we always appreciate it when you click the Vegas.com referral link here or on the website.        You can find Josh on twitter @vegasjaydubs

Doug Miles Big Band Files
Episode 22: “BIG BAND FILES” CHRISTMAS SHOW 2022

Doug Miles Big Band Files

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 55:11


Doug Miles hosts the “Big Band Files” Christmas show featuring Christmas music from the American Popular Songbook and its great artists. (www.dougmilesmedia.com)

What the Riff?!?
Christmas Songs that Rock V: A What the Riff Rabbit Hole

What the Riff?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 44:36


We at What the Riff!?! hope that y'all have a great Christmas — we hope these songs make your season a little more merry and bright.“Deck the Halls” by Twisted SisterThis classic carol was probably not originally envisioned to be quite as rocking as this, but Dee Snyder and Twisted Sister took it up a notch!  This is the sixth and last Twisted Sister studio album they would produce, and we're sure they donned their gay apparel for this final outing.  “Skynyrd Family” by Lynyrd SkynyrdSome southern charm was put on this song that tells of Lynyrd Skynyrd finishing up their tour and headed home for Christmas.  It is off their eleventh studio album entitled “Christmas Time Again,” released in 2000.   “I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus” by the Jackson 5John Lynch brings us a classic Christmas song as performed by the Jackson 5.  Michael Jackson recorded this song on his 12th birthday in 1970.“2000 Miles” by  the PretendersThis song was on “Learning to Crawl,” the breakout studio album by the Pretenders released in 1983.  Chrissie Hynde wrote the song for James Honeyman-Scott, the group's original guitarist who had passed away the year prior to this recording.“Mistress for Christmas” by AC/DCRob may find a lump of coal in his stocking for picking this song for the Christmas podcast!  Brian Johnson of AC/DC isn't looking for peace, love, and joy for Christmas…but for a little Christmas nookie.  We learned that this song was inspired by Donald Trump.“Joy to the World” by Michael BoltonWe don't get a lot of Michael Bolton on our podcasts, and John Lynch set out to rectify that.  Bolton voices this classic Christmas hymn in his unique Yacht Rock style.“Boogie Woogie Santa Claus” by the Brian Seltzer OrchestraBrian Seltzer of Stray Cats fame put this one out there in 2002.  The Brian Seltzer Orchestra formed in 1990 as a swing and jump blues band, and put out the album “Boogie Woogie Christmas” with this and other Christmas classics.  This is a cover of the song, which was originally released by Mabel Scott in 1954.“(There's No Place Like) Home for the Holidays” by Perry ComoPerry Como released this classic Christmas song in 1954.  It tells of the longing to be home at Christmas, and some of the travelers making their way home.“Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree” by Brenda LeeJohnny Marks, who wrote “Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer,” “A Holly Jolly Christmas,” and other Christmas songs wrote this one as well.  Brenda Lee recorded this in 1958 when she was 13 years old.  It is the fifth best selling Christmas single of all time according to Neilson SoundScan.  “Feliz Navidad”  by Jose FelicianoPuerto Rican musician Jose Feliciano wrote this in 1970. He recorded it in Los Angeles while feeling homesick at Christmas as his extended family was in New York.  “Feliz Navidad” means “Merry Christmas” in Spanish. “It's Gonna Be a Punk Rock Christmas” by the RaversWayne brings us a bit of PUNK for the Christmas season.  The Ravers released this back in 1977.  “It's the Most Wonderful Time of the Year” by Andy WilliamsWe decided to include more “non-rock singles” in this episode, and this classic holiday tune originated in 1963 on Williams' first Christmas album.  It tells of all the activities that surrounds the Christmas season.“Let it Snow! Let it Snow! Let it Snow!” by Dean MartinSammy Cahn and  Jule Styne wrote this in the summer of 1945 during a heat wave in Hollywood, California.  Dean Martin released a version in 1959, and re-recorded it in 1966.“Blue Christmas” by Seymour Swine and the SquealersThis novelty song was recorded in 1984 for a North Carolina radio station morning show.  Denny Brownlee is the comedian and impressionist who brought Seymour Swine to life - primarily to avoid copyright issues associated with ©Porky Pig.“O Come All Ye Grateful Dead Heads” by Bob RiversComedian Bob Rivers had this parody on his “Twisted Christmas” album in 1987.We hope y'all have a very Merry Christmas and a happy New Year!

Two Bandits Watching Bluey
Episode 78 - Sleepytime: Featuring Adal Rifai!

Two Bandits Watching Bluey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 32:39


It's time to hide our tears in #NoRulesNovember, as we talk Sleepytime with our guest Adal Rifai! The improvs addition to parenting!! Getting stared down in bed?! Bingo tears sung by Dean Martin! Possible actual podcast crying?!  Find Adal at: @magictavern (@chuntttttt ). Also @heyriddleriddle @monsterlinepod and @siblingspeculia   We love you folks! For real life!  As always, thanks to all the party people that listen and follow, feel free to rate and review us! We love hearing from the Blueyverse! New and old episodes! Let us know what ya think!!! We dare ya!   Hit up our Patreon to give us of what you love to watch/listen to/what brings you joy and have us join you in that fun! We are up and running and are having a blast! linktr.ee/watchingbluey  Twitter: @WatchingBluey Email: WatchingBluey@gmail.com  Merch: http://bit.ly/2BWBSwag     

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie
Episode 2326: Landau Murphy, Jr. AGT-NBC Winner, CNN, New Music, Fatherhood, Tours~ Happy Thanksgiving & Christmas Made for Two Pt. 1

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 22:09


AGT, CNN, The ViewLots of Great Stuff Happening for Landau, International Travel, New Music, & Fatherhood!  Part 1Landau Eugene Murphy Jr. first burst onto the national conscience as the Sinatra-and-Soul singing  on NBC TV's “America's Got Talent with his incredible voice, undeniable charisma and unparalleled showmanship.  And a decade later, he's still going strong.Seeing Landau in concert is a revelation; backed by the dynamic Landau Big Band, you'll always hear swinging arrangements of Great American Songbook classics from Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Nat ‘King' Cole and many more, along with a dusting of that special Motown Magic that is sure to move your feet and make you sing along.And after the show, every show, you'll always have the opportunity to meet Landau one-on-one for photos and have the chance to talk with him about his incredible rags-to-riches story.  “It's my favorite part of the night; it's something we always do. Sometimes I'm the last one at the venue, talking to fans and friends. The janitor is waiting on me to lock up!”Landau was born into extreme poverty in the Appalachian coalfields of southern West Virginia. His parents split while he was in elementary school, and Landau was shipped off to Detroit in the middle of the night. He woke up in the Motor Cities notoriously gang and drug-riddled “7 Mile” neighborhood. Landau likes to say that he went from Almost Heaven to Little Baghdad overnight!After a series of dead-end jobs, run-ins with the police and a too-soon failed marriage, Landau eventually found himself homeless and sleeping in his car. Then, his voice became his calling card.“I loved to play basketball in Detroit, and these guys were good. Some of them went onto the NBA. But we were in the hood; it wasn't anything to see guns drawn on the court after the game, so to keep people cool and laughing, when I'd dunk on someone, I'd sing a Frank Sinatra song like “Fly Me To The Moon” and everyone would laugh and put their guns away.”Eventually, that one-of-a-kind voice would lead him back to West Virginia to perform for local charities and nursing homes. Landau says, “I was singing for charities, when most of the time, I had less than the people receiving the charity proceeds did, but that was OK because I was singing.”At the end of his rope, Landau tied a knot and pulled himself back up by auditioning for NBC TV's “America's Got Talent” with thousands of others. After months of competition, Landau emerged the winner, scoring a million dollars, a recording contract, and America's hearts, and he's never looked back.Landau's Columbia Records debut album “That's Life” reached number one on the Billboard Jazz Charts and was followed by “Christmas Made For Two”, “Landau” and his latest “Landau Live In Las Vegas” recorded during a performance at the legendary Caesar's Palace.  Landau has made dozens of TV appearances including “The Today Show”, “The View”, CNN, “Fox and Friends”, “The Talk”, the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, and the Hollywood Christmas Parade.He's performed all over the world, from China to New York City, Los Angeles to Europe where he had the honor to perform for U.S. servicemen and their families stationed there. He's sung the national anthem prior to games by the Los Angeles Lakers, Washington Wizards, New York Rangers, Baltimore Orioles, Oklahoma City Thunder, Washington Nationals, and his beloved West Virginia University Mountaineers during a nationally televised homecoming game.He's helped raise millions of dollars for charities, many in his home state of West Virginia where he serves on the Board of Directors for the Children's Home Society of West Virginia and was named “West Virginian of the Year” by the Governor's office and the state's largest newspaper.Landau's book “From Washing Cars to Hollywood Stars” featuring his amazing story reached #1 on Amazon, his “Live in Washington DC at Bethesda Blues and Jazz” concert DVD was a best-seller and he had his first movie cameo in 2017 in the Ron James biopic “Choices”.In 2021 Landau proudly released LANDAU LIVE IN LAS VEGAS a pre-pandemic recording at Caesars Palace that includes several never-before-released tracks. Enjoy Landau's unique take on the Great American Songbook as well as classic R&B, all backed by his long-time stellar musicians in LANDAU'S LITTLE BIG BAND, with guest background vocals by former Temptations and Four Tops lead singer Theo Peoples!© 2022 Building Abundant Success!!2022 All Rights ReservedJoin Me on ~ iHeart Media @ https://tinyurl.com/iHeartBASSpot Me on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/yxuy23bAmazon Music ~ https://tinyurl.com/AmzBASAudacy:  https://tinyurl.com/BASAud

Movie Madness
Episode 341: Blu-Ray Black Friday

Movie Madness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 97:14


It's the Blu-ray time of the week and Peter Sobczynski joins Erik Childress again to talk a whole bunch of 4Ks for your Black Friday shopping. Take advantage of the Barnes and Noble Criterion sale to grab one of the best films from Pixar and one of the best from Spike Lee. Shout Factory has new editions of genre cult classics from Neil Jordan and Norman Jewison while Vinegar syndrome delivers a 4K of maybe the ultimate cult film. Kino has another Eastwood in 4K and a comic book parody before the Marvel onslaught. Erik goes to bat for James Gunn's spinoff from The Suicide Squad and talks of the curse that prevented his dad from seeing Pearl Harbor prevented in a movie. They talk more Bob Clark, an immense set from Sony Classics and the origins of Martin & Lewis. Finally they discuss one of the best comedies of the year and a new 4K of one of the best comedies of the 1980s. 0:00 - Intro 1:22 - Criterion (Wall E 4K, Malcolm X 4K) 13:27 - Vinegar (RoadHouse 4K) 19:01 - Shout Factory (The Company of Wolves 4K. Rollerball 4K) 29:43 - Warner Bros. (Peacemaker) 35:55 - Kino (Mystery Men 4K, High Plains Drifter 4K, Hold Me Tight) 50:12 - Universal (Bros) 55:58 - Blue Underground (Final Countdown 4K) 1:03:17 - IFC (Hatching) 1:08:25 - VCI (Children Shouldn't Play with Dead Things 4k) 1:14:21 - Sony (SPC Classics Set) 1:19:01 - Paramount (My Friend Irma, Planes Trains Automobiles 4K) 1:31:01 – New Blu-ray Announcements

The Sounds of Christmas
Rhonda Burchmore and Jack Earle Invite You To A Red Hot Swingin' Christmas

The Sounds of Christmas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 31:44


Ken Kessler from the Sounds of Christmas talks to Australian entertainer Rhonda Burchmore and big band leader Jack Earle about their latest collaboration - "A Red Hot Swingin' Christmas"! They talk about some of the songs they chose to record, including a song Dean Martin recorded almost seventy years ago that almost no one has covered since! Plus, they also recorded a big band version of Slade's "Merry Xmas Everybody"! Rhonda and Jack also talk about the tour they're currently on, their next projects and plans, and the possibility of "A Red Hot Swining' Christmas 2"!Rhonda's website: http://rhondaburchmore.comJack's website: https://www.jackearle.comGet a signed copy of "A Red Hot Swingin' Christmas": http://rhondaburchmore.com/store/redhotxmasStream the new album: https://snd.click/RB-SwinginXmas

Coffee Talk with Adika Live
DON RANDIE STORIES OF THE WRECKING CREW & THE MUSIC OF THE 60'S

Coffee Talk with Adika Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 80:09


Guest Don RandiDon Randi's experiences behind-the-scenes, in-the-studio as a member of the Wall of Sound/Wrecking Crew and on-tour, both hilarious and emotional, with some of the most admired music artists and producers of all time like Nancy Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Phil Spector, Jimmy Bowen, Dean Martin, the Jackson 5, Brian Wilson, Linda Ronstadt, Sammy Davis Jr., Glen Campbell and many more.http://donrandi.com/* The New Website ➜ https://www.adikalive.com/Merchandise ➜ https://adikalive.bigcartel.com/The Ultimate VIP ALL ACCESS BACKSTAGE PASSFull episodes can be seen in Patreon! Get exclusive content and entry into the vinyl games on Patreon: ➜ https://www.patreon.com/The_adika_group?fan_landing=trueYour Donation Helps Support your Favorite Show & Channel ➜ https://www.paypal.me/stephenadika1AMAZON WISHLIST ➜ https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/30GQNR69L9048?ref_=wl_shareCLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ➜  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheAdikaGroup?sub_confirmation=1Artists on Record |  ADIKA Live The PodcastApple ➜ https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/coffee-talk-with-adika-live/id1529816802?uo=4Spotify ➜ https://open.spotify.com/show/2lXgg3NVdnU3LmXgCrgHwk iHeartRadio ➜ https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-coffee-talk-with-adika-liv-71566693/*Follow ADIKA Live on Tik Tok: ➜https://vm.tiktok.com/TTPdMmEfFm/ADIKA Live on Twitter➜ https://twitter.com/TalkAdikaThank you for your support!_____________________________________________Artists On Record: Support the show

Laugh Tracks Legends of Comedy with Randy and Steve

For those of us of a certain age (ok, our age), Adam West was our first Batman and the legendary Frank Gorshin was our first Riddler. A gifted comic impressionist, Gorshin built a long career as a standup comic and character actor. And while his maniacal Riddler is best known, you couldn't have watched television in the 1960s and 70s without catching Frank in a sitcom, on a talk show, or logging time on The Dean Martin Celebrity Roasts. As always, find longer clips below and thanks for sharing our shows. To find an easy to search archive of our past shows find us on YouTube at "Laugh Tracks Legends of Comedy." And thanks for sharing our shows! Want more Gorshin? While Frank is best remembered for his Batman work, he was first a fine comic impressionist with a long list of credits. Here is a bit of Frank's act from 1964 on Ed Sullivan -- the time he "opened" for the Beatles. https://dai.ly/x4wd08m Frank Gorshin's Riddler was the breakout villain of the Adam West version of Batman. Frank played the role 10 times, plus he took the character to other shows and even issued a single in character that scraped the Billboard Top 40. Here is a nice fan-made supercut of some of the Riddler's best bits from 1966.https://youtu.be/C9aCdP83eAw   Frank Gorshin did an uncanny Burt Lancaster and an even better Dean Martin -- so what better time to deploy them both than on a Dean Martin Celebrity Roast!https://youtu.be/mJzcU8z2U14      

WGN - The After Hours with Rick Kogan Podcast
Diving into the life and career of Tony Ocean

WGN - The After Hours with Rick Kogan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022


Musician Tony Ocean joins Rick Kogan in studio to discuss his life and career. Later, Tony talks about his music as well as sharing the story of how his impersonation of Dean Martin changed the course of his career.

1049 Park Avenue: An Odd Couple Podcast

This episode covers Jack Klugman and Tony Randall's TV appearances as themselves - on talk shows, in ads, on Dean Martin roast, and in song. 

Cloud Jazz Smooth Jazz
Cloud Jazz 2271 (Chris Botti temas vocales) - Episodio exclusivo para mecenas

Cloud Jazz Smooth Jazz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 56:40


Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! Este monográfico está dedicado al trompetista Chris Botti. Hacemos un repaso a su discografía a través de algunos de los temas vocales que ha ido introduciendo en ella. Temas interpretados por artistas tan destacados como Sting, Edie Brickell, Michael Bublé, Gladys Knight, Jill Scott, Chantal Kreviazuk, Bridget Benenate, Dean Martin, Shawn Colvin o Paula Cole.Escucha este episodio completo y accede a todo el contenido exclusivo de Cloud Jazz Smooth Jazz. Descubre antes que nadie los nuevos episodios, y participa en la comunidad exclusiva de oyentes en https://go.ivoox.com/sq/27170

Impact Radio USA
LIVE SINGING "You're Nobody Till Somebody Loves You" (11-9-22)

Impact Radio USA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 10:40


In our newest segment, one which reflects on our complete lack of judgement and discernment, we present LIVE SINGING, the segment that features various singers "singing" (yes, that word was intentionally placed within quotation marks!) some of your favorite songs! On today's show, "Paranoid Pete" and "Operatic Olivier" came in to sing, "You're Nobody Till Somebody Loves You", by Dean Martin! As Al often says, what could POSSIBLY go wrong???

Impact Radio USA
"Dr. Paul's Family Talk" (11-9-22) TWO HOUR SHOW

Impact Radio USA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 120:00


NOW YOU CAN CLICK ON THE TIMELINE TO FIND YOUR FAVORITE SEGMENT(S) OR LISTEN TO THE WHOLE SHOW! Please check out our full TWO-HOUR radio show, or snippets contained within, from Wednesday, November 9 , 2022, wherein we discussed: 0:00 - Hello, Introduction, Update, and Today's Show Details 7:16 - "Arrogant Al" Entered the Fray! 8:34 - The World Series and No-Hitters and Perfect Games 14:53 - Kyrie Irving and the First Amendment 19:49 - Elections .... or Selections? 27:39 - LIVE SINGING Segment, wherein the CHO Singing Group, including "Cannabis Carl", Hicksville Harry", and "Operatic Olivier" came in to sing "Don't Get Around Much Anymore", by Duke Ellington. As Al always says, what could possibly go wrong? 48:53 - Part 1 of Paul's Interview With Psychic, Astrologer, and Author, AMBIKA DEVI 1:23:08 - Other Shows on Impact Radio USA 1:25:47 - LIVE SINGING Segment, wherein "Operatic Olivier" and "Paranoid Pete", came in to sing "You're Nobody Till Somebody Loves You", by a host of singers, including Dean Martin. As Al always says, what could possibly go wrong? 1:33:40 - Al's Question on "Don't Get Around Much Anymore" 1:36:29 - Part 2 of Paul's Interview With Psychic, Astrologer, and Author, AMBIKA DEVI As a reminder, you can catch all of our live shows on Wednesdays at 11:00 am (ET) on "Impact Radio USA", through the following site: http://www.ImpactRadioUSA.com (click on LISTEN NOW) (NOTE: Each live show is also repeated at 2:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m., and 5:00 am on the next day) Enjoy!

SpyHards Podcast
109. The Silencers (1966)

SpyHards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 98:08


Agents Scott and Cam, along with guest operative Ajay Chowdhury, co-author of Some Kind of Hero: The Remarkable Story of the James Bond Films, slide into the bathtub with Dean Martin and Stella Stevens for the first Matt Helm adventure, 1966's The Silencers.  Directed by Phil Karlson. Starring Dean Martin, Stella Stevens, Daliah Lavi, Victor Buono, Arthur O'Connell, Robert Webber, James Gregory, Nancy Kovack, Roger C. Carmel and Cyd Charisse. You can buy "Some Kind of Hero: The Remarkable Story of the James Bond Films" wherever books are sold. Also, keep an eye on MI6 Headquarters for Ajay's upcoming limited edition Connery Bond magazine. You can also follow Ajay on Twitter. Become a SpyHards Patron and gain access to top secret "Agents in the Field" bonus episodes, movie commentaries and more! Pick up exclusive SpyHards merch, including the "What Does Vargas Do?" t-shirt by @shaylayy, available only at Redbubble Social media: @spyhards View the NOC List and the Disavowed List at Letterboxd.com/spyhards Podcast artwork by Hannah Hughes. Theme music by Doug Astley.

Sunday Arts Magazine

What do you get when Michael Bublé, Harry Connick Jnr and Robbie Williams meet Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jnr and Dean Martin…. Capturing the style, class and humour of the... LEARN MORE The post Rat Pack appeared first on Sunday Arts Magazine.

Welp, dig in!
EPISODE 65 - Cole Young of Metalwood Studios

Welp, dig in!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 126:55


We bring on friend of show the, Cole Young from Metalwood Studios (the coolest golf shop in LA) to talk about the movie 'Blades' - we also talk about 'The Caddy' with Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis

Up Next with John Contratti
Interview With Singer/Actress Deana Martin

Up Next with John Contratti

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 23:09


Singer and actress Deana Matin stops by to share her life growing  up with her famous dad, Dean Martin, and chats about her career in music, film and television. 

The True Crime Journals
TCJ Page 41: Bonnie Lee Blakely

The True Crime Journals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 32:41


Bonny Lee Bakely grew up in New Jersey. After her own dream of becoming a Hollywood starlet did not pan out, she shifted her sights to just marrying someone famous. She locked in on celebrities like Jerry Lee Lewis, Dean Martin, & Gary Busey before finally landing a marriage to Robert Blake. Robert Blake was later charged with the murder of Bonny Lee Bakely, but acquitted at trial. So the question remains, who killed Bonny Lee Bakely?Support the show

The Loaded Goat
Don Knotts' Early Years

The Loaded Goat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 17:25


We've revisited Andy Griffith's work before TAGS. This week, we take a look at Don Knotts' work with Steve Allen and Dean Martin.

Unnatural Selection
Buckle up Buckaroo

Unnatural Selection

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 80:33


On this week's episode of the Unnatural Selection Podcast we discuss a bunch of stuff: UK Prime Minister Liz Truss announces resignation after a month and a half in power. ‘Buckle up': US backers of Just Stop Oil vow more Van Gogh-style protests. Aileen Getty. Greens senator Lidia Thorpe admits to undisclosed relationship with ex-Rebels president Dean Martin while on law enforcement committee. Qantas shares surge as Joyce predicts profit. The Unnatural Selection podcast is produced by Jorge Tsipos, Adam Direen and Tom Heath. Visit the Unnatural Selection website at www.UnnaturalShow.com for stuff and things. The views expressed are those of the hosts and their guests and do not reflect those of any other entities. Unnatural Selection is a show made for comedic purposes and should not be taken seriously by anyone. Twitter: @JorgeTsipos @TomDHeath @UnnaturalShow Instagram: @JorgeTsipos @AdamCDireen @Tom.Heath @UnnaturalShow

Green Left Weekly Radio
150 Years of the Maritime Union || Rally for Public Housing Tenats || Western Sahara: Australian company importing phosphate from occupied territory

Green Left Weekly Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022


Featuring the latest in activist campaigns and struggles against oppression fighting for a better world with anti-capitalist analysis on current affairs and international politics. Presenters: Jacob Andrewartha, Chloe DSNewsreportsDiscussion of headline newstory responding to the report that Greens senator Lidia Thorpe admitted to an undisclosed relationship with ex-Rebels president Dean Martin while on law enforcement committeeDiscussion of Green Left article - Anger grows with Flemington Race Course flood wallInterviews and DiscussionInterview with Dave Ball assistant secretary of the Maritime Union of Australia (Victoria) discussing the 150th anniverary of the union - reflecting on it's history, some of it's achievements, it's proud track record of international solidarity, and where to next for the union. You can listen to the individual interview here.Interview with Kerrie Byrne a public housing activist about a upcoming rally for public housing tenats on Friday October 28 demanding improved maintence of public housing tenats along with a discussion about the current situation for public housing. You can listen to the individual interview here.Interview with Ron Guy from Australian Unions for Western Sahara discussing the occupation of Western Sahara by Morroco and how an Australian company is currently importing phosphate from the occupied territory. You can listen to the individual interview here.

Classical Music Discoveries
Episode 25: 19025 Hauser - The Player

Classical Music Discoveries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 47:48


THE PLAYER, which features an accompaniment from the Czech National Symphony Orchestra conducted by Steven Mercurio, skillfully merges modern-day hits with timeless classics in custom HAUSER flavor. The genre-bending artist has found a deep appreciation for Old Hollywood and classic rock-n-roll greats like Elvis and Dean Martin, who have inspired much of his new style. The new record, HAUSER follows in the footsteps of his heroes, taking the stage as a cross-generational legend in his own right.Purchase the music (without talk) at:Hauser - The Player (classicalmusicdiscoveries.store)Your purchase helps to support our show! Classical Music Discoveries is sponsored by La Musica International Chamber Music Festival and Uber. @CMDHedgecock#ClassicalMusicDiscoveries #KeepClassicalMusicAlive#LaMusicaFestival #CMDGrandOperaCompanyofVenice #CMDParisPhilharmonicinOrléans#CMDGermanOperaCompanyofBerlin#CMDGrandOperaCompanyofBarcelonaSpain#ClassicalMusicLivesOn#Uber Please consider supporting our show, thank you!Donate (classicalmusicdiscoveries.store) staff@classicalmusicdiscoveries.com This album is broadcasted with the permission of Crossover Media Music Promotion (Zachary Swanson and Amanda Bloom).

No Vacancy with Glenn Haussman
From the Vault: The Mafia's Favorite Vegas Steakhouse

No Vacancy with Glenn Haussman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 59:37


From the vault! This is a classic episode so the folks involved (not BF!) have moved on. Hear the history of Las Vegas through the prism of its oldest steakhouse, the Golden Steer, which opened in 1958. Owner Michael Signorelli tells a great tale about how this became a famous haunt for entertainers, the mafia and high rollers. The Golden Steer Steakhouse is also known for its famous and infamous customers such as: Tony "The Ant" Spilatro, Natalie Wood, Al Hirt, Nat "King" Cole, Joe DiMaggio, Elvis Presley and Mario Andretti just to name a few. Here's a few more: Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr. who found refuge here away from racism on The Strip. The story is told by owner Dr. Michael Signorelli as well as Kevin Ball, Corporate Vice President - Strategic Sourcing at American Casino & Entertainment Properties (Stratosphere and more). Plus, a special appearance by Bruce Ford, SVP Business Development with Lodging Econometrics. Eat at The Golden Steer! http://www.goldensteerlasvegas.com/introduction.html Subscribe on iTunes: No Vacancy with Glenn Haussman Subscribe on Android: https://play.google.com/music/listen#/ps/Ifu34iwhrh7fishlnhiuyv7xlsm

CKCC Radio: Home of Club Kayfabe's Community of Podcasts
Ranking Tracks Episode 68: Dean Martin - This Time I'm Swingin

CKCC Radio: Home of Club Kayfabe's Community of Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 18:40


Ranking Tracks Episode 68 is live! Definitely changing it up with this one as this time I rank Dean Martin's 1960 album This Time I'm Swingin'. Absolutely loved the album from start to finish. Do you have a favorite Rat Pack member?

Watchers in the Fourth Dimension: A Doctor Who Podcast
Episode 95: Big Giant Shiny Metal Balls (The Sontaran Experiment)

Watchers in the Fourth Dimension: A Doctor Who Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 37:28


We're heading down to a deserted far future Earth, where a baked potato is evaluating a small group of humans for… well… apparently, an invasion… but it seems to be more for plain old sadism. Maybe. Anyway, in this episode we're discussing The Sontaran Experiment!   Along the way, Reilly once again gets disgusted by the tongue movements of a Sontaran, Anthony asks how these humans totally missed Nerva being in orbit, Julie desires a Doctor Who serial written by Bob Barker and Dean Martin, and Don comes up with new theories about Styre's motives. The entire team ponders how everything going on with this deserted Earth seems to be happening in the same extremely small geographic area!   If you would like to watch along with us, this serial is available for streaming at both Britbox US (https://www.britbox.com) and Britbox UK (https://www.britbox.co.uk). It can also be found on DVD from either Amazon US (https://amzn.to/3CH2VXZ) or Amazon UK (https://amzn.to/3Ci5Jtl). The entirety of Season 12 can also be found in a lovely Blu Ray boxset from both Amazon US (https://amzn.to/3RWV2md) and Amazon UK (https://amzn.to/3d5ZO1N).   Other media mentioned in this episode: Planet of the Apes (Amazon US: https://amzn.to/35xdTl2 | Amazon UK: https://amzn.to/3iWbYcK) Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Amazon US: https://amzn.to/3Bvp4Fy | Amazon UK: https://amzn.to/3lofajC) Monty Python's Flying Circus: The Complete Series (Amazon US: https://amzn.to/2VNSNKA | Amazon UK: https://amzn.to/37JfHoE) Star Wars: The Skywalker Saga (Amazon US: https://amzn.to/3ptuM83 | Amazon UK: https://amzn.to/3BSULsQ) The Simpsons – The Complete Fifth Season (Amazon US: https://amzn.to/3EqUm4I | Amazon UK: https://amzn.to/3edayMy) Creepshow (Amazon US: https://amzn.to/3fSlpf2 | Amazon UK: https://amzn.to/3yoSLJ3) Star Wars: The Bad Batch (Disney+: https://www.disneyplus.com) Sparks – Balls (YouTube: https://youtu.be/sfKnnkkM-LQ)   Finally, you can also follow us and interact with us on various forms of social media - Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. You can also e-mail us at watchers4d@gmail.com. If you're enjoying this podcast, please subscribe to the show, and leave us a rating or review.

The Sounds of Brooklyn and Beyond

Featuring the new single from indie pop time traveller Victoria Reed; a trip down modern exotica lane with Kolumbo; brand new releases on the ECM label from Keith Jarrett, Fred Hersch and Enrico Rava; Erik Satie reimagined and remixed by Henrik Schwarz; Alwyn's new music in ‘chopped but not slopped' form; the unique Indian fusion of pianist Charu Suri; and finally, a little something from Dean Martin.

LIVIN THE GOOD LIFE SHOW
Deana Martin, American Singer } Daughter to Dean Martin

LIVIN THE GOOD LIFE SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 13:22


Deana Martin was born in Manhattan to Dean Martin and his first wife, Elizabeth Anne "Betty" McDonald. She moved to Beverly Hills, California, with her family by the age of one. She later went to live with her father and his second wife, Jeanne Biegger. During her childhood, it was not unusual for his Rat Packfriends, Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis Jr., to visit. Being around them persuaded her to pursue a career in entertainment.Martin trained professionally at the Dartington College of Arts in the United Kingdom.[3] Her theatrical credits include Romeo and Juliet, The Taming of the Shrew, Hamlet, and A Taste of Honey.[4] She co-starred in the National Broadway tour of Neil Simon's play Star Spangled Girl with George Hamilton and Jimmy Boyd. Other starring roles include Wait Until Dark, 6 Rms Riv Vu, A Shot in the Dark, and The Tunnel of Love. She made her major motion picture debut in Young Billy Young with Robert Mitchum, David Carradine, and Angie Dickinson. This debut led to starring roles in the films Strangers at Sunrise with George Montgomery and A Voice in the Night with Vito Scotti.She made her television debut in 1966 on The Dean Martin Show.  She was a frequent guest, performing in musical and comedy numbers with a wide array of entertainers, including Frank Sinatra.She also appeared on A&E Biography, Access Hollywood, CBS Sunday Morning, Country Music Television, E! Entertainment Television, Entertainment Tonight, Larry King Live, Live with Regis & Kelly, Sky Italia, The Bonnie Hunt Show, The Dating Game (where she chose Steve Martinas her date),[11] The Monkees, The Today Show, The Tony Danza Show, The Big Breakfast, and Bruce Forsyth On Vegas. For four seasons she hosted The Deana Martin Show.Since 2021 Martin has hosted Dean and Deana Martin's Nightcap on WABC-770 AM in New York.Martin began her recording career with producer Lee Hazlewood at Reprise Records. The recordings included her country music hit "Girl of the Month Club" while she was a teenager. Other tunes were "When He Remembers Me", "Baby I See You", and "The Bottom of My Mind", all recorded during the 1960s. Musicians from the Wrecking Crew, including Glen Campbell, played on these recordings.Memories Are Made of This was released in 2006. She covered some of her father's hit songs, including the title cut and "Everybody Loves Somebody", "That's Amore", "Just Bummin' Around", and "For Your Love" written by her mother Betty Martin. She also sang a duet with her father's former comedy partner Jerry Lewis on "Time After Time." The album was produced by her husband John Griffeth and reached the iTunes Top 10 chart, where it remained for 40 weeks throughout 2006 and 2007.By 2008, after her tour, she was ready to record again. She went into the studio at Capitol Records with the same personnel to record Volare, released in 2009. It debuted at number seven on the Billboard magazine Heat Seek chart, reached No. 22 on the magazine's Jazz Albums Chart, and appeared in the iTunes Top 10 chart.The song "Volare" peaked at No. 40 in Billboard magazine. Martin was back in the studio working on Destination Moon (2013). Her fourth album includes "Break It to Me Gently", "I Love Being Here With You", and "Beyond the Sea" and four new songs: "Read Between the Lines", "Where Did You Learn to Love Like That", "Paradise", and "Stuck in a Dream with Me". She sang a duet with her father on the Cole Porter song "True Love". Swing Street was released in 2016. She talked to Doug Miles about the album on his show

Laugh Tracks Legends of Comedy with Randy and Steve

Meet Dom DeLuise, a fixture on tv variety and talk shows during the 1970s and 80s and a frequent comic costar in the movies, particularly in a string of (first) Mel Brooks' and (then) Burt Reynolds' flicks including classics such as Blazing Saddles and Smokey and the Bandit. Whether goofing with Dean Martin as floundering magician "Dominick the Great", trying to get down from a mountain as Father Fyodor in The Twelve Chairs, or even teaching you how to make great Italian dishes in his warm and funny series of cooking videos, Dom never wore out his welcome in a career that spanned 40 years. As always, look for full cuts in the comments at laughtracksradio.com and thanks for sharing our shows.

The Dom Giordano Program
How Much Will Marijuana Weigh Into Pennsylvania's Midterms?

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 43:23


Full Hour | In today's second hour, Dom leads off the Dom Giordano Program by discussing the importance of marijuana legalization in the upcoming midterm elections, telling of a Broad and Liberty story that points to Fetterman's pro-Marijuana stance as having a big impact in the support that the Democratic candidate is receiving. Then, Giordano offers his opinion on the scandal including Herschel Walker, who denied allegations that he paid for an abortion of an ex-girlfriend while running on a pro-life platform. Then, Giordano welcomes in South Philadelphia activist Jody Della Barba to discuss the upcoming Columbus Day Parade coming up in Philadelphia, along with featured act Deana Martin. First, Dom asks Jody for an update on the situation between the parade organizers and city officials, after years of Mayor Jim Kenney making it as hard as possible for the event to take place. Then, Dom gets into a conversation with Deana Martin, daughter of legendary singer Dean Martin, about her role in the upcoming parade. Dom gets some history of the great singer from Deana, with Dan asking about her father's thoughts on rock and roll music. (Photo by Getty Images)

The Dom Giordano Program
Deana Martin, Daughter of Dean Martin, Joins to Promote Upcoming Columbus Day Parade

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 10:10


Giordano welcomes in South Philadelphia activist Jody Della Barba to discuss the upcoming Columbus Day Parade coming up in Philadelphia, along with featured act Deana Martin. First, Dom asks Jody for an update on the situation between the parade organizers and city officials, after years of Mayor Jim Kenney making it as hard as possible for the event to take place. Then, Dom gets into a conversation with Deana Martin, daughter of legendary singer Dean Martin, about her role in the upcoming parade. Dom gets some history of the great singer from Deana, with Dan asking about her father's thoughts on rock and roll music. (Photo by Manny Carabel/Getty Images)

Success Made to Last
Success Made to Last with Deana Martin, daughter of legendary Dean Martin, talking music and travel

Success Made to Last

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 20:50


Deana Martin, daughter of legendary crooner Dean Martin, returns to our show for the 4th time to wax nostalgically about her Dad, talk about current projects and promote an upcoming Disney cruise. Visit her at deanamartin.com today.

REAL MUSIC with Gary Stuckey
Deana Martin Interview!

REAL MUSIC with Gary Stuckey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 22:44


Not only is he a talented singer and actress, she's also the daughter of the late great Dean Martin....Deana Martin shares stories of her Dad, the Rat Pack and more! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/gary-stuckey/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/gary-stuckey/support

Chicken Dinner
Swinging Full Bear feat. Tony Miller | Ep. 206

Chicken Dinner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 45:57


In this episode of the "Chicken Dinner" podcast, Sam Panayotovich discusses an injury scoop on Aidan O'Connell and weekend football picks. Special guest Tony Miller from the Golden Nugget joins the show to talk about running bets for Dean Martin and sweating million-dollar wagers.SUBSCRIBE! "Chicken Dinner" on iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever else you listen to your podcastsFOLLOW! @chickenxdinner @spshoot

Musicians And Beyond
Episode 19 - Joey "Voices" Noone, Master Impressionist

Musicians And Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 37:09


Sit back and enjoy this wild and crazy ride with Joey "Voices" Noone. As a young boy Joey used to entertain his friends and family with talents far beyond those of other Malden kids. Joey has honed in on his talent blessings and today has made it a career. His talents include being a master celebrity impressionist, singer, songwriter and even an author of an extremely successful book "Good Things Are Supposed To Happen To You." Joey has filled venues across the country entertaining crowds with his take on Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Cher (thong and all), Neil Diamond, Joe Pesci, Robert De Niro, Elvis Presley, Ray Charles and so many more. It's a show not to miss. Joey has written and recorded songs mostly revolving around the country music genre. He is preparing to launch on one of the most incredible songs we have heard "Send Pictures Of America" which is a tribute to all of those that keep us Americans safe every day. Stay tuned because you or your loved ones can be part of the interactive song launch and tribute to our soldiers. The limits are endless with Joey Voices! Be sure to check him out on all social media platforms and at his website www.joeyvoices.com, which is designed and hosted by our very own Mark Lawhorne. #joeyvoices #Singer #songwriter #country #music #Book #author #Inpressionist #franksinatra #deanmartin #cher #thong #lol #louisarmstrong #neildiamond #joecocker #alpacino #raycharles #algreen #davematthews #johnmayer #Beegees #tomjones #Elvispresley #rodneydangerfield #bobbydarrin #robertdeniro #tonybennett #joepesci #malden #gratitude #lawofattraction #celebrity #joeymeows #grateful --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/musiciansandbeyond/support

Rochester Today
New Documentaries About Dean Martin and the Movie 9 to 5

Rochester Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 39:47


The Med City Movie Guy, Chris Miksanek reviews some new documentaries and highlights some of the new movies available for viewing at home.

Little Italy of LA Podcast
Vanessa Racci: a 38-year-old jazz and cabaret singer.

Little Italy of LA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 30:08


Meet Vanessa Racci, a 38-year-old jazz and cabaret singer, influenced at a young age by legendary performers Dean Martin, Connie Francis, and Frank Sinatra when her grandfather played their music around the house. And that's when she got the bug to perform.But Vanessa almost didn't pursue her dreams, because her traditional family influenced to pursue a more “stable career.” And that's where her story begins. After working in the corporate world, Vanessa decided to ditch the 9-5, train, and go on the road. Since then, she's been singing with some of the greatest performers of our time, and loving every minute.She joins us today on #DeborahKobyltLIVE and the #LittleItalyPodcast to encourage others to listen to their inner voice, and not someone else's. Because that's why we're here, to flourish with the gifts we were born with. Please find our show on all video and audio platforms, and invite your friends, too. We appreciate your support. #DeborahZaraKobylt@vanessaracci #vanessaracci #italianamericansingers #Italianjazz #vintagetunes #jazzmusic #jazzsinger #retrojazz #italianamericanmusicSupport the show

Deborah Kobylt LIVE
Vanessa Racci, Italian American singer and Italian jazz expert

Deborah Kobylt LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 30:06


I learned a lot from my recent interview with Vanessa Racci, the 38-year-old jazz and cabaret singer who nearly gave up her dream of becoming a performer because her traditional family wanted her to pursue a more “stable career.” She tried, but didn't listen, and instead listened to her inner voice to perform.   Vanessa was influenced at a young age by legendary performers Dean Martin, Connie Francis, and Frank Sinatra when her Italian grandfather played their music around the house. And that's when she got the bug to perform. But she held off for a while, working 9-5 in the corporate world, until one day she decides to hit the road, and she's never looked back. This is the story of a young woman who wouldn't give up on her dreams, and is now living her dream.   Here's a clip from our show with Vanessa, and you'll find our full interview on #DeborahKobyltLIVE, #LittleItalyPodcast and #LittleItalyOfLAPodcast on all video and audio platforms. We invite you to join us, and please share with your friends, too. And thanks for tuning in. We appreciate your support #DeborahZaraKobylt 

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 153: “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-three of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys, and the collapse of the Smile album. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a sixteen-minute bonus episode available, on "I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night" by the Electric Prunes. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources There is no Mixcloud this week, because there were too many Beach Boys songs in the episode. I used many resources for this episode. As well as the books I referred to in all the Beach Boys episodes, listed below, I used Domenic Priore's book Smile: The Story of Brian Wilson's Lost Masterpiece and Richard Henderson's 33 1/3 book on Van Dyke Parks' Song Cycle. Stephen McParland has published many, many books on the California surf and hot-rod music scenes, including several on both the Beach Boys and Gary Usher.  His books can be found at https://payhip.com/CMusicBooks Andrew Doe's Bellagio 10452 site is an invaluable resource. Jon Stebbins' The Beach Boys FAQ is a good balance between accuracy and readability. And Philip Lambert's Inside the Music of Brian Wilson is an excellent, though sadly out of print, musicological analysis of Wilson's music from 1962 through 67. Catch a Wave: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson by Peter Ames Carlin is the best biography of Wilson. I have also referred to Brian Wilson's autobiography, I Am Brian Wilson, and to Mike Love's, Good Vibrations: My Life as a Beach Boy. As a good starting point for the Beach Boys' music in general, I would recommend this budget-priced three-CD set, which has a surprisingly good selection of their material on it, including the single version of “Heroes and Villains”. The box set The Smile Sessions  contains an attempt to create a finished album from the unfinished sessions, plus several CDs of outtakes and session material. Transcript [Opening -- "intro to the album" studio chatter into "Our Prayer"] Before I start, I'd just like to note that this episode contains some discussion of mental illness, including historical negative attitudes towards it, so you may want to check the transcript or skip this one if that might be upsetting. In November and December 1966, the filmmaker David Oppenheim and the conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein collaborated on a TV film called "Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution".  The film was an early attempt at some of the kinds of things this podcast is doing, looking at how music and social events interact and evolve, though it was dealing with its present rather than the past. The film tried to cast as wide a net as possible in its fifty-one minutes. It looked at two bands from Manchester -- the Hollies and Herman's Hermits -- and how the people identified as their leaders, "Herman" (or Peter Noone) and Graham Nash, differed on the issue of preventing war: [Excerpt: Inside Pop, the Rock Revolution] And it made a star of East Coast teenage singer-songwriter Janis Ian with her song about interracial relationships, "Society's Child": [Excerpt: Janis Ian, "Society's Child"] And Bernstein spends a significant time, as one would expect, analysing the music of the Beatles and to a lesser extent the Stones, though they don't appear in the show. Bernstein does a lot to legitimise the music just by taking it seriously as a subject for analysis, at a time when most wouldn't: [Excerpt: Leonard Bernstein talking about "She Said She Said"] You can't see it, obviously, but in the clip that's from, as the Beatles recording is playing, Bernstein is conducting along with the music, as he would a symphony orchestra, showing where the beats are falling. But of course, given that this was filmed in the last two months of 1966, the vast majority of the episode is taken up with musicians from the centre of the music world at that time, LA. The film starts with Bernstein interviewing Tandyn Almer,  a jazz-influenced songwriter who had recently written the big hit "Along Comes Mary" for The Association: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] It featured interviews with Roger McGuinn, and with the protestors at the Sunset Strip riots which were happening contemporaneously with the filming: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] Along with Frank Zappa's rather acerbic assessment of the potential of the youth revolutionaries: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] And ended (other than a brief post-commercial performance over the credits by the Hollies) with a performance by Tim Buckley, whose debut album, as we heard in the last episode, had featured Van Dyke Parks and future members of the Mothers of Invention and Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] But for many people the highlight of the film was the performance that came right before Buckley's, film of Brian Wilson playing a new song from the album he was working on. One thing I should note -- many sources say that the voiceover here is Bernstein. My understanding is that Bernstein wrote and narrated the parts of the film he was himself in, and Oppenheim did all the other voiceover writing and narration, but that Oppenheim's voice is similar enough to Bernstein's that people got confused about this: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] That particular piece of footage was filmed in December 1966, but it wasn't broadcast until April the twenty-fifth, 1967, an eternity in mid-sixties popular music. When it was broadcast, that album still hadn't come out. Precisely one week later, the Beach Boys' publicist Derek Taylor announced that it never would: [Excerpt: Brian Wilson, "Surf's Up"] One name who has showed up in a handful of episodes recently, but who we've not talked that much about, is Van Dyke Parks. And in a story with many, many, remarkable figures, Van Dyke Parks may be one of the most remarkable of all. Long before he did anything that impinges on the story of rock music, Parks had lived the kind of life that would be considered unbelievable were it to be told as fiction. Parks came from a family that mixed musical skill, political progressiveness, and achievement. His mother was a scholar of Hebrew, while his father was a neurologist, the first doctor to admit Black patients to a white Southern hospital, and had paid his way through college leading a dance band. Parks' father was also, according to the 33 1/3 book on Song Cycle, a member of "John Philip Sousa's Sixty Silver Trumpets", but literally every reference I can find to Sousa leading a band of that name goes back to that book, so I've no idea what he was actually a member of, but we can presume he was a reasonable musician. Young Van Dyke started playing the clarinet at four, and was also a singer from a very early age, as well as playing several other instruments. He went to the American Boychoir School in Princeton, to study singing, and while there he sang with Toscaninni, Thomas Beecham, and other immensely important conductors of the era. He also had a very special accompanist for one Christmas carolling session. The choir school was based in Princeton, and one of the doors he knocked on while carolling was that of Princeton's most famous resident, Albert Einstein, who heard the young boy singing "Silent Night", and came out with his violin and played along. Young Van Dyke was only interested in music, but he was also paying the bills for his music tuition himself -- he had a job. He was a TV star. From the age of ten, he started getting roles in TV shows -- he played the youngest son in the 1953 sitcom Bonino, about an opera singer, which flopped because it aired opposite the extremely popular Jackie Gleason Show. He would later also appear in that show, as one of several child actors who played the character of Little Tommy Manicotti, and he made a number of other TV appearances, as well as having a small role in Grace Kelly's last film, The Swan, with Alec Guinness and Louis Jourdain. But he never liked acting, and just did it to pay for his education. He gave it up when he moved on to the Carnegie Institute, where he majored in composition and performance. But then in his second year, his big brother Carson asked him to drop out and move to California. Carson Parks had been part of the folk scene in California for a few years at this point. He and a friend had formed a duo called the Steeltown Two, but then both of them had joined the folk group the Easy Riders, a group led by Terry Gilkyson. Before Carson Parks joined, the Easy Riders had had a big hit with their version of "Marianne", a calypso originally by the great calypsonian Roaring Lion: [Excerpt: The Easy Riders, "Marianne"] They hadn't had many other hits, but their songs became hits for other people -- Gilkyson wrote several big hits for Frankie Laine, and the Easy Riders were the backing vocalists on Dean Martin's recording of a song they wrote, "Memories are Made of This": [Excerpt: Dean Martin and the Easy Riders, "Memories are Made of This"] Carson Parks hadn't been in the group at that point -- he only joined after they'd stopped having success -- and eventually the group had split up. He wanted to revive his old duo, the Steeltown Two, and persuaded his family to let his little brother Van Dyke drop out of university and move to California to be the other half of the duo. He wanted Van Dyke to play guitar, while he played banjo. Van Dyke had never actually played guitar before, but as Carson Parks later said "in 90 days, he knew more than most folks know after many years!" Van Dyke moved into an apartment adjoining his brother's, owned by Norm Botnick, who had until recently been the principal viola player in a film studio orchestra, before the film studios all simultaneously dumped their in-house orchestras in the late fifties, so was a more understanding landlord than most when it came to the lifestyles of musicians. Botnick's sons, Doug and Bruce, later went into sound engineering -- we've already encountered Bruce Botnick in the episode on the Doors, and he will be coming up again in the future. The new Steeltown Two didn't make any records, but they developed a bit of a following in the coffeehouses, and they also got a fair bit of session work, mostly through Terry Gilkyson, who was by that point writing songs for Disney and would hire them to play on sessions for his songs. And it was Gilkyson who both brought Van Dyke Parks the worst news of his life to that point, and in doing so also had him make his first major mark on music. Gilkyson was the one who informed Van Dyke that another of his brothers, Benjamin Riley Parks, had died in what was apparently a car accident. I say it was apparently an accident because Benjamin Riley Parks was at the time working for the US State Department, and there is apparently also some evidence that he was assassinated in a Cold War plot. Gilkyson also knew that neither Van Dyke nor Carson Parks had much money, so in order to help them afford black suits and plane tickets to and from the funeral, Gilkyson hired Van Dyke to write the arrangement for a song he had written for an upcoming Disney film: [Excerpt: Jungle Book soundtrack, "The Bare Necessities"] The Steeltown Two continued performing, and soon became known as the Steeltown Three, with the addition of a singer named Pat Peyton. The Steeltown Three recorded two singles, "Rock Mountain", under that group name: [Excerpt: The Steeltown Three, "Rock Mountain"] And a version of "San Francisco Bay" under the name The South Coasters, which I've been unable to track down. Then the three of them, with the help of Terry Gilkyson, formed a larger group in the style of the New Christy Minstrels -- the Greenwood County Singers. Indeed, Carson Parks would later claim that  Gilkyson had had the idea first -- that he'd mentioned that he'd wanted to put together a group like that to Randy Sparks, and Sparks had taken the idea and done it first. The Greenwood County Singers had two minor hot one hundred hits, only one of them while Van Dyke was in the band -- "The New 'Frankie and Johnny' Song", a rewrite by Bob Gibson and Shel Silverstein of the old traditional song "Frankie and Johnny": [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "The New Frankie and Johnny Song"] They also recorded several albums together, which gave Van Dyke the opportunity to practice his arrangement skills, as on this version of  "Vera Cruz" which he arranged: [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "Vera Cruz"] Some time before their last album, in 1965, Van Dyke left the Greenwood County Singers, and was replaced by Rick Jarrard, who we'll also be hearing more about in future episodes. After that album, the group split up, but Carson Parks would go on to write two big hits in the next few years. The first and biggest was a song he originally wrote for a side project. His future wife Gaile Foote was also a Greenwood County Singer, and the two of them thought they might become folk's answer to Sonny and Cher or Nino Tempo and April Stevens: [Excerpt: Carson and Gaile, "Somethin' Stupid"] That obviously became a standard after it was covered by Frank and Nancy Sinatra. Carson Parks also wrote "Cab Driver", which in 1968 became the last top thirty hit for the Mills Brothers, the 1930s vocal group we talked about way way back in episode six: [Excerpt: The Mills Brothers, "Cab Driver"] Meanwhile Van Dyke Parks was becoming part of the Sunset Strip rock and roll world. Now, until we get to 1967, Parks has something of a tangled timeline. He worked with almost every band around LA in a short period, often working with multiple people simultaneously, and nobody was very interested in keeping detailed notes. So I'm going to tell this as a linear story, but be aware it's very much not -- things I say in five minutes might happen after, or in the same week as, things I say in half an hour. At some point in either 1965 or 1966 he joined the Mothers of Invention for a brief while. Nobody is entirely sure when this was, and whether it was before or after their first album. Some say it was in late 1965, others in August 1966, and even the kind of fans who put together detailed timelines are none the wiser, because no recordings have so far surfaced of Parks with the band. Either is plausible, and the Mothers went through a variety of keyboard players at this time -- Zappa had turned to his jazz friend Don Preston, but found Preston was too much of a jazzer and told him to come back when he could play "Louie Louie" convincingly, asked Mac Rebennack to be in the band but sacked him pretty much straight away for drug use, and eventually turned to Preston again once Preston had learned to rock and roll. Some time in that period, Van Dyke Parks was a Mother, playing electric harpsichord. He may even have had more than one stint in the group -- Zappa said "Van Dyke Parks played electric harpsichord in and out." It seems likely, though, that it was in summer of 1966, because in an interview published in Teen Beat Magazine in December 66, but presumably conducted a few months prior, Zappa was asked to describe the band members in one word each and replied: "Ray—Mahogany Roy—Asbestos Jim—Mucilage Del—Acetate Van Dyke—Pinocchio Billy—Boom I don't know about the rest of the group—I don't even know about these guys." Sources differ as to why Parks didn't remain in the band -- Parks has said that he quit after a short time because he didn't like being shouted at, while Zappa said "Van Dyke was not a reliable player. He didn't make it to rehearsal on time and things like that." Both may be true of course, though I've not heard anyone else ever criticise Parks for his reliability. But then also Zappa had much more disciplinarian standards than most rock band leaders. It's possibly either through Zappa that he met Tom Wilson, or through Tom Wilson that he met Frank Zappa, but either way Parks, like the Mothers of Invention, was signed to MGM records in 1966, where he released two solo singles co-produced by Wilson and an otherwise obscure figure named Tim Alvorado. The first was "Number Nine", which we heard last week, backed with "Do What You Wanta": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Do What You Wanta"] At least one source I've read says that the lyrics to "Do What You Wanta" were written not by Parks but by his friend Danny Hutton, but it's credited as a Parks solo composition on the label. It was after that that the Van Dyke Parks band -- or as they were sometimes billed, just The Van Dyke Parks formed, as we discussed last episode, based around Parks, Steve Stills, and Steve Young, and they performed a handful of shows with bass player Bobby Rae and drummer Walt Sparman, playing a mix of original material, primarily Parks' songs, and covers of things like "Dancing in the Street". The one contemporaneous review of a live show I've seen talks about  the girls in the audience screaming and how "When rhythm guitarist Steve Stillman imitated the Barry McGuire emotional scene, they almost went wiggy". But The Van Dyke Parks soon split up, and Parks the individual recorded his second single, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] Around the time he left the Greenwood County Singers, Van Dyke Parks also met Brian Wilson for the first time, when David Crosby took him up to Wilson's house to hear an acetate of the as-yet-unreleased track "Sloop John B". Parks was impressed by Wilson's arrangement techniques, and in particular the way he was orchestrating instrumental combinations that you couldn't do with a standard live room setup, that required overdubbing and close-micing. He said later "The first stuff I heard indicated this kind of curiosity for the recording experience, and when I went up to see him in '65 I don't even think he had the voices on yet, but I heard that long rotational breathing, that long flute ostinato at the beginning... I knew this man was a great musician." [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B (instrumental)"] In most of 1966, though, Parks was making his living as a session keyboard player and arranger, and much of the work he was getting was through Lenny Waronker. Waronker was a second-generation music industry professional. His father, Si Waronker, had been a violinist in the Twentieth Century Fox studio orchestra before founding Liberty Records (the label which indirectly led to him becoming immortalised in children's entertainment, when Liberty Records star David Seville named his Chipmunk characters after three Liberty executives, with Simon being Si Waronker's full forename). The first release on Liberty Records had been a version of "The Girl Upstairs", an instrumental piece from the Fox film The Seven-Year Itch. The original recording of that track, for the film, had been done by the Twentieth Century Fox Orchestra, written and conducted by Alfred Newman, the musical director for Fox: [Excerpt: Alfred Newman, "The Girl Upstairs"] Liberty's soundalike version was conducted by Newman's brother Lionel, a pianist at the studio who later became Fox's musical director for TV, just as his brother was for film, but who also wrote many film scores himself. Another Newman brother, Emil, was also a film composer, but the fourth brother, Irving, had gone into medicine instead. However, Irving's son Randy wanted to follow in the family business, and he and Lenny Waronker, who was similarly following his own father by working for Liberty Records' publishing subsidiary Metric Music, had been very close friends ever since High School. Waronker got Newman signed to Metric Music, where he wrote "They Tell Me It's Summer" for the Fleetwoods: [Excerpt: The Fleetwoods, "They Tell Me It's Summer"] Newman also wrote and recorded a single of his own in 1962, co-produced by Pat Boone: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "Golden Gridiron Boy"] Before deciding he wasn't going to make it as a singer and had better just be a professional songwriter. But by 1966 Waronker had moved on from Metric to Warner Brothers, and become a junior A&R man. And he was put in charge of developing the artists that Warners had acquired when they had bought up a small label, Autumn Records. Autumn Records was a San Francisco-based label whose main producer, Sly Stone, had now moved on to other things after producing the hit record "Laugh Laugh" for the Beau Brummels: [Excerpt: The Beau Brummels, "Laugh Laugh"] The Beau Brummels  had had another hit after that and were the main reason that Warners had bought the label, but their star was fading a little. Stone had also been mentoring several other groups, including the Tikis and the Mojo Men, who all had potential. Waronker gathered around himself a sort of brains trust of musicians who he trusted as songwriters, arrangers, and pianists -- Randy Newman, the session pianist Leon Russell, and Van Dyke Parks. Their job was to revitalise the career of the Beau Brummels, and to make both the Tikis and the Mojo Men into successes. The tactic they chose was, in Waronker's words, “Go in with a good song and weird it out.” The first good song they tried weirding out was in late 1966, when Leon Russell came up with a clarinet-led arrangement of Paul Simon's "59th Street Bridge Song (Feeling Groovy)" for the Tikis, who performed it but who thought that their existing fanbase wouldn't accept something so different, so it was put out under another name, suggested by Parks, Harpers Bizarre: [Excerpt: Harpers Bizarre, "Feeling Groovy"] Waronker said of Parks and Newman “They weren't old school guys. They were modern characters but they had old school values regarding certain records that needed to be made, certain artists who needed to be heard regardless. So there was still that going on. The fact that ‘Feeling Groovy' was a number 10 hit nationwide and ‘Sit Down, I Think I Love You'  made the Top 30 on Western regional radio, that gave us credibility within the company. One hit will do wonders, two allows you to take chances.” We heard "Sit Down, I Think I Love You" last episode -- that's the song by Parks' old friend Stephen Stills that Parks arranged for the Mojo Men: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down, I Think I Love You"] During 1966 Parks also played on Tim Buckley's first album, as we also heard last episode: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And he also bumped into Brian Wilson on occasion, as they were working a lot in the same studios and had mutual friends like Loren Daro and Danny Hutton, and he suggested the cello part on "Good Vibrations". Parks also played keyboards on "5D" by the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "5D (Fifth Dimension)"] And on the Spirit of '67 album for Paul Revere and the Raiders, produced by the Byrds' old producer Terry Melcher. Parks played keyboards on much of the album, including the top five hit "Good Thing": [Excerpt: Paul Revere and the Raiders, "Good Thing"] But while all this was going on, Parks was also working on what would become the work for which he was best known. As I've said, he'd met Brian Wilson on a few occasions, but it wasn't until summer 1966 that the two were formally introduced by Terry Melcher, who knew that Wilson needed a new songwriting collaborator, now Tony Asher's sabbatical from his advertising job was coming to an end, and that Wilson wanted someone who could do work that was a bit more abstract than the emotional material that he had been writing with Asher. Melcher invited both of them to a party at his house on Cielo Drive -- a house which would a few years later become notorious -- which was also attended by many of the young Hollywood set of the time. Nobody can remember exactly who was at the party, but Parks thinks it was people like Jack Nicholson and Peter and Jane Fonda. Parks and Wilson hit it off, with Wilson saying later "He seemed like a really articulate guy, like he could write some good lyrics". Parks on the other hand was delighted to find that Wilson "liked Les Paul, Spike Jones, all of these sounds that I liked, and he was doing it in a proactive way." Brian suggested Parks write the finished lyrics for "Good Vibrations", which was still being recorded at this time, and still only had Tony Asher's dummy lyrics,  but Parks was uninterested. He said that it would be best if he and Brian collaborate together on something new from scratch, and Brian agreed. The first time Parks came to visit Brian at Brian's home, other than the visit accompanying Crosby the year before, he was riding a motorbike -- he couldn't afford a car -- and forgot to bring his driver's license with him. He was stopped by a police officer who thought he looked too poor to be in the area, but Parks persuaded the police officer that if he came to the door, Brian Wilson would vouch for him. Brian got Van Dyke out of any trouble because the cop's sister was a Beach Boys fan, so he autographed an album for her. Brian and Van Dyke talked for a while. Brian asked if Van Dyke needed anything to help his work go smoothly, and Van Dyke said he needed a car. Brian asked what kind. Van Dyke said that Volvos were supposed to be pretty safe. Brian asked how much they cost. Van Dyke said he thought they were about five thousand dollars. Brian called up his office and told them to get a cheque delivered to Van Dyke for five thousand dollars the next day, instantly earning Van Dyke's loyalty. After that, they got on with work. To start with, Brian played Van Dyke a melody he'd been working on, a melody based on a descending scale starting on the fourth: [Plays "Heroes and Villains" melody] Parks told Wilson that the melody reminded him vaguely of Marty Robbins' country hit "El Paso" from 1959, a song about a gunfighter, a cantina, and a dancing woman: [Excerpt: Marty Robbins, "El Paso"] Wilson said that he had been thinking along the same lines, a sort of old west story, and thought maybe it should be called "Heroes and Villains". Parks started writing, matching syllables to Wilson's pre-conceived melody -- "I've been in this town so long that back in the city I've been taken for lost and gone and unknown for a long, long time" [Excerpt: Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks, "Heroes and Villains demo"] As Parks put it "The engine had started. It was very much ad hoc. Seat of the pants. Extemporaneous values were enforced. Not too much precommitment to ideas. Or, if so, equally pursuing propinquity." Slowly, over the next several months, while the five other Beach Boys were touring, Brian and Van Dyke refined their ideas about what the album they were writing, initially called Dumb Angel but soon retitled Smile, should be. For Van Dyke Parks it was an attempt to make music about America and American mythology. He was disgusted, as a patriot, with the Anglophilia that had swept the music industry since the arrival of the Beatles in America two and a half years earlier, particularly since that had happened so soon after the deaths both of President Kennedy and of Parks' own brother who was working for the government at the time he died. So for him, the album was about America, about Plymouth Rock, the Old West, California, and Hawaii. It would be a generally positive version of the country's myth, though it would of course also acknowledge the bloodshed on which the country had been built: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider" section] As he put it later "I was dead set on centering my life on the patriotic ideal. I was a son of the American revolution, and there was blood on the tracks. Recent blood, and it was still drying. The whole record seemed like a real effort toward figuring out what Manifest Destiny was all about. We'd come as far as we could, as far as Horace Greeley told us to go. And so we looked back and tried to make sense of that great odyssey." Brian had some other ideas -- he had been studying the I Ching, and Subud, and he wanted to do something about the four classical elements, and something religious -- his ideas were generally rather unfocused at the time, and he had far more ideas than he knew what to usefully do with. But he was also happy with the idea of a piece about America, which fit in with his own interest in "Rhapsody in Blue", a piece that was about America in much the same way. "Rhapsody in Blue" was an inspiration for Brian primarily in how it weaved together variations on themes. And there are two themes that between them Brian was finding endless variations on. The first theme was a shuffling between two chords a fourth away from each other. [demonstrates G to C on guitar] Where these chords are both major, that's the sequence for "Fire": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Mrs. O'Leary's Cow/Fire"] For the "Who ran the Iron Horse?" section of "Cabin Essence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] For "Vegetables": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Vegetables"] And more. Sometimes this would be the minor supertonic and dominant seventh of the key, so in C that would be Dm to G7: [Plays Dm to G7 fingerpicked] That's the "bicycle rider" chorus we heard earlier, which was part of a song known as "Roll Plymouth Rock" or "Do You Like Worms": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider"] But which later became a chorus for "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] But that same sequence is also the beginning of "Wind Chimes": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] The "wahalla loo lay" section of "Roll Plymouth Rock": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Roll Plymouth Rock"] And others, but most interestingly, the minor-key rearrangement of "You Are My Sunshine" as "You Were My Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "You Were My Sunshine"] I say that's most interesting, because that provides a link to another of the major themes which Brian was wringing every drop out of, a phrase known as "How Dry I Am", because of its use under those words in an Irving Berlin song, which was a popular barbershop quartet song but is now best known as a signifier of drunkenness in Looney Tunes cartoons: [Excerpt: Daffy Duck singing "How Dry I Am" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ap4MMn7LpzA ] The phrase is a common one in early twentieth century music, especially folk and country, as it's made up of notes in the pentatonic scale -- it's the fifth, first, second, and third of the scale, in that order: [demonstrates "How Dry I Am"] And so it's in the melody to "This Land is Your Land", for example, a song which is very much in the same spirit of progressive Americana in which Van Dyke Parks was thinking: [Excerpt: Woody Guthrie, "This Land is Your Land"] It's also the start of the original melody of "You Are My Sunshine": [Excerpt: Jimmie Davis, "You Are My Sunshine" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYvgNEU4Am8] Brian rearranged that melody when he stuck it into a minor key, so it's no longer "How Dry I Am" in the Beach Boys version, but if you play the "How Dry I Am" notes in a different rhythm, you get this: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody] Which is the start of the melody to "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] Play those notes backwards, you get: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody backwards] Do that and add onto the end a passing sixth and then the tonic, and then you get: [Plays that] Which is the vocal *countermelody* in "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] And also turns up in some versions of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains (alternate version)"] And so on. Smile was an intricate web of themes and variations, and it incorporated motifs from many sources, both the great American songbook and the R&B of Brian's youth spent listening to Johnny Otis' radio show. There were bits of "Gee" by the Crows, of "Twelfth Street Rag", and of course, given that this was Brian Wilson, bits of Phil Spector. The backing track to the verse of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Owed more than a little to a version of "Save the Last Dance For Me" that Spector had produced for Ike and Tina Turner: [Excerpt: Ike and Tina Turner, "Save the Last Dance For Me"] While one version of the song “Wonderful” contained a rather out-of-place homage to Etta James and “The Wallflower”: [Excerpt: “Wonderful (Rock With Me Henry)”] As the recording continued, it became more and more obvious that the combination of these themes and variations was becoming a little too much for Brian.  Many of the songs he was working on were made up of individual modules that he was planning to splice together the way he had with "Good Vibrations", and some modules were getting moved between tracks, as he tried to structure the songs in the edit. He'd managed it with "Good Vibrations", but this was an entire album, not just a single, and it was becoming more and more difficult. David Anderle, who was heading up the record label the group were looking at starting, would talk about Brian playing him acetates with sections edited together one way, and thinking it was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together, the only possible way, and then hearing the same sections edited together in a different way, and thinking *that* was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together. But while a lot of the album was modular, there were also several complete songs with beginnings, middles, ends, and structures, even if they were in several movements. And those songs showed that if Brian could just get the other stuff right, the album could be very, very, special. There was "Heroes and Villains" itself, of course, which kept changing its structure but was still based around the same basic melody and story that Brian and Van Dyke had come up with on their first day working together. There was also "Wonderful", a beautiful, allusive, song about innocence lost and regained: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] And there was CabinEssence, a song which referenced yet another classic song, this time "Home on the Range", to tell a story of idyllic rural life and of the industrialisation which came with westward expansion: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "CabinEssence"] The arrangement for that song inspired Van Dyke Parks to make a very astute assessment of Brian Wilson. He said later "He knew that he had to adhere to the counter-culture, and I knew that I had to. I think that he was about as estranged from it as I was.... At the same time, he didn't want to lose that kind of gauche sensibility that he had. He was doing stuff that nobody would dream of doing. You would never, for example, use one string on a banjo when you had five; it just wasn't done. But when I asked him to bring a banjo in, that's what he did. This old-style plectrum thing. One string. That's gauche." Both Parks and Wilson were both drawn to and alienated from the counterculture, but in very different ways, and their different ways of relating to the counterculture created the creative tension that makes the Smile project so interesting. Parks is fundamentally a New Deal Liberal, and was excited by the progresssive nature of the counterculture, but also rather worried about its tendency to throw the baby out with the bathwater, and to ignore the old in pursuit of the new. He was an erudite, cultured, sophisticated man who thought that there was value to be found in the works and attitudes of the past, even as one must look to the future. He was influenced by the beat poets and the avant garde art of the time, but also said of his folk music period "A harpist would bring his harp with him and he would play and recite a story which had been passed down the generations. This particular legacy continued through Arthurian legend, and then through the Middle Ages, and even into the nineteenth century. With all these songs, half of the story was the lyrics, and the folk songs were very interesting. They were tremendously thought-driven songs; there was nothing confusing about that. Even when the Kingston Trio came out -- and Brian has already admitted his debt to the Kingston Trio -- 'Tom Dooley', the story of a murder most foul 'MTA' an urban nightmare -- all of this thought-driven music was perfectly acceptable.  It was more than a teenage romantic crisis." Brian Wilson, on the other hand, was anything *but* sophisticated. He is a simple man in the best sense of the term -- he likes what he likes, doesn't like what he doesn't like, and has no pretensions whatsoever about it. He is, at heart, a middle-class middle-American brought up in suburbia, with a taste for steaks and hamburgers, broad physical comedy, baseball, and easy listening music. Where Van Dyke Parks was talking about "thought-driven music", Wilson's music, while thoughtful, has always been driven by feelings first and foremost. Where Parks is influenced by Romantic composers like Gottschalk but is fundamentally a craftsman, a traditionalist, a mason adding his work to a cathedral whose construction started before his birth and will continue after his death, Wilson's music has none of the stylistic hallmarks of Romantic music, but in its inspiration it is absolutely Romantic -- it is the immediate emotional expression of the individual, completely unfiltered. When writing his own lyrics in later years Wilson would come up with everything from almost haiku-like lyrics like "I'm a leaf on a windy day/pretty soon I'll be blown away/How long with the wind blow?/Until I die" to "He sits behind his microphone/Johnny Carson/He speaks in such a manly tone/Johnny Carson", depending on whether at the time his prime concern was existential meaninglessness or what was on the TV. Wilson found the new counterculture exciting, but was also very aware he didn't fit in. He was developing a new group of friends, the hippest of the hip in LA counterculture circles -- the singer Danny Hutton, Mark Volman of the Turtles, the writers Michael Vosse and Jules Siegel, scenester and record executive David Anderle -- but there was always the underlying implication that at least some of these people regarded him as, to use an ableist term but one which they would probably have used, an idiot savant. That they thought of him, as his former collaborator Tony Asher would later uncharitably put it, as "a genius musician but an amateur human being". So for example when Siegel brought the great postmodern novelist Thomas Pynchon to visit Brian, both men largely sat in silence, unable to speak to each other; Pynchon because he tended to be a reactive person in conversation and would wait for the other person to initiate topics of discussion, Brian because he was so intimidated by Pynchon's reputation as a great East Coast intellectual that he was largely silent for fear of making a fool of himself. It was this gaucheness, as Parks eventually put it, and Parks' understanding that this was actually a quality to be cherished and the key to Wilson's art, that eventually gave the title to the most ambitious of the complete songs the duo were working on. They had most of the song -- a song about the power of music, the concept of enlightenment, and the rise and fall of civilisations: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] But Parks hadn't yet quite finished the lyric. The Beach Boys had been off on tour for much of Brian and Van Dyke's collaboration, and had just got back from their first real tour of the UK, where Pet Sounds had been a smash hit, rather than the middling success it had been in the US, and "Good Vibrations" had just become their first number one single. Brian and Van Dyke played the song for Brian's brother Dennis, the Beach Boys' drummer, and the band member most in tune with Brian's musical ambitions at this time. Dennis started crying, and started talking about how the British audiences had loved their music, but had laughed at their on-stage striped-shirt uniforms. Parks couldn't tell if he was crying because of the beauty of the unfinished song, the humiliation he had suffered in Britain, or both. Dennis then asked what the name of the song was, and as Parks later put it "Although it was the most gauche factor, and although maybe Brian thought it was the most dispensable thing, I thought it was very important to continue to use the name and keep the elephant in the room -- to keep the surfing image but to sensitise it to new opportunities. One of these would be an eco-consciousness; it would be speaking about the greening of the Earth, aboriginal people, how we had treated the Indians, taking on those things and putting them into the thoughts that come with the music. That was a solution to the relevance of the group, and I wanted the group to be relevant." Van Dyke had decided on a title: "Surf's Up": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] As the group were now back from their tour, the focus for recording shifted from the instrumental sessions to vocal ones. Parks had often attended the instrumental sessions, as he was an accomplished musician and arranger himself, and would play on the sessions, but also wanted to learn from what Brian was doing -- he's stated later that some of his use of tuned percussion in the decades since, for example, has come from watching Brian's work. But while he was also a good singer, he was not a singer in the same style as the Beach Boys, and they certainly didn't need his presence at those sessions, so he continued to work on his lyrics, and to do his arrangement and session work for other artists, while they worked in the studio. He was also, though, starting to distance himself from Brian for other reasons. At the start of the summer, Brian's eccentricity and whimsy had seemed harmless -- indeed, the kind of thing he was doing, such as putting his piano in a sandbox so he could feel the sand with his feet while he wrote, seems very much on a par with Maureen Cleave's descriptions of John Lennon in the same period. They were two newly-rich, easily bored, young men with low attention spans and high intelligence who could become deeply depressed when understimulated and so would get new ideas into their heads, spend money on their new fads, and then quickly discard them. But as the summer wore on into autumn and winter, Brian's behaviour became more bizarre, and to Parks' eyes more distasteful. We now know that Brian was suffering a period of increasing mental ill-health, something that was probably not helped by the copious intake of cannabis and amphetamines he was using to spur his creativity, but at the time most people around him didn't realise this, and general knowledge of mental illness was even less than it is today. Brian was starting to do things like insist on holding business meetings in his swimming pool, partly because people wouldn't be able to spy on him, and partly because he thought people would be more honest if they were in the water. There were also events like the recording session where Wilson paid for several session musicians, not to play their instruments, but to be recorded while they sat in a pitch-black room and played the party game Lifeboat with Jules Siegel and several of Wilson's friends, most of whom were stoned and not really understanding what they were doing, while they got angrier and more frustrated. Alan Jardine -- who unlike the Wilson brothers, and even Mike Love to an extent, never indulged in illegal drugs -- has talked about not understanding why, in some vocal sessions, Brian would make the group crawl on their hands and knees while making noises like animals: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains Part 3 (Animals)"] As Parks delicately put it "I sensed all that was destructive, so I withdrew from those related social encounters." What this meant though was that he was unaware that not all the Beach Boys took the same attitude of complete support for the work he and Brian had been doing that Dennis Wilson -- the only other group member he'd met at this point -- took. In particular, Mike Love was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. As he said later "I called it acid alliteration. The [lyrics are] far out. But do they relate like 'Surfin' USA,' like 'Fun Fun Fun,' like 'California Girls,' like 'I Get Around'? Perhaps not! So that's the distinction. See, I'm into success. These words equal successful hit records; those words don't" Now, Love has taken a lot of heat for this over the years, and on an artistic level that's completely understandable. Parks' lyrics were, to my mind at least, the best the Beach Boys ever had -- thoughtful, intelligent, moving, at times profound, often funny, often beautiful. But, while I profoundly disagree with Love, I have a certain amount of sympathy for his position. From Love's perspective, first and foremost, this is his source of income. He was the only one of the Beach Boys to ever have had a day job -- he'd worked at his father's sheet metal company -- and didn't particularly relish the idea of going back to manual labour if the rock star gig dried up. It wasn't that he was *opposed* to art, of course -- he'd written the lyrics to "Good Vibrations", possibly the most arty rock single released to that point, hadn't he? -- but that had been *commercial* art. It had sold. Was this stuff going to sell? Was he still going to be able to feed his wife and kids? Also, up until a few months earlier he had been Brian's principal songwriting collaborator. He was *still* the most commercially successful collaborator Brian had had. From his perspective, this was a partnership, and it was being turned into a dictatorship without him having been consulted. Before, it had been "Mike, can you write some lyrics for this song about cars?", now it was "Mike, you're going to sing these lyrics about a crow uncovering a cornfield". And not only that, but Mike had not met Brian's new collaborator, but knew he was hanging round with Brian's new druggie friends. And Brian was behaving increasingly weirdly, which Mike put down to the influence of the drugs and these new friends. It can't have helped that at the same time the group's publicist, Derek Taylor, was heavily pushing the line "Brian Wilson is a genius". This was causing Brian some distress -- he didn't think of himself as a genius, and he saw the label as a burden, something it was impossible to live up to -- but was also causing friction in the group, as it seemed that their contributions were being dismissed. Again, I don't agree with Mike's position on any of this, but it is understandable. It's also the case that Mike Love is, by nature, a very assertive and gregarious person, while Brian Wilson, for all that he took control in the studio, is incredibly conflict-avoidant and sensitive. From what I know of the two men's personalities, and from things they've said, and from the session recordings that have leaked over the years, it seems entirely likely that Love will have seen himself as having reasonable criticisms, and putting them to Brian clearly with a bit of teasing to take the sting out of them; while Brian will have seen Love as mercilessly attacking and ridiculing the work that meant so much to him in a cruel and hurtful manner, and that neither will have understood at the time that that was how the other was seeing things. Love's criticisms intensified. Not of everything -- he's several times expressed admiration for "Heroes and Villains" and "Wonderful" -- but in general he was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. And his criticisms seemed to start to affect Brian. It's difficult to say what Brian thinks about Parks' lyrics, because he has a habit in interviews of saying what he thinks the interviewer wants to hear, and the whole subject of Smile became a touchy one for him for a long time, so in some interviews he has talked about how dazzlingly brilliant they are, while at other times he's seemed to agree with Love, saying they were "Van Dyke Parks lyrics", not "Beach Boys lyrics". He may well sincerely think both at the same time, or have thought both at different times. This came to a head with a session for the tag of "Cabinessence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] Love insisted on having the line "over and over the crow flies uncover the cornfield" explained to him, and Brian eventually decided to call Van Dyke Parks and have him come to the studio. Up to this point, Parks had no idea that there was anything controversial, so when Brian phoned him up and very casually said that Mike had a few questions about the lyrics, could he come down to the studio? He went without a second thought. He later said "The only person I had had any interchange with before that was Dennis, who had responded very favorably to 'Heroes and Villains' and 'Surf's Up'. Based on that, I gathered that the work would be approved. But then, with no warning whatsoever, I got that phone call from Brian. And that's when the whole house of cards came tumbling down." Parks got to the studio, where he was confronted by an angry Mike Love, insisting he explain the lyrics. Now, as will be, I hope, clear from everything I've said, Parks and Love are very, very, *very* different people. Having met both men -- albeit only in formal fan-meeting situations where they're presenting their public face -- I actually find both men very likeable, but in very different ways. Love is gregarious, a charmer, the kind of man who would make a good salesman and who people use terms like "alpha male" about. He's tall, and has a casual confidence that can easily read as arrogance, and a straightforward sense of humour that can sometimes veer into the cruel. Parks, on the other hand, is small, meticulously well-mannered and well-spoken, has a high, precise, speaking voice which probably reads as effeminate to the kind of people who use terms like "alpha male", and the kind of devastating intelligence and Southern US attention to propriety which means that if he *wanted* to say something cruel about someone, the victim would believe themselves to have been complimented until a horrific realisation two days after the event. In every way, from their politics to their attitudes to art versus commerce to their mannerisms to their appearance, Mike Love and Van Dyke Parks are utterly different people, and were never going to mix well. And Brian Wilson, who was supposed to be the collaborator for both of them, was not mediating between them, not even expressing an opinion -- his own mental problems had reached the stage where he simply couldn't deal with the conflict. Parks felt ambushed and hurt, Love felt angry, especially when Parks could not explain the literal meaning of his lyrics. Eventually Parks just said "I have no excuse, sir", and left. Parks later said "That's when I lost interest. Because basically I was taught not to be where I wasn't wanted, and I could feel I wasn't wanted. It was like I had someone else's job, which was abhorrent to me, because I don't even want my own job. It was sad, so I decided to get away quick." Parks continued collaborating with Wilson, and continued attending instrumental sessions, but it was all wheelspinning -- no significant progress was made on any songs after that point, in early December. It was becoming clear that the album wasn't going to be ready for its planned Christmas release, and it was pushed back to January, but Brian's mental health was becoming worse and worse. One example that's often cited as giving an insight into Brian's mental state at the time is his reaction to going to the cinema to see John Frankenheimer's classic science fiction horror film Seconds. Brian came in late, and the way the story is always told, when he was sat down the screen was black and a voice said from the darkness, "Hello Mr. Wilson". That moment does not seem to correspond with anything in the actual film, but he probably came in around the twenty-four minute mark, where the main character walks down a corridor, filmed in a distorted, hallucinatory manner, to be greeted: [Excerpt: Seconds, 24:00] But as Brian watched the film, primed by this, he became distressed by a number of apparent similarities to his life. The main character was going through death and rebirth, just as he felt he was. Right after the moment I just excerpted, Mr. Wilson is shown a film, and of course Brian was himself watching a film. The character goes to the beach in California, just like Brian. The character has a breakdown on a plane, just like Brian, and has to take pills to cope, and the breakdown happens right after this: [Excerpt: Seconds, from about 44:22] A studio in California? Just like where Brian spent his working days? That kind of weird coincidence can be affecting enough in a work of art when one is relatively mentally stable, but Brian was not at all stable. By this point he was profoundly paranoid -- and he may have had good reason to be. Some of Brian's friends from this time period have insisted that Brian's semi-estranged abusive father and former manager, Murry, was having private detectives watch him and his brothers to find evidence that they were using drugs. If you're in the early stages of a severe mental illness *and* you're self-medicating with illegal drugs, *and* people are actually spying on you, then that kind of coincidence becomes a lot more distressing. Brian became convinced that the film was the work of mind gangsters, probably in the pay of Phil Spector, who were trying to drive him mad and were using telepathy to spy on him. He started to bar people who had until recently been his friends from coming to sessions -- he decided that Jules Siegel's girlfriend was a witch and so Siegel was no longer welcome -- and what had been a creative process in the studio degenerated into noodling and second-guessing himself. He also, with January having come and the album still not delivered, started doing side projects,  some of which, like his production of tracks for photographer Jasper Daily, seem evidence either of his bizarre sense of humour, or of his detachment from reality, or both: [Excerpt: Jasper Daily, "Teeter Totter Love"] As 1967 drew on, things got worse and worse. Brian was by this point concentrating on just one or two tracks, but endlessly reworking elements of them. He became convinced that the track "Fire" had caused some actual fires to break out in LA, and needed to be scrapped. The January deadline came and went with no sign of the album. To add to that, the group discovered that they were owed vast amounts of unpaid royalties by Capitol records, and legal action started which meant that even were the record to be finished it might become a pawn in the legal wrangling. Parks eventually became exasperated by Brian -- he said later "I was victimised by Brian Wilson's buffoonery" -- and he quit the project altogether in February after a row with Brian. He returned a couple of weeks later out of a sense of loyalty, but quit again in April. By April, he'd been working enough with Lenny Waronker that Waronker offered him a contract with Warner Brothers as a solo artist -- partly because Warners wanted some insight into Brian Wilson's techniques as a hit-making producer. To start with, Parks released a single, to dip a toe in the water, under the pseudonym "George Washington Brown". It was a largely-instrumental cover version of Donovan's song "Colours", which Parks chose because after seeing the film Don't Look Back, a documentary of Bob Dylan's 1965 British tour, he felt saddened at the way Dylan had treated Donovan: [Excerpt: George Washington Brown, "Donovan's Colours"] That was not a hit, but it got enough positive coverage, including an ecstatic review from Richard Goldstein in the Village Voice, that Parks was given carte blanche to create the album he wanted to create, with one of the largest budgets of any album released to that date. The result was a masterpiece, and very similar to the vision of Smile that Parks had had -- an album of clever, thoroughly American music which had more to do with Charles Ives than the British Invasion: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "The All Golden"] But Parks realised the album, titled Song Cycle, was doomed to failure when at a playback session, the head of Warner Brothers records said "Song Cycle? So where are the songs?" According to Parks, the album was only released because Jac Holzman of Elektra Records was also there, and took out his chequebook and said he'd release the album if Warners wouldn't, but it had little push, apart from some rather experimental magazine adverts which were, if anything, counterproductive. But Waronker recognised Parks' talent, and had even written into Parks' contract that Parks would be employed as a session player at scale on every session Waronker produced -- something that didn't actually happen, because Parks didn't insist on it, but which did mean Parks had a certain amount of job security. Over the next couple of years Parks and Waronker co-produced the first albums by two of their colleagues from Waronker's brains trust, with Parks arranging -- Randy Newman: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "I Think It's Going to Rain Today"] And Ry Cooder: [Excerpt: Ry Cooder, "One Meat Ball"] Waronker would refer to himself, Parks, Cooder, and Newman as "the arts and crafts division" of Warners, and while these initial records weren't very successful, all of them would go on to bigger things. Parks would be a pioneer of music video, heading up Warners' music video department in the early seventies, and would also have a staggeringly varied career over the years, doing everything from teaming up again with the Beach Boys to play accordion on "Kokomo" to doing the string arrangements on Joanna Newsom's album Ys, collaborating with everyone from U2 to Skrillex,  discovering Rufus Wainwright, and even acting again, appearing in Twin Peaks. He also continued to make massively inventive solo albums, releasing roughly one every decade, each unique and yet all bearing the hallmarks of his idiosyncratic style. As you can imagine, he is very likely to come up again in future episodes, though we're leaving him for now. Meanwhile, the Beach Boys were floundering, and still had no album -- and now Parks was no longer working with Brian, the whole idea of Smile was scrapped. The priority was now to get a single done, and so work started on a new, finished, version of "Heroes and Villains", structured in a fairly conventional manner using elements of the Smile recordings. The group were suffering from numerous interlocking problems at this point, and everyone was stressed -- they were suing their record label, Dennis' wife had filed for divorce, Brian was having mental health problems, and Carl had been arrested for draft dodging -- though he was later able to mount a successful defence that he was a conscientious objector. Also, at some point around this time, Bruce Johnston seems to have temporarily quit the group, though this was never announced -- he doesn't seem to have been at any sessions from late May or early June through mid-September, and didn't attend the two shows they performed in that time. They were meant to have performed three shows, but even though Brian was on the board of the Monterey Pop Festival, they pulled out at the last minute, saying that they needed to deal with getting the new single finished and with Carl's draft problems. Some or all of these other issues almost certainly fed into that, but the end result was that the Beach Boys were seen to have admitted defeat, to have handed the crown of relevance off to the San Francisco groups. And even if Smile had been released, there were other releases stealing its thunder. If it had come out in December it would have been massively ahead of its time, but after the Beatles released Sgt Pepper it would have seemed like it was a cheap copy -- though Parks has always said he believes the Beatles heard some of the Smile tapes and copied elements of the recordings, though I don't hear much similarity myself. But I do hear a strong similarity in "My World Fell Down" by Sagittarius, which came out in June, and which was largely made by erstwhile collaborators of Brian -- Gary Usher produced, Glen Campbell sang lead, and Bruce Johnston sang backing vocals: [Excerpt: Sagittarius, "My World Fell Down"] Brian was very concerned after hearing that that someone *had* heard the Smile tapes, and one can understand why. When "Heroes and Villains" finally came out, it was a great single, but only made number twelve in the charts. It was fantastic, but out of step with the times, and nothing could have lived up to the hype that had built up around it: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Instead of Smile, the group released an album called Smiley Smile, recorded in a couple of months in Brian's home studio, with no studio musicians and no involvement from Bruce, other than the previously released singles, and with the production credited to "the Beach Boys" rather than Brian. Smiley Smile has been unfairly dismissed over the years, but it's actually an album that was ahead of its time. It's a collection of stripped down versions of Smile songs and new fragments using some of the same motifs, recorded with minimal instrumentation. Some of it is on a par with the Smile material it's based on: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] Some is, to my ears, far more beautiful than the Smile versions: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] And some has a fun goofiness which relates back to one of Brian's discarded ideas for Smile, that it be a humour album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "She's Going Bald"] The album was a commercial flop, by far the least successful thing the group had released to that point in the US, not even making the top forty when it came out in September, though it made the top ten in the UK, but interestingly it *wasn't* a critical flop, at least at first. While the scrapping of Smile had been mentioned, it still wasn't widely known, and so for example Richard Goldstein, the journalist whose glowing review of "Donovan's Colours" in the Village Voice had secured Van Dyke Parks the opportunity to make Song Cycle, gave it a review in the New York Times which is written as if Goldstein at least believes it *is* the album that had been promised all along, and he speaks of it very perceptively -- and here I'm going to quote quite extensively, because the narrative about this album has always been that it was panned from the start and made the group a laughing stock: "Smiley Smile hardly reads like a rock cantata. But there are moments in songs such as 'With Me Tonight' and 'Wonderful' that soar like sacred music. Even the songs that seem irrelevant to a rock-hymn are infused with stained-glass melodies. Wilson is a sound sculptor and his songs are all harmonious litanies to the gentle holiness of love — post-Christian, perhaps but still believing. 'Wind Chimes', the most important piece on the album, is a fine example of Brian Wilson's organic pop structure. It contains three movements. First, Wilson sets a lyric and melodic mood ("In the late afternoon, you're hung up on wind chimes"). Then he introduces a totally different scene, utilizing passages of pure, wordless harmony. His two-and-a-half minute hymn ends with a third movement in which the voices join together in an exquisite round, singing the words, "Whisperin' winds set my wind chimes a-tinklin'." The voices fade out slowly, like the bittersweet afternoon in question. The technique of montage is an important aspect of Wilson's rock cantata, since the entire album tends to flow as a single composition. Songs like 'Heroes and Villains', are fragmented by speeding up or slowing down their verses and refrains. The effect is like viewing the song through a spinning prism. Sometimes, as in 'Fall Breaks and Back to Winter' (subtitled "W. Woodpecker Symphony"), the music is tiered into contrapuntal variations on a sliver of melody. The listener is thrown into a vast musical machine of countless working gears, each spinning in its own orbit." That's a discussion of the album that I hear when I listen to Smiley Smile, and the group seem to have been artistically happy with it, at least at first. They travelled to Hawaii to record a live album (with Brian, as Bruce was still out of the picture), taking the Baldwin organ that Brian used all over Smiley Smile with them, and performed rearranged versions of their old hits in the Smiley Smile style. When the recordings proved unusable, they recreated them in the studio, with Bruce returning to the group, where he would remain, with the intention of overdubbing audience noise and releasing a faked live album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "California Girls [Lei'd studio version]"] The idea of the live album, to be called Lei'd in Hawaii, was scrapped, but that's not the kind of radical reimagining of your sound that you do if you think you've made an artistic failure. Indeed, the group's next albu

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American Timelines
Episode 189: American Timelines 1956, Part 3: May/June 1956

American Timelines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 74:02


Episode 189: American Timelines 1956, Part 3:  The Ormesher Sister Murders & The First Death of the Vietnam War Joe & Amy forge onto May and June of 1956, featuring planes colliding over the grand canyon, a rock n roll concert melee, an aircraft carrier fire, a double murder, the first official death of the Vietnam war and of course BIRTHDAYS!!! Season 5, Episode 64, of American Timelines. Also, get 40% off your subscription of Magic Mind at: https://www.magicmind.co/ATL  With discount code  ATL

Bernie and Sid
Deanna Martin | 9-5-2022

Bernie and Sid

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 4:56


Dean Martin's daughter Deanna joins Bernie & Sid in the Morning to discuss music radio, her father and Frank Sinatra, and music bringing kindness to the world. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Italian American Podcast
IAP 246: You're Nobody 'Til Somebody Sculpts You! Steubenville, Ohio's Quest to Honor Dean Martin

The Italian American Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 46:12


He was the “King of Cool,” an Italian American star whose casual magnetism and incomparable voice defined the Rat Pack style that influenced generations of American popular culture. Now, Dean Martin's hometown is seeking to honor him for all time with a larger-than-life statue at the heart of this once-bustling community. In this week's episode, we are exploring the life and legacy of Steubenville, Ohio's favorite son through the eyes of Gerald Ravasio, the chairman of the committee that is seeking to construct this well-deserved monument to a unique Italian American legend. Gerald helps us uncover Dino Paul Crocetti's humble beginnings, from his Italian-speaking childhood to the bullying that drove him away from school and into the underground nightclubs and casinos that earned Steubenville the sobriquet “Little Chicago." We'll also gain insight into Dean Martin, the dedicated Italian American who never forgot his hometown, and kept himself involved in philanthropic activities to help sustain the Steubenville community even while one of the biggest stars on the planet. And we'll discover some of Steubenville's iconic Italian American fare, like pizza on the square and the meat sauce heel, while reminiscing over life in this distinctly Italian Enclave. And, if YOU want to help the Dean Martin Committee bring this dream to fruition, consider making a donation by sending checks to: Historic Fort Steuben 120 S.3rd Street Steubenville, Ohio 43952. Checks should be made payable to “Old Fort Steuben Inc.” and be sure to write “Dean Martin Statue Fund” in the memo line. You can also visit www.oldfortsteuben.com and select “donate,” then scroll down to select “Dean Martin Statue Fund.”

Sam Waldron
Episode 231, “Million-dollar voices,”

Sam Waldron

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 57:44


Episode 231, “Million-dollar voices,” identifies 11 singers whose voices were so rich and distinct that they were easily worth $1 million. Performers include Dean Martin, Bing Crosby, Matt Monro, Nat King Cole, Patsy Cline, Johnny... Read More The post Episode 231, “Million-dollar voices,” appeared first on Sam Waldron.

John Wayne Gritcast
Episode 38 - Red Steagall

John Wayne Gritcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 70:15


In the season 2 finale of John Wayne Gritcast, we sit down with western legend, Red Steagall. Red is an American actor, musician, poet, and stage performer. He has worked with artists like Ray Charles, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Glen Campbell and discovered Reba McEntire. Ethan and Red sit down in the Cowboy Channel studio to discuss Red's exciting life. Red also tells the story of when he met John Wayne while he was recording his Grammy Nominated album, America, Why I Love Her. Red is such an icon in the western community and we are so thankful to have him as our Season 2 finale guest! Thank you to our partners! John Wayne: An American Experience - Sprawling over 10,000 square feet, the John Wayne: An American Experience exhibit is structured to give you an intimate tour of the life of John Wayne. Visit them in the Fort Worth Stockyards today. More information about John Wayne on JohnWayne.com Shop our official store on JWStockandSupply.com Follow us on Social Media Instagram.com/johnwayneofficial Facebook.com/johnwayne Twitter.com/johndukewayne TikTok.com/johndukewayne

Music From 100 Years Ago
Musicians With Something In Common

Music From 100 Years Ago

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 46:28


Musicians include: Peggy Lee, Stan Kenton, Oscar Levant, Margaret Whiting, Stan Freberg, Buddy Rich, Dean Martin and Ray Conniff. Songs include: Stardust, Careless Hands, Artistry In Rhythm, That's Amore, I Don't Know Enough About You and Quiet Riot.

Podcast – The Overnightscape
The Overnightscape 1940 – Charm of Limits II (8/22/22)

Podcast – The Overnightscape

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 221:53


3:41:53 – Frank in New Jersey, plus the Other Side. Topics include: Avuá Cachaça Amburana, driving fun, 1954 trip, Dean Martin, mezcal shopping, Blue Star Shopping Center, The Empire Strikes Back (1980), K-Pop, LOONA concert on Times Square, prequelmania, House of the Dragon, The Sandman, She-Hulk, Alpha Flight, Michael McKean Mandela Effect, recent show titles, The Duelist […]

BOPCAST
Bobby Doc - Dissing Our Diss Tracks, Opening for Juice WRLD, Country Rap and B.Y.O. Sound Board

BOPCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 115:55


We have a lot of rappers on the show, but after talking with 50+, I've found that most artists are even more dynamic than their art. Today I sat down with Bobby Doc, who is pursuing a career in music in an attempts to change the game for those that come after him; and that's only one of his goals.  Hiphop is competitive. At times it's detrimental to the artist, and at others, it's the reason they succeed. Regardless, I know we can all benefit from more support coming from those that are a bit further down the line.  Bobby and I dive into how we can take notes from comedy and comedians in general, and as always on BopCast, we work our way around. Use the timestamps below to navigate, or take the plunge with us for the whole conversation.  https://www.instagram.com/_bobbydoc/ (Follow Bobby) https://qr.io/r/Dh7a0m (Stream Bobby Doc) (1:46) - Opening for Juice WRLD, the Concert Crave Business Model and Being a “Rapper” (8:35) - Why Bobby started writing music and why he never sits down to write.  (14:33) - Artists are always efficient in the final hours. Why TikTok consultants charge so much.  (17:41) - Is hiphop being competitive a bad thing? Why hiphop should learn from comedy. Is T.I. good at comedy?  (22:21) - Donald Glover is the modern-day Dean Martin. And Mark Normand in my DM's. There is no King of New Jersey in terms of music.  (26:46) - Jersey has some of the most talented hiphop artists in the world, but venues don't want rappers.  (31:25) - Getting bumped after selling tickets, why all artists want to get signed, and how Bobby got signed.  (37:08) - Sully's manager wanted him to be Lil Dicky. Bobby and Sully's writing process.  (45:15) - It all started with a diss track.  (49:10) - Sully's first song - You a Goon Diss Track  (51:46) - Bobby's first remix - How to Love  (55:00) - Fans are the only thing that matters.  (01:04:50) - Country rapper David Morris, F350 Freestyle reaction and David's come up.  (01:06:40) - Bobby's rap name evolution.  (01:11:47) - The origin of the shit show and James Webb telescope pictures.  (01:14:03) - Are there really Nazi aliens? The movie Signs.  (01:22:15) - Bobby's fights stories and Sully's punch in the neck.  (01:30:56) - Britney Griner's case in Russian.  (01:36:34) - Are gun people similar to weed people? And the Mathew Cox crime story.  (01:45:20) - Are girls crazy for watching murder mysteries? And why they're smarter overall.  (01:49:00) - For those who were mentioned here.  (01:49:30) - The future of Bobby Doc.

This Day In The Mob
Cleveland Mafia Don James Licavoli

This Day In The Mob

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 24:51


Born on This Day In The Mob, 8/18,1904 was boss of The Mayfield Road Mob, James Licavoli. Licavoli started out as a bootlegger in St. Louis and Detroit before heading to Ohio. There he teamed up with a young Jimmy The Weasel Frattianno. He ran numerous gambling dens including one that employed a young dealer named Dean Martin. Once Cleveland boss John Scalish died, Licavoli took over the mob in Cleveland.  He quickly found himself in a bloody and violent war with Irish gangster Danny Green. We cover it all in the latest episode of This Day In The Mob. 

Quiz Quiz Bang Bang Trivia
Ep 168: Summer Blockbusters Trivia with Fighting in the War Room

Quiz Quiz Bang Bang Trivia

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 79:51 Very Popular


On Today's Special Film Trivia Episode It is with extreme pleasure that we announce that Fighting in the War Room will be joining us for a special film trivia episode. Matt Patches is the Senior Entertainment Editor at Polygon, Katey Rich is the deputy editor of VanityFair.com and together they form team Operation Kino. Dave "Da7e" Gonzales will have a book about Marvel coming out in 2022, David Ehrlich is a senior film critic at Indiewire and together they from team We're Thinking of Ending Katey and Patches. The amount these guys know about film trivia is only matched by their wit and banter. Enjoy this episode and then run (or click) over to Fighting in the War Room and give them a listen, a follow, and all that good stuff! Twitter: follow the show (@FITWR), Katey (@kateyrich), Da7e (@da7e)  Patches (@misterpatches), and  David (@davidehrlich) . Do you know the answers to the following questions: The same fictional high school served as a featured location in Sixteen Candles, Weird Science, The Breakfast Club, and what other comedy? And for 2 extra pts, what was the name of the HS? The 6th highest-grossing film of 1981, what movie and its sequel were the final film appearances of Dean Martin? And for two extra points, which famous actor had his second Hollywood role in this movie? If you take the first letters of the main characters' names, Dom, Robert, Eames, Arthur, Mal and Saito - they spell "Dreams" which is fitting for what movie? Sean Connery was 61 years old when he played what role, a character who was supposed to be 37 at the time of the movie's setting? Fired for allegedly not knowing the difference between a whale and a shark, who was the first director hired for Jaws? In what Oscar-winning romance does one member of the 2 lead characters say "Ditto" when the other says I love you? Alluding to director Christopher Nolan's son, what was the film's false title given during production of The Dark Knight in order to thwart would-be onlookers? Mad Max Fury Road, is the first Mad Max movie that credits the character with his full name, what is his full name? What was the first film to gross 100 million in its opening weekend alone? For 5 points we will give you a hint. 2002 How many dinosaurs in jurassic park are actually from the Jurassic period? What is the only sequel in the 20th Century to win an Academy Award when the previous installment received no nominations?   Don't forget the UNICEF Fundraiser on May 21st at 8pm EST and to donate at https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/uniceftrivia If you liked this episode, you might enjoy listening to Peter Rijks and Jamie McCarthy in this sibling rivalry trivia showdown episode. Music Hot Swing, Fast Talkin, Bass Walker, Dances and Dames, Ambush by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Don't forget to follow us on social media: Patreon - patreon.com/quizbang - Please consider supporting us on Patreon. Check out our fun extras for patrons and help us keep this podcast going. We appreciate any level of support! Website - quizbangpod.com Check out our website, it will have all the links for social media that you need and while you're there, why not go to the contact us page and submit a question! Facebook - @quizbangpodcast - we post episode links and silly lego pictures to go with our trivia questions. Enjoy the silly picture and give your best guess, we will respond to your answer the next day to give everyone a chance to guess. We will also post old videos of us with Katy Colloton. Instagram - Quiz Quiz Bang Bang (quizquizbangbang), we post silly lego pictures to go with our trivia questions. Enjoy the silly picture and give your best guess, we will respond to your answer the next day to give everyone a chance to guess. Twitter - @quizbangpod We want to start a fun community for our fellow trivia lovers. If you hear/think of a fun or challenging trivia question, post it to our twitter feed and we will repost it so everyone can take a stab it. Come for the trivia - stay for the trivia. Ko-Fi - ko-fi.com/quizbangpod - Keep that sweet caffeine running through our body with a Ko-Fi, power us through a late night of fact checking and editing!

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast
GGACP Classic: Sid and Marty Krofft

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 77:52


GGACP celebrates the birthday of legendary producer, showman and puppeteer Sid Krofft (July 30, 1929) by revisiting this classic episode from 2018 featuring Sid and his brother and longtime partner Marty Krofft. In this episode, Sid and Marty discuss their unusual creative process, the origins of “H.R. Pufnstuf” and “Land of the Lost” and the failure of their ambitious indoor theme park, “The World of Sid and Marty Krofft.” Also, Dean Martin drops the ax, Bette Davis drops an f-bomb, Walt Disney doles out advice and Liberace “dates” Sonja Henie. PLUS: Live, nude puppets! Sid Caesar to the rescue! Remembering Martha Raye! “The Brady Bunch Variety Hour”! And Sid and Marty sue McDonald's — and win! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices