Podcasts about ontarians

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Best podcasts about ontarians

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Latest podcast episodes about ontarians

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
What Do You Need to Earn to Live in Ontario?

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 7:46


The Ontario Living Wage Network recently released its recommended hourly wages for regions across Ontario. Hamilton-Niagara Hub journalist Justin Chandler reviews the numbers and adds context to why Ontarians need to make more than just minimum wage to thrive.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Coming SOON: NOW and NEXT
What could we do with $33B? That's the cost of poverty in Ontario.

Coming SOON: NOW and NEXT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 36:25


Dave and Erin share their insight on why newsrooms seem to be behind when it comes to talking about news stories of the day.We dip into the latest report from Feed Ontario and the numbers aren't good. More than half a million Ontarians used a food bank between April 2021 and March 2022. Food bank visits topped 4.3 million during that period of time in Ontario - a 42% increase over the last three years.Check out the report https://feedontario.ca/research/hunger-report-2021/Feed Ontario's research from 2019 suggests poverty costs the province $33 billion a year! We could buy Twitter with that kind of money!The feds' heat pump incentive is not as helpful as it looks is the wrong investment in the wrong infrastructure as we attempt to transition away from fossil fuel energy sources. And Erin's excited for Dump Day in Eastern Passage.But remember the lives that are on the line when you dig into that lobster dinner. Erin recalls reporting on the loss of the Miss Ally: https://globalnews.ca/news/396714/miss-ally-damaged-extensively-no-bodies-found-inside-hull-rcmp/ Wanna join Dave for coffee on the weekends?Support Now and Next EXTRA! with Dave Trafford. Subscribe to our Exclusive Supercast feed for access to Now and Next EXTRA -the full version of The Brief with DT, early access to Now & Next episodes, AMA sessions with the SSN team, and access to our message board. Your contributions to our show helps us pay our team of producers and editors and produce more awesome podcast series! CONTACT US! Dave on Twitter www.twitter.com/davetraffordErin on Twitter www.twitter.com/erintraffordErin on Instagram www.instagram.com/its.erintraffordErin on TikTok www.tiktok.com/erintraffordEmail us hello@storystudionetwork.comNow & Next Cast and CrewAssociate Producer Becky ColesProduction Manager Jaime NickersonAudio Editors Mike Treutler and Drew GarnerSonic Logo Designer and Creative Branding Greg MacDonaldExecutive Producers - Erin and Dave TraffordNow & Next is a Story Studio Network Original

The Evan Solomon Show
Canada unveils plan to counter ‘increasingly disruptive' China

The Evan Solomon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 78:11


What is the significance of Canada's long-awaited Indo-Pacific strategy? How does it address China's ‘disruptive power' on the global stage? Deb Hutton speaks with a former Canadian diplomat. On today's show:  A conversation with Ben Rowswell, director of the Global Democracy Program at the Canadian International Council and former Deputy Ambassador to Afghanistan. What are the key takeaways from the Emergencies Act inquiry? We speak with Peter MacKay, former Minister of Justice and Attorney General and former Minister of National Defence, Michael Kempa, a criminologist at the University of Ottawa, and Sharan Kaur, former Deputy Chief of Staff to Bill Morneau. Ian Bridge, defencement from the 1986 Canada World Cup team, reacts to Canada scoring its first-ever World Cup goal.  Carolyn Stewart, executive director of Feed Ontario, on a new report which shows more Ontarians are relying on food banks.

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
How Unaffordability is Hitting Ontario

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 8:32


Ontario Hubs affordability journalist Kat Eschner reports on what some Windsor organizations are doing to combat food insecurity as inflation continues to affect Ontarians.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

On the Ledge - the Ontario Politics Podcast
Umm...Where's Doug Ford? Anyone?

On the Ledge - the Ontario Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 28:31


The OTL gang is assembled! Keith Leslie at CHCH-TV, John Wright SVP Maru Public Opinion, Sabrina Nanji, Publisher and Editor of the Queen's Park Observer and SSN Chief Executive Producer Dave Trafford are around the table.In this episode:Ontario's premier has been AWOL this past week, skipping out on Question Period, failing to attend the Order of Ontario ceremony and ghosted Ottawa's newly elected Mayor Mark Suttcliffe.Could the average Ontarian pick the Health Minister out of a line-up? Sylvia Jones is proving to be a complete failure while the hospital and healthcare system is in crisis. Jones has the nerve to suggest this second term government inherited this mess.And the hits just keep coming. The Auditor's Report, as Sabrina notes, the Annual Government Phonebook of Fail is set for release in the next couple of weeks.BTW, if you enjoy On the Ledge, you'll probably enjoy our daily SSN podcast - NOW and NEXT with Dave Trafford and Erin Trafford.Support Now and Next! For $10 a month, you can subscribe to our Exclusive Supercast feed for access to Now and Next EXTRA with Dave Trafford on Saturdays and Sundays - including the full length interviews featured on The Daily Brief, early access to Now & Next episodes, AMAs and our message board.You're just a few clicks away. Start here: nowandnext.supercast.com

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Why Are Young People Leaving Ontario?

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 27:14


2021 marked the first year where more Ontarians moved to Quebec than the reverse. And this year, the ,Alberta is Calling, ad campaign is all over Toronto's public transit. Are young Ontarians choosing to build their careers and start families elsewhere? What does it mean to the province? We find out more about the reasons behind this unprecedented outward migration.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
What Can Ontarians Expect from COVID-19 This Winter?

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 20:25


Nam Kiwanuka talks to Niagara Region's acting medical officer of health Dr. Mustafa Hirji about what the pandemic's impacts will be in Ontario over the fall and winter months. We explore what early indicators like wastewater are showing; how uptake of bivalent vaccines is going; population immunity; what needs to happen to protect families and prevent the further collapse of the health-care system.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Finance Minister: Is Ontario Heading for a Recession?

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 21:50


40-year high inflation. Broken supply chains. Overburdened hospitals. A lingering pandemic. Ontarians are staring down many challenges heading into 2023, which will inevitably affect their finances. This week, the Ford government introduced its fall economic statement, laying out how it has managed Ontario's budget, what the future holds. Steve Paikin speaks with Minister of Finance Peter Bethlenfalvy to learn more.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bill Kelly Show
Reaction to New Masking Guidelines, Rough waters in the Twitterverse & The Washington Report w/ Reggie Cecchini!

Bill Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 33:28


The Bill Kelly Show Podcast w/ Shiona Thompson: Ontario's chief medical officer of health is "strongly recommending" that Ontarians wear masks in all indoor public settings, including in schools and in childcare settings, but stopped short of recommending a return to a mask mandate in the province. GUEST: Dr. Anna Banerji (ban-er-ji), O.Ont MD MPH FRCPC DTM&H, Faculty Lead, Indigenous and Refugee Health, Post MD Education, Faculty of Medicine, , University of Toronto - Elon Musk has unleashed chaos at Twitter in the few short weeks since he took the helm of the company, and experts say lawsuits, regulatory intervention and ultimate financial collapse could be on the horizon. The billionaire has let his decision making play out on a public stage from the start, tweeting about new policies before promptly reversing them and polling users about features like verification. Experts say this back-and-forth style of leading such a large company is unprecedented, and could spell trouble for Twitter's future, as advertisers flee the disordered platform and regulators discuss potential investigations. GUEST: Carmi Levy Technology Analyst & Journalist - Topics Include: U.S. Midterm results Democrates keep Senate And more…. GUEST: Reggie Cecchini, Washington Correspondent for Global News

Power and Politics
Ontario's top doctor strongly recommends people wear masks in public indoor spaces

Power and Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 51:16


Nov. 14, 2022 - Ontario Medical Association President Dr. Rose Zacharias talks about the recommendation that Ontarians mask up as pediatric hospitals deal with an influx of patients. Plus, three MPs discuss their decision to study allegations of Chinese interference in the 2019 federal election at a Parliamentary committee.

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Is COVID-19 Dysregulating Our Immune Systems?

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 32:28


Are people becoming sick more often, experiencing more severe symptoms and having more difficulty treating viral infections after having had COVID-19? If so, why? Epidemiologists, immunologists, and other experts discuss increasing evidence that SARS-CoV-2 can cause immune dysregulation for several months after infection. How should Ontarians protect themselves over the fall and winter months?See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CANADALAND
(Détours) Option nucléaire

CANADALAND

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 46:04


Le calcul politique de Doug Ford se retourne contre lui alors que les Ontarien.nes démontrent leur soutien aux travailleurs et travailleuses de l'éducation suite à la tentative du gouvernement provincial d'empêcher une grève historique. Puis quelle est la conversation entourant le bilinguisme au Nouveau-Brunswick suite à la nomination controversée de Kris Austin au Comité de révision de la Loi sur les langues officielles ? Emilie Nicolas anime cet épisode de Détours avec Stéphanie Chouinard.English: Doug Ford's political maneuvering backfires as Ontarians show their support for education workers after the provincial government tried to prevent a historic strike. And what is the conversation surrounding bilingualism in New Brunswick following the controversial appointment of Kris Austin to the Official Languages Act review committee? Emilie Nicolas hosts this épisode of Détours with Stéphanie Chouinard.Liens : Poll: 6 of 10 Ontarians blame Ford government for labour disruptionsChantal Hébert sur la loi 28 en OntarioAndrew Coyne sur la loi 28 en OntarioFrançois Gravel : Démissionnez, M. HiggsSoutenir CANADALAND : https://canadaland.com/joinVous pouvez écouter sans annonces sur Amazon Music—inclus avec PrimeYou can listen ad-free on Amazon Music—included with PrimeCorrection : L'épisode a été modifiée pour corriger une erreur factuelle. Les travailleurs et travailleuses de l'éducation en Ontario revendiquent une augmentation de salaire de 3,25 $ l'heure et non pas une augmentation de 11% par année sur trois ans.Correction: This episode has been edited to correct a factual error. Education workers in Ontario are demanding a wage increase of $3.25 per hour, not an 11% increase per year over three years. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Bill Kelly Show
Most Ontarians blame Ford gov't for school closures, Why the culture of the “New Right” is dangerous & Ontario backtracks on Greenbelt pledge!

Bill Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 53:01


The Bill Kelly Show Podcast: Topics Include: Labour board hearing concludes Poll suggest most Ontarians blame Ford for school closures And more…. GUEST: Sabrina Nanji, Publisher of the Queen's Park Observer - The populist radical right has been on the rise for some time, with candidates and parties on the far-right fringe of the political spectrum reaching new heights across the world. So why is the ideology of the “New Right” so dangerous? GUEST: Johannes Steizinger, Associate Professor of Philosophy at McMaster University - The Ontario government has decided to override Hamilton's decision not to expand urban boundaries. It will now compel the city to do so, something Housing Min Steve Clark has been threatening to do for months. What's the impact on Hamilton? GUEST: Luca Bucci, CEO of the Ontario Home Builders Association

rabble radio
Has the Ford government declared a class war? Why Ontario education workers are taking to the streets

rabble radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 30:01


This week on rabble radio, we're sharing an interview between CUPE Ontario President Fred Hahn and rabble editor Nick Seebruch. The two spoke on Nov. 2 to explain what's at stake in the labour dispute in Ontario.  At the time of this episode's posting, CUPE has announced that it will strike on Friday, Nov. 4 and OPSEU – the Ontario Public Services Employees Union – says its 8000 education workers will join them. The Ontario Federation of Labour has also taken to social media to share their support for CUPE.  But how did we get here?  To recap, CUPE Ontario has been negotiating with the Ford government, trying to secure better pay for its educational support workers. As Marc Belanger explained on a special RadioLabour episode this week, when inflation is taken into account, the lowest paid educational worker in Ontario has seen their wages effectively cut by 11 per cent since 2012.  CUPE has been seeking a wage increase of $3.25 per hour in each year of a three year collective agreement.  On Sunday, October 30th, 97% of CUPE Ontario's 55,000 education workers voted to give the Ford government the legally necessary five day notice of a potential provincial-wide strike should their wage demands not be met.  Despite a long week at the bargaining table, the Ford government was not to be persuaded.  On Thursday evening, the Ford government passed Bill 28 which imposes a new work contract on educational support workers with a pay increase of 2.5 per cent, well below the rate of inflation.  Ford invoked the Constitution's notwithstanding clause which allows the provincial government to override part of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and bypass the union's right to bargain and strike. The use of the notwithstanding clause means that Bill 28 cannot be challenged in court. In doing so, Judy Rebick says the Ford government has effectively called a “class war against unions.” CUPE president Laura Walton has pledged that their members will strike on Friday, November 4 and that the strike will continue "for as long as it takes." The Ontario Federation of Labour took to social media saying: “Doug Ford and Stephen Lecce have declared war on 1 million union members, 7 milllion workers, 14 million Ontarians. Get ready to fight.”  This is a developing story. Join in the conversation on our discussion board, babble.   Photo: Courtesy of CUPE  If you like the show please consider subscribing on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you find your podcasts. And please, rate, review, share rabble radio with your friends — it takes two seconds to support independent media like rabble. Follow us on social media across channels @rabbleca. Or, if you have feedback for the show, get in touch anytime at editor@rabble.ca.

Bill Kelly Show
Will Bill C-22 be a good or bad thing?

Bill Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 10:31


Will Bill C-22, the proposed Canada Disability Benefit Act, Be a Trick or Treat? House of Commons Public Hearings Started Monday, but will the AODA Alliance Ever Get to Make a Presentation? GUEST: David Lepofsky, Chair of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Can Finfluencers Be Trusted?

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 30:02


What is an "finfluencer," and why are they gaining popularity? We look at the increasing prevalence of content creators sharing personal finance advice on social media. Can they be trusted? While some creators are supporting financial literacy and accessibility, others are providing a false sense of expertise and gaining reach by spreading dubious advice. How can Ontarians spot the difference? And should the province crack down with legislation?See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Morning Show
All Ontarians Aged 12 Eligible For Bivalent Booster

The Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 10:24


Greg and Sheba look at the opening for all people in Ontario 12+ for the Covid-19 bivalent booster.

Parkdale Haunt
27: SMALL HOURS

Parkdale Haunt

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 41:43


SMALL HOURS: The very early morning, just after midnight, when most people are asleep.SPA MENU: Manicure - $5840-Minute Massage - $150Full Body Soak and Scrub - $189Full Body Immolation - ComplimentaryThe Fires of Moloch Burning Away the Sin Within Your Flesh - +$50 (weekends only)I just want to say here that I think we're the first podcast to include a cursed ONroute (for the non-Ontarians in the audience, this is the name of the highway rest areas with restaurants and whatnot), so make a quick run in to get a bagel for the road and grab me a coffee, because we got a long drive ahead of us deep into the endless dark. Featuring the voices of: Emily Kellogg as ClaireAlex Nursall as JudithIan Boddy as OwenJocelyn Dotta as LydiaTaylor Davis as Austin Bird Adil Lakhani as the Voice on the Radioand Tom Eymundson as the Man in the DarkCONTENT WARNINGS: The occult, physical violence, possession, fire, ghosts, death (mentioned)Parkdale Haunt is an original podcast Created and written by Alex Nursall and Emily KelloggDirected and produced by Alex Nursall Engineering and sound design by Ian BoddyTheme music by Phil WrightRecorded at Pirate Toronto Distributed by the Rogers Frequency Podcast NetworkYou can find us on Twitter and Instagram @parkdalehauntSupport us on Patreon at patreon.com/parkdalehauntGet merch at teepublic.com/user/parkdale-hauntLinks, transcripts, and more are available at parkdalehaunt.com

Ontario Morning from CBC Radio
Ontario Morning Podcast

Ontario Morning from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 25:18


Like cities across Ontario, Peterborough has been grappling with homelessness. Last night, city council held a special meeting to hear a city staff report on homeless shelters. Time to grab that voter card and head to the polls -- ah, not quite! With municipal elections happening across the province, more Ontarians than ever before will vote online. But is Ontario ready? Prairie tallgrass plays an important role in ecosystems across Ontario. We heard about a seed collection initiative taking place this weekend... one that comes with the added benefit of making nature more accessible to new Canadians.

Bite Me: The Show About Edibles
Growing with Green Beard

Bite Me: The Show About Edibles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 78:14


In this Faces of Cannabis interview, I sit down with my good friend Green Beard. Living in Ireland, GB actively works to fight for legalization while breaking stigma so that one day Irish cannabis users can cultivate and consume cannabis without fear of repercussions. We cover quite a bit of ground in this conversation, enjoy!Cannabis is life.Green BeardHigh on Homegrown podcastGreen Beard Grows - Twitter - YouTube - InstagramHempcrete - article3.5 grams - Ontarians call it a half quarter, Irish call it a Henry, Nifty, Eighth Cannabis is very underground in Ireland due to current illegalityGenerational Perspectives episodeGB's cannabis hero in the fight for legalization in Ireland - Martin Condon - Martin's World YouTubeJorge Cervantes - The Cannabis Encyclopedia on AmazonAutoflowers are great for shorter outdoor growing climatesDutch Passion seedsDWC - deep water cultureTwisted's ChannelFan Leaf Infusions with Breeder Steve episodeConcentrates with Chase episode - aka Temple GrowerThat's it for this week friends.  Please email me any questions, comments, pictures of your creations or anything else, I love hearing from listeners!  Direct messages to bitemepodcast@fastmail.com or the podcast hotline.You can also support the show by subscribing, sharing episodes, leaving a review or buying me a cookie!  Whatever way you choose, I'm grateful that you're listening.  Stay high,MargeWin a Goldleaf Cannabis Taster Journal if you subscribe to the Bite Me Edibles Enthusiast Email Newsletter. Head over to the Bite Me website and click the 'subscribe to Bite Me mail' button to enter. Winner will be chosen October 31st, 3pm EST. Good luck!Goldleaf Journals & PrintsSupport the showFind all the links you need in one place!

The CJN Daily
Ontario election watch: Political strategist Steve Adler on the top races and Jewish issues this fall

The CJN Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 13:14


Ontarians head to the polls on Oct. 24 to vote for their municipal governments. And while some storylines seems set—Toronto Mayor John Tory looks poised to win for a third time—races in Vaughan, Ottawa, Hamilton, Richmond Hill and Brampton are far less certain. The outcomes are even less predictable given how low voter turnout was in the province's 2018 municipal elections, when just 38 per cent of eligible voters cast their ballots. What does all this mean for Jewish voters? To analyze the issues, we're joined by Steve Adler, a lobbyist with the communications strategy firm NATIONAL. Adler previously worked around the Ontario legislature with the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, and has been watching the 2022 municipal elections closely, including what's going on with various district school boards, which have become frequent battlegrounds between Zionists and Palestinian activists. What we talked about: Read NATIONAL's Ontario election primer Read Josh Lieblein's Doorstep Postings column on Toronto city council candidate Philip Davidovits Learn about the "For the Child" photographic exhibition happening at Ottawa City Hall Credits The CJN Daily is written and hosted by Ellin Bessner (@ebessner on Twitter). Zachary Kauffman is the producer. Michael Fraiman is the executive producer. Our theme music is by Dov Beck-Levine. Our title sponsor is Metropia. We're a member of The CJN Podcast Network. To learn how to support the show by subscribing to this podcast, please watch this video.

Zoomer Week in Review
The Science Advisory Table's Final Report & High Costs for Thanksgiving Meals

Zoomer Week in Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 19:01


The now disbanded Ontario Science Advisory Table has released a final report that focuses on the response to the pandemic by family doctors and nurses. It

The FEED
Craig Alexander – Chief Economist at Deloitte Canada / Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences Survey / Happy Spouse, Happy House / Natasha Ferguson - Owner of Ethelfox Construct Group / 360Kids - Nightstop

The FEED

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 55:13


• Ann Rohmer speaks with Craig Alexander – Chief Economist at Deloitte Canada; is a recession inevitable? What can we do now to save for the days ahead?• As we approach World Mental Health Day on October 10, a new Ipsos Poll conducted on behalf of Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences (Ontario Shores) reveals that three in ten (31%) Ontarians aged 18+ are affected by mental health issues. This equates to an astonishing 3.5 million adults in Ontario, of which three-quarters (75%) claim to be suffering from anxiety related disorders. Kevin Frankish discusses.• Whose satisfaction is more important in a mixed-gender romantic relationship?  Jim Lang has a discussion with a York University co-author of new study says ‘Happy spouse, happy house' is more accurate than age-old adage ‘happy wife, happy life'• Tina Cortese speaks with  Natasha Ferguson, owner of Ethelfox Construct Group, one of the only construction companies owned by a black woman in Canada. She is helping to break down barriers for women and people of colour.  This is especially important as we prepare to mark United Nations International Day of the Girl, which is celebrated on Oct. 11.• Tina Cortese introduces us to NIGHTSTOP. 360Kids has been accredited as the first Nightstop provider in Canada. Nightstop provides a safety net for those forced to leave their home by offering emergency accommodation.

The Rush with Reshmi Nair & Scott MacArthur

Being thankful for Canadian Thanksgiving..How is the Ford government handling the top issues? A new survey suggests Ontarians aren't happy.

The Jerry Agar Show
Fri-Oct-7th Hour 1: New Poll says Ford Government is failing in certain areas.

The Jerry Agar Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 38:28


Jerry says the new poll that suggests Ontarians believe the Premier is failing in healthcare and housing affordability carries zero consequences because YOU won't pay up.  PLUS is Thanksgiving costing you more this year?  A new examination says "yes!"  Jerry says, "hold on..."

On the Ledge - the Ontario Politics Podcast
Poll says most Ontarians overwhelmingly think Ford Nation is mishandling healthcare, LTC and housing

On the Ledge - the Ontario Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 37:28 Transcription Available


The OTL gang is assembled! Keith Leslie at CHCH-TV, John Wright SVP Maru Public Opinion and SSN Chief Executive Producer Dave Trafford are around the table. In this episode: Quebec re-elects Legault and the UCP in Alberta chooses Danielle Smith to succeed Jason Kenney and the province's premier designate. It puts pressure on federal-provincial relations. Is Trudeau up to the task? An Angus Reid survey says Ontarians “overwhelmingly” say Ford Nation is mishandling the healthcare, LTC, and housing files four months into the PC's second mandate. More than 20% of municipal election races are over. A record number of candidates have been acclaimed ahead of the October 24th election day. BTW, if you enjoy On the Ledge, you'll probably enjoy our daily SSN podcast - NOW and NEXT with Dave Trafford and Erin Trafford. Support Now and Next! For $10 a month, you can subscribe to our Exclusive Supercast feed for access to the full episode of The Daily Brief, early access to Now & Next episodes, AMAs and our message board. You're just a few clicks away. Start here: nowandnext.supercast.com

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Managing Personal Finances Amid Inflation

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 19:21


With rising costs of everything from mortgage rates to groceries, how are Ontarians managing to make ends meet? Is it even possible to strategize for a successful financial future? Jackie Porter, certified financial planner at Carte Wealth Management, [provides insights on how to manage in these uncertain times.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Ontarians Choose Lake Superior as Their Favourite Great Lake

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 5:46


Polls have closed for The Agenda's Great Lakes face-off and Ontarians have chosen a winner! The anonymous creator behind the Twitter parody account @LakeSuperior joins us once again to celebrate his victory.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CTV News Toronto at Six Podcast
CTV News Toronto at Six for Sept. 27, 2022

CTV News Toronto at Six Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 46:24


A hydrochloric acid leak sent 23 people to hospital in St. Catharines; More than 170,000 Ontarians lost their family doctor during the first six months of the pandemic; and, here's how an accomplice in a string of jewellery heists across the GTA has evaded police twice.

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Understanding the Great Lakes Through Indigenous Knowledge

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 33:41


What can be learn about climate adaptation and conservation from from Indigenous ways of knowing and being? How can reconciliation change how Ontarians interact with our waterways?See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

COVID Era - THE NEXT NORMAL with Dave Trafford
Bruce McIntosh| Shawn Rodreeg-Lemieux| Jessika Black

COVID Era - THE NEXT NORMAL with Dave Trafford

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 29:00


 Bruce McIntosh goes over how Canada's Wonderland is charging $50 to folks with disabilities to rent an electric wheelchair. Bruce is member of Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) Alliance, and the founding president of the Ontario Autism Coalition The world youth chess champion Shawn Rodreeg-Lemieux is the first person from Quebec and second person from Canada to win the title. He's also on his way to becoming a grandmaster. He shares about the championship, chess, and more. Meet Montreal-based high school teacher by day and wrestling champion by night Jessika Neri, known in the ring as Jessika Black

ON Point with Alex Pierson
Ontarians On Social Assistance Are Struggling More Amid Inflation

ON Point with Alex Pierson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 8:13


While many of us are feeling the pinch on our wallets due to the rising costs of everyday goods, those who are feeling it even more are individuals who are in social assistance programs. Kat Eschner, TVO's Affordability Reporter, came on to talk to Alex about it and why TVO is introducing the affordability beat.

The Morning Show
No Holiday For Ontarians During Queen's Funeral

The Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 7:06


Greg and Sheba discuss Premier Ford's discussion not to give Ontario a day off on September 19th for the Queen's funeral. 

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
More Private Players in Health Care?

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 35:05


Would more private health care help alleviate the problems within Ontario's health-care system and give Ontarians more, and faster options?See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Five Reasons to Buy Meat from Small Farms

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 13:29


Stephanie Kloostra, a farmer at Copperwood Acres, makes the case for buying meat, dairy, and produce straight from small farms across the province.With inflation hitting hard, Ontarians are looking into high quality, pasture-raised meat, while supporting small businesses.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ON Point with Alex Pierson
Can You Live Off Of $92.51 Worth Of Groceries For Two Weeks?

ON Point with Alex Pierson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 10:10


Today the Bank of Canada announced they were increasing interest rates by another 75 basis points, bringing us to a total increase of 3.25%. When we see interest rates go up, we see cost of living go up, but those who are on ODSP, often get the short end of the stick when it comes to getting an affordable income to support themselves. To send a message to Doug Ford that this isn't an acceptable way to live, MPPs across Ontario are confining themselves to only spending $92.51 for two weeks worth of groceries to really understand what it's like to squeeze those dollars. Joining Alex to discuss this is David Lepofsky, a Lawyer and Chair with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance.

Ontario Morning from CBC Radio
Ontario Morning Podcast - August 24 2022

Ontario Morning from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 18:34


Since 1991, August 24th has been a day to celebrate independence for Ukrainians, but what does that mean when the country has been locked in six months of war? We heard from one Owen Sound woman who's been helping resettle families fleeing the fighting. New data from Ontario's chief coroner shows more Ontarians died of opioids during the second year of the pandemic than the first. But the data also shows a dip in overdose deaths earlier this year. We checked in with one harm reduction advocate in the Peterborough area.

The Pulse on AMI-audio
Meet Lorin MacDonald, Canadian Disability Hall of Fame inductee

The Pulse on AMI-audio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 40:29


Interview with Lorin MacDonald - human rights lawyer, disability advocate, and 2022 Canadian Disability Hall of Fame inductee. Lorin reflects on her involvement with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) and her advocacy for making closed-captioning universally available. This is the August 20, 2022 episode.

ThinkEnergy
Summer Recharge: The Evolution of Electrical Safety

ThinkEnergy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 51:08


While the rate of electrical fatalities is trending downwards, electrical injuries as a whole are not as rare as we'd hope. From the underground electrical economy to DIYers taking on home renovations, electrical safety accidents have increased over the last two years. Josie Erzetic, President and CEO of the Electrical Safety Authority, told us how her organization is working to combat these issues and protect consumers from dangerous acts. Listen to our chat during this thinkenergy Summer Recharge.  Do you work in a construction related industry? Call or email (ESA.communications@esasafe.com) the ESA to learn about their spring startup sessions. They are happy to send somebody out to educate your workers about the potential hazards around powerline contact.  Related links: Grounded in Ontario Podcast: www.ESAsafe.com/podcast Josie Erzetic, LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/josie-erzetic-0bb58010/ Electrical Safety Authority: https://esasafe.com/compliance/what-you-need-to-know/ --- To subscribe using Apple Podcasts:  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/thinkenergy/id1465129405 To subscribe using Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/7wFz7rdR8Gq3f2WOafjxpl To subscribe on Libsyn: http://thinkenergy.libsyn.com/ --- Subscribe so you don't miss a video: https://www.youtube.com/user/hydroottawalimited Check out our cool pics on https://www.instagram.com/hydroottawa More to Learn on https://www.facebook.com/HydroOttawa Keep up with the Tweets at https://twitter.com/thinkenergypod   Dan Seguin  00:06 This is thinkenergy. The podcast that helps you better understand the fast changing world of energy through conversations with game changers, industry leaders and influencers. So join me, Dan Seguin, and my co-host, Rebecca Schwartz, as we explore both traditional and unconventional facets of the energy industry.  Hey everyone, welcome to the summer rewind edition of the thinkenergy podcast. While we recharge our batteries during these lazy hazy days of summer, we're bringing back some blasts from our podcast past. We'll be reintroducing some of our most popular interviews that garnered a lot of attention and interest. There's been a lot of talk about the future electrification of energy on the path to net zero. The episodes we've selected are very future focused with themes around green innovation, renewable energy, and our impact on the environment. So I hope you enjoy the summer rewind edition of today's episode. In the meantime, have a happy summer. And we'll be back on August 15th to kick off another exciting season. Cheers. Dan Seguin  00:50 Hey, everyone, welcome back. This is the ThinkEnergy podcast. And in today's episode, we'll be talking about safety in this increasingly, electric world. I'm dancing.   Rebecca Schwartz  01:02 And I'm Rebecca Schwartz.   Dan Seguin  01:04 Electricity is everywhere. It has become a necessary part of our lives powering the way we live, work and play. Rebecca, how much of a headache is it when the power goes out?   Rebecca Schwartz  01:19 Hmm, it's a huge headache, Dan. And let me tell you, as a social media coordinator, I know firsthand that our customers feel the pain.   Dan Seguin  01:28 Yep, I'm the same way when the power goes out, we notice but apart from those moments, it's easy to take for granted. Likewise, with it being such a critical resource that already has many safeguards in place, it's easy to forget just how dangerous it is   Rebecca Schwartz  01:45 so true. And well, most of us have likely experienced an electric shock of some kind. Hopefully, for most people, just a small Static Shock, you know, from walking across your carpet with socks on and touching the closest victim in proximity to you. But I digress. static shocks like these are of little consequence. However, when it comes to the electric current running through our homes, businesses and communities via wires and powerlines incidents involving electric shock are anything but amusing.   Dan Seguin  02:15 Unfortunately, the sobering reality is that electrical injuries are not as rare as you and I or the Electrical Safety Authority would like. According to the Ontario electrical safety report, there have been a 135 electrical related fatalities in the past 10 years. 52 of those deaths were a result of electrocution, or the effects of an electrical burn, and 83 were a result of electrical fires. The silver lining is that the rate of electrical fatalities is actually trending down. fatalities have dropped 13% Compared to the previous 10 year period.   Rebecca Schwartz  02:59 And the organization behind this downwards trend is the Electrical Safety Authority. They serve to regulate and promote electrical safety in Ontario, improve safety for the well being of all Ontarians and ultimately to reduce electrical injuries and fatalities to zero.   Dan Seguin  03:16 So Rebecca, here's today's big question. How has the electrical safety authorities strategically evolved, its approach to safety in this modern and increasingly electric world? Special guest, Josie Erzetic, Chief regulatory officer and General Counsel for the Electrical Safety Authority is here with us today to help ground us with a greater understanding of the dangers behind electricity, and how we can protect ourselves, our loved ones, and our colleagues from injury. Hey Josie, Welcome to the show. Perhaps you can start us off by telling us more about your organization, your role as a regulator, and what fuels your passion for working there?   Josie Erzetic  04:12 Thanks so much, Daniel. I'm really happy to be on the show. So Thanks for inviting me. I guess what I'd start off with is just talking about ESA's mission, and that is to promote electrical safety across Ontario. So in fact, our vision is an Ontario where people can live work and play safe from electrical harm. So we're talking about electrical safety at home, as well as in the workplace. So how do you do that? We basically have carriage four regulations in the province. So the first one being the one people probably associate most which with us, which is the Ontario Electrical Safety Code. The second one is that we license all of the LEC's and ME's, that's master electricians and licensed electrical contractors in the province. Thirdly, we regulate electrical product safety. And finally, we regulate the safety of all licensed distribution companies in the province. And that would be, for example, Ottawa Hydro. So we regulate safety in that regard as well. And we're constantly just scanning the market for new areas that we perceive present an electrical safety risk to consumers to Ontarians. And we promote education, electrical safety education. So what what fuels my passion you asked? It's basically that safety and consumer protection mandate, I find it very, very meaningful work to do this. So that's what gets me up in the mornings. And I'm really fortunate to just work with a really, really great group of people.   Rebecca Schwartz  06:01 with safety and risk mitigation top of mind how the accidents increased or decreased in the last five to 10 years. And how do you measure this?   Josie Erzetic  06:10 it's a really good question. And I'm very happy to report that over the last 10 years, overall, the state of electrical safety in Ontario has improved. There's been a 42% reduction in critical injuries that result as a result of electrical incidents, and there's been a 30% reduction in electrical fires. Overall, as well over the past decade, there's been an 11% decrease in electrical related fatalities. When it comes to power lines, specifically, there has been an 8% decrease in the last 10 years in power line related fatalities. So how do we know this? we track all the data. So we look very carefully at electrical fatalities, as well as critical injuries. And we really sort of hone in on where they're coming from. So I'll give you an example. For example, dump truck drivers a number of years ago, we recognized that there were a lot of electrical contact with power lines as the result of dump truck drivers keeping the box on their truck in an elevated position. So as a result of that we really focused in on that problem and started to do a lot of work with that industry. So what did we do? we created a whole campaign around, look up, look out. So we posted these types of signs all around construction areas, we posted power line safety posters. We delivered safety talks to industry associations to students to construction workers. And we worked in partnership with the IHSA, which is the infrastructure Health and Safety Association. And we also translated some of our safety materials into other languages, including French, Portuguese, Punjabi, to make sure that people understood the message. And as a result of it, what's happened is that the number of powerline contacts from that industry has decreased by 28%, when you compare five year periods. So having said all that, there's still a lot of work to be done. And we're again tracking data to look at where we might see other risk areas so that we can really focus in on those.   Dan Seguin  08:53 Now let's move on from data to reports. I know you recently released an annual safety report. What is that telling you?   Josie Erzetic  09:01 So our annual safety report is called the Ontario electrical safety report or OESR. It's the only document of this kind in Canada. And what it really does is help us identify emerging risk areas. So this this last month, we released our 20th edition. And what it's telling us on the homeowner side certainly is we've seen an increase in power line contacts reported from the public. So this is not what I was referring to earlier in terms of fatalities per se, but it's just an increase in the numbers of contacts, which of course could lead to serious injury or fatality, so we want to really think about data like this and try to send our safety message to the public. So where are we seeing contact? we're seeing it in areas like tree trimming or cutting. We're seeing it in things like kite flying or home improvement. work. For example, if you think about it, you're working around your home, you're moving around a ladder, let's say, to clean your eavestroughs, anything like that. And we're potentially seeing power line contact as a result, yard renovations. So we noticed that, especially during this pandemic period, where people are doing a lot of their own renovation work, there's a potential there for power line contact. So what we've done is we're shifting a lot of our campaigns online, and we're sending out messages like stop, look and live, we find that people are going online, when they're thinking about doing renovations when they're hiring contractors to help with some of those renovations. So we want to send out those messages that make sure you're aware of powerlines, you're aware of what you're doing, and that you stay far enough away. Another example is pools and pool clearances or hot tubs. So in that sense, we've sent out messages saying make sure you keep yourself and your equipment, for example, pool skimmers, which can be quite long, far away from overhead power lines, and our recommendation is at least three meters away. So that's on the homeowner side. And if we want to switch it now to the work side, on the occupational side, I point to the fall of 2019. Were in the span of about 24 hours, we were notified tragically of two critical injuries and two deaths as a result of powerline contact. And those were four separate incidents. So one was a crane construction worker. The second one was arborists that were it was a team of two arborists that were involved in tree trimming. The third one involved a TTC worker. So that's the Toronto Transit Commission in Toronto. And, and the fourth one was a drill operator. So this was a really tragic day where you had a number of incidents just occurring in very close temporal proximity. But it was also a catalyst for us to think about redesigning our power line campaign. And so what we're doing as a result is we have campaigns twice annually so that we make sure it's at the start of construction season, as well as in the fall months. We're also working closely with the Ministry of Labor to understand all of the circumstances behind those incidents. And we also work with our industry partners to make sure that we educate workers who are at high risk, and I mentioned arborist as an example. So we want to again focus in on those occupations that we think are at high risk of powerline contact. We've also observed a rise in incidents involving young workers. And as a result, we have specialists who go to the colleges to ensure that students young workers involved in things like heavy machinery operation in the arborist industry, get the information about the potential hazard around power line contact, so to ensure that they're well educated on that. And we also encourage any companies. So anyone who is listening to this podcast, who you know works in a construction related area, if you want to give us a call about our spring startup sessions, we're happy to send somebody out to educate your workers about the potential hazards around powerline contact. And you can do this by just emailing us at ESA.communications@esasafe.com. And we'd be happy to do a spring startup session for folks.   Rebecca Schwartz  14:11 Thanks, Josie. We'll make sure to include that in our show notes. So we read that the Electrical Safety Authority is striving to be a modern risk based electrical safety regulator for Ontarians. What exactly does that mean?   Josie Erzetic  14:25 Yeah, it's a great question. And I often think about that, myself, what does it mean to be to be a modern regulator, so it can mean a lot of things to a lot of people, but I'll sort of give you the key elements of it for us. So it really, it means to us to use something that we call risk based oversight. It means leveraging technology and really fostering the capabilities of our people. So when we say risk based oversight, as you can imagine, trying to be a safety regulator. The complex world we live in today in a in a province, as populous as the province of Ontario is a difficult task, you can't be everywhere all at once. So we use risk base to really prioritize and focus on the highest risk electrical installations, we actually have an algorithm that helps us understand which installations are the high risk ones, and we prioritize those and have a whole system for prioritization. So we're basically putting the most time in the highest risk areas. Along those lines were also through. And we did this through the COVID period, we're really piloting the use of what we call remote inspections. So that in other words, rather than an inspector attending at each installation, there's the possibility for a licensed electrical contractor to send in photos or videos. And we put job aids around that and given instruction to the industry about what we're looking for. So again, so low risk installation, and in the inspectors discretion, they can accept photos or videos, which you can imagine, makes it more efficient for us doing our job. And it's also, you know, potentially an efficiency value to the contractor as well to submit photos rather than having somebody attend in person. So that's another thing where we're moving forward as a modern regulator, I'd say, in terms of leveraging technology, we've really moved digital, I think, as have a lot of companies at this time. So example, where we used to have all our master exams happening in person, they can now happen virtually. So we have a system where we can do virtual proctoring of exams, so you can do your exam online, we can do online training, which is either synchronous or asynchronous, which is which is terrific for folks. If it's synchronous, then you might have an instructor with you asynchronous, you're watching videos, or you're going through PowerPoint on on your own time. So it's, it's leveraging technology for us, but also for the folks that we service. And another big thing we've done is our plan review group, which looks at electrical drawings, for complex electrical installations. So say, for example, for a car manufacturer or a large industry, rather than having these clients submit hard copies of complicated electrical plans, they can now do so digitally through our electronic plan review portal. So that's something again, that's very good for clients and good for efficiency purposes. For us, we also have a new scheduling tool that provides customers better notice of when an inspector is going to arrive, which is again, a real win from a from an efficiency standpoint, and we're now launching a project that would allow master electricians and licensed electrical contractors to submit documents online, so time saving there. And the last area I'd say is focusing on fostering new skills. So where our employees need to augment skills or develop new skills, we're very supportive of continuing education and, and skills broadening. And we're also looking at where do we have gaps? Where is technology? Or is our sector evolving, and we need to ensure we're evolving with it. So an example I give you there is what we've just been talking about, which is around data analytics. So we've recognized that we need to improve our capability in that regard. And as a result, we've hired a couple of new people to help us in that regard. And we're also augmenting skills of folks that we already have working for us. I think I'd be remiss if I didn't mention diversity and inclusion. I think a lot of employers are thinking about that right now, as are we. And so we do have what we call an idea strategy, which is inclusion, diversity, equity and accessibility. And I think that is a very important part of being a modern regulator. And I would say that, you know, I'm really happy to report that 80% of our executive team is now women. So I think we're making some real advances in that area, but you know, I'll be honest with you, I'd like to see more so We're continuing to work on that. So I guess that's in summary, what I really see is being a modern regulator.   Dan Seguin  20:08 That's very interesting. Thanks, Josie. Now, wondering if you could tell us about your organization's new corporate strategy at a high level? Can you walk us through the four strategic goals and why they're so important?   Josie Erzetic  20:23 Yeah. So it's, it's a very good question. And some of these goals we have maintained from previous years and others we've really expanded upon. So I would say the, the first of the four main goals is really safety. And that's one that's always been a focus of our organization. But having said that, we can all see the rapid evolution of technology in the sector. So we're really maintaining a close focus on that, and working with industry partners in that regard. So examples I give you there are things like the adoption of electric vehicles or energy storage technologies. So in the example I give you is that I'm currently sitting on a council that the Ministry of Transportation has set up around Evie adoption. So we want to participate on councils like that, that look at this one is on the electrification of the transportation sector. So that's an important part important pillar in the strategy, and an important part of what we're doing. So we do things like we anticipate new risk areas, we have something called the harm lifecycle, which really has a scanning the market, looking at potential for new technology, new harms that we should be monitoring and assessing. And then we decide, is this a high risk area that we would like to pilot a program in as an example? Is this something we should be partnering on? Like the example I just gave you with what MTO is doing? Is this something that we want to continue as a program, once we have achieved our goals in it? Is it something that we exit from so we have a whole lifecycle and how we look at risk. So I think that's an important part of the new strategy around safety. And then compliance, that's also something that we have carried over from our previous strategy. But I think, if anything, I would say we're almost amping up what we're doing in this area. So we work closely with our licensed communities, for example, the licensed electrical contractor community, and we educate the public in terms of ensuring that they hire a licensed electrical contractor, rather than, for example, going to unlicensed individuals. And we refer to that as the underground economy. So I would say that this new strategy really emphasizes the importance of getting at that underground economy or, you know, I'd like to put it as like, just let's take a bite out of that underground economy, let's reduce what's going on there. So we want to educate homeowners to not hire unlicensed individuals. And we will take enforcement action, where it's required against those people who are working illegally and not taking out licenses or permits because there are real safety and consumer protection risks around that type of work. And we've got some real active campaigns around that. For example, we have a Kijiji Blitz, where we are actively looking for people advertising services illegally on Kijiji and forcing those to come off Kijiji. Our third goal is operating with organizational agility. And I think, as a lot of companies are doing today, and as we talked about earlier, we're trying to leverage technology to make ourselves more efficient, and reduce, you know, burden for the licensees. So whether those are licensed electrical contractors, or LDCs, such as Hydro Ottawa, we're trying to reduce burden for our clients. And I think the last area is really around public accountability. We want to be seen as a publicly accountable transparent regulator So we do regular surveys of our customers to identify areas for improvement. You know, what are our strengths? But what are our weaknesses? And how can we do better? I think ESA has a culture of continuous improvement, which we're very proud of.   Rebecca Schwartz  25:18 Thanks for the reference to the underground economy, it seems like there's a black market for everything, even electrical services. Has there been a story that's stuck with you in regards to an electrical incident resulting in a serious injury that could have been prevented? Or is there a safety tip that you wish everybody knew?   Josie Erzetic  25:37 Yeah. So thank you for that question. And something that is real top of mind for me lately, is something called lichtenburg generators. So we've had a number of serious injuries and some deaths involving these devices. And my safety tip is stop using these devices. They are devices that they can either be made. So people were seeing people doing them as do it yourself projects, or they can be purchased. However, they're not a product that's either approved or certified by any certification body, and they're extremely dangerous. So we're aware of at least five fatalities and one critical injury that have taken place over the last three years. And a couple of those fatalities occurred earlier this year. And what these things are, I don't know if you've ever heard of them before, but they are used to create art. So they're like a wood burning type device. So you create it by burning designs into wood or acrylic. But they're a lot of them are homemade. And people take parts out of microwaves, for example, to put these things together. And they have a lot of accessible wiring components. So they're very unsafe to handle. And so and particularly on social media forums, we're seeing that individuals are posting videos, and they're instructing each other on how to build these devices. So right now we have a very comprehensive public safety awareness campaign to educate the public about the dangers of using Lichtenberg generators. And we're specifically targeting that sort of do it yourself, community and those who are interested in things like woodworking so what we're finding it's primarily men aged between 20 and 40, to not carry out this type of hobby and not use these types of devices. And if anyone is aware of advertising of this kind of advice, we would encourage them to call us at 1-877-esa-safe or visit us online. And and make us aware of this because we are asking, particularly YouTube to try to get these How To Videos removed. So the safety tip again, is don't use these devices. They're very dangerous.   Dan Seguin  28:20 Now your organization has a vision, a big vision to create an Ontario where people can live, work and play safe from electrical harm. During the pandemic, have there been any particular challenges or opportunities in achieving this?   Josie Erzetic  28:37 Yeah, it absolutely, because as I'm sure you both have found, people were at home. That means, among other things, a lot of on at home online shopping. So we want to make sure that people are very aware that electrical products that you're looking at, make sure they've been approved by a recognized certification body. So from both a safety awareness point of view, but also a consumer protection point of view, we want to make sure that people are buying approved products, as you both know. Online, it's so it's a global problem. You can buy products from anywhere in the world now and have them shipped directly to your house. So again, as a regulator, it's hard to be everywhere all at once. So the best thing is to have consumers aware themselves that when you're buying electrical products, you will want to ensure that it's either CSA certified UL certified, that you've got an approval mark on that product and you look for it when you're buying it on these online platforms. We share jurisdiction here with Health Canada, so I know Health Canada is all so concerned about this problem. So what we've done is we've set up a task force and we include ourselves on it, Health Canada, our own ministry, provincially, which is the ministry of government and Consumer Services. We've got manufacturers working with us distributors, consumer advocates, we've got bricks and mortar stores as part of the task force. But we also have online retailers. And we're all discussing the problem of consumer awareness, consumer protection and safety, because it's an all our interest to make sure people are safe. And we're putting resources into follow up on any reports we see, or we receive about unsafe consumer products. So we have been and we will follow up on 100% of reports we receive where somebody says, Look, I bought this thing it's unapproved, you know, I found that it sparked or there was a flash, when I tried to plug it in, we will follow up on all these things. We're also really enhancing consumer consumer awareness efforts, especially around this time of year, we're heading into holiday shopping season. And so we do have a holiday safety campaign. That's where we see a lot of people online, a lot of people looking at electrical products. So this campaign really focuses on consumer safety. And this year, in particular, we're encouraging folks who, you know, may be doing a lot of holiday decorating, they may be getting together to do this type of thing. So they're putting more emphasis on it this year, I don't know maybe more so than last year, when nobody came over. We're saying, you know, look closely at your your lights, right, your holiday lights that you're buying, make sure they're approved, make sure you use them correctly. Make sure if you have old ones that you're digging out of your basement, that there's no damage to cords, so just you know, be careful.   Rebecca Schwartz  32:04 Josie, you mentioned amateur DIY is like the dangerous Lichtenberg wood burning video on YouTube. Has there been other instances where the Electrical Safety Authority has seen an increase in electrical accidents? Or what about new areas of concern?   Josie Erzetic  32:20 Yeah, it's, it's a really, it's a good question. And again, particularly through this pandemic period, where people are looking for new hobbies, or, you know, they're at home, they're thinking about ways to renovate their house, maybe they cannot find a contractor or someone says to them, okay, it'll be months and months before somebody can get your house. So they just, they feel like, Oh, well, I could I want to do it myself. Right. So in that sense, we really remind homeowners consumers, that electricity is something that is dangerous, that you need to hire a professional to do it, there is the potential homeowners can do their own work. But in our view, it is better to hire a professional because there are safety risks inherent in the work. If homeowners are doing it themselves, then we certainly would remind them that they must take out the proper notifications with ESA, because that then has an inspector coming to their house to inspect the work. So at the very least, you want to ensure that happens. But we would say primarily, look, leave it to the professionals. So hire a licensed electrical contractor. And only a licensed electrical contracting business can be hired to do this. So when you're hiring people, we also remind folks to ask to see the accurate slash ESA license number. So that should be ever it should be on the estimates you get. It should be on their their trucks, their business cards, their ultimate invoice if you're not seeing that you could be hiring somebody that's in that underground economy that we talked about earlier. So be very careful about who you're hiring. And in this regard, obviously, ESA puts out a lot of its own information. But we also now are partnering with the Mike Holmes group. And you'll probably remember Mike Holmes He's done a lot of work on television. He does a lot of work also through social media. So he has a very large following. And so as a result, we're able to amplify the message by working with that group with Mike Holmes and his family to really get out that message that this is something maybe you don't want to take on on your own because of the safety risks. So certainly, both Mike his son, Mike Jr, and Sherry have posted both on YouTube as well as their other social channels about the importance when you're thinking about renovating to hire a licensed electrical contractor, and also the importance of ensuring you ensuring that you have ESA inspect the work. So you want to make sure at the end of the job, you get an ESA certificate of acceptance when the job's complete. So you know, it's done right. The other thing we've been noticing recently, and we've really made an effort to get the word out on this, so maybe I'll mention it here on this podcast as well, is the difference between a licensed electrical contractor, a master electrician, or what we call a C of Q, Certificate of Qualification holder, a certified electrician. Sometimes people think, oh, this person is an electrician, I'll just hire them directly know, who you need to hire is a licensed electrical contractor, because they are a business. And they were required by us to have $2 million in liability insurance, as well as the WSIB insurance coverage. So how this works is the licensed electrical contractor employs Master electricians who are responsible for overseeing the work of certified electricians, so you don't hire those folks directly. You hire the LEC, and it's important for consumer protection, because that way, if there's an injury, God forbid, or something happens in your home, then there is insurance that covers that. And the homeowner, him or herself is not responsible. So we're really working to increase awareness on the differences between the licensed electrical contracting businesses, which are who you hire, versus the master electricians or the certified electricians. I think that's very important.   Rebecca Schwartz  37:17 Great tips Josie and gotta love Mike Holmes, perhaps now a little bit more broadly, pandemic times or not what are some of the biggest challenges and opportunities that are facing the Electrical Safety Authority right now in general?   Josie Erzetic  37:32 I think I I go back to the underground economy and underground work that we we talked about earlier. So and I think we mentioned that it's just it's such a big problem, not just for our sector. But overall, I think, Rebecca, that you mentioned that you can, you know, almost buy anything in the underground market now. So you really, I think Statistics Canada estimates the underground economy is over $16 billion. That's with a B in Ontario alone. So it's just it's a big problem. And we as I said, I'd like to start a new slogan, like, let's take a bite out of the underground economy, like we really need to ensure with something like electricity, there are such safety and consumer protection issues, that this is not something you want to fool around with and leave to someone who's non licensed and not take out proper permits in this area. There's just too much at risk both with your personal safety and the safety of your home. There could be a fire that results from this. So what are we doing to really tackle this i and Daniel, I think you mentioned it earlier too. It's the Kijiji work so we're actually working a lot of people go online to find contractors. We are online and looking at those ads on Kijiji, and we will send notification to advertisers who we think are unlicensed businesses offering these types of services. If we don't get a voluntary response to take down that ad, Kijiji will forcibly remove it so big shout out to Kijiji for working with us and taking those ads down. And and if we still get repeat offenders, you wouldn't believe this people will come back and advertise again. We're prosecuting them. So we now have 20 charges pending before courts. So I would say that number one consumers do not hire unlicensed people. Be careful about who you're hiring online. We're out there we're working on it, but be careful as to see those licenses people who are doing this work illegally. I would say we are working hard to pull your ads off. Do not do this come into the licensed community. If you want to do this work, then get a license and do it properly. or we will also be looking to prosecute. So we this is important. The other thing we noticed with a high level of EV adoption, we undertook an EV charger Blitz. So we noticed that some EV charging systems that you put in your home in order to charge your vehicle were being done by unlicensed individuals and being done without permits. So we had our inspectors go out and inspect and alert both homeowners because sometimes homeowners don't know that was put in improperly and alert us to where we saw, charters being put in without permits are being put in by unlicensed contractors. And as a result, we've noticed this the period that we were looking at it this year, compared to last year, we've had almost a doubling of the amount of notifications that were taken out. So it makes a big difference when people know that we're out there. We're inspecting these things, and we expect them to be done properly and safety. And we also have an anonymous online reporting tool. So I would even say to your listeners, if you think there could be unlicensed activity going on somewhere, please let us know about it. So you can go online, you will, it's anonymous, but we do appreciate details. So we can do the follow up and investigate, you go to esasafe.com. And we found that this has been a very effective tool since we launched it in April 2020. To get reports, and I will tell people that we do follow up on 100% of the leads we get about unlicensed activity.   Dan Seguin  41:47 Okay, we've covered challenges and opportunities. What about the rise of digital communication? Has it changed your organization's ability to communicate safety messaging?   Josie Erzetic  41:59 Yeah, I'd say it, it really, really has. And we've shifted a lot of our educational campaigns on to social media, because as we alluded to earlier, we do find that is where people are looking, for example, to hire contractors, they're looking for ideas, say on renovation, you know, people will follow certain interior designers, they they will follow renovators on things like Instagram, or they'll follow them on Twitter. So we're leveraging platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Google, Google, YouTube, all of those, because we find that that's where people are going now. But we also find there are potential dangers lurking there as well. And so we really have to monitor and be on top of those. So I'll give you an example of something that was a tic toc challenge that that we were made aware of in early 2020. And this was a challenge where that was issued over tick tock and it was basically about plugging in a phone charger. And then using either was a penny or a nickel or something to drag across the exposed prongs. And it results in in smoke and sparks and but it can also result in fire. So it this is obviously a really dangerous activity. So we became aware of it on social media. And then we use social as well as traditional media in order to educate, you know, basically parents and kids who were doing this, that this was unsafe, and they shouldn't be doing it. And we that was a very successful campaign. And we had more than 15 million views on that. And so we're very, very grateful. And, and we actually we won some awards for what we were able to do with with social media just in terms of identifying a risk and then educating people that they shouldn't be carrying engaging in this activity. And and I guess I should say to that we're also we're leveraging some new new opportunities, like a podcast like what you guys are doing here, which I applaud you for, by the way, we're trying to do the same thing.   Rebecca Schwartz  44:21 Now Josie, our listeners have made it this far. And now they want to know some ways that they can keep their electrical safety knowledge up to date. How can they do that?   Josie Erzetic  44:30 Yeah. So one way to do it is exactly what the two of you are doing with your podcast. We have our own podcast and it's really focused on electrical safety. So it's called Grounded in Ontario, and you can find it on our website at ESAsafe.com/podcast, but you can also go to typical platforms where you'd find podcasts like Apple podcasts or Spotify and located there. So we have new episodes coming out basically monthly. And we talk about things like what we've talked about here and more. So we've had an episode on pools and hot tubs and safety issues relating to that those EV supply equipment. So electrical vehicle chargers, which we also alluded to here, we also talk about arc fault and ground fault circuit interrupters. And we have a new episode that's just coming out on the underground economy, which we've also talked about. So that's a great place to get information. Also, our website has a lot of information and talks about things like do it yourself, renovations, talks about holiday safety talks about home and work safety. So I would, you know, recommend listeners go there. And I'd also always encourage people that if there are safety concerns, or you want to report activity, please go to our website, or please call us and I can give you the number, it's 1-877-372-7233. So we'd love to hear from people.   Dan Seguin  46:12 Okay, as it relates to your podcast Grounded in Ontario, I'll make sure that we post a link in our show notes, well Josie How about you close us off with some rapid fire questions? Are you ready?   Josie Erzetic  46:26 I'm ready.   Dan Seguin  46:27 Okay. What is your favorite word?   Josie Erzetic  46:30 I have to say I, I you know, obviously top of mind for me. workwise is safety. But just one of my favorite things to think about is also chocolate.   Dan Seguin  46:40 Now, what is one thing you can't live without?   Josie Erzetic  46:45 Chocolate?   Dan Seguin  46:45 What is something that challenges you   Josie Erzetic  46:48 with Rebecca, my love of chocolate? Because then I have to make sure that I you know, keep exercising or something?   Dan Seguin  46:55 If you could have one superpower, what would it be?   Josie Erzetic  47:00 I think the superpower question is always a really is a really great one. And I always I like picking flying for this one. Because then I figure it makes the commuting easier. And it would just be would it be great to just zip to your cottage fast or you know, zip to Europe or something. Especially these times where you know, travel is so difficult.   Dan Seguin  47:22 Josie This is my favorite one here. If you could turn back time and talk to your 18 year old self. What would you tell her?   Josie Erzetic  47:29 Okay, this one, this one I am going to answer very seriously, I would say something that I say to my my kids now who are 19 and 16. And that is believe in yourself. Believe in yourself believe in what you can do. You know, trust, trust yourself. So that that I think is very important for young people to remember.   Dan Seguin  47:53 And lastly, what do you currently find most interesting in this sector?   Josie Erzetic  47:59 Um, so I would say it's it's the pace of change. I just think our sector the energy sector is just fascinating. Right now we've talked about things like electrification of transportation, and the speed of the adoption there. We think of things like energy storage, the growth of renewables, I think of distribute, you know, distributed energy resources. I think it's fascinating. We're all concerned about climate change. So we're thinking about how we can reduce our carbon footprint, what, what role does energy play in that? What What will it look like 2030 4050 years from now where we might have entire communities that are doing things like net metering, we might have, you know, renewable generation, within a smaller community, or just you'll have solar panels on your roof, you'll have an energy storage system in your basement, you'll have an Eevee charging outside. So I think that is fascinating. I think energy is so fundamental to how we live and maybe how we'll deal with fundamental global issues like the climate crisis. And so ESA is part of that. I think it's so exciting, because you need to have all of that working safely. So the role we play is fascinating. So that's what I just find hugely fascinating and challenging about our sector.   Rebecca Schwartz  49:25 Well, Josie, we reached the end of another episode of The think energy podcast. Thanks so much for joining Dan and I today. We hope you had fun.   Josie Erzetic  49:33 I had a great time with you guys. Thanks so much. Really appreciate it.   Rebecca Schwartz  49:38 I sure hope you enjoyed this episode of The ThinkEnergy podcast. If so please head over to our iTunes SUBSCRIBE And leave us a review.   Dan Seguin  49:46 Now For show notes and bonus content visit hydroottawa.com/thinkenergy. Also, be sure to tell your friends and colleagues about us. Thank you for listening.

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Can the PC Government Really 'Get It Done'?

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 27:07


After winning the largest majority in 35 years, an emboldened and more experienced Premier Doug Ford is now laying out his plans for Ontario for the next four years. "We have a big agenda to fulfill and keep our promises," he has said. But he is staring down a 40-year- high inflation rate, a buckling health-care system, and tense labour negotiations with teachers. On the day the Progressive Conservative government delivers its Throne Speech, we discuss what lies ahead for Ontarians.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
599: Drs. Audrey Elias & Jenn Bell: Doing Continuing Education Different w/ Trailhead Learning Collective

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 40:32


In this episode, Co-Founders of Trailhead Learning Collective, Jenn Bell, PT, ScD, COMT, and Audrey Elias, PT, PhD, OCS, talk about their work doing Continuing Education different. Today, they talk about the current state of Continuing Education, integration of information, and addressing Continuing Education courses. How is Trailhead Learning Collective different? Hear about active learning techniques, some upcoming retreats, and get Audrey and Jenn's advice to their younger selves, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “Our patients are human, but we, as clinicians, are human, and it's important to respect that.” “There is a time and place for everything.” “There is an alternative way to get your continuing education done that also takes care of yourself.” “Remain flexible and keep watching for those opportunities.” “All of it is worth it. All those experiences are things that you can draw on.” “It's alright to go do different things that aren't exactly on your path.”   More about Audrey Elias and Jenn Bell Jenn Bell, PT, ScD, COMT, and Audrey Elias, PT, PhD, OCS, are co-founders of Trailhead Learning Collective. Audrey is clinical faculty in the University of Montana School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences. She completed her DPT in 2009, did her residency with Therapeutic Associates in Washington state, and then completed her PhD in clinical  biomechanics at the University of Montana in 2015. She then did a post-doc at the University of Guelph before returning to UMPT as clinical faculty, training entry-level students and residents in the DPT program and in the UMPT clinic. Her primary area of research involves how psychological factors play into movement, particularly following knee injury. Most importantly, she loves being outside, whether skiing, running, hiking, paddle-boarding, or lounging around a campfire with her son and husband. Jenn is the Program Director and Director of Clinical Education at UMPT. She completed PT school in 2006, then completed her COMT in 2012 and her ScD from Texas Tech in 2013, all while treating patients in a variety of settings in rural Alaska. She has treated patients and taught in PT programs in virtually every setting all over  the world, including Kenya, Ethiopia, and Malawi, and is an internationally-recognized expert in inter-professional education and global health. She is also the co-Primary Investigator and Team Advisor for Montana Inter-Professional Student Hotspotting, improving outcomes in underserved populations in rural Montana. Above all, she is always, always, having a good time outside with family, friends, food, and an adventure, setting an example for her two young daughters. Together, and through the values of adventure, growth, authenticity, collaboration, and respect, Jenn and Audrey are working to build a collective of compassionate, confident, critical thinkers who utilize best-practices in their field.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, ConEd, Education, Learning, Research, Networking, Integration, Innovation, Collaboration,   Resources Prevention & Wellness for the Running Athlete. https://www.trailheadlearn.com/healthywealthysmart   Get 10% off your first retreat: Mention Healthy, Wealthy, & Smart at Registration.   To learn more, follow Audrey and Jenn at: Website:          https://www.trailheadlearn.com Facebook:       Trailhead Learning Collective Instagram:       @audreyroseelias                         @jennbell427                         @trailheadlearning   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:07 Welcome to the healthy, wealthy and smart podcast. Each week we interview the best and brightest in physical therapy, wellness and entrepreneurship. We give you cutting edge information you need to live your best life healthy, wealthy and smart. The information in this podcast is for entertainment purposes only and should not be used as personalized medical advice. And now, here's your host, Dr. Karen Litzy.   00:35 Hey everybody, welcome back to the podcast. I am your host, Karen Litzy. I want to thank you all for joining us today. And again, if you haven't then definitely subscribe to the podcast on any platform in which podcasts are streamed. So today's episode, we are talking about doing continuing education different and my guest today are Dr. Jenn Bell and Dr. Art Audrey Elias. They are cofounders of Trailhead learning collective. Audrey is a clinical faculty in the University of Montana School of Physical Therapy and rehabilitative sciences. She completed her DPT in 2009 Did her residency with therapeutic associates in Washington state and then completed her PhD in Clinical biomechanics at the University of Montana in 2015. She then did a postdoc at the University of Guelph before returning to you and PT as clinical faculty training entry level students and residents in the DPT program and in the UN PT clinic. Her primary area of research involves how psychological factors play into movement, particularly following knee injury. Most importantly, she loves being outside weather, skiing, running, hiking, paddleboarding, or lounging around a campfire with her son and her husband. Jen is the program director and clinical and Director of Clinical Education at UMP T. She completed PT school in 2006 then completed her Colm T in 2012, and her side Dee from Texas Tech in 2013, all while treating patients in a variety of settings in rural Alaska. She has treated patients and taught and PT programs in virtually every setting all over the world including Kenya, Ethiopia and Malawi, and is an internationally recognized expert in interprofessional education and Global Health. She is also the CO primary investigator and team advisor for Montana interprofessional student hotspotting improving outcomes in underserved populations in rural Montana. Above all, she is always having a good time outside with family friends food and an adventurer setting example for her two young daughters together and through the values of adventure growth and authenticity, collaboration and respect. Jen and Audrey are working to build a collective of compassionate, confident critical thinkers who utilize best practices in their field. Now, like I said, they are the founders of Trailhead learning collective. And Jen and Audrey have a special offer for healthy, wealthy and smart listeners. If you go to their website, which is on the podcast dot healthy, wealthy dot smart page, and you want to check out their next learning opportunity. Then you get 10% off because you're listening to this podcast. So if you go to Trailhead learned.com Or go to the podcast website, and when you apply to be part of their next learning opportunity, and mentioned this podcast will get 10% off. So a big thank you to Jen and Audrey for that. And in the meantime, everyone enjoyed today's episode. Hello, Jen and Audrey. Thank you so much for coming on to the podcast today to talk about the innovative way you guys are doing continuing education courses. So doing Con Ed differently, and I love it. But before we get into that, Jen, why don't we start with you say a little bit about yourself. So the viewers know or the viewers, the listeners know who's who.   04:12 Yeah, it sounds great. So I'm Tim Doyle and I'm the Program Director and the Director of Clinical Education at the University of Montana's physical therapy program. I've been at UN for nine years. I'm just going in to start my 10th year there, which is wild to think I've been doing this for almost a decade. And prior to moving to Montana, I was in Rural Clinical Practice in Alaska. And so I lived in a town of 2500 people at the end of the road for bed hospital. So got to kind of treat whatever walked in the door. It was a really great opportunity. And during that time, I was working on my doctorate of science who Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. So yeah, it's all about   04:53 Excellent, Audrey. Go ahead a little bit more about yourself.   04:59 Thanks, Karen. And I'm Audrey Elias. I am also at the University of Montana and clinical faculty there. I treat patients in the clinic, but most of my time is actually treating patients with students. So I'm a preceptor in our integrated clinical education program. And then I also teach in the DPT program, as well. I did my PhD at the University of Montana, I did my DPT at the University of Montana. So I pretty much have been in Montana for a very long time. But I also practiced in Washington, in the far west, on the Olympic Peninsula, in rural areas where we saw lots of different folk. Yeah, and then Jen and I are also cofounders of Trailhead learning collective. So we're heavy, heavy University of Montana. But we're also doing this other thing.   06:02 And we are going to talk about that today. But before we get into that, let's talk about the why behind it. So what has your clinical education or continuing clinical education been like in the past where you thought you know, this, I'm not connecting with this and I need to do something different. So talk a little bit about your journeys.   06:26 And you go ahead   06:29 yeah, um, so you know, carrying that's a great question kind of what informed us to get to this place or we decided to found Trailhead learning collective. You know, I've done I've been in clinical practice and a PT for 15 years, and I've done everything from going to CSM was 17,000 of my closest friends to Education Leadership Conference with the APTA Academy of Education, to, you know, the weekend course that someone brings into their clinic. And what I find oftentimes is that I'm in these courses. And, you know, I'm, I'm finding myself kind of not super engaged with the learning, there's a lot of lecture. And, you know, sitting around going from being in a really active profession where I'm doing everything from crawling around on the ground with my patients to helping them stand up and walk to sitting oftentimes at a plant in a clinic all weekend long, being lectured to. And so I was really looking for something different from that. Actually, what's your experience been? Well,   07:39 I did my orthopedic residency right out of school, and in private practice with therapeutic associates in Port Angeles, Washington, and I averaged one three day weekend of Con Ed a month for almost a year and a half. And I hosted those courses, I got the bagels, I got the coffee, I made sure the bathrooms were clean, I did all of that. So I've done a lot of that. And I've been I did my PhD and went to CSM was 17,000 of my closest friends over and over and over again. I've done like every kind of Con, as you can imagine, I've done you know, 45 minute online things through Harkness school for dance injury. I've done level one pelvic floor. And, you know, they got real intimate with 15 brand new people. And to be so to be my authentic self here, I will fall asleep if I am sitting down for more than 20 minutes. And I will not remember a single thing. Anyone tells me if I'm being lectured at, if I'm not actively engaged in I fell asleep in my first class in undergrad. I it's just how I work. So I have to have really engaging Con Ed, you know, if I'm going to learn anything, otherwise, I do it all on my own afterward, right? So I'll go to 18 hours on a weekend where I don't get to go on my run. I don't get to spend time with my family. I have a 10 year old now I don't get to do these other things that I wanted to do. And then I would have to go home and I'd have to review it all on the treadmill. Because now I'm moving I'm doing stuff and then I can actually learn or I'd have to like go for a run with Jen and tell her all about what we just did in order for me to actually process and I just thought to myself You know, I want something different. I want, I want to use this, I want to use this information immediately. And I also think, doing my PhD, we did, I did a randomized clinical trial, post ACL reconstruction stuff, and just trying to get help people understand how to use that. I can't just tell them, it does not work. It doesn't work. We have to do it, we have to not just show we have to do and work together on it. So yeah, I think it's just a long time of realizing that there's a place and a time for everything. And but there's but there needs to be this thing as well, that can serve people like me.   10:57 And, you know, you kind of described what a lot of continuing education courses are in the PT world where you go, you sit at a plan, you're taking notes, maybe you get a stretch break, you have like some sort of pastry, and coffee. And the question I always had with those in particular is, what if it's not your learning style? What if you need a little something different, like something that involves more demonstration, more movement, more, getting up more? Just a different style of learning. So what have Have you seen the current state of continuing education? And do you feel like we're really maximizing professional development? Go ahead, Jen.   11:44 Oh, Audrey, go ahead. Oh, well, I feel like what's really interesting is that in a physical therapists are super committed to learning. Just in general, I was actually so we're both huge nerds. So he's doing quite a lot of literature search on this. And if I was trying to write an abstract for CSM, I wouldn't be able to, because you have to have at least five papers within the last five or seven years or something. And there just aren't any, there's no literature on what's going on. With Con Ed, currently, there's a paper just this year about so in the PT and PT J, with continuing education courses for orthopedic and sports PTs in the US often lack supporting evidence. And so they went through and review available intervention courses. So great paper. But there was one by Adrian Lowe this year, looking at the impact of a three hour PMP course, on low back pain, and how people did. It was pretty good. It was really interesting. But otherwise, well, next paper is 15 years ago, that I combined. So we don't really know what's going on in the form of knowing that I'm familiar with, we don't really know, in terms of my anecdotal experience, go, the learning environments that I have experienced are not really set up to maximize learning based on pedagogical evidence. So we know that active learning is important. And it just, it makes it like it's really, really hard. We just don't see a ton of that. And I think what happens is that, then we get where content becomes like a chore, right? It's a box, you have to tick, I gotta get Montana, I have to have 20 hours every two years. So I think 3030 Whatever it is, I have to have it and I have to go and check in order to check them tick that box. And I think it ends up becoming problematic on a lot of different levels. Yeah. I don't know if I answered that question completely.   14:15 I think so. Jen, do you need to fill in any blanks there? Yeah, well,   14:20 you know, I think what Audrey was hitting on thinking about in our continuing education courses, we can bring in the pedagogical research, just like we bring in to physical therapy research. And until you know, we do this a lot in our entry level program, we're thinking about what are the best ways that adults learned? How can we convey this information in a way that's effective that's going to address our learning outcomes, not just our patient outcomes. And so that's really one of the things that Audrey and I are looking to bring to our Trailhead learning collective courses and retreats is bringing in the research on active and learning mean, and teaching adult learners. And so bringing that in, you know, really minimizing the amount of lecture that we do engaging in active learning techniques, whether it's going through cases together, having discussions, you know, putting up big whiteboards and doing some, you know, throwing out ideas and looking at other people's ideas, you know, that way really kind of shifting the paradigm from being teacher centered to being learner centered. So you know, when you're in that lecture based course, it's about this expert that's standing in front of you talking and conveying to you what you should be doing in clinical practice. We're really trying to flip that and bring all of these learners together, oftentimes have, you know, decades of clinical practice, have all of these pearls all of this knowledge, and asking them to share it with one another. And we'll bring in the evidence on, you know, the the content that we're teaching on. But really, not bringing a group of people together that have years of clinical practice, and have learned a lot and asking them to not talk to one another and just listen to what an expert says. So really trying to kind of flip that model and really focusing in on the learner experience, and learner engagement.   16:16 Right. And that kind of leads me to the next question, what a perfect transition is, you know, going from a traditional model, which can be effective in getting information from me, the teacher to you, the student? But is it effective when it comes to information processing integration into clinical life? So can you kind of talk about the those concepts as perhaps not being equal and not being the same? And how can we get better integration of information?   16:58 Yeah, can you make a great point, you know, lecture is a really effective way to just transfer knowledge. But that piece of integrating it and making changes is where we see that active learning tends to be more effective. Like Audrey said, there's really not great evidence about, you know, do continuing education courses, impact and change how people engage in clinical practice, we hope and we believe that, you know, if we can effectively teach you something, then you'll use that information. So that's like, that's a gap in the research. But we do know that active learning techniques, improve retention, and kind of consolidation of information, and kind of thinking that information deeper into our longer term memory. And so that's why we use active learning techniques. There's also some really cool, early research coming out on looking at the impact of exercise of aerobic exercise, on learning. And so boom strand and inco, Hall and 2020 published a study and they looked at a single bout of aerobic exercise. And what they found is that it improves attention, concentration, and learning and memory functions and young adults. And so there's some studies like that coming out showing that if we can incorporate this component of physical activity, with our learning, either right before, during or after there's some different sides looking at the different benefits of those, then we can improve learning and retention as well.   18:33 And can you give some examples of active learning techniques? Because we've said that a couple of times, and I can just picture people being like, Okay, that's cool.   18:42 But what does that mean? It was so fun. Because I mean, we've both been teaching. For so long, both I will say we've taught both in the entry level DPT program. And then we've also we teach continuing ed courses before this as well. And mostly in that lecture based thing, we're like, oh, I don't like to teach that either. And I think we both were like, Okay, we need to change this up. So we've gone to a week long training on for the National Institute of scientific teaching, and just teaching how to teach in this way. In the sciences. It's very, it's pretty easy to do in the humanities. But in the sciences, it can be very, like, Oh, I just need to get this information across. Right. So in STEM fields, it's like, well, I just need to know how to pipette or whatever in chemistry. So there are lots of different ways so we can do like gallery walks, put up things with small groups. They process the information put up different ways and how they would do it around the room the rest of the day, and then their entire group walks around the process, we can do two to one, activities, give a prompt, everyone has a minute, maybe, to think on their own individually, maybe write something down there is that reflective cognitive process that comes from actively hand writing something down, that there are mental changes who have to write it down, turn to their neighbor, talk about the individual thing, and then come back in a larger group and, and everybody has to go around and say what their partner did, and pros and cons thereof. So lots of discussion. Obviously, when Jen, you had a really good one that you are doing,   20:50 what are the ones that I do with some of my classes is that I, when I start to teach about a new topic, the first thing I do is kind of the same scenario that Audrey just talked about candidate seat by myself, think with a partner and think with a group. But I prompt the group and the learner is to think about what it is you need to know about this topic. So based off your experiences you've had so far, kind of brainstorm, what are the things that you need to know? So we're really priming them to, you know, what is it that I do know? What is it that I don't know? What are things that are what are those, maybe when we share out to group, then people are going to identify those unknown unknowns that they didn't know, they needed to know. And so we can kind of start off by kind of forming a list of everything we're gonna need to go through and talk about, it's great for me, because then I can be like, oh, I need to make sure that we you know, dig into this some more and, and then at the end, we can go back through that list and be like, did we do we know everything we needed to know going into this? And so oftentimes, you know, instead of just starting off with me, like, hi, welcome. And then I start lecturing, why don't we start with you kind of digging into what it is that you want to learn about a topic, and going from there?   22:07 Yeah, I love that that's very similar to a course that I took last year through Goldman Sachs called the Goldman Sachs 10 KSB program, which is 10,000 small business program. And it is exactly what you just described, we would get the information, we would they would give us prompts to do ourselves, we have a paired partner, where we would talk about them, then we go into the larger group and talk about what our partners did. And the partners would talk about what we did. And it was really, really helpful. And that's the first time I've experienced that I've never experienced that at a continuing education course. So in it, it it really, like when you're done, you're like, Oh, I yeah, I know this, I understand it, I get the concepts, it's like rooted in there, because you had so many conversations about it with one on one with your instructor and with the group.   23:00 I think physical therapy can be so at work, we are so busy, right? Seeing 12 to 20 people a day, sometimes you have to be going, I know, and getting your documentation done all this stuff. It's rote, you're just going, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom. And so going into a Con Ed course and learning a clinical Pearl for five minutes. And maybe you even talk briefly with your buddy about how you might use that. The sad fact is that on Monday, when you go in your brain, you are going to drop down into habitual levels that just are, especially if you've been in practice for more than six months. And it takes a lot of energy to, to, in the moment, reflect back on what you did and saw and actually incorporate it deeply into your body. But with these techniques, we can get at least a tiny little tendril, of a root. And hopefully that can grow and root a little deeper, so that we see more change in how we're actually working. And we're actually treating patients   24:17 and does it sounds like we're becoming a little too robotic. A little too robotic, maybe in work a little too robotic in continuing ed. You know, like, you're okay, I have to go. I'm going to sit, I'm going to listen to these lectures. I'm going to get through it. I'm going to get my CPUs and then I'm going to do this on Monday and then it just doesn't happen. So then what what happens to that continuing education? Does it just fall out of your head like what happens?   24:47 Well, how many times have you take learned anatomy of the hip? Every single continuing education course you teach anatomy of the hip? I have taught I learned it. I've taught it many, many times. Each and every single time, I forget it. And I need that review because those things do drop out of our heads so quickly. And it's not bad. It's not saying that we're wrong or awful, that is normal. That is being a human, we can't get away from it.   25:18 One of the things that we try to do with these opportunities to really engage with the different people that are there in this in this group with you learning together, is giving you the opportunity to take that that new knowledge, or maybe that review of knowledge you've learned before, and take it and look at it a different way. And think about how you know, the person you're working with is going to use that in their practice, and then really work as a team to think about how can I take this knowledge in on Monday, in my setting, I mean, you know, here in Montana, I have clinicians that are going back to, to dot Montana, and are practicing in the next PT is 100 miles away. So how can they incorporate that into their clinical practice, versus the clinician, you know, that's in a sports specialized clinic in Bozeman, Montana. And so we really want to empower clinicians not just to suck in all the information that we're giving to them, but actually really dig into the material and think about how they can use it. And so one of the things we're trying to do with our courses is challenge the assumption that in these 15, CEUs, that you're going to earn, that we have to pack in as much material as possible. That's really not an assumption that we're working off of. So we're we're going to kind of switch that paradigm and say, instead of having this massive breadth of information, we're gonna give you a smaller amount of information, but we're gonna go a lot deeper. And we're really going to dig into how you can use this in clinical practice. And so it's just a kind of a shift in that assumption.   27:01 Yeah. And that leads me into the next question, again, a great lead in how is Trailhead learning collective different? How were you set up differently,   27:10 one of the things that we talked about a lot. And going back to when you said, it sounds like we're getting a little robotic. I think one of our kind of prime values, our main values is authenticity and respect. And that's respecting everything from the land that we're on to the humans that we're working with. We are working with humans, our patients are humans, but are we as clinicians are human. And I think it's important to respect that, like taking that much time away is hard. And burnout is very, very real and extremely prevalent. So one of the things that we are really wanting to do is make a trailhead learning retreat, actually, that like it's a retreat, it is the time to rediscover joy. In physical therapy, it's a time to go to a cool place, have someone take care of you. So all inclusive, your housings included, it's delightful, you're on a mountain or on a beach or wherever we happen to be in the desert. In house chef cooking your meals that are delicious, and primed for you. And having active learning where you're an active participant and feeling engaged, and validated and real, and also get to go out and adventure like experience the place. Yeah, I've been to so many cool places for continuing education, and ended up sitting in a plant in a clinic or in a conference room for the entire day. And then, in order to get any exercise at all, I just went for a run on the treadmill in the hotel. And I didn't get to experience anything about that place. So I think one of the thing that is making Trailhead different is we're really trying to treat the learner as a whole human being and make this time worth it both personally and professionally. In kind of all of those different aspects when you go for a cool trail run, we can make that happen. And you can get 15 hours you can tick that box for sure. And we'll make it worth your time. And you get to be taken care of for a little while.   29:44 Yeah, kind of reminds me of when you see on social media people saying How come I didn't take Monday off of work after having this continuing ed course it was too much and now I'm like totally burned out. So it sounds like maybe this would quell that a little bit. it. And the other part I wanted to talk about is something that we spoke about before we went on. And that's making a connection with the people in the course with you. Because so often we go to these courses, maybe there's 20 people, maybe there's 100, and you end up knowing no one, when you leave. Right. So how, how are you addressing that?   30:21 Yeah, Karen, that's a great point, I went to a continuing education course, a few years ago in San Francisco, and coming from, you know, at the time I was practicing in rural Alaska. And so I really would have loved to get to know more about, like, what is clinical practice, like, in San Francisco compared to, you know, what I am navigating and I left not knowing a single person, you know, part of that is on me, I didn't, you know, I did the thing that a lot of us do it kind of courses, I sat at my phone in the plant, I said, some, you know, small talk at the coffee. And so we're making a really deliberate effort, we're all in the same housing, we're sharing all of our meals together, and engaging in physical activity together, in addition to the time that we're doing the act of learning and getting those continuing ed credits done. And so really creating a space for folks to show up authentically. So I don't expect anyone to show up to her courses, having had 100% success with every single patient they've ever treated, but we want folks to show up and, you know, talk openly and honestly about the places that they struggle in their clinical practice, and, you know, had those conversations and to have this network develop, as we're in this space together. The the course that we're teaching in October is, of course, provincial wellness for the running athlete. And, you know, Audrey is gonna start us off with some really great conversation about bias and how our beliefs about ourselves as runners impacts how we believe and talk to our running athlete, patients. And so you know, being able to kind of explore those parts of ourselves and how they inform our clinical practice, or maybe, at times, potentially cloud our judgment, we can start to have those more intimate conversations as clinicians and people and start to build that network so that when you leave, you have this collective of physical therapists that you know, that you've created some bonds with.   32:25 Yeah, so kind of being a little more social. And, you know, off it sounds to me, like business retreats that I've gone on, you know, even if it's a one day mastermind, you leave with these people who, even after one day, kind of stay with you, because you've purposefully made those bonds.   32:46 Yeah, exactly. And I think that's one of the things that, that the business role does really well is that if we're gonna bring all these people together, we're going to, you know, put them in spaces and create opportunities for them to network on that deeper level. And in physical therapy, we are so focused on getting our patients better at all are we're so focused on the patient, that oftentimes the time when we gather for continued education, we're not speaking about each other as clinicians. And, and like Audra said those hope people that show up. And so that's one of the ways that we are approaching this differently.   33:24 Yeah, it sounds it sounds delightful. And now as we start to wrap things up, what do you want the listeners to take away? What are your big talking points? Or maybe there's only one? I don't know. But what do you want people to take away from? How and why you're doing things differently?   33:47 I think one of the one of the things that I want people to understand for themselves is that there is a time and place for everything. And sometimes you need that quick online 30 minutes learning about FAI, or stroke or whatever, because you have a patient who's really like, right, then you need a little bit and you should get some credit for the work that you do in that moment. I think that's excellent. I really like the you know, read for credit that JLS PT does, I had a paper that was a read for credit paper and I was like, This is great. Somebody's gonna like get value, monetary value from reading my paper. That is excellent. traditional lecture has its place but then I think it's fine. I think it's important for people to say you know what, this is what I need. I I need this time and I'm okay with going and getting it I deserve that. I am a value as well. And this is important. So I think you know valuing Oh, that kind of experience a little more. want somebody to take that away? Well, you know, I think that   35:09 I have two small daughters. And oftentimes the parenting people say, you know, it's really important to take care of yourself so that you can better take care of your kids. And I think that we have to remember that as clinicians, and so finding ways to really take care of ourselves as, as people and humans, as we're doing this continuing education, certainly there's those times where like Audrey said, you need that quick Con Ed. But there, there is an alternative way to get your continuing education done. That also takes care of yourself.   35:43 Yeah, I love it. I love the concept around it. And I, I think you guys are going to be successful in this because it sounds like it's plugging a hole in the continuing education world that people really want. And I also think it's outstanding that you are both been educators for close to a decade. And you can bring all of that to, to continuing education courses. Because I think that's really important. Now, let's talk about when the course is where people can find it social media, where can they find you give us all the details.   36:28 Yeah, so our upcoming courses October 7, eighth, and ninth in Whitefish, Montana. So as I said earlier, so of course on prevention and wellness for the running athlete that is paired with guided trail running with our friends and partners with Alpine reading diets. So you can find information about our course and upcoming courses, we're about to announce a winter course that snowshoeing skiing, and biking, fat biking. That's all on our website, Trailhead. learned.com,   37:01 I wanted to say that we're gonna do 10% off the first retreat for healthy, wealthy and smart listeners, just we so the way we do it is we get your information, and then call you this is a very intimate environment. So we want to start off that way. So you would send us your information that you're interested in the course we call you, we get everything. And at that point, just say that you heard about it from healthy, wealthy and smart.   37:29 The last question is what I asked everyone, and knowing where you are now in your life, and in your career, what advice would you give to your younger self and your younger self, let's say maybe right out of PT, school,   37:43 you know, the advice that I would give to my younger self, is actually advice that I continue to get to my, I'm not gonna say older self, but current self. And we'll get to my future self. You know, I read this great book, by Adam Grant called Think again. And in the book, he talks about, you know, really staying flexible in your thinking. And I think there's been a lot of times in my life that I've had a five year plan, and I'm going to fix my five year plan. And I think I would encourage my younger self to have maybe a very loose plan, but to not get too stuck on what the five year plan is, there are certainly times in life where that five year plan helps you stick it out, like when you're doing your doctorate or science. But there's been so many opportunities that if I was, you know, had pigeon holed myself into that five year plan, I would have missed them. And so to remain flexible, and keep watching for those various opportunities.   38:42 Yeah, I love it. Audrey, how about you?   38:47 I think they would give the same advice to myself now that I did, that I would give to my younger self as well. And it's advice that I give to my students. And that would be that it's all worth it. Like all of those experiences are things that you can draw on for your as you're talking to patients. And as you're thinking critically, I teach clinical reasoning, and all of those experiences give you some flexibility of thought. And I think that's really important. So like going and just experimenting and being okay, like it's alright to go do different things that aren't exactly on   39:30 your path. Excellent advice from both of you. And I do want to thank you so much for coming on the podcast and talking about doing continuing education different with Trailhead learning collective. I think it's it sounds like a great opportunity, and I encourage all the listeners to check it out. We'll have links at the podcast, follow them on social media. So thank you so much for coming on and sharing all of your fun stuff. Coming up. Thanks so much.   40:03 Thanks for having us. Ontarian it's been great to chat with you. Yes. Awesome.   40:06 Thanks so much,   40:07 and everyone thanks so much for listening. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.   40:13 Thank you for listening and please subscribe to the podcast at podcast dot healthy, wealthy smart.com. And don't forget to follow us on social media

This Matters
To boost or not to boost? Ontario expands fourth shots to all adults

This Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 14:34


Guest: May Warren, Toronto Star reporter Fourth COVID-19 vaccine doses are now open to all Ontarians older than 18 years of age. Ontario's chief medical officer of health Dr. Kieran Moore made the much awaited announcement to expand eligibility on Wednesday, but the tone of the announcement left many confused. Dr. Moore said that healthy, currently vaccinated people continue to have significant protection against the worst effects of COVID, and can, if they want, wait for a new vaccine in the fall that will better target Omicron variants. So, should you get a shot right now or not? Reporter May Warren helps you make that decision. This episode was produced by Saba Eitizaz, Alexis Green and Matthew Hearn

Talking Scared
98 – Tim McGregor and Blaming the Danish

Talking Scared

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 70:38


Things are a bit fishy this week, as I'm joined by long-time friend-of-the-show Tim McGregor (@TimMcGregor1) to talk about the long history of fish-tailed women and why we find them so frightening … and sexy! Tim's forthcoming novella, Lure, is a mermaid story with bite! No Ariel here; Sebastian the Crab is hiding. Instead it's about the war of attrition between a brutal patriarchal settlement and the sea-she-creature who holds them to account.(a little fitting for this week's misogyny-a-thon in the Supreme Court) As well as mermaid lore, we also talk about Tim's upbringing in the Ontarian wilds … and his father's axe … as well as disagreeing on heroes and villains, and delving into Tim's experiences on the periphery of one of the year's biggest horror meltdowns.  Enjoy! Lure is published on July 18th by Tenebrous PressOther books discussed in this episode include:Between Two Fires (2012), by Christopher BuelhmanInto the Drowning Deep (2017), by Mira GrantAll the Murmuring Bones (2021), by Angela Slatter – (episode 29)The Essex Serpent (2016), by Sarah PerryThe Monsters of Templeton (2008), by Lauren GroffSupport Talking Scared on PatreonCome talk books on Twitter @talkscaredpod, on Instagram, or email direct to talkingscaredpod@gmail.com Download Novellic on Google Play or Apple Store.Support the show

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Between Governments: Ontario's Provincial Politics Purgatory

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 10:57


Queen's Park reporter Jessica Smith Cross helps Ontarians navigate the political grey area between election day and the day new MPPs are sworn in, as a part of the 43rd legislative assembly. Who's currently in the premier's chair and what comes next? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CrossPolitic Studios
Ontarians and Gun Owners Lose While Alphabet Soup Totali-tolerance Continues [Liberty Dispatch]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 69:22


Liberty Dispatch ~ June 7, 2022 On this episode, co-hosts Andrew DeBartolo and Matthew Hallick discuss the results of the Ontario Election 2022 and the Fed's handgun grab. They are also joined by guest Cory McKenna of The Cross Current and Tim Tysoe host of The Liberty Lounge. [Story 1] Ontario Election 2022 Recap: Ontario Election Results 2022. The Firing Squad: Tampa Bay Rays Players Criticized for Not Promoting Pride Month: Most, but not all, Rays show their LGBTQ+ support | Tampa Bay Times; Ron DeSantis vetoes $35M Tampa Bay Rays baseball complex after team's gun control tweet: report; Gas Prices Continue to Soar: Canada Average Regular Gas Price Comparison by Province, Washington state gas stations run out of fuel, prep for $10 a gallon; Gas prices soar over $10 per gallon in many European cities: Roadshow; James Topp Continues His March Across Canada: Canadian Armed Forces veteran marching from Vancouver to Ottawa for freedom - Rebel News. [Story 2] Canadian Federal Government Set to Ban Handguns: Invoking Uvalde, Trudeau out to freeze handgun sales - POLITICO; Canada introduces law to freeze handgun sales, ban look-alike toys | Reuters; Gun violence, by the numbers | CBC Docs POV; A Brief History of Gun Control: A Disarmed Population Is Easier To Oppress Than An Armed One; This Is the Number of Innocent People Murdered by Governments. Are You Anti-State Yet? Sick of Mainstream Media Lies? Please Support us in bringing you real, truthful reporting and analysis from a Christian perspective.Subscribe to our various shows:LIBERTY DISPATCH PODCAST: https://libertydispatch.podbean.com OPEN MIKE WITH MICHAEL THIESSEN: https://openmikewithmichaelthiessen.podbean.com THE LIBERTY LOUNGE WITH TIM TYSOE: https://rumble.com/c/c-1639185 Stay up-to-date on all things LCC: Gab: https://gab.com/libertycoalitioncanada Telegram: https://t.me/libertycoalitioncanadanews Instagram: https://instagram.com/libertycoalitioncanada Facebook: https://facebook.com/LibertyCoalitionCanada Twitter: @LibertyCCanada - https://twitter.com/LibertyCCanada Rumble: https://rumble.com/user/LibertyCoalitionCanada YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLb1yNIeJ-2bSuHRW4oftRQ You can also find us on Spotify & Apple Podcasts and just about every other podcast catcher!Please LIKE, SUBSCRIBE, RATE & REVIEW and SHARE it with others!

ON Point with Alex Pierson
A Record Heatwave And Thousands Are Still Without Power

ON Point with Alex Pierson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 12:00


Guest host Arlene Bynon is joined by Miriam Diamond, a Professor for the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Toronto to talk about the thousands of Ontarians still without power. Miriam tells Arlene how these events are just beginning, and will be very unpredictable.  Let's get talking See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rebel News +
DAILY | Trudeau decriminalizes drugs in BC; Border restrictions extended; Ontario votes tomorrow

Rebel News +

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 59:27


Andrew Chapados and Dakota Christensen give their reactions to Prime Minister Trudeau's decision to decriminalize hard drugs in British Columbia, the extension of border restrictions and look ahead as Ontarians head to the polls to select the province's next premier tomorrow.

This Matters
There is a big demand for accessible housing in Ontario. Few can find it

This Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 20:51


Guest: Bailey Martens, Toronto Star reporter Despite 2.6 million people in Ontario being disabled, there is no policy mandating barrier-free housing for those who need it. There is not even a mention of housing in the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). For many people with disabilities in this province, the search for housing is as challenging as the lack of options. Star reporter Bailey Martens spoke to one family that had to move eight times in eight years to find wheelchair accessible housing for their young child. She tells their story on today's episode. This episode was produced by Saba Eitizaz, Alexis Green and Matthew Hearn

New Left Radio
Who Should Win the Ontario Election, with Tony Clement and Rima Berns-McGown

New Left Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 46:41


Fan of the show? https://www.patreon.com/newleftradio (Support us on Patreon)! We're joined by former Ontario and federal Minister of Health Tony Clement and (newly) former ONDP MPP Rima Berns-McGown to discuss all things Ontario election and just who Ontarians should select on June 2nd. About Hon. Tony Clement The Honourable Tony Clement is a former Minister in the Stephen Harper Government federally, and the Mike Harris and Ernie Eves Governments in the Province of Ontario. During his time in the House of Commons (2006-2019) Mr. Clement served as: Minister of Health, Minister of Industry, President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario. He therefore played a lead role in getting Canada's economy back on track after the most significant global economic recession since the 1930s. In Opposition Clement was Foreign Affairs Critic and Justice Critic. https://twitter.com/tonyclementcpc?s=21 (Follow Tony on Twitter) About Rima Berns-McGown Dr. Rima Berns-McGown is the former member of Provincial Parliament for Beaches-East York. She served as the Official Opposition Critic for Poverty and Homelessness and a member of the Standing Committee on the Legislative Assembly. Before she was elected, Rima taught Diaspora Studies at the University of Toronto. She holds a PhD in International Politics from the University of Aberystwyth, an MA from the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International studies of the Johns Hopkins University, and a Bachelor of Journalism and Political Science from Carleton University. She has a long history of writing about and advocating for systemic change that creates equity and societies that truly work for everyone who lives in them. Rima was born in South Africa of a mixed background and is proud to be a member of Ontario's first Black Caucus. https://twitter.com/beyrima?s=21&t=Mf5AXSMB1Kcg-hb3vREsYA (Follow Rima on Twitter) Stay connected with the latest from New Left Radio by https://newleft.us6.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=8227a4372fe8dc22bdbf0e3db&id=e99d6c70b4 (joining our mailing list) today! _________