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Best podcasts about north carolina press

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Latest podcast episodes about north carolina press

Dig: A History Podcast
Ghosting the Patriarchy: Spiritualism and the Nineteenth-Century Women's Rights Movement

Dig: A History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 48:39


Spiritualism Series, Episode # 4 of 4. When Ann Braude published her groundbreaking book Radical Spirits in 1989, critics did not like that Braude prominently linked the women's rights movement, particularly during the antebellum period, with Spiritualism. And even now, thirty years on, many histories still gloss over these important connections. So today we are exploring the close association of Spiritualism and the women's rights movement of the nineteenth century. Bibliography Braude, Ann. Radical Spirits: Spiritualism and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America. Second Edition. Indiana University Press, 2001. Cox, Robert S. Body and Soul: A Sympathetic History of American Spiritualism. University of Virginia Press, Reprint 2017.  Franzen, Trisha. Anna Howard Shaw: The Work of Woman Suffrage. University of Illinois Press, 2014.  Hewitt, Nancy A. Radical Friend: Amy Kirby Post and Her Activist Worlds. The University of North Carolina Press, 2018.  McGarry, Molly. Ghosts of Futures Past: Spiritualism and the Cultural Politics of Nineteenth-Century America. University of California Press, 2008.  Seeman, Erik R. Speaking with the Dead in Early America. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

New Books Network
Ricardo A. Herrera, "Feeding Washington's Army: Surviving the Valley Forge Winter of 1778" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 63:53


In Feeding Washington's Army: Surviving the Valley Forge Winter of 1778 (University of North Carolina Press, 2022), Dr. Ricardo Herrera presents a major new history of the Continental Army's Grand Forage of 1778. Dr. Herrera uncovers what daily life was like for soldiers during the darkest and coldest days of the American Revolution: the Valley Forge winter. Here, the army launched its largest and riskiest operation—not a bloody battle against British forces but a campaign to feed itself and prevent starvation or dispersal during the long encampment. Dr. Herrera brings to light the army's herculean efforts to feed itself, support local and Continental governments, and challenge the British Army. Highlighting the missteps and triumphs of both General George Washington and his officers as well as ordinary soldiers, sailors, and militiamen, Feeding Washington's Army moves far beyond oft-told, heroic, and mythical tales of Valley Forge and digs deeply into its daily reality, revealing how close the Continental Army came to succumbing to starvation and how strong and resourceful its soldiers and leaders actually were. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Military History
Ricardo A. Herrera, "Feeding Washington's Army: Surviving the Valley Forge Winter of 1778" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 63:53


In Feeding Washington's Army: Surviving the Valley Forge Winter of 1778 (University of North Carolina Press, 2022), Dr. Ricardo Herrera presents a major new history of the Continental Army's Grand Forage of 1778. Dr. Herrera uncovers what daily life was like for soldiers during the darkest and coldest days of the American Revolution: the Valley Forge winter. Here, the army launched its largest and riskiest operation—not a bloody battle against British forces but a campaign to feed itself and prevent starvation or dispersal during the long encampment. Dr. Herrera brings to light the army's herculean efforts to feed itself, support local and Continental governments, and challenge the British Army. Highlighting the missteps and triumphs of both General George Washington and his officers as well as ordinary soldiers, sailors, and militiamen, Feeding Washington's Army moves far beyond oft-told, heroic, and mythical tales of Valley Forge and digs deeply into its daily reality, revealing how close the Continental Army came to succumbing to starvation and how strong and resourceful its soldiers and leaders actually were. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books in History
Ricardo A. Herrera, "Feeding Washington's Army: Surviving the Valley Forge Winter of 1778" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 63:53


In Feeding Washington's Army: Surviving the Valley Forge Winter of 1778 (University of North Carolina Press, 2022), Dr. Ricardo Herrera presents a major new history of the Continental Army's Grand Forage of 1778. Dr. Herrera uncovers what daily life was like for soldiers during the darkest and coldest days of the American Revolution: the Valley Forge winter. Here, the army launched its largest and riskiest operation—not a bloody battle against British forces but a campaign to feed itself and prevent starvation or dispersal during the long encampment. Dr. Herrera brings to light the army's herculean efforts to feed itself, support local and Continental governments, and challenge the British Army. Highlighting the missteps and triumphs of both General George Washington and his officers as well as ordinary soldiers, sailors, and militiamen, Feeding Washington's Army moves far beyond oft-told, heroic, and mythical tales of Valley Forge and digs deeply into its daily reality, revealing how close the Continental Army came to succumbing to starvation and how strong and resourceful its soldiers and leaders actually were. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in British Studies
Ricardo A. Herrera, "Feeding Washington's Army: Surviving the Valley Forge Winter of 1778" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in British Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 63:53


In Feeding Washington's Army: Surviving the Valley Forge Winter of 1778 (University of North Carolina Press, 2022), Dr. Ricardo Herrera presents a major new history of the Continental Army's Grand Forage of 1778. Dr. Herrera uncovers what daily life was like for soldiers during the darkest and coldest days of the American Revolution: the Valley Forge winter. Here, the army launched its largest and riskiest operation—not a bloody battle against British forces but a campaign to feed itself and prevent starvation or dispersal during the long encampment. Dr. Herrera brings to light the army's herculean efforts to feed itself, support local and Continental governments, and challenge the British Army. Highlighting the missteps and triumphs of both General George Washington and his officers as well as ordinary soldiers, sailors, and militiamen, Feeding Washington's Army moves far beyond oft-told, heroic, and mythical tales of Valley Forge and digs deeply into its daily reality, revealing how close the Continental Army came to succumbing to starvation and how strong and resourceful its soldiers and leaders actually were. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 631 (7-4-22): Frogs and Fireworks

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:22).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImageExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-30-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of July 4 and July 11, 2022.  This is a repeat of a 2016 episode celebrating the July 4th holiday.  The episode features Virginia Tech master's degree graduate Kriddie Whitmore as a guest voice. SOUNDS - ~ 4 sec – Gray Treefrogs and fireworks. This week, for Independence Day episode, we drop in on a most unusual July 4th conversation: two Gray Treefrogs, surrounded by fireworks, are debating U.S. water history.  Sound unimaginable?  Well, just have a listen. SOUNDS - ~2 sec – Frogs and fireworks. Frog 1 – There those humans go again, shootin' off their fireworks and makin' it hard for us frogs to hear each other's calls!  What's all the ruckus about, anyway? Frog 2 - Why, it's July 4th!  They're celebrating this country's Declaration of Independence in 1776 from Great Britain.  I think it's cool—at least it's a break from hearing YOU guys calling every evening. Frog 1 – And just why are YOU so excited about the birthday of this big, bustling, human country?  Seems to me that it's been nothing but trouble for aquatic habitats and creatures like us since those first ships came over here from that Europe place.  Everywhere we try to hop, there's polluted rivers and lakes, lost wetlands and other habitats, and hot, dry pavement. Frog 2 – Well, yeah, you're right, partly.  This country's waters have had a pretty hard history.  And we amphibians have had the worst of it in some cases and places, with this permeable skin we have.  But you're forgetting about some positive things.  The humans' Congress passed the Clean Water Act in 1972, and a bunch other important acts, too.  And right here in this state, Virginia, the constitution says it's the Commonwealth's policy to protect its atmosphere, lands, and waters from pollution, impairment, or destruction. Frog 1 - Have all those things done any good? Frog 2 – Well, not always or everywhere.  Just in Virginia, hundreds of water bodies are impaired and need expensive clean-up programs.  For instance, I've got cousins living near that Chesapeake Bay, and they tell me every year it's some things good, other things fair, and still others needing a ton of work.  But many rivers and lakes certainly are in better shape than they were 40 or 50 years ago; the Potomac River's one example.  Those humans have many competing interests, so sometimes what they do isn't so good for water, or lands, or creatures like us. But other times, it is.  People have learned a lot over the years about using and managing natural resources more sustainably, and all kinds of people work hard trying to do that. Frog 1 - Yeah, I guess you're right.  You know, it's not easy being a frog, but I guess it's pretty tough being a person, too. Frog 2 – Now that's a pretty realistic call! SOUNDS - ~3 sec – fireworks.Frog 2  – Hey, there's the fireworks finale.  And that sounds like the Air Force Concert Band playing one of my favorites, “The Washington Post,” by John Philip Sousa.  Let's have a quick listen, then we better get back under cover.  All the humans will be coming back from the fireworks soon. Both frogs – Happy July 4th!MUSIC - ~ 14 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode replaces Episode 323, 7-4-16, and Episode 427, 7-2-18. Virginia Water Radio thanks Kriddie Whitmore, a 2016 master's degree graduate in Forestry from Virginia Tech, for participating as the guest voice in this episode. Thanks also to Jennifer Gagnon, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, for reviewing a draft of the episode. This episode's frog and fireworks sounds were recorded Blacksburg, Va., around 9:30 p.m. on July 4, 2015. This episode's music was an excerpt of “The Washington Post,” written by John Philip Sousa in 1889, and performed here by the United States Air Force Concert Band on their 2001 album “I Am An American,” accessed online at http://www.allmusic.com/album/i-am-an-american-mw0002256231, as of 6-29-22.  Information about “The Washington Post” is available from the United States Marine Band, “Sousa-The Washington Post” (3:30 video), online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mxrh1CrMmTY; and “The President's Own/John Philip Sousa,” online at http://www.marineband.marines.mil/About/Our-History/John-Philip-Sousa/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE (Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) on the deck of a residence in Blacksburg, Va., Sep. 23, 2009. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT CONSERVATION IN THE VIRGINIA CONSTITUTION Following are the four sections of Article XI, “Conservation,” of the Virginia Constitution, as accessed at the Virginia Legislative Information System, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/constitution/article11/, on June 30, 2022.Section 1. Natural resources and historical sites of the Commonwealth.To the end that the people have clean air, pure water, and the use and enjoyment for recreation of adequate public lands, waters, and other natural resources, it shall be the policy of the Commonwealth to conserve, develop, and utilize its natural resources, its public lands, and its historical sites and buildings.  Further, it shall be the Commonwealth's policy to protect its atmosphere, lands, and waters from pollution, impairment, or destruction, for the benefit, enjoyment, and general welfare of the people of the Commonwealth. Section 2. Conservation and development of natural resources and historical sites. In the furtherance of such policy, the General Assembly may undertake the conservation, development, or utilization of lands or natural resources of the Commonwealth, the acquisition and protection of historical sites and buildings, and the protection of its atmosphere, lands, and waters from pollution, impairment, or destruction, by agencies of the Commonwealth or by the creation of public authorities, or by leases or other contracts with agencies of the United States, with other states, with units of government in the Commonwealth, or with private persons or corporations.  Notwithstanding the time limitations of the provisions of Article X, Section 7, of this Constitution, the Commonwealth may participate for any period of years in the cost of projects which shall be the subject of a joint undertaking between the Commonwealth and any agency of the United States or of other states. Section 3. Natural oyster beds. The natural oyster beds, rocks, and shoals in the waters of the Commonwealth shall not be leased, rented, or sold but shall be held in trust for the benefit of the people of the Commonwealth, subject to such regulations and restriction as the General Assembly may prescribe, but the General Assembly may, from time to time, define and determine such natural beds, rocks, or shoals by surveys or otherwise. Section 4. Right of the people to hunt, fish, and harvest game. The people have a right to hunt, fish, and harvest game, subject to such regulations and restrictions as the General Assembly may prescribe by general law.SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Program, online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/; and “Slight improvements in Bay health and new economic data added in 2021 Chesapeake Bay Report Card,” June 7, 2022, news release, online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/news/blog/slight_improvements_in_bay_health_and_new_economic_data_added_in_2021_chesa.Commonwealth of Virginia, Constitution of Virginia, “Article XI Conservation,” accessed online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/constitution/article11/. John D. Kleopfer and Chris S. Hobson, A Guide to the Frogs and Toad of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now Department of Wildlife Resources), Richmond, Va., 2011. Bernard S. Martof, et al., Amphibians and Reptiles of the Carolinas and Virginia, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1980. Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, “Water Quality Monitoring in the Potomac Estuary,” online at http://www.mwcog.org/environment/water/potomacestuary.asp.Thomas V. Cech, Principles of Water Resources: History, Development, Management, and Policy, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, N.Y., 2003.U.S. Environmental Protection Agency:“National Aquatic Resources Surveys,” online at https://www.epa.gov/national-aquatic-resource-surveys;“Summary of the Clean Water Act,” online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations/summary-clean-water-act.Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Water Quality Assessments/Integrated Report,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quality/assessments/integrated-report.Zygmunt J. B. Plater et al., Environmental Law and Policy: Nature, Law, and Society, West Publishing Co., St. Paul, Minn., 1998. For More Information about Amphibians in Virginia and Elsewhere AmphibiaWeb, https://amphibiaweb.org/index.html. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. J.C. Mitchell and K.K. Reay, Atlas of Amphibians and Reptiles in Virginia, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries/Richmond (1999); available online (as a PDF) at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/atlases/mitchell-atlas.pdf, courtesy of the Virginia Herpetological Society.  (Herpetology is the study of amphibians and reptiles.) Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“A Guide to Virginia's Frogs and Toads,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/frogs-and-toads/;“A Guide to the Salamanders of Virginia,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/salamanders/;“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/(the Gray Treefrog entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020007&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19173);“List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf;“Virginia is for Frogs,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/virginia-is-for-frogs/;“Wildlife Information,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/information/. Virginia Herpetological Society, “Frogs and Toads of Virginia,” online at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/frogs_and_toads_of_virginia.htm. For More Information about Federal Environmental and Natural Resources LawsCornell University Law School/Legal Information Institute:“Environmental Law,” online at https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/environmental_law; “Natural Resources,” online at https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/natural_resources. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “Laws and Regulations,” online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations.  The section for the Clean Water Act is online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations/summary-clean-water-act; the section for the Endangered Species Act is online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations/summary-endangered-species-act; the section for the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is online at https://www.epa.gov/nepa. For More Information about Virginia Natural Resources Laws Virginia Secretary of Natural Resources Web site, online at http://naturalresources.virginia.gov/.  See the “Agencies” link to access the various Virginia state agencies involved with resources regulation and management. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Amphibians” and “History” subject categories. Following is the link to another episode on Gray Treefrogs.Episode 528, 6-8-20. Following are links to other episodes done for July 4th. Episode 168, 7-1-13 – Water and the Revolutionary War.Episode 220, 6-30-14 – Water origins of Virginia Declaration signers.Episode 273, 7-6-15 – The Great Road on the Virginia Peninsula.FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and ProcessesK.7 – Plants and animals have basic needs and life processes.1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; human actions can affect the availability of natural resources; and reducing, reusing, and recycling are ways to conserve natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations. Biology&

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New Books in History
Mahshid Mayar, "Citizens and Rulers of the World: The American Child and the Cartographic Pedagogies of Empire" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 39:05


In this episode of New Books in Literary Studies, John Yargo spoke with Mahshid Mayar about how children's puzzles and schoolbooks at the turn of the 20th century helped shape U.S. political relations with the world. Professor Mayar is an assistant professor of American Studies at Bielefeld University and research associate at the English Department, Amherst College. Mahshid has just published Citizens and Rulers of the World: The American Child and the Cartographic Pedagogies of Empire, with the University of North Carolina Press. Citizens and Rulers of the World recovers how American children at the turn of the 20th century navigated knowledge about world geography in the shadow of the rapidly expanding American empire. John Yargo recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Mahshid Mayar, "Citizens and Rulers of the World: The American Child and the Cartographic Pedagogies of Empire" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 39:05


In this episode of New Books in Literary Studies, John Yargo spoke with Mahshid Mayar about how children's puzzles and schoolbooks at the turn of the 20th century helped shape U.S. political relations with the world. Professor Mayar is an assistant professor of American Studies at Bielefeld University and research associate at the English Department, Amherst College. Mahshid has just published Citizens and Rulers of the World: The American Child and the Cartographic Pedagogies of Empire, with the University of North Carolina Press. Citizens and Rulers of the World recovers how American children at the turn of the 20th century navigated knowledge about world geography in the shadow of the rapidly expanding American empire. John Yargo recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Literary Studies
Mahshid Mayar, "Citizens and Rulers of the World: The American Child and the Cartographic Pedagogies of Empire" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 39:05


In this episode of New Books in Literary Studies, John Yargo spoke with Mahshid Mayar about how children's puzzles and schoolbooks at the turn of the 20th century helped shape U.S. political relations with the world. Professor Mayar is an assistant professor of American Studies at Bielefeld University and research associate at the English Department, Amherst College. Mahshid has just published Citizens and Rulers of the World: The American Child and the Cartographic Pedagogies of Empire, with the University of North Carolina Press. Citizens and Rulers of the World recovers how American children at the turn of the 20th century navigated knowledge about world geography in the shadow of the rapidly expanding American empire. John Yargo recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in American Studies
Mahshid Mayar, "Citizens and Rulers of the World: The American Child and the Cartographic Pedagogies of Empire" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 39:05


In this episode of New Books in Literary Studies, John Yargo spoke with Mahshid Mayar about how children's puzzles and schoolbooks at the turn of the 20th century helped shape U.S. political relations with the world. Professor Mayar is an assistant professor of American Studies at Bielefeld University and research associate at the English Department, Amherst College. Mahshid has just published Citizens and Rulers of the World: The American Child and the Cartographic Pedagogies of Empire, with the University of North Carolina Press. Citizens and Rulers of the World recovers how American children at the turn of the 20th century navigated knowledge about world geography in the shadow of the rapidly expanding American empire. John Yargo recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Geography
Mahshid Mayar, "Citizens and Rulers of the World: The American Child and the Cartographic Pedagogies of Empire" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in Geography

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 39:05


In this episode of New Books in Literary Studies, John Yargo spoke with Mahshid Mayar about how children's puzzles and schoolbooks at the turn of the 20th century helped shape U.S. political relations with the world. Professor Mayar is an assistant professor of American Studies at Bielefeld University and research associate at the English Department, Amherst College. Mahshid has just published Citizens and Rulers of the World: The American Child and the Cartographic Pedagogies of Empire, with the University of North Carolina Press. Citizens and Rulers of the World recovers how American children at the turn of the 20th century navigated knowledge about world geography in the shadow of the rapidly expanding American empire. John Yargo recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography

Green & Red: Podcasts for Scrappy Radicals
Capital's war on the working class w/ Prof. Chad Pearson and Prof. Ahmed White (G&R 168)

Green & Red: Podcasts for Scrappy Radicals

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 66:10


“The remedy” to labor troubles, said J. West Goodwin, a Missouri businessman and newspaperman “is a counter organization.” In a fascinating conversation around the history of capital and labor, we dive deep into the business sector's remedies to workers organizing unions, blacks seeking greater liberation and other forms of progress. We talk about laws criminalizing syndicalism and the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), vigilante groups from the Ku Klux Klan to committees of "law and order" doing the bidding of the ruling class and private security forces that the bosses hire to repress labor organizing. We also discuss current events paralleling the earlier periods of labor and progressive repression. We talk about race, class and the iron heel of the state coming down on all those that resist it. We talk with Prof. Ahmed White at the University of Colardo Boulder, and Prof. Chad Pearson at Collin College about their forthcoming books (see the bios below) on the topics. Bios// Ahmed White is the Nicholas Rosenbaum Professor of Law at the University of Colorado-Boulder where he has taught labor and criminal law since 2000. He is the author of The Last Great Strike: Little Steel, the CIO, and the Struggle for Labor Rights in New Deal America (Oakland: University of California Press, 2016) as well as a great many law review articles, book chapters, reviews, and essays. His current book, Under the Iron Heel: The Wobblies and the Capitalist War on Radical Workers, will be published later this year by the University of California Press and he is presently at work on another book, this one about communist organizing and labor repression in the 1920s and 1930s. Chad Pearson teaches history at Collin College, a community college in Plano, Texas. He is the author of Reform or Repression: Organizing America's Anti-Union Movement (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016) and is co-editor with Rosemary Feurer (pronounced Foyer) of Against Labor: How U.S. Employers Organized to Defeat Union Activism (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2017). He has published essays in Counterpunch, History Compass, Jacobin, Journal of Labor and Society, Labor History, Labour/Le Travail, and Monthly Review. His current book, Capital's Terrorists: Klansmen, Lawmen, and Employers in the Long Nineteenth Century, will be published by the University of North Carolina Press later this year. ----------------------------------------------------------- Outro// "Union Burying Ground" by Woody Guthrie Links// Pearson: Capital's Terrorists: Klansmen, Lawmen, and Employers in the Long Nineteenth Century (https://bit.ly/3zQ8anh) White: Under the Iron Heel The Wobblies and the Capitalist War on Radical (https://bit.ly/3n301Ev) The Ku Klux Klan Was Also a Bosses' Association (https://bit.ly/3y8tQtn) The Right-Wing Violence Trump Has Encouraged Has Deep Roots in American History (https://bit.ly/3tSrr3v) Memorial Day, 1937 (https://bit.ly/39Fo611) Law, Labor, and the Hard Edge of Progressivism: The Legal Repression of Radical Unionism and the American Labor Movement's Long Decline (https://bit.ly/3HEbW55) Follow Green and Red// https://linktr.ee/greenandredpodcast Check out our new website: https://greenandredpodcast.org/ Donate to Green and Red Podcast// Become a recurring donor at https://www.patreon.com/greenredpodcast Or make a one time donation here: https://bit.ly/DonateGandR This is a Green and Red Podcast (@PodcastGreenRed) production. Produced by Bob (@bobbuzzanco) and Scott (@sparki1969). “Green and Red Blues" by Moody. Editing by Isaac.

Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it

By 1861, there were 250,000 free people of color living in the American South. They were signs of contradiction amidst a slave society built upon the concept of white supremacy in a racial hierarchy. Laws curtailed and denied their rights seemingly in every conceivable way, from prohibiting their legal testimony against whites to barring them from the ballot box. Whites attempted to control them through classification, variously and contradictorily terming them "negroes," "mulattoes," "mustees," "Indians," "mixed--bloods," or simply "free people of color". The last of these was the only one which these people seemed to accept for themselves, and make their own. But while these free people of color faced every conceivable attempt to deny them of power and personhood, they succeeded in raising families, building communities, establishing businesses and organizations, and enabling them to flourish. Some even rose to economic prominence in their own communities, even gaining the respect of their white neighbors. And often both groups interacted: in business, in churches, and even in families. My guest Warren Eugene Milteer, Jr., has written three books about free people of color: Hertford County, North Carolina's Free People of Color; North Carolina's Free People of Color, 1715-1885; and Beyond Slavery's Shadow: Free People of Color in the South. As you can see from the tiles, they have moved from investigating a North Carolina county, to gradually encompassing the entire American South. This is therefore a very comprehensive and purposeful project; as you'll find out in our conversation, it's also a deeply personal one. Warren Milteer is Assistant Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. For Further Investigation This is the third and final podcast of the month focusing on the experience of Black Americans in both slavery and freedom. In Episode 266, I had a conversation with Isabela Morales about the incredible story of the Townsend family; and in Episode 267, David Hackett Fischer described some of the regional cultures of Blacks in early America. Melvin Patrick Ely,  Israel on the Appomattox: A Southern Experiment in Black Freedom from the 1790s through the Civil War. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004. Jack D. Forbes, Africans and Native Americans: The Language of Race and the Evolution of Red-Black Peoples. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1993. Luther P. Jackson, Free Negro Labor and Property Holding in Virginia, 1830–1860. New York: D. Appleton-Century, 1942.  Patricia Phillips Marshall and Jo Ramsay Leimenstoll. Thomas Day: Master Craftsman and Free Man of Color. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press,2010.  A. B.Wilkinson, Blurring the Lines of Race and Freedom: Mulattoes and Mixed Bloods in English Colonial America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2020.

LIVE! From City Lights
Farah Jasmine Griffin in Conversation with Robin D.G. Kelley

LIVE! From City Lights

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 54:15


Farah Jasmine Griffin in conversation with Robin D.G. Kelley, discussing her new book "Read Until You Understand: The Profound Wisdom of Black Life and Literature," published by W.W. Norton & Co. This event was originally broadcast via Zoom and hosted by Josiah Luis Alderete. You can purchase copies of "Read Until You Understand: The Profound Wisdom of Black Life and Literature" directly from City Lights here: https://citylights.com/new-nonfiction-in-hardcover/read-until-you-understand/ Farah Jasmine Griffin is a professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of "Who Set You Flowin'?": The African-American Migration Narrative, and the coeditor of "A Stranger in the Village: Two Centuries of African-American Travel Writing." She has been the recipient of fellowships from the Ford Foundation and the Bunting Institute at Radcliffe College. She lives in Philadelphia. Robin D.G. Kelley is a scholar history of social movements in the U.S., the African Diaspora, and Africa; black intellectuals; music and visual culture; Surrealism, Marxism, among other things. His essays have appeared in a wide variety of professional journals as well as general publications, including the Journal of American History, American Historical Review, The Nation, Monthly Review, New York Times, Color Lines, Counterpunch, Souls, Black Renaissance/Renaissance Noir, Social Text ,The Black Scholar, Journal of Palestine Studies, and Boston Review, for which he serves as Contributing Editor. He is the author of "Africa Speaks, America Answers: Modern Jazz in Revolutionary Times" (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2012); "Thelonious Monk: The Life and Times of an American Original" (The Free Press, 2009); "Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination" (Beacon Press, 2002); with Howard Zinn and Dana Frank, "Three Strikes: The Fighting Spirit of Labor's Last Century" (Beacon Press, 2001); "Yo' Mama's Disfunktional!: Fighting the Culture Wars in Urban America"(Boston: Beacon Press, 1997); "Race Rebels: Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class" (New York: The Free Press, 1994); "Into the Fire: African Americans Since 1970" (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996) [Vol. 10 of the Young Oxford History of African Americans series]; "Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression" (Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1990). This event was made possible by support from the City Lights Foundation: citylights.com/foundation

New Books in History
On Religion and Photography in 19th-Century America

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 50:35


Dr. Rachel Lindsey is Assistant Professor in Saint Louis University's Department of Theological Studies. She has a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Religion from Princeton University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from Missouri State University. She is the author of Communion of Shadows: Religion and Photography in Nineteenth Century America from University of North Carolina Press. We discussed Communion of Shadows and her fantastic projects, Lived Religion in the Digital Age and Arch City Religion. You can find Dr. Lindsey's projects at archcityreligion.org and religioninplace.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
On Religion and Photography in 19th-Century America

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 50:35


Dr. Rachel Lindsey is Assistant Professor in Saint Louis University's Department of Theological Studies. She has a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Religion from Princeton University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from Missouri State University. She is the author of Communion of Shadows: Religion and Photography in Nineteenth Century America from University of North Carolina Press. We discussed Communion of Shadows and her fantastic projects, Lived Religion in the Digital Age and Arch City Religion. You can find Dr. Lindsey's projects at archcityreligion.org and religioninplace.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
On Religion and Photography in 19th-Century America

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 50:35


Dr. Rachel Lindsey is Assistant Professor in Saint Louis University's Department of Theological Studies. She has a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Religion from Princeton University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from Missouri State University. She is the author of Communion of Shadows: Religion and Photography in Nineteenth Century America from University of North Carolina Press. We discussed Communion of Shadows and her fantastic projects, Lived Religion in the Digital Age and Arch City Religion. You can find Dr. Lindsey's projects at archcityreligion.org and religioninplace.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Photography
On Religion and Photography in 19th-Century America

New Books in Photography

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 50:35


Dr. Rachel Lindsey is Assistant Professor in Saint Louis University's Department of Theological Studies. She has a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Religion from Princeton University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from Missouri State University. She is the author of Communion of Shadows: Religion and Photography in Nineteenth Century America from University of North Carolina Press. We discussed Communion of Shadows and her fantastic projects, Lived Religion in the Digital Age and Arch City Religion. You can find Dr. Lindsey's projects at archcityreligion.org and religioninplace.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/photography

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
On Religion and Photography in 19th-Century America

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 50:35


Dr. Rachel Lindsey is Assistant Professor in Saint Louis University's Department of Theological Studies. She has a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Religion from Princeton University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from Missouri State University. She is the author of Communion of Shadows: Religion and Photography in Nineteenth Century America from University of North Carolina Press. We discussed Communion of Shadows and her fantastic projects, Lived Religion in the Digital Age and Arch City Religion. You can find Dr. Lindsey's projects at archcityreligion.org and religioninplace.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

New Books in Christian Studies
On Religion and Photography in 19th-Century America

New Books in Christian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 50:35


Dr. Rachel Lindsey is Assistant Professor in Saint Louis University's Department of Theological Studies. She has a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Religion from Princeton University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from Missouri State University. She is the author of Communion of Shadows: Religion and Photography in Nineteenth Century America from University of North Carolina Press. We discussed Communion of Shadows and her fantastic projects, Lived Religion in the Digital Age and Arch City Religion. You can find Dr. Lindsey's projects at archcityreligion.org and religioninplace.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/christian-studies

Leftist Reading
Leftist Reading: Russia in Revolution Part 4

Leftist Reading

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 22:15


Episode 92:This week we're continuing Russia in Revolution An Empire in Crisis 1890 - 1928 by S. A. Smith[Part 1]Introduction[Part 2-3]1. Roots of Revolution, 1880s–1905Autocracy and OrthodoxyPopular ReligionAgriculture and Peasantry[Part 4 - This Week]1. Roots of Revolution, 1880s–1905Industrial Capitalism - 0:41[Part 5]1. Roots of Revolution, 1880s–1905[Part 6 - 8?]2. From Reform to War, 1906–1917[Part 9 - 11?]3. From February to October 1917[Part 12 - 15?]4. Civil War and Bolshevik Power[Part 16 - 18?]5. War Communism[Part 19 - 21?]6. The New Economic Policy: Politics and the Economy[Part 22 - 25?]7. The New Economic Policy: Society and Culture[Part 26?]ConclusionFootnotes:84) 1:06Peter Gatrell, The Tsarist Economy, 1850–1917 (London: Batsford, 1986).85) 3:27Peter Gatrell, ‘Poor Russia, Poor Show: Mobilizing a Backward Economy', in Stephen Broadberry and Mark Harrison (eds), The Economics of World War I (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 235–75 (238).86) 4:31Gatrell, ‘Poor Russia', 237.87) 5:50Rogger, Russia in the Age of Modernisation, 126; Naselenie Rossii v XX veke, vol. 1, 26.88) 6:29Catherine Evtuhov, Portrait of a Russian Province. Economy, Society, and Civilization in Nineteenth-Century Nizhnii Novgorod (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011).89) 7:11S. N. Semanov, Peterburgskie rabochie nakanune pervoi russkoi revoliutsii (Moscow: Nauka, 1966), 152.90) 7:32S. A. Smith, Red Petrograd: Revolution in the Factories (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983), 13.91) 9:26Thomas C. Owen, Capitalism and Politics in Russia: A Social History of the Moscow Merchants, 1855–1905 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981).92) 10:54A. J. Rieber, Merchants and Entrepreneurs in Imperial Russia (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1982).93) 11:00Susan P. McCaffray, The Politics of Industrialization in Tsarist Russia: The Association of Southern Coal and Steel Producers, 1874–1914 (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1996).94) 12:34Figes, People's Tragedy, 113.95) 13:55‘Prokhorovtsy kuptsy', .96) 15:09N. A. Ivanova and V. P. Zheltova, Soslovno-klassovaia struktura Rossii v kontse XIX– nachale XX veka (Moscow: Nauka, 2004), 224.97) 15:48Gregory L. Freeze, ‘The Soslovie (estate) Paradigm and Russian Social History', American Historical Review, 91:1 (1986), 11–36; Elise Kimerling Wirtschafter, Social Identity in Imperial Russia (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1997).98) 16:31Ivanova and Zheltova, Soslovno-klassovaia struktura Rossii, 90–1; Alison K. Smith, For the Common Good and their Own Well-Being: Social Estates in Imperial Russia (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015), 150.99) 17:03Rabochii klass Rossii ot zarozhdeniia do nachala XXv. (Moscow: RAN, 1989), 273.100) 17:15Rashin, Formirovanie, 172.101) 17:42O. I. Shkaratan, Problemy sotsial'noi struktury rabochego klass a SSSR (Moscow: Mysl', 1970), 192.102) 17:54L. D. Trotsky, The History of the Russian Revolution, .103) 18:37Shkaratan, Problemy, 146; E. E. Kruze, Peterburgskie rabochie v 1912–14 godakh (Leningrad: Izd-vo Akademii Nauk SSSR, 1961), 76.104) 19:08Peter Gatrell, Russia's First World War: A Social and Economic History (London: Pearson, 2005), 72.105) 20:34Kahan, Russian Economic History, 172.

Did That Really Happen?

This week we're going back to 17th century Virginia with Disney's Pocahontas! Join us to learn about pugs, the promises of the Virginia Company, tattoos, Governor Ratcliffe, and more! Sources: IMDB, Pocahontas: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0114148/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 The Making of Pocahontas, Documentary available at https://youtu.be/-78sG39u-3g Pocahontas, Rotten Tomatoes: https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/1063452-pocahontas Roger Ebert Review, Pocahontas: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/pocahontas-1995 John White, "Woman of the Secotan-Indians of North Carolina," 1585, available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:North_carolina_algonkin-kleidung01.jpg Edward L Bond, "Source of Knowledge, Source of Power: The Supernatural World of English Virginia, 1607-1624," Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 108, 2 (2000) AT Sinclair, "Tattooing of the North American Indians," American Anthropologist 11, 2 (1909) Pocahontas, Powhatan Museum of Arts and Indigenous Culture, available at http://www.powhatanmuseum.com/Pocahontas.html Joseph Highmore, Portrait of a Lady with a Pug Dog, painting reproduction available at https://artuk.org/discover/artworks/portrait-of-a-lady-with-a-pug-dog-70968 Portrait of a Lady From the Order of the Pug, available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Attributed_to_Anna_Rosina_Lisiewska_-_Portrait_of_a_Lady_from_the_Order_of_the_Pug.png William Hogarth, the Painter and His Pug, available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Painter_and_His_Pug_by_William_Hogarth.jpg Photo of Mausoleum of William the Silent, available at https://www.flickr.com/photos/87453322@N00/14806345853 Pugs, American Kennel Club, available at https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/dog-breeds/pug-history-ancient-companion-origins/ Laura D. Gelfand, Our Dogs, Ourselves: Dogs in Early Modern Art, Literature, and Society. Brill, 2016 Forrest K. Lehman, "Settled Place, Contested Past: Reconciling George Percy's "A Trewe Relacyon" with John Smith's "Generall Historie," Early American Literature 42:2 (2007): 235-61. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25057497  Jeffrey L. Sheler, "Rethinking Jamestown," Smithsonian Magazine (January 2005) https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/rethinking-jamestown-105757282/  John Smith, The generall historie of Virginia, New England & the Summer Isles: together with The true travels, adventures and observations, and A sea grammar. Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/resource/lhbcb.0262a/?st=gallery  (82-106) Captain John Smith: A Select Edition of His Writings ed. Karen Ordahl Kupperman (University of North Carolina, 1988) 79-132. https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807839317_kupperman.9    Martin H. Quitt, "Trade and Acculturation at Jamestown, 1607-1609: The Limits of Understanding," The William and Mary Quarterly 52:2 (1995): 227-258. https://www.jstor.org/stable/2946974  Walter L. Hixson, ""No Savage Shall Inherit the Land": The Indian Enemy Other, Indiscriminate Warfare, and American National Identity, 1607-1783," U.S. Foreign Policy and the Other eds. Michael Patrick Cullinane and David Ryan, 16-41 (Bergahn Books, 2015). https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qct9n.4  Virginia Bernhard, "Poverty and the Social Order in Seventeenth-Century Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 85:2 (1977): 141-155. https://www.jstor.org/stable/4248117   Misha Ewen, ""Poore Soules": Migration, Labor, and Visions for Commonwealth in Virginia," in Virginia 1619: Slavery and Freedom in the Making of English America eds. Paul Musselwhite, Peter C. Mancall, and James Horn, 133-149 (University of North Carolina Press, 2019). https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469651811_musselwhite.11  Hugh T. Lefler, "Promotional Literature of the Southern Colonies," The Journal of Southern History 33:1 (1967): 3-25. https://www.jstor.org/stable/2204338     

The Modern Art Notes Podcast
Romare Bearden, Milton Avery

The Modern Art Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 82:33 Very Popular


Episode No. 550 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian and author Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore and curator Edith Devaney. Gilmore is the author of "Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination," which was just published by the University of North Carolina Press. The book examines how Bearden's address of his native South -- he was born and was initially raised in the Charlotte, NC area before his family was effectively forced to leave the South -- was informed by the vagaries of memory and even imagination. Gilmore is the Peter V. & C. Vann Woodward Professor Emerita of History at Yale University. Her previous books include "Gender and Jim Crow: Women and the Politics of White Supremacy in North Carolina, 1896-1920," and "Defying Dixie: The Radical Roots of Civil Rights, 1919-1950." Indiebound and Amazon offer "Bearden" for $26-40. Devaney discusses “Milton Avery,” a survey of the artist's career now at the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford. The exhibition debuted at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth and is in Hartford through June 5. The exhibition features about 70 paintings Avery made between the 1910s and the mid-1960s and emphasizes Avery's interest in color. It's on view at the Wadsworth through June 5. “Avery” was co-organized by the Royal Academy, London, the Wadsworth and MAMFW. Its catalogue was published by the Royal Academy. Indiebound and Amazon offer it for about $45.

Below the Radar
Settler Memory: The Disavowal of Indigeneity and the Politics of Race — with Kevin Bruyneel

Below the Radar

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 36:07


Settler Memory: The Disavowal of Indigeneity and the Politics of Race in the United States (University of North Carolina Press 2021) is about the displacement of Indigeneity in the discourse around race in American political theory, with settler memory being about recognizing or acknowledging the history of Indigenous peoples in colonialism, and then disavowing the active presence of settler colonialism and Indigenous politics in the present. Am and Kevin discuss how Black theorists, like James Baldwin, discuss Indigeneity in their politics, and how tensions can arise between different conceptions of land, history, and identity. Kevin's overall project is to link antiracism with anticolonialism, which shows through in the conversation.. Full episode details: https://www.sfu.ca/vancity-office-community-engagement/below-the-radar-podcast/episodes/173-kevin-bruyneel.html Read the transcript: https://www.sfu.ca/vancity-office-community-engagement/below-the-radar-podcast/transcripts/173-kevin-bruyneel.html Resources: Settler Memory: The Disavowal of Indigeneity and the Politics of Race in the United States by Kevin Bruynee: https://uncpress.org/book/9781469665238/settler-memory/ Bacon's Rebellion: https://www.blackpast.org/african-american-history/events-african-american-history/bacons-rebellion-1676/ W.E.B. Du Bois: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/dubois/ James Baldwin: https://nmaahc.si.edu/james-baldwin The White Possessive: Property, Power, and Indigenous Sovereignty by Aileen Moreton-Robinson: https://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/the-white-possessive Layli Long Soldier: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/layli-long-soldier Dr. Kim TallBear: https://kimtallbear.com/ Cristina Sharpe: https://profiles.laps.yorku.ca/profiles/cesharpe/ Cedric Robinson: https://globalsocialtheory.org/thinkers/robinson-cedric-j/ I Am Not Your Negro: https://www.pbs.org/independentlens/documentaries/i-am-not-your-negro/ Kyle Mays: https://www.kyle-mays.com/ Afro Pessimism: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2020/07/20/the-argument-of-afropessimism Frank Wilderson: https://www.frankbwildersoniii.com/about/ Leanne Betasamosake Simpson: https://www.leannesimpson.ca/ Robyn Maynard: https://robynmaynard.com/ Stuart Hall: https://globalsocialtheory.org/thinkers/hall-stuart/ Kēhaulani Kauanui: https://jkauanui.faculty.wesleyan.edu/ Jean M. O'Brien: https://shekonneechie.ca/biographies/jean-obrien/ Lee Maracle: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/lee-maracle-death-bc-indigenous-writer-poet-1.6245582 Jodi Byrd: https://as.cornell.edu/news/new-faculty-jodi-byrd Campuses and Colonialism: https://www.oah.org/insights/opportunities-for-historians/cfp-campuses-and-colonialism-symposium/ Malinda Maynor Lowery: http://history.emory.edu/home/people/faculty/lowery-malinda-maynor.html Stephen Kantrowitz: https://history.wisc.edu/people/kantrowitz-stephen/ Alyssa Mt. Pleasant: https://arts-sciences.buffalo.edu/africana-and-american-studies/faculty/faculty-directory/mt-pleasant.html

The Research Like a Pro Genealogy Podcast
RLP 201: Coming to the Table with Suzanne Lowe

The Research Like a Pro Genealogy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 37:32


Today's episode of Research Like a Pro is an interview with Suzanne Campbell Lowe. In 2005, Suzanne learned from a white cousin about her Campbell family's connection -- through slavery -- to a black man named James Meredith. Over the course of the next several years, Suzanne's white and black families have built their relationships and explored their descendancy from their common ancestor: a prominent white leader of the Confederacy named J.A.P. Campbell. Join us as we discuss Suzanne's journey getting to know her black cousins and learning about African American research. Links Coming to the Table Website - https://comingtothetable.org/  James Meredith - iconic black rights activist - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Meredith Bettye Kearse, The Other Madisons: The Lost History of a President's Black Family (Mariner Books, 2020).  https://www.bettyekearse.com/  George Washington's black son West Ford - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Ford_(slave) Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Within the Plantation Household: Blacka nd White Women of the Old South (University of North Carolina Press, 1988). https://uncpress.org/book/9780807842324/within-the-plantation-household/ RLP 121: African American Research Part 1 - https://familylocket.com/rlp-121-african-american-research-part-1/ RLP 122: African American Research Part 2 - https://familylocket.com/rlp-122-african-american-research-part-2/ RLP 123: African American Research Part 3 - https://familylocket.com/rlp-123-african-american-research-part-3/ RLP 124: Researching African American Ancestors Part 4 - https://familylocket.com/rlp-124-researching-african-american-ancestors-part-4/ Iconic Activist James Meredith's Black and White Families Forge a New Frontier Together - YouTube recording of the Meredith / Campbell families' program - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJ_zDsG3YB0&t=7s James Meredith, The Father of White Supremacy (Meredith Pub, 1995). James Meredith's article, available for purchase here - https://www.jamesmeredithonline.com/books/father-white-supremacy Research Like a Pro Resources Research Like a Pro: A Genealogist's Guide book by Diana Elder with Nicole Dyer on Amazon.com - https://amzn.to/2x0ku3d Research Like a Pro eCourse - independent study course -  https://familylocket.com/product/research-like-a-pro-e-course/ RLP Study Group - upcoming group and email notification list - https://familylocket.com/services/research-like-a-pro-study-group/ Research Like a Pro with DNA Resources Research Like a Pro with DNA: A Genealogist's Guide to Finding and Confirming Ancestors with DNA Evidence book by Diana Elder, Nicole Dyer, and Robin Wirthlin - https://amzn.to/3gn0hKx Research Like a Pro with DNA eCourse - independent study course -  https://familylocket.com/product/research-like-a-pro-with-dna-ecourse/ RLP with DNA Study Group - upcoming group and email notification list - https://familylocket.com/services/research-like-a-pro-with-dna-study-group/ Thank you Thanks for listening! We hope that you will share your thoughts about our podcast and help us out by doing the following: Share an honest review on iTunes or Stitcher. You can easily write a review with Stitcher, without creating an account. Just scroll to the bottom of the page and click "write a review." You simply provide a nickname and an email address that will not be published. We value your feedback and your ratings really help this podcast reach others. If you leave a review, we will read it on the podcast and answer any questions that you bring up in your review. Thank you! Leave a comment in the comment or question in the comment section below. Share the episode on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest. Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, or your favorite podcast app. Sign up for our newsletter to receive notifications of new episodes - https://familylocket.com/sign-up/ Check out this list of genealogy podcasts from Feedspot: Top 20 Genealogy Podcasts - https://blog.feedspot.com/genealogy_podcasts/

Media-eval: A Medieval Pop Culture Podcast

Sarah and guest Miti von Weissenberg explore sanctity and voluntary poverty in 1989 film Francesco! Join us as we delve into the real lives of St. Francis and St. Clare of Assisi, the intertwined histories of the Franciscans and the Poor Clares, and the link between biopic and hagiography. Learn more about Miti's research and teaching: https://www.xavier.edu/history-department/directory/marita-vonweissenberg Learn more about St. Francis of Assisi and his legacy: Francis of Assisi: Early Documents. Edited by Regis J. Armstrong, J.A. Wayne Hellman, and William J. Short. New York: New City Press, 1999-2001  Moorman, John R. H. A history of the Franciscan Order from its Origins to the Year 1517. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1968 Vauchez, André, translated by Michael F. Cusato. Francis of Assisi : The Life and Afterlife of a Medieval Saint. Yale University Press, 2012   The Cambridge companion to Francis of Assisi. Edited by Michael J.P. Robson Thompson, Augustine. Francis of Assisi : A New Biography. Cornell University Press, 2012.  Appelbaum, Patricia. St. Francis of America: How a Thirteenth-Century Friar Became America's Most Popular Saint. Chapel Hill: university of North Carolina Press, 2015.  Learn more about St. Clare of Assisi:  Mooney, Catherine M. Clare of Assisi and the Thirteenth Century Church: Religious Women, Rules, and Resistance. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016.  Mueller, Joan. The privilege of poverty : Clare of Assisi, Agnes of Prague, and the struggle for a Franciscan rule for women. University Park, Pa. : Pennsylvania State University Press, 2006. Learn more about Franciscan spirituality: Ahlgren, Gillian T.W. The Tenderness of God: Reclaiming our Humanity. Lanham: Fortress Press, 2017.   Learn more about medieval sanctity: Bartlett, Robert. Why Can the Dead Do Such Great Things? : Saints and Worshippers from the Martyrs to the Reformation. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013.  Vauchez, André. The Laity in the Middle Ages : Religious Beliefs and Devotional Practices. South Bend, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1993. Vauchez, André. Sainthood in the Later Middle Ages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Social Media: Twitter @mediaevalpod E-mail: media.evalpod@gmail.com Find Miti at @MvonWeissenberg Rate, review, and subscribe!

New Books Network
Ryan Hall, "Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877" (UNC Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 76:39


No matter what people call them today the northwestern Great Plains have been and continue to be Blackfoot country, argues Colgate University assistant professor Ryan Hall in Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877 (University of North Carolina Press, 2020). By maintaining their boundaries and enforcing power between both European empires and Indigenous neighbors, the Blackfoot were able to carve out a lasting niche in the contested borderlands of the early North American West of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Although disease, resource depletion, and colonization would eventually be visited upon the Blackfoot, along with American settler colonialism, this outcome was never preordained. Nor was that the entire story, as Blackfoot history carries on well after such well known events as the Montana gold rush and the Marias Massacre. Beneath the Backbone of the World is an example of Native history's power to force a rethinking of North American history's arc. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network