Podcast appearances and mentions of Scott Gottlieb

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Best podcasts about Scott Gottlieb

Latest podcast episodes about Scott Gottlieb

The Megyn Kelly Show
Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. on COVID Orthodoxy, Fauci's Legacy, and War in Ukraine | Ep. 419

The Megyn Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 110:42


Megyn Kelly is joined by Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., author of "A Letter to Liberals," to discuss COVID pandemic orthodoxy, the need for discussion and debate, the elimination of freedoms due to the COVID pandemic, Dr. Fauci demanding blind faith in authority, the important issue of whether the COVID vaccines prevent transmission, myocarditis risk from COVID and from vaccines, rise in "unexplained" deaths in a post-COVID vaccine world, the truth about how many lives COVID vaccines saved and lost, the lack of important data needed to understand the rise in deaths post-COVID, what Fauci said about vaccines that could have an adverse effect before the COVID vaccines were available, the absurdity of the new booster which was only tested on eight mice and no humans, Pfizer's involvement in the Trump administration, Alex Berenson and tech censorship, RFK's disbanded "vaccine safety" commission, Scott Gottlieb and our supposed medical elite, American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendations, problems with the VAERS system, personal backlash from family and friends, his views of Donald Trump then and now, Herschel Walker and our politics today, the war in Ukraine, American imperialism, RFK's personal connection to the war as his son Conor was fighting in the country, and more.Alternately, here's the CDC on vaccines:https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/index.htmlhttps://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/index.htmlFollow The Megyn Kelly Show on all social platforms: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/MegynKellyTwitter: http://Twitter.com/MegynKellyShowInstagram: http://Instagram.com/MegynKellyShowFacebook: http://Facebook.com/MegynKellyShow Find out more information at: https://www.devilmaycaremedia.com/megynkellyshow 

The Todd Herman Show
How to sicken an entire generation Ep_395_Hr-1

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 44:17


THE THESIS: If you wanted to slowly sicken an entire generation with plausible deniability you wouldn't do anything different from what Fauci, Gates, Collins, Walensky, Birx, Pfizer's Bourla and Bancel of Moderna have done. THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES: 8 Bible Verses about Wicked RulersProverbs 29:2When the righteous increase, the people rejoice,But when a wicked man rules, people groan.Isaiah 10:1Woe to those who enact evil statutesAnd to those who constantly record unjust decisions,Micah 7:3Concerning evil, both hands do it well.The prince asks, also the judge, for a bribe,And a great man speaks the desire of his soul;So they weave it together.THE NEWS & COMMENT:When he saw how they were designed, this man warned about what these mRNA injections would do to the population. They were “leaky” “vaccines” and, as such, they would not stop transmission or infection and they would cause Antigen Dependent Enhancements. Because the so-called “vaccines” do not kill the virus by ending its ability to spread, it strengthens the virus by giving it opportunities to mutate. Now, Dr. Vanden Bossche sees what he warned about happening on a massive scale. [AUDIO] - Internationally recognised vaccine developer Geert Vanden Bossche, PhD, says that by vaccinating everyone with a vaccine that doesn't prevent transmission, we are destroying people's immune systems, and setting the stage for a global health disaster.Dr. Vanden Bossche was not the only one who knew the virus wouldn't stop transmission or infection. I quickly discovered it by reading Big Pharma's SEC filings and by simple application of common sense; how could hijacking your body's genes into creating the most toxic portion of a virus not result in creating immunological derangement? You know who else was aware of that? It appears Pfizer knew. My theory is Pfizer didn't test for transmission or infection because Pfizer didn't want the answer. [AUDIO] - Pfizer Rep J Small says Pfizer

Squawk Pod
Retail Investors Beware: Not-So-Free Trading 9/2/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 26:08


The Labor Department released the number of American jobs added in August: 315,000. Only slightly below expectations, CNBC's Steve Liesman and former CEA member Tyler Goodspeed consider what the report means for the Federal Reserve's next rate hike. According to a new study by a group of professors, commission-free trades might not be free. UCLA Irvine Professor Christopher Schwartz explains the study, the fee and payout discrepancies between brokerages, and shares the best and the worst firms for retail trader pockets. As offices across the U.S. gear up for a reunion, China is locking down over 21 million people because of 700 covid cases. Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb discusses the difference between our approaches to public health, and shares which vaccines we should be getting–and when we should get them. Plus, Starbucks has named Howard Schultz's successor, and Lululemon delivered a strong quarterly performance.  In this episode:Dr. Scott Gottlieb, @ScottGottliebMDBecky Quick @BeckyQuickMike Santoli @michaelsantoliSteve Liesman, @SteveLiesmanCameron Costa, @CameronCostaNY

NBC Meet the Press
MTP NOW Aug. 18 — The ‘outlier' midterms; Mar-a-Lago latest; Scott Gottlieb

NBC Meet the Press

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 49:17 Very Popular


Mixed signals for midterms: Turnout, candidate quality and former President Trump's investigations are setting up a "wild card" election in November. A judge has allowed the partial unsealing of an affidavit to search former President Trump's home in Mar-a-Lago. Scott Gottlieb discusses the CDC's planned overhaul, monkeypox and vaccine hesitancy. NBC News' Antonio Hylton checks the temperature of rural voters in North Carolina as part of our County-to-County project. America's teacher shortage remains unsolved, with school getting closer and closer each day.

Squawk Pod
Dr. Scott Gottlieb & the CDC Reorg; Walter Isaacson & the Other Side of Elon Musk 8/18/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 31:35 Very Popular


After internally reviewing its own response to the covid-19 pandemic, the CDC has concluded, there's room for the agency to improve. Director Rochelle Walensky has announced her plan to restructure the CDC, and in so doing to improve future responses and to rebuild public trust in the organization. Dr. Scott Gottlieb examines the road ahead for the CDC and Washington's role in improving it. While Wall Street and Twitter still reel from the latest Elon Musk antics, biographer and Tulane professor Walter Isaacson details the little-seen side of the quirky billionaire; as he writes Musk's biography, Isaacson reveals that there's much more to Tesla's CEO than his tweets. Plus, we're decrypting the Federal Reserve's July minutes and unpacking the roller coaster trades for Bed Bath & Beyond and other meme stocks this week. In this episode:Walter Isaacson, @WalterIsaacsonDr. Scott Gottlieb, @ScottGottliebMDBecky Quick @BeckyQuickAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinKatie Kramer: @Kramer_Katie

Squawk Pod
Market Momentum & the Largest Profits Ever 8/15/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 25:28 Very Popular


Markets are looking less and less like a recession, according to CNBC's senior economics reporter Steve Liesman. He, Mike Santoli, and Becky Quick explain the rebound in stocks and in jobs data that has assuaged many investor concerns. Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb offers a rundown of the latest health news, including the recent discovery of polio in New York City sewage, the CDC's updated covid guidelines, and national vaccination rates for both viruses. CNBC's Eamon Javers reports on the alarming backlash against federal law enforcement in the aftermath of the FBI's Mar-a-Lago search. Plus, China's economy has hit a speedbump, and oil giant Saudi Aramco has reported record quarterly profits, larger than Apple's or Exxon Mobil's. In this episode:Dr. Scott Gottlieb, @ScottGottliebMDEamon Javers, @EamonJaversBecky Quick @BeckyQuickSteve Liesman, @SteveLiesmanMike Santoli, @michaelsantoliCameron Costa, @CameronCostaNY

Face the Nation on the Radio
Economy, Monkeypox, Mary Daly

Face the Nation on the Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 46:36 Very Popular


This week on "Face the Nation with Margaret Brennan," we talk to Florida Republican Sen. Rick Scott about the party's opposition to the Democrats' economic plan, and former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb returns to discuss the monkeypox health emergency. And after a surprising July jobs report, we talk to San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank President and CEO Mary Daly about what it means for the U.S. economy.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Squawk Pod
Washington Weekend: Competing for Chips & Voting for Billions 8/5/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 39:11 Very Popular


President Biden is set to sign the Chips and Science Act, aimed to support US semiconductor manufacturing. Senator Maria Cantwell (D-WA) discusses the bipartisan effort to boost US competitiveness with China and other major chips producers. Also in Washington, Senator Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) has finally signed off on the Inflation Reduction Act, the Democrats' reconciliation bill that includes hundreds of billions of dollars in spending on climate, health care initiatives. CNBC's Ylan Mui reports that her support could cement the votes needed to pass the bill; the “vote-a-rama” starts this Saturday, so the Senate will be working through the weekend. The Biden administration has declared monkeypox a national health emergency, and former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb answers questions about its spread, its virulence, and the health system's path forward. Plus, Visa CEO Al Kelly has issued a statement on the MindGeek child pornography lawsuit, and Warner Bros. Discovery hosted its first earnings call since its merger.  In this episode:Sen. Maria Cantwell, @SenatorCantwellYlan Mui, @ylanmuiJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkAndrew Ross Sorkin, @AndrewrsorkinKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

Squawk Pod
Polio's Back? and Our Viral News Flash 7/22/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 25:15


President Biden has tested positive for covid-19, and the White House has shared his prognosis and treatment. Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb discusses the President's health status, Paxlovid, and how pockets of unvaccinated communities could have prompted America's first case of polio in ten years. FedEx is delivering a big change for customers, and American Express has scored points for shareholders with its impressive Q2 report. Plus, the Squawk Box segment that went viral! Aureus Asset Management's Karen Firestone laughs about the meme-worthy moment in her (and her husband's, and her dog's!) markets hit this week. In this episode:Dr. Scott Gottlieb, @ScottGottliebMDKaren Firestone, @Karen_FirestoneBecky Quick @BeckyQuickJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkAndrew Ross Sorkin, @AndrewrsorkinKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

The REAL David Knight Show
Fri 15Jul22 "Horror Story" Resignations at NIH, CDC, FDA as Rats Jump Ship

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 181:14


* "Like a Horror Story" — mass resignations of people at FDA, CDC, NIH who see what's happening* Judge devastates Elizabeth Warren's Bureaucratic Monster — CFPB. The worst of all the lawless bureaucracies is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and it's deliberate by design* Bolton brags on CNN about plotting coups but says Trump was not capable of planning an insurrection and only interested in himself* Tape leaked of Bannon telling a group, a couple of days before election, that the plan was to falsely claim victory * Ivana Trump, alumni of First Wives Club, dies* BMW charges $18 PER MONTH to turn on seat heaters! You will own NOTHING* A/C coolant banned again for cars (as patent runs out) and HVAC compressors for homes are in short supply nationwide * INTERVIEW: Father of MK-ULTRA & LSD: "Poisoner in Chief" — Stephen Kinzer's biography with new details of CIA's Scott Gottlieb. What Gottlieb did, what made him so dangerous and how it aligns with what is happening today* INTERVIEW: Time to OccupyPeace. Gerald Celente, TrendsResearch.com, on the state of war and people coming together in 1 week for peace (OccupyPeace.com)Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 994 Kodak, TN 37764

The David Knight Show
Fri 15Jul22 "Horror Story" Resignations at NIH, CDC, FDA as Rats Jump Ship

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 181:14


* "Like a Horror Story" — mass resignations of people at FDA, CDC, NIH who see what's happening* Judge devastates Elizabeth Warren's Bureaucratic Monster — CFPB. The worst of all the lawless bureaucracies is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and it's deliberate by design* Bolton brags on CNN about plotting coups but says Trump was not capable of planning an insurrection and only interested in himself* Tape leaked of Bannon telling a group, a couple of days before election, that the plan was to falsely claim victory * Ivana Trump, alumni of First Wives Club, dies* BMW charges $18 PER MONTH to turn on seat heaters! You will own NOTHING* A/C coolant banned again for cars (as patent runs out) and HVAC compressors for homes are in short supply nationwide * INTERVIEW: Father of MK-ULTRA & LSD: "Poisoner in Chief" — Stephen Kinzer's biography with new details of CIA's Scott Gottlieb. What Gottlieb did, what made him so dangerous and how it aligns with what is happening today* INTERVIEW: Time to OccupyPeace. Gerald Celente, TrendsResearch.com, on the state of war and people coming together in 1 week for peace (OccupyPeace.com)Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 994 Kodak, TN 37764

Squawk Pod
A Deal Off, A ‘Kill Switch,' & A Saudi Trip 7/11/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 34:47 Very Popular


Elon Musk is over Twitter. He's aiming to terminate the $44 billion dollar deal, and Twitter's ready to take him to court over it, but Musk is seemingly unbothered by the drama. Former SEC Chair Jay Clayton maps out the various outcomes at this stage in Twitter-Musk saga. Covid cases are ticking up as we head into the end of the summer, and while most of us have readjusted our individual risk calculus to allow for normal life, former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb suggests keeping our masks on. Leaked documents from Uber's past are raising questions about the company's ethical foundation, and Starbucks is rolling back a new, potentially questionable offering. Plus, President Biden is gearing up for his first in-office trip to Saudi Arabia. In this episode:Dr. Scott Gottlieb,@ScottGottliebMDJoe Kernen,@JoeSquawkAndrew Ross Sorkin,@AndrewrsorkinCameron Costa,@CameronCostaNY

The FOX News Rundown
Former FDA Commissioner Breaks Down The Clash With Juul

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 22:32 Very Popular


The unknown health effects of e-cigarettes and vaping products have long been discussed but recently the Food and Drug Administration has announced plans to remove all products from the popular e-cigarette company Juul from shelves due to insufficient public health data. This past week, the FDA dropped their suspension of Juul and the Juul company agreed to suspend their court case while the government reopens its investigation into the company's products. Earlier this week, former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb joined the podcast to break down the thought process behind the FDA's initial decision, the effect this could have on smokers attempting to quit, and how this could deter youth from vaping. Due to time limitations, we could not include all of the interview in our original segment. Today on the FOX News Rundown Extra, you will hear our entire interview with Dr. Gottlieb about this decision and how it could impact the vaping and tobacco industry. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition
Former FDA Commissioner Breaks Down The Clash With Juul

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 22:32


The unknown health effects of e-cigarettes and vaping products have long been discussed but recently the Food and Drug Administration has announced plans to remove all products from the popular e-cigarette company Juul from shelves due to insufficient public health data. This past week, the FDA dropped their suspension of Juul and the Juul company agreed to suspend their court case while the government reopens its investigation into the company's products. Earlier this week, former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb joined the podcast to break down the thought process behind the FDA's initial decision, the effect this could have on smokers attempting to quit, and how this could deter youth from vaping. Due to time limitations, we could not include all of the interview in our original segment. Today on the FOX News Rundown Extra, you will hear our entire interview with Dr. Gottlieb about this decision and how it could impact the vaping and tobacco industry. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

From Washington – FOX News Radio
Former FDA Commissioner Breaks Down The Clash With Juul

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 22:32


The unknown health effects of e-cigarettes and vaping products have long been discussed but recently the Food and Drug Administration has announced plans to remove all products from the popular e-cigarette company Juul from shelves due to insufficient public health data. This past week, the FDA dropped their suspension of Juul and the Juul company agreed to suspend their court case while the government reopens its investigation into the company's products. Earlier this week, former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb joined the podcast to break down the thought process behind the FDA's initial decision, the effect this could have on smokers attempting to quit, and how this could deter youth from vaping. Due to time limitations, we could not include all of the interview in our original segment. Today on the FOX News Rundown Extra, you will hear our entire interview with Dr. Gottlieb about this decision and how it could impact the vaping and tobacco industry. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The FOX News Rundown
How Can You Stop A Mass Shooter?

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 32:43 Very Popular


During a 4th of July parade in Highland Park, IL, a gunman opened fire into a crowd, killing at least 7 people and injuring more than 30. The suspect, Robert Crimo III, was arrested later that day. He had reportedly been planning the attack for weeks and had posted violent content on his social media account, leading many to wonder what can be done to prevent mass shootings before they occur. Former FBI Special Agent John Iannarelli joins the Rundown to discuss the warning signs exhibited by the gunman, the responsibility of social media companies to take action, and what families and communities can do to prevent a mass shooting.   The Food and Drug Administration had issued all products from the e-cigarette company Juul off the market after the agency found Juul had failed to provide sufficient data showing the products were safe for public health. As the company appeals the decision, it is once more throwing e-cigarette and vaping products in the limelight as many question these products' safety. Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb joins the podcast to break down the issues surrounding Juul products and how the FDA can balance cracking down on youth vaping issues while giving adult smokers tools to break smoking habits.   Plus, commentary by Fox News contributor Liz Peek. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

From Washington – FOX News Radio
How Can You Stop A Mass Shooter?

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 32:43


During a 4th of July parade in Highland Park, IL, a gunman opened fire into a crowd, killing at least 7 people and injuring more than 30. The suspect, Robert Crimo III, was arrested later that day. He had reportedly been planning the attack for weeks and had posted violent content on his social media account, leading many to wonder what can be done to prevent mass shootings before they occur. Former FBI Special Agent John Iannarelli joins the Rundown to discuss the warning signs exhibited by the gunman, the responsibility of social media companies to take action, and what families and communities can do to prevent a mass shooting.   The Food and Drug Administration had issued all products from the e-cigarette company Juul off the market after the agency found Juul had failed to provide sufficient data showing the products were safe for public health. As the company appeals the decision, it is once more throwing e-cigarette and vaping products in the limelight as many question these products' safety. Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb joins the podcast to break down the issues surrounding Juul products and how the FDA can balance cracking down on youth vaping issues while giving adult smokers tools to break smoking habits.   Plus, commentary by Fox News contributor Liz Peek. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition
How Can You Stop A Mass Shooter?

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 32:43


During a 4th of July parade in Highland Park, IL, a gunman opened fire into a crowd, killing at least 7 people and injuring more than 30. The suspect, Robert Crimo III, was arrested later that day. He had reportedly been planning the attack for weeks and had posted violent content on his social media account, leading many to wonder what can be done to prevent mass shootings before they occur. Former FBI Special Agent John Iannarelli joins the Rundown to discuss the warning signs exhibited by the gunman, the responsibility of social media companies to take action, and what families and communities can do to prevent a mass shooting.   The Food and Drug Administration had issued all products from the e-cigarette company Juul off the market after the agency found Juul had failed to provide sufficient data showing the products were safe for public health. As the company appeals the decision, it is once more throwing e-cigarette and vaping products in the limelight as many question these products' safety. Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb joins the podcast to break down the issues surrounding Juul products and how the FDA can balance cracking down on youth vaping issues while giving adult smokers tools to break smoking habits.   Plus, commentary by Fox News contributor Liz Peek. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hidden Forces
The Power of Crisis & How to Fight a Geopolitical Recession | Ian Bremmer

Hidden Forces

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 49:42 Very Popular


In Episode 255 of Hidden Forces, Demetri Kofinas speaks with Ian Bremmer. Ian Bremmer is the president and founder of Eurasia Group, the world's leading global research and consulting firm, and GZERO Media, a company dedicated to providing intelligent and engaging coverage of international affairs. Bremmer is also the author of ten books, including his latest, “The Power of Crisis,” in which he argues that we are unprepared for a trio of looming crises in the areas of pandemic response, climate change, and the next technological revolution. All of these looming crises that Ian focuses on are subjects that we've explored in great depth over the years with folks like fmr. FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb, Secretary of Defense Ash Carter, NASA's Chief Climate Scientist Gavin Schmidt, Google's Eric Schmidt, and so many more. You can find all of those previous and relevant conversations in the related section on the episode page of our website. Because of the ongoing war in Ukraine and its effect on global commodity markets—and in particular oil & gas—our conversation with Ian leads with a discussion about climate policy. The discussion focuses specifically on the war in Ukraine, what it reveals about our vulnerabilities as we try transition towards more sustainable, carbon-free forms of energy production, and how to balance our national security concerns while still ensuring that we can meet the long-term climate goals set out in the 2016 Paris Agreement. In the second part of their conversation Kofinas and Bremmer continue their discussion about energy markets, eventually pivoting to a much broader conversation about the upcoming elections in 2022 and 2024, and specifically why there seems to be a persistent leadership deficit in American politics today and what we can do to change that. They also discuss media reform and what we can do as individuals and in some cases as influencers with large followings to have more constructive and good-faith conversations around the issues that matter to all of us as we navigate what may well be the most dangerous time for the international system since at least the early stages of the Cold War. The goal of today's conversation, among other things, is to bring you the perspective of someone who operates within some of the most powerful networks of people in the world—and is an advisor to many of them. Ian Bremmer has years of experience speaking with global leaders, CEO's of Fortune 100 companies, and experts across all industries & territories, making him an invaluable resource for anyone trying to think about the future path of policy, risks to global governance, and so much more.  You can access the full episode, transcript, and intelligence report to this week's conversation by going directly to the episode page at HiddenForces.io and clicking on "premium extras." All subscribers gain access to our premium feed, which can be easily added to your favorite podcast application. If you enjoyed listening to today's episode of Hidden Forces you can help support the show by doing the following: Subscribe on Apple Podcasts | YouTube | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | CastBox | RSS Feed Write us a review on Apple Podcasts & Spotify Subscribe to our mailing list at https://hiddenforces.io/newsletter/ Producer & Host: Demetri Kofinas Editor & Engineer: Stylianos Nicolaou Subscribe & Support the Podcast at https://hiddenforces.io Join the conversation on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter at @hiddenforcespod Follow Demetri on Twitter at @Kofinas Episode Recorded on 06/21/2022

Squawk Pod
Meetings and Metaverses 6/23/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 38:31 Very Popular


Big Oil executives head to Washington today for a meeting with the Biden Administration to go over a diminishing list of options to contend with the rising price of gas.  President Biden announced plans to enact a “gas tax holiday” in the U.S. this summer, and has not received broad initial support. Amos Hochstein, State Department Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs, discusses the $0.18 reduction per gallon the holiday would save and the outlook for getting the policy through Congress. Mark Zuckerberg says a billion people will soon be spending their time – and money – in the metaverse, but Joe Kernen, Becky Quick and Andrew Ross Sorkin have differing ideas about what to actually do there.  Plus, the FDA will ban the sale of Juul e-cigarettes. Squawk Box regular and former head of the regulator, Scott Gottlieb, weighs in on the vaping industry as well as the latest concerns about Covid-19 variants.  And, more smaller cities will soon be harder to reach by airplane. To hear more from Mark Zuckerberg about Meta's future, check out CNBC's Mad Money podcast: https://www.cnbc.com/2018/03/01/mad-money-with-jim-cramer-podcast.html   In this episode:Amos Hochstein, @AmosHochsteinScott Gottlieb, @ScottGottliebMDJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickAndrew Ross Sorkin, @AndrewrsorkinKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

Face the Nation on the Radio
Financial Frustrations: White House NEC Director Brian Deese; Loretta Mester, President of Fed Bank of Cleveland

Face the Nation on the Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 45:44 Very Popular


This week on “Face the Nation with Margaret Brennan,” we discuss the Jan. 6 hearings with Rep. Zoe Lofgren, a Democrat from California, go over the recently approved COVID-19 vaccine for kids with former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb and take a look at America's inflation problem.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Leading Voices in Food
E170: Why the US Must Reduce Sodium Intake: It's Costing Lives

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 23:37


Today, we're going to talk salt with Dr. Michael Jacobson, former president and co-founder of the Center for Science in the Public Interest. Dr. Jacobson is one of the authors of an important article published recently in the journal Hypertension. The article comes to a startling conclusion that delays in implementing voluntary sodium reduction targets by the food and restaurant industry may result in nearly 265,000 preventable deaths between 2017 and 2031. Interview Summary   So Mike, you've been a hero of mine for decades and I really admire the work you've done on so many different topics. And you and I have written a thing or two over the years which has been a great pleasure for me to do, but on things like soda taxes and nutrition policy, but you've also had a really long standing deep interest in the issue of salt. So let's start with the following question. Tell us why salt is a problem.   The main concern about too much salt is that it contributes to high blood pressure. That's a major cause of heart attacks and strokes, kidney disease, and probably some other problems both here in the United States and throughout the world. In almost all cultures, people are drinking/eating excessive amounts of salt far more than what the World Health Organization or the Department of Health and Human Services here in the United States recommends. Hypertension experts have been concerned about excess salt for decades and decades. Back in 1969, there was a White House conference on food, nutrition, and health and one of the recommendations was to reduce sodium intake. Mostly sodium chloride, but also some other ingredients in food besides salt and nothing was done. I first got involved in this in 1977 when a newly minted nutritionist came to Center for Science in the Public Interest, Bonnie Leaman. And I asked her to look into salt and what she found was very disconcerting. It seemed like a wide range of hypertension experts was encouraging people to consume less salt and some people were urgent government action. So in 1978, the Center for Science in the Public Interest petitioned the Food and Drug Administration to restrict levels of sodium and packaged in restaurant foods and require warnings on foods that contained excessive amounts of sodium. Almost nothing was done and the next 45 years or so is just a history of inaction by the most responsible health officials in the country. And similar inaction was occurring worldwide. And there've been Institute of Medicine reports, World Health Organization reports and a whole bunch of things like that. But Americans are consuming today just about the same amount of sodium as we were consuming 10, 20, 30 or more years ago. It's really a sad tale about government in action and we can talk about some of the reasons why that's happened.   I'd love to hear some of that and boy, it's pretty disheartening that the scientific evidence has been around so lot, but so is the inaction. So I'd like to get to the why of this in a minute, but let me ask you a question first. Does the problem mainly come from how you and I, and everyone else, uses a salt shaker on foods at home or in restaurants, or is it salt added by the industry to foods that people buy?   Well 100 years ago, it probably would've been the salt shaker, but now the vast majority of foods that we eat come in boxes and cans. They come in freezer cases at grocery stores and restaurants. We get about a third of our food from restaurants and that's really the culprit - and it should make it easier to solve this problem. But instead of having to persuade 330 million people to put down the salt shaker, the government could set limits on the amount of sodium in different packaged foods. Or it could require warning notices on foods to contain excessive amounts of sodium and let me just give you a few examples. This is from my book, Salt Wars, of some restaurant meals and to give you just a benchmark. The government recommends that people consume no more than 2300 milligrams of sodium per day, 2300 milligrams. It's about a teaspoon worth of salt. So compared to the 2300 milligrams, if you get a spicy chicken sandwich with fries and chicken soup at Chick-fil-A, you're getting 50% more than that. You're getting 3,800 milligrams of sodium. A roasted turkey breast sandwich at Jason's Deli, 4,200. At Chili's restaurant, honey chipotle crispers and waffles, 4,700, twice as much as the recommendation. At an AMC movie theater, you can get a soft pretzel with more than three times as much sodium. So the amounts are just outrageous and that reflects that it's cheap and easy to add salt to a food and most people like the taste of salt, it's built into us genetically and the portions at restaurants are gargantuan. So that's turned restaurant food into a major problem for sodium.   Mike, I think you've started to answer the question about why these changes haven't been made. It sounds like industry is probably having pretty powerful sway over the lack of action that legislators have had in the past on this issue. Is that true? Are they just thinking we don't want to make this change because people will like our products more if they're high in sodium?   Yes, and they're afraid that if their company lowers sodium, a competitor might not lower sodium. And that's actually an advantage of having mandatory limits but the issue is the same as getting lead out of gasoline, getting DDT off of farms. Anytime there's a big corporate interest, big financial interest in the status quo, those companies, those industries don't want to change. It can be expensive to change - maybe you need new machinery, a new processes. In the case of salt, though, you hardly need to do anything. Obviously, if a company wants to lower sodium, it needs to taste the food before it sends it out on the marketplace. And it might have to replace some of the salt with other seasonings, add or more vegetables or more chicken, depending on the food. But it's not rocket science at all. It should be something that companies can do and some companies have really made an effort. Remember, nobody's saying get rid of all the salt. The government recommends that we reduce sodium intake from about 3,400 milligrams a day down to about 2,300. So that's a one third reduction in intake. And some companies are meeting the FDA's recommended limits right now, other companies are not. But it's something that companies just need to say “we're going to do it.” And usually they can change the food so that there's no difference in taste whatsoever. And there's one little trick that more and more companies are using is to replace table salt with potassium salt. Replace sodium chloride with potassium chloride, which isn't quite as salty as sodium chloride, regular salt. It's a great replacement and you can replace maybe a third of the sodium in a packaged food simply by using potassium chloride, and that extra potassium is really beneficial in reducing blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular disease, especially for people who already have high blood pressure.   So Mike, help me understand something. If it's pretty easy to make these changes for the industry and you say that you can do it in ways that don't make taste of the foods deteriorate, why in the heck aren't the companies doing it? You think for no other reason to stay out of the way to litigation might be a good reason to do this, but certainly they could score some public health points by doing this. Why aren't they doing it?   They certainly could. It takes an effort. They have to assign people. At a big company like ConAgra or General Mills that makes hundreds of products, that means they have to do it methodically. It's going to take some time and time is money. So maybe they have to hire some extra food technologists, extra dieticians, extra chefs to figure out the right combinations. So there is some expense, it's not totally free. I talked to ConAgra many years ago about trans fat and they said, when they got rid of trans fat from their foods, partially hydrogenated oil, they also looked at sodium. They found out that in some of their foods, they were using far too much salt and the extra salt wasn't even detectable. It wasn't making foods saltier. It was just a waste. And so they were able to cut back on sodium in some of their products like Chef Boyardee. No effect on taste and they saved a little bit of money to boot. And I mentioned potassium salt. Campbell has been using potassium salt in tomato soup. Their regular red label, condensed tomato soup probably their number one seller over the decades, and they didn't tell anybody. Nobody noticed, they just reduced sodium by I think it was about a third. So the government has known this. Everybody's known that companies could lower sodium, but the government, I think, was afraid to act because of members of Congress who are so anti-regulatory. And then food and restaurant companies in their districts might lobby them to stop the government from interfering with their businesses and that's all happened. They put pressure on legislators. It happened in the 1980s, it happened in the 2010s very recently. I can't emphasize this enough. Excess sodium is causing as many as 100,000 premature deaths every year. That's an unbelievable number, year after year after year, but it's silent. Obituaries don't say he died from eating too much salt, people just accept it and that a heart attack might occur one year or 10 years earlier than it might otherwise have done, but it's just happening in the background so silently.   So Mike let's loop back to your paper and hypertension and also your book, Salt Wars. I'm happy you mentioned that and I'll mention it again at the end. So it sounds like there's a clear case for action and that the government has done something on this. The FDA has proposed some voluntary targets. Could you talk to us about that and what's kind of the history of the FDA and what the heck's taken so long?   First, the major health authorities around the world have said for decades people are eating too much sodium. You've got to cut back, especially in packaged foods. So that's the World Health Organization, American Heart Association and others, but that's indisputable and you're right. The government has done something. We have nutrition labels now so people can compare one food to another. And I urge listeners go to the grocery store, look at salad dressings or soups or breakfast cereals or packaged meats. Almost every category of food will show a range of sodium levels. And in most categories, you can lower sodium by 25% or more simply by switching from one good tasting brand to another. So we got nutrition labels but that hasn't had an overall effect on sodium consumption and probably hasn't had much effect on industry. So in 2010, the National Academy of Sciences issued a report saying that past efforts to lower sodium intake have been a failure. And now it was time for the Food and Drug Administration to set mandatory limits on sodium in packaged foods in 2010. The Food and Drug Administration immediately said it wasn't going to do mandatory limits, but would come out with some voluntary targets. It took six years for the FDA to come out with voluntary targets in 2016. That was near the end of the Obama Administration and the administration wasn't able to finalize the proposed targets. So we go into the Trump years and that's when Congress stepped in and they told the FDA that it could not move forward with some of the targets that it was proposing or it would lose its funding. So that had an effect, but surprisingly, although the Trump Administration was vehemently anti-regulatory, but the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, Scott Gottlieb, was in touch with reality. He was probably the only regulator in the government who was, and in 2018, he said the single most important thing to improve nutrition is to lower sodium levels and that the FDA was going to finalize those voluntary targets in 2019. Well, a few months later, Commissioner Gottlieb quit and the FDA under Trump didn't do anything. It took the Biden Administration not quite a year in October 2021 to finalize those voluntary targets. And so now we have to see will they work? And I'm skeptical that even these modest targets, which give industry two and a half years to lower sodium by an average of about 12%, I'm skeptical that they're going to have much of an impact. I don't see any real effort by the Food and Drug Administration to educate the public or to pound on industry's door and say, you got to lower sodium. I don't know if they're meeting with the big food companies and trade associations, but at least there's some movement and we should be grateful. But that over four year delay in finalizing the proposed voluntary targets has been deadly and that's what our paper calculates how many unnecessary deaths will have been caused by that four and a third year delay in finalizing those targets. And as you said earlier, it's roughly a quarter of a million unnecessary deaths between 2017 and 2031.   It's so discouraging to hear that. Now we face another period of some years that will be necessary to prove that the voluntary guidelines won't be met by the industry and then there will be a long process of talking about whether government should do anything, that'll depend of course, on who's in the White House. So, oh boy, it doesn't sound like anything's going to happen soon.   Not going to happen soon. So the FDA set targets for April 2024. It won't get the data on the effectiveness of the targets until probably 2025, 2026. And then what's it going to do if industry didn't do much? Then surely that would set the stage for mandatory limits, but to get those mandatory regulations will take many more years, probably five more years. And it's distressing how long it takes government to act on anything that touches somebody's interests, landowners, banks, food manufacturers. I've urged the Food and Drug Administration to immediately start developing mandatory limits and or warning notices for food packages so that if the targets are not met in 2024 or 2025, the FDA could immediately propose these stricter regulations and hopefully get them adopted within a couple of years, but to wait three years or four years before building that hammer to require action is naive.   So let me ask you this. So often the case that public health innovation does not begin in the United States and other countries are way out ahead of us on some of these things, is that true in the case of sodium and are there examples from other countries of things that have been done?   Well, the Britains consume about as much sodium as we do, but back in 2005 or so, the British government said people are consuming too much salt. And so it came up with voluntary targets that served as a model for the Food and Drug Administration 10 years later. And so the British government published these voluntary targets and it simultaneously mounted a major public health campaign, urging the public to read labels and reduce their sodium intakes to choose the lower sodium brands. And it also called out major companies that were lowering sodium and major companies that were not lowering sodium. So it really created an issue. And then it more quietly met with the big companies and tried to persuade them to lower sodium. And when the government looked five years later or so, it discovered that there'd been a 10 or 15% reduction in sodium intake. And remember, we don't have to stop consuming sodium, we need to make a about a one third reduction in sodium. And so that the British government got people down about one third of the way that they wanted to go. But then the government changed hands, there's been a conservative government in there and the campaign has just fallen by the wayside, but you could look at other countries. Turkey of all countries has set limits on sodium in bread, one of the major sources of sodium. South Africa has set limits on sodium, mandatory limits in bread, breakfast cereals, potato chips, cured meats, and a bunch of other categories. Israel and Chile have taken a different route. In Mexico, they require warning notices on foods that are high in sodium. So you can go around the world and at least 30 countries, maybe more have adopted either voluntary or mandatory programs to reduce sodium intake and that's partly because of the World Health Organization taking a very strong stand on this and other countries are looking at a place like Britain. Finland has achieved very significant reductions in sodium. So the examples from around the world show that it's feasible to make these really modest reductions in sodium levels and in packaged foods and people are perfectly content. I don't know if any consumer outrage about lowering sodium because people don't know the difference. It tastes just the same.   It's nice to hear some optimism in your voice when you talk about what's happened in other countries and let's hope that they will form models for the US to follow when the political will finally comes. So right now, what can consumers do? Is there anything?   Yes. The easiest thing is when you're shopping, look for lower sodium brands of just about any category of food. Jesus, there's a huge difference between Swiss cheese that's rated really low in sodium and Muenster and mozzarella and other cheeses, cheddar cheese. So just read labels carefully and you could make major reductions. At restaurants though, it's really tough because just about every meal is loaded with sodium. So the main trick I think is to use less condiments, less salad dressing, don't eat salt, avoid soup, which is just a salt bomb and then bring half of your meal home. Split the high sodium meal at least over two days, rather than eating it all at once. And then at home just when you're cooking, use less salt, use light salt where the sodium content is about half the usual and Martin and other companies make light salt. So it's within somebody's control, but it takes so much effort to compare all these labels when you're going to the store to always be adjusting the recipes that we use from cookbooks. So it'd be so much easier, so much more helpful if the food industry said, okay, we're going to really take this on, make a major public health contribution to the country.   Bio   Michael Jacobson holds a Ph.D. in microbiology from MIT and has dedicated his life to advocating sound nutrition and food safety policies. He co-founded the Center for Science in the Public Interest, was its long-time executive director, and now serves as Senior Scientist. He has written numerous books and reports. He's been honored with such awards as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Hero Award (2010), the American Public Health Association's David P. Rall award for advocacy in public health (2011), and the Food Marketing Institute's Esther Peterson Consumer Service Award (1992).  

Squawk Pod
Elon's New Headline; Cramer's Urge for the Fed; Monkeypox in the U.S. 5/20/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 23:25


Health authorities in Europe, the U.S., and Australia are investigating a recent outbreak of monkeypox cases, a rare virus typically confined to Africa. Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former FDA commissioner and CNBC contributor, discusses whether this country's first case of monkeypox is cause for concern, and how the country will handle the latest rise in Covid-19 infections. Business Insider reports that SpaceX paid a flight attendant $250,000 in severance over a sexual misconduct claim made against CEO and founder Elon Musk. Musk tweeted that “wild accusations” against him were untrue, although he didn't specify the allegations. The Squawk Box team discusses Mad Money host Jim Cramer's urge for Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell to act on inflation, aggressively and immediately. Plus, rates for babysitters are rising, and a shoe stock is on the move!In this episode:Dr. Scott Gottlieb, @ScottGottliebMDJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

Face the Nation on the Radio
Face the Nation on the Radio 5/15/22

Face the Nation on the Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 45:14


This week's edition of “Face the Nation with Margaret Brennan,” features breaking news from Buffalo, NY as a man is in custody for a mass shooting at a supermarket that killed 10 and injured 3. Investigators believe the shooting was racially motivated. U.S. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg discusses the baby formula shortage and the plans to bring it to an end. Former FDA commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb talks about the baby formula shortage and possible Covid surges in the summer. Lloyd Blankfein, the former CEO and current senior chairman of Goldman Sachs, says tamping down inflation will require "some pain" as the Federal Reserve raises interest rates.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Squawk Pod
Red-Hot Inflation; Dr Scott Gottlieb: “I do not see China's way out of Covid” 5/11/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 31:10 Very Popular


Inflation rose again in April, continuing a climb that has pushed consumers to the brink and is threatening the economic expansion. The consumer price index accelerated 8.3% in April, more than the 8.1% estimate and near the highest level in more than 40 years. Bitcoin dropped below $30,000 for the second time this week before turning positive as the hot inflation report causes investors to shun risky assets. Purdue University President, Mitch Daniels, former OMB director and former governor of Indiana, discusses the opportunities facing new college graduates amid the U.S.'s tight labor market. Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former FDA commissioner and CNBC contributor, breaks down China's pandemic response and rising Covid cases in the Northeast. Plus, job cuts at Carvana and Got Milk? Starbucks is under fire from actor James Cromwell for charging its customers extra for vegan milk. That won't do, Starbucks, that won't do.In this episode:Mitch Daniels, @purduemitchScott Gottlieb, @ScottGottliebMDAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

Squawk Pod
Tech Trades & the Archegos Margin Call in the Courts 4/27/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 22:56


U.S. stocks rose in volatile trading today after the Nasdaq Composite closed yesterday at a new low for the year, attempting to rebound from a tech-led sell-off in April. Archegos Capital Management's owner, Bill Hwang, and its former chief financial officer, Patrick Halligan, were arrested today in connection with the implosion of the family office last year. The men are being charged with racketeering conspiracy, securities fraud and wire fraud, according to a statement from the U.S. district court. Companies including Texas Instruments and Deutsche Bank are out with new warnings about the potential impact of the Covid outbreak in China. CNBC's Eunice Yoon reports Beijing is currently winding down its city wide testing and Shanghai is expected to lift the lockdown measures. Meanwhile, former FDA commissioner and CNBC contributor, Scott Gottlieb, says China does not have a Covid endgame and will see rolling lockdowns for the “foreseeable future”.In this episode:Eunice Yoon, @onlyyoontvScott Gottlieb, @ScottGottliebMDAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickCameron Costa, @CameronCostaNY

Face the Nation on the Radio
Face the Nation on the Radio 4/24/22

Face the Nation on the Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 46:30 Very Popular


This week on “Face the Nation with Margaret Brennan,” we'll have the latest on U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin's visit to war-torn Ukraine and a Sunday exclusive interview with Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal. Plus, we check in with former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb on the long-awaited COVID vaccine for America's youngest. Also joining the program is European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde, to discuss the impact of the war in Ukraine on inflation and the economy globally.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H3 – Apr 20 2022

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 37:09 Very Popular


Who'd be a better POTUS, Biden or the Easter Bunny? Former FDA commissioner, Dr. Scott Gottlieb, says regarding mask mandate confusion: "It could be solved by CDC being a more competent agency." Former Obama official Dr. Kavita Patel suggests carrying some extra masks with you to give to people near you, carry some rapid tests with you if you're traveling. Asked whether people should continue to wear masks on planes, President Biden said, "That's up to them." Psaki bristles at suggestion Americans "moving on" from travel mask mandate: "Political whims on a plane" aren't data. Proud data nerd Ryan Girdusky joins Clay and Buck to discuss the GOP prospects in midterm election. Pirates of the Caribbean actor Johnny Depp takes the stand for second day in his defamation suit against ex-wife Amber Heard. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Squawk Pod
Netflix's Plunge, Disney's Drama, & America, at Half-Mask 4/20/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 35:00


In a shocking and disappointing report on Wall Street, Netflix revealed a loss of subscribers in the last quarter–its first loss in 10 years. Florida Governor Ron DeSantis is taking aim at Disney by presenting a bill that could revoke the company's near-autonomy over the 40 square miles it inhabits in the Sunshine State. Skybridge Capital founder Anthony Scaramucci discusses the clash of politics and business, and whether the Governor's action is a wise retaliation for Disney's criticism of Florida's “Don't Say Gay” bill. Former FDA Commissioner considers the risks for ending the mask mandates–both political, for the CDC, and physical, for all travelers. Plus, Elon Musk is at it again–just in time for his favorite day of the year. In this episode:Anthony Scaramucci, @ScaramucciDr. Scott Gottlieb, @ScottGottliebMDAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkMelissa Lee, @MelissaLeeCNBCCameron Costa, @CameronCostaNY

The News with Shepard Smith
Police Arrest Brooklyn Subway Shooting Suspect 4/13/22

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 50:16


Police in New York City say Frank James, the man who allegedly shot 10 people in a Brooklyn subway, turned himself in. He is now in police custody and facing federal charges. Valerie Castro reports from the federal courthouse in Brooklyn, where he is set to make his first court appearance tomorrow. Plus, Perry Russom reports as cops in Michigan brace for protests after they released new videos of a police officer shooting and killing a Black man, Patrick Lyoya, during a traffic stop last week. Also, Dr. Scott Gottlieb joins Shep to discuss the CDC extending the mask mandate for all public transportation. And the reason more families are traveling to Vegas post-pandemic.

Squawk Pod
Shortages, Lockdowns, & Inflation Nations 4/11/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 32:35


China's strict “no-Covid” policy is prompting lockdowns across the country, and residents are sharing reports of food shortages and hoarding as they weather the latest wave of the pandemic. CNBC's Eunice Yoon reports from China on the quarantines and the inflation sweeping the nation. Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb details the low vaccination rates in China that might be contributing to such a dire situation over 2 years into the pandemic. White House economist Heather Boushey, a member of President Biden's Council of Economic Advisors, discusses inflation in the U.S., high energy costs around the world, and what the government might do to mitigate American pocketbook pains. Plus, WarnerMedia and Discovery have made their merger official; investors and streamers are tuned in for the resulting changes to the entertainment and media landscapes.  In this episode:Heather Boushey, @hboushey46Dr. Scott Gottlieb, @ScottGottliebMDEunice Yoon, @onlyyoontvJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickAndrew Ross Sorkin,@andrewrsorkinKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

Squawk Pod
Reading the ‘Recession Predictor' 4/01/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 26:23


The bond market briefly flashed a warning that recession could be imminent; Joe Kernen, Becky Quick, Andrew Ross Sorkin, and CNBC's senior economics reporter Steve Liesman explain Wall Street's hype about the inverted yield curve. The other talk on Wall Street: a social breakfast between Activision Blizzard CEO Bobby Kotick and trader Alexander von Furstenberg that's now in the center of official probes into insider trading concerns. Also caught up in the probes are billionaire magnates Barry Diller and David Geffen. Plus, China is in the thick of another battle with Covid, but here at home, former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb says, we're nearing the end of its pandemic phase.   In this episode:Dr. Scott Gottlieb, @ScottGottliebMDSteve Liesman, @steveliesmanBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

Squawk Pod
Biden's Budget, Shanghai's Lockdown, & the On-Stage Slap 03/28/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 31:31


President Joe Biden's 2023 federal budget proposes tax hikes on the ultra-wealthy and on corporations while providing billions of dollars in new spending at the Defense and Justice Departments. Joe, Becky, and Andrew digest the proposal, its potential to bolster domestic investment, and plans to reduce the federal deficit. In light of increasing Covid infections, Shanghai began a two-stage lockdown today. CNBC's Eunice Yoon reports the lockdown of China's largest city includes orders to work from home as well as the suspension of public transit and ride hailing. Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former FDA commissioner and CNBC contributor, discusses China's zero-Covid policy and says Shanghai will have a hard time containing Covid infections. Plus, Axios media reporter, Sara Fischer recaps Sunday's memorable Oscars ceremony, slaps, streaming wins, and all.  In this episode:Dr. Scott Gottlieb, @ScottGottliebMDEunice Yoon, @onlyyoontvSara Fischer, @sarafischerAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

Face the Nation on the Radio
Face the Nation on the Radio 3/20/22

Face the Nation on the Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 45:48


This week on “Face the Nation” with no end in sight for the war in Ukraine moderator Margaret Brennan has exclusive interviews with Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin on the new weapons being sent to Ukraine and the diplomatic approach to arming them. Chinese Ambassador to the U.S. Qin Gang on the relations between the U.S. and China after President Biden warns Beijing not to help Russia with its invasion. Ukrainian Ambassador to the U.S. Oksana Markarova on her country's battle against Russia. A rare Sunday interview with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. And former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb on the latest Covid news. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Squawk Pod
Rate Hikes & a Relief Rally. 03/18/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 33:07


The markets are on track for their best week since November 2020, despite geopolitical risks continuing to brew abroad. CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports on the rising Covid-19 cases across Europe, and what experts think that means for the U.S.'s pandemic response. Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former FDA commissioner and CNBC contributor, also breaks down the latest surge, but says the U.S. will not see a major wave of infections as we head into the spring and summer. President Joe Biden signed an executive order last week directing agencies to study cryptocurrencies as well as to come up with a government-wide approach to regulating digital assets. Perianne Boring, Chamber of Digital Commerce founder and president, says the move is a “huge validation” for blockchain. Plus, March Madness has begun! Joe Kernen discusses his not-so-perfect brackets with guest hosts Brian Sullivan and Michael Santoli. In this episode:Perianne Boring, @PerianneDCDr. Scott Gottlieb, @ScottGottliebMDMeg Tirrell, @megtirrellBrain Sullivan, @SullyCNBCMichael Santoli, @michaelsantoliJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkKlaire Odumody, @klairemarie

The Nonlinear Library
LW - Omicron #16: Danger in China by Zvi

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 6:13


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Omicron #16: Danger in China, published by Zvi on March 14, 2022 on LessWrong. What is happening in China? Scott Gottlieb says we essentially don't know the extent to which Omicron has spread in China. What do we know? We know China has not made great use of its time so far, and seems incapable of the loss of face necessary to get mRNA vaccines, nor does it seem to have stockpiled sufficient amounts of treatment for over a billion people if things get fully out of hand. We know that China has now locked down tens of millions of people. We know that they previously shut down schools in Shanghai, with some pretty strange implementation details. And we know they have quite a few cases. We don't know how many, but the official counts are certainly not overcounting cases. “Because of the large number of cases in a short period of time, it is inevitable that there will be some panic all over the country, and Shanghai is no exception,” said Dr. Zhang Wenhong, a prominent infectious disease expert in Shanghai, in a post on his social media account on Monday. We also know from Hong Kong what it could look like if a population that only had access to Sinovac and has had few previous infections has uncontrolled spread of Omicron. Things get very bad very quickly. The thing I noticed right away about China's reaction this time in Shanghai, which came first, was that it wasn't as complete. The will to succeed seemed not to be there on the same level. Yes, this was a series of coercive actions the West would be incapable of taking, but what reason was there to think they would work? Closing off all school-based transmission won't slow down Omicron much. Closing schools is a half-measure. If you have reason to think schools need to be closed, and you are following China's old playbook, than anything that makes you need to shut down Shanghai's schools should make you shut down all of Shanghai. In other cases, China has made this extremely expensive and painful choice, and it has worked. This time, faced with a more dangerous variant, they only closed schools and hoped the problem would go away. That is not going to work (not that it has had time to have an impact yet, but it was never going to work). Now they've ‘restricted movement in many neighborhoods' of Shanghai, but not in others, and this is still very different from the nature of previous Chinese lockdowns. And consider what they are doing in Dongguan, which is perhaps too big to shut down in the same way as Shanghai: City authorities told residents not to leave the city, except for essential reasons. Those leaving must show negative test results within 48 hours of departure. A few entrances on highways to other cities were closed, while all shuttle buses linking airports in other cities and check-in terminals in Dongguan were halted. Some museums and libraries in the city also closed to visitors. Its factories are still running, however. “(Workers) need to do COVID tests, but it's not a prerequisite for them to be able to enter factories,” said King Lau, who helps manage a metal coating factory. That is not going to be enough. Some cases will get out, and cases within the city will still rise, unless this was caught so early there really were only a handful to start and then they got super lucky. They still were willing to shut down Shenzen and a total of about 60 million people so far, while showing signs they are approaching their limits. So what happens now? If there are this many cases already, the question is whether the outbreak is somehow contained to the cities and areas that are now locked down, or otherwise the tide can somehow be turned. I do not see how this happens. China could ramp up its reactions, locking down more cities and areas with harsher conditions, in an attempt to make it stop, but can it afford to ...

The Nonlinear Library: LessWrong
LW - Omicron #16: Danger in China by Zvi

The Nonlinear Library: LessWrong

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 6:13


Link to original articleWelcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Omicron #16: Danger in China, published by Zvi on March 14, 2022 on LessWrong. What is happening in China? Scott Gottlieb says we essentially don't know the extent to which Omicron has spread in China. What do we know? We know China has not made great use of its time so far, and seems incapable of the loss of face necessary to get mRNA vaccines, nor does it seem to have stockpiled sufficient amounts of treatment for over a billion people if things get fully out of hand. We know that China has now locked down tens of millions of people. We know that they previously shut down schools in Shanghai, with some pretty strange implementation details. And we know they have quite a few cases. We don't know how many, but the official counts are certainly not overcounting cases. “Because of the large number of cases in a short period of time, it is inevitable that there will be some panic all over the country, and Shanghai is no exception,” said Dr. Zhang Wenhong, a prominent infectious disease expert in Shanghai, in a post on his social media account on Monday. We also know from Hong Kong what it could look like if a population that only had access to Sinovac and has had few previous infections has uncontrolled spread of Omicron. Things get very bad very quickly. The thing I noticed right away about China's reaction this time in Shanghai, which came first, was that it wasn't as complete. The will to succeed seemed not to be there on the same level. Yes, this was a series of coercive actions the West would be incapable of taking, but what reason was there to think they would work? Closing off all school-based transmission won't slow down Omicron much. Closing schools is a half-measure. If you have reason to think schools need to be closed, and you are following China's old playbook, than anything that makes you need to shut down Shanghai's schools should make you shut down all of Shanghai. In other cases, China has made this extremely expensive and painful choice, and it has worked. This time, faced with a more dangerous variant, they only closed schools and hoped the problem would go away. That is not going to work (not that it has had time to have an impact yet, but it was never going to work). Now they've ‘restricted movement in many neighborhoods' of Shanghai, but not in others, and this is still very different from the nature of previous Chinese lockdowns. And consider what they are doing in Dongguan, which is perhaps too big to shut down in the same way as Shanghai: City authorities told residents not to leave the city, except for essential reasons. Those leaving must show negative test results within 48 hours of departure. A few entrances on highways to other cities were closed, while all shuttle buses linking airports in other cities and check-in terminals in Dongguan were halted. Some museums and libraries in the city also closed to visitors. Its factories are still running, however. “(Workers) need to do COVID tests, but it's not a prerequisite for them to be able to enter factories,” said King Lau, who helps manage a metal coating factory. That is not going to be enough. Some cases will get out, and cases within the city will still rise, unless this was caught so early there really were only a handful to start and then they got super lucky. They still were willing to shut down Shenzen and a total of about 60 million people so far, while showing signs they are approaching their limits. So what happens now? If there are this many cases already, the question is whether the outbreak is somehow contained to the cities and areas that are now locked down, or otherwise the tide can somehow be turned. I do not see how this happens. China could ramp up its reactions, locking down more cities and areas with harsher conditions, in an attempt to make it stop, but can it afford to ...

Squawk Pod
Upticks and Crackdowns in China, Tom Brady's Welcome Back

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 30:07


China's Covid cases are now the highest they've been since the beginning of the pandemic. Domestically, the country is addressing health concerns by halting business and production while simultaneously cracking down on its biggest tech stocks. Internationally, Chinese leaders are meeting with U.S. officials to discuss China's role in Russia's war on Ukraine. CNBC's Kayla Tausche reports on the latest attacks in Ukraine and the week's negotiation agenda for global powers. Two years after the WHO declared the coronavirus a global pandemic, Dr. Scott Gottlieb reflects on the long road since then, and considers global risks of a resurgence. Plus, the NFL's shortest retirement: Tom Brady is heading back to the field less than two months after announcing his departure. In this episode:Dr. Scott Gottlieb, @ScottGottliebMDKayla Tausche, @kaylatauscheSteve Liesman, @steveliesmanJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

B-Time with Beth Bierbower
Healthcare Trends with Senior Policy Fellow Susan Dentzer

B-Time with Beth Bierbower

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 57:44


Susan Dentzer is one of the nation's most respected health policy experts and thought leaders and is the Senior Policy Fellow at the Robert J. Margolis Center for Health Policy at Duke University.  Based in Washington, DC, she works on a range of health policy issues including health system transformation, the use of artificial intelligence and related technologies in health care, biopharmaceuticals policy, and improving cancer care as well as maternity and infant care. She is the editor and lead author of the book "Health Care Without Walls: A Roadmap for Reinventing U.S. Health Care."   Show notes:  Book:  Uncontrolled Spread by Scott Gottlieb.  Podcasts: Hacks on Tap. 

In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt
Omicron in the US: What You Need to Know (with Scott Gottlieb)

In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 50:53


Andy digs into the latest science behind Omicron with former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb. They discuss what we know about the origin of Omicron, how it's likely to play out in the US, and if we'll need an Omicron-specific vaccine. It's still early, but Andy and Scott have you covered with the most up-to-date information out there about this new variant and the risk it poses.    Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt and Instagram @andyslavitt.    Follow Scott @ScottGottliebMD on Twitter.   Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium.    Support the show by checking out our sponsors!   Click this link for a list of current sponsors and discount codes for this show and all Lemonada shows: https://lemonadamedia.com/sponsors/  Throughout the pandemic, CVS Health has been there, bringing quality, affordable health care closer to home—so it's never out of reach for anyone. 

Learn more at cvshealth.com.   Check out these resources from today's episode:    Watch Dr. Fauci's full interview about Omicron on State of the Nation: https://www.cnn.com/videos/politics/2021/12/05/fauci-full-12-5.cnn   Learn more about the Omicron outbreak in Tshwane, South Africa, as mentioned by Scott: https://www.samrc.ac.za/news/tshwane-district-omicron-variant-patient-profile-early-features Read more on the coming oral antivirals from Merck and Pfizer and what they mean with Omicron looming: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/07/science/merck-pfizer-covid-pill-treatment.html Check out Scott's book, Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic: https://www.harpercollins.com/products/uncontrolled-spread-scott-gottlieb?variant=39344420356130 Find a COVID-19 vaccine site near you: https://www.vaccines.gov/  Order Andy's book, Preventable: The Inside Story of How Leadership Failures, Politics, and Selfishness Doomed the U.S. Coronavirus Response: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250770165    Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia.    For additional resources, information, and a transcript of the episode, visit lemonadamedia.com/show/inthebubble. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cuomo Prime Time with Chris Cuomo
Republicans Cling to Trump as He Pushes More Election Lies

Cuomo Prime Time with Chris Cuomo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 43:47


First, Chris discusses Bill Maher's warnings to democrats of a "slow-moving coup" with Philip Bump. Chris continues that conversation with democracy expert Steven Levitsky. Chris wraps up the show with Dr. Scott Gottlieb on what the end of the covid pandemic could look like. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

AEI Podcast Channel
What the Hell is Going On?: WTH is going on with the COVID vaccines? Dr. Scott Gottlieb with everything you need to know

AEI Podcast Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 54:39


This week, the AEI Podcast Channel presents the latest episode of What the Hell is Going On? If you enjoy this episode, subscribe to the podcast on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-the-hell-is-going-on/id1467993804 (Apple), https://open.spotify.com/show/2Yo2gsVPUYm7iPTZHm1qKt?si=_tzMmfoISiiBShcJQopqYQ&dl_branch=1 (Spotify) or wherever you get your podcasts. Learn more about Uncontrolled Spread (New York Times Bestseller) https://www.uncontrolledspread.com (here). Pfizer and Moderna recently announced that their coronavirus vaccines are both safe and highly effective, shattering the previous record for developing a vaccine for a novel virus. While this news is promising, Americans are also approaching the worst phase of the pandemic as we enter the winter with a record number of cases. Dr. Scott Gottlieb once again joined the show to explain everything you need to know about the forthcoming vaccines. He discusses vaccine distribution, when things will finally get back to normal, and whether US adversaries might weaponize viruses to target Americans in the future. Dr. Gottlieb is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. He returned to AEI in 2019 after serving as the 23rd commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. He has a medical degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine and did his residency in internal medicine at the Mount Sinai Medical Center. https://www.aei.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/11.23.20-Gottlieb-transcript.pdf?x91208 (Download the transcript here.)

Cuomo Prime Time with Chris Cuomo
Federal Arrest Warrant Issued for Gabby Petito's Fiancé

Cuomo Prime Time with Chris Cuomo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 43:17


First, Chris discusses the federal arrest warrant issued for Brian Laundrie with Joey Jackson and Casey Jordan. Then, Chris discusses the first witness testimony subpoenas issued by January 6th committee with Rep. Adam Schiff. Chris wraps up the show with Scott Gottlieb on the CDC's recommendation for covid booster shots.  To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

AEI Podcast Channel
AEI Events Podcast: Uncontrolled spread: A book event with Scott Gottlieb

AEI Podcast Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 49:59


This week, AEI presents today's episode of the AEI Events Podcast. If you enjoy the episode, you can find the AEI Events Podcast on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-aei-events-podcast/id1173743623 (Apple), https://open.spotify.com/show/341NyeuHUV0sIlxHiZp7Do?si=xM-j1HM8SnOJaY8kYb7img&dl_branch=1 (Spotify) or wherever you get your podcasts. As the COVID-19 pandemic begins to shift from an acute crisis to an endemic pathogen, AEI's Scott Gottlieb — physician, medical policy expert, public health advocate, and former US Food and Drug Administration commissioner — is releasing a book, “Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic” (HarperCollins, September 2021), to help leaders and policymakers understand how COVID-19 was able to trounce America's pandemic preparations. Dr. Gottlieb identifies why the United States was caught unprepared and outlines essential policies and investments to protect the United States and the world from future threats. He outlines specific steps that must be taken to protect against the next outbreak. Please join Dr. Gottlieb and AEI President Robert Doar for a discussion of the issues raised in “Uncontrolled Spread.” https://www.uncontrolledspread.com/ (Purchase your copy here.)

The AEI Events Podcast
Uncontrolled spread: A book event with Scott Gottlieb

The AEI Events Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 49:59


As the COVID-19 pandemic begins to shift from an acute crisis to an endemic pathogen, AEI's Scott Gottlieb — physician, medical policy expert, public health advocate, and former US Food and Drug Administration commissioner — is releasing a book, “Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic” (HarperCollins, September 2021), to help leaders and policymakers understand how COVID-19 was able to trounce America's pandemic preparations. Dr. Gottlieb identifies why the United States was caught unprepared and outlines essential policies and investments to protect the United States and the world from future threats. He outlines specific steps that must be taken to protect against the next outbreak. Please join Dr. Gottlieb and AEI President Robert Doar for a discussion of the issues raised in “Uncontrolled Spread.” https://www.uncontrolledspread.com/ (Purchase your copy here.) Watch the full event https://www.aei.org/events/uncontrolled-spread-a-book-event-with-scott-gottlieb/ (here).

Bloomberg Businessweek
How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic

Bloomberg Businessweek

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 40:47


Bloomberg News Technology Reporter Austin Carr explains how Microsoft and Google are part of the plan to wire rural America. Bloomberg News Social Media Reporter Naomi Nix shares news that Facebook Chief Technology Officer Mike Schroepfer is stepping down. Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb discusses his book “Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic." And we Drive to the Close with Megan Horneman, Director of Portfolio Strategy at Verdence Capital Advisors. Hosts: Carol Massar and Tim Stenovec. Producer: Paul Brennan. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Race to Value Podcast
COVID-19 & SARS-CoV-2 Delta Variant: Scientific Insights from a Leading Virologist, with Dr. Rodney E. Rohde

The Race to Value Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 53:04


We are pleased to release a special bonus episode and do our part to address the nation's concerns around the pandemic and the COVID vaccine. As it stands right now, around 164 million people, or 50% of the total U.S. population, have now been fully vaccinated. Ultimately, with a large portion of the U.S. population still unvaccinated, it seems that COVID-19 is not going to disappear soon. The U.S. will continue to see outbreaks of the virus in communities with low vaccine uptake. Our guest is Dr. Rodney Rohde, a virologist and clinical laboratory expert with 30 years of experience in Public health, virology, and zoonotic disease, and is a Professor in the College of Health Professions and Associate Director for the Texas State University Translational Health Research Center. This episode is for anyone who wants to hear a scientific discussion about SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 to combat misinformation that is out there about the pandemic. Episode Bookmarks: 04:30 Dr. Rohde shares a brief overview of the medical laboratory profession and the Clinical Laboratory Science degree programs 08:30  The impact of the pandemic on the medical laboratory staffing crisis 09:50 Dr. Rohde speaks about the importance of laboratory medicine in improving value-based care and health equity 13:00 Did SARS-CoV-2 originate from a laboratory leak at the Wuhan Institute of Virology?  Or did the virus originate from a zoonotic spillover event? 18:15 Referencing Dr. Rohde's recent article discussing how the US is split between the vaccinated and unvaccinated – and how the deaths and hospitalizations reflect this divide 20:00 Dr. Rohde discusses how “99.5% of all the people dying from COVID-19 in the U.S. are unvaccinated” and how to understand breakthrough infections happening with the vaccinated 22:30 How to eradicate a virus and why current immunization rates will not support disease eradication 24:50 "Viruses, especially RNA viruses, are the most diabolical microbes on the planet.” 25:30 Viral mutations that create infectious variants and the opportunism of infection 28:20 The global achievement of smallpox eradication 28:50 Dr. Rohde explains vaccine efficacy and what people should ask their physicians if debating whether or not to receive the vaccine 31:00 The low of mRNA vaccines 34:00 Dr. Rohde explains what the Delta variant is and provides a scientific overview of viral mutations 37:00 The changing pathology of the virus and how younger, unvaccinated people are now being affected by the Delta variant 38:00 Booster shots for immunocompromised individuals and the likelihood of boosters for the general population 39:20 The transmissibility of the Delta variant. what the R-naught number means in understanding viral contagion, and how Delta variant compares to Ebola transmission 45:00 Referencing the COVID-19 thought leadership and insights from Scott Gottlieb, Tom Frieden, and Peter Hotez 46:20 The three-year cycle of unchecked pandemics, the development of herd immunity, and the potential for an endemic transition in 2022 47:50 The significance of the landmark scientific achievement of developing a mRNA vaccine technology (the first time in history!) 50:00 Viewing public health as part of our public defense and why we need to learn that one lesson from this pandemic!

Axios Pro Rata
Former FDA Head Scott Gottlieb on the proposed menthol ban

Axios Pro Rata

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 15:37


The idea of banning menthols was first floated in 2017 by then-FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb, as nearly half of smokers between 12 and 17 smoke menthols. But around 85% of Black smokers prefer menthols, largely due to racially targeted marketing, and this has led to concerns about how enforcement of a ban could disproportionately impact Black Americans.   Dan digs into the history of this proposed ban, what enforcement could look like, and when it might go into effect with Scott Gottlieb. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Political Economy with James Pethokoukis
Scott Gottlieb, Rick Hess, & Michael Strain: COVID-19 this fall

Political Economy with James Pethokoukis

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2020 61:04


Scott Gottlieb, Rick Hess, and Michael Strain all join Jim Pethokoukis to discuss the current state of the COVID-19 pandemic in America, exploring the public health and economic aspects of the crisis and their effect on the US education system. The post https://www.aei.org/multimedia/scott-gottlieb-rick-hess-michael-strain-covid-19-this-fall/ (Scott Gottlieb, Rick Hess, & Michael Strain: COVID-19 this fall) appeared first on https://www.aei.org (American Enterprise Institute - AEI).

A Healthy Dose
Scott Gottlieb

A Healthy Dose

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2020 44:44


Physician, investor and former FDA Commissioner, Scott Gottlieb, sits down with Trevor and Steve on this episode of AHD.