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Best podcasts about Schwab

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Latest podcast episodes about Schwab

Charles Schwab’s Insights & Ideas Podcast
When Interest Rates Rise, What Should You Do with Bonds?

Charles Schwab’s Insights & Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 21:32


The Fed is hiking short-term interest rates to slow the economy. Now the bond market is starting to expect less inflation longer term, and so yields on Treasury bonds have declined from their peak. What should bond investors do?In this episode, Mark Riepe speaks with Kathy Jones, Schwab's chief fixed income strategist. Kathy has analyzed global bond, foreign currency, and commodity markets extensively throughout her career as an investment analyst and strategist, working with both institutional and individual clients. Kathy makes regular broadcast appearances on CNBC, Yahoo Finance, Bloomberg TV, and many other networks and is often quoted by The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Financial Times, and Reuters.Kathy and Mark discuss the reasons why investors typically hold bonds in a portfolio, how the yield curve tends to function, quantitative tightening, and many other topics related to bonds and the current interest-rate environment.Follow Financial Decoder for free on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen.Financial Decoder is an original podcast from Charles Schwab. For more on the series, visit Schwab.com/FinancialDecoder. If you enjoy the show, please leave us a rating or review on Apple Podcasts. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURESThe information provided here is for general informational purposes only and should not be considered an individualized recommendation or personalized investment advice. The investment strategies mentioned here may not be suitable for everyone. Each investor needs to review an investment strategy for his or her own particular situation before making any investment decision.All expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market conditions. Data contained herein from third-party providers is obtained from what are considered reliable sources. However, its accuracy, completeness or reliability cannot be guaranteed. Supporting documentation for any claims or statistical information is available upon request.Examples provided are for illustrative purposes only and not intended to be reflective of results you can expect to achieve.Investing involves risk including loss of principal.Please note that this content was created as of the specific date indicated and reflects the author's views as of that date. It will be kept solely for historical purposes, and the author's opinions may change, without notice, in reaction to shifting economic, business, and other conditions.Diversification does not eliminate the risk of investment losses.Fixed income securities are subject to increased loss of principal during periods of rising interest rates. Fixed-income investments are subject to various other risks including changes in credit quality, market valuations, liquidity, prepayments, early redemption, corporate events, tax ramifications and other factors. Lower-rated securities are subject to greater credit risk, default risk, and liquidity risk.Tax-exempt bonds are not necessarily suitable for all investors. Information related to a security's tax-exempt status (federal and in-state) is obtained from third parties, and Schwab does not guarantee its accuracy. Tax-exempt income may be subject to the alternative minimum tax. Capital appreciation from bond funds and discounted bonds may be subject to state or local taxes. Capital gains are not exempt from federal income tax.Preferred securities are often callable, meaning the issuing company may redeem the security at a certain price after a certain date. Such call features may affect yield. Preferred securities generally have lower credit ratings and a lower claim to assets than the issuer's individual bonds. Like bonds, prices of preferred securities tend to move inversely with interest rates, so they are subject to increased loss of principal during periods of rising interest rates. Investment value will fluctuate, and preferred securities, when sold before maturity, may be worth more or less than original cost. Preferred securities are subject to various other risks including changes in interest rates and credit quality, default risks, market valuations, liquidity, prepayments, early redemption, deferral risk, corporate events, tax ramifications, and other factors.(0822-2H72)

The Bookish Banter Podcast
Ep 22: Apollycon Recap 2022 (and the math ain't mathin')

The Bookish Banter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 115:48 Very Popular


Welcome to the Thunderdome! Join your hosts and a few new faces, Jess (@bookshelfbinge), Molly (@mollysmilesreads), and Shaye (@shayealexabk), while we deep dive into Apollycon 2022. Let's chat while Kearsten plays the ultimate hostess and tries to wrangle this rowdy bunch while they share their experiences with the ticket buying, volunteering, and the convention process. **Disclaimer: Everything shared in this episode will be our own opinions and experiences; we are not here to invalidate anyone's experience, we just wanted to share as much information with you as possible. Follow Jess on Tiktok, Instagram and her podcast here, Molly on Tiktok and Instagram, and Shaye on Tiktok and Instagram! Our pick for the August Book Club is Vicious by V.E. Schwab, click here to join the discord and follow along! Our Journey thru Middle Earth Readathon is just starting and there is still plenty of time to join. Our first event will be a one hour reading sprint this Wednesday, August 10th at 4pm PST/7pm EST. Please subscribe and leave us a 5 star review and follow along on Instagram and Tiktok @TheBookishBanterPodcast. If you want to check out our Patreon, click here for behind the scenes content and bonus episodes!!! Message us with any episode requests or if you just want to say hi! Follow Tatyana on Instagram @TheLiteratureLlama2.0 and Tiktok and follow Kearsten on Instagram @KearstenKeepsReading and Tiktok. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thebookishbanterpodcast/support

CBS Eye on Money
Asset Allocation Concerns

CBS Eye on Money

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 11:10


I left my financial advisor several months ago and have a variety of retirement accounts and I'm not sure if I should consolidate and if my mix of assets is ideal.Have a money question? Email us, ask jill [at] jill on money dot comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Fazit - Kultur vom Tage - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
"Warburgs Passage": Kunst-Kolloquium im Engadin mit Arbeiten von Alexander Kluge

Fazit - Kultur vom Tage - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 7:33


Schwab, Corneliawww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, FazitDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

CBS Eye on Money
In My 20s and Looking for a Financial Checkup

CBS Eye on Money

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 20:51


Even though I'm only in my 20s, I feel like I'm in need of a financial checkup, especially regarding a gifted mutual fund account. Have a money question? Email us, ask jill [at] jill on money dot comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Its Never Too Late
IT'S A DATE! Calendar Girl - Patt Schwab -It's Arr-gust.

Its Never Too Late

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 32:58


IT'S A DATE! Calendar Girl - Patt Schwab -It's Arr-gust. That means Pirates Day. We celebrate Annie Oakley's Birthday and of course, National Toilet Paper Day. Class! All the way https://fundamentallyspeaking.com pattschwab@icloud.com SwimmingUpstreamRadioShow.com #holidays #celebration #August #fundamentallyspeaking #Pirates #AnnieOakley

Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn
Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn - July 31, 2022 - HR 3

Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 39:03


Villain Klaus Schwab is coming for your car. The World Economic Forum has announced it wants to "reduce ownership of private vehicles" as part of its Green Energy crusade. But would that include the private jets of the Davos attendees? Of course not. The Global Elites want you to own nothing -- so they can own everything for you. Eva Vlaardingerbroek on WEF control of farms and the food supply. Fortunately, some nations like Japan, Brazil and Mexico are saying NO to Schwab's Schemes. NO Bugs. More to follow. Meanwhile, talking the Ukraine Blacklist. Corrupt Zelensky wants to censor Rand Paul, Colonel Macgregor and Glenn Greenwald. Hey, how did we Backbone truth-tellers not make the list? A Ukrainian official says Americans must sacrifice some part of their "cozy life" to help Ukraine. How many more BILLIONS do they want from us? Big no thanks. Plus, scientific notes on Monkey Pox from the New England Journal of Medicine. The scarf lady Dr. Deborah Birx now says "we overplayed the vaccines." Also, in the Captain Obvious department, Fox News reports that "strategists" say a "recession could pose a threat to Democrats in midterm elections." Wow ya think? We listen to Bill Clinton's simple definition of a "recession" -- and conclude we're in one right now. Notes on not caring what the New York Times thinks. Callers on Faith, Freedom and Trump 2024.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bookish Banter Podcast
Ep 21: Interview with Sophie Irwin

The Bookish Banter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 62:03


We are so excited for a chance to chat with debut author, Sophie Irwin! Hang out while we dive into the creation of her new novel, A Lady's Guide to Fortune Hunting, some swooning over Taylor Jenkins Reid, and of course some talk about the ultimate regency status (a wealthy widow). We hope you love this episode as much as we loved talking with Sophie! Follow Sophie Irwin on Instagram and make sure to grab a copy of A Lady's Guide to Fortune Hunting! Our pick for the August Book Club is Vicious by V.E. Schwab, click here to join the discord and follow along! Please subscribe and leave us a 5 star review and follow along on Instagram and Tiktok @TheBookishBanterPodcast. If you want to check out our Patreon, click here for behind the scenes content and bonus episodes!!! Message us with any episode requests or if you just want to say hi! Follow Tatyana on Instagram @TheLiteratureLlama2.0 and Tiktok and follow Kearsten on Instagram @KearstenKeepsReading and Tiktok. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thebookishbanterpodcast/support

The Option Genius Podcast: Options Trading For Income and Growth
How to Be an RIA With Paul Ashcraft - 133

The Option Genius Podcast: Options Trading For Income and Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 57:16


Allen: All right, passive traders, we have a treat in store for you today. Many of you know about the option continuum, which is basically, you know, our levels of breakdown of where you are as an options trader, you start with level one, you don't know anything. And then you get to level 10, maybe if you want to, which is option professional. And basically a professional means that you are so good at trading options, that you are now trading and managing other people's money and you're getting paid for it. Many of you have reached out to us in the past and said, Hey, I want more information on that. And we haven't really put it out there because I am not doing it myself. Right now, as a professional, I don't I'm not measuring anybody else's money. And so, you know, I'm not the best person to talk to about that. But we keep getting people and be like, hey, you know, I want to learn, I want to learn. So one of our members, Paul Ashcraft, has volunteered to join us today. And I want to thank you, Paul, for coming and helping out. A few a couple of months ago, I think in one of our groups, I think it was a passive group, where I had put in there like, Hey, I'm thinking about starting a hedge fund. So I'm thinking about going professional, right? And he reached out and said, hey, you know, I'm already doing it if you want to, if you want to talk and I can answer your question. So we had an amazing conversation, I learned a lot. And I was like, You know what, this would be really helpful for everybody else. So I asked Paul, hey, could you do it again? And we can record it this time? It was like, Yeah, sure, no foul. And so he's here, Paul, thank you. Thank you for being on thank you for taking the time to do this. Paul: Thank you very much. Pleasure. Allen: And you're Paul is a member of our of a lot of our programs. So passive trading formula, the blank check, and now the credit spread mastery as well. So you know, it's good to see that, hey, if you're a money manager, then you're continuously getting learning and learning new things to help out your students, or your clients, I guess. So. Well, tell me, why did you get into management? What was it that drawed you through that? Paul: Well, I sort of got tricked into it. I had a, I'm a CPA by trade, and I had a client who was becoming an NFL player agent. And he trusted me and wanted me to help him manage his people's NFL players money. So I started the licensing process at that time. And so that sort of tricked me into it. So that sort of fell apart. And then he wasn't getting more leads for what he was doing. So I basically continued since then, so Allen: Okay, so were you already trading on your own? Or before that? Or did you learn as you want to? Paul: Yeah, I've been trading, you know, for quite a while. Off and on. So yeah, I've had some experience of trading. Allen: Okay. So you are comfortable, you could do it? Paul: I knew I needed to learn, I do need to learn some more. But yeah, I feel like I could I knew enough about the world to do that. Allen: Okay. And so you are known as what is a RIA, a registered independent advisor? Paul: Right. That's correct. Allen: So that's one of the ways of managing money. What exactly is an RIA? Paul: It's basically a firm that is licensed by the FINRA basically, and you are licensed to where you can manage other people's money. Allen: And all RIAs, are fiduciaries, right? Paul: That's correct. Yeah.  Allen: Right. Because a lot of people don't know the difference between a fiduciary and a non fiduciary. And so a fiduciary, if you don't know you are legally bound to do what's in the best interest of the client. A lot of these other companies that people think about when they're talking about money management, or Wealth Advisors, retirement advisors, all these words that they use, they have no license, or maybe they do have a license, but they're not a fiduciary. So they're not required to do what's best for the client. And so they can sell you a product that they get the highest commission on, even if it's not really a good thing, a good fit for you. So that's why..  Paul: Yeah one of the ways I deal with that fiduciary criteria is basically whatever I do for other people, I do for myself. Allen: Okay. Okay, interesting. So, what does it take to open an RIA? Paul: Well, if you want to legal structure and need, like, I have an LLC got a creative for that. And I have had to pass a serious 65 test, which you'd like an SEC test, and get to come up some kind of agreement you have with your clients that's approved by FINRA to sign them on as clients. Those are the basics you have to do. Allen: Okay, and like how long did it take you to go through all that? Remember? Paul: I'm gonna say, basically of six to nine months. Allen: Okay, and how long have you been? How long have you been an RIA? Paul: Since 2014, so roughly eight years. Allen: Awesome. Yep. Cool. And for those of you, you know, I'm going to repeat it later on, but Paul's business website is Businessadvisors.Pro. So if you ever or if you need a good adviser, you know, please reach out to Paul. And I'll repeat at the end, and we'll put it in the show notes. I just wanted to get that out there. Paul: And that's mainly my CPA website, just so you know. Allen: Very cool. BusinessAdvisors.Pro, there you go.  Paul: And then sort has been done about creating my Wealth Advisors website, because you're so under scrutiny when you were you advertise things, so I just sort of steered away from that a little bit. Allen: Interesting. Okay. So I guess there's certain things you can say and certain things you cannot say. Paul: Basically, anything you put out there to the public, you have to like, monitor it for five years, and they can question you about it anytime. So I just figured one way to get around that is just not to do it. Allen: Okay. So then that leads me to my next question, like, how do you find clients if you're not advertising? Paul: Well, you know, I have CPA clients, probably like half the clients, I have my Wealth Advisors from CPA side. Other thing is like, from friends, and referrals from other people who use me. Allen: Okay. So it takes time to build all that up?  Paul: Yes, yes. And I'm currently working on more. More advertising. Allen: Okay. All right. So the advertising is possible. It's not it's not like it's restricted. But you have to be careful of what you do and how you do it. Paul: Yes, yes, yeah. Allen: Now, what are your clients looking for? Because, you know, if somebody comes to you and says, Hey, you know, I'm looking to make more money, obviously, but they have so many, so many choices. They can do it themselves, it could go to like, like Fidelity and have them do it. They could go to they're really rich, they can have their own private like, you know, Bank of America, has their own private wealth, people. So when they come to you, what do they tell you? Like? What are they looking for in terms of an advisor? Paul: Well, I mean, I had someone recently come to me, and, you know, we're signing them up, or things that I'd say we, if we look, if we're here a year later, what do you want to what your criteria are saying, I did a good job. And he wanted a 10% return, which has been difficult in this market. But that's, that's one thing. Another thing? I you know, most advisors out there, these basically are, they're buying hold people, I mean, and they bid six things in a bucket, and don't look at it too often. So I, I basically say that I'm actively working in their account, and I'm not sure I'm going to just put it there and not be looking at it. Allen: So obviously, you probably tell them about your options experience and the different types of strategies you use. Paul: Yeah, a lot of times just the casual person warnings on the manager money that, that if I tried to tell them all that it would go way over their head. Because, you know, it took me like two years talking about options to actually start doing it myself, you know, so I'm trying to be a little bit of conscientious about what they can and cannot handle information wise. I'll be glad to talk about it, they want to, but I'm not gonna write too much about it. Allen: And I bet that would that would set you apart, right? You know, it's like, hey, you know, we can do plain vanilla stuff. Or we can do if you're a little bit more aggressive than we can do this, and this and this. And then if it goes over there, that's fine. But as long as they're like, whoa, this guy knows. Paul: Yeah, definitely. That's certainly part because like, my CPA, well, I deal with investment advisors. And like, no one, no one that I know of is actually managing costs. I mean, like, you know, every week or things like that, Allen: yeah, yeah, they just don't I mean, part of it is they have, depending on where they are some of these guys that I know, they have broker dealers, and the broker basically tells them what they can do and what they can't do. And trading is like, No, you're not doing it. They just they can't, they're not allowed. And so, you know, we get we get clients that are financial advisors, they come in, they're like, oh, yeah, I'm a financial advisor, like, oh, they shouldn't, you know, all this stuff. And they're like, oh, I don't do any of this for my son. I don't know, they don't even teach us this stuff. In financial advisors. Cool. So it's like, once I call again, I'm like, Oh, my God. Paul: Yeah, most of them are just like, call themselves people. And it is this, they don't necessarily know that much about investing. It's more about they have relationships with people, and they train their people to be accustomed to five to 7% returns. So so don't want you to do that as that's, you know, not a hallmark. Allen: Yeah, yeah. Like, you know, when I go to if I go to a dinner party, or whatever, and, you know, always comes up. So what do you do? It's like, well, I teach people how to do this. And the first they're like, really, is that, you know, what do you what do you mean? And then we tell them a little bit about it, and they go, Yeah, you know, we try to aim, you know, for 5% a month, and they're like, what a month. Really? Oh, wow, I gotta learn about that. And then, you know, you explain a little bit and then they're, like, bored and then they go talk to somebody else. Because, you know, it's cool. They want, they want it. They just want to do the work. So that's cool. Now as an advisor, how do you How do you charge? Like, what do you charge? How do you do it? Paul: So I have what's called a serious 65 license. So I'm able to charge a percentage of what assets are under management. Okay, so the basic generic, charged with as generally 1% of assets under management. Okay, that if I'm doing more as a some different strategies, things like that, I'm probably going to up the field more because it's, it is active trading. Allen: It takes more time. Yeah, yeah. Because I remember way back when I had a guy at America ice, and he was my advisor. And yeah, he would charge a minimum of 1% on assets every year. Every time you put money, you gave him money, they would take 5% off the top. And then every every mutual fund and every index fund or whatever that they put you in. And most of them were, you know, Ameriprise products. Each of those things would have a separate fee every year. So I mean, I got dealing left and right. I didn't know what I was doing. At the time, I was thinking I am going to you know, I'm smart. I got an advisor. But yeah, he was the one getting rich. And so.. Paul: They made that money, whether they go down or go up it. Allen: Yeah, I mean, they take the money right up front, 5% off the top. As soon as you make a deposit, it's like, man, you haven't done anything. Even if I turn around and ask for the money back, I just love fibers. Do you have like a lot of Is There a lot of overhead for being a advisor? You need a large staff? Paul: Right now, it's just me. And so I'm already have all my setup for my CPA business. So there's not really that much more to do.  Allen: And you can run it from the same location. Yes, yes. Okay. So then who does the like the backend stuff, you know, statements, and compliance audits, all that stuff. Paul: So we use Interactive Brokers as the broker dealer. So they basically, so all my clients have their own account set up with them, and it sort of goes underneath my master account. So so they take care about the then get a statement from there anytime they want to find out what their balances. And if they need to take up money, they can contact them and get the money taken out. So they saw him. So we're doing a lot of the back office stuff. Allen: Awesome. So you really don't have to do anything. And they they opened the account themselves, the client opens the account themselves, they deposit the money themselves, they can take it out whenever they want, they can go and log in, see all the trades, see whatever is there. So you really don't have a lot of customer service issues. And so you don't have to send send out statements, because Interactive Brokers will do that. Right. Paul: And one of my strategies is if someone is, I call it high maintenance, then I probably can't handle that, you know, they probably need to find someone else because, you know, I got enough things to do is it is. Allen: Awesome, cool. And then. So you don't handle any of the money either. Because they just go straight to interactive. So you're like a hands off, okay, I'll do the trades, but I'm not touching your money. So you don't have to worry about me taking your money and running away and flying to Bermuda or something.  Paul: Yeah, just like the Bernie Madoff deal where he was. He they call it having custody of the funds, and he had custody. And so they, they talked about that when you're going through your testing and things like that, about having custody and not having custody and things like that. So yeah, it's a big red flag. Allen: Yeah. Because I mean, like, I've been looking into starting my own hedge fund, you know, using the the passive trading strategies and such. And I looked at RIA first and then I looked at, you know, hedge fund as another way, and I think from what I've been able to find so far is that if you start a hedge fund, and you don't charge any management fees, you don't need the license, you can set it up in a way where you know, you get you only take a percentage of the profit. So if there's a gain, you can get a percent, but you don't get that yearly management fee. If you want the yearly management fee, then you do have to separate a separate Ria, to do the management of the fund. Okay, I didn't know that. Yeah, so I thought that was pretty cool. So we've been looking at that as well, different things. So now, what percentage of your management is active? versus, you know, index funds, mutual funds, etc? Paul: I'd say about half. Allen: Okay, and all of the clients are okay with that, or do you do client by client? Paul: I pretty much put everybody under the same model. Yeah. So Allen: And so with interactive, how does that work, you have to go into each account to put a trade on or you just put one trade on and it just trickles.. Paul: There's a master account and I can set up different  classification. So I could I could buy 1000 shares of IBM and have it spread it putting all the accounts did that.  So they have to watch out for is some of the accounts can trade certain things, some can't, like RIAs cannot do you know, futures and naked options and things like that as far as, at least on the credit side. Allen: Okay. All right. So can does that get confusing? If you want if you want like, Okay, I want like a say IBM, I want my IBM stock to be 5% of all of my everybody's portfolio. Paul: Yeah, that would be a different the different equation. So basically, like I did a trade today where I figured, you know, want to take a $10,000 risk. So divided by what that option was going for. And I bought that many contracts to take on that kind of risk. So not necessarily rebalancing everyone is usually trade by trade. So putting on a certain set of circumstances, set a step stop loss and things like that. Allen: Okay, cool. So you can do it as easy or as simple as you want. Or you can make it as complicated as you want. Yeah, up to you. Yeah. Nice. So what types of what types of trades do you do? Paul: Well, some of what you teach. So I do some swing trading. And of course, you know, credit spreads and things like that. And some, you know, some some of the dividend paying stocks and covered calls and things like that. Allen: And do you do any any oil futures options? Paul: Well, I'm not. I'm just at the point to get licensed for that. Allen: It's a separate license? Paul: That's as a separate license. Yes. So you have to you have to get licensed through the, Chicago Board of Trade, the NFA and National Futures Association. Allen: Okay. Okay. And then will you be able to do it the same as everything else through Interactive Brokers? Paul: Yes, I think so. Sometimes you don't know to actually do it. So I think it's pretty similar. Allen: Sweet. Okay. Now, as a as an RIA, do you also advise your clients on other alternative investments, you know, real estate, crypto anything else? Or is it just stocks, bonds, options? Paul: I'm always getting to ask questions, you know, because I'm in, you know, really, I'm gonna CPA world or the IRA world, I'm getting asked questions. So I will advise on that if I think I have a good opinion. You know, I'm not roll up on that rolled up on crypto Allen: Right, right. Are you still bound by the same fiduciary type rules on that or?  Paul: You could come under some scrutiny. You know, you'd like an offsetting handed comment, and then someone does something crazy. And so you got to be a little careful. Allen: Yeah. All right. And okay, so him now with the interactive account, or the broker dealer, is the software any different? Like, versus if you open a regular account by yourself? Is there anything you have to learn a new platform? Or is it basically the same thing?  Paul: It's pretty much the same platform, you just have to understand how to do the trading, like I was telling you about, like, allocating between all the accounts, but the platform itself is basically the same. Okay. Cool. Yeah. Allen: What do you see as the future of money management, because like, you know, they got these robo advisors now, and they got like Robin Hood, trying to get everybody to trade on their own. And so what do you see down the pike? You know, do you see like, your clients are like, yeah, rather just have you do it? Or are robots or whatever? Paul: Yeah, I can see, you know, some of the robot picking up. But on average, most people out there don't know, hardly anything about the investing world. My average client, so I think it's going to be still a good field you know, way up currently doing it. Allen: Okay, and who is like your average client? Paul: They're probably like 50 years old, that did 60. And probably, you know, got assets anywhere from, you know, 50 to 50,000 to over a million dollars, you know? Allen: And do you have any limits on who can invest with you? And how much? Paul: No, I mean, like, I'm not, I'm just gonna take on any account right now. It would need to be over a certain dollar amount for me to I just always have to keep that in mind about, you know, do I want to take on a five or $10,000 account? Because it's gonna be extra work. Taking that versus the capital issue at-- You don't have to be you don't have to comply with the day trading rules. You know, because because if you if you accidentally in and out three, three trades in a week, then your account gets shut down. You know, so you have to deal with that. So yeah, so I'm trying to gradually move up from like a minimum of 25,000 to 50,000, 200,000. Allen: Okay. And then you also have a certain criteria like a certain person that you want right? Certain somebody they can handle the options and that Intertek can handle that because I mean, it does swing a little bit. So if they have a 5,000 to $10,000 account, they freak out if they lose $1,000, obviously, that's not the right person for you anyway. Paul: Right. But on that same note, I had a client the other day that, you know, they have, you know, an excess a half million dollars with me. And they want to know how they could put in more money since this market was down so they could capture, capture that now mark? I love that kind of client. expecting them to call you and tell you, why is my account down? Actually, that question is dead. They're saying, How can we put more money in?  Allen: Yeah, that's a smart, that's a Smart Client. So that's, that's got to be your email, you know, going out, like, Hey, he's trying to give me more now. double down on your investments. Okay. Now, How has being a money manager improved your own trading? Or hasn't? Paul: Well, I mean, it's made me to seek out new avenues of investing. You know, because I'm looking out for my clients. By the same token, when I do that, I find things that I can use to, you know, like, I don't know, if I would have found the old future options without that, you know, seeking out new new investment strategies, you know, so I could do a better job for my clients. Allen: Okay. Now, we've had a lot of volatility lately. And you've, you've alluded to it already. When stocks down about 20% or so right now, how do you deal with the investor concerns or expectations? Paul: I'm continually learning that. The more, the more proactive you can be with that, I find that it's better. Like, if you have a bad day or a bad trade that, you know, that affects it so much, and then maybe call and talk to them about it versus waiting for them to call you later, and they get their quarterly statements. And they call you know? Allen: Right. So do you find that a large portion of your job is just talking to people and just calming them down? Or explaining certain things to them? Or educating them? Paul: In the beginning? Yes. If someone's with you for a while, and they haven't gotten, understood your ways, and why you do what you do. And it would be generally in the first year of a client relationship, you indeed do that more, but there is sort of they get to know you, you you get to know them and sort of like a training curve there. Allen: And now, most of your clients, are they either they know you or they were referred to you. Right. So there's always there's already that trust built in from the beginning. Most of them yes, yeah. So if you, you know, advertising, somebody comes in cold, they're like, oh, yeah, I like what you're doing here. You know, here's $100,000, there's gonna be a lot more back. Paul: Yeah. Allen: Okay. So how are you handling? How are you handling the volatility? Like when somebody calls up and says, Oh, my count is down. How do you? What do you do there? Paul: Well, number one, what I did when I saw when I saw the market starting to tank, I basically, was going more into cash. So like, I the client won't know why we aren't investing. I said, Well, I'm waiting for the market to give me indication has, it's found the bottom or, you know, it is headed back up. So I don't want to, I'm not a bottom picker. But I don't want to like, write it further down. You know. So that's one way of dealing with it. And they seem to appreciate that quite a bit and understand that. So I don't think that's something you get out of a typical advisor. Allen: So yeah, but what if somebody calls you and says, Oh, my God, you know, I'm down 10%? What am I going to do? I can't handle this. How do you handle that? Have you ever had that happen? Paul: Yeah. I tried to change up their strategies a little bit to get them a little more solid, or maybe not trade as much in their account. Just being a little more cautious. Allen: Okay, so Okay, so you can actually choose, like, let's say, we talked about that IBM thing. So if you're like, Hey, I'm buying IBM, you could choose and say, okay, don't put it in this account in this account, just because in all these other ones,. Yeah. All right. So you can actually tailor it because like, if somebody goes, Yeah, I just want to be long stocks, or I just want tech stocks. And I just want you know, credit spreads. So they you can, you can do that. Yeah, okay. Yep. So, do you have any shortcuts that you can share? You know, for somebody that's thinking, hey, you know, this sounds like cool, I'm gonna I'm gonna get into this. RIA business, anything that you probably didn't know, ahead of time that you would have liked to have known? Paul: This is sort of like a unknown territory. Because, I mean, when I was doing it, I couldn't get anybody to actually figure it out what like a serious 65 license would do. And I was sort of going into blindly a little bit. So I mean, I think the number one thing is maybe you know, then contact me. Shortcuts is, you know, I don't know like I had to find a place to take the take the course for that. And then I hired a guy to tutor me some. And, you know, there's, there's these firms out there wanting you to sign up with them for them to do oh, you know, like your paperwork and so forth. And I just sort of like fumbled my way through it and plagiarized another agreement online affected us. And so another thing is to know if you're in this world, you will get audited. Personally. Well, the your investment firm, right, yeah. Yeah. Like I'm in the CPA world, and I probably will never get out a different CPA world. But the investment side, I will get audited probably time and time again. So far, it's only been once one step Florida, but yeah, Allen: okay. Yeah. I mean, that's a good thing. I guess, you know, that, that the advisors and like you said, you know, the Bernie Madoff, he keeps him at bay as much as he can a little bit. So some of that, I guess, from a consumer standpoint, and that's a good thing to hear. Paul: Yeah, but a lot of a lot of us, they don't necessarily understand the world as much as you do. And it's more like them checking a box somewhere in a city. They ask this question, or I did that, but they don't really find that don't really necessarily know exactly what they're doing, you know, Allen: Yeah. So but do you mean tax audited or audited by like the audit by Paul: the state by the financial regulatory people for the state you're in Allen: The state regulatory? Okay, so every state has their own regulatory stuff that you have so far. Paul: Yeah. So just just sort of background here. Usually, as you're managing under $100 million, you're managed by the state. But then once you hit $100 million in the SEC is basically is going to your watchdog, it's gonna look over your shoulder. Allen: Okay. All right. Cool. And you're in Florida, right? Correct. But you can take clients from anywhere? Paul: I can. But different states have different rules, most of them allow you to take five to 15 clients, and not really be registered with them. But then once you hit over that threshold, they want you to fully registered with them. But there are a few states that require you if you get one client, they want you to be registered. And Louisiana was one of those states. Allen: So I guess, depending on how much capital the guy is gonna give you whether it's worth it to register there.. Paul: Exactly, exactly, yeah. Okay. All right. Allen: So would you knowing what you know, now, are you happy that you went this route? Paul: Ask me again, in a few years. Allen: Well, you've been doing already for like, eight years. So kind of got some kind of track record here. Paul: Yeah, it's been, you know, it's been definitely a learning curve, you know, from the regulatory side. And then from the investment side, too, so? Yes, I'm glad I did it. But it' had its rough moments. Allen: Well, give me an example. Paul: Well if you if you lose on a trade, you know, it can affect your account and other people's account. So that's probably the biggest things that has happened to me, you know? And then you got to figure out how am I gonna tell this person this?  Allen: Yeah. So how did you how did you deal with that? Paul: I prayed a lot. Basically, if I knew the fact that someone so much, I would, I call them and talk to him about it. But in a certain situation, like, because it was spread over so many accounts, it didn't really affect anyone that much. It wasn't that big of a deal. Like, you know, if I'm managing $5 million of money, and I lose 20,000, you know, the most Someone's probably gonna lose is maybe 2 or 3000. So the overall number is a big number. But you know, we spread between all the counts, it's not that big of a number. Allen: Interesting. Okay. Yeah, I mean, that's that thing, right? There is like, the biggest thing that's kept me out of it for all these years, you know, people have been asking me from the beginning, okay, can you take my money? I'm like, nope, nope, because I don't know how I'm gonna handle the stress. I don't know if, um, we will sleep, I can lose my own money, you know, market down 20% Okay, whatever, it'll go back up, I got time, you know, but somebody else if I lose your money, and I don't know, I don't know how I'm gonna handle it. And so that's the one thing that that's really caused me to be hesitant up till now. And I agree what you said about not having that much information out there. You know, I mean, there are companies out there that will like if you want to be in RIA you type in how to be an RIA and there's a company that hey, you if you give us like 30 grand, you know, we'll do all the paperwork and we'll file everything for you. So you Okay, but what do I actually get? You know, they're like well you do the paperwork. Well what about after that? How do I get clients how do I do this how to do that they will help you at all and these two guys they had approached, they had talked that a because I'm you know Option Genius is in what's called the financial publishing space that world, so we have our own little conventions and all the Guru's come and hang out and talk marketing and stuff. And so there was there was these two guys who were speakers, and they were telling all of the financial publishers that hey, you guys need to get into the into the management business, because you guys already have all these clients? They already trust you? You know, and they probably have a lot of money because people coming to me, you know, they say, Hey, I want to learn how to trade options. Okay, cool, you know, and how large is your account? They're like, Oh, 50,000. Okay, cool. And they trading options with 50,000. But they also have like, maybe a million dollar IRA, that they're not touching, or their wife has $500,000 that is with some other financial advisor that she doesn't want her husband to touch with options. So it's like, yeah, everybody that comes in has a lot more money. So if you started an IRA or an advisor, then you know, they'll give you that money as well. And you can make all this money. And I was like, Okay, that's interesting. But, you know, what are the legalities and all that and they wanted, I don't know, obtain $1,000 plus a percentage of the company to actually teach me all this stuff. And I'm finding a there's a lot of secrecy, as you can say, you know, and Wall Street, I think puts it like that on purpose. Because they don't want everybody to know what they're doing and what they that they don't know what they're doing. Pretty much. So cool. Paul: I don't know, that's intentional, but it just got I think there's so few people who are looking to do it. And like, it's not a widespread throughout the population thing. So you don't find as much about it, you know. Allen: Maybe okay, yeah, I'll take that. Yeah. Because like, you know, even like, what is the difference between an RIA and a hedge fund? You know, I've been beating my head, like, which one? Which way? Do we go? Which way? Do we go? If we go this way? Or this? Or what are the pros? What are the cons, and there's like, no one person that can that can tell me, if you want to go to a hedge fund, they got a little hedge fund world, and, you know, you got to you got to pay the dues to get in. If you want the RA world, then it's more common, but it's, it's for the guys, you know, for people who are like, Yeah, you know, I just want to put everybody's money in an index fund, you know, so it's like, what you're doing is totally different, like, I have not met any advisors that are actually, you know, trading that actively for people. So I mean, compared to the other guy, Joe Schmo that charges 1% a year, or 2% a year, just to put their money in an index fund compared to what you're doing, you know, your value is just so much more. But it does seem like it's very similar to a hedge fund where, you know, a hedge fund is a little bit different, where all the money is pooled into one spot. And then, you know, the, the trader controls it, you're doing kind of similar, where you can look at it and be like, Okay, I got, you know, $10 million under management, how am I going to split that up into different trades? And it just happens to be in different people's accounts? So have you ever thought about increasing your rates because like a hedge fund, they can charge a percentage of the gains? An RIA can't? Can they do that? Paul: They can do that on their certains particulars criteria? I think like you have to have an investor who's has at least $2 million in investable assets. They have at least $1 million invested with you. And then you can have certain arrangements where you say, Well, if I make whatever percentage I'll make about what the s&p does, you'll split it with me, or something like that, you know? Okay, so again, it's very, it's has a lot of criteria to it can't be done, though. Okay. Yeah. Because I wouldn't say the hedge fund world is based on what you're telling me is, cuz you're basically commingling all the funds. Right? So you got to do like a statement for each person or something. Yeah. And so I think the advantage is, you can just commingle it all and then do whatever you need to do. And then at the end of the day, you somehow allocated? Allen: Right, so the thing with the hedge fund is that all the investors have to be accredited. Okay, so accredited, as you know, probably, you know, you basically you have a million dollar net worth not putting your house, or you're making upwards of 300,000 a year. So, you know, basically, so at least Paul: They have to tell you, they're accredited. Right? Allen: I think we would actually want them to be proof, you know, give me proof otherwise, we're not letting you in. Paul: That was actually in so my testing I just did is like, yeah, you want this criteria? But are you actually gonna go go check it? No. So Allen: Interesting. Okay. Because I mean, you know, the government says that the hedge funds, you know, if you're an accredited investor, you should be smarter than the average bear. And so, if you lose money, it's not that big a deal. Like you are smart enough to get into it. You know, somebody with $5,000 or $10,000. That's my life savings. No, sorry, you can't invest in this. Even though the hedge fund might be like doing 1,000,000% a year, you can't invest because you're not accredited. Ras can take basically everybody, so that was one of the things okay, somebody comes in with 50,000 as an RIA, you might just take it because it's not that much paperwork. It's not extra for you. But for a hedge fund. Yeah, no, I can't do it. Because I gotta, I gotta pay the auditing company. I gotta pay the statement company. I got to pay the customer. You know, whoever's doing customer service and answering the phone and doing all that, and salespeople and all that. So 50,000 is not going to cut it, you know, the limit is a lot higher. For sure. Okay. Yeah. So yeah, that, in that sense, totally different world. But very similar from what I'm seeing is that, you know, you're doing probably what we're gonna be doing, you know, similar. Paul: So you probably can't take qualified money like IRAs and things like that. Allen: I think they can. Yeah, yeah, I think they can, as long as a person is accredited. And so there's different regulations, 5063 C, or six, C, five, or six D, they'll those tell you, you know, if you can take accredited and non accredited, and then can you advertise or not, I'm still learning all this, it's all different, because like, if you start a Real Estate Fund, different from if you're doing a hedge fund, versus a private equity fund, so some of the rules apply to everything. Some of the rules are just separate. So I'm still learning all that. But I know that the Interactive Brokers, people, they've done webinars in the past with attorneys. So if anybody wants to start a hedge fund, you can still use the Interactive Brokers platform. And they have they actually have a separate portal, I think, for hedge funds. Yeah, I've seen that. You've seen that too? Where you can actually see what other people are doing. And what are the trades that they're making? Paul: I didn't know about that. I just knew that they had some kind of hedge fund portion of what they're doing. I didn't know exactly what it meant. Allen: Yeah. So So what they said was that, you know, the attorney was like, you know, it'll take several, you know, maybe $30,000, to set up your hedge fund, you can probably do it with a smaller amount, if you want to start an incubator fund, which is like, you know, if you have your own money, and you put in and say $300,000, and you trade it as if it's a fund, and you don't maybe that that paperwork might be like 7000, and you set that up, you treat it as a fun, you build up your track record, and be like, Oh, hey, look, you know, I was trading for six months, I got this, that or not, and then you can start advertising it, and you convert it to a full fund. And then you can say, well, look at my track record, this is what I did. And then people can come in for the full fund. So that was one of the things that they were they were talking about. But so yeah, we were we were looking at an interactive, but the one thing that interacted with their software is a little bit more clunky or less user friendly than some of the most user friendly software. Yeah, it was my personal accounts. Now. So when, do you still trade on on your own on the side? Or is all of your money in the big? Paul: I have some money still in the in the huge fund? And then, you know, I have some I have an account on the side, right? Allen: So that separate account, did that change it all after you got licensed? Because they always, you know, when you open an account, they always ask you, are you licensed? And then they're I don't know why they do that. Is there to change anything on? You're not gonna recall? Paul: Yeah. So, there's, there's occasions where you can link up an account with the master fund, and you can D link the account. So I think at one time I had, it's actually my 401k account for my accounting firm attached to the IRA account, but then I detached it. One of the main reasons was for futures. Okay, because I knew I wasn't qualified to do futures for the whole fun. But I could on a mountain account. Allen: Ah, okay. So you have to keep it separate to do the futures options. Yeah. Until you get licensed by them. And is that like a lengthy process as well? The futures options? License? Yeah. Paul: I took a series three exam back a month or so ago. So I'd studied for two or three months, and again, got a tutor. Yeah. Okay. Allen: All right. How many clients do you have right now? Paul: I'd say about 20-25. Allen: Okay. All right. Cool. And so, from a financial standpoint, has it been worth it? Paul: Yeah, it's been really good. I might, my intention when I know that, you know, once I got into it, my intention was over the years, you know, retirement age, is at my incomes shift for my CPA business or to my investment business. So I could do that, say two hours a day and retirement versus, you know, doing tax seasons and all that. CPA visits. Allen: Okay. Is that still the plan? Yes. Still plan. Awesome. Cool. So yeah, I mean, handling managing millions of dollars of assets in two hours a day. That sounds pretty good to me. Paul: That might be a pipe dream. But that's what I had in mind.  Allen: I think you could do it your own way. You're on your way. Cool. Awesome. So is there anything that I haven't asked you that you think like, oh, yeah, people need to know this. Paul: I could probably sit here and think about a few things. Not on every call. No, no, no, no. I mean, one thing you have to like for instance, a you have to have a like an email account that you Gotta add to retain all your emails for at least like five years. That's one thing to keep in mind. And like I have to send a like a balance sheet and income statement to the state of Florida every year and get someone to notarize it. You have to upload information to the FINRA site at least once a year. And that's where you pay your like on license Louisiana along Florida and things like that. So I pay my fees for those licensing booth vendors website. Allen: And that you had told me that the fee that you charge for management that comes out Interactive Brokers basically pays you every quarter, your fixed asset if I had to build it, right, yeah. Paul: Okay. So, so they do it automatically. But when I got audited, the state wanted me to actually create invoices. So the answer your question is, I'm not sure what the real requirement is. So far, I guess I met that criteria then. So I'm not actually grading him. What's the reporter right now? Okay. Allen: Yeah, I mean, because like, I mentioned, those two consultants that I had talked to, they had told me that I would have to bill everybody invoice, everybody, every quarter. And those people would have to pay me directly. So it wouldn't be taken out of their account, it would be sent directly to me that they would have to write a check every quarter. And I'm like, that's a pain in the butt. You know, that's pretty cumbersome. Yeah, if a customer has to pay, you know, a big check every quarter for management fees. And then especially if you have a down year, he's like, What am I paying for it? I don't pay for this anymore. And you don't get paid. So I was like, Okay, that's a big red flag. But I'm glad that that's not true. Cool. Okay. Paul: One thing I have figured out there is, like, there's an account I was going to take from someone from one advisors to me, and they had all their fees, like totally hidden with all these mutual funds and things like that. And so like, you know, that account, I was gonna charge 3.3%. But we weren't able to ever get to the bottom of what the other advisor was charging. So, even though they have a lot of disclosures and things like that, I think we could have pressed the issue if we really wanted to. But, um, but you know, I ended up losing that account. Allen: So did that customer realize that, that he's being charged all these things? Paul: No, no, no clue. No, I mean, whenever I sort of parted ways, and I said, you guys at least need to figure out what they're charging you. You'd be surprised at the amount of inept that's out there and people who are actually hiring advisors, like, yeah, most people do not keep like their annual statements. They couldn't tell me how much they made last year. You know, because really, when I'm taking on an account, I want to know, what their track record has been sort of what I would need to beat to make them happy. You know, a lot of them are not that attuned to that. Allen: That's crazy. Yeah. I mean, people, they work their entire lives to save up money and invest it so they can retire. But then they don't pay any attention to the money. Oh, boy.. Paul: I think it's because they don't know that much about it. So they wouldn't know what to do if it was not what they wanted, you know? Allen: Yeah. I mean, you gotta you gotta take a little bit of time to at least read the statements and figure out where's the money going? And it could be better disclosed, you know, the statements could be easier to read that that's definitely sure. That's, yeah. But it is what it is for now. Paul: Like, I have this account right now, I'm probably going pick up another six to nine or 1000. And I asked them to get their annual statements ready. Because I wanted to see what they have been. have been doing, you know, so, you know, so they didn't know if there'll be they'll find those. So let me guess. It's like, it's weird. Allen: Okay, they just like asked her her advisor. Paul: Oh, that might be red flag fight flight to them. And they are looking so yeah. Wow. Okay. All right. seem bizarre. Allen: So if somebody was thinking about starting their own advisory firm, what would you say? They would need in terms of like, what are the minimums, okay, you should have been in the market for, you know, five years, you know, or you got to know XYZ, is there anything that you would say that, you know, if you don't, if you can't even do this, and this is not for you? Paul: Well, they're planning on doing what I'm doing, they probably need at least three to five years, you know, their own market experience. But, you know, that being said, like, I just met with someone the other day, and I could put all my funds through their strategies, and just sit and coast. You know, really, they charge an extra 1% or whatever, so I'll back off of my fee a little bit. You know, so you can you can play the game different ways. Wow. So you could do like I can see a new person and starting that and just have these other you know, because they have what's called sub managers or something like that. I don't know the exact term. Basically, you're hiring other money managers to manage the money you have for your clients. Right, like sub advisors, maybe is what it's called. Okay. So I'm not saying it will totally preclude them that they didn't have three to five years. But, you know, hopefully they're drawing on someone's experience to help hold their handle that Allen: Right. And do you know how much it costs to get it up and running? Paul: I would say three to five grand. Wow, that's not much. I mean, the hardware, these firms are brought in to charge you five times that? Allen: Yeah. Okay. So well, the sub accounts. Yeah, actually, I do remember those consultants talking to me about that. Paul: They they call it sub advisors? Allen: Yeah, I think that's what it is. And it's like, yeah, you know, if you don't want to do it yourself, you can put your money, you can put your your clients money into different buckets, and then they just do it for you, and they charge and then you split the fees or whatever, or something like that. So, and then each broker, each broker dealer has different ones. So like Fidelity or Schwab will have different sub accounts versus what you could put your stuff in. But interesting, I just Just curious the ones that you had talked to what what strategies were they were using, Paul: They're using free cash flow to is their criteria for who they're investing in. So they have like international, they call a cash cow c-o-w. So they've international domestic, and things like that. So they have a different definition of free cash flow. So they're they're fearing that's the best value, their way of determining value out there, like sort of like a value fund, but their own definition of what value is. Allen: Okay, so they're investing in stocks. Paul: Yes, international and domestic.   Allen: And they handle the ins and outs. And so you could put a portion of your client's money in there, you put it all in there. So it's like, it's like an ETF. So basically, you can say I want 20% of my money to go on this domestic one 20% International. And I might, I'm in talks with them. So I might end up doing some more money that way. But so they're coming up with different sample portfolios that I can use their funds for. Allen: Okay, interesting. And so that must be a much larger company. Paul: Yeah, I'm not sure how big they are. But they're, you know, big enough to where they had like a representative here in central Florida and some of their back office helping them out. Awesome. I'm not sure their size yet. Allen: Yeah. So I mean, this rabbit hole is pretty big. You can dive in there and spend a lot of time figuring all this stuff out. Paul: Yeah, yeah. So I can see a way I could sit and close more. But you're only doing it two hours a day anyway. Allen: Cool. All right. Paul: Well, maybe we're gonna get into my retirement years, a certain amount of years. I'll just put it there and just coast. The zero hours a day. Yep. Allen: Yeah, my, my neighbor in the office next door, he's a financial adviser. He's been doing it for, I think, 25 years now. So he's built up, you know, a sizable clientele. And so now he's at the point where he wants to retire. But he doesn't know what to do with the firm. He's like, you know, he makes probably a good 500,000 a year income from it. And he's like, I want one of my kids to take over. But the kids are not really willing, and not interested. He's like, I don't know what to do. So he's still there.  So there's been periods of times or, you know, like, I sit on the CPA world deal with other investment advisors, where it's been a quite a lucrative market to get bought your practice bought out by bigger, let's say Merrill Lynch or something like that, you know, they pay some pretty big bucks to buy those books of business. Yeah, yeah. Because I mean, one of the things that the consultants told me is that once you get you get a client, that turnover, meaning the fact that they're going to leave you is not very high, they're gonna stay with you for years and years. So you can count on that money coming in, you know, that fee money coming in for a long period of time, unless you unless you totally screw it up, and then they're gonna leave. Paul: If you play the play smart. You know, if you're dealing with someone 50 years old, right now, you know, another 10 or 20 years, you're gonna pick up their kids and things like that when they need investment advice and stuff. It's, it'd be a self perpetuating thing. Allen: Yeah, yeah. And I do like the fact that there's always going to be somebody there willing to buy you, your company. You know, because a lot of times in smaller companies if you're the only person or if you got one or two employees, nobody really wants to buy the company even if it's successful. Nobody wants to buy it because they would without you there they're basically buying a job for themselves, right? It's not running on its own you're the one doing all the work in this case. Yeah, you're the one doing all the work but they don't need you. They can just, you know, have their own advisors take over. So you still get a pretty decent multiple when you sell so that's really cool too. Right? Paul: Also, I met a.. in my travels on this world. I've met the company and actually finance you if you want to buy on someone else's practice in the financial visor word world. Allen: Hmm.. So have you looked into that? Paul: I had a conversation or two with them, but I haven't really pursued it further. Yeah. Because I didn't know if I wanted to buy a larger practice. Right? Yeah. Because generally, that is a seven year payout to do that. So, you know, seven years, you'd be free and clear. Allen: That'll be interesting. Yeah. So a lot of ways to skin this cat. So you would I mean, I'm assuming that if anybody asked you, Hey, should I do this? Probably the answer is yes. Paul: Yeah, I mean, just mean, talk to people who have done it, and sort of figure out if it's a good fit for you, you know? Yeah. It's definitely can be pretty lucrative. Allen: Right? And I like the fact that it's like, for you at least it's more localized, you know, so you're not competing with somebody in California or Canada, or whatever. It's like, yeah, you guys get your clients over there. I'll have my clients over here. You know, they love me, they trust me. We hang out maybe. And sometimes. So it's not like a competitive situation. So, right. Awesome. Are you in any? Are there any, like, associations or memberships for advisors?  Paul: No, I'm not. Allen: No, but obviously, they probably have them? Paul: Yeah, I'm just not familiar. Very familiar with that. I have another advisor to hang out with suddenly sort of share some ideas. That's, that's all I have right now. Allen: And they're also private. Like on their own? Paul: Now, one of the reasons I didn't cover this in the beginning, like when I started looking into this whole thing, I didn't want to get clients and then share my fees with other people. That's why I didn't latch on to a bigger firm and start building my clients from there. So that's why I started my own Ra. So they will be my clients. And I get all the fees for them. And no one else had had rights to him. So that's, that's one of the reasons I did the way I did it. Allen: Okay. Okay. So what would be the benefits of going with a larger firm just to name recognition? Paul: Well, they have, one of the biggest things is called compliance. So like, right now, I'm my own compliance officer for my firm, okay, and larger firm like that they have whole departments that take care of compliance, for you to make sure you don't get in trouble, the regulators and so forth. So, like this other advisor, I had, he joined another firm, just so you could have that compliance piece to it. But in his firm, he can't trade options. Right? Allen: Because they're very limited. Yeah, exactly.  Paul: It's taught me to join his is up, like can't trade options. Allen: Because compliance says no. Paul: It was on the client's officer. Allen: Right. So that's why when you said you were thinking about advertising, it's the risk is on you because you're the compliance officer. So you got to know exactly what can be done and what can't be done. Right. Right. Interesting, cool. Is there anything else because  I'm out of questions. Paul: One of the things, one of the things I tell you, I looked into going with other companies, other inactive brokers when I started, okay, and like Charles Schwab wanted you to have $7 million you're managing before you could go with them. Allen: Whoa, okay. And they're the biggest right right now, I think. Paul: I think so. Yeah. Yeah. So that's one reasons with Interactive Brokers, because they didn't have the minimums like that. I didn't really check too much rather than other people. Allen: So and how's your customer service at Interactive Brokers, because they for personal accounts, they don't have a good reputation. Paul: Yeah, they have a separate line, you can call as a professional advisor. So it's, I get pretty quick attention. Usually, you know, it's not it's not perfect, but you know, it's decent. Yeah, but you're happy. Yeah, I'm not saying that. I'm sure other companies have better customer service but you know, for right now, they, you know, I might need to call him a few times, but I get what I needed if I need need to.. Allen: And how are their margins and Commissions? Paul: Commission's are pretty low. I don't have the exact numbers I just know less than like $1 per 100 shares. Allen: And who comes out of the customers account? Obviously. Paul: Each person like when you do a trade display something all the counselee they pick up their own fees. Allen: Cool. All right. Well, thank you Paul. You know, Paul's website is again BusinessAdvisors.Pro. Paul said that he could reach out you know, you guys can reach out to him if you have any questions. And Paul is also in our other memberships are other programs as well past trading formula blank check and credit spread. So if you guys are members of those, you can reach out to him there. You'll find him in the group. And he's been very gracious with his time. So I do want to thank you and And he's very active in the group and you know you've been helping a lot of newer people as well they're so appreciate you there. Interesting place, interesting world and as I dive in I'm probably going to reach out to you more. Paul: Sounds great, I appreciate it.  Allen: Thank you thank you so much and we'll talk to you soon JOIN OUR FREE PRIVATE FACEBOOK GROUP: https://optiongenius.com/alliance  Like our show? Please leave us a review here - even one sentence helps. Thank you!

Break Away from the Rat Race
Passive Income from Senior Living Facilities with Brandon Schwab

Break Away from the Rat Race

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 38:50


Brandon Schwab is the CEO of Boutique Senior Living Fund and Shepherd Premier Senior Living. Brandon works everyday to change the senior living industry. BRANDON SCWAB has been a serial entrepreneur since the age of 15, he brings 20+ years of operating experience to Shepherd Premier Senior Living since its founding in 2014. He has a vision to improve the senior living industry forever. He wants to provide a better way of delivering quality care that is resident focused, not bottom line focused. The industry is currently being led by large corporations with investors to report profit margins to as a priority while overlooking the needed care of the greatest generation of residents. Caregiver to resident ratios of 1:15-20 as the national average is unacceptable, it needs to be changed. His boutique senior living model aims to provide 1 caregiver to every 5 residents. The better caregiver ratio directly equates to better care provided to residents.

ETDPODCAST
Nr. 3306 „Das kann sich noch hinziehen“ – Rechtsprofessor Schwab über Prozess zur Soldatenimpfpflicht

ETDPODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 8:34


Auch wenn eine schriftliche Urteilsbegründung im Verfahren zur Soldatenimpfpflicht vom Bundesverwaltungsgericht noch nicht vorliegt, so ist schon jetzt klar: Die Beweisaufnahme hat ein Nachspiel. Web: https://www.epochtimes.de Probeabo der Epoch Times Wochenzeitung: https://bit.ly/EpochProbeabo Twitter: https://twitter.com/EpochTimesDE YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC81ACRSbWNgmnVSK6M1p_Ug Telegram: https://t.me/epochtimesde Gettr: https://gettr.com/user/epochtimesde Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EpochTimesWelt/ Unseren Podcast finden Sie unter anderem auch hier: iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/at/podcast/etdpodcast/id1496589910 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/277zmVduHgYooQyFIxPH97 Unterstützen Sie unabhängigen Journalismus: Per Paypal: http://bit.ly/SpendenEpochTimesDeutsch Per Banküberweisung (Epoch Times Europe GmbH, IBAN: DE 2110 0700 2405 2550 5400, BIC/SWIFT: DEUTDEDBBER, Verwendungszweck: Spenden) Vielen Dank! (c) 2022 Epoch Times

Real Estate Investing Abundance
REIA 179 Brandon Schwab: 5 Reasons You Need Boutique Senior Living In Your Investment Portfolio Before the Next Crash & How to Not let Inflation Eat Your Money

Real Estate Investing Abundance

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 26:22


Brandon Schwab has been a serial entrepreneur since the age of 15, he brings 20+ years of operating experience to Shepherd Premier Senior Living. Where he started and runs a fund to change the senior living industry from BIG Box to boutique cozy homes.Main Points:Senior Living TOP commercial asset class last 10 yearsSenior Living TOP commercial asset class after last 2008 crashSenior Living of Tomorrow is NOT the Traditional Senior Living You Remember Senior Living is the Most Recession Proof Asset Class Available Today Every Investor Needs to Know This About Senior Living & How COVID Changed The LandscapeBoutique Senior Living is to Senior Living what Uber is to the Taxi Cab IndustryConnect with Brandon Schwab:Www.BoutiqueSeniorLivingFund.comCalendly Account www.BrandonSchwab.combrandon@boutiqueseniorlivingfund.comlinkedin.com/in/brandonschwab847-380-8624

CBS Eye on Money
Help Me Help Mom

CBS Eye on Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 19:52


My mother is on the verge of full retirement, and over the last year, I've been trying to help her consolidate several accounts into Vanguard. Are we moving in the right direction? Have a money question? Email us, ask jill [at] jill on money dot comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Librorum
#121 LA VIDA INVISIBLE DE ADDIE LARUE, V.E. SCHWAB

Librorum

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 15:34


Me hace mucha ilusión volver a grabar una reseña para el podcast, además, de un libro que me ha ayudado a superar el bache lector en el que había caído hacía meses. Esta novela de fantasía de Victoria Schwab: La vida invisible de Addie LaRue me ha gustado, con sus más y sus menos y […] The post #121 LA VIDA INVISIBLE DE ADDIE LARUE, V.E. SCHWAB first appeared on Sons Podcasts.

WashingtonWise Investor
Five Big Issues Top Washington's To-Do List

WashingtonWise Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 29:23


While progress in Washington is slow, several issues that matter to investors are moving up the chain. Five of Schwab's financial experts join Mike Townsend to check in on recent developments, including the Fed's progress in bringing inflation under control, the pros and cons to regulating cryptocurrency, pending healthcare bills, touchy U.S. China relations, and changes to retirement savings that could impact investors' planning.WashingtonWise is an original podcast for investors from Charles Schwab. For more on the series, visit Schwab.com/WashingtonWise.If you enjoy the show, please leave a ★★★★★ rating or review on Apple Podcasts.Important DisclosuresInformation on this site is for general informational purposes only and should not be considered individualized recommendations or personalized investment advice. The investment strategies mentioned here may not be suitable for everyone. Each investor needs to review an investment strategy for his or her own particular situation before making any investment decision.The policy analysis provided by the Charles Schwab & Co., Inc., does not constitute and should not be interpreted as an endorsement of any political party.Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS) are inflation‐linked securities issued by the US Government whose principal value is adjusted periodically in accordance with the rise and fall in the inflation rate. Thus, the dividend amount payable is also impacted by variations in the inflation rate, as it is based upon the principal value of the bond. It may fluctuate up or down. Repayment at maturity is guaranteed by the US Government and may be adjusted for inflation to become the greater of the original face amount at issuance or that face amount plus an adjustment for inflation.Fixed income securities are subject to increased loss of principal during periods of rising interest rates. Fixed income investments are subject to various other risks including changes in credit quality, market valuations, liquidity, prepayments, early redemption, corporate events, tax ramifications and other factors.Digital currencies are highly volatile and not backed by any central bank or government. Digital currencies lack many of the regulations and consumer protections that legal-tender currencies and regulated securities have. Due to the high level of risk, investors should view cryptocurrency as a purely speculative instrument. All expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market, economic and political conditions.Data contained herein from third-party providers is obtained from what are considered reliable sources. However, its accuracy, completeness or reliability cannot be guaranteed.All corporate names and market data shown above are for illustrative purposes only and are not arecommendation, offer to sell, or a solicitation of an offer to buy any security. Supporting documentation for any claims or statistical information is available upon request.The Schwab Center for Financial Research is a division of Charles Schwab & Co., Inc.Investing involves risk, including loss of principal.Past performance is no guarantee of future results and the opinions presented cannot be viewed as an indicator of future performance.Please see www.schwab.com/indexdefinitions.This information does not constitute and is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized tax, legal, or investment planning advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, Schwab recommends consultation with a qualified tax advisor, CPA, financial planner, or investment manager.0722-23JN

CBS Eye on Money
Don't Know How Much and Where to Invest

CBS Eye on Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 17:40 Very Popular


With a large raise on the horizon, and a huge pension at retirement, I'm not quite sure how much and where we should be investing. Have a money question? Email us, ask jill [at] jill on money dot comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Bet Sweats
Schwab on Kyler Murray, 49ers QBs & MORE

Bet Sweats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 17:45


Frank Schwab joins Erin, Nick & Cody to discuss the 49ers QB situation, Kyler Murray's contract stipulations, the AFC West & the New England Patriots. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Kultur heute Beiträge - Deutschlandfunk
Nacht der Liebe - Roland Schwab inszeniert den neuen Bayreuther "Tristan"

Kultur heute Beiträge - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 5:52


Fuchs, Jörn Florianwww.deutschlandfunk.de, Kultur heuteDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

TacoTech
Coming LIVE from T3 2022 - Kartik Srinivasan from Schwab

TacoTech

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 13:25


In our final episode recorded live at the 2022 T3 Advisor Conference, we welcome Kartik Srinivasan, Director - Head of 3rd Party Integration, Digital Advisor Solutions, at Charles Schwab. Kartik discusses trends like the personalization of investments, how Schwab is elevating advisor tech experiences with API solutions, and why he's so excited about advancements in client onboarding.

Financial Decoder
How Much Risk Is Right for You?

Financial Decoder

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 28:57


Balancing the trade-off between risk and return is one of the most fundamental decisions an investor makes. But it can be difficult to "know thyself" and truly understand your risk tolerance. Myriad psychological factors may cause you to behave differently than your stated risk profile when confronted with market volatility. And beyond weathering the ups and downs of the market, there are other types of risk that can impact the pursuit and achievement of your financial goals.   In this episode, Mark is joined by Susan Hirshman, CFA®, CFP®, CDFA®—director of wealth management for Schwab Wealth Advisory. Susan shares her perspective on risk from her years working as an advisor to high-net-worth and ultra-high-net-worth investors. Susan and Mark discuss the difference between risk tolerance and risk capacity, how to determine your true risk tolerance, and how a wealth management plan can help you stay the course when your risk tolerance is tested.Follow Financial Decoder for free on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen.Financial Decoder is an original podcast from Charles Schwab. For more on the series, visit Schwab.com/FinancialDecoder. If you enjoy the show, please leave us a rating or review on Apple Podcasts. Important DisclosuresThe information provided here is for general informational purposes only and should not be considered an individualized recommendation or personalized investment advice. The investment strategies mentioned here may not be suitable for everyone. Each investor needs to review an investment strategy for his or her own particular situation before making any investment decision.All expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market conditions. Data contained herein from third-party providers is obtained from what are considered reliable sources. However, its accuracy, completeness or reliability cannot be guaranteed.  Supporting documentation for any claims or statistical information is available upon request.Examples provided are for illustrative purposes only and not intended to be reflective of results you can expect to achieve.Investing involves risk including loss of principal.Please note that this content was created as of the specific date indicated and reflects the author's views as of that date. It will be kept solely for historical purposes, and the author's opinions may change, without notice, in reaction to shifting economic, business, and other conditions.

Charles Schwab’s Insights & Ideas Podcast
How Much Risk Is Right for You?

Charles Schwab’s Insights & Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 28:57


Balancing the trade-off between risk and return is one of the most fundamental decisions an investor makes. But it can be difficult to "know thyself" and truly understand your risk tolerance. Myriad psychological factors may cause you to behave differently than your stated risk profile when confronted with market volatility. And beyond weathering the ups and downs of the market, there are other types of risk that can impact the pursuit and achievement of your financial goals.   In this episode, Mark is joined by Susan Hirshman, CFA®, CFP®, CDFA®—director of wealth management for Schwab Wealth Advisory. Susan shares her perspective on risk from her years working as an advisor to high-net-worth and ultra-high-net-worth investors. Susan and Mark discuss the difference between risk tolerance and risk capacity, how to determine your true risk tolerance, and how a wealth management plan can help you stay the course when your risk tolerance is tested.Follow Financial Decoder for free on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen.Financial Decoder is an original podcast from Charles Schwab. For more on the series, visit Schwab.com/FinancialDecoder. If you enjoy the show, please leave us a rating or review on Apple Podcasts. Important DisclosuresThe information provided here is for general informational purposes only and should not be considered an individualized recommendation or personalized investment advice. The investment strategies mentioned here may not be suitable for everyone. Each investor needs to review an investment strategy for his or her own particular situation before making any investment decision.All expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market conditions. Data contained herein from third-party providers is obtained from what are considered reliable sources. However, its accuracy, completeness or reliability cannot be guaranteed.  Supporting documentation for any claims or statistical information is available upon request.Examples provided are for illustrative purposes only and not intended to be reflective of results you can expect to achieve.Investing involves risk including loss of principal.Please note that this content was created as of the specific date indicated and reflects the author's views as of that date. It will be kept solely for historical purposes, and the author's opinions may change, without notice, in reaction to shifting economic, business, and other conditions.

Yeshiva of Newark Podcast
Rischa D'Araisa-Season 5-Episode 13-Every Musing isn't fit to print-A Hatrazah of a Remark sullies the lustre of Rav Shimon Schwab Zatzal

Yeshiva of Newark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 33:22


This podcast is powered by JewishPodcasts.org. Start your own podcast today and share your content with the world. Click jewishpodcasts.fm/signup to get started.

Creative Capital
Creative Capital Podcast 181: Boutique Senior Living Investments with Brandon Schwab

Creative Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 46:42


Joining us today to discuss a unique, yet lucrative investment strategy is Brandon Schwab! Brandon is on a mission to raise the bar for senior living. He saw the need for quality care first-hand, and opened Shepherd's first home in 2014. He brings 20+ years of operating experience to his role managing real estate acquisitions, developments, and financing. Today, we dive into topic such as details of the senior living niche, what's the best way to structure a deal of this caliber, how to attract institutional investors and how to get them to invest with you, why this asset class is very recession resilient, what's stopping so many other investors from jumping into this niche, and so much more!  This is one of those episodes that will keep you entertained and educated as we navigate the unchartered waters of Boutique Assisted Living Facilities!

CBS Eye on Money
Financial Planning with Restless Energy

CBS Eye on Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 24:00


Thankfully, I feel like we're doing okay when it comes to our finances, the curveball is that my mother-in-law, who's only 58, lives with us and is almost entirely dependent.Have a money question? Email us, ask jill [at] jill on money dot comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Business Breakdowns
Charles Schwab: The 8 Trillion Dollar Gorilla - [Business Breakdowns, EP. 66]

Business Breakdowns

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 67:16 Very Popular


This is Matt Reustle and today we are breaking down the financial institution known as Charles Schwab. Schwab is a financial behemoth. They report over $8 trillion in assets under custody and a market cap scratching $120 billion but I think the most fascinating part about this breakdown is the strategic pivot taken by Schwab. While the online brokerage market has been decimated in recent years from fee compression, Schwab has been pivoting their business model to that of a traditional bank. Now what does that mean? Today, Schwab makes the majority of their money earning interest on customer cash deposits.    To break down Schwab, I am joined by Holland Advisors' Founder and Portfolio Manager, Andrew Hollingworth. Andrew has written extensively on Schwab, which we link to in our show notes. We cover what it means to operate as a bank vs online broker, how Charles Schwab himself grew this business out of a newsletter, and what's on the horizon for Schwab in the future. We hope you enjoy this breakdown of Charles Schwab.   For the full show notes, transcript, and links to the best content to learn more, check out the episode page here.   -----   This episode is brought to you by Tegus. Tegus is the new digital hub for market intelligence. The Tegus platform empowers Investors and Corporate Development teams to invest smarter by pairing best-in-class technology with the highest quality user-generated content and data. Find out why a majority of the top firms are using Tegus on a daily basis. If you're ready to go deeper on any company and you appreciate the value of primary research, head to tegus.co/breakdowns for a free trial.   -----   This episode is brought to you by Scribe. Scribe is the trusted transcription provider for the business and investing community. Scribe is designed to accurately transcribe messy, real-world audio and is unique in that it's optimized for the complexities of enterprise audio, such as company and product names, currencies, accents and numbers. Visit kensho.com/breakdowns to learn more and unlock your free trial.   —--   Business Breakdowns is a property of Colossus, LLC. For more episodes of Business Breakdowns, visit joincolossus.com/episodes.   Stay up to date on all our podcasts by signing up to Colossus Weekly, our quick dive every Sunday highlighting the top business and investing concepts from our podcasts and the best of what we read that week. Sign up here.   Follow us on Twitter: @JoinColossus | @patrick_oshag | @jspujji | @zbfuss | @ReustleMatt   Show Notes [00:03:30] - [First question] - Why Schwab isn't well understood by the market  [00:05:18] - The story of Charles Schwab and how active he is in the company  [00:08:13] - The business model of Schwab itself; Holland Advisors Research [00:12:51] - Can it be compared to a franchise model; Another Flywheel [00:15:46] - What did they see in the space that convinced them to shift their business model [00:18:19] - How Schwab benefits from their customers keeping money in cash [00:20:18] - What stops competitors from copying the Schwab model [00:23:12] - Where Schwab stands out with cash on the balance sheet [00:24:17] - The reasoning behind the TD Ameritrade acquisition [00:30:38] - The Schwab customer base  [00:33:28] - Convincing new customers to transfer their accounts to Schwab [00:37:14] - How their market share has changed over the years [00:38:50] - Building their balance sheet  [00:46:34] - How their acquisition of TD Ameritrade helps their balance sheet [00:49:50] - Valuing a complex business like Schwab [00:56:43] - Key drivers of their earnings growth  [00:58:31] - How they use their net interest margin  [01:00:43] - What the market pullback this year has meant for Schwab [01:03:43] - Major lessons learned from analyzing Schwab

The Fact Hunter
Interview with SFR Co-Founder Paul English

The Fact Hunter

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 114:35


On the July 20th edition of "The Fact Hunter" we interview Speak Free Radio co-founder Paul English. Paul describes his awakening journey, his thoughts on how we fix the mess we're in, the education system, the "mockingbird media", bankers greed, and much, much more. For all things SpeakFreeRadio go to https://speakfreeradio.comFor all things Fact Hunter, go to https://www.thefacthunter.comEmails: thefacthunter@mail.comNever stop searching for the truth.

CBS Eye on Money
Too Much in Traditional 401(k) at Age 36?

CBS Eye on Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 13:46 Very Popular


In our mid 30s, I'm starting to wonder if we have too much money in our traditional 401(k)s? Is it time to start using the Roth option? Have a money question? Email us, ask jill [at] jill on money dot comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
The Perils of Margin Investing

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 25:19


Proverbs 21:5 tells us that, Steady plodding brings prosperity; hasty speculation brings poverty. Nowhere is that more true than with your investments. We'll talk about that today on MoneyWise. There are two types of margin when it comes to your money. One is good the other is very, very bad. The good kind is the margin in your budget. It's money left over after paying all of your bills and obligations. We sometimes call it discretionary income. You need this margin so that you can save for emergencies and invest for the future. That's why we call it good and so does God's Word. Proverbs 21:20 says, Precious treasure and oil are in a wise man's dwelling, but a foolish man devours it. Now, the other kind of margin involves your investments, and it's really a form of gambling. Thankfully, margin investing is generally prohibited in qualified retirement accounts, like your 401k or IRA. But that still leaves regular brokerage accounts, where margin investing is not only allowed, in many cases, it's encouraged by brokerages. According to Yardeni Research, investors who used margin currently owe around $750 billion dollars. That figure is down from a year ago, so the trend is heading in the right direction but that still leaves an enormous risk for margin investors, especially with the market's current volatility. MARGIN INVESTING So what exactly is margin investing? It's when you borrow money from your brokerage to invest more than you otherwise could with your own money. You're actually betting that the stocks you buy with margin money will increase in value. If they do, you're a winner, but if they don't, you're in for trouble. Here's an example. Let's say you inherit $50,000 from your rich uncle. You can't put the money in your 401k or IRA because you can only fund those accounts with earned income. So you open a regular brokerage account, like a Fidelity, Vanguard or Schwab. But then you hear about this amazing opportunity to invest on margin. The Federal Reserve allows investors to borrow from their brokerage up to 50% of the purchase price of stock. What does that mean for your $50,000? It means you can actually buy $100,000 worth of stock, doubling your holdings. If the stock increases in value, your gains would be twice what you'd make with just the $50,000. But that's one giant if. If the stock declines, you're on the hook for the losses. In theory, you could lose your entire portfolio if the stock went to zero because your initial $50,000 is collateral against what you borrowed. Don't think that can happen? In 2000, Enron stock was selling for around $90 a share. A year later after a horrific accounting scandal Enron stock was selling for 26 cents a share. Investors lost billions. Now, why would a brokerage want you to invest on margin? When you think about it, it's sort of like borrowing chips from a casino to gamble with. A lot of folks would never dream of doing that, but investing on margin is really the same thing. And brokerages make it easy to do because they charge interest on the margin money they loan increasing their revenues. And since your loan is collateralized by the money you put in their risk of losing is practically nil. Now, you must apply to invest on margin, and provide financial details just like you would when you apply for a mortgage, but how hard is that? One popular investing platform, Robinhood, has gotten a bit of a bad reputation for pushing margin investing too hard and earning 5% interest on the margin money it loans. Of course, when the value of stocks bought with this leveraged money goes up, everyone is happy. But when it drops, you're the only loser, and potentially a big loser. If the value of the stock bought with borrowed money drops low enough, as it certainly did with Enron, you'll experience what's known as a margin call. That's when your brokerage suddenly demands more money from you to hold your investment. That will happen automatically when the value of your total $100,000 investment drops to $25,000. That's the 25% maintenance margin required by law. But many brokerages will issue a margin call well before that. If you can't come up with the additional funds within what is usually a short time frame, the brokerage can then liquidate your investment meaning they take the money you put in to cover their losses. The key to successful investing is to have a well-balanced portfolio and to hold it for a very long time. Investing requires patience so we can't urge you enough never invest with margin. The risk is simply too great. On today's program, Rob also answers listener questions: ● Should you tithe on a 401k? If so, how so? ● What factors determine whether the closing costs on a mortgage refinance are fair? ● How can someone gift an inheritance? ● How does Christian Healthcare Ministries compare to medical insurance? ● Would it be wise to invest in commercial real estate? RESOURCES MENTIONED: ● CHministries.org Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or email them to Questions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website at MoneyWise.org where you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, join the MoneyWise Community, and even download the free MoneyWise app. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

Buchkritik - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
Buchkritik: "Das Buch vom Dreck" von Piotr Socha Monika Utnik-Strugala

Buchkritik - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 6:06


Schwab, Sylviawww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, BuchkritikDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

The Todd Herman Show
Did ESG just help topple a Country?  Episode 204 - Hour 2 Did ESG Just Help Topple A Country

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 51:19


THE THESIS: ESG will destroy small businesses and middle class people as it makes demigods of the WEF type psychopaths.  THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  God's perfect timing is not our own. But, The Lord makes clear He will frustrate the plans of the wicked.  Job 5:12 He thwarts the plans of the crafty,     so that their hands achieve no success. Micah 2:1 Human Plans and God's Plans 2 Woe to those who plan iniquity,     to those who plot evil on their beds! At morning's light they carry it out     because it is in their power to do it. 16 more verses on God foiling the plans of the wicked THE NEWS & COMMENT: The official collapse of Sri Lanka was at least partially driven by ESG type mandates . . . Sri Lanka Just Fell. What Do We Have to Do With It? The anti-growth environmental movement deserves much of the blame . . . the same types of mandates the separate Country of California has pushed California's Energy War On The Poor . . . the exact, same type of theories being applied in America. Listen tn Deb Haaland, who is somehow the Interior Secretary as she speaks aimlessly about rising fuels costs and, remember, this is testimony to the Senate. My favorite line of Deb's is the accidental honesty “we don't take price into account . . . “  [AUDIO] -  Deb Halland's meandering word collage before the Senate ESG type diktats are also the excuse for destroying Dutch farmers . . . [AUDIO] - Eva Vlaar Joins Tucker Carlson Tonight To Discuss The Dutch Farmers Protest Against Their Government's Radical Climate Change Agenda Eva: "Farmers are hardworking, God-fearing and especially self-sufficient people that are just standing in the way of their globalist agenda." The Prime Minister of The Netherlands is just like the Prime Minister of Canada. He is a product of the psychopath, Klaus Schwab, boss of the World Economic Forum, who push ESG in Holland everywhere .  . .  [AUDIO] - How close is WEF chairman Klaus Schwab to Dutch PM Mark Rutte? Introducing Rutte at an Atlantic Council award ceremony, Schwab praised the Dutch leader as the "best looking" PM in Europe and said he was a "real statesmen." Andrew Bolt at Sky News did detailed report on the fact that the attack against Dutch farmers--which apparently include “police” shooting at them, is part of a globally coordinated attack on freedom.  [AUDIO] - Sky News coverage about the WEF infiltrating governments around the world using young global world leaders such as Trudeau and the methods used to end protests, like recently in Canada and the Netherlands. Ah . . . The Politico, coming to the rescue of the people who run Joe Biden by pretending lower wages is good news.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jet Setter Show
141: Davos Man: How the Billionaires Devoured the World, Peter S. Goodman, Global Economic Correspondent

Jet Setter Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 48:23


Is the World Economic Forum in Davos a serious discussion about climate change and injustice, or just a chance for billionaires to get together and do business? Find out as Jason Hartman interviews Peter S. Goodman, Global Economic Correspondent for The New York Times, as they discuss his new book, Davos Man: How the Billionaires Devoured the World. The World Economic Forum institution was started by German economist Klaus Schwab back in the 70s, on the proposition that if you got businesses and governments together, you could solve a lot of problems. Schwab claims to be interested in public private partnerships and win-win solutions. But somewhere along the way, the WEF has become, under the guise of a nonprofit foundation, a highly lucrative enterprise. Schwab brings in heads of state from around the world to meet with billionaires, public intellectuals, a whole lot of journalists, the odd Hollywood celebrity, musicians etc. But according to Goodman, it's a charade; they are there to do business. The WEF 2022 recently took place last May. Peter profiles the “Davos Man” as someone who makes himself the solution where he is the problem: just allow us to do our deals, and have our conversations about how to solve the big problems of the day and we will take care of that and all of the benefits will just magically trickle down throughout society. Let's not kid ourselves. That is something that has in reality happened zero times… Key Takeaways: 0:00 Welcome Peter S. Goodman, Global Economic Correspondent for The New York Times, author of Davos Man: How the Billionaires Devoured the World 1:05 World Economic Forum conference in Davos - is this a shadow government? 3:04 Rent-seeking behavior in Davos 3:59 The WEF was started by German economist Klaus Schwab back in the 70s 5:07 A chance for the billionaire class to virtue signal 7:11 Who is the “Davos Man?” 9:30 Marc Benioff, philanthropy, Trump tax cuts and capitalism 11:53 Big companies avoid taxes by using foreign subsidiaries 16:59 Christian Smalls, Amazon warehouse worker 19:41 “Davos Man” makes himself the solution where he is the problem 24:00 Bankers get bailed out, but homeowners don't 24:55 Healthcare system and surprise billing 29:06 Generating profit opportunities for themselves at social expense 35:11 Is Trump the “Anti-Davos Man?” 37:59 China is a complex challenge for the global trading system 43:09 China's WTO session was driven by the interests of American shareholders 44:41 Our democratic society is under threat from this inequality 46:00 We need three things: progressive taxation, antitrust enforcement and collective bargaining 46:53 Get more info at PeterSGoodman.com. Follow Peter on Twitter @petersgoodman About Peter S. Goodman Peter S. Goodman is the global economic correspondent for The New York Times, based in New York. He appears regularly on The Daily podcast, as well as major broadcast outlets like CNN, the BBC, Sky News, MSNBC, and Monocle Radio. ​ He was previously Executive Global News and Business Editor of the Huffington Post, where he oversaw award-winning investigative, international, business, and technology reporting.   Follow Jason on TWITTER, INSTAGRAM & LINKEDIN Twitter.com/JasonHartmanROI Instagram.com/jasonhartman1/ Linkedin.com/in/jasonhartmaninvestor/ Learn More: JasonHartman.com Get wholesale real estate deals for investment or build a great business – Free course: JasonHartman.com/Deals Free White Paper on The Hartman Comparison Index™: HartmanIndex.com/white-paper Free Report on Pandemic Investing: PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips in Vimeo Free Class: CYA Protect Your Assets, Save Taxes & Estate Planning: JasonHartman.com/Protect Special Offer from Ron LeGrand: JasonHartman.com/Ron What do Jason's clients say? JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Contact our Investment Counselors at: www.JasonHartman.com Watch, subscribe and comment on Jason's videos on his official YouTube channel: YouTube.com/c/JasonHartmanRealEstate/videos Guided Visualization for Investors: JasonHartman.com/visualization Jason's videos in his other sites: JasonHartman.com/Rumble JasonHartman.com/Bitchute JasonHartman.com/Odysee Jason Hartman's Extra YouTube Channel Jason Hartman's Real Estate News and Technology (RENT) YouTube Channel

Beards, Books, and Bourbon Podcast
"Deja Vu, Dejah Thoriss, Hand of Vecna" The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue & Isaac Bowman Bourbon

Beards, Books, and Bourbon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 68:43


Stephen and Mark will contemplate what it might be like if they never had an impact on anything or anyone (kind of like their podcast) as they discuss "The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue" by V.E. Schwab.  They will also plant some ideas about a delicious new find.  Isaac Bowman portwine barrel finished bourbon.

WashingtonWise Investor
Recession: Are We There Yet?

WashingtonWise Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 37:51 Very Popular


“Recession” is the word of the hour—no matter the hour. We are all watching and listening to find out what the Fed will do next, if it will make a difference, what's happening with jobs and wages, where interest rates and prices could be going, and when our portfolios might make a turnaround.Kevin Gordon, a senior investment researcher with the Schwab Center for Financial Research, joins Mike Townsend to discuss the nature of recessions, what measures Schwab is watching, and why they matter when assessing where we stand. Kevin also shares insights on how the economic downturn is impacting the U.S. housing market, the bottom lines of corporations, and the financial system overall. He also offers some thoughts about how nervous investors can remain grounded during this period of economic and market uncertainty.Mike also gives an update on the momentum that is building with Senate Democrats and the White House as they try to pass their long-stalled economic package, along with new developments in the tax plan they are considering to offset some of their spending priorities. He also reports on the Senate's continuing progress on retirement savings legislation.WashingtonWise is an original podcast for investors from Charles Schwab. For more on the series, visit Schwab.com/WashingtonWise.If you enjoy the show, please leave a ★★★★★ rating or review on Apple Podcasts. Important DisclosuresInformation on this site is for general informational purposes only and should not be considered individualized recommendations or personalized investment advice. The investment strategies mentioned here may not be suitable for everyone. Each investor needs to review an investment strategy for his or her own particular situation before making any investment decision.The policy analysis provided by the Charles Schwab & Co., Inc., does not constitute and should not be interpreted as an endorsement of any political party.All expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market, economic and political conditions.Data contained herein from third-party providers is obtained from what are considered reliable sources. However, its accuracy, completeness or reliability cannot be guaranteed.The Schwab Center for Financial Research is a division of Charles Schwab & Co., Inc.Investing involves risk, including loss of principal.Past performance is no guarantee of future results and the opinions presented cannot be viewed as an indicator of future performance.Diversification, asset allocation, and rebalancing strategies do not ensure a profit and do not protect against losses in declining markets. Rebalancing may cause investors to incur transaction costs and, when a nonretirement account is rebalanced, taxable events may be created that may affect your tax liability.This information does not constitute and is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized tax, legal, or investment planning advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, Schwab recommends consultation with a qualified tax advisor, CPA, financial planner, or investment manager.The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) is a private, nonpartisan organization that facilitates cutting-edge investigation and analysis of major economic issues.0722-2P5C

CBS Eye on Money
What to Do With Extra Cash Flow?

CBS Eye on Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 18:32


After paying off medical school loans, we're looking at a bunch of extra cash flow. What should we do with it? Have a money question? Email us, ask jill [at] jill on money dot comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

CBS Eye on Money
In Our Late 30s, Are We on Track?

CBS Eye on Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 18:01 Very Popular


We're in our late 30s and would love to know if we're on track to achieve our financial goals, including retirement and funding college for our child. Have a money question? Email us, ask jill [at] jill on money dot comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Financial Decoder
Should You Get Out of the Market Now and Get Back In Later? (Rebroadcast)

Financial Decoder

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 29:06


When the market drops quickly, many investors scramble for the exits. Yet that decision is usually an emotional one rather than a rational one. In this special bonus episode, Mark Riepe discusses some tools that can help you stay the course with your plan. Mark talks with David Koenig, vice president and chief investment strategist for Schwab Intelligent Portfolios. They discuss how you can use rebalancing, tax loss harvesting, and other strategies to your advantage during a down market.Subscribe to Financial Decoder for free on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen.Financial Decoder is an original podcast from Charles Schwab.If you enjoy the show, please leave a ★★★★★ rating or review on Apple Podcasts.  Important Disclosures:Please read the Schwab Intelligent Portfolios Solutions™ disclosure brochures for important information, pricing, and disclosures related to the Schwab Intelligent Portfolios and Schwab Intelligent Portfolios Premium programs. Schwab Intelligent Portfolios® and Schwab Intelligent Portfolios Premium™ are made available through Charles Schwab & Co. Inc. (“Schwab”), a dually registered investment advisor and broker dealer. Portfolio management services are provided by Charles Schwab Investment Advisory, Inc. ("CSIA"). Schwab and CSIA are subsidiaries of The Charles Schwab Corporation. Schwab Intelligent Portfolios® and Schwab Intelligent Portfolios Premium™ are designed to monitor portfolios on a daily basis and will also automatically rebalance as needed to keep the portfolio consistent with the client's selected risk profile. Trading may not take place daily.The information provided here is for general informational purposes only and should not be considered an individualized recommendation or personalized investment advice. The investment strategies mentioned here may not be suitable for everyone. Each investor needs to review an investment strategy for his or her own particular situation before making any investment decision.All expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market conditions.Diversification, periodic investment plans (dollar-cost-averaging), and rebalancing a portfolio cannot assure a profit or protect against a loss in any given market environment. Rebalancing may cause investors to incur transaction costs and, when rebalancing a non-retirement account, taxable events may be created that may affect your tax liability.This information does not constitute and is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized tax, legal, or investment planning advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, Schwab recommends consultation with a qualified tax advisor, CPA, financial planner, or investment manager.Roth IRA conversions require a 5-year holding period before earnings can be withdrawn tax free and subsequent conversions will require their own 5-year holding period. In addition, earnings distributions prior to age 59 1/2 are subject to an early withdrawal penalty.Investing involves risk including loss of principal.Examples provided are for illustrative purposes only and not intended to be reflective of results you can expect to achieve.Indexes are unmanaged, do not incur management fees, costs and expenses, and cannot be invested in directly.(0722-2FAC)

Pillars Of Wealth Creation
POWC #496 – Switching from SFH to Senior Assisted Living with Brandon Schwab

Pillars Of Wealth Creation

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 60:24


It can be intimating to switch from investing in single family homes to start buying senior assisted living facilities. Brandon Schwab gives us his secrets of how to do it successfully. Welcome to Pillars of Wealth Creation, where we talk about building financial freedom with a special focus in business and Real Estate. Follow along as Todd Dexheimer interviews top entrepreneurs, investors, advisers and coaches. Brandon Schwab has been a serial entrepreneur since the age of 15, he brings 20+ years of operating experience to Shepherd Premier Senior Living since its founding in 2014. He has a vision to improve the senior living industry forever! He wants to provide a better way of delivering quality care that is resident focused, not bottom line focused. Some would call him a disruptor and others would call him a visionary, he prefers to be thought of as a passionate business man that saw a problem and wholeheartedly pursued the solution. His boutique senior living model aims to provide 1 caregiver to every 5 residents. The better caregiver ratio directly equates to better care provided to residents. 3 Pillars 1. Time freedom to do whatever you feel like 2. Have a clear passive income target 3. Converting active income to passive income investments Book: Lifeonaire by Steve Cook and Shaun McCloskey You can connect with Brandon by calling his office at 847-380-8624 Interested in coaching? Schedule a call with Todd at www.coachwithdex.com Connect with Pillars Of Wealth Creation on Facebook: www.facebook.com/PillarsofWealthCreation/ Subscribe to our email list at www.pillarsofwealthcreation.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/c/PillarsOfWealthCreation

Charles Schwab’s Insights & Ideas Podcast
Should You Get Out of the Market Now and Get Back In Later? (Rebroadcast)

Charles Schwab’s Insights & Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 29:06


When the market drops quickly, many investors scramble for the exits. Yet that decision is usually an emotional one rather than a rational one. In this special bonus episode, Mark Riepe discusses some tools that can help you stay the course with your plan. Mark talks with David Koenig, vice president and chief investment strategist for Schwab Intelligent Portfolios. They discuss how you can use rebalancing, tax loss harvesting, and other strategies to your advantage during a down market.Subscribe to Financial Decoder for free on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen.Financial Decoder is an original podcast from Charles Schwab.If you enjoy the show, please leave a ★★★★★ rating or review on Apple Podcasts.  Important Disclosures:Please read the Schwab Intelligent Portfolios Solutions™ disclosure brochures for important information, pricing, and disclosures related to the Schwab Intelligent Portfolios and Schwab Intelligent Portfolios Premium programs. Schwab Intelligent Portfolios® and Schwab Intelligent Portfolios Premium™ are made available through Charles Schwab & Co. Inc. (“Schwab”), a dually registered investment advisor and broker dealer. Portfolio management services are provided by Charles Schwab Investment Advisory, Inc. ("CSIA"). Schwab and CSIA are subsidiaries of The Charles Schwab Corporation. Schwab Intelligent Portfolios® and Schwab Intelligent Portfolios Premium™ are designed to monitor portfolios on a daily basis and will also automatically rebalance as needed to keep the portfolio consistent with the client's selected risk profile. Trading may not take place daily.The information provided here is for general informational purposes only and should not be considered an individualized recommendation or personalized investment advice. The investment strategies mentioned here may not be suitable for everyone. Each investor needs to review an investment strategy for his or her own particular situation before making any investment decision.All expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market conditions.Diversification, periodic investment plans (dollar-cost-averaging), and rebalancing a portfolio cannot assure a profit or protect against a loss in any given market environment. Rebalancing may cause investors to incur transaction costs and, when rebalancing a non-retirement account, taxable events may be created that may affect your tax liability.This information does not constitute and is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized tax, legal, or investment planning advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, Schwab recommends consultation with a qualified tax advisor, CPA, financial planner, or investment manager.Roth IRA conversions require a 5-year holding period before earnings can be withdrawn tax free and subsequent conversions will require their own 5-year holding period. In addition, earnings distributions prior to age 59 1/2 are subject to an early withdrawal penalty.Investing involves risk including loss of principal.Examples provided are for illustrative purposes only and not intended to be reflective of results you can expect to achieve.Indexes are unmanaged, do not incur management fees, costs and expenses, and cannot be invested in directly.(0722-2FAC)

The Todd Herman Show
God bless the Ducth farmers and God save The Netherlands and the World. Episode 192 - Hour 2 Thank You Dutch Farmers

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 42:37


THE THESIS: The Dutch farmers are fighting against the biggest theft of land and resources their Country has ever seen. Their Prime Minister is owned and operated by the WEF, he even touted their “food innovation hubs” being built in The Netherlands. Just as the WEF wanted zero alternatives to the mRNA garbage, they want zero alternatives to factory fish and fake meat.  THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  THE NEWS & COMMENT: The Mockingbird Media pretends the protest by Dutch farmers is about some minor annoyances like fertilizer use and selling a few less pounds of meat. Here's how Reuters reported it (it seems the AP is opting for the Propaganda of Silence(™).  Proving again that he deserves the top show in cable news, Tucker Carlson spoke with a Dutch woman about what's being done to farmers and it's not about fertilizer or “just” eliminating some livestock.  [AUDIO] - Eva Vlaar Joins Tucker Carlson Tonight To Discuss The Dutch Farmers Protest Against Their Government's Radical Climate Change Agenda Eva: "Farmers are hardworking, God-fearing and especially self-sufficient people that are just standing in the way of their globalist agenda." The Prime Minister of The Netherlands is just like the Prime Minister of Canada. He is a product of the psychopath, Klaus Schwab, boss of the World Economic Forum: [AUDIO] - How close is WEF chairman Klaus Schwab to Dutch PM Mark Rutte? Introducing Rutte at an Atlantic Council award ceremony, Schwab praised the Dutch leader as the "best looking" PM in Europe and said he was a "real statesmen." Andrew Bolt at Sky News did detailed report on the fact that the attack against Dutch farmers--which apparently include “police” shooting at them, is part of a globally coordinated attack on freedom.  [AUDIO - 3 parts] - Sky News coverage about the WEF infiltrating governments around the world using young global world leaders such as Trudeau and the methods used to end protests, like recently in Canada and the Netherlands. Again, here's how The Washington Post covered it Did the farmer REALLY try to drive into police and their vehicles? Here's the video.  Netherlands Police Open Fire at Farmers Protesting Globalist ‘Climate Change' Restrictions; Dutch ministers “warn that farmers will have to adapt or face the prospect of shuttering their businesses.” Remember the rules in conservative radio: there are no conspiracies because, by their very nature, people cannot keep secrets--especially about a global cabal. Fair enough: none of what's happening is a secret and many of us have been warning about it for a decade and more. But … that's because we are “conspiracy theorists.”  [AUDIO] - Rosa Koire explains #Agenda21 #Agenda2030. This was 2013, so before the Memorandum of a Strategic Partnership Framework was signed (2019) by the UN & Klaus Schwab/WEF to accelerate the process. A PERSONAL NOTE: God decides when we expire. God will decide when nations expire. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The David Knight Show
Fri 8Jul22 Dutch Farm Fight is GLOBAL FOOD FIGHT

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 181:37


* We can now clearly see the path to the long stated goal of vacating rural areas and forcing people into Smart City prisons — attack farms and food supplies. Netherland's Davos puppet Rutte is taking the lead.* Nuclear winter — the man-made climate change NATO, Biden and Putin are contemplating & provoking. Here's what will happen…* CBDC — the ultimate tool of techno-tyranny — is coming fast. Here's how it's different from crypto & from cash* A Tale of Two Small Countries — one that capitulated to globalist fear campaign and one that transcended the fear* Jab Mandate: not 40,000 but 60,000 booted from Army Reserves as Marines plead with courts for justice* GM's autonomous taxi immediately crashes and Ford's EV F-150 has 85 mile range fully loaded* Mass shooting plot by illegal aliens foiled* "It's the Economy, Stupid" and 90% agree Biden's feds are hurting them and their family, but the worst is yet to come as Biden sells our emergency oil reserves to China while begging Saudi Arabia for more* FDA takes baby step to rectifying baby formula shortage but nothing concreteFind out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 994 Kodak, TN 37764

Money Life with Chuck Jaffe
Schwab's Sonders: Near-term risk is in re-setting earnings expectations

Money Life with Chuck Jaffe

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 59:26


Liz Ann Sonders, chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab & Co., says that the next step the stock market must take to begin a recovery involves adjusting earnings expectations, noting that several years of record earnings "set the bar too high," and now investors must adjust to lower, more realistic gains. Yes, she notes, valuations have dropped due to the bear market, pricing "a heck of a lot of negativity into the market," but it's now time for 'the E to come under pressure.' Sonders notes that while she thinks the economy is in a recession, the label matters much less than the pain investors have been feeling. Also on the show, John Kosar, chief market strategist at Asbury Research, says the market is nearing "a strategic bottom," with bad news being priced into the market giving the potential for liftoff if the market sees any signs of improvement moving forward. And Rob Shaker of Shaker Financial Services, says that the closed-end fund market showed signs of a "sympathy widening" in mid-June, an event that can be a sign of a market bottom; if that holds -- without any additional excessive selling to reverse the recent trend -- it could mean a bounce-back is in the offing.

CBS Eye on Money
How to Handle a Large Inheritance

CBS Eye on Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 17:09


Thanks to a large inheritance, we want to make sure we're on the right track going forward. Have a money question? Email us, ask jill [at] jill on money dot comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

CBS Eye on Money
What to Do With Home Sale Proceeds?

CBS Eye on Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 13:01 Very Popular


With $100,000 on the horizon thanks to a recent home sale, what should I do with the proceeds? Invest, keep in cash, something else? Have a money question? Email us, ask jill [at] jill on money dot comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Closing Bell
Closing Bell Overtime: Tech-Led Turnaround 7/5/22

Closing Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 43:48 Very Popular


Stocks finished the session well off the lows of the day, with the Nasdaq ending the day solidly in the green. Schwab's Liz Ann Sonders gives her take on the big market swings. Plus, Deutsche Bank out with a bullish call on Tesla despite weak delivery numbers. The analyst behind that call makes his case. And, Yardeni Research President Ed Yardeni is revising his recession forecast. He explains why and what it could mean for your money.

The Millionaire's Lawyer - JP McAvoy

A Little About Brandon Schwab:Brandon has been a serial entrepreneur since the age of 15, he brings 20+ years of operating experience to Shepherd Premier Senior Living since its founding in 2014. He has the vision to improve the senior living industry forever! He wants to provide a better way of delivering quality care that is resident-focused, not bottom-line-focused. Some would call him a disruptor and others would call him a visionary, he prefers to be thought of as a passionate businessman that saw a problem and wholeheartedly pursued the solution. His grandpa Schwab, who meant the world to him, received what he considered sub-par care at one of the "big box facilities" and it broke his heart. He knew there  had to be a better way out there. He didn't find the "better way" until July of 2014 when he discovered it in Orlando, Florida in a small boutique 5 resident cozy home called Sutton Homes. This home inspired him, it opened his eyes or turned on the lightbulb to the "better way". At least he was confused and didn't understand how he didn't know much about boutique senior living although he fancied himself as an experienced real estate investor that co-led an investment club of over 100+ people. He quickly realized that this was his purpose in life,  everything else he's done left him empty or always seeking more but in reality, it prepared him for Shepherd Premier Senior Living & the boutique senior living niche industry. The industry is currently being led by large corporations with investors to report profit margins as a priority while overlooking the needed care of the greatest generation of residents. Caregiver to resident ratios of 1:15-20 as the national average is unacceptable, it needs to be changed. His boutique senior living model aims to provide 1 caregiver to every 5 residents. A better caregiver ratio directly equates to better care provided to residents.In this episode of The Millionaire's Lawyer, JP, and Brandon Schwab discuss:Brandon was able to turn some real estate that he had into a massive residential facility for the elderlyHe was able to note how the passive income was pretty profitable and wanted to expand on that industryAs Brandon Schwab was expanding within his real estate portfolio he noted the senior home industry and noted how cold they felt so he decided to make a differenceBoth Brandon Schwab and JP feel like this upcoming economic crash is overdue.They feel like it would be a great idea to take advantage of the crash and invest in tangible assets.Take action first, and then figure things out along the way. Sometimes the initiation is the hardest part and overthinking this is the easier thing to do.Connect with Brandon Schwab:FacebookLinkedIn(847) 380-8624Connect with your host, JP:TwitterInstagramFacebookWebsiteShow:LinkedInEmail:  jpmcavoy@conductlaw.comPhone:  1-833-890-8878THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR:Conduct LawWebsite

The Remote Real Estate Investor
Brandon Schwab on how senior living facilities are powerful win-win investments

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 29:33


Brandon Schwab is based in Chicago where he specializes in boutique assisted living. Brandon who is, founder, and CEO of Shepherd Premier Senior Living and Boutique Senior Living Fund had experienced first-hand the deficient care of his grandfather at a large, industrial-type senior living facility, he vowed to make improvements in the industry by starting his own senior living company that provides better, quality care to the elderly. It seems that parts of the US are significantly under-served with this class of product. To learn more or to connect with Brandon tune in to today's podcast and you can set up a time to speak with him directly. Brandon talks about his unique business model of syndicating small senior living assets. Episode Link: https://boutiqueseniorlivingfund.com/ wwww.shepherdpremierseriorliving.com www.brandonschwab.com   Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: Hey, everyone, welcome to another episode of the Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum, and today I'm joined by Brandon Schwab, who is going to be talking to us about how he's turning the senior living facility industry upside down. So let's get into it…   Brandon Schwab, what's going on, man? Thanks so much for taking the time to hang out with me today. I appreciate you coming on.   Brandon: Hey, man, this year is awesome, man. Thank you for having me.   Michael: Oh, of course and I think we're gonna have a lot of fun today, talking about senior living, which is I don't think we've ever covered this topic on the show before. So I'm super excited.   Brandon: Never…?   Michael: I don't think ever I don't think ever and shame. I know, I know, I know. Shame on us, that's our bad but give us the quick and dirty. We're gonna get into senior living in just a minute. Give us we can do it, who you are, where do you come from and what is it that you're doing in real estate today?   Brandon: Down and dirty… I've been in Crystal Lake Illinois. For 35 years, I am 40. I've got two kids I got in real estate in 2010. But back before that, I actually opened up our own company at the age of about 15 years old. I did that for 14 years, until I figured out quickly that I didn't actually own anything. I thought I owned something the whole time. But I found out at the end, I didn't actually own any assets. So therefore, I  didn't actually have anything to own to actually have up for sale. So I got into this industry in 2010. After I got crushed after 2008 happened. I at the age of 15. I was cleaning cars in RVs for 14 years and I thought I was crushing it doing there. I was taking home 200 220,000 per year but I was probably working 7080 hours per week. So like wholesaling back in 2010. Because I was like dude, I got paid like $200 for each car and probably about 500 for each RV. So like wholesaling in our first deal was like $1,000 I was like, do you know that would take me like 40 hours just to like, even come close to that and I said I have to get into that business. So that's it, man, it's awesome. Fast forward to today I am changing the industry for how the elderly are taking care of totally upside down.   Michael: That's wait. So you're putting elders on their head? I don't think is that is that good for them?   Brandon: We obtained we are changing the whole and we're changing the whole industry of how everyone thinks of it because typically, if you think of the older industry, right? You think of 100 to 200 type with a ton of elderly in there, right? Tons of them, right and they typically have a pretty terrible odor and the odor isn't very good. It's the odor because people don't get any help and then there's also the atmosphere of everyone asking for help because the average caregiver has to care for 20 to 30 people. I don't know on you, but we are in the top country in this whole entire and if that's how we care for the elderly, I feel like we didn't do things properly and they have to be totally turned upside down because how they're currently doing it isn't able to operate. I had a thing happen in our family back in 2004 where there was a person in our family who was 85 who ended up in a place for 200 beds and we pulled the pull cord to have people come in there to help them and it took them 10 minutes 15 minutes by 20 minutes like I'm getting like pretty irritated by 25 minutes like I just lose my shit and I go out to get a them to help them and I can't say I handled it all that well because I kind of exploded but like that's how I was first exposed and it turns out that's actually common to how the industry is able to operate and I said that's terrible. I hate this industry, hate it, hate it hate it.   They bought 10 years after that I was down in Florida and I got exposed to a five a home that had five people in it and I was like what is this? You know at the time I had 23 homes in our total I began build In our portfolio in 2012, and by the end of 12, I had 23 homes and I had, I thought I kind of had everything figured out. Well, at the end of 14, I'm in this house down in Florida and I'm doing each one of these like arms kind of crossed, because I'm just looking at the place and I go, What is this? I haven't ever seen a home before that is it was probably a 2800 foot house. There was houses on each side, probably 10 or 12 feet from the house and I was just like, What is this because typically as I would go down to Florida, Kelly's dad would play his piano in the old folks home 328 times per year for 35 bucks and I hated going because it was typically in these huge in the elderly in the odor was just terrible and I was just like, if we can get out of that, is there anything that I can do that I don't have to actually, and I would offer to like cook to clean all of that just so I didn't have to go? Thank God, I didn't I didn't have any option because I was ill put this house and I was like, What is this? This is cool. It's it didn't have any odor. It had this awesome atmosphere and I was just like, how have I been in?   How have I been investing in assets and I don't have any clue what this is and I asked the girl in charge, and I said, hey, how much do these people pay to be here and I threw out a figure of like 1500 or $2,000 in this girl did this hurt? Like her eyes came down here and like this girl's answer was like, and just kind of kept on walking and I was like, Kelly, what the hell was that answer? She didn't even answer me. So I ended up calling her and the girl goes, Brandon, I am sorry, I thought that you were only kidding because they begin at $5,200 a month, what times five people I'm like, that's $26,000 and every home that I had all 23 Our highest was like $2,200 per month and our average was like 18 and I said holy crap that one house with five people in it was outperforming every house that I had two times each month. And I was like, I'm in the I have to get into that business and by the time I was able to come home, I found a house in a town of 832 people and it was the house was 4880 feet on three acres. So like we bought it for 250 and put $550,000 into it right over the top. I got this house full by February of 17 and we were gross and 55,000 of income within a cost of the expenses of like 30 to 32,000 a month. So this house was jam on month, one month, one house, we were changing the industry to and offered this cool option that people have never heard of.   Michael: So you're netting like 20 grand a month on this place.   Brandon: Per house, yes and I have homes that are 1015 and 20 each home. So that's the that's the entry level for us, is 10, so…   Michael: I mean, okay, I've like speeches, I have so many questions. So I've got to imagine caring for the elderly. This is a very medically intensive, medically heavy industry and so talk to us a little bit about how do you how do you get into this industry because I think there's so many barriers to medical and then care and I could go on but tell us how you how you got started.   Brandon: So when I got going, I had everything in the to open up the house, right, I was able to open it. I even got the first two or three people in there, right and when I quickly got past like two or three people, I quickly figured out that I didn't really have the experience to operate them, right. So I was doing what I was trying to do to get the house full was I was calling on churches, in particularly wanting to talk to the head of each church. Now, I found out quickly that churches are hard to call on because they don't ever answer and they don't tend to call you back but I finally got one and I called in I was talking to the church pastor and honestly, I think he felt terrible for me because he's like, Brandon, you aren't so good at this like this is this isn't going to be your thing, right? So like he goes Brandon, hi god, their closest friend was in health care for 38 years. She just retired in in. She was getting kind of anxious to like go in to do things. So they introduced me and she was in health care industry for 38 years I ended up taking You're out to eat every Tuesday for about six months and I finally got her on our team, I got her to invest, but I had her in charge of operations and that was back in 2015. So I basically was able to open up homes, but I quickly figured out that I needed a team of experts to actually operate them. So after I had her in, it was in 2015, I kind of had her handle the ops and I focus on opening up homes.   Michael: That is wild. So at the beginning, before you brought her up, where I mean, were you there at the home, cooking, cleaning, doing all that kind of stuff yourself?   Brandon: No, I only had to go there when people didn't come in. So there was a handful of times where a person called in, and I had to go in there. That wasn't very fun and I quickly figured out I need to have things in place that that isn't going to ever happen over because I found out quickly that I am not very good when it comes to cleaning and taking care of people I quickly said, you know, I had to get out early. So I found people, I did have to cover a handful of shifts and I did call in for help because there were some things I just couldn't do.   Michael: I can imagine, I can imagine. So when you're looking at properties, I mean, this first property, what about it kind of jumped out at you and said, Hey, this, this is a good candidate or a good prospect to purchase, you know, for this type of business.   Brandon: So when I was down in Florida, I saw a five bed house in the five bed house was great. But the five bed house wasn't. It was geared for like an owner operator, a person that was in a health care field and I quickly figured out that that wasn't going to be us that I couldn't do that personally. So I decided to exercise. So I was looking for a first floor house, it was like 5000 feet, first floor 5000 feet. That's hard to find. So when I came back home, I thought that they'd be everywhere because down in Florida, there's 1800 of these homes. California has 2800 out there close to you, I think Arizona has 3000, Texas has 15,000 back by us. There's 55 by five, so I said…   Michael: And when you say when you say these homes, you mean like single family homes in neighborhoods that are being used for senior care facilities.   Brandon: So I am talking about homes that are caring for the elderly under 10 people. It is under 15 people per home.   Michael: Okay, All right. So you had 55 in your market…?   Brandon: 55 not in and there's 18 in all of Florida, and there was only 55 here, right and I said, that's bingo. Perfect I'm in, so that's how I first jumped in but a thing a thing that happened is when I first got in, there wasn't a ton of other people out there doing this. So I had to kind of go teach people this concept. So the healthcare part was definitely challenging but the houses that I was trying to find where four to 5000 feet, first floor only our first house, it was on three acres. It was a financial planner that I purchased that bought our debt built in office on to his house. So I had to open things up, I ended up putting 550,000 into the first house. So I had four private bedrooms, and I had three bedrooms for two people each. So for privates, and then I had three for two. So I had a total of 10. Did I go over, did I go overboard? Absolutely but I feel like if you're going to do anything, you have to do it how it ought to and I put three ADA A's on the inside for people to go to the psych bathroom, I only had to have only one and I had 380 access points to get into the house and out of the house and we just did everything over the top. So that's how I first got in and then beyond that house, it was harder to find that type of house over. So fast forward to today I've got five homes up and operating. I got two homes opening up in quarter three this year. And then in 2000 are in I also have 7.2 acres of land that I bought before COVID that I was going to put our own homes on.   Michael: This is incredible. So what is the financing look like for these homes? I mean, can you go to a bank and say hey, I want the purchase. I want to purchase it at 20 and I want you to give me a line of credit for the construction for the rehab. I mean who's financing this type of stuff…   Brandon: I had a chance, dude when I went in there to talk to these guys, they thought I had like, they couldn't get it. These guys are used to like, easy, typical type deals, when I told them that, that I was going to 10 people each paying 5000 to 5500. Each month, their heads literally exploded. They're like, Hey, man, why don't you come back after you do your first house? Then I'll talk to you and I was able to do that and they're like, hey, why don't you come back when you have two houses and then at that, at that part, I am like, you know, I don't think I'm going to actually go ask him for anything anymore. But like, that's how it happens. So a thing that I do for financing is I actually brought in private capital, from investors on a per L for each home and that's, that is how we did, I had to offer some pretty high IRR hours. But when you're first getting things going, that is your only option and a thing that I found that I was really good at is when I was buying properties, I was buying like oddball type properties, not the typical like three to 2200.   So I was buying houses that were on properties that the typical family at the time weren't trying to buy, right. So I was buying houses that were on the app on the MLS for 200 days, 400 days, 500 days and what I would do is I would give them an offer for them to carry back financing at the full asking price. Or I would give them an offer for cash but the cash offer was like so like 50% and a lot of times I was just using that cash offer to help prop up the other offer but I've had a handful of times where when I was putting in those two offers, they would take the other one. So I bought one house off the MLS one time that was on for 2.4 million. I bought that for 750 cash and other time I bought one