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  • 12PODCASTS
  • 187EPISODES
  • 33mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 30, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about tcast

Latest podcast episodes about tcast

Tcast
Diving Into the Deep End With Financier and Author, Leo Tilman

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 24:12


Risk and intelligence are two factors that define the success of any organization. Information is everywhere, and yet companies and organizations are still faced with data-related challenges that hinder their development. Is information-gathering all there is to running an operation?   In this episode, Leo Tilman joins Alexander McCaig to discuss risk and its relevance to finance, strategy, and more. Leo Tilman is a leading authority on strategy and risk, who predicted the financial crisis between 2007-2008. He also authored Agility: How to Navigate the Unknown and Seize Opportunity in a World of Disruption, which is featured in this podcast.   Definition of Agility Within Risk Intelligence   To adapt to the everchanging uncertainties that organizations, governments, and even individuals face, agility is a must. This seven-letter word is often defined as the ability to assess and respond to changes, while making it distinct from flexibility or adaptability. What sets agility apart is that it calls for an individual to be purposefully decisive, while still grounded in the will to succeed in whatever endeavor an individual or group is facing.    Regardless of an entity's position in the world, they are always within the environment that surrounds them. To understand what defines an individual's or a group's agility, we must first define the environment they are in. This is important because it helps provide insight into how agility can be expressed in those specific circumstances.   An environment consists of two components: first, the dominant trends that shape the world around us. These are the specifics of an environment, and illustrate how the environment is a dynamic entity that is capable of changing over time.   The second component refers to the fundamental nature of environments, described through theories. An example is Clausewitz's theory on war and its accurate description of competitive environments.     The Portfolio of Risks and Risk Assessment   An organization must be proactive in assessing the risks that it will face. Here comes the portfolio of risks, which is a set of risks that an organization must make to meet its objective. This involves multiple facets within the organization, like financial risks, strategic risks, and so on.   However, the executives of an organization need to come together and discuss the risks they face, as well as the environment they are in. By discussing and analyzing their circumstance, they're able to determine what factors they have control over, and what they don't.   Because of the vast amounts of data that companies and organizations have access to, it becomes a challenge to try and filter through all the data. Furthermore, companies soon realize that truly valuable information, like data about their clients or competitors, isn't available all the time.   And so, being proactive about data-gathering is essential. By dedicating time and resources towards gathering valuable data, one can understand not only the situation but also the necessary risks needed to be taken. With that in mind, the portfolio of risks is then created.   The Human Element Within an Organization   Regardless of the amount of information that an organization has, and regardless of the strategies put in place, nothing can succeed without the human element. It is the flexibility of human beings that allows groups to move towards their goals.   It is the ability for human beings to adapt through the uncertainty of an environment, and process information that may change the status quo of their situation. Because of the complexity of the environment that anyone is in, it is up to the agility of human beings to formulate responses towards these changes.   For that reason, cultural assessments within an organization are important to move through the internal fog of data that organizations have access to. Because no matter how well we know our circumstances, our clients, or our competition, none of it matters until we first know ourselves.   How much is your data worth? www.tartle.co   TCAST is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
We're All One Big Pile of Space Junk

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 16:07


Junk. It's everywhere. From island-sized floating masses of garbage to the thousands of tons of space debris found in low orbit, mankind has left its permanent mark on planet Earth. As junk is generated as a byproduct of consumerism, the debris left behind by satellites, or the inefficient data-grabbing of companies; we are faced with mountains of waste every day.   The question then is, how should we tackle this junk problem? Similarly, how should companies handle the acquisition and exchange of data? In the information age, the ever-increasing volume of data is proving to be a challenge within the data marketplace.    In this episode, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby discuss human junk and its effect on our evolution.   The Self-Destructive Situation of Our Space Debris   There are a hundred million pieces of debris found in Earth's low orbit. Each of those are only larger than a millimeter. That may sound harmless, but the environment is different in outer space. Up there, there's barely any friction or gravity, which allows the individual pieces to speed up at around 17,500 miles per hour.   And so, a tiny piece of junk floating around can cause large amounts of damage to any equipment unfortunate enough to get hit. A bigger yet obvious problem is the difficulty with which people can repair damages, as it's hard to even reach the damaged equipment.   As of the year 2020, there are currently 3,372 active satellites in orbit. Now, the US Regulatory has already permitted SpaceX from launching satellites, of which they plan to launch 42,000 of them. This will only increase the risk of important satellites and instruments from being damaged.   The International Space Station has even had near-miss events because of space debris, which cements it as a real problem with real consequences. Obviously, this isn't the problem of the ISS alone.   Humanity's Junk and Its Effects on Our Evolution   Junk has become such a prevalent issue around the world, and yet we don't even consider why it exists in the first place. We create plastic and other pollutants for commercial goods, without taking into account what happens to it after it is thrown away.   Ever since humans have developed technology, we created this mentality of not caring about the aftermath of our actions. Which, in turn, has created all this junk and waste around us, which is hindering our evolution as a society.   This isn't to say that we are unaware of our predicament. However, the way we try and solve this problem is by simply going around the junk. For example, instead of trying to get rid of space debris, they instead designed better spacecraft to withstand the high-speed debris that crashes into our satellites.   In addition to humanity's indirect approach towards junk, our pre-existing systems are open and do not take into account the amount of waste that will inevitably get created. Because of the open systems that society has relied upon, we are continuously burying ourselves beneath our waste.   As an example of society's indirectness towards problems, picture this scenario. A child is left in their car seat as the parents go inside the store. The parents are reliant on the car's system, that it will provide AC and therefore keep the child cool. However, what happens when the AC malfunctions? We could design a camera to observe, but that's simply an indirect fix.   Instead of simply going to the root of the problem and simply bringing the child along, the parents create complicated measures.    TARTLE's Mission to Eradicate Junk Data   Junk is everywhere, and yet it is simply tolerated. Instead of finding roundabout ways to avoid junk, we should instead focus our efforts on it. Focusing on it gives humanity a deep understanding of the cause and effect of junk, and how we can eliminate it.   Within the data marketplace, TARTLE is cleaning up data for buyers and sellers alike, creating order and organization from piles upon piles of junk data. TARTLE is creating a closed system with no waste, making it efficient and precise. www.tartle.co   TCAST is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Connectivity and Productivity: A Discussion With Author and Speaker, Phil Simon

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 22:25


Changes in technical breakthroughs and evolving skill needs are shaping the nature of the workplace of the future. While the pandemic did not fundamentally alter the way people cooperated, it did speed up the pace of change. This resulted in a faster adoption of the concept of remote work.   With the world adjusting to a new life after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, how do we best utilize the tools that we have so that we can continue our levels of productivity even in remote working situations?   In this episode, Alexander McCaig discusses this issue with Phil Simon, a keynote speaker, adviser, and Zoom and Slack educator. He is also the author of eleven non-fiction works, the most recent of which is Reimagining Collaboration: Slack, Microsoft Teams, Zoom, and the Post-Covid World of Work.   Adjustments in the Workplace   According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of Americans working remotely more than doubled from around 30 percent to 60 percent in March 2020, and organizations began embracing new collaboration platforms such as Slack, Microsoft Teams, and Zoom as part of the adjustment process as a result of this increase.    At the start of 2020, few people would be familiar with the names of even one of these tools, much alone all of them. Several of us are now working remotely as a consequence of COVID-19, and Zoom has been so widely used that it has become a verb: to "Zoom" means to communicate using video conferencing technology.   When businesses were forced to close and employees were required to wear masks, just a few businesses were allowed to continue operations as usual. The vast majority of people were entirely unprepared for the enormous changes that were about to take place in their lives. When it came to internal communication, they continued to rely on email as well as on typical corporate processes and attitudes.   A New Age of Productivity   To cope with COVID-19's repercussions on corporate organizations, employers, human resource managers, and consultants were obliged to think creatively about how they might implement a remote work strategy. Businesses had an urgent need to alter these barriers in dealing with the international economic instability caused by the virus.   If a shift to a new system is the path moving forward, what possible methods can businesses use to better utilize the tools that we currently have in this day and age?   Phil Simon suggests that companies should start embracing the Hub-Spoke model of collaboration. This model is a technique of distribution wherein a centralized "hub" operates. From the hub, products are sent outward to smaller groups known as spokes for further storage and delivery.   With this model, it aims to help firms significantly increase staff productivity, simplify current business procedures, and provide the basis for subsequent machine-learning and artificial intelligence advances.   The hub may be thought of as a meta-organization that functions in parallel to established innovation laboratories. Employees at the innovation-hub can connect informally over the web and work freely on innovation to bolster the firm's performance.   Out with the Old, In the New?   Efficiency should not be dependent on one factor alone. While the hub-spokes model creates a more systematic approach in revamping business models to fit the current situation, it is best to have it hand-in-hand with tried and tested organizational techniques.   By adopting particular initiatives and establishing a culture that supports their virtual workforce, executives may boost their teams' performance output and engagement. They must build and sustain a culture of trust, as well as modernize leadership communication methods and procedures in order to properly educate virtual personnel.    Additionally, team members must be encouraged to share leadership. Finally, executives must establish and conduct frequent alignment checks to ensure that virtual workers adhere to the organization's cultural values, including their commitment to its goals.   All of these procedures begin with the realization that team formation will be significantly different with remote members, demanding the creation of new leadership strategies, communication routines, and tools.   Final Thoughts   In a world where social distancing and remote work has become the new normal, it is now more important than ever to make good use of the current technologies we have to be just as productive as before the pandemic hit the globe.In Simon's concluding statements, he deems it important that for a collaborative system to work, employees must be willing to commit to the shift fully. Problems will surely arise when employees refuse to use certain technologies because they either find it too complicated or too time-consuming to actually learn new things instead of going the more traditional route of working.   The willingness to change is always the first step towards growth. Just as the world has changed, we must also be willing to adapt to this change. Resistance will always be a hindrance to progress, just as the refusal to learn denies a person the chance to be more efficient and productive.   It is part of TARTLE's vision to create a world where knowledge is shared and problems are solved through a collective and collaborative effort. We believe that teamwork is power, and collaboration is the key to progress. The power is back in your hands.   What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   TCAST is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Human Gridlocks and Its Impact on Society

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 26:24


Human nature and prediction models. We base our perspective of human nature on two-dimensional grids, molding our society and its systems towards these grids. Despite this being the norm, people aren't so clear-cut as to simply be placed into broad labels.   So how then, do we categorize human behavior? Is there a better approach to what we have now? Perhaps one that encompasses everyone, while still taking into account the multifaceted nature of a person.   In this episode, join Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby as they tackle human creativity and the variances that make everyone unique.   Three-Dimensional People In Two-Dimensional Systems?   In the 1960s, a two by two grid was employed by Boston Consulting Group as a model they can show to their clients. Because of its simplicity, it can be easily understood by everyone. More importantly, it is a convenient way to present data.   With systems that involve predictable and binary data, using a grid makes sense. However, using a two by two grid is not the best approach when dealing with human behavior. We cannot simply force people into one of the four categories within the grid.   A person, whose thoughts and actions are infinitely complex, cannot be placed into a singular label. Everyone is three-dimensional, such as that emotions can't be numerically described, and therefore cannot be placed into two-dimensional grids with a pen and paper.   With systems that require labels and measurements, using a grid is indeed the most efficient way to do so. For mapmakers, laying out squares to measure land is easy, because of its two-dimensional nature. For geneticists, the Punnett chart is a simple way to predict chromosomal traits and how they blend together. And so, dealing with predictable components using a grid is common sense.   An example of a two by two grid that attempts to categorize human beings is the New York Magazine Approval Matrix. The matrix gets released every week and is a literal grid that places current human events and happenings into one of four categories. They take these incredibly multifaceted aspects of our society and force them to fit within a single two by two grid.   The Infinite Variability of A Human Being Humans come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. No matter how small, the tiniest difference in personality or thought processes can develop into entirely different people. Even a single variation in one's environment can create a completely unique experience for a person.   With things like predictive traffic models, you can somewhat predict a group of people's general behavior. During the pandemic, however, a traffic model cannot explain the sudden reduction in traffic. Moreover, it cannot predict the outcome of a virus and how it affects traffic in the future.   Again, a two-dimensional grid cannot be used to describe a person's thoughts and decisions for their future. For example, a person thinks about a past event. However, this thought relates to how they should act in the future. This causes a shift in ideas and perspective in how they think about themselves. This scenario cannot be described by simply using a two-dimensional system.   TARTLE has figured out the commonality between everyone, and that is their inherent uniqueness and creativity. Every person is an outlier compared to everyone else and should be treated as such.   Using a Unity Model for a Holistic Approach   With that being said, there is a type of system that attempts to approach human uniqueness in an all-encompassing manner. A unity model. An entity should then design systems and models that are for humans, rather than a target demographic. This eliminates the metaphorical walls that divide people into specific groups, without limiting the scope and growth of a given system.   Creativity is an inherent trait that is both unique and ubiquitous to everyone. An expressive painter cannot be labeled as “weird” or “crazy” for being creative in their own way. Rather, it is who they are as an individual.   A person's label should not be confined within the walls of a grid, but rather a gradient of creativity that cannot be simply described with a word or two. Going back to describing painters, no one should compare one artist's expression with another artist, with each artist being unique on their own.   Instead of visualizing a system as a grid, we should instead view it as a spherical model. Imagine plotting a single point on a sphere. If this sphere was rotated, it would still be equal to any other point plotted on the sphere.   Closing Thoughts: The Norm of Two-Dimensional Systems Each person should be treated as an absolute uniqueness; a gradient of colors that cannot be defined by binary systems. Everyone is inherently creative, and everyone has experiences and thoughts unique to themselves.   Despite our society's norm of placing everyone into clear-cut definitions, we should instead strive to expand our perspective towards the infinite creativity of human nature. Just because everyone has adapted to this norm, does not mean that it is the correct way to describe people. www.tartle.co TCAST is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
MAGA Through Research and Development with MIT Economist, Jonathan Gruber

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 32:39


How do we encourage economic growth and progress across the country? The United States was once revered as one of the most successful economies in the world—but today, it struggles to generate the job opportunities and market stability necessary for its citizens to ensure their quality of life. This is the question that Jonathan Gruber and Simon Johnson explore in their book, entitled Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth and the American Dream. In this episode, Alexander McCaig sits down with Jonathan Gruber to have a meaningful dialogue on what the government's missing out on by decreasing funding in research and development.    The Effect of RnD on the US Economy According to Jonathan Gruber, public investment in research and development played a pivotal role in the economic progress of the United States. All the technological advancements we have the privilege of experiencing today—such as our smartphones and laptops—were, in part, fueled by the amount of funding that was poured into the pursuit of science. However, the level of public investment decreased drastically, from about two percent of GDP in 1962 to just under half of that today. In his book, Jonathan Gruber explains that the nation's renewed support in science and technology would play a significant part in generating economic growth. This is especially important in an era where plenty of citizens are facing job instability, outright unemployment, and health concerns brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. Ushering in a new era for research and development would not just benefit certain industries. Jonathan Gruber posits further that aside from overall growth, it would create better jobs across the economy. This would naturally occur as the market adjusts to accommodate an influx of tech professionals across the country, because they would need these goods and services to support their work as well as their quality of life.   Decentralizing Opportunities for Innovation While the US does have certain cities where tech-based growth is made possible, they are not enough to power the economy. In fact, concentrating opportunities in “superstar” cities such as San Francisco, New York, Seattle, and the Silicon Valley can be counterproductive.  This is because the demand for professionals will incentivize people to relocate from one city to another. As a result, these cities experienced increased congestion and housing prices—and those who do not have the experience necessary to become a valuable asset to the area will be forced to leave. At this point, Jonathan Gruber emphasizes the importance of government involvement in encouraging basic research. Setting aside funding for research and development that is carried out in other areas would help incentivize private investors, or venture capitalists, to take that risk as well.    Will Robots Take Over Our Jobs? One salient point of discussion in the episode was when Alexander McCaig asked Jonathan Gruber about the impact of robotics on the future of work. Alexander pointed out that there may be some routine jobs that may phase out completely because they would be delegated to robots, who would be more efficient at performing such activities. Jonathan Gruber believes that the outlook for robotics is optimistic, and that people should focus on the capabilities that can be developed when there is enough funding for the country to get a leg up on the tech race. Being able to scout the future of artificial intelligence and machine learning would give researchers a head start on the careers that it would affect, in both a positive and negative manner. “The bottom line is, you can wring your hands about the fact that some low-level jobs are going to be taken by robots, or you can get to work making the robots,” Jonathan Gruber explained.  To illustrate his perspective, Jonathan Gruber explained how the invention of the wheel raised concerns about the viability of horse-drawn carriages back in the day. Fast forward to modern times, it is clear that refining the wheel has led to a plethora of different jobs across transportation, engineering, and construction as people and cities work to make their locations friendlier to vehicles.  Planning ahead for new job roles could help the labor market adjust and accommodate accordingly.   Closing Thoughts: Taking the First Step Forward When asked about his parting words, Jonathan Gruber encourages people to take an “if you build it, they will come” mentality. People living in communities tend to go for an incredibly narrow or vague focus, but what they need is an actionable plan that can be carried out step by step. When people have a concrete and tangible action to look back on, they have a source of inspiration that pushes them forward—even if they do not secure the funding needed to make it happen just yet. The future is bright and full of possibilities. It's time to take the pivot back towards science, technology, and data.  What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Helping Enterprises Ethically Establish Relationships with End Customers: TARTLE Welcomes New Chief Revenue Officer Martin Herrick to Champion this Process

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 32:50


TARTLE is adding to its leadership team with Martin Herrick as Chief Revenue Officer.  Martin has a wealth of experience in education and finance, having worked in higher education for seven years before transitioning to the private education lending space.  He has held roles as Chief Revenue Officer in the fintech space, working on a new financial asset class called Income Share Agreements (ISAs). Prior to this, Martin has made an impact in other C-suite and executive positions. He worked as the Vice President for Business Development, and eventually the Senior Vice President, for Education Loan Source in the Greater San Diego Area from 2014 to 2019. Martin's work with TARTLE brings him closer to individuals who are struggling to gain access to higher education. “The users who will be using TARTLE to fill out education packets are probably in the blind spot of most colleges and universities, who don't have a direct line of access to these students,” he explained, “They're not going in to talk to their college counselors, filling out surveys, or completing their FAFSAs. They're searching for platforms like TARTLE to find revenue that they can make for their family, to help with the tough times that they're going through right now.” “I'm looking to prove to the higher education administrators that we go out to, in the colleges that we partner with to buy data off of our platform, that these are students they would have otherwise missed out on had they not taken a look at TARTLE to see who's interacting with our platform.” Martin's unique skill set and experience in education, finance, and technology will be instrumental in the TARTLE platform's evolution into a marketplace that is better equipped to cater to its Big 7, particularly in initiatives related to educational access. This episode also deep-dives into: How the rising cost of education affects our capacity for human understanding The impact of COVID-19 on how people perceive higher education and student loans Discussing how student loans are mostly accessible to those who are already backed with generational wealth TARTLE's capacity to reinvent higher education Illustrating the difficulties people may run into when trying to pay for higher education Finding clear and data-driven solutions to making higher education more accessible Emphasizing the urgency of finding tangible methods to affordable higher education For podcast, radio, TV interviews, media opportunities, and other press-related inquiries, please contact Media Director Shiela Pialago at sp@tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Navigating the Dreamscape with Neuroscientist and Author, Sidarta Ribeiro

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 54:17


Why is there so much emphasis on the thoughts and actions that govern our day to day lives, but not as much on the ones that happen as we sleep?  It's difficult to understate the influence of modern technology because its effects are so tangible. We see how platforms like TARTLE are geared towards a clear end goal. We're connected to our smartphones and devices around the clock. But we seem to be forgetting about the first device and data set that we were given to work with: the human mind, and our subconscious. At most, dreams are an interesting icebreaker or topic for idle talk—but we think that they can mean something more. It is time to revisit how dreams can have an impact on the course of our lives, as well as that of the people around us.   Dreams: Our Most Ancient, Most Well-Developed Technology   Sidarta Ribeiro shared a personal experience with a fellow PhD candidate. One day, Sidarta Ribeiro needed a ride to the field center of Rockefeller University for an experiment. However, he was unable to push through with his activity because it was used by another candidate. This setback meant that he had to reschedule his experiment, which affected his productivity. Understandably, this affected Sidarta Ribeiro's perception of the person. He went to sleep feeling annoyed and irritated. However, he dreamt of a scenario where he angrily confronted the person and ended up getting physically hurt. When he woke up, he found himself in the right mindset and mood to peacefully discuss what happened with his colleague, and they made amends. This is a personal example of how dreams can be used to simulate instances of the future using references that we have made in the past. It can help guide us and give us insight. Giving the mind some space to process what has happened throughout our day can have some benefits for our wellbeing.   Bringing Back the Focus to the Self   Alex mentioned how, surprisingly, we only spend 55 percent of our lives awake. This means that if we don't pay attention to our dreams, we're missing out on almost half of our entire life experience In the modern world, there is a growing dichotomy between inner work and outer work that we need to bring our attention to— especially when we put so much value on what is external, but choose to forego focused introspection on the self. Sidarta Ribeiro pointed out that today's research into mental health and wellbeing appear to be closely intertwined with drugs that induce a dream-like state. This could be the first step in a collective effort to bring back emphasis on our subconscious. It's time to return to our inner world and start using dreams, one of our most ancient technologies, to our advantage once more.   Dreams as a Gamechanger Throughout History   The dream state has had a massive impact on the course of history. One solid example is the Oracle of Delphi, a widely revered high priestess of the Temple of Apollo who gave predictions and guidance to both individuals and city-states. Her words influenced the decisions of important figureheads such as Aegeus, the king of Athens; Croesus, the king of Lydia; and Alexander the Great, conqueror of the ancient world. Ancient and contemporary Mayan religion also posited that dreams are sacred, because they functioned as portals that helped an individual connect with their ancestors for guidance. The dream state is closely intertwined in the definition of spirituality across several religions and concepts of faith.  Today, the role that our dreams fulfilled in old societies is now being fulfilled by a variety of different mechanisms and technologies. Amidst all this progress, it's time to take a break and ask ourselves: do we like where we're going, now that we're leaving our subconscious in the dust?   Closing Thoughts: Human Progress Through the Dream State   We are consistently pressured to maximize our productivity and levels of efficiency. The technologies we develop are influencing us to think of our value according to the volume of our work. While our reliance on the dream state has, to a large extent, been diminished due to our increased proficiency in technical knowledge, we forget to ask ourselves about the implications of this change. It is undeniable that our subconscious has played a massive role—not just in the individual lives of ordinary people, but in the rise and fall of civilizations. The dream state is a data mine that we, as a collective, are slowly losing out on. It's an opportunity for introspection that can help us make better decisions. Most importantly, it helps us regulate our wellbeing through proper rest and recreation. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
TARTLE's New Micropayment System - And Its Macro Benefits

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 6:44


How can you make the most out of your data? In the status quo, we are used to leaving our personal information and digital footprint in the hands of other entities: multinational corporations, political figureheads— those who claim that they have the right to because they have our best interests at heart. The TARTLE platform wants to cut through this fluff and return the power of data to the hands of those who deserve to wield it: the people. With that said, there are plenty of new and exciting updates being implemented on the marketplace. Here's what you need to watch out for.   More Opportunities to Earn: In this episode, Alex introduced a new and more effective micropayment system, which gives users the capacity to earn more at a faster pace. These updates are available on the TARTLE wallet and can be viewed by anybody logging in to the application. Furthermore, users can now see their available balance in US Dollars. This is a step forward to making income generation more relatable and attractive, because funds were previously shown in TARTLEcoin. Once users have hit a certain threshold, they can withdraw their funds into their PayPal account. Netizens that conduct more work on the platform through syncing their accounts, filling their data packets, changing their settings, and otherwise leaving a trail of activity, will be awarded with more cash. As an additional incentive for first-time users on the fence, the platform offers rewards for users filling out their first data packet.   More on the Horizon: Beyond this announcement, Alex and Jason also hinted at the release of high-value data packets in the future. These packets would cover topics that are incredibly sought after, such as healthcare, ancestry, Google profiles, and location history.  TARTLE hopes to usher in a new era of data ownership, encouraging people on the ground to become data champions for their own personal causes. There is so much potential in your life experiences and activities. It's time we reclaim our online persona. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

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Flexing TARTLE's Adaptability to Modern Trends and Technology

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 15:21


Have you ever felt like you were too caught up in the minute details of day-to-day living to realize the amount of change that occurred around you? Often, progress happens in increments and these shifts can be tracked in retrospect. However, being mindful of these new trends and circumstances can take some practice.  When it comes to data, information is evolving at an unprecedented pace; not just in terms of volume but in speed as well. The size, depth, and speed of all the knowledge we have at our hands can become overwhelming, especially when we have never been properly equipped to deal with our own data in the first place.  The TARTLE marketplace is an opportunity for individuals to adapt to this new reality and take control over their data. In a world where historically, corporations have gotten away with profiting off of our personal information, we are committed to helping the people on the ground get their voice back. It's a worldwide initiative that we have decided to undertake to aid in humanity's progress.   Keeping an Ear to the Ground: The Race for Innovation and Relevance - There is a constant pressure for companies to innovate. Plenty of old tech companies that played such an important role in our childhood eventually became obsolete due to their inability to keep up with the times—such as Kodak, Blockbusters, and Toys R Us. It's a tough lesson for any business: if you don't keep up, you will be left behind. One pertinent example is the use of the Internet of Things (IoT) in the healthcare industry. IoT has immense potential in helping health researchers and doctors keep entire populations healthy. This is because it captures large swathes of information in real time. TARTLE is committed to integrating these APIs into its marketplace, so that users have the opportunity to turn it into a fungible data packet and share it with causes that they support. On an individual level, we are also constantly reinventing ourselves on multiple levels. We try out new looks, styles, relationships, thought patterns, and beliefs. Human nature compels us to always adjust, to always be in the search of something that works. This challenge to be better is what makes life so exciting and meaningful. Regardless of whether we speak of individuals or businesses, resistance to change can be fatal. If the first step forward is hidden under a mountain of bureaucracy and red tape, then communication can become impossible. It is easy to find comfort in a routine, or in a process that's worked for as long as you can remember— but this is not an excuse to shut out the possibility for change.   Lending a Voice to the Oppressed - One big challenge in our progress of understanding countries in conflict is that gathering reliable sources of information on the ground can be incredibly difficult, if not impossible. Organizations have problems establishing the foundation needed to conduct their operations, while the people on the ground may not have the opportunity to think of reaching out when their top priority is survival. In any conflicted situation, connection can play a pivotal role in giving privileged actors the capacity to help the disenfranchised. TARTLE gives the oppressed individuals in these scenarios an opportunity to anonymously share data packets about their experiences.   Closing Thoughts: Learning to Bend, Not Break - TARTLE is on a constant mission to make sure that it is flexible enough to adapt to any trend or circumstance. The platform's first priority is the progress of humanity as a collective. Amidst constant growth and evolution, it is important that the marketplace is matched with the amount of people that interact with the system and the way in which they interact with it.  The marketplace is an avenue to create new tools and features out of a genuine need to solve a problem, instead of creating more bloatware or products for show. It opens conversations and discussions with individuals who are directly affected by all the serious issues we are facing today, compelling those in power to face some harsh truths about the world we live in—and the responsibility we have in changing it for the better. Your data is timeless. Now, it's time to find out what it's worth. www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

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A Critique of Capitalism With Author, Professor, and Director, Bernd Stahl

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 43:30


Technology, philosophy, and society. We have been primed to think that a capitalist system is capable of giving everyone the compensation they deserve—but we also know that this isn't always the case, especially for those who may need it the most. How do we take a closer look at the technologies and the organizations that provide the quality of life we have now? A foundation on the theories that apply to our circumstances is a step in the right direction. In this episode, Alexander McCaig explores these ideas with Bernd Stahl, author of Information Systems: Critical Perspectives. Bernd is also a Professor of Critical Research in Technology and Director of the Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility at De Montfort University. Is Emancipation in Today's Labor System Possible? The process of emancipating someone may seem like a noble goal. However, it can be difficult to gauge whether or not we are actually doing harm by taking this opportunity on their behalf. For example, one common perspective of companies is that they have the social responsibility to make profits because it would be distributed to the shareholders and trickle down to employees. Unfortunately, there are plenty of people who do not participate in this success and are not capable of being a part of this economic system. Wealth generation and opportunities to it are vastly different, especially in a capitalist structure. There are plenty of possible approaches to consider for this problem. Those who are pessimists believe that the system inherently ensures that some people will always be “outside.” As a result, the only true solution would be to implement radical change. Others believe that information systems can be used to make the economy more inclusive and spread wealth more evenly. With such polarizing views on how the labor system should be structured, it may seem like an impossible task to bring everyone into a discussion where they can give their own benchmarks for what is best. The Impact of Today's Environment on Our Reflexivity: The magnitude of such a feat is further emphasized when we think of the tech-driven world we live in. Due to our different backgrounds and preferences, Bernd points out that the idea of maximizing individual potential can vary widely from one person to another. The essence of critical theory would be to have a society where people are free to flourish, without other individuals or systems telling them what success is and how it should be achieved. It's an extension of our capacity to practice our individual liberties. Sadly, those in power often influence the system to fulfill their vested interests—and a crucial part in making this possible is taking away our ability to self-reflect, or to practice reflexivity. This is TARTLE's mission: to give people the avenue to practice critical reflection and self-awareness, bringing back that sense of common responsibility to humanity one step at a time. Surveillance Capitalism and Its Effects on Human Behavior: In such a tech-driven landscape, the provision of goods and services does not provide a lot of opportunities to interact with other people. Bernd illustrates this by pointing to electronic marketplaces and discussing how straightforward the transaction is. If this seems like an advantage, we need to dig a little deeper. We are no longer encouraged to think of the human realities behind eBay, Amazon, or other e-commerce platforms. All we need to consider is the availability of the product, estimated shipping time, and the most competitive cost. As a result, these platforms discourage us from taking more discursive action—all a part of surveillance capitalism efforts by big internet service providers to prevent us from thinking deeper about our purchases. The formula across different systems is similar: structure our work, extract our data, and lead us to buy something that we may or may not need. Regardless, the end result is to influence the general population's behavior so that they are at an advantage. “The potential for giving people freedom or reducing their freedom is there in any type of technology, across different types of political systems, even though it may look very different in different systems,” Bernd concluded. Modern technology draws parallels to a panopticon, where prisoners would be watched around the clock. While the original intention of this set-up was to benefit the prisoner through observation and feedback, the term is now being used as a mechanism of control. Indeed, when we are under constant surveillance from devices we've become so reliant on, it can either have a chilling effect or a normalizing effect. The outcomes are undetermined, but it certainly plays a crucial role in altering human behavior. Transparency in information systems will be important in bringing back the power, and the capacity to speak, to the people. Closing Thoughts: Awareness of the Human Ecosystem: When asked about his parting words, Bernd encouraged listeners to think of humanity as an ecosystem: the reality that we live in a society of other individuals and other actors, with unique needs and desires. It's a fragile ecosystem, and one that we should try and balance in our capacity, as stewards of the earth and of each other. Businesses and information systems were previously thought to be all about improving efficiencies and maximizing productivity. However, we've moved far beyond such a profit-driven perspective; now, Bernd hopes we remember that technology is always socio-technical, with human beings working alongside modern devices to improve the living circumstances of their fellow human beings. It is this sense of urgency to uplift the living conditions for humans across the board that encouraged us to develop TARTLE. Data-driven measures are the key to rebuilding the self-awareness we've lost in the great tech race for the boldest, biggest, and flashiest devices. The power is back in your hands.   What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   A Critique of Capitalism With Author, Professor, and Director, Bernd Stahl by TARTLE is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Why NGOs and Not-for-Profits Should Sign Up to Receive Funds from TARTLE

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 12:12


What Is Status Quo? While significant progress has been made in various private and corporate sectors, the social aspect of innovation has yet to reap the same magnitude of benefits with the help of technology and big data. Understandably, big tech struggles with their capacity to influence the social arena with the data that they have stored. Consider how much information on human trafficking, propaganda, and other crimes are siloed away across social media platforms. It is difficult to understand the depth of the impact that inaction has on these issues, but one thing is clear: inaction means more than just stagnancy. It is a step backward for social progress across several sectors, especially as we continue to grow in population and potential. The State of Social Innovation: In our current situation, charities and nonprofits push themselves forward by approaching potential donors for assistance. Due to a lack of mobility and flexibility, they are unable to access the full potential of their social efforts. The reality is that building a stable network of donors and stakeholders requires plenty of marketing leverage, availability, and resources — and sometimes, the best leads for driving social change are located across the globe. Better access starts with giving these organizations a safe, reliable, and efficient platform to share their work; something or someone that functions as the main focal point for the big problems of the world. Introducing the TARTLE Marketplace: We've enhanced the TARTLE Marketplace, bringing an altruistic arm to the space so that NGOs, nonprofits, and charities now have the place they need to campaign for awareness and funding.  TARTLE is invested in seeing bigger and better results from social efforts. While the pace of innovation we experience today is a phenomenon we should celebrate, we also acknowledge that this comes at a price: our responsibility to fight for a common good has also become more pressing and more evident. This is an emerging opportunity to become a part of something bigger and to be noticed in the way that these initiatives deserve to be noticed. What We Owe Each Other: With this in place, social organizations no longer need to go through tons of bureaucratic red tape or continue to milk the last funds out of the same donors everybody else in the area has approached. They have better access to concerned audiences and potential stakeholders who are interested in what they do and want to work on their mission. Conversely, having a space for these organizations makes change more accessible to the general public. We have the digital infrastructure necessary to support stable, secure connections between social initiatives and the rest of the world. Finally, the Marketplace opens up exciting new sources of income for NGOs and charities. It's not just about accessing donors and funding; it's also about the potential for these organizations to sell data packets on their areas of specialization. This new revenue stream has the dual effect of increasing the earning potential for specialists, as well as connecting these specialists to other professionals who are interested in what they know. Social problems can be difficult to solve because they are incredibly dynamic. These efforts require the involvement of numerous stakeholders and feedback loops, not just between nonprofits, but across government agencies and even private companies. The TARTLE Marketplace is an emerging platform that will solve the red tape caused by limited cooperation, data inequality, and poor IT resources. We do not profit from any information sold nor donations sent. Closing Thoughts: We aren't far from a future where we can predict, with perfect accuracy and precision, the trajectory, strength, and direction of major environmental catastrophes. Imagine the impact this would have on the efforts of non-governmental and governmental agencies alike. This could mean disseminating information and proactively setting up relief efforts, ensuring the safety of potentially displaced communities, and securing infrastructures well ahead of the catastrophe. We also envision a future where illicit activities, such as human trafficking, terrorist radicalization, and widespread discrimination can be actively profiled across the very same social media platforms we use to connect with our friends and family, empowering the organizations in charge to have a more active role in stopping these activities. In the current pandemic situation, we also hope for a world where we can use tech-powered initiatives to efficiently fund and procure vaccines, medical equipment, and healthcare campaigns for developing areas that may be left behind as efforts to curb the coronavirus are outrun by the disease's capacity to mutate and infect. These are the dreams that make the blood, sweat, and tears behind the data-driven TARTLE Marketplace worth fighting for.  What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Talking to Past Loved Ones Through Artificial Intelligence

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 9:58


For years, “delebrities” — which refer to the continued licensing of the names and images of dead celebrities, helped rake in millions of dollars for advertising and marketing purposes. In showbiz, they've also been utilized from beyond the grave to maintain the integrity of a film in progress.  Back when Furious 7 was still in the works, fans all over the world mourned the untimely passing of Paul Walker. In an effort to remain true to the spirit of the film. Director James Wan decided to hire a digital effects studio to insert Walker's likeness into the last parts of the movie. 350 CGI shots of the late actor, with distant shots of his brother, helped bring his character's arc as well as the movie into completion. This trend isn't limited to deceased celebrities. Recently, the DeepNostalgia app brought tons of netizens to tears as they watched old family photos of loved ones come alive in just a few clicks. It's brought looking to pictures, text chats, and other content of our deceased loved ones for comfort to a different level. If this is a glimpse into what life after death can promise for the ones who've been left behind, how will tech professionalists, programmers, and data scientists navigate the ethics of preserving the name, image, and likeness of the deceased?  In Loving Memory: In this podcast, we mention how important it is to collect information and knowledge gathered in the past, and forward it in the most efficient manner. Ultimately, the purpose of technology has always been to enhance our capabilities by opening doors to new and exciting possibilities. We've been capable of introducing a better quality of life through the introduction of blockchain technology in the global logistics industry, online banking and cryptocurrency for the unbanked in developing countries across the world, and cloud storage for businesses around the world. What's contentious about this is the intent behind our usage of such technologies. These machines have yet to find a way to operate autonomously and on their own goals; it's always an extension of our desires and needs. Grief and loss have always been difficult aspects of our existence. However, with the introduction of these technologies, the permanence of their death is brought into question. What if we could create new memories with the artificial likeness of our deceased loved ones?  Meaningfully Processing Our Grief: The modern understanding of how we process grief, which can be attributed to Swiss-American scientist Elizabeth Kübler-Ross, laid out the general roadmap: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and finally, acceptance. There is no question about whether we can develop technologies powerful enough to emulate our deceased loved ones. However, there certainly is contention about whether it would help us come to terms with their passing. A common concern, should these technologies proliferate, is whether it would hinder the grieving from making it past the first stage of denial — where they choose instead to cling to a false, preferable reality.  To add to the confusion, progress does not always take a linear path. It is possible for some people to cope well with the loss of a loved one for extended periods of time, only to relapse aggressively into nostalgic and even self-destructive behaviors when they are exposed to a trigger that brings them back to such a painful point in their life.  Closing Thoughts - Human Psychology and Experience: When such a visceral reminder of people who have had a strong impact on our lives can become a lingering possibility, the temptation to relapse becomes more tangible. How can these technologies be used to improve the way we process our grief? As is with any other man-made creation, understanding and regulating the impact of our work is just as important as turning the potential of what we make into reality. We live in exciting times and we are, doubtlessly, privileged to have our lives improved by the presence of the latest scientific innovations. Whether we can continue to remain at the helm of our own progress remains to be seen. Our response to these possibilities may define what it means to live out one of the most pivotal parts of the authentic human experience: the aspect of our lives that is associated with human psychology and moving on, and the painful learning process that everybody inevitably has to deal with. How far would you go to bring back someone you love? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
The Secret to Success With Jeff Gothelf, Agility Expert and Author of Forever Employable

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 35:21


In today's fast-paced world, it is easy to pin our personal worth to the amount of work that we do. It almost seems like our pursuit for happiness no longer resides in finding what we are passionate about, but in the amount of productivity and hustle we can generate on a regular basis.  In this episode, author and agility expert Jeff Gothelf is here to remind everybody that this is not the case. We inherently have value by virtue of being human beings, and we are capable of finding new ways to share our own narratives. Each one of us has a tremendous story to tell. These are ideas that resonate consistently throughout his new book, entitled Forever Employable. It's time to break away from the mold and see how we, as individuals, can enrich the path for future entry-level professionals within our industries—through the pandemic and beyond.   Experimenting With Different Channels - Traditionally, a successful person was always thought of as an extrovert. They would be known for their charisma and communication skills, and those who were introverted were at a disadvantage.  But in this day and age, there are a thousand ways for people to express themselves without necessarily meeting an audience face to face. Giving yourself the freedom to experiment with a variety of different channels and content will help you figure out two important aspects of being forever employable. First, it will help you figure out the content you are comfortable sharing with your audience on a consistent basis. Second, it will help you find out where your audience is and how they want to hear from you. When you combine these two, you discover your unique way of generating opportunities. Building a platform and a network does not require a specific skill set or personality trait; it only calls for experimentation, ingenuity, and an open mind. Finding An Evergreen Problem - Jeff shared his experience with his first book, entitled Lean UX. At this point, he has been talking about Lean UX to a variety of audiences and conferences around the country for over thirteen years. He believes that it's the most successful book he has written. He shared that while the first few years were exhilarating, he eventually had doubts on whether he could continue sharing his insights and his book. However, he said that the people he opened up to about his concerns reassured him that his ideas remained relevant. According to those who advised him, the content in Lean UX is crucial to solving an “evergreen problem” or core problem. These are components of work that remain relevant to a job role despite the changing demands of the business landscape. One example Jeff gave was a project manager's responsibility to unite a diverse group of people under one vision. This meant that Jeff found the content that he was most comfortable sharing with other people—he just needed to find new and creative ways to present it to different audiences. The constant reinvention is both internally and externally driven: it's internal because he needed to be able to sustain the passion that he had for his content by propagating it in different ways, but it's also external because he was pushed to keep it relevant for the demands of the market.  Closing Remarks: Forge Your Own Path - After Jeff's discussion on creating one's own narrative, Alex related his advice to Joseph Campbell's The Hero with a Thousand Faces, where Campbell explores how most mythological narratives or “hero's adventure' share a similar fundamental structure. “I feel as we're building that brand, setting that steak, we're going through all those different stages of the architect of the development of what we are, our brand or our business to actually become that great hero at the end...we deal with different rivals, right, different challenges, personal, interpersonal, whatever it might be, but the way myth carries, it's potent regardless of the length of time,” he explained. Jeff's parting words encourage us to take our future into our own hands. Loyalty to a single corporation or business entity may have worked for the past generations, but the variety in work set-ups and business models that we have the opportunity to experience today allow for more flexibility in our career path.  According to Jeff, the most important part of our career journey is making sure that we take control of our professional lives. Create a presence that is uniquely our own. Having others write our narratives for us is a waste of our true potential. When TARTLE was first conceived, it took four more years of testing and experimentation before the platform stabilized. Whatever it is you are passionate about, it's worth sharing and you are worthy of pursuing it. Your data is priceless. www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Why Data Is Absolutely Necessary for the Evolution of Humans Part 3

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 21:18


Have you ever been so caught up in the process of creating something, you wind up losing sight of what you wanted as an end product? Hard work and ambition are admirable, especially when invested in the creation of new and exciting technologies. However, it is easy to get lost in the mechanics of work and to forget about the vision that inspired you to take up the mantle in the first place. In this episode, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby discuss the negative impact of the ongoing tech race on humanity—and how we can fix it. Are We Real-Life Inspector Gadgets?: Jason pointed out a discussion made by Aubrey Marcus that was pertinent to humanity's current situation. It was about how Inspector Gadget was dependent on his niece, Penny, to solve crimes and figure out cases. However, he always thought that he was the one responsible for saving the world when he created all sorts of new and complex technologies. Several parallels can be seen between humanity and Inspector Gadget. One is that despite our desire to foster peace and understanding, we do not approach such lofty goals with a concrete plan nor with small actions, we can commit to on a daily basis.  Another is in our obsession to constantly develop new and exciting technologies without a clear end goal in mind. Since the 1800s, when humans started experimenting with the implications of automating routine activities and making work more efficient, there has been a tendency to look at technology as a way to bring about heaven on earth.  However, utopia cannot be achieved just by perfecting the physical aspect of our world. It's also about the parts of our human experience that are not tangible, such as our understanding of one another. The work we put in research and development can easily become divorced from our understanding of each other, and of nature when we forget about using technology to co-create with nature and not around it. Technology Is Not the Key to Happiness: Why do we keep losing our way? According to Jason, it is because we believe that more tech automatically makes us more happy—even though there was never an assurance that increasingly sophisticated technologies would bring us more fulfillment.  If modern technology is being used to process and analyze data at the speed of light, why don't we turn to nature for inspiration more? Nature is constantly generating and giving data. The problem now is we are stuck churning out technology just for the sake of having it. When it comes to smartphones, it seems like we have plenty of new models to choose from every year. Plenty of people plan their finances around the next flagship device to be released, immediately letting go of the ones they just bought as they chase the next best thing. However, there was never a need to let go of so much tech. Their main function was to serve as tools for us to make better decisions, but not to hold our hand and teach us how to make these better decisions ourselves.  What's this extravagant tech race all about? What are we trying to reach for? Constructing the Tech Tower of Babel: Perhaps we invest in the latest technologies in the hopes that it can give us a deeper understanding of ourselves.  “We've had great advances in technology, but why has there not been a correlation of war and death going down? Why has human happiness not gone up? Right? Why have all these prevalent diseases increased?” Alex asked, “It's because we still lack understanding. The technology hasn't been designed to understand one another.” We could start using technology to start asking and answering difficult questions. Maybe we can finally compel ourselves to reflect on how there are aspects of our personality that are mirror images of what is happening around us; or how our thoughts are similar to the state of nature. We can look into the log of thoughts, behaviors, and actions that are produced by our devices to finally face the parts of ourselves that we've been trying to ignore. The TARTLE marketplace envisions a world where everybody has access to that deeper understanding. Anybody, regardless of their social status or location, can take responsibility for their part in changing the world.  Closing Thoughts: Standing in Solidarity: Amidst the pandemic, the call for isolation has had a massive effect on the human experience. We are similar to trees in that when we stand alone, the likelihoods of withering away are high. However, when we live in communes the way forests are made out of a society of trees, our individual identities and personalities help ensure our continued survival as a collective.  TARTLE is analogous to what is going on in the forest. It is composed of many people, with a wide variety of characteristics, personalities, and thoughts. We have the opportunity to unite and data that is right, truthful, and meaningful with others around the clock. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Why Data Is Absolutely Necessary for the Evolution of Humans Part 2

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 16:44


How many times have we been placed in uncomfortable situations, and in which ones can we confidently say that we had the knowledge we needed to exit the circumstance with grace? Sometimes, our minds take shortcuts when we need to work through complex problems so that we do not overburden ourselves— but when we start relying on ducking into the side alleys to get to the destination, we do not get a full perspective of what we are truly dealing with. In this episode, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby discuss the harmful tendency to live lives within our little bubbles, comfort zones, and echo chambers. They point to how data can show us the ultimate truth and the objective reality—and why we need to start paying attention. Zero and the Inter-Dimension: Right off the bat, Alexander and Jason kickstarted the discussion by comparing the function of our choices to the number line, with zero as the space where there is no value. The positives lie to the right dimension of zero, while the negatives make up the left dimension. This makes zero, as the middle point, an inter-dimension of sorts. We choose to pivot one way or another when faced with difficult events and circumstances in life. However, we may not always have the full capacity to make the best-informed choice. It is human nature to sit within our own comfort zones and echo chambers, because we like information that validates us and exchanges where we know what to do. Our best solution lies in harnessing the power of data. Regardless of religion, political affiliation, or social class, data is capable of making us question the distorted lens we view reality with. We have the opportunity to hold ourselves responsible for our thought processes and interactions with the help of data, instead of continuing to live our lives in a passive manner.  It is difficult to face the reality that we may not be making the most out of our lives now. After all, procrastination is a natural human instinct.  “When you stagnate and you don't afford yourself new catalysts. It's like you're working with the same old data set every single day. What's there to be learned? The data sets [have] stopped.” Alexander explained.  Data as the Ultimate Truth: We underestimate the power of an objective and apolitical observer in our lives, which is what data represents. It captures our thoughts, actions, and perceptions— even the ugly parts of us that are distorted. This could be caused by a subconscious adherence to tradition, lifestyle, beliefs, values, ignorance, and others.  These misconceptions affect our openness to other people. We may become upset because they do not follow the same thought processes or behavioral patterns we do. In the long term, it could isolate us from other people or communities because it feeds into an us versus them mentality.  A lack of self-awareness does not just have an impact on our quality of life, or the lives of those around us. We slowly become vulnerable to the whims of more influential figures, who do not have any qualms with exploiting the minorities and pandering to the needs of the masses for personal gain.  Since data represents the ultimate truth, we need to harness its power for ourselves. It can empower us to make better decisions on so many levels. We deserve the truth and the ability to make better choices. Closing Thoughts: Overcoming Cognitive and Personal Bias: While the capacity to make better choices is a reward in and of itself, it can now be an opportunity to be financially compensated as well. The TARTLE marketplace is a way for us to earn from contributing to the ultimate truth. It is a platform that encourages us to be more collaborative over authentic information.  We are in need of tools and platforms that give us the opportunity to see beyond ourselves. It is time for us to take a step forward. Understanding the truth behind our circumstances gives us a glimpse of what is timeless, of the objective reality around all of us. We no longer need to think in abstractions or to bend over backwards to justify our emotions when we can be energized by what is present in the here and now. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Why Data Is Absolutely Necessary for the Evolution of Humans Part 1

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 16:35


One common misconception of data is that it is out of reach for many of us: a confusing mixture of encrypted numbers, letters, and other symbols that do not really hold any significance for the general populace. However, recent developments have translated these massive repositories of data and made it possible for us to access that only media conglomerates have had before. As a result, we also have access to parts of ourselves that we used to take for granted or outgrow, in the past. We have a renewed perspective on individual thoughts and behaviors. The data we have on why individuals think or behave a certain way can help us unravel these complex issues at a fundamental level, and we can work on improving ourselves from the grassroots. The TARTLE marketplace is an avenue for people to give voice to these thoughts by turning it into data. Beyond the opportunity to earn from your personal experiences, you can also use the platform to work for a bigger cause that is important to you. Furthermore, it is not just you helping others but also about the potential for others to help you as well. The beauty of data is that it can be used for analysis in several different ways. If you do not have the tools or capacity to extract these insights for yourself just yet, then you can work with data professionals on the platform who can do it for you. How Data Encourages Us to Look Inward: The tech revolution has changed the way we interact with the physical world. We use artificial intelligence and machine learning to reprogram our transportation systems, financial services, social media, and more. However, these are developments that build on the external features of our existence. We have yet to look at how we can capture data at a primary level: our thoughts.   Collective intelligence has empowered people to speak up for themselves regardless of who they are and where they are located, and communities can band together to start creating tribes of thought. These groups can be measured and analyzed, with data scientists using their findings to adjust the direction at which the tech revolution progresses. Beyond that, it also allows the people within those tribes to become more self-aware about their individual wellbeing. These data deposits have insights on what they are locally challenged with, which means that people can look into how or why they are affected: what triggers the event, what exacerbates it, and what they can do to manage these thought processes in a healthy manner. As a community, data is the key to showing different communities how their perceptions or preconceived biases lead to trouble within their locality. It serves as the bridge to solving these problems and finding understanding amongst different groups.  Clearly, data is more than just a catalyst for the hard sciences. It is our way of advancing in the social sciences as well. We can take that power for ourselves and analyze the data to improve our quality of living as individuals, communities, and as humanity. Life After Death With Data Sets: At the rate we are going, most of our life experiences are captured and stored in the digital space. In terms of speed, consistency, and accuracy, it's clearly the superior way of retaining human knowledge in comparison to word of mouth and paper. There is no need to worry about human error or the cost of maintaining a printing press.  It is interesting to think that data, which is intangible and stored in a virtual space, is derived from physical events and goes on to influence physical events as well. Data is a medium capable of capturing experience, thought and life—even long after the data source passes away.  What are the implications of this on the human experience? Having most of our lives recorded in data packets means that we can continue to have an impact on future generations in more tangible ways. Our lives on earth have more potential to have a bigger impact even after our passing, because our data perseveres beyond the memories of our family, friends, and written documents.  Closing Thoughts: Data and Its Effect on Human Consciousness: Alex mulled over his belief of a future where everything is captured by technology. All our actions and decisions are subject to analysis, down to the smallest details—and the people on the ground are directly sharing in the experience of this analysis. With so much information in humanity's hands, our future selves may feel pressured to take on the responsibility of using this data for the better.  Do we have it in us to actively work on the pursuit of decisions, activities, and experiences that increase our lifespan— and by consequence, increase the probability of us evolving at a more accelerated rate? Only time will tell. Without us knowing, the technologies we use collect crucial information about our life experiences on a day-to-day basis. The TARTLE marketplace is an opportunity for you to reclaim that data and to work for a bigger cause. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!        

Tcast
Everyday Chaos: Technology, Complexity, and How We're Thriving in a New World of Possibility with Long-Time Affiliate of Harvard's Berkman Klein Center and Best Selling Author David Weinberger, Ph.D

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 68:31


Technology is quickly becoming the backbone of modern infrastructure. At the pace that it is progressing, it may someday become as ubiquitous and as vital to our economy as cement and concrete. However, AI is agnostic. Despite its immense computing capabilities, it will never be capable of human understanding and discernment. One example of this is the results derived from A/B Testing, where researchers compare two versions of a marketing asset to see which one performs better. While it can show which campaign would run better, it cannot provide any new learning.  With this limitation in mind, is it still beneficial for us to know what the most probable outcome for a certain event would be—even if we don't understand the why or how for its occurrence? Can Machine Learning Go Wrong?: At this point, David discussed an imaginary scenario where even something as non-controversial as spam mail could become a problem if it was found that legitimate emails from businesses owned by people of color were found to be falsely marked as spam at an unequal rate, in comparison to people who are not of color. Aside from the inefficiency, the AI would become an unfair metric for emails and may even be damaging businesses on the basis of race. The decision-making process behind sorting emails into the spam folder is compromised because the technology is using so many signals in “deep, complicated, and multi-independent patterns of probability” that will be near-impossible to comprehend without a lot of time, money, and effort. At this point, this massive system is hurting communities that are already disenfranchised in the first place. This brings to mind Microsoft's Tay.ai, a chatbot on Twitter created by the tech giant in 2016 that was designed to mimic the conversational patterns of a 19-year-old girl. It would learn from continuous interaction with other users on the social media platform. Immediately after its release, Tay became controversial after it started tweeting inflammatory and offensive comments. As a result, Microsoft was pushed to shut down the service only sixteen hours after it was launched.  Social Justice And Technology: It's a clear indication that the people responsible for programming AI have a corresponding social burden to fulfill, particularly in ensuring that their technology does not harm anyone. This burden can become even bigger when machine learning and AI is applied to other fields, such as medicine and smart transportation. Beyond Tay.ai, computer scientists and engineers around the world find themselves at the helm of constructing technologies with so much potential. How do we address inherent human bias in these individuals? David reveals that most people who have the knowledge to work with these complex technologies do not necessarily have the same depth of understanding for social justice as well. This led to a call for participatory machine learning, otherwise known as the design justice movement. Giving Minorities A Seat At The Table: Participatory machine learning involves people who are familiar with related issues on social justice, as well as communities who would be most affected by the presence of new technologies. They are given a position in planning and management.  Their input is important from the get-go because it does have an impact on how these systems work. To further explain, David painted the picture of an imaginary emerging smart city that decided to use AI to reinvent its bus system.  Ultimately, all the new bus stops, routes, and schedules are successful in moving people faster to their destinations, and the numbers echo its success. However, a caveat: these statistics have been decided on average, and only show that it is successful based on how well it moves affluent communities more efficiently than those located on the outskirts of the city. Those living on the outskirts, who need efficient transportation more than others for work and productivity, become isolated from the system. At this point, it would be difficult to unravel all the work put into making the new transportation system a success. It's important for the marginalized to be consistently consulted on the impacts of new infrastructures and technologies, even after construction and installation are finished. Those responsible for creating these systems have a special responsibility to ensure that those who do not have the same footing will finally get a seat at the table.  David agrees that it may be a lengthier, more expensive process. After all, it will take more time, money, and effort to locate these people, recruit them, and ensure that everyone is on the same page. However, it is the cost that we need to pay if we want a shot at eliminating inequality.  The Limits of Machine Learning: Beyond the cost of bringing people to the table, David acknowledges that technological progress is already expensive in and of itself. Machine learning systems require individuals who are highly educated in computer science and computer engineering; they will also need other systems that require massive technologies to run.  Finally, lingering questions on data sharing and ownership prevent communities from fully utilizing what they have. To what extent do you own your data and what should your relationship with it be? What does it mean to own something? We do not live in individual data cocoons that we own. We live in a community. This public community cannot be run without public data, and public sharing of information about one another.  The thoughts that define my actions within this system of public information and data, however, are missed by algorithms, analysis, and machine learning. This is because people do not want or have the ability to share why they are driven to take certain actions.  Ultimately, it appears that one of our most profound discoveries from machine learning is that the world is much more complex than we ever wanted to believe. Despite these sophisticated machines processing massive amounts of information, we do not have the capability to provide a completely accurate and precise prediction of what will happen. This does not mean that the approximate knowledge we have now is worthless. It helps us appreciate our universe in a new way by teaching us to be comfortable with complexity.  Are We Entitled to Understanding Anything?: In line with TARTLE's mission to promote stewardship and collective responsibility, Alexander asked the implications of machine learning in helping humans create better decisions and more informed choices based on the observable universe. To this, David asked a thought-provoking question: why do you think humans are entitled to understanding? Machine learning and artificial intelligence are capable of taking us to greater heights without the interference of human cognitive biases. With its objective oversight, it has the potential to bring out the best in us as human beings that live in a complex system. As technology continues to innovate at an unprecedented pace, David leaves us with a parting message: machine learning will drive us to examine all the values that we hold, and sometimes to consider painful trade-offs between two or more equally important values. “So don't hold on too tightly to any one value; think about how you may have to give up on some of it in order to support other very important targets.” David concluded. www.tartle.co   Everyday Chaos: Technology, Complexity, and How We're Thriving in a New World of Possibility Harvard Senior Researcher and Best Selling Author David Weinberger, Ph.D. by TARTLE is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!    

Tcast
The Social Aspects of Long-Term Health: TARTLE and SDOH Packets

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 11:31


Social determinants of health (SDOH) refer to a wide variety of nonmedical factors that can influence an individual's health. It looks at environments where people are born, live, work, play, and age.  This has a bigger impact on our wellbeing than we think: according to a study, ninety percent of the determinants of our health are derived from our lifetime social and physical environment, not from the provision of healthcare. With so much on the line, TARTLE is working with the world's foremost researchers and doctors on SDOH to design data packets as a part of its advocacy for public health under the Big 7 initiative. Encouraging Proactivity Using SDOH Data Packets: In the podcast, Alex and Jason discuss how medical research is mostly reactive. It deals with the disease only after it has affected a person. This backtracking, or the habit of “putting out fires,” has a negative effect on our development and gives diseases a head start on their capacity to disrupt lives.  So, how can we start building a disease-free society? While it may not be a possibility in our lifetime, the potential to develop the foundations for it is already present. With SDOH data packets, we can build our knowledge of how people are infected by the disease from the ground up. This means that within a country, we can take a closer look at how the disease affects rural versus urban communities in different ways. Local policymakers can start formulating stronger health legislation based on more solid data. On a global scale, we can start answering pressing questions we have had on how different cultures and locations impact the general health of entire communities.  For example, the country of Bhutan is one of the poorest countries in the world—but why are they one of the happiest as well, with higher rates of longevity? What more can we uncover about how social determinants influence the quality of life from one continent to another? With SDOH data packets, the possibilities are endless. How SDOH Could Have Helped the COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout: It is difficult to estimate how one's body would react to the COVID-19 vaccine. As a result, misinformation and fake news have made it doubly challenging for health authorities to convince everyone to take the shot. However, SDOH packets may have the answer to making these injections easier to understand and access. For example, the relevant health authorities could issue surveys for individuals who have taken the vaccine to find out who they were feeling after their first and second shot. They can then cross-reference these answers to the SDOH packets of each person, looking for potential triggers or commonalities that lead to an increased risk of complications. Without a doubt, getting vaccinated is our best shot at beating the COVID-19 pandemic. There have been plenty of efforts to incentivize vaccinations around the world: some governments offer cash payouts, discounts, and other perks. However, the biggest incentive that people will want to follow—particularly the misinformed, who are major victims of this pandemic—is a certainty that the vaccine can do good. This can be achieved through SDOH data packets, which can be used to understand how the vaccine would affect different body types and health profiles.  It is important for authorities to be proactive about information dissemination in a world where black propaganda spreads just as fast. When people are empowered with the knowledge they need to make an informed medical decision, we have a better opportunity at decreasing the loss of human life and improving the quality of life overall. The Importance of Sharing SDOH Data Packets: Some people are quick to shoot down the idea of SDOH data packets and the Marketplace. In the podcast, Alex briefly discusses TARTLE's experience with trolls on social media platforms.  Most of the time, poor communication and prejudice are caused by a lack of understanding. In this scenario, netizens hiding behind the veil of anonymity to badmouth the Marketplace without even giving it a chance to develop the framework and reach more people do not realize the negative impact that they have on the community—not just on themselves. “What you're saying is actually complete nonsense. If you are bad-mouthing something that is an opportunity to truly heal others, to give them the aid, to understand other people, you're limiting your own evolution,” Alex explained. Now more than ever, it is imperative that we come together as a community and lift others up. Creating data packets that contain an individual's social determinants of health could make an impact on the way entire communities are being treated. When we can formulate better health policies as a result of more informed choices, our actions have a spillover effect on future generations, quality of life, and economic stability.  Closing Thoughts: Our Responsibility to Others: The TARTLE marketplace is the only platform in the world that gives people the opportunity to connect with organizations in a safe and secure manner, regardless of where they are located or who they are aligned to. It's a place that empowers people on the ground to take control and be responsible for their own data in a world where we are so used to just giving it away to other companies.  One byproduct of wielding more power over our data is an increased knowledge of the communities that we affect, the values that we hold dear, and the causes we want to support. Regardless of whether you are an individual or an entity, TARTLE aims to foster an increased sense of awareness for the plight of others by creating connections where possible. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
I Think, Therefore I Earn: Selling Your Data on the TARTLE Marketplace

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 19:32


With all the technology that we have today, imagine how all the most important and meaningful parts of your life have been condensed into a bunch of data packets. Now that people are becoming more aware of how all-encompassing our online presence has become, we are on the cusp of changing the way we deal with our information. This won't be an easy task and even the most advanced countries are still taking their first steps in redistributing the power of data sharing to the people. However, we are confident about our capacity to push this forward and help in the work of spreading awareness. In this episode, we discuss how the TARTLE marketplace is designed to help restore equilibrium to data management and sharing. Reclaiming Your Data: These days, data is more than just the information needed to access certain websites and applications. It's what companies, and even some governments, use to provide a tailored experience. This covers our ad preferences, history, and the connections that we make.  When you think of how much data you create, you're bound to wonder: do I create data, or does data create me? In the status quo, people do not have a lot of control over their own information. Our lack of awareness when it comes to what we can do with the data we create has given social media platforms a prime advantage: they can profit off of our interests, social circles, and movements.  While the European Union's GDPR and an overall trend towards increased data awareness around the world is helping alleviate the situation, it's not enough to help people take the next step forward. We all deserve a platform where we can practice taking initiative and having active ownership over our own data to help expedite the process. TARTLE is a marketplace that operates around the clock and is available around the world. We are offering a nonprofit platform that empowers individuals on the ground to practice autonomy and self-sovereignty. On the TARTLE marketplace, you are fully responsible for your information. It's our way of helping bring back power to the people. Turning Your Thoughts Into Passive Income: What if you could earn passive income for your thoughts? Technology is capable of shaping the way we think and act in the same way that we are capable of using technology for our own gain. With this in mind, TARTLE created a way for you to place all your data on a secure platform— with the added benefit of having it siloed in there as well. There is plenty of potential in how we express ourselves. Data is always in your possession and as long as you're online, it's growing. It does not discriminate as well because regardless of your location, ethnicity, or personal beliefs, technology will still maintain a profile of who you are and what you like doing as a digital citizen.  But if so much potential exists, why don't we feel like we're doing anything groundbreaking with our smartphones? This is because the power we have over our information has been seized by other actors: corporations and even governments. It's high time we took it upon ourselves to restore a balance within that system. To parallel it in other scenarios, there is a need for equilibrium in plenty of natural systems. We need balance in our climate, our physical and mental wellbeing, thermodynamics, energy, and more because too much of anything can become dangerous. This is what inspired us to create TARTLE: the need to provide a supportive structure that people and communities on the ground could grow off of. “If there's no balance, then there's no real learning that can happen here,” Alexander argued, “There's no real fair exchange occurring.” The TARTLE platform recognizes that everyone is equal in the creation of information and that everyone has the equal opportunity to earn off of it. Closing Thoughts: How Data Can Make Us Better People: Data is capable of making us better people because it breaks down preconceived notions and barriers to communication that we may have had of others. Often, opportunities to connect are limited to certain geographical areas or social classes.  Here is a way we can all participate in a flexible, antifragile free market that will bend and grow seamlessly with continued human interaction. The TARTLE platform will learn from how we compile our data and who we choose to sell it to. The more we use TARTLE to facilitate data sharing, the higher our chances of communing with other people from vastly different backgrounds and fostering understanding as a natural byproduct of our own efforts.  This is how we evolve. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
2.5 Billion Tyrannosaurus Rexes and Data Approximations

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 11:55


Studying the history of life is an important venture. It's how we understand why certain characteristics exist in living organisms, and it can also be used to explain the importance of biological events that are happening today.  A study on the population density of the Tyrannosaurus Rex, one of the world's most famous predators, was first published on Science and reported on the National Geographic. It's a huge claim, with researchers estimating that a total of 2.5 billion T.rex have lived in North America, the native region of the species, going out as far north as Alaska and as far south as Mexico across a time span of two to three million years.  This estimation is a huge claim and has certainly caught the eye of paleontology enthusiasts, However, there are a wide variety of variables that can compromise the validity of the information being tested: the location where the bones are found; shifts caused by glacial patterns and tracks throughout the years; inconsistencies with carbon-14 dating, which provides an approximate age; and even human intervention, which may not be enough to fill in the gaps in information that we do not know nor have the tools to understand just yet.  If data-driven ventures cannot be used to sample what we know to be true, then is it still worth it? Are approximations a step in the right direction or is it too rooted in theory to be useful? How Much Hindsight Is Too Much?: The pursuit of estimates often discounts the importance of absolutes. In paleontology, there are plenty of assumptions made that may affect the results of their research. As Alexander mused, much remains unsaid about the foundations of the study—and it may have an impact on whether or not scientists are taking the right perspective on the matter. Analyzing data from the source and having a clear log of how the researchers conducted their tests is standard procedure. However, what is the impact of creating logs for circumstances that can no longer be observed by anyone living? “Who decided that the dinosaur is a dinosaur or not a dinosaur? Who decides that it sits in this area of time as opposed to another? What if my carbon dating is wrong, and maybe this aquatic animal that we didn't think existed prehistorically actually did exist?” Alexander asked, expressing doubts. Transparent and Tangible Research: This is the second time that scientists have made an attempt to estimate the population density of T-rexes in the past, and results closely resemble an earlier estimate that was published in 1993. The difference between these two papers is that this most recent study utilizes the latest in T-rex biology research to set upper and lower limits on the total population—one approximation after another.  Since there is so much inexactness and uncertainty in what we do, it is important to focus on the fundamentals: ideas, principles, and beliefs that we know to be observable, objective, and tangible. When we go overboard on theory, we may find ourselves defining a biased picture of what the data represents. This concern is not just limited to research and development in paleontology. With the vast variety of tools, knowledge, and technology that we have at our disposal today, it can become all too easy to take the wrong direction. When we take the next step forward, we need to make sure that our feet are planted firmly on the ground. Dealing With the Metaphorical T-rex of Today: At the pace that science and technology is developing today, it's safe to assume that more discoveries will be made—not just in paleontology, but in other sciences and across other industries as well. It is vital that scientists continue working towards making these discoveries more accessible to the public while staying true to the path of innovation.  There is a different impact in analyzing tangible beings, objects, and events. TARTLE is an opportunity to look at the T-rexes of the modern world: clear and imminent threats that are capable of harming us and the people we care about. The TARTLE platform is an opportunity to connect with like-minded individuals and organizations so that we can work as a collective to preserve our earth and our economy for future organizations. www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Is Wealth Inequality Entrenched in Our Legal Code? With Scholar and Author Katharina Pistor

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 47:12


Money doesn't grow on trees, but we know some people have vast reservoirs of wealth at their disposal. In certain cases, their tools for wealth creation are passed down from generation to generation. Why do these bottlenecks happen and why does wealth inequality exist? How can we work towards a more equitable society, where those in poverty have a better change at upward mobility? The answers to these questions aren't easy, especially when the law itself appears to be a hindrance to the masses. In this episode, Katharina shares her valuable insights on how the law works—and why it is not working in favor of the most vulnerable. The Legal Code's Role in Inequality: Policymaking around assets is concerned with creating conditions where everyone can prosper. As a result, the legal code is constantly designed and redesigned in an attempt to evolve alongside society. However, Katharina discussed how the people behind the code have consistently chosen to angle the content towards their benefit as the resource holders. This means that when wealth is created, it is typically bottlenecked within families or corporations that have the resources and power needed to influence state decisions. These exclusive groups can generate value from that asset for a longer period of time. This is where power asymmetry happens. The state is responsible for turning land into physical property, ideas into intellectual property, and assets into financial property. Legal backing is a social resource that is used to cordon wealth from the masses. It's time we think of ways we can level out the playing field and stop this one-sided reinforcement of wealth accumulation. The state endeavors to produce a legal environment where everyone is equally protected by the law. However, this lofty goal often discounts the reality that not everybody has equal access to the law. The privileged would have the resources to hire lawyers who can bend the law to their will across not just one, but multiple legal systems. The mantra “it's legal” now carries a darker undertone. Fitting in the Gaps Between the “Scaffolding”: Katharina described gaming the law as “exploiting every little gap in the scaffolding of existing regulations that we can find.” Lawyers are taught to look at the existing rules and regulations and find a gap where the client can slip through. The really sophisticated ones know how to bend some of it. It would be impossible to aim for the pillars because these are parts of the case where their actions are clearly seen as illegal. Their goal is to fit new things in the gaps between the scaffolding. It's taking the phrase “know the rules so you can break them” to a whole new level. One poignant revelation in their discussion was Katharina's explanation that the law can never really be complete. This leaves our legal system vulnerable to malicious actors in positions of power who are capable of exploiting the gap for private gain—reducing the law to a mere barrier in their climb to the top. It is truly a threat to both the rule of law and to democratic governments.  Turning the Immaterial Into Assets: Where do we draw the line and who gets to do it? Having access to legal coding is the key to wealth. This isn't just about physical or material assets; it's also applicable to ideas as well. One key turning point in the discussion is their perspective on whether such a trend would carry over to digital assets, such as cryptocurrencies as well. Katharina pointed out the irony in how Bitcoin only became valuable once it was centralized, and urged people to think of alternatives where real people can participate in the arrangement without having to delegate all their power to figureheads that may not align with the interests of the masses.  The legal code is a collective commitment to stand behind a particular use of the collective means of coercion. The community designs who have access to that centralized needs of coercion and under what conditions. Under this definition, it would certainly carry over to digital assets too. Now, it's up to us to push for an environment where social mobility and wealth creation is available for all. Closing Thoughts: There is clearly an impetus for a platform where everybody has an equal playing field; a safe space for ordinary people to build a portfolio in transacting with today's hottest asset, which is data.  The TARTLE marketplace is a platform with the vision of bringing back power to the people. Users are fully equipped to profile and market their data to causes around the world that matter to them the most. Here, people have the opportunity to fight for something bigger than themselves while earning at the same time. Everybody has an opportunity to create wealth. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Data-Driven Government Surveillance Can Be a Nightmare

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 10:00


Can data be used to harm other people? The reality is that in some parts of the world, it is already being used to trial increased surveillance and fuel oppressive social systems. This is a clear indication that technology will only ever be a reflection of the human hands responsible for its creation and maintenance.  In this episode, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby discuss the social implications of China's authoritarian hold on its citizens—particularly its military-industrial complex's creation of a three-billion US dollar supercomputer satellite center in the country's Wenchang Spacecraft Launch Site.  Despite the official statement claiming that this enormous tech site will be used as part of a “massive constellation of commercial satellites” that can “offer services from high-speed internet for aircraft to tracking coal shipments,” we think it pays to be a little critical of the difference between what's being reported—and what's being done.   Big Brother Is Watching: China has been the subject of widespread criticism after it announced the development of a social credit system in 2011. This system builds on a mass surveillance structure of more than 770 million cameras installed across the country as of 2019, with expectations that it will eventually hit the one billion mark by the end of 2021. The social credit system is used to score individuals and companies based on a collection of data from different sources. Individuals are rewarded for appropriate social behavior, such as proper conduct on mass transportation systems and adherence to waste sorting rules in their city.  Conversely, they will be punished for “negative behavior” which can include elderly residents suing family members for not visiting regularly (Shanghai); cheating in online video games (Suzhou), failing to show for reservations at hotels or restaurants (Suzhou); and failing to pick up any take-out food that was ordered (Suzhou). Individuals with poor credit scores will face restrictions on loans, transportation, and even education. As part of the system's effort to encourage good behavior, some local governments offer incentives to those with a higher credit score. These people will be prioritized in health care provision, and can even waive deposits to rent public housing.  Businesses are required to submit data on their operations and on their partners and suppliers. Their credit score can be influenced by their behavior and ratings from their suppliers.  Finally, individuals and businesses that are deemed “untrustworthy” will be publicly named and shamed.   The Social Credit System: Thought Police?: A society where human behavior is closely controlled and dictated by the state, through the latest technological capabilities, sounds like the plot of a dystopian sci-fi novel like George Orwell's 1984—but this is already the reality for more than a billion individuals and 28 million companies in China. What are the implications of the social credit system? Critics are quick to point out that the government is using incomplete or inaccurate data to determine the provision of social privileges, and sometimes rights, for their own citizens. The implementation of a stable credit system is also dependent on the strength of basic services, such as regulation in the credit industry and data protection. Those with lose credit scores may find it difficult to continue to progress in society, particularly if there is no concrete policy that can support their rehabilitation or reintegration. Lastly, in a world where we have yet to fully account for all the factors that contribute to how and why we make decisions, this could easily turn into a system that disproportionately punishes people and businesses who are already struggling.    A Glimpse Into 1984: Beyond 1984, the hit television series Black Mirror also showed a glimpse into a society where people are controlled by their data. One of their episodes, entitled Nosedive, draws viewers into a world where everyone's social status is controlled by the quality of their ratings on social media. A series of unfortunate events that are outside of the protagonist's control have a massive impact on her credit score, which in turn cripples her socioeconomic status. These important pieces of media and literature highlight how the agnosticism of data, alongside the impact of human intervention, can drastically change the impact of technology. It is our responsibility to ensure that AI is developed with a conscientious hand, and that it is capable of empowering minorities instead of widening the inequality gap.   Closing Thoughts: Humanity's thirst for innovating new and exciting ways of harnessing technology compels us to participate in a shared initiative: one that will help preserve our free will, personal autonomy, and human rights.  The TARTLE platform is our life's work toward ensuring that your personal data remains personal. Everything you share is given with your full consent, and we help you connect to other like-minded individuals and organizations who can represent your interests. www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Can We Trust Insurance Companies With Big Data?

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 13:04


Insurance. No one likes it. No one really wants it. We definitely hate paying for it. And why wouldn't we? Insurance companies are notorious for not wanting to pay out any money on a claim and sometimes dropping people if they do successfully collect on one. After all, insurance companies aren't really about protecting you, they're about making money. As the sniveling weasel in The Incredibles put it, “What about our shareholders? Who's looking out for them, huh?”  As one would expect, insurance companies are always looking to cut their costs. For that, they have turned to data collection and analysis. TARTLE is of course big on data and what we can learn from it. However, we are not fans of the way insurance companies and pretty much everyone else tends to make use of third party data for their purposes. Not only is the sourcing of the data unethical in itself, it can also wind up being discriminatory. Not intentionally, sometimes assumptions are made that are written into the algorithms that analyze the data. Those assumptions may seem like no big deal at first, but they can be processed in such a way that they exclude far more people than intended, people that seem to fit a given profile but in the end differ in certain important ways the algorithm isn't meant to look for. That's one of the dangers of completely automating everything. When an AI is running the show, it doesn't care about any programmed biases, it just does what it is told and does it completely ruthlessly. That is why Connecticut recently reminded insurers in the tiny state that they need to be careful to avoid any sort of discrimination in their use of data. Easier said than done. To illustrate that, let's say the insurance company offered a discount to anyone who linked a Whoop or a Fitbit to their insurance account. That might seem innocuous. Certainly, they are sourcing data in a better than normal way since people have to opt in to share it. However, those things on your wrist cost money. Money that not everyone might be able to afford. Just a Whoop subscription runs around $30 a month. How many people are going to be paying that so they can opt into a discount program? Not many, especially since that discount will probably not defray the costs of the subscription.  On one hand, it seems perfectly reasonable to grant a discount to people who are willing to share more of their health data. Why wouldn't an insurance company want to incentivize that behavior? Of course, they would. On the other hand, not everyone can afford it, as stated above. Which makes this a case of exclusion based on economics. Intentional? Probably not. Not too many people actually wake up in the morning and ask themselves how they can screw over poor people today. Not even people working for an insurance company.  So, what is the solution? How can an insurance company reward customers for sharing their health data without excluding those who can't afford the necessary devices? TARTLE has exactly the right solution. We offer these companies the chance to reach out directly to their customers. The company can ask its customers on TARTLE to share whatever data they would like and when someone chooses to do so, the company simply pays the person for the data. That is something that virtually anyone can take advantage of. Yes, there are people who can't afford any sort of device to work with TARTLE on, but if we are being honest, they don't have insurance anyway. The solutions to that problem are on a whole other level (though there are other ways other organizations can use us to tackle that one). What we offer is the chance for insurance and other companies to interact directly with their customers to get the information they need and for those people to be incentivized. It's a win/win scenario for everyone willing to take advantage of it. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Becoming Antifragile in the Pursuit of Knowledge

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 18:38


Despite significant technological and scientific progress in the study of physics, time, and space, it looks like we still have a long way to go before we ever truly understand the impact of what we are looking for.  When exploring the origins of the universe and the nature of everything we see and know, in what ways have we exhausted our pursuit for scientific inquiry? How can we improve the way we study such an important part of our existence? Is it possible to become too data-driven in our search for meaning? Jason suggests that we continue to fall short of understanding the universe because we've never pursued a proper relationship with the subject matter. This could be the case; plenty of social studies call for the researchers to immerse themselves in the communities they study. Since we acknowledge the universe as a dynamic, living, and breathing entity, this could be a new take to an ages-old problem. Exploring The Green Lumber Fallacy: According to a book entitled Antifragile by Nassim Nicholas Taleb, the Green Lumber Fallacy points to one's incapacity to truly understand the implications of what they know and how to use it. It is rooted in the idea that while we may be focused on the right issues, we may not yet be capable enough to fully comprehend its complexity. Indeed, our desire for knowledge is going in the right direction. But are we looking at it in the right perspective? Alexander points out that while 99 percent of our universe is composed of material we can't see, “we're looking at one percent, maybe less—and think we're bad-ass, and we have the answer for all of it.” “That's like, I have the ocean on earth. I've taken out one droplet of water. One. I'm going to study it and say all of the fundamental rules of the universe and everything sits right here in this one drop, because I can see it.” he continued. Must We Bend Before We Break?: The author of Antifragile, further, explores the concept of antifragility: things that are not just resilient to disorder, but are dependent on it for growth and development. Parallels can be drawn between antifragility and the scientific method. This is because the constant search for knowledge requires that researchers are always open to the possibility of having their hypotheses disproven. With such a massive universe left to comprehend and explore, it would be a step backward for humanity to assume that we already have all the tools, equipment, and mindset required to uncover the truth.  It's on us to continuously question the methodologies we've set for ourselves. Are we maximizing our progress when we take the conservative approach? Do we still give ourselves room for creativity?  Beyond exploring the big cosmic question, modern advancement has taken an aggressive view and approach to nature. Our thirst for development has led us to create sprawling urban jungles that have taken over large swathes of lush greenery. We've replaced rivers, forests, and habitats with rock-hard concrete and gas-belching machinery.  It's time to be more discerning of what we leave behind when we reach for the stars. How We Can Refocus Becoming Antifragile: TARTLE goes beyond the surface to bring two human parties together. It's a platform that gives people the opportunity to support experiences they may have never been exposed to otherwise. The benefit is twofold: the first is in the transfer of skills and knowledge between communities who become invested in a common cause. The second is the capacity for these causes to look for alternative sources for funding, from people and entities that they would never have been able to reach without the platform. Antifragility is a constant test of our character, especially when we're exposed to lived realities that are so different from ours. However, it's also an important part of the authentic human experience. Underneath the chaos of sharing this world with 7.6 billion other people are simple hopes, dreams, and aspirations—a chance to find common ground and empowerment in our common humanity. www.tartle.co     Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Our Concrete Jungles Are Slowly Killing Us

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 16:54


Concrete has become synonymous with urban development and progress. It's responsible for creating shelters, protecting manmade infrastructures from natural disasters, making transportation easy, and more. However, the environmental cost of creating concrete is often understated. It's a convoluted process with plenty of extraction involved. As a finished product, concrete also makes cities hotter because it absorbs the heat of the sun, and traps gases from car exhausts and air conditioning units. In addition, it separates us from our natural environment without providing an alternative for so many important ecological functions. The cost of creating concrete jungles is the loss of fertile soil, animal habitats, river systems, and lush greenery.   Is it time to reinvent the concrete wheel?   What We Can Do With Concrete: One solution that is currently in the works is using concrete to store greenhouse gases back in the bedrock. “If it's getting released from the ice, earth naturally in its own chemistry and set up, has these pockets. So if we put it back in the porous nature of the bedrock, we can store that and prevent it from being up in the atmosphere; so send it back down where it needs to go,” Alex explained. Historical records indicate that the Romans were the first to deal with concrete. Despite the test of time, plenty of infrastructures remain standing today. One notable achievement was the creation of concrete that could withstand the test of coastal regions, where saltwater speeds up the process of degradation. This wasn't the case for Roman concrete, which even benefited from the microorganisms carried by the seawater. Alex described it as “a symbiotic relationship between the saltwater, the organisms, and the concrete itself.”   Process of Making Concrete: Is concrete worth the environmental trade-off? The process of manufacturing and maintaining it makes up around eight percent of the world's annual carbon emissions. Components that go into the creation of concrete include silica, alumina, iron, limestone, and gypsum —- materials that are extracted from the Earth's crust by diesel-powered machines and then processed in kilns that generate heat by burning coal or fossil fuels.  The current strategy for producing concrete is incredibly complex and involves plenty of anaerobic processes. Convincing corporations to make changes to the way they create concrete will be a challenge because these entities are already accustomed to this traditional method. This means that they have invested time, money, labor, and effort into maintaining all the machinery and manpower needed to keep these environmentally degrading practices alive.  It's commodifying inefficiency, normalized and understated to avoid public clamor. Some companies are already looking into making concrete a more environmentally friendly substance. A company based in Halifax, Canada named CarbonCure discovered a process that takes liquified CO2 from ammonia and ethanol plants, and injects it into wet concrete while it is being mixed. This increases the concrete's compressive strength and replaces some of the cement used in the process. It's an opportunity to repurpose the waste product of other industrial plants while minimizing the amount of time used to form concrete in a kiln, which requires high amounts of heat and pressure — around 2,700 degrees Fahrenheit. Since the system is simple and easy to deploy, CarbonCure has a strong selling point. Concrete manufacturers do not need to implement massive shifts in their processes just to become more eco-friendly; this strategy only requires a little extra hardware.   It's All Dirty Work — In More Ways Than One: Convincing the concrete industry to clean itself up won't be easy work. Alexander and Jason brush on how concrete plays a pivotal role in funding and facilitating criminal activity, pointing out the challenges in convincing malicious actors to invest in ecologically friendly alternatives; but the problem runs deeper than that as well. Prominent websites such as Taylor & Francis Online, The Guardian, the World Economic Forum have released stories on the seedy underbelly of concrete and construction, labeling the material as “the most destructive material on earth” and “the dirtiest business.”  It's disheartening to think that even after this podcast, concrete isn't a standalone villain we can all gang up against. We've got an entire industry to hold accountable and demand transparency from.   How TARTLE Can Help: Climate stability is one of TARTLE's Big 7. While calling for action won't be an easy feat, every small act we can generate towards this cause is a small step forward in the right direction. With the TARTLE platform, you have the opportunity to support groups, not-for-profits, or charitable organizations that work towards scientific research and development in this niche. How much is your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Taking Dogecoin to the Data Dojo

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 12:42


Let's talk about Dogecoin. We've had a lot of requests to discuss it since it has been in the news a lot, stirring up the online world with a sudden spike in price and a subsequent roller coaster of ups and downs. It's known as the plucky little crypto that could, the gateway for the regular person to get into cryptocurrency without having to mortgage the house to get one or two Bitcoins. Or is it? Let's dive into the doge pound.  Started back in 2013, the meme currency chiefly differentiated itself from Bitcoin right off the bat by using a different, less resource intensive encryption method, which meant that it became much faster and cheaper to mine it as well as transfer it. That also resulted in a lot more of them becoming available in a short period of time. Which in turn made it easier to manipulate. Elon Musk provided the perfect example when he tweeted out his support of Dogecoin, causing that massive spike in its perceived value we mentioned earlier. It went from a fraction of a cent to $0.46 practically overnight. If someone had put down a mere hundred dollars a month before, they suddenly found themselves with a lot of money available to them.  Yet, is it a currency? If you recall from our discussion on Bitcoin and whether it is a currency, one of the things that makes it so is whether or not it has fees associated with transferring it. Bitcoin has massive fees to do anything with it and while Doge has few fees, they still exist. It also is a centralized coin that has no real cap. It started with one but it was reached so quickly that they just pumped out five times that cap without thinking twice.  It also has had its trade restricted by well-known trading apps like Robinhood. The story is that Doge was trading at such a high volume, it caused a system failure. Taking that explanation at face value it still sucks. It means that Robinhood's code can't handle a popularly traded stock or coin. It's an indictment of the way they run their business. It's as though they never thought to stress test their system. Normally that wouldn't be such a big deal but it's one of the most popular ways to buy and sell crypto of all kinds, including Dogecoin.  How do you navigate all of this? All too often, people are constantly reacting. Whether it's a tweet from Musk or Tom Brady adding laser eyes to his profile pic (this happened and the price of Bitcoin spiked. No joke). This reactive behavior is what is causing the price of Doge, Bitcoin, and others to fluctuate so much. No one is really looking for and getting solid data about what is happening right now. Actually happening, not what a random tweet asserts is happening. It isn't hard to imagine how regular people are getting hurt here as they sell when they should hold and buy when they should wait. Not just regular people either, but funds and even professional investors can get sucked in when they are too greedy.  That's why TARTLE is such an advocate for getting hard, first person data to make decisions with. Instead of reacting, it's possible to get a read on what is going on by actually talking directly to people. When a fund does that, they are making decisions not based on the latest tweet but on what real people are planning and perceiving. That is a much better approach than just following whatever pied piper comes along. If enough people can grasp this concept, perhaps the general behavior will change and people will look to fundamentals again instead of just memes and bring some stability back to the market. What's your crypto worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Looking Past the Big Bucks and Misconceptions in Economic Theory

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 13:49


The social function of economic science consists precisely in developing sound economic theories and in exploding the fallacies of vicious reasoning. In the pursuit of this task the economist incurs the deadly enmity of all mountebanks and charlatans whose shortcuts to an early paradise he debunks. - Ludwig von Mises That's a pretty lofty view of economics and economists. As such it is far, far away from any view that most people have, especially of economists. Anyone who is even the slightest bit informed as to the track record of economists and their pronouncements will at best see them as something like a weatherman. In this view, the economist tries to make honest predictions based on the available data but gets it wrong more often than not. At worst, people see the economist as exactly the kind of charlatan Mises decries in the above quote. Economics as a discipline has lost a lot of respect. In short, economics is in trouble.  A big part of the problem is that too many economists don't actually start with data. Not that they don't use data. What they do is start with a theory that they prefer and then find the data to support their theory, ignoring or explaining away everything else. And that is on a good day. On a bad day (which seems to happen more and more) the economist is just providing quasi-intellectual cover to justify the policies of whichever government or corporation that they are working for. You can definitely see this if you pay attention to politics. Each party has its favorite economists to trot out to justify what they are doing, or to attack what the other team is doing, regardless of what the policy is. I first noticed this when way back in the Clinton administration, there was a Democrat move to do away with the “marriage tax” and the Republicans opposed it. Once Bush was in office, the positions flipped. Not that I believe either party really cared about the tax. It was simply another political football.  This is also apparent in the varying attitudes towards deficit spending. Both parties love it when they are in charge. They just spend it on slightly different things. If you pay too much attention to it, you just might drive yourself bonkers.  Another issue is that modern economists are too focused on tinkering around with policy, hoping to manipulate the market to get the outcome they want. This leads to extremely shallow thinking as all they wind up doing is at best looking at surface data and then trying to manipulate that so it fits better with their vision. What they neglect is everything below the surface, everything that is actually driving the data they are responding to.  Let's get back to economists and their theories for a minute. Economists are often professors, teaching others about economics and how they work. One might be inclined to ask if they really know so much about economics, why aren't they rich? Don't they know how the systems work and how to make use of their knowledge to their own benefit? Perhaps it's because there is more going on than their equations can account for. That is one of the central aspects of Mises and his Austrian School of Economics, there is just too much data to actually absorb it all. With any economy, there are any number of variables that simply cannot be accounted for. That's why Mises considered the idea of central planning and that one can control the market to be absurd. It is simply impossible to plan without knowing all the variables. Things will just happen whether you know the cause or not. Not only that, Mises understood that many if not most of the variables are not directly related to money, which is why he advocated for economists studying the social sciences. Instead, perhaps we should be more humble and realize we can't know everything and instead, observe the data as it is without imposing theories on it. Then perhaps we can move towards Mises' goal of understanding the world a little better.  What's your economy worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Ring Ring, Get Your Vaccine: Personal Data, Free Will, and Governance

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 10:41


One of our big seven things we really care about at TARTLE is government and corporate transparency. Normally, when this topic comes up, we are calling one or the other out for their lack of transparency. Today, we actually get to go the other way for once.  That is thanks to the governor of Alaska who recently ordered the justice department to investigate the state's health department. If that sounds unusual, it is. Governments typically don't publically announce that they are investigating themselves. What could have prompted the unusual action? It turns out Alaska's Health Department has been using data in ways that not the governor disapprove of, they may also have violated federal HIPAA laws. As with so many other things in the last year and a half, the situation was prompted by COVID. What they did was set a program to call senior citizens in Anchorage and enquire as to their vaccination status. The health department also outsourced that particular activity to third-party contractors. The program was begun to help people understand and take advantage of the availability of the COVID 19 vaccines. However, there are several questions to be asked. Did the seniors of Anchorage actually need any help with this? Did they ask for it? Did the health department actually ask them? What about the data? Whether or not a person has a particular vaccine is sensitive medical data, data that should not be getting shared with a third party, the ones doing the actual work. Finally, one has to wonder just what the state was doing with that data in the first place. Public emergency or not, the government should not have that kind of information about individuals. How did they acquire it and for what reason did they do so?  Once data starts to get shared like that, from one group to the next, it becomes harder and harder to track exactly what is being done with it. The sovereignty over the data has been lost and anonymity, in this case, is obviously also compromised. From those third parties, a patient's data could be sold virtually anywhere, including their identity.  Fortunately, once news of the program got out (thanks to one of Anchorage citizens blowing the whistle), the governor stopped it and ordered the investigation. In at least this instance, Governor Mike Dunleavy showed real leadership. Not only did he shut down the program, he ordered the investigation, and even more importantly, did so publically. And it gets better. Dunleavy ordered a full review of all the data sharing agreements for the state, promising to put policies in place that would prevent such a thing from ever happening again. It isn't often you see this kind of transparency coming from the government. For that, he should be commended. www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Operations of Organizations and Our Communities With Special Guest and Systems Thinker, Christian Lemp Part 2

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 29:16


If the first part of their discussion explored the parallels between social systems and AI technology, this second half provides insight on how Christian's work draws inspiration from an unlikely source: the natural world and the animal kingdom.  From there, he touches briefly upon the responsibility of modern tech professionals to be aware of the social implications of their work, providing words of encouragement to listeners of the podcast within the industry.   Drawing Inspiration From the Natural World: Ants leave trail pheromones to food that they find and then return to the colony. This leaves a road for other ants to find, which leads to the collective outcome of being able to feed everyone in the community. Similarly, honey bees coordinate with other bees to maintain their hive and protect the queen. These are examples of biological systems that are naturally capable of self-regulating— so where's our capacity to solve that on a larger scale, in business and societies? Here, Christian discussed the possibility of our efforts being limited because we approach problem solving with a two-dimensional mindset—when in reality, we should be looking at the scenario in three dimensions. For example, one may be able to see, hear, and touch a forest, but they won't be able to see what happens underneath the soil. There is a call for us to “move away from the two dimensional, polarizing world that sticks us in buckets and says, this thing is this or that, but there can't be a flexibility or the nuances of an entity in between that can actually move throughout dimensions.” But is it possible to run multinational corporations and governments as efficiently as beehives without taking away an individual's creative capacity, while ensuring that the system remains flexible enough to meet challenges brought about by outside forces?   Former Approaches to Systems of Organizations: Modern organizations find themselves adapting to a strange new status quo: one where management must deal with remote employees and asynchronous work. It's a symptom of decentralization in a structure, where control and command has become less concentrated on hierarchy.  Therefore, the ability to make collective decisions while operating asynchronously is an indication that the business has a strong internal culture that naturally reinforces good decision-making despite the time differences and differences in flows of information. Prior to this, most organizations preferred to take an authoritarian approach to systems management. This is where the leader is responsible for planning out the entire route from start to finish and people are expected to follow. It works in instances where the leader has a clear vision and knows what needs to be done to achieve it across multiple levels. However, not a lot of people enjoy working in an environment where they are only ever expected to be followers of someone else's vision. There is little to no room to foster genuine creativity on a micro level/on the ground. Organizations also try to implement the consensus approach, where everyone communes to find a solution that pleases everyone. While it's a more democratic method, the process is slow and the end goal remains restrictive for the people on the ground.    Is it Time to Relax Our Approach?: Could a more relaxed approach to implementing a system be in order? Christian muses over a world where companies focused on establishing a strong organizational culture. This would encourage everyone who was hired, who understood and was aligned with the company's vision and mission, to naturally work towards a solution in both a collective and individual sense.  This alternative gives more flexibility to individuals and small teams when a new challenge arises. While people still need to attend meetings and management will continue to make room for mistakes, this approach gives people the opportunity to proactively think of how they can use their talents towards their goals instead of wedging them into a box—or turning them into drones.  Diffusing a small element of the decision-making process could help your organization by injecting a diverse array of perspectives and skillsets. Upper management shouldn't take the entire burden of thinking outside the box.   Remaining Ethical in Positions of Leadership and in Tech: Christian briefly discussed the responsibility of leaders to build diverse teams, especially when they are in the tech industry or developing artificial intelligence. He drew from his personal experience working with an insurance domain to prove his point. In this case, the domain was working on using AI to scan aerial images and assess the value of a home, seeing if it would fit within their risk profile. However, they found out that the AI system automatically excluded homes with a chain link fence. If this algorithm made it to the market, it would not have underwritten any homes with a chain link fence—which is a common fixture in poor neighborhoods. This would have created a bias against people who needed insurance the most, and it would have been an unintended outcome of trying to solve a simple problem using AI without the added layer of human intervention. As much as possible, the teams behind AI development need to come from a wide array of backgrounds so that the creation of new technologies incorporate as many perspectives as possible.   Closing Remarks: to the Tech Professionals of the Future: Christian encourages professionals employed in data science, analytics, and technology to internalize the weight of their responsibility: their capacity to change the market and directly affect people through products and services.  “People in positions of decision power, who are practitioners and implementing, have a responsibility to optimize for the right thing, and really be humble and understanding. And that's just something that leaders have to do,” he explained. He also revealed that what stood out for him the most from TARTLE was the ability to “have a bottomless approach to data collection and ownership.” TARTLE is our step forward towards a reality where people have better control over their own data. Currently, our personal information is working for the benefit of the wealthiest people and the most powerful organizations in the world. The concept of getting paid for your Facebook account, Instagram posts, and Twitter feed may be a little far-fetched—but this is exactly what makes money for these platforms. The TARTLE marketplace is our work towards inverting this model and bringing back the power to where it truly belongs: the people. www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Bitcoin Is Not a Currency

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 22:06


Is the granddaddy of crypto actually a currency? That's one heck of a question, especially since many have touted it as exactly that. Bitcoin was supposed to be this decentralized thing that would allow regular people to buy and sell independently of any government system and its fiat currency. However, the way things have developed have prompted many to ask what Bitcoin actually is. Is it a currency, a commodity, or an asset?  Well, it definitely is not a commodity. A commodity is a tangible good that can be used to actually make things. Its value comes from its usefulness and how much value society places on that use. Bitcoin by its nature is not tangible and can't actually be used to make anything.  What about currency? It is called a cryptocurrency after all. Yet, what makes something a currency? It has to be easily transported and transferred to another party at little or no cost. In a sense, Bitcoin is easy to transport because it is strictly digital. You can carry the code or the password to your Bitcoin account around with you in your pocket. However, transferring it is difficult. It actually costs far too much money in electricity and fees to move it from your account to another to justify using it to make purchases. Imagine buying a $1.50 cup of coffee for two hundred dollars just because of all the transfer costs. Not that buying such a small item with it is even possible. Bitcoin can only be divided so much, and given the value of a single Bitcoin, even a Satoshi (the smallest Bitcoin unit) is worth over three dollars as of this writing. That leaves its value as an asset. Anyone who bought Bitcoin ten years ago, or even two, and seen the value of their investment skyrocket in the time since will definitely attest to the currency's value as an asset. If you dropped two hundred on it ten years ago and cashed out today, you would definitely be a millionaire several times over. In a way, it is even better than gold. This is because while that shiny rock does a great job storing value, it doesn't really increase in value. What does that mean? Basically, you can use the same amount of gold to buy a suit today as you would have used fifty years ago. While it is worth more dollars than it was then, that's only because the dollar is worth less. Yet, the value of gold remains the same, with minor fluctuations.  Bitcoin however is currently increasing in dollar value at a pace that far exceeds inflation, making it a better investment for growth. At least for now. It has proven exceptionally volatile, increasing or decreasing in value by tens of thousands based on tweets from certain high profile people, or a government policy change.  How did we get to that point? Why did Bitcoin reach a point where it isn't a currency, and probably never will be? How did it become a valuable but volatile digital asset? Because it wound up being tied to the U.S. dollar. It didn't necessarily need to be tied to the dollar but the investment behavior of many drove the public perception in that direction. As soon as people started talking about it in terms of dollars, the die was cast and now the coin that started it all is inextricably linked to a centralized fiat currency. Which in turn means that Bitcoin is now a centralized asset, though it is supported by a decentralized network.  Perhaps the people behind Bitcoin dreamed too big. Maybe they didn't understand the dangers of putting it out for everyone right away. It might have been different if that had begun smaller, in a specific ecosystem.  TARTLEcoin for example is meant for use within the TARTLE ecosystem. It is something that anyone can earn through simple actions and can be easily transported and transferred in a matter of seconds at extremely low cost. It even has a specific value in that each one grants you priority when buyers are looking for data too. Everyone can access and use it and everyone knows exactly what it is for. Perhaps this will be a better way, one that avoids the dollar trap. What's your crypto worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

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Operations of Organizations and Our Communities With Special Guest and Systems Thinker, Christian Lemp Part 1

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 25:14


What can machine learning and data engineering tell us about how social systems are wired to function? As it turns out, these fields are more alike than meets the eye.  Christian Lemp, an early TARTLE adopter and professional systems thinker, explains that he was drawn to his career path after years of observation and experience in different parts of the world. While Christian originally studied math and economics, which led to a short career in finance, he found himself more attracted to how different communities thought and interacted with each other.  From there, he took a leap and entered the world of machine learning and data engineering. Christian helped find ways to understand organizations and optimize their work processes. However, he quickly realized that this work entailed untangling a series of systems that were all interconnected—some of which would require more creative, community-centric solutions.    Interconnected Problems Require Interconnected Solutions: The deeper Christian delved into studying operations of organizations, the more he saw that problems in his line of work could not be solved individually. Since all the problems were so intertwined with one another, trying to make solutions one at a time would only reroute the issue to another part of the organization at best, and make the overall situation more dire at worst. Instead, organizations needed to commune and mutually come to one big solution that could solve all the problems at once.  Outside of organizations, this is an issue that can also manifest on a cultural and national scale—especially in locations with diverse cultures. For example, the banner of the United states houses numerous states and regions, each with their own special communities. All these communities are bound to have their own personal interests and biases.    Is Efficiency An Absolute Good?: Given how complex all of that is, what place does mere efficiency have in our understanding of it? Not much, at least as it is currently understood. This is true across the board. Many things that seem as though they should be efficient don't wind up being so at all.  For example, monocropping is a common practice amongst farmers, where they grow the same crop on the same plot of land year after year. While it is simpler to manage and highly efficient, monocropping also makes the soil less productive over time because it depletes the nutrients found in the soil. As a consequence, it reduces organic matter in the soil and can cause significant erosion. While there are short-term gains for the farmer, it eventually nets a long-term loss because it hurts their soil. If that is true for an activity like farming, how much more true is it as applied to human society? The fact is that there is simply too much going on in any society for it to be completely understood, much less controlled by any one individual. It's just impossible. Yet when we get out of the way (for the most part), things seem to organize themselves into a symbiotic relationship.  Short of that understanding, we tend to try to wedge people into different boxes. This is an effort that is not only doomed to failure but will also sooner or later lead to resistance, which can affect the work we put towards providing solutions as a whole.   Closing Thoughts: With all this information, it may feel like we've reached a dead-end for the problems we face in our society: we can't solve one problem at a time, and thinking of one big all-encompassing solution seems like an impossible task.  However, the discussion with Christian suggests that there is one simple thing we are capable of doing that can help alleviate the solution: we can treat everybody we come across with dignity. Instead of forcing them to fit into a system based on our preconceived notions, we give them the space to see where they can fit in instead. Those in charge of creating systems should not be building people around systems; rather, they should be taking the time to understand everyone in their complexity, and building systems around people. This is the kind of work that the TARTLE platform is putting in. We want to provide a safe space for people on the ground to take back control of their data and funnel it to causes and organizations that are important to them. When we give them the power to directly support what reflects their own personal ideals, we empower people to become more united and open to one another.  What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

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How Small, Everyday Innovations Drive Oversized Results - NYT Best Selling Author Josh Linkner

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 35:50


Do you believe that you are on the cusp of a breakthrough on a daily basis? Despite popular belief (and to some extent, the media's portrayal of success stories), the wildest successes rarely ever happen on a whim. These stories are the result of regular and consistent creative acts, which prime our brain and our mindset to be more receptive for the big reveal to the big solution. This is the message of Josh Linkner's book, entitled Big Little Breakthroughs, and he believes that everybody has the capacity to be creative; however, a lot of people hold themselves back for several reasons. It could be due to preconceived notions they have of themselves, a bias against creative thinking, or certain thinking habits.    Exercising the Creative Muscle: We are used to thinking that your creativity is like our height: a physical feature we grow into for a bit, but cannot change eventually. However, the reality is it's more like our weight. By implementing changes in habit, mindset, and lifestyle, we are capable of making incremental adjustments.  However, creativity does not exist in a binary. It's more like our position changes on a spectrum depending on how consistently we choose to exercise our creativity muscle. There are plenty of misconceptions that prevent us from being creative. The first is that it is only possible to be a creative person in certain industries. We have conditioned ourselves to think that it is only in the arts that we can be creative—but in reality, there are plenty of opportunities to express the right side of our brain across all industries.  Creativity can be a powerful tool in hyping up conversations with your clients in customer service positions, finding quick solutions to last-minute problems in operations, and extracting meaningful insights from pools of data.  The biggest blocker of creative output has never been a lack of natural talent, or a lack of opportunity; Josh believes that it is caused by fear and our tendency to stick to safe ideas, while we wait for a “right time” to launch the more provocative ones. It is our responsibility to be more thoughtful of the status quo, and challenge ourselves to find new ways to be creative.   Creativity in Nation Building and Social Justice: In the podcast, Josh shared an insightful discussion he had with Caron Proschan, one of the individuals he interviewed for Big Little Breakthroughs. Caron was a fitness nut who also enjoyed chewing gum. One day, when she reached into her bag for a stick of gum, she realized that it was an eerie shade of blue— almost certainly synthetically produced using who knew what substances. This small discovery inspired Caron to search for natural alternatives. However, there was no such thing as natural gum. The massive chewing gum industry was run almost entirely by two giant organizations, with no concern for the quality of the ingredients that went into manufacturing gum. As a result, Caron set out to create the world's first all-natural gum. She is now the founder and CEO of Simply Gum. Beyond Caron and her passion towards creating natural snacking alternatives, we see traces of these small changes in other parts of our lives. Rosa Parks is another stunning example of how simple actions can lead to ripple effects. Her act of defiance on the bus was eventually used as a source of empowerment for the civil rights movement.  This is meaningful because it indicates that the power for change does reside in everyday people; not large corporations, entities, or figures in authority.  “Sustainable progress usually doesn't come from the stroke of an autocratic leader; it comes from the body of the people.” Josh concluded. In many situations, the action that starts the ripple effect is always small: saying “no,” or just looking for ways to improve something you love. Creativity is not limited to situations or people that make you feel fear; rather, the sparks for creativity can come from a positive desire or drive to change something.   Closing Thoughts: Eradicating Anti-Creative Biases: Big Little Breakthroughs is a rallying call for people to become more aware of the way they limit themselves. Now that we've established that everyone is capable of being creative, how do we encourage ourselves to develop it as a skill? According to Josh, experimentation is the key to making creativity a habit. Trying to solve a problem from the get-go will be difficult; but pinpointing small actions people could take would be a great start. Josh likened this process to pointillism. Pointillism, which refers to painting in small strokes that eventually blend into an image from a distance, is the perfect metaphor for his message. He challenges everybody, especially the younger generation to find small ideas to work on and rise from every failure with a slight creative pivot.   It's inspiring to think that a passing thought is all it can take for you to change the world. www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

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Influencers, Social Shopping, and the Power of E-Commerce

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 11:01


Many of the things we interact with on a daily basis have some sort of influence on us. Given how much time we, and especially the younger generations spend scrolling social media on our phones, it is no wonder that what is called social shopping is extremely popular. If a member of Gen Z has a favorite person he follows on Instagram, spending possibly hours a day just scrolling that one person's posts, listening to their stories, that means there is a degree of admiration, or a desire to be like them. Should this Instagram influencer post about some favorite brand for a product, then it is entirely likely that our hypothetical follower will be buying whatever is being sold. It's even more obvious when you realize that for Gen Z social media is their preferred source of information. That's where they spend their time, get information, and get entertained; it's no wonder that is where they are also spending their money.  If you think about it, this is really nothing new. We are influenced by what we see and hear, even more so if the person doing the advertising is someone we recognize. That's why cigarette companies used to spend millions getting celebrities to pose in their ads, or why Bud Light commercials are so memorable, or why the typical Michael Bay movie has more product placement than the Super Bowl. All of that is designed to influence us to buy certain products.  No one is really immune either. No, not even you. You almost certainly have a t-shirt with a favorite band, or movie, or just some cool company you like to support. ‘But, I wasn't influenced! I just happen to like that stuff!' Yes, that is exactly how it works. Don't worry, it isn't even necessarily bad. After all, you need a shirt. If you want to pay a couple extra bucks for a shirt with a picture of One Punch Man on it, more power to you. I have several from brands I bought for the express purpose of supporting the brand, even though I can assure you I don't need another shirt.  Naturally enough, social media companies have been figuring this out and plenty of apps allow you to buy things directly through them. Instagram for example has a cool carousel with just a few products in it that should be related to whatever you are checking out at the moment.  Brands have also been finding new ways to capitalize on the trend. They will often seek out popular influencers, or YouTubers or another popular user of a given app and ask them to feature their products. Depending on the nature of the channel and the company, that results in a company paying a person or just allowing them to keep the product in exchange for a review. In this way, the company gets to make sure its products are getting in front of the audience most likely to buy it. That's a win-win situation for the company because their conversion rate goes up, the influencer makes some side money or at least gets some free gear, and the buyer gets more in-depth knowledge about a product or brand he is buying and a more convenient way to do so. Many influencers even have the integrity to not give a positive review if they just don't like a given product, meaning the buyer can have higher confidence the products will work as advertised. If you think about it, what these brands are doing, reaching out to a narrow audience but one that is more likely to be interested in them is very similar to what we advocate for at TARTLE. A brand like Patagonia is clearly using their data to determine where they should best spend their advertising dollars. They are going right to the source when they find influencers using their products who already have an audience to help sell their brand. That is a solid use of data and social media platforms that helps everyone, which we can definitely get behind.  What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!    

Tcast
You Are Watching Netflix—and Netflix Is Watching You

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 8:47


Netflix is one of the biggest names of the Digital Age. It went from being a new way to rent movies, to a streaming service aggregating everyone else's movies and TV shows, to being a powerhouse creator of original content in its own right. Oh, and it killed a one-time giant Blockbuster along the way and helped spawn a whole new branch of the entertainment world. However, it's fair to ask if Netflix is really about making movies and TV shows. Is that really their main concern? The answer of course is ‘no'. The company is primarily about making money and for that, they need subscribers and in order to get the largest number of subscribers possible, they make use of a lot of data.  Naturally, they start with what they hope you want to see and basically spam your feed with a bunch of generically popular content. Over time, they will try to narrow it down. How do they do that? They make use of algorithms to gather information on what you watch. They also pay attention not just to what you click on, that is both too simple and not terribly informative. How many times have you clicked on a movie only to get about ten minutes in and decide you don't want to watch it? The algorithms pay attention to that as well. What you watch, how long you watch it for, when you watch it, and all of that goes into the algorithm. From there, Netflix's hope is that they will be able to find similar movies and put them in your recommended feed. Sounds simple doesn't it? Yes and no. For one, there are holes in this system. Not just the occasional recommendation you would never plan on watching but major problems that can break the algorithm altogether. Say you have roommates and you all share an account but also have very different tastes in movies? Or you have kids. Chances are you watch different things when they are around. That of course is what the profiles on Netflix and every other streaming service are all about. If they can break out each person individually, the algorithm has a chance to work. However, how many people really bother with the different profiles? I'm guessing it's not as many as Netflix would like. Also, what if you have a busy schedule and rarely have time to watch a full two hour movie? You only have fifteen minutes here, twenty minutes there and typically work on something while the movie is on. So it might take a whole week to watch one movie. That kind of person likely wrecks the algorithm entirely.  Not to mention, how long does it take to build up a worthwhile profile of a given subscriber? One week? A month? A year? It will vary from person to person based on how much they watch, meaning how effective the recommendations are will vary a lot from one subscriber to the next. In short, Netflix's algorithms are extremely inefficient in a variety of circumstances, and that means they are wasting time and money building user profiles that don't work. What should they do then? What would be a more efficient means of building those user profiles? Netflix could work with us at TARTLE. They could go directly to subscribers and ask what it is that they would like to watch. Who their favorite actors and directors are. When do they watch? Do they prefer movies or series? Do they like their series dumped all at once or would they prefer a weekly schedule? Netflix could talk directly to its subscribers and get feedback directly from them and so build a far more accurate profile than any other method. This would be faster and cheaper and in the end far more financially rewarding. Which means they could spend that extra time and money making better content to draw in more subscribers.  What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

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Robber Barons vs. Tech Giants - Are We Learning From Our Past?

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Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 12:43


Mark Twain once said, “History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes.” History of course can't exactly repeat itself. There are too many variables at play that differentiate circumstances. However, those circumstances can still be similar. Because of that, we can still learn from the past, though we often don't. A case in point is the similarity between various global monopolies and those of the robber barons in the later part of the 19th century.  These men controlled vast swaths of the United States economy, giving them the ability to have a huge effect on national policy and to dictate their employees' lives far beyond anything that most people in the Western world will have experienced. Not only would they use their large coffers to ‘lobby' politicians, they would also buy out anyone who looked to be a competitive threat. One might reasonably point out that these start-up companies didn't have to sell. Technically, that's true. In reality, that underestimates the determination of the bigger companies. They would simply charge their potential rivals higher prices for goods or services they provided, or persuade their friends in business to do so. The pressure would become so great that it would sell out or go bankrupt. Should someone continue to resist, it could get ugly. Just go look into the way Edison harassed Tesla. Or the Pinkerton Detective Agency and its role in suppressing unions.  There were of course the justly maligned company towns. While mostly associated with mining companies, there were a few variations on the theme. In their most well-known format, the company town was a place where the employees lived and bought most of their stuff. And everything was owned by the company. That meant rent was paid to the company, all of a family's groceries, clothes, and anything else were all paid back to the company. Why couldn't they buy their stuff elsewhere and break the cycle? Because the company didn't pay them in cash, they paid them in vouchers or tokens that were only redeemable in the town. Other types of company towns would have certain lifestyle requirements like no drinking or smoking. Think of them as a forerunner of the modern Home Owners' Association.  Today, the tech companies look like they are in a similar position as the robber barons of old. They regularly buy out competition. In fact, it recently came out in a congressional hearing that the founders of Instagram felt the need to sell because they would get destroyed otherwise. Tech companies have worked together to censor pundits, governments, officials, even a sitting president. Whether you like the people censored or not, it sets a very dangerous precedent, especially when the same companies will do the bidding of China just for access behind the Great Firewall.  And of course they can influence markets to an unprecedented degree. By controlling the flow of information and mining data they can swing the stock of whole industries just by what they allow to be said. Just look at the way Elon Musk can swing the price of Bitcoin or DogeCoin just with a tweet.  There is also evidence that some of these companies are flirting with the idea of the company town again. Their vast sprawling campuses have a variety of services and amenities that make it tempting to basically stay right there. Some, like Facebook, are openly looking at getting into the realm of real estate. Then there are the more recent stories about Blackrock and other firms buying houses at ridiculous prices in Appalachia. The speculation is that they are intentionally pricing out the middle class and looking to force them to become permanent renters. That's just one general store away from being a modern company town.  Where will it all lead? It's hard to say. We dodged a bullet in the robber baron days. It's hard to say exactly why, but it seems likely that the various communist revolutions that swept Europe in the early twentieth century gave people a wake-up call to change a few things before the same happened here. Can we avoid the pitchforks again? Only time will tell. What's your sovereignty worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

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Chatter: The Voice in Our Head, Why It Matters, and How to Harness It - Best Selling Author and Award-Winning Professor Ethan Kross

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Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 55:05


We have an innate capability to independently perform a wide variety of physical and mental functions. It's hard-wired into our rules of our survival. However, this is not a perfect mechanism; we do have the ability to silently use language to process our lives, but we don't really have an in-depth understanding of how it works just yet.  This knowledge gap is what fuels the self-help industry, which has a wide variety of ideas and methods. Some are backed by scientific evidence, while others are manifested as a result of a strong placebo effect. Regardless of how these solutions are created, it's clear that one's mental state is key to making change happen. So what's it like inside our heads and how can we improve the way we converse with ourselves? Self-Help: Cutting Through the Pseudoscience: Ethan's book, entitled Chatter: The Voice in Our Head, Why It Matters, and How to Harness It provides a welcome academic perspective on the power of that little voice in your head. He provides a refreshing take on how even the oft-overlooked act of talking to ourselves the inner dialogue has a science to it. that leads to obsession, overthinking, and rumination is broken down into chemicals and reactions in your brain.  If you've ever found yourself obsessing over an issue that happened years ago, or staying up at night because you found yourself triggered by a passing memory, Ethan's insights on how the immaterial manifests into material may be the key to reining those thoughts in and getting a good night's sleep. One common critique of the self-help industry is that most coaches and authors often sell placebos for negative ways of thinking. They cover up the problem instead of getting to the root of an idea.  While Ethan concedes that placebos can have a powerful effect on one's mental state, it can also prevent people from seeking the help they need to turn their life around. Mental wellbeing is an important aspect of adult life that may need attention. While his book is not a replacement for therapy, it does give people the opportunity to find sound scientific advice without having to shell out a lot on seeking psychiatric help, which can come at prohibitively high prices even with healthcare insurance. Learning How to Self-Regulate: Our inherent response to negative emotion is to avoid confrontation, or at least refrain from getting triggered. Unfortunately, negativity is an integral part of the authentic human experience. It's the way we cope, or self-regulate, that's the game-changer. When faced with a problem, we are challenged to pick between immediately trusting our guts, or holding back and letting it run its course first.  We've all heard of how we need to trust our intuition; however, it's not a foolproof method to solving all our conflicts. A better understanding of how our brain is wired to think—and how we wire our brains to think—can better help us distinguish between those two states. Time Travel and Personal Development: Hindsight is an incredibly powerful tool that can be used for both good and bad. This idea of staying in the moment can be harmful because it encourages people to remain stagnant, and ignore opportunities to process important experiences. The pressure to always stay in the moment also places restrictions on what your brain is really capable of. Your mind is constantly working on making calculations based on your past experiences, and translating it into forecasts for the future. In this way, it's a lot like time traveling. Breaking Destructive Thought Cycles: It's easy to believe that our internal thought process won't have an impact on our actions. However, the truth is that living in a constant state of harm or fear does not afford a good foundation for individuals to make good choices— not just for themselves, but also for others.  A natural consequence of experiencing adversity is our attempt to look inward and try to analyze every facet of that event. While this may be done with the best intentions, it is all too easy to get stuck in negative thought loops; reliving the worst parts of the challenge in their head. This is a debilitating process which can quickly become a habit.  Another aspect of this is that sadness becomes a familiar, and even a comfortable, state of being. The negative chatter is accustomed to highlighting the worst parts of our lived experience. As a result, our ability to process in a healthy way becomes affected.  Closing Thoughts: The Road to Better Chatter: Cognitive bias is a quiet problem with a serious impact. It takes plenty of commitment for an individual to successfully change the way they think, feel, and behave about themselves despite outside pressure.  Thankfully, Ethan points out plenty of ways for you to retrain your thinking. The key is to give yourself psychological space, or an opportunity to view yourself as another person struggling with their own unique problems. This is where the metaphorical fly on the wall idea comes in: if you've ever found it much easier to give advice than to follow it, distancing techniques are the key to internalizing these messages.   Ethan and Chatter gave plenty of insight on how external divides may come from internal manifestations of unresolved emotion and cognitive bias. In a world where people are separated by a multitude of different beliefs, perspectives, and experiences, this discussion could be a step forward to more open dialogues—especially when people begin with themselves. www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Data Transparency and Governance Strategy for Financial Industry - Special Guest: Linda Powell

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 41:35


One central aspect in Linda's career is the importance of data analytics. When it comes to data as an asset, plenty of different entities can claim ownership to it: financial institutions, vendors, banks, and even the government. With so much data going around, it's important to know where the data is coming from, how to process it into useful information, and how it can be centralized in a way that it can be used by more parties in more projects.   How Do We Preserve Repositories of Skills and Knowledge? The finance sector is working on capturing processes of knowledge into analytical models. As data enters these models, technology can work on computing this information and laying out analyses for us in a more efficient manner. This gives two benefits: first, the process of computing this information is not lost. Second, computing is done more efficiently. There is no need to return to square one when a longtime employee vacates a position. Here, Linda makes several parallels between retail and finance using labels for canned goods as an example. Due to incredibly small margins in retail, it's important for canned goods to be transparent about the content and process involved in making this product. This is because it serves as their competitive edge.  If financial institutions were also as concerned about being transparent, then it would make maneuvering financial markets more efficient. According to Linda, the biggest problem that financial institutions had when dealing with the crash of Wall Street was in being able to uniquely identify institutions. When the Lehman brothers crashed, she described everyone to have “held their breath for about 48 hours while transactions settled, because nobody knew who all of the subsidiaries of Lehman were and they didn't know how to uniquely identify.” With such a catastrophic experience institutions can and should learn from, she is optimistic that the benefits of data standards will be observed and acknowledged by institutions.   Holding The Front Line: Linda perceives her previous work on the board of governors of the Federal Reserve as similar to being a medic. “I was the medic who, once the wounding was happening and people were like, hey, I need to find out this piece of information. And then we would figure out how to cobble some stuff together, look at things in a different way or produce some different sets of information. It was absolutely fascinating,” she explained. In efforts to learn from the collapse of the Lehman brothers and ensure that it does not happen again, big banks are investing plenty of money in data management infrastructure so that they can get precise and accurate reporting on where they stand. This faster and more efficient flow of data can help financial institutions preemptively deal with ebbs and flows in the market, instead of scrambling to react.   The Way Forward: When working on the projects, Linda noticed that her team members had to take data from several different databases before they could piece together a clear picture of the companies they needed to look at and the identifiers they needed to study.  This inspired her to create an integrated database where all government and vendor data, their unique identifiers, and the legal entity identifier were stored. From stock prices to bond prices and financial statement information, this served as a reusable launching point for future projects that everybody in the organization could access. It allows individuals to free up more time working on different aspects of future projects, which makes the entire process more efficient, resources more available, and human labor more open to higher-tier aspects of work such as algorithms. This is called the economies of scale. That's three benefits: resource efficiency, economies of scale, and ready to deploy at any time.  One challenge of implementing this change is convincing people to change their mindset from making sure that they get the task done in the easiest, most efficient way for themselves; to finding ways to get the task done while giving the next people who will be using this data the opportunity to use it in the most efficient way — even if it can be a bigger challenge upfront.  It's encouraging people to look beyond merely making unique personal identifiers to data sets so that they can get the job done instead of finding a standardized identifier for the information and then applying it.  “It's taking the larger view of things, of how do I make things more efficient for the entire ecosystem, so that we can do things that we currently can't do at all?” Linda asks.   Closing Thoughts: Setting Up The Data Hierarchy of Needs: According to Linda, it's human nature to get excited about big and lofty goals like machine learning and artificial intelligence. However, the root of any successful and sustainable effort is found in learning how to target and harness one's data. While achieving enlightenment in finance is possible, it would be difficult for people and businesses to scale the process effectively because they have to start from square one every single time.  So, when you think of the data you handle and how it can be a part of something greater with a little extra effort upfront — how much is your data worth? www.tartle.co   Data Transparency, Finance, and Governance with Linda Powell, Global Head of Data Strategy, Governance, and End User Computing at Citibank by TARTLE is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Reflecting on FOMO and the Mindset of Patrick McGinnis

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 14:25


Hot on the heels of our last article seems like a good time to think just a bit more about FOMO and its effects and how it is often used against us. For those just jumping in, FOMO is the Fear of Missing Out, a sense of anxiety that comes from being aware of or even just thinking there are cool things happening that you aren't a part of. It's fear that you are being left out and left behind by everyone around you. Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby discussed it in depth with the person who coined the term, Patrick McGinnis. I highly recommend you head over to T-Cast to check it out.  FOMO is normally associated with social media but it certainly exists outside of Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. FOMO in a sense is just another term for good old-fashioned peer pressure. If you think everyone is going to a party every weekend, you naturally think you should too. If you don't you're missing out and if you are worried about what people think about you (and let's be honest, pretty much everyone does to some degree) then that will cause some anxiety. So most people will go out for some heavy drinking every night on the weekends. Don't get me wrong, I like a good beer or whisky but there is such a thing as too much of a good thing. Indulging too much will not only lead to you doing a bunch of stuff you might not remember the next day, it also means you will likely need a couple of days to fully recover and be productive again.  Chris Williamson, podcast host and motivational speaker was in a similar cycle when he realized that he was wasting a lot of time. He made the choice to quit drinking for a thousand days and upped his productivity by orders of magnitude, just by not giving in to the pull of the crowd, by not giving in to FOMO. It allowed him to stop and think about what he wanted to do, independent of everyone else. Suddenly, Chris had the freedom to exclude himself and be happy with that.  Those kinds of situations are also exacerbated by social media. People post pictures of themselves having a great time day after day but never post the aftermath. They leave out the puking in the toilet, the crashed car, the stressing over bills, and everything else. It's a distorted view of reality and a lot more people should probably take the Williamson route and step away a bit.  Plenty of companies naturally make use of FOMO. Nearly every ad for every product or service is built on making you think you need something to be cool. Every cigarette ad back in the day had some ridiculously good-looking model taking a nice long drag on a lung dart. It was designed to make you think all the cool kids were doing it. It's not much different from anything else, they want to get your attention and FOMO is an incredibly powerful tool for making that happen.  Even if you don't quite fit into the algorithms they will still be gunning for your attention and your wallet. It isn't like the marketers stop sending you ads, they just spam you with random stuff until you click on something. Suddenly the algorithm has a hook and you might just find yourself with more ads related to that one thing. They're trying to draw you into the way they see the world and get you to spend your money and time on what they want.  How do you fight that? You realize what is happening, that these companies, while useful, are not your friend. They don't want to be, they just want you to think so. Realizing what is going on enables you to make a choice, then change your behaviors and step away from the crowd, to choose your own path with your money, your data, and your time.  What is your sovereignty worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Creative Trespassing: How to Put the Spark and Joy Back Into Your Work and Life - Best Selling Author Tania Katan

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 45:27


How many of us live our lives locked in the rat race? Despite the belief that money can't buy happiness, we can't deny that a surplus of income can give people the opportunity to live comfortable lives. It is this driving force for a stable future that has pushed many bright-eyed graduates into corporate positions, where they are gridlocked into a specific routine or career path.  Younger generations are working on introducing exciting new alternatives, such as increased work-life balance, remote jobs, and the rise of the gig economy. Conversely, corporations are also looking into new ways to accommodate this change in priority; interesting new policies such as a liquor room are briefly touched upon in the podcast.  In this episode, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby are joined by Tania Katan as they discuss issues adjacent to the meaning of work, the value of money, and the opportunity to enliven the monotony of day to day life.    Life Is A Stage: Alexander made interesting parallels between theater and office culture, in that everyone has a role they should play. One thought-provoking question he asked was whether people should sit within the confines of that role, or “add the nuances of you that makes you special.” At this point, Tania shared her roots in theater and how she eventually diverged from the path. She was excited to use her training as a writer in theater, but found a disconnect between the work she trained for and the work she actually ended up doing. This prompted her to work odd jobs on the side, such as telemarketing and bagging groceries. These diversions led to a big discovery: inadvertently, she had started inserting things she learned from theater into the routine of day to day life, to keep her and her colleagues entertained.    The Suspension of Disbelief: According to Tania, the foundation of theater is the suspension of disbelief. Throughout the podcast, it's a recurring motif as well: what if straight-laced professionals in rigid industries like business and finance learned to approach their work with the suspension of disbelief?  It's easy to slip into a certain persona when you dedicate yourself to a certain station and work routine eight hours a day, five days a week. The process can be comforting; but it can also be mind-numbing, and eventually restricting. This metaphorical carry-over between broadway and work is the same individuality that helped Tania find the inspiration to write her book and share her experiences. She discovered that there is always an opportunity to transform the environment and make an audience out of anybody, anywhere; whether it's racing to make the largest number of customers smile, paying it forward amongst your workmates with a cup of coffee, or just taking a ten-minute break to stretch with your crew. It's this attempt at bridging a connection and breaking the routine that can help everybody feel more alive.   Creative Trespassing: In the podcast, Tania revealed that her book was entitled “Creative Trespassing” because she wanted to encourage creatives to encroach in spaces they are not necessarily welcomed in—or at least, where they are not invited through the front door.  One particular salient point in their discussion included the issue of toxic workplaces, and where there is still an opportunity for this to happen. A call for structure and order means that businesses may not handle creative people very well; as a result, plenty of innovative minds become “lost” in the woodwork. To this, Tania explained that humans do have an innate ability to solve practical problems in new ways. Like any other skill, creativity requires active participation and engagement — it's not just about companies finding ways to create comfort zones, but also about employees looking for ways to break out of that comfort zone. This means that there is definitely still a chance for creatives to flourish in high-pressure work spaces, and even be the reason for positive change within these areas.   Bringing Out The “Little C”: Oftentimes, creativity can be paralyzing. It can be difficult to break out from the fear of failure. This traps people in a situation where they are afraid to move at all, and it can be a common problem amongst perfectionists in particular. To break out of this mold, Tania suggests creatives try two methods: the first is two actively set out and make bad work; and the second is to break the task down into small, incremental actions that anybody can make on a regular basis. It's exciting to think of our capacity to come together in one community, to create large and beautiful new things, without having to sacrifice our individuality in the process. In fact, it's the exact opposite: our unique collective of separate identities is precisely what allows us to innovate new solutions and inventions. www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Ushering in the New TARTLEcoin

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 10:17


TARTLE is always trying to find ways to improve the experience for those who entrust us with protecting their data. As an example, we recently relaunched our website, making it much easier and more intuitive to navigate. We also try to be proactive about these kinds of things. We didn't just put it out there and rely on you to figure it out. We did a whole series of podcasts and articles to help walk you through the new layout, from signup to confirmation, to filling out your first data packets, explaining the reasons behind each aspect along the way.  One of the things we touched on briefly in that series was TARTLEcoin. TARTLEcoin is a new feature we have introduced to help reward you for sharing your information and participating in TARTLE's mission of reclaiming data for everyone. Now of course is the obvious question, how does TARTLEcoin work? Every time you share data, every time you share your experience on TARTLE, every data packet you fill out, the more you verify your identity, the more TARTLEcoins you get. Like most currency, you earn more of it based on the work you put into the system. One important way that TARTLEcoin is different is that its value increases based on the amount of work you put into it. Yes, you get more and the value increases at the same time. That might seem counterintuitive, however, TARTLEcoin isn't currency in the sense that the dollar is currency. You don't directly trade it for goods and services, you trade it for access. Access to what? To offer to buy your data.  To clarify, this isn't buying access to anything that others don't get. This isn't a tiered system like that. You just get it sooner. That is, when a buyer is looking for data that you have, you get notified first, or rather sooner based on the amount of TARTLEcoin you've earned. That of course is where the real value of the TARTLEcoin lies, in getting the first crack at selling your data. That kind of reward can be very important, especially if there is a buyer with a limited budget who can only afford to purchase a relative handful of data packets. Instead of having to hop right on to sell your data, hoping to beat the 20,000 users who might also want to sell to a person who only wants 1000 packets. Since you'll be notified ahead of time, you can actually finish driving home in order to respond instead of pulling off to take care of business.  It's obvious how TARTLEcoin can benefit a TARTLE user. However, it also benefits the buyer. Remember, a seller is rewarded based on how much work he is putting in. That means the buyer is purchasing data from a person who is dedicated to the TARTLE mission and is interested in sharing plenty of data and in being fully open and honest about it, leading to better data, better decisions and better outcomes for the companies the buyer might represent. TARTLEcoin is actually the economics of human interaction put into practice. It lets you get more and do more based entirely on your own interest level in a given data packet that you've filled out.  To clear something up before we get ready to wrap up this announcement, in no way does TARTLEcoin replace our system for selling your data. You still get paid in crypto when you've sold data. The TARTLEcoin is totally in addition to everything we normally provide. So, you get TARTLEcoin for signing up with TARTLE, for watching a video, for sharing your TARTLE activity, and of course for actually selling your data and various other opportunities as well.  So, what's your data worth? More than it was, my friend, more than it was. www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
What Is Energy: A Guide to Understanding the Theory of Data Part 3

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 19:50


Every action that people make requires energy. From simple things like taking a walk, to more interesting things like forging a sword, to more modern things like building a digital data marketplace. But not just energy swirling around randomly. Energy wielded by people implies purpose, which in turn implies thought and desire. Energy becomes the middleman between thought and achieving the aim of that thought.  Where do we typically direct our energy? We direct it to the alleviation of some kind of anxiety. When we take a walk, we might be going to the store for food. Or we might just need some quiet time to think. We make a sword, or any weapon to alleviate anxiety about security. TARTLE was made to alleviate anxiety about data privacy. Basically, if there is a worry that people have, they will expend their energy to find a solution, something to eliminate or at least reduce the worry in question.  We are also frequently looking for ways to further decrease those worries. We went from just walking for transportation, to horses, to cars, to planes. War went from clubs, to swords, to bows, to guns, to cruise missiles. Data privacy has gone from passwords, to ad blockers, to VPNs. People are constantly working to improve whatever they are doing, often making additional tools that in turn have other uses. Your Google Maps works because of the military's GPS system. WD-40 exists because of the early space program, as do a number of synthetic fabrics that are used by athletes today. We create tools to help us build our tools and those secondary tools often have secondary and tertiary benefits that their creators could not have foreseen. The result is a system of interactions that amplify a variety of work efforts, helping us to not only reach the original goals but several others we didn't even intend to affect. Often, such developments will result in helping others reach goals without even knowing about it.  That is a big part of why humanity is the dominant species on the planet. We are able to take our thoughts and desires and figure out how to use our energy to make them a reality. In a way, we are able to use our energy to impose our desires on space-time, taking them from the realm of thought to the world of the material.  How does all of this relate to TARTLE and to you? You've been using social media as a tool, probably for years at this point. No doubt, you've used it to achieve certain goals. You wanted to connect with people, share thoughts, run a business, etc. All the work you've put into those tools has been to reach your goals, whatever they are. However, there is a lot of secondary benefit from all that work that you've put into these platforms, benefits that you rarely if ever see. All your work is going to amplify the work of others. This might be all right except often those secondary benefits are used against you. Your data is gathered and used to manipulate you to make more money from you without you even knowing about it. TARTLE exists as a tool to help you regain that energy and the ensuing secondary benefits for yourself. You reclaim it and decide when others will benefit from it while still benefiting from it yourself. That is, TARTLE exists to help you amplify your own efforts, to reach your goals. We have tens of thousands of members in nearly every country on earth. Each one is amplifying the energy of the others and the more there are the greater the amplification will be. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Critical Thinking With Data

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 19:18


Critical thinking is hard. No, really. It takes patience, dedication, and a degree of humility that is hard to maintain. Some people think that if you think critically, you will automatically agree with them. Others think that critical thinking means uncritically rejecting whatever your parents and grandparents taught you. Neither will ever put it quite that way but if you pay close attention to what is said by some, those conclusions are hard to avoid. Not that you should take my word for it. If you were paying attention, you might have caught that I did a little bit of the first – assuming that people thinking critically will agree with me. See? It's hard to avoid the traps even when you're writing about them.  So, what really is critical thinking and how does one do it? Thinking critically means being willing to take the time to understand something as thoroughly as possible before reaching a strong conclusion about it. To be willing to take a look at different points of view and weigh them against each other. It's more complicated than hearing the two main sides of an issue and then assuming the truth is somewhere in the middle. It's more complicated because the truth may be in between, but how far is one side or the other? Or one side might be completely wrong. Or the truth might be something neither side has even considered. I told you this is hard.  How does one begin? As with a lot of things, mindset is everything. You need to realize that you will likely never know every single thing about any one thing. Aquinas once said humanity has yet to discern the essence of a single gnat. Nothing has changed in the eight centuries since he wrote that. We know more, but not everything. If that sounds depressing, it shouldn't. It means there is always more to learn.  Start small, with a subject that already interests you, and pick up a book that catches your eye. And yes, a real book if you can, something you can highlight and make notes in the margins. Don't try to power through and crush out the page count. Save that kind of reading for fiction. Yes, there are different kinds of reading. That fact and much of the method I'm about to lay out are in How to Read a Book by Mortimer Adler. In any case, take your time and read through it, making notes as you go. Pay attention to others the author cites and get their books, and do the same with them. With each book, take the time to learn the author's voice, how he thinks, what his own presuppositions seem to be. Then be willing to correct your conclusions when you realize you got something wrong. Don't forget to pick up one or more works that contradict the author, whether he cites them or not. Every now and then the lone voice crying in the wilderness is saying something you should be paying attention to. Remember, it was once the consensus in certain circles that no planets existed outside the solar system, or that eugenics makes total sense and you should totally cure people by cutting them so the evil humor could escape. It's usually worth listening to the person challenging the consensus. Even if he proves to be off his rocker, just kicking the apple cart can get some new and productive thoughts going.  Doing all of that will actually just get you started thinking truly critically. After taking in all that data, you need to sift and weigh it, looking up additional information to fill in holes you'll find as you go along.  All data analysis needs to be approached with a similar level of patience and humility. How many companies when they collect marketing data run it through different analytical models to see if they line up? Or have multiple people look at the data? How many organizations have people whose whole job is to check different analyses against each other to see if it all adds up? The answer is sadly few. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
MIT Top Breakthrough Technologies

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 22:33


People are amazing creatures. We are constantly developing new, exciting, and at times, worrying technology. Sometimes, they are the same thing. When the first person harnessed fire, figured out how to transport it and get it started, no doubt it was all of these things and for obvious reasons. Even something as benign as the wheel has led to technologies that it would be better if no one had. Yet, we continue to innovate, striving for the good and often stumbling along the way. Recently, the MIT Technology Review released its annual round up of breakthrough technologies. Let's take a look at some of them and some positives and negatives.  The first on the list is mRNA vaccines. While the recent deployment of covid vaccines has gotten a lot of attention for being the first vaccine of this kind, the base technology has existed since the 1990s. While many are skeptical of the covid vaccines, this type of medical application could have a hugely positive impact on our ability to fight a whole host of diseases such as HIV. Next up is GPT-3 which is a language learning program. It actually has the capability to mimic what people write thanks to being trained on tons of books and of course the internet. The aim of this program is to help computers better understand the way people think and express those thoughts and thus take another step closer to artificial intelligence. On the negative end of this is the fact that some of the people working on it seem to think that they need to train it to not hold certain biases. On the surface, that might not get your attention. It would be a good thing if the AI didn't have any biases wouldn't it? Sure, but what about the biases of those who are training it? Since the AI is learning based on reading what people have written, those programmers training the AI are making determinations on biases not just for themselves, but for the AI by determining which human writings are biased. Even more, the AI is likely to be seen as completely unbiased and objective by the general public. There will be a lot of people who accept its conclusions without question, making the inevitable bias inherent in the system something that affects the opinions of potentially millions.  Shifting gears a bit, TikTok has done some interesting things with its recommendation algorithms. It actually works not just off of likes but it cross-references the preferences of others who like the same video. That helps it recognize communities of people, niches with similar interests. You basically get recommendations if someone within this network likes the same video you did.  Naturally, Lithium-Metal batteries are great. They can help store energy from lots of renewables for a long time. As always though there is a downside. Those batteries involve a lot of mining operations that are more than a little rough for the environment. Is it a net gain if we can better use renewables? Maybe, but that is going to take a lot more data to figure that out.  The one we are going to leave off with today is data trusts. The idea is that some sort of entity will manage your data on your behalf. Why on earth do I need someone, anyone to manage my data? The answer is that I don't. I and thousands of people on TARTLE from all around the world are perfectly capable of taking care of our data ourselves. All they have to do is sign up and then choose whether or not to share it. It's very simple. When people talk about doing things on your behalf, it usually means they are looking for ways to get something from you. In this case, it is the data itself. This feels very much like an attempt to get more access to people's data and use it to find ways to manipulate them.  As we said, sometimes technological innovation is both exciting and concerning. There is almost always some kind of downside. One thing that doesn't have a downside is TARTLE. All you do is sign up and protect or share your data at your own convenience and get rewarded for it. For once, there isn't a downside.  What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Definition of Insanity - Princeton Pathways

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 7:57


Since the dawn of time, people have been trying to make others go the direction they want. Whether a simple path in the grass or specifying people's place in society. One of the earliest documented examples of this kind of idea at work is Plato's Republic. Socrates' student laid out a society in which all of humanity would be divided up into specific castes, with the philosophers at the top (any time anyone tries to plan a society, his class is always at the top), the warriors next and then workers. Breeding was to be strictly controlled so that the correct offspring would be produced in arguably the first large scale eugenic plan.  Plenty of others have tried to plan societies from the top down. Every socialist country represents an attempt to do this, always to disastrous results as the failure of the rulers to consider any number of variables results in famines and economic stagnation. China is considered by many to be an exception, but if you follow them at all, you know that they currently are running concentration camps and have been backing off their one child policy for years now, most recently allowing couples to have three kids as they realize they are on the verge of a demographic collapse. This reflects a remarkable lack of foresight. It doesn't even work on a small scale. The Puritans who came over on the Mayflower were originally organized in an overly planned way, dictated by those who financed their burgeoning colony. It was a very communal structure and had little incentive for people to work on their own terms, leading to the near-death of the entire colony. It was only when they abandoned the plan and let people find their own path that things turned around.  Why is that? Why do the plans so seldom work? Most top down plans are simply too rigid. You can have a general layout for a village, or guardrails to keep people from falling off a cliff, but if you get much more granular than that you tend to run up against human nature.  Here's the deal, when you try to control people too closely you get one of three responses. One is that people are cowed and lose all motivation to better themselves and the world around them. They become broken by the system. Or people become enamored of the system and their whole life becomes about promoting the system. When the system is too controlling it doesn't wind up producing anything good, just more people absorbed by it. Finally, there are those who rebel against the control and you wind up with violence against the system, leading eventually to some kind of revolution.  The same principles apply even down to a very micro level, down to keeping people off the grass. When you just put paths arbitrarily through the grass, it can be very difficult to get people to stay on them. This is something that Princeton University learned the hard way. No matter how much they tried to keep people off the grass, they wouldn't listen. People walked wherever they wanted and thus tended to ruin the grass. Finally, the university came up with a novel solution – they paid attention to where people were walking on their own. As it turned out, people tended to find their own, more efficient paths when left to themselves. Princeton then set about making new paths to fit what people were doing on their own. That simple change, of backing off and letting people find their own way of doing things and working with that rather than trying to direct it meant a whole lot fewer headaches for the groundskeepers. It also illustrated that trying to wedge people into particular paths doesn't work all that well.  Having paths of course is good. And there will always be a need for the occasional guardrail to keep people from doing something stupid. However, most of the time, working with people rather than forcing them will lead to better and more efficient results. All because rather than wedging people into a system, someone observed, gathered the relevant data and adjusted their plans around people, instead of adjusting people around their plans. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Deforestation in 21st Century - Where Have All the Trees Gone?

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 13:08


Here's a bit of a head scratcher – there are multiple forms of deforestation. Wait? Isn't deforestation just about cutting down trees? You'd think so, but it isn't necessarily that simple. Deforestation isn't simply loggers cutting down trees to be turned into houses, furniture, and paper. It is also clearing out trees for farms, both crops and cattle. Cattle farming for instance accounts for a lot of the deforestation occurring in the world, especially in Brazil. The crops the forest might get cleared out include rubber trees and cocoa plants, both of which are major cash crops in South America where much of the world's rainforest is located. All of it takes away a significant part of the world's oxygen-producing trees.  There have been lots of victories though. There are people who remember that once upon a time, vast swaths of forest were cut down, with no plans to replenish them. Back in the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, it's easy to see how Europeans would see the vast forests of this seemingly endless continent and act as though the supply of wood were endless. As we know, we learned differently. Fortunately, most logging companies in the West have some sort of replanting program. It takes time to replenish, especially when cutting down full-grown oaks and other slow growth trees. It can take forty years or more before reaching full growth. Various pines grow faster but the wood isn't as desirable for a variety of reasons. Some of those plans were not the best either. Part of FDR's New Deal was a number of government programs designed to get people back to work.  One of those programs was a replanting effort. One of the areas that it helped reforest was Northern Michigan. While it certainly accomplished that goal, anyone who has spent any time there will tell you a lot of the forests aren't all that pretty. They're full of jack pines planted almost in rows or scattered and clustered in ways you don't see in an old growth forest. That's because the people doing the planting didn't know what they were doing. They were either throwing seeds randomly on the ground or trying to plant them in a mechanistically efficient way. The results aren't what one would hope. Still, all of those replanting initiatives – government and business alike - were a step in the right direction and it came about at a time when it was possible for environmentalists, businesses, and government to find middle ground. The environmentalists could be made to understand that trees meant homes for people and the businesses could be made to understand the need for replanting, and governments and businesses could be made to see that doing things like cutting all the trees next to a river led to problems later as erosion accelerated immensely without the tree's root systems to both use the water and hold the soil.  Unfortunately, times are different now. The positions are more extreme and every side is more intractable than ever. Yet, it is clear that some kind of middle ground has to be found. As vast as the South American rainforests are, they are not infinite. We have to figure out some way to get the resources we need to house, feed, and clothe nearly 8 billion people while still leaving something for future generations. Part of that will likely be simply consuming less. Rather than buying a new piece of furniture, it might be worth refurbishing what you have. Or build new out of scrap like pallet wood. A few less hamburgers wouldn't hurt either. That means less forest is cut down to make room for more cows.  Finding the best solutions that will keep people working and not living in a van down by the river while also protecting the planet as a whole will not be easy, it will take a lot of data. Data that you can share and purchase on TARTLE. Data on what conservation efforts are most effective, data on the effect of various practices and policies, data that can point the way to solutions for everyone.  What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
What Is Energy: A Guide to Understanding the Theory of Data Part 2

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 23:01


Last time in this brief series on the concept of sovereignism, we explored in depth how every political system thus far devised involves individuals giving up some of their sovereignty to a collective government in the hopes of getting increased security in return. While that works at least for a while, eventually the government tends to grow and take more and more control for itself until some sort of despotism takes hold. That despotism can take many forms but the important part is that it means individuals no longer have control over much of their own lives.  That control takes a lot of energy. For a state to maintain control over a population the amount of energy that gets expended is nuts. And that isn't to grow, to expand, or to increase prosperity, it's just to control and keep things where they are at. That's why the state keeps trying to control more. It and the people who run it believe that controlling more will mean there is more energy to direct towards growth. The problem is that it works in the short term. The state pulls in more and for a while can do more work with that infusion of energy. Yet, before long, that energy again gets sucked up in maintaining control. So it tries to get more energy until the people who make up the state's population aren't giving any more. Either because they have no more to give or because they just aren't having it. When that point is reached, the state begins to crumble, breaking down under the strain of maintaining control. So, what is energy? In this reading, you could say energy is control. It is used to maintain control, either by the state over people or by people over themselves. It is also power. Power over others, over things. Power to accomplish goals, whatever they might be. All that might be small thinking though. Why? Because energy is at the root of everything. The computer I'm writing this on obviously requires electricity, which most likely comes from a fossil fuel plant. Those fossil fuels were once plants and animals that pulled nutrients from the ground with the help of the sun.  The energy from the sun is therefore at the base of everything that happens here on earth. Yet, that is not the real base, you can keep going back all the way to the big bang, which was all the energy still in the universe contained in an infinitesimal point. We get to study that energy in the Cosmic Background Radiation, microwaves that carry a record of the first moments of the universe. It's the energy signature of the creation of the universe. Do you want to know the truth about what happened in those first moments? Study the energy. So perhaps, ultimately energy is a signpost to the truth. Not only is this true when it comes to understanding the truths of the universe, it works to a degree with people too. What to know about what a person really wants? What a person thinks is important? Look at what they do, where they spend their energy. Especially their energy when the necessities are met. What do people do with their energy after they have food and shelter? No matter what they say then, that is a big indicator of what they really find important. That's the truth.  Why then would we give any of that up? Why give up truth, power or control to a centralized entity that will likely use it against you? Whether it be a business or a government, chances are anything you give them can and will be used against you. That's why people should be moving to systems like TARTLE and cryptocurrency. Take back control of your data, the record of how you spend your energy. Get away from the systems of the centralized entities that don't have your interests at heart. Why do you think they want your data so much? It isn't for your benefit, it's for theirs. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
What Is Energy: A Guide to Understanding the Theory of Data Part 1

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 22:24


Statism is a general term that applies to some degree to just about every type of socio-economic structure you can think of. That's because in all of them, from capitalism to fascism to communism, there is some level of state control. Obviously more in some than in others. Certainly, capitalism allows for a lot more individual freedom than the other two isms mentioned and pretty much any other that has been tried before. Still, there is some level of control that is given up by sovereign individuals. Perhaps it would be more accurate to say they are individuals who should be sovereign.  What is interesting is that all of these systems at least begin by people choosing to give up some control to a centralized government. Eventually, the government is given enough control that it begins to take whatever more control it wants regardless of what the people have actually chosen. That's when you get various forms of despotism, from those we are most familiar with like fascism and communism to oligarchies like what the capitalism of the West is fast becoming if it isn't already there.  It naturally has to be recognized that anarchy (not in the chaos in the streets sense, but in the complete lack of government sense) isn't really feasible. People will organize themselves into groups. We're hardwired to do so. And unfortunately, that means we are going to need to be protected from other groups at some point. You can be as peaceful as you want in group A but group B down the other side of the valley may just decide your grass is greener. That means there will be some kind of provision for the military and an apparatus for trade with different groups. Peaceful, free, and fair trade, coupled with the backing of military have probably prevented more wars than we will ever know. If there is no need to get the stuff needed by force with fair and free trade and if trying to do so would be met with an equal or greater force, then peace is maintained. Regardless, this basic society doesn't actually require much in the way of a federal, centralized government. In fact, the necessary government would be pretty small.  That is exactly how the United States was originally set up. The Federal Government was meant to deal with foreign nations, preferably through trade but also through war if we were to be attacked. These minimal activities didn't require much in the way of taxes to support them either. Yet, we have clearly gotten very far afield from those golden days.  Now, it looks like we are moving into something different. Digital technology is empowering and returning power back to individuals in ways that haven't been possible before. It has opened up communication and resource sharing beyond borders. The TARTLE team is just one example we happen to be familiar with. We have team members from New Mexico to the Philippines. Massive corporations shift their own resources and finances around with a few keystrokes. Individuals can start their own businesses, earn, sell, and make purchases with Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. The world is becoming decentralized in a way that actually makes the familiar nation-state look like a dinosaur.  Like the dinosaurs, the nation-state is slow to react to changes while individuals can be much more flexible. That's why states and major businesses are trying to control technology and data, both the development and distribution of it. In a sense, both business and government (which Chesterton referred to as Hudge and Gudge, two entities that inevitably merge) rely on people to be their technology creation labor force and then use that technology to increase their level of control.  Next time, we'll get deeper into sovereignism and the question of what energy is. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Tcast
Not For The Woke of Heart - Free Speech with Professor Jonathan Zimmerman, PhD

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 54:00


One challenging aspect of dealing with speech is that it bridges the gap between an individual's thoughts and their action. Now that everything is so accessible and the internet is everywhere, it's important to analyze the kind of influence our words have on each other.  With so much power to connect and communicate in the palm of our hands, we are pushed to be more proactive and to hold ourselves accountable for the kind of discourse that we allow. Consequently, this also prompts us to think of the level of inclusivity that we promote in our social circles.Today, TARTLE looks into the price of putting limits on speech with Jonathan Zimmerman.   Is It Time To Cancel Today's Cancel Culture? How has cancel culture and the evolution of what it means to secure social justice, particularly in the context of social media and the internet, changed the way today's generation navigates speech? “It's funny, that when we become emotionally charged...logic seems to fly out the door and we forget the reason for why certain fundamentals were in place that, I guess, allow us to be emotionally outspoken,” Jonathan explained on the podcast.  Today's cancel culture can be vicious: anybody can be publicly named and shamed for accountability, and boycotting has become a pivotal part of Gen Z's definition of social justice. This collective action serves as an opportunity for the masses to voice their concerns to public figures — but also to participate in a greater cause from the comfort of their homes.  In recent times, Jonathan shared how his Trump-supporting students were afraid of opening up about their political beliefs to the rest of the class. This prompted him to implement a meet and greet from students from another college under a premise that they called “the wedding tables model.”  Students from the University of Pennsylvania would be assigned to sit in circular tables with students from Cairn University. At the center of the room, a carefully selected roster of students from the two institutions would initiate a conversation on their beliefs, which would be on opposite ends of the spectrum. This gave everyone the opportunity to experience opening up to a perceived political rival or enemy — but without the fear of being judged. Similarly, TARTLE  also gives people an opportunity to look beyond political affiliations. It gives people and entities around the world the platform needed to share data truthfully, anonymously, and securely about themselves so that they may find common ground over time — what it means, Alex says, to be a human being across all the 220 countries on this planet.   The Roots of Limiting Free Speech: The Brandenburg Case In 1964, an officer in the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) named Clarence Brandenburg held a meeting with fellow members, in the presence of invited media representatives.  Here, Brandenburg made several anti-Semitic and anti-black statements; he also made several hints to the possibility of committing “revengeance” if the federal government and the Court continued “suppressing the white Caucasian race.” Finally, he declared that KKK members were set to march on Washington DC, on Independence Day. While Brandenburg was convicted, fined $1,000, and sentenced to one to ten years in prison, the US Supreme Court later reversed his conviction. It held that a new test, called the “imminent lawless action” test or the Brandenburg test, should be used as a metric for speech. This new test, which continues to be the standard used by the government to punish inflammatory speech: is composed of three elements: intent to speak, imminence of lawlessness, and likelihood of lawlessness. Brandenburg's case was important in enforcing an idea Jonathan mentions in the podcast: that no right is absolute. However, if the state is pushed to limit speech in any situation, it must adhere to an absolutely clear rationale for it.   Are Limits To Free Speech, Limits To Peace? Jonathan pointed out that often, there is plenty of discussion about the legal environment surrounding free speech — but not as much about the educational. With campuses touted as protected areas for speech, he calls for people to be more thoughtful about “modeling a different and a better kind of exchange in our schools.” In 1965, thirteen-year-old Mary Beth Tinker wore a black armband to school in protest of the United States' involvement in Vietnam as part of a group protest. She, alongside her brother John, was one of five students that were singled out for punishment.  Immediately after they were suspended, Tinker reported that her family received multiple threats from the public. Despite the lack of an absolute and immediate threat to learning in the school, the lives of Tinker and her fellow students changed drastically after this simple act of defiance. Incidents like this prompt the need for people, particularly from the younger generation, to have venues where they are free to experience each other's humanity despite differences in politics.    Free Speech Facilitating Self-Reflection Jonathan shared his realizations about his own prejudice when he came across a religious missionary while volunteering for the Peace Corps in Nepal: when you really get angry with somebody, it's because you see a part of yourself in them that you don't like. Furthermore, anger clouds the judgment and encourages us to lash out at the individual, instead of the problem at hand. This instinctive emotion pushes us to be aggressive and to defend ourselves against an abstract fear.  In the podcast, Jonathan posits that increased tolerance for others' right to free speech — especially from those who hold views and beliefs on the opposite end of the spectrum — is an important part of the authentic human experience because it's a learning process. Minimizing ideas that are against the ones we hold dear to us as harmful may help protect one's ego; but it inhibits learning, and a perspective of growth.   Closing Thoughts: Free Speech Is A Radical Value — Not A Conservative One In a world where information is so accessible, we are challenged to evolve beyond the instinctual and reflexive part of human nature and start seeing others as unique, complex individuals with experiences, motivations, and perspectives that are just as compelling as our own. Inhibitions on free speech become a crutch we grow reliant on, inhibiting our capacity for growth and leading to self-sabotage. Arguing that certain subjects should not be discussed is, according to Jonathan, also arguing that people are not capable of self-governance — which can be seen in areas and countries where censorship is a norm. Our continued freedom to think, speak, and act is also shaped by the way we choose to respond to other people. When all this is translated into data on the internet, it really makes you think — how much is your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!  

Tcast
Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom & Data of the Forest - Special Guest: World's Leading Forest Ecologist Suzanne Simard

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 49:16


In line with TARTLE's mission to promote climate stability, one of its Big 7, James and Alex welcomed Suzanne Simard to the podcast.  Suzanne, who is a Professor of Forest Ecology at the University of British Columbia and the author of Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering The Wisdom of the Forest, explores the significance of emphasizing data-driven action on climate change — particularly on the old-growth forests of British Columbia. She offers an eye-opening perspective on the deterioration of these old-growth forests and the colossal amount of environmental data with untapped potential. Throughout their discussion, she also drew plenty of thoughtful parallels between big data and the fight against deforestation.   Old Growth Forests: Massive Data Networks? The complex data networks making up a bulk of the tech systems we are heavily dependent on today are eerily similar to the interactions of trees in old growth forests. Suzanne realized that trees are in constant conversation underground. This is made possible with the help of sophisticated fungal networks that link one tree to the rest of the forest. However, this large-scale communication network is displaced when the old forests are cut down — and even when plantations are created, the network “goes silent for a little while.” Even when the forest begins to rebuild, it would take decades — if not centuries — for these areas to regain the same complexity that they once had when they interacted as a society of trees in an old growth forest.  Beyond the impact of this loss to local biodiversity, there is much to be said about how clearcutting these old growth forests is akin to cutting off entire societies from communicating with one another. This, inherently, is an injustice to our environment and a setback at our attempt to become true stewards of the earth.    Selective Harvesting Versus Clear-Cutting Suzanne introduced the importance of selective harvesting, a regenerative method that allows trees to grow back without trouble. While this is the best step forward, most companies in status quo prefer to clearcut entire forests because of the reduced cost.  One particularly harmful practice of clearcutting is the harvest of “mother trees” — big, old trees that are both the most ecologically valuable in the forest and the most profitable. When corporations use clearcutting to profit from forests, they set back the local environment in five distinct ways. The first is the loss of biodiversity; the second is the loss of carbon, an element that's important for sustaining life; next is a rise in water levels, a change in soil temperature, and an increased rate of decomposition.    Can't See The Forest For The Trees For many people, it's easier to focus on the problems that are directly in their sight instead of trying to grasp the bigger picture. Regretfully, this decision becomes a matter of survival in some situations: low-income families depend heavily on the sachet economy to get by, tech-challenged SMEs in rural areas still rely on paper documentation to keep track of their business, and the shift to renewable products can often be difficult because these items have a higher upfront cost.  We are challenged to think of the environment in two ways: first, to look beyond the concerns that plague our day-to-day activities; and second, to help others who are not as fortunate or as privileged as us get the access to look beyond as well.  There is a massive network of corporations, institutions, and individuals that enable the pace at which our climate is dying. It's going to take a whole new level of mindfulness before we start changing how this works on a noticeable level — not just for ourselves and our loved ones, but for our communities as well.   Stewardship: What We Owe Each Other Suzanne points out that humanity's relationship with the environment has evolved significantly. On a continuum, foresting started off as an exploitative practice; but as we realized that we only had a finite amount of resources to work with, we made an attempt to regulate and then manage these harvests. In the ‘80s and ‘90s, the US entered a period of science-based management. It was here, she explains, that the big leagues understood the connection between deforestation, climate change, and big data.  But despite our progress, we have yet to reach a stage where we can accurately call ourselves stewards of the environment. This title calls for us to be proactive about the land and to hold ourselves accountable for climate change, not just as a present concern but also as a part of our intergenerational ethic. This time, it's not just a question of what your data is worth. How much is our collective data, as aspiring stewards of this planet, worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!    

Tcast
Data is Like Physical Property

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 25:11


Gold has been the standard for monetary value for millennia. Ever since humanity realized it likes shiny rocks (relax, I know it's a metal) gold has been highly desired and sought after. More than a few people have been killed because they had it and someone else wanted it. In one of the more distressing attempts to get out of the Great Depression FDR actually ordered the confiscation of privately held gold, sending agents to people's homes and offering them the ‘fair compensation' of fiat currency.  Interestingly, it doesn't even change value much. An ounce of gold today can buy pretty much what an ounce of gold could buy fifty years ago. However, it has a much larger dollar value attached. What that tells you is that one green piece of paper is worth a whole lot less than it was fifty years ago.  There are of course things more valuable than gold. Platinum is a precious metal that is rarer and more valuable as a rule. Bitcoin is argued by many to be more valuable than gold, at least in the modern age. Should we ever get the EMP apocalypse that would probably change. However, there is one thing that is definitely worth more than all of those, and arguably has always been, and that would be data. Good old-fashioned information, the currency of kings, robber-barons, politicians, and tech lords around the world.  A piece of information can alter the fate of empires, or make the difference between a massive profit or going out of business. That's why today businesses and governments spend billions, if not trillions collectively to gather as much information on you and me as they possibly can. That's why there are so many apps that want permissions to every bit of info on your phone, or there is so much info tied up in a simple digital photo. It's also why there are cameras everywhere. Sure, at the beginning they were probably put in strictly with the idea of improving security and catching criminals. Then it became about tracking traffic, both foot and car. But there is a mission creep. The local government or the particular business you are in can now use those cameras to track your movements, who you talk to, what kind of clothing you like to wear and when.  What one might consider to be particularly galling is the fact that not only is all the data gathered without your actual consent, it's done often without your knowledge and then it is kept from you. Even better, the means of acquiring information are kept from you. Not so much the knowledge of the means (though in some cases that is true) but the means themselves. After all, you can't exactly get a hold of those street cameras for your own purposes.  Then of course, there are the satellites. Oh yeah, if you don't like location data and street cameras, you will absolutely hate satellites. Those things can seriously read your license plate from space. They have far more resolution than you can get from Google Earth where the average person is limited to what you can see from around 150ft. Just imagine how much data the government, and the mega-corps that can afford to pay the fees to access the higher resolutions can get from those.  Not that I want my neighbor having access to that information either. What I would like is not having companies and my government spying on me, even for the ‘common good'. That's why TARTLE is so important. We are at the forefront of a movement to regain control of our data. That starts with people signing up and protecting their data with us and deciding whether or not you share it on your terms. But that, as they say, is just the beginning.  What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!