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European Union regulation on the processing of personal data

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Selling With Social Sales Podcast
LinkedIn Prospecting Strategies and Trends with Alyssa Merwin, #197

Selling With Social Sales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 44:21


If the past 18 months have taught us anything, it's that virtual selling is here to stay. And, in order to master the new art of modern selling, sales leaders must tap into the prospecting power of the social selling tools at their disposal.  Because those sales reps that know how to personalize their outreach, engage prospects in meaningful conversations, and quickly identify the most pressing pain points, will have an unfair advantage well into the future. No one knows how to leverage social media to close deals better than my guest on this episode of the Modern Selling Podcast.  Alyssa Merwin is the global Vice President of LinkedIn Sales Solutions, one of the company's fastest-growing lines of business. In her role, Alyssa leads the global sales organization to help companies around the world engage with LinkedIn's community of nearly 800 million members, connecting buyers and sellers to support organizations' business objectives.   With more than 20 years of experience in the sales industry, Alyssa has a proven track record of achieving strong business results and managing high-performing teams. Since joining LinkedIn in 2011, she has held numerous leadership positions, and most recently served as Vice President of Sales Solutions for North America, during which time the business experienced tremendous growth.   Outside of LinkedIn, Alyssa is a member of the Sales Impact Academy's Advisory Board, an investor and advisor to Black Star Fund, and an investor in Stage 2 Capital. Prior to joining LinkedIn, Alyssa spent nine years at CEB, now Gartner, and held various sales positions during her tenure. When it comes to keeping the pulse on sales – what works and what trends to look out for – Alyssa's genius is truly unmatched. If you've been looking for proven strategies to get more “hellos” and make your prospecting more efficient and effective, then tune into this strategy-rich conversation with Alyssa. You'll walk away with at least 5 actionable LinkedIn prospecting strategies to use by the end of this episode – guaranteed! How has prospecting changed in a post-COVID world? Since early 2020, I've personally witnessed radical shifts in how sales organizations are both reaching out to their prospects AND how they're training their sales teams.  When you study the effectiveness of strategies like cold email outreach, it starts to paint a very different sales picture that all sales leaders must be aware of. In my research, I've found that the number of sales emails sent has increased by 60% since 2020, however, the response rates have plummeted over 30%. So, it's not just about having more touchpoints with your prospects. Selling in this new virtual environment is all about having the right touchpoints, that convey the right value and that address the right pain points. I asked Alyssa to share what she's seen as the sales leader of LinkedIn in terms of how the pandemic has reshaped the sales industry: “Virtual selling will be core to how we all go to market from here on out. We've found that 70% of people go through the entire sales process without ever talking to a salesperson. They're able to find the information they need, make the decisions that work best for them, and feel more productive as a result – all in this virtual space. Like many organizations have, we will continue to need to adapt and evolve in this particular environment. At best we are looking at a hybrid approach, but we have to recognize and accept the importance of virtual selling.” I couldn't agree more with Alyssa! As the world's largest digital sales training company, we're constantly reading the market to see how we can better position our courses, find new topics to offer, and ways to better engage our prospects and customers. Many sales organizations have tried to shift to this virtual selling space by sending more emails or making more cold calls. As Alyssa suggests in our conversation, the shift that's needed has to go well beyond just doing more of the same tactical sales strategies and really get at the heart of buyer intent. Join the full conversation to hear specifically what unique prospecting strategy Alyssa recommends using to get a response back on the first outreach. How can sales organizations take a buyer first approach? Today's modern buyer is well informed. They're well researched and they know what options are available to them even before they ever get on a sales call. That's why tailoring your sales process to your prospect is so important. From how you write your outreach messages, to identifying their pain points, to the way you speak about your offering – everything has to feel personalized. I was curious to get Alyssa's take on this “buyer first” approach and how she would recommend a sales organization go about implementing this model. Her insights are spot on, “We know that our buyers are getting further through the sales decision or the buying decision before we even walk in the door. There's just so much more information available – we can easily hop onto a website, we can look at a demo, we can reach out on LinkedIn. As sales leaders, we have to recognize this new playing field and truly get clear on how we have to show up differently. Part of that is getting smart about the industry, the company, the individual you're meeting with and do it in a very detailed way that puts them at the center of the conversation.” Taking this time to do the research is such a critical step that so many sales reps overlook.  That's why at Vengreso our sales team follows the “Three by Three” method before we ever reach out to a prospect. Want to hear what it is and how we use it to 10x our response rates?  Download the episode and pay particular attention around the 20-minute mark. What are the most important sales trends to watch? We have to move away from the “smile and dial” prospecting strategies of the past and start to build a new level of buyer engagement. I wanted to get Alyssa's expert opinion on the state of the sales industry and where she saw the focus shifting in 2022. The way she sees it, there are three emerging trends that sales leaders need to keep a pulse on: Data privacy and compliance. The level of sophistication of online sales tools is rapidly increasing, but so too is the need to protect consumer data and private information. Alyssa strongly recommends taking inventory of the sales enablement tools you're using now and making sure they're compliant with GDPR and other data privacy standards.  Buyer intent data. We have to move beyond just focusing on who to contact and how to contact them and fully understand the science of buyer intent. Knowing when and how best to engage your prospect, what buyer signals to look for, and where your buyer is in the process will make sellers much more effective going forward.  Digital referrals. With platforms like LinkedIn that give you incredible visibility into the connections in your network – mastering how to ask for a digital referral will continue to be an important skill to develop. It's by breaking through the sales noise with a personal touchpoint that will separate average sales reps from those who consistently exceed quota without having to send hundreds of cold emails to do it. This is just the tip of the sales iceberg that Alyssa shares in this episode.  Make sure you listen all the way until the end to hear the best digital referral process to follow. [Hint: We use it and it works wonders!]

그것은 알기 싫다
446c. 일상생활 2022:모빌리티, 동물보건사, GDPR, 출산, 공항, 장병내일준비적금 /홍성갑, 윤세민

그것은 알기 싫다

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 60:00


Daily Tech Headlines
Austrian Data Watchdog Rules Google Analytics Violates GDPR – DTH

Daily Tech Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022


The Austrian Data Protection Authority rules that Google Analytics violates GDPR, Telsa removes references to a 2022 production date for the Cybertruck from its website, and Nigeria lifts its ban on Twitter. MP3 Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. You can get an ad-free feed of Daily Tech Headlines for $3 a month here. A special thanks toContinue reading "Austrian Data Watchdog Rules Google Analytics Violates GDPR – DTH"

Startuprad.io - Startup podcast from Germany
AskBrian is the Digital Assistant All Busy Professionals Need

Startuprad.io - Startup podcast from Germany

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 24:43


"If you can order a pizza with an AI bot, … you should also be able to order the analysis of a company with an AI bot."Pavol Sikula, Founder and CEO AskBrian.ai Subscribe Here  Find all options to subscribe to our newsletter, podcast, YouTube channel or listen to our internet radio station here: Link https://linktr.ee/startupradio Our Sponsor Startupraven  The best way to identify investors and cooperation partners for early-stage startups. Sign up for early access here: https://startupraven.com/ "The first skill was actually “AskBrian, tell me a joke”"Pavol Sikula, Founder and CEO AskBrian.ai Our Cooperation with the German AI Association (KI Bundesverband)  This is the first interview in our series with the KI Bundesverband (https://ki-verband.de/en/), Germany's association for artificial intelligence. The association has 350 members consisting of startups, experts, and corporates. KI Bundesverband is therefore one of Germany's largest associations dedicated to AI, with members from AgTech, Fintech, BioTech, Cybersecurity, Manufacturing, Logistics, and many more fields of business. In the interview series, we will have members of the association giving you a glimpse in what is going on in AI in Germany. The Founder  Our interview guest this week is Pavol (https://www.linkedin.com/in/pavol-sikula/), CEO and Founder of AskBrian (https://www.askbrian.ai/) a virtual AI assistant for professionals. The idea of AskBrian stems from Pavol's background in management consulting, where he spent more than a decade with Roland Berger and Stern Steward & Co, in restructuring. In his spare time, Pavol is also a kid's soccer coach. "All of our data is securely hosted, GDPR compliant, in Germany."Pavol Sikula, Founder and CEO AskBrian.ai The Startup  AskBrian is the AI assistant for busy professionals like management consultants or investment bankers. It helps by automating everyday tasks like listed and private company profiles, translations in multiple languages, making PowerPoint more attractive, and converting documents e.g. PDFs and Pictures to the format of your choice e.g. Word. https://www.linkedin.com/company/askbrian-gmbh/ https://www.askbrian.ai/ https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/askbrian/ Venture Capital Funding  AskBrian closed already two funding rounds, for undisclosed amounts. They intend to raise another funding round in Q1 2022. Original Post  Find all links and show notes on the original post here: https://www.startuprad.io/blog/askbrian-is-the-digital-assistant-all-busy-professionals-need/

Great Women in Compliance
Jonathan Armstrong

Great Women in Compliance

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 43:51


Welcome to the Great Women in Compliance Podcast, co-hosted by Lisa Fine and Mary Shirley.  Welcome to the first Great Women In Compliance episode for 2022. Lisa and Mary are really excited about starting off another year of connecting, communicating and celebrating our GWIC family. While Mary and Lisa usually start out each quarter with a joint discussion, this time they do a joint interview with a guest who was there when this podcast was born. Jonathan Armstrong is a strong supporter of women in compliance, diversity, and is an expert in GDPR, Brexit, and many other multinational issues, as well as a partner at Cordery Compliance, and is based in the UK. He is also on the Compliance Podcast Network as a co-host of the "Everything Compliance" and "Life with GDPR" podcasts.  In this episode, we talk about what he thinks should be top of mind for E&C professionals in multinational organizations, how Brexit has impacted compliance programs, and what is new in the world of GDPR and data privacy.   Jonathan is also known for his ability to connect and build relationships. and talks about how he builds his network and his approach. Lisa and Mary like to think that one of the highlights of Jonathan's career is that he won the GWICie for Comic Relief, and not only will you understand why after listening to this episode. As always, we are so grateful for all of your support and if you have any feedback or suggestions for our line up or would just like to reach out and say hello, we always welcome hearing from our listeners. If you are enjoying this episode, please rate it on your preferred podcast player to help other likeminded Ethics and Compliance professionals find it.  You can also find the GWIC podcast on Corporate Compliance Insights where Lisa and Mary have a landing page with additional information about them and the story of the podcast.   You can subscribe to the Great Women in Compliance podcast on any podcast player by searching for it and we welcome new subscribers to our podcast. Join the Great Women in Compliance community on LinkedIn here. 

Data Privacy Detective - how data is regulated, managed, protected, collected, mined, stolen, defended and transcended.

Turkey is the first 2022 stop on our global tour about data localization. What is Turkey's approach to cross-border transfers of personal data about its citizens and residents? Turkey's Law on Protection of Personal Data is comprehensive and like the European Union's former Data Protection Directive, though it differs in some respects. Data localization is not part of this existing Turkish law. Instead, Turkey takes a sectoral approach to cross-border collection and processing of personal data of its residents. Turkish banks must collect and store Turkish customer data within Turkey. Data localizations requirements apply to payment and electronic money institutions, forcing companies like Paypal or Venmo to locate a payment system within Turkey and to comply with Turkish data privacy regulations. Social media providers must register with and report every six months to Turkish authorities about Turkish social media users. In August 2021, the Turkish Data Protection Authority (KVKK) proposed to amend Turkish law to permit cross-border data transfers if it issues an adequacy decision about another country. But unlike GDPR, the amendment would require the foreign country to be reciprocal in its data privacy laws, a unique approach that extends beyond adequacy. If adopted, the KVKK approach would encourage multinational companies to use Turkish-based servers and a Turkish subsidiary to have broad access to the Turkish market but would allow flexibility through binding corporate rules and notifying the Turkish authorities of a standard undertaking. Tune in to Episode 78 to learn how and why Turkey may be aligning with evolving European standards instead of more authoritarian and protectionist rules evident in China, Russia, and India. If you have ideas for more interviews or stories, please email info@thedataprivacydetective.com.

RCA Radio
2022 Industry Outlook - Medical Device

RCA Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 32:13


In this episode of RCA Radio, host Brandon Miller, Seyed Khorashahi, and Thor Rollins explore what is happening in the medical device industry in 2022 and provide you with insight on how to prepare yourself for these upcoming initiatives. Seyed is Regulatory Compliance Associates® Inc. (RCA) Executive VP of Medical Device and CTO. Thor is Nelsons Laboratory's Toxicology, and Extractables and leachables (E&L) Expert. Listen in as we provide an outlook into the most important things happening in 2022 to the medical device industry such as; New technology uses cases, new notified body regulations, upcoming onsite inspections, supply chain issues, and much more.

GDPR Weekly Show
GDPR Weekly Show Episode 176 :- Lastpass, T-Mobile, Sega, Colchester Council, Nat-West, Rhode Island, Pulse TV, South Korea, Amazon, US State Incident Reporting, India data rules, Redline Have I Been Pwned

GDPR Weekly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 27:28


Coming up in this week's episode:  Lastpass data breach update, T-Mobile data breach, Sega narrowly avoids data breach, Colchester Council data breach, Nat-West ex-employee has customer data under her bed, Rhode Island Passenger Transport Authority data breach, Pulse TV data breach, South Korea declared adequate for GDPR, Amazon granted deferment of GDPR penalty, US State incident reporting changes in 2022, India data rules to be updated in 2022, Redline data appears on Have I Been Pwned

Financial Investing Radio
FIR 139: The Data Privacy 2-STEP For YOUR AI !!

Financial Investing Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 18:39


In this episode, we take a look at some simple steps to protect the privacy of the data for your AI. Welcome everybody to another episode of click AI radio. Well, certainly data privacy has been on the minds of a lot of people and organizations and governments and governments and institutions, and so forth. No surprise there. One of the things though about AI is that, in general, it's not spent as much time if you will, putting a focus on that area. And it's been a bit of a problem and will become more of a problem if we don't do something about it. As we work with our application and use of AI itself. Now I was looking at several different groups and what they talked about and what they felt about it. At the end of this episode, I'm going to throw out two steps that I have seen that help us mitigate the challenges around this right to help to prevent some of the challenges of slippage, if you will, of getting the privacy of people's information out there that that shouldn't be now to frame that up. I want to introduce a framework for it. One of the one of the blogs, I looked at those, it was called beware the privacy violations and artificial intelligence applications it came from comes from is a see if I can say that is aca.org. There you go. A blog from there. Anyway, here, I'm gonna read an interesting quote here, right said, Look, artificial intelligence has been no different when seen through a privacy by lens design lens, as privacy has not been top of mind in the development of AI technologies. Yeah. All right. So end quote there. I agree with that that has been true. In fact, a lot of our efforts have been, can we just prove the viability of this technology in terms of helping people, individuals, businesses, certainly, there's been success with AI. And there's been some challenges. Now, they what what's introduced here is three interesting pieces to consider. When we're looking at privacy, one of those has to do with what's called data persistence. All right, so put your nerd hat on gonna be nerdy here for a moment, data persistence, that means the data existing today will last longer than the human subjects that created it. All right. And that's of course, driven by things like low data storage costs, and all the technologies that are available to allow our data to live a lot longer than us as people. So that creates a potential privacy challenge. There's another data privacy challenge. It's called Data repurposing, and that is, data that was originally created then gets used in ways that is beyond what it was originally intended. And AI is data hungry, we'll use that up, suck that up. Alright. And the third sort of area around privacy includes what's called a data spillover. And here's where, and this happens a bit in it actually drove a lot of the GDPR stuff, right, which is data collected on people who were not the target of data collection. And so of course, driving out of it was things like, you know, GDPR, out of Europe, certainly CCPA out of California, all of those things drive to or point to the need for having some regulation around it. Now, it's one thing to have regulation that's entirely different, to enforce it. And some of that comes upon us as business owners, it means that there are few things that we can and must do in order to protect the privacy of people's data and their information while still delivering value from AI. And that's that's certainly the balance that we're going for. One of the primary concerns, of course, with AI is its ability to replicate or reinforce or even amplify harmful biases, right? And this is a challenge because those biases can proliferate and then end up driving insights and and recommendations and predictions that of course, take you know, are wrong, right have have this human bias in it, there's there's another challenge to that we have with AI, let's say that we're going to try to fix that or solve for that. One of the problems, though, is that a lot of our auditing methods used today are based on the fact that something has already occurred, meaning in this case, with AI, that makes it even more difficult, right? Because it means that I've created an AI model, and I'm starting to then employ recommendations, insights and decisions, ways in which I work with people or deliver solutions, all with the incorporated bad behavior already. So it's kind of late, that doesn't mean that we shouldn't do the audits on the data. But they're post deployment by nature, meaning I've, I've already deployed it. So what we have to figure out is to find a balance, right, with privacy, as well as AI progress, it's finding the ability to say I'm gonna, I'm going to grow my my data usage in a way that that protects the privacy of the individuals involved. But I also need to allow AI to move forward and that right, there is, of course, a challenge that we're looking to pursue it some groups use consent today, right? It's a get someone to consent that they you know, you can be happy to share your information with them. That has some challenges with that those consents, not always as powerful as a tool as we might believe. And there's been examples where consent has been still misappropriated, right, what we thought originally what people thought originally was consent for certain use, then there was spill over into other areas, meaning people, you know, people didn't know their data was being used by AI for other purposes. So again, even though consent might be there, and organizations or people are well, intending, controlling, controlling the the, you know, the the boundaries of the consent, and enforcing that still is a real challenge, and relies on a lot of people to manually handle that, which means that there's more opportunities for us to mess up. I was looking at a report from the Brookings Institute, they were talking about AI Governance Initiative. And most interesting, there's this is some legislation that was pursuing this balance of how to pass privacy legislation, while while still allowing for AI to do the kind of work that it needs to bring about some of the benefits to humanity that we feel that we can do with this with this awesome technology. One of the techniques that that is mentioned here in this Brookings Institute report was, and you've heard it before, is all around what's called algorithm clarity, right? It's having clarity on how the algorithms using your information, right, that seems to be a useful piece to help dealing with it. But one of the problems with that is, you know, as an SMB owner, is that it ends up giving though, the burden typically on the backs of the of the SMB owner to say two things, one, I have to I have to make things transparent, so that my customers are aware that some aspects of their business information is leveraged by AI, right. And so that's, that's sort of the first incumbency is to say, I'm going to tell you, here's, here's what, here's what we're going to do with your data, it's going to be, you know, used in AI, and to draw the line on what information is not used. Okay? So that's what kind of comes out of this, right? It's, it's a, it's an activity or, you know, being forthright with, with our customers, on on what the intended use of the information that will or will not be used right in to draw that line. That's the first sort of consideration in algorithmic clarity. The second consideration, though, is explainability. Right. So that's, again, where you let your customers know what kind of algorithms are being used. Right. And this may include, you know, access to a human to provide that clarity, you know, okay. The thing I struggle with this, and of course, I that's all well and good. The thing I sometimes get challenged with here is what the heck does it mean to have one of the people in your team explain? Oh, yeah, you know, we use linear regression, or we use a particular classification model or, you know, a Bayes model, right, etc. We used all these different machine learning models and algorithms to that's what good is that right? 99% of people are gonna be like, What are you talking about? How did that help me understand any better? So this area of explainability, right, so the transparency Hey, we're going to use this kind of information or Not this kind of information in terms of the AI. So being clear with your customers on that. And then number two, coming up with a well Set Description for the kinds of algorithms being used, the, here's us maybe a simple way to think about it, you can break it into two buckets, right? When you're trying to explain AI to your customer say, we're going to be using this set of data for our AI algorithms. But we want to let you know that there's sort of two major areas, right. And what I'm gonna say here doesn't apply to all of AI, but for sort of vague, you know, AI for analytics, then then this applies. And it can be simply this. For those kinds of AI problems, where we're trying to determine yes or no answers, then we use what's called classification models, right? So it will be good for us to sell you this product or that product, yes or no? All right, classification kinds of problems. Then there's the other kind of problem, which is we'll use some AI algorithms to help us know, what might be the right price range, right? Now, of course, those are called more regressions, style algorithms. But you don't need to say that. It's simply we're going to use AI to help us understand yes, or no kinds of answers or questions to, you know, answer the questions. And the others, we're going to use it to understand, you know, proper pricing, perhaps right? Things that are not necessarily yes or no, but but degrees of difference, right? Those are two major buckets. And we can work on developing pretty simple language to explain this stuff. Otherwise, what good is it right if people can't, can't get it? Alright, I want to just point out one other thing here. So let me just summarize. So there's two things I think that an SMB can do to apply AI. Alright, so and to help solve for this problem of data privacy, after looking at and applying AI in multiple situations, or excuse me, over many years, come down to these two, two steps. They're a bit overly simplified, but I still think that if you print these out, put it on your wall, it could save you some real pain. Alright, so here's the first one. The first one is where I've seen a fair amount of pain. And this will sound really overly simple. First one is this. Start your AI journey with vetted questions and data oversight. Like what? Alright, I'll I'll come back to that. Number two, apply AI using smart steps. What? Alright, I'll come back to that. Awesome. Alright, so let me talk about number one here for a moment. So uh, number one here starting your AI journey with vetted questions and data oversight. It seems like an obvious first step, but when you examine the case studies of AI failures empirically, it looks like you know, this step has either been skipped or was not given the proper waiting look, a key technique here is to first vet what while you're doing this is to first bet by leveraging an independent party or going under NDA with someone, but what you want to challenge is the intended question you're trying to address with AI? Right, some of the biggest missteps with AI has been? No, that was the wrong question to be asking, this is the wrong use case to be pursuing right? There was inherently something that was either, you know, prone to lots of bias or was an unethical use of AI. Right. So in this step, the anticipated questions for AI. I know that sounds so simple, but it should be written down and evaluated in the context of the impact to your customers, and to other interested parties and to humanity for crying out loud, right? Just stop and do that simple stuff. I know, it sounds so doggone obvious. But alright, now, what does it mean to vet your AI questions? Well evaluate the AI implications to your customers, as well as look at some of those three elements that I introduced earlier. In other words, hey, will there be data persistence? What does it mean for the data that I'll be collecting to be in existence longer than the humans that created it? Right? What does that do in terms of in terms of privacy impacts or data repurposing? Wait a minute, are we going to be using the data beyond its originally you know, imagined purpose? And if so, you know, what obligation do we have to the people of all and number three data spillovers, right? Ask the question. Wait, are we collecting data on people that were not targeted those with whom we you know, initially intended? So stop and ask do I have the right question and then And then also, what's the impact of these two these three AI privacy areas of data persistence, repurposing, and data spillovers? All right, that's step one, stop and do a little vetted questioning, right and data oversight before you get too far. All right, number two is this. This in this one I call applying AI using smart steps. What this means is to iterate on the AI model and continue to refine and refactor and rebuild it as more as learned. What that does is it allows us to even adjust our AI models that might have some bias that we discover, right? So what it means is to build your vetted model, learn from experience, and then evaluate the impact to your business, your customers and then iterate. Right. So there's a book that came out not too long ago, it's by Bernard Marr. It's called "Artificial Intelligence In Practice". And what he's got in there is he's got 50 company use cases where AI was applied. Now I just want to pull something from that book, that's interesting. He goes, in that book, there's this one use case about Alibaba in China, right, who ultimately built a virtual platform that mimicked customer behaviors. And one of the reasons they did it was because it would take too long and too much effort to continually refactor their system. And so this virtual platform is used to allow the AI to continue to be refined and rebuilt and refactor. Now, you know, to do you know, to do lots of model rebuilding, in some situations, right, that's really heavy effort to do. So you either gonna have to put in the extra effort upfront to really ensure that you got the data privacy problem solved for or it well do that. And if you're able to then do the smart steps, which I found really helpful, which is, take the model Build it, try to apply it look for where a bias might be exposed, or privacy might be exposed when you didn't expect it. The lesson is this. Adjust your mindset as a business owner to refine your AI model over time, right take into consideration the changes in context, the changes in the economy, as well as lessons learned. And put in your mind that part of doing AI means that that will you know, continue to refine and improve and rebuild this AI model. Now when you combine these two steps, right, this first step is the vetted privacy aware questioning, right and looking at your data, as well as the mindset of smart steps where you simply refactor and approve you and model over time. What I found is that if you do those two things, you're in a much better position. For better privacy AI data privacy considerations. It puts you on a great path for both near term as well as long term viable business impact, you know, to your organization. Alright, everybody, thanks for joining and until next step. Until next time, use the two steps to ensure privacy for your AI that brings incremental business growth. Thank you for joining Grant on ClickAI Radio. Don't forget to subscribe and leave feedback. And remember to download your free ebook, visit ClickAIRadio.com now.  

ClickAI Radio
CAIR 58: The Data Privacy 2-STEP For YOUR AI

ClickAI Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 18:39


In this episode, we take a look at some simple steps to protect the privacy of the data for your AI. Welcome everybody to another episode of click AI radio. Well, certainly data privacy has been on the minds of a lot of people and organizations and governments and governments and institutions, and so forth. No surprise there. One of the things though about AI is that, in general, it's not spent as much time if you will, putting a focus on that area. And it's been a bit of a problem and will become more of a problem if we don't do something about it. As we work with our application and use of AI itself. Now I was looking at several different groups and what they talked about and what they felt about it. At the end of this episode, I'm going to throw out two steps that I have seen that help us mitigate the challenges around this right to help to prevent some of the challenges of slippage, if you will, of getting the privacy of people's information out there that that shouldn't be now to frame that up. I want to introduce a framework for it. One of the one of the blogs, I looked at those, it was called beware the privacy violations and artificial intelligence applications it came from comes from is a see if I can say that is aca.org. There you go. A blog from there. Anyway, here, I'm gonna read an interesting quote here, right said, Look, artificial intelligence has been no different when seen through a privacy by lens design lens, as privacy has not been top of mind in the development of AI technologies. Yeah. All right. So end quote there. I agree with that that has been true. In fact, a lot of our efforts have been, can we just prove the viability of this technology in terms of helping people, individuals, businesses, certainly, there's been success with AI. And there's been some challenges. Now, they what what's introduced here is three interesting pieces to consider. When we're looking at privacy, one of those has to do with what's called data persistence. All right, so put your nerd hat on gonna be nerdy here for a moment, data persistence, that means the data existing today will last longer than the human subjects that created it. All right. And that's of course, driven by things like low data storage costs, and all the technologies that are available to allow our data to live a lot longer than us as people. So that creates a potential privacy challenge. There's another data privacy challenge. It's called Data repurposing, and that is, data that was originally created then gets used in ways that is beyond what it was originally intended. And AI is data hungry, we'll use that up, suck that up. Alright. And the third sort of area around privacy includes what's called a data spillover. And here's where, and this happens a bit in it actually drove a lot of the GDPR stuff, right, which is data collected on people who were not the target of data collection. And so of course, driving out of it was things like, you know, GDPR, out of Europe, certainly CCPA out of California, all of those things drive to or point to the need for having some regulation around it. Now, it's one thing to have regulation that's entirely different, to enforce it. And some of that comes upon us as business owners, it means that there are few things that we can and must do in order to protect the privacy of people's data and their information while still delivering value from AI. And that's that's certainly the balance that we're going for. One of the primary concerns, of course, with AI is its ability to replicate or reinforce or even amplify harmful biases, right? And this is a challenge because those biases can proliferate and then end up driving insights and and recommendations and predictions that of course, take you know, are wrong, right have have this human bias in it, there's there's another challenge to that we have with AI, let's say that we're going to try to fix that or solve for that. One of the problems, though, is that a lot of our auditing methods used today are based on the fact that something has already occurred, meaning in this case, with AI, that makes it even more difficult, right? Because it means that I've created an AI model, and I'm starting to then employ recommendations, insights and decisions, ways in which I work with people or deliver solutions, all with the incorporated bad behavior already. So it's kind of late, that doesn't mean that we shouldn't do the audits on the data. But they're post deployment by nature, meaning I've, I've already deployed it. So what we have to figure out is to find a balance, right, with privacy, as well as AI progress, it's finding the ability to say I'm gonna, I'm going to grow my my data usage in a way that that protects the privacy of the individuals involved. But I also need to allow AI to move forward and that right, there is, of course, a challenge that we're looking to pursue it some groups use consent today, right? It's a get someone to consent that they you know, you can be happy to share your information with them. That has some challenges with that those consents, not always as powerful as a tool as we might believe. And there's been examples where consent has been still misappropriated, right, what we thought originally what people thought originally was consent for certain use, then there was spill over into other areas, meaning people, you know, people didn't know their data was being used by AI for other purposes. So again, even though consent might be there, and organizations or people are well, intending, controlling, controlling the the, you know, the the boundaries of the consent, and enforcing that still is a real challenge, and relies on a lot of people to manually handle that, which means that there's more opportunities for us to mess up. I was looking at a report from the Brookings Institute, they were talking about AI Governance Initiative. And most interesting, there's this is some legislation that was pursuing this balance of how to pass privacy legislation, while while still allowing for AI to do the kind of work that it needs to bring about some of the benefits to humanity that we feel that we can do with this with this awesome technology. One of the techniques that that is mentioned here in this Brookings Institute report was, and you've heard it before, is all around what's called algorithm clarity, right? It's having clarity on how the algorithms using your information, right, that seems to be a useful piece to help dealing with it. But one of the problems with that is, you know, as an SMB owner, is that it ends up giving though, the burden typically on the backs of the of the SMB owner to say two things, one, I have to I have to make things transparent, so that my customers are aware that some aspects of their business information is leveraged by AI, right. And so that's, that's sort of the first incumbency is to say, I'm going to tell you, here's, here's what, here's what we're going to do with your data, it's going to be, you know, used in AI, and to draw the line on what information is not used. Okay? So that's what kind of comes out of this, right? It's, it's a, it's an activity or, you know, being forthright with, with our customers, on on what the intended use of the information that will or will not be used right in to draw that line. That's the first sort of consideration in algorithmic clarity. The second consideration, though, is explainability. Right. So that's, again, where you let your customers know what kind of algorithms are being used. Right. And this may include, you know, access to a human to provide that clarity, you know, okay. The thing I struggle with this, and of course, I that's all well and good. The thing I sometimes get challenged with here is what the heck does it mean to have one of the people in your team explain? Oh, yeah, you know, we use linear regression, or we use a particular classification model or, you know, a Bayes model, right, etc. We used all these different machine learning models and algorithms to that's what good is that right? 99% of people are gonna be like, What are you talking about? How did that help me understand any better? So this area of explainability, right, so the transparency Hey, we're going to use this kind of information or Not this kind of information in terms of the AI. So being clear with your customers on that. And then number two, coming up with a well Set Description for the kinds of algorithms being used, the, here's us maybe a simple way to think about it, you can break it into two buckets, right? When you're trying to explain AI to your customer say, we're going to be using this set of data for our AI algorithms. But we want to let you know that there's sort of two major areas, right. And what I'm gonna say here doesn't apply to all of AI, but for sort of vague, you know, AI for analytics, then then this applies. And it can be simply this. For those kinds of AI problems, where we're trying to determine yes or no answers, then we use what's called classification models, right? So it will be good for us to sell you this product or that product, yes or no? All right, classification kinds of problems. Then there's the other kind of problem, which is we'll use some AI algorithms to help us know, what might be the right price range, right? Now, of course, those are called more regressions, style algorithms. But you don't need to say that. It's simply we're going to use AI to help us understand yes, or no kinds of answers or questions to, you know, answer the questions. And the others, we're going to use it to understand, you know, proper pricing, perhaps right? Things that are not necessarily yes or no, but but degrees of difference, right? Those are two major buckets. And we can work on developing pretty simple language to explain this stuff. Otherwise, what good is it right if people can't, can't get it? Alright, I want to just point out one other thing here. So let me just summarize. So there's two things I think that an SMB can do to apply AI. Alright, so and to help solve for this problem of data privacy, after looking at and applying AI in multiple situations, or excuse me, over many years, come down to these two, two steps. They're a bit overly simplified, but I still think that if you print these out, put it on your wall, it could save you some real pain. Alright, so here's the first one. The first one is where I've seen a fair amount of pain. And this will sound really overly simple. First one is this. Start your AI journey with vetted questions and data oversight. Like what? Alright, I'll I'll come back to that. Number two, apply AI using smart steps. What? Alright, I'll come back to that. Awesome. Alright, so let me talk about number one here for a moment. So uh, number one here starting your AI journey with vetted questions and data oversight. It seems like an obvious first step, but when you examine the case studies of AI failures empirically, it looks like you know, this step has either been skipped or was not given the proper waiting look, a key technique here is to first vet what while you're doing this is to first bet by leveraging an independent party or going under NDA with someone, but what you want to challenge is the intended question you're trying to address with AI? Right, some of the biggest missteps with AI has been? No, that was the wrong question to be asking, this is the wrong use case to be pursuing right? There was inherently something that was either, you know, prone to lots of bias or was an unethical use of AI. Right. So in this step, the anticipated questions for AI. I know that sounds so simple, but it should be written down and evaluated in the context of the impact to your customers, and to other interested parties and to humanity for crying out loud, right? Just stop and do that simple stuff. I know, it sounds so doggone obvious. But alright, now, what does it mean to vet your AI questions? Well evaluate the AI implications to your customers, as well as look at some of those three elements that I introduced earlier. In other words, hey, will there be data persistence? What does it mean for the data that I'll be collecting to be in existence longer than the humans that created it? Right? What does that do in terms of in terms of privacy impacts or data repurposing? Wait a minute, are we going to be using the data beyond its originally you know, imagined purpose? And if so, you know, what obligation do we have to the people of all and number three data spillovers, right? Ask the question. Wait, are we collecting data on people that were not targeted those with whom we you know, initially intended? So stop and ask do I have the right question and then And then also, what's the impact of these two these three AI privacy areas of data persistence, repurposing, and data spillovers? All right, that's step one, stop and do a little vetted questioning, right and data oversight before you get too far. All right, number two is this. This in this one I call applying AI using smart steps. What this means is to iterate on the AI model and continue to refine and refactor and rebuild it as more as learned. What that does is it allows us to even adjust our AI models that might have some bias that we discover, right? So what it means is to build your vetted model, learn from experience, and then evaluate the impact to your business, your customers and then iterate. Right. So there's a book that came out not too long ago, it's by Bernard Marr. It's called "Artificial Intelligence In Practice". And what he's got in there is he's got 50 company use cases where AI was applied. Now I just want to pull something from that book, that's interesting. He goes, in that book, there's this one use case about Alibaba in China, right, who ultimately built a virtual platform that mimicked customer behaviors. And one of the reasons they did it was because it would take too long and too much effort to continually refactor their system. And so this virtual platform is used to allow the AI to continue to be refined and rebuilt and refactor. Now, you know, to do you know, to do lots of model rebuilding, in some situations, right, that's really heavy effort to do. So you either gonna have to put in the extra effort upfront to really ensure that you got the data privacy problem solved for or it well do that. And if you're able to then do the smart steps, which I found really helpful, which is, take the model Build it, try to apply it look for where a bias might be exposed, or privacy might be exposed when you didn't expect it. The lesson is this. Adjust your mindset as a business owner to refine your AI model over time, right take into consideration the changes in context, the changes in the economy, as well as lessons learned. And put in your mind that part of doing AI means that that will you know, continue to refine and improve and rebuild this AI model. Now when you combine these two steps, right, this first step is the vetted privacy aware questioning, right and looking at your data, as well as the mindset of smart steps where you simply refactor and approve you and model over time. What I found is that if you do those two things, you're in a much better position. For better privacy AI data privacy considerations. It puts you on a great path for both near term as well as long term viable business impact, you know, to your organization. Alright, everybody, thanks for joining and until next step. Until next time, use the two steps to ensure privacy for your AI that brings incremental business growth. Thank you for joining Grant on ClickAI Radio. Don't forget to subscribe and leave feedback. And remember to download your free ebook, visit ClickAIRadio.com now.  

Serious Privacy
The Final Countdown with the Best

Serious Privacy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 44:17


This week on Serious Privacy, Paul Breitbarth and K Royal say goodbye to season 2 of Serious Privacy and look forward to season 3. 2021 might be a year that many of us actually would like to forget but for the privacy community, it was an exciting year and a lot of good things have happened. We have new laws, new guidance, more enforcement and court decisions, and a continuously expanding field of privacy professionals. The podcast continued to grow - this is the 91st episode and well over 50,000 downloads to date - and received wide recognition, including from the master of the privacy podcast directory Jeff Jockisch! A few weeks ago, you already heard predictions from lots of IAPP Brussels visitors for 2022. Today, you'll hear ours. Will they come true? Do you agree? We had amazing guests on this season and our first season. It is difficult to choose which ones to feature in this episode. Some episodes are chosen by the listeners, so those are easy, but the others - not so easy at all. You will hear select clips from Helen Dixon about international investigations and dealing with criticism, Romain Robert with noyb (about enforcement taking time), tracking and dark patterns, from episode 36 (Jocelyn Paulley, Partner at Gowling WLG in London and Lindsey Schultz, Senior Counsel at Global Privacy for Visa), Eric Cole (cybersecurity and ethical hackers - episode relevant again because of Log4Shell), and Emerald de Leeuw (recommendation for Paul to get started) - along with information on PIPL and SCCs. As always, please feel free to share your thoughts with us - therewill be a year end show on the best episodes. Get your vote counted! Follow us on LinkedIn as Serious Privacy and on Twitter @podcastprivacy @EuroPaulB and @HeartofPrivacy. 

Data Protection Breakfast Club
Incumbents and Cheesesteaks with Odia Kagan - Partner at Fox Rothschild

Data Protection Breakfast Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 45:01


GDPR compliance can often feel like playing the old 80s arcade game Frogger, leaping from one thing to another, trying to avoid the MACK trucks and cars (fines or rule changes). Thankfully people like Odia Kagan are pros and help clients across the road. Odia is a big 80s fan and fits right in on the DPBC!

Forward Thinking Founders
779 - Quimby Melton (Confection) On Creating a Data Generator for the Privacy-First World

Forward Thinking Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 13:07


Quimby Melton is the cofounder of Confection. We care about collecting, storing, and distributing user data in a way that aligns with your personal preferences and complies with data protection laws like CCPA, GDPR, and LGPD. ★ Support this podcast ★

On Top of PR
Marketers and Data Privacy with Sharon Toerek

On Top of PR

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 33:18


Our guest is Sharon Toerek, intellectual property and marketing law attorney and owner of Toerek Law, a national law firm based in Cleveland, Ohio. Five things you'll learn from this episode:Common data compliance mistakes companies makeWhat General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is and its effects on marketers in the United StatesThe importance of a team that can look at consumer data from a marketing, legal, and technological point of viewQuestions brands should be asking to ensure responsible data practicesWhy marketers should have a response plan in place for data inquiriesQuotables“If listeners could come away with one thing from this conversation, it would be to remember that it doesn't matter where you are. It doesn't matter where your agency is. It matters where your consumer is sitting. And so, if you're that unlucky company who maybe has 10, 20, 100 consumers in Germany on your list, you've got to comply with GDPR.” — @SharonToerek“Ultimately, all roads are going to point back to the brand when it comes to being responsible for complying with the law.” — @SharonToerek“Have a plan ready for how you're going to respond to consumers before you even launch the campaign.” — @SharonToerek“I love it when we take responsibility and we do things ethically as an industry, and we push others to do the same thing. Even if we're dragging people along and trying to get them to come along with us (kicking and screaming), I think it's the right thing to do for the industry.” — @JasonMudd9 If you enjoyed this episode, would you please share it with others and leave us a review?About Sharon ToerekOur episode guest is Sharon Toerek, intellectual property and marketing law attorney and owner of Toerek Law, a national law firm based in Cleveland, Ohio. She focuses on clients in the advertising, marketing, and creative services industries, helping creative professionals protect, engage, and monetize their creative assets. Guest's contact info and resources:Sharon Toerek on Twitter Sharon Toerek on LinkedInMore about Sharon on her blog, Legal + Creative Additional Resources:Previous On Top of PR episode on social media disclosure Episode recorded: Nov 18, 2021Sponsored by:On Top of PR is produced by Axia Public Relations, named by Forbes as one of America's Best PR Agencies for 2021. Axia is an expert PR firm for national brands.On Top of PR is sponsored by ReviewMaxer, the platform for monitoring, improving, and promoting online customer reviews.Burrelles has a special offer for On Top of PR fans. Check it out at burrelles.com/ontopofpr.About your host, Jason MuddOn Top of PR host, Jason Mudd, is a trusted adviser and dynamic strategist for some of America's most admired brands and fastest-growing companies. Since 1994, he's worked with American Airlines, Budweiser, Dave & Buster's, H&R Block, Hilton, HP, Miller Lite, New York Life, Pizza Hut, Southern Comfort, and Verizon. He foReviewMaxer On Top of PR is brought to you by ReviewMaxerSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/OnTopofPR)

The Data Diva E59 - Emma Martins and Debbie Reynolds

"The Data Diva" Talks Privacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 46:43


Debbie Reynolds, “The Data Diva,” talks to Emma Martins,  Data Protection Commissioner at Data Protection Authority - Bailiwick of Guernsey (Europe). We discuss her journey to data protection and Data Privacy, her most significant concerns about Data Privacy now, GDPR enhancing privacy awareness, third-party party Data Privacy concerns, privacy concerns of small and medium-sized businesses, her ethical test for Data Privacy, European attitudes versus US perception of Data Privacy, the challenges of surveillance, greater scrutiny of Data Privacy steps needed to be compliant, the problem of privacy in technology implementations, advice for businesses starting their data protection journey, privacy perceived as a burden can hurt business success, and her hopes for Data Privacy in the future.

Chatham House - Undercurrents
Transatlantic Tech Talks: Digital trade

Chatham House - Undercurrents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 38:25


Transatlantic Tech Talks is a three part mini-series on the Undercurrents podcast feed, produced with the support of Microsoft, which explores the state of international cooperation on digital governance between Europe, the UK and USA. As technological innovation accelerates, and new digital tools and business models arise, governments are working to develop a framework of regulations to safeguard the rights and interests of their citizens. Not all stakeholders agree, however, on the best way to achieve this. While some advocate a ‘digital cooperation' approach based on transparency and data-sharing, others are more concerned with maintaining ‘digital sovereignty'. In this final episode, Ben is joined by three experts to discuss the prospects for transatlantic cooperation in the digital trade sector. His guests include Susan Aaronson (Director of the Digital Trade and Data Governance Hub at George Washington University), Euan MacMillan (Head of the Digital Trade Negotiations for the UK government's Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport) and Marianne Schneider-Petsinger (Senior Research Fellow, US & Americas Programme at Chatham House). They discuss how international negotiations on digital trade have progressed, the pressure points that need to be resolved (including data flows and consumer privacy) and where the European Union, UK and USA can work together.  Credits: Speakers: Susan Aaronson, Euan MacMillan, Marianne Schneider-Petsinger Hosts: Ben Horton Editor: Jamie Reed Sound Services Music: Jamie Reed Sound Services Recorded and produced by Chatham House

UnderCurrents
Transatlantic Tech Talks: Digital trade

UnderCurrents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 38:25


Transatlantic Tech Talks is a three part mini-series on the Undercurrents podcast feed, produced with the support of Microsoft, which explores the state of international cooperation on digital governance between Europe, the UK and USA. As technological innovation accelerates, and new digital tools and business models arise, governments are working to develop a framework of regulations to safeguard the rights and interests of their citizens. Not all stakeholders agree, however, on the best way to achieve this. While some advocate a ‘digital cooperation' approach based on transparency and data-sharing, others are more concerned with maintaining ‘digital sovereignty'. In this final episode, Ben is joined by three experts to discuss the prospects for transatlantic cooperation in the digital trade sector. His guests include Susan Aaronson (Director of the Digital Trade and Data Governance Hub at George Washington University), Euan MacMillan (Head of the Digital Trade Negotiations for the UK government's Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport) and Marianne Schneider-Petsinger (Senior Research Fellow, US & Americas Programme at Chatham House). They discuss how international negotiations on digital trade have progressed, the pressure points that need to be resolved (including data flows and consumer privacy) and where the European Union, UK and USA can work together.  Credits: Speakers: Susan Aaronson, Euan MacMillan, Marianne Schneider-Petsinger Hosts: Ben Horton Editor: Jamie Reed Sound Services Music: Jamie Reed Sound Services Recorded and produced by Chatham House

Les Technos
Log4J, la faille Apache qui fait même tomber Minecraft

Les Technos

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 68:26


C'est avec Aurélien et Sébastien que nous passons un peu de temps cette semaine. Au menu de ce 332ème épisode une grosse faille de sécurité qui permet potentiellement à des pirates d'abuser à distance des droits de serveurs web (on verra que les incidences sont multiples). La conduite autonome fait un bond en avant en Allemagne et c'est Mercedes-Benz qui en est l'auteur. Le fabricant Oppo annonce des lunettes à réalité assistée. Il va falloir faire avec cette nouvelle façon de voir. Nouveaux aussi, cette nouvelle façon d'implanter les transistors que proposent IBM et Samsung. On parle aussi de Linux, de GDPR, d'informatique quantique et de robot réaliste. Bienvenue et d'avance merci de vous abonner au Technos, merci également pour les partages de nos contenus dans vos réseaux.A comme Année de Linux (00:02:14) 2021, enfin l'année du desktop Linux? Linux si'mpose doucement sur le marché desktop. (source)D comme Daimler (00:08:31) Daimler homologue son Drive Pilot. Daimler homologue son Drive Pilot. (source)G comme GrinDPR (00:16:29) 7M$ d'amende pour une app n'ayant pas respecté la GDPR. Grindr à l'amende de 7.1 millions de dollars pour des soucis GDPR. (source)I comme Informatique quantique (00:24:23) Où en est on dans l'informatique quantique ? Avancées et débouchés du Qbit. (source)O comme Oppo (00:32:55) Oppo annonce ses Air Glass. Air Glass, les lunettes à réalité assistée par Oppo. (source)R comme Robots (00:37:10) Ameca, un robot très réaliste. Le visage d'Ameca plus vrai que nature ! (source, source)S comme Sécurité (00:44:53) Log4J, la faille qui fait trembler la toile. Log4J, la faille Apache qui fait même tomber Minecraft. (source, source)T comme Transistors (00:56:03) Une "foret" de transistors dans les futures puces. Une nouvelle manière d'implanter des transistros. (source, source)U comme USB (01:03:32) L'USB over network, avec 27 failles en prime. Des failles majeures sur l'USB pour des services clouds. (source)

Decrypted Unscripted
Dr. Johnny Ryan: Senior Fellow at The Irish Council for Civil Liberties | Fighting for Digital Rights - Episode 38

Decrypted Unscripted

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 58:03


Dr. Johnny Ryan joins David Biderman and Dominique Shelton Leipzig to discuss why, from his perspective, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in Europe should have been one of the most important global privacy laws in the world—but is falling woefully short of his expectations. He explores the current problems around advertising technology, privacy, and tracking and how he sees the future of digital advertising security. Dr. Ryan also dives into the Irish Council for Civil Liberties' (ICCL) current lawsuit against IAB Tech Lab for allegedly breaching EU privacy rules.Dr. Ryan is a senior fellow at the ICCL and the Open Markets Institute. He focuses on surveillance, data rights, competition/anti-trust, and privacy. Dr. Ryan is former chief policy and industry relations officer at Brave, the private web browser, and led Brave's campaign for GDPR enforcement. His other previous roles included chief innovation officer of The Irish Times and senior researcher at the Institute of International and European Affairs (IIEA).

Serious Privacy
The Door is Always Open: A week in Privacy with Paul and K

Serious Privacy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 40:19


This week on Serious Privacy, Paul Breitbarth and K Royal take some time to review recent events or developments in privacy and data protection. With little happening in the U.S. (where is Ohio's privacy law?), the focus is more on Europe and India. K and Paul discuss the European Data Protection Board's recent guidance on international transfers, the new decision by the Wiesbaden court (in Hesse, Germany) on cookies and the U.S., and the highest fine to date in the Netherlands. Join K and Paul as they explore what the U.S. Cloud Act has to do with cookies. It's not really clear, but more information has come with the publishing of the interim order. And lastly, there is news to share on a personal level. Tune in to find out. As always, please feel free to share your thoughts with us - therewill be a year end show on the best episodes. Get your vote counted! Follow us on LinkedIn as Serious Privacy and on Twitter @podcastprivacy @EuroPaulB and @HeartofPrivacy. ResourcesThe German case decision on cookies The white paper on the US Cloud Act 

Cyber Security med Olav og Karim
S02E10 – GDPR med Jan Sandtrø

Cyber Security med Olav og Karim

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 48:24


Beskrivelse: I tiende episode av sesong 2 har vi fått besøk av en av Norges fremste eksperter på GDPR, Jan Sandtrø. I episoden snakker vi om hvorfor GDPR og informasjonssikkerhet henger så tett sammen, databehandleravtaler, overføringsgrunnlag, Schrems II, med mer! Level: 100 Kilder som nevnes/anbefales: – https://sandtro.no Medvirkende: - Olav Østbye, Cloudworks - Karim El-Melhaoui, NBIM – Jan Sandtrø, advokat og GDPR ekspert Følg oss! - https://www.linkedin.com/company/O3CYBER - https://twitter.com/O3CYBER - https://facebook.com/O3CYBER.no Ris og ros? Gi oss gjerne en tilbakemelding, både positive og forbedringspotensiale. Dette kan du gjøre via kontakt oss i menyen på nettsiden vår, CastO3.no Forslag til nye episoder? Skulle du ha noen ønsker/forslag til nye episoder så ta gjerne kontakt med oss på den måten du selv ønsker, se nettsiden vår CastO3.no

Chatham House - Undercurrents
Transatlantic Tech Talks: Cooperation or sovereignty?

Chatham House - Undercurrents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 48:49


Transatlantic Tech Talks is a three part mini-series on the Undercurrents podcast feed, produced with the support of Microsoft, which explores the state of international cooperation on digital governance between the United States, the UK and Europe. As technological innovation accelerates, and new digital tools and business models arise, governments are working to develop a framework of regulations to safeguard the rights and interests of their citizens. Not all stakeholders agree, however, on the best way to achieve this. While some advocate a ‘digital cooperation' approach based on transparency and data-sharing, others are more concerned with maintaining ‘digital sovereignty'. In the first episode of this series, Ben is joined by Casper Klynge (Vice-President for European Government Affairs, Microsoft), Harriet Moynihan (Acting Director, International Law Programme, Chatham House) and Marianne Schneider-Petsinger (Senior Research Fellow, US & Americas Programme, Chatham House) who set out the broad context for these debates. They assess where the major government, private sector and civil society actors stand on the question of digital governance, and how they are approaching the international negotiations. Credits: Speakers: Casper Klynge, Harriet Moynihan, Marianne Schneider-Petsinger Host: Ben Horton Editor: Jamie Reed Sound Services  Music: Jamie Reed Sound Services Recorded and produced by Chatham House

UnderCurrents
Transatlantic Tech Talks: Cooperation or sovereignty?

UnderCurrents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 48:49


Transatlantic Tech Talks is a three part mini-series on the Undercurrents podcast feed, produced with the support of Microsoft, which explores the state of international cooperation on digital governance between the United States, the UK and Europe. As technological innovation accelerates, and new digital tools and business models arise, governments are working to develop a framework of regulations to safeguard the rights and interests of their citizens. Not all stakeholders agree, however, on the best way to achieve this. While some advocate a ‘digital cooperation' approach based on transparency and data-sharing, others are more concerned with maintaining ‘digital sovereignty'. In the first episode of this series, Ben is joined by Casper Klynge (Vice-President for European Government Affairs, Microsoft), Harriet Moynihan (Acting Director, International Law Programme, Chatham House) and Marianne Schneider-Petsinger (Senior Research Fellow, US & Americas Programme, Chatham House) who set out the broad context for these debates. They assess where the major government, private sector and civil society actors stand on the question of digital governance, and how they are approaching the international negotiations. Credits: Speakers: Casper Klynge, Harriet Moynihan, Marianne Schneider-Petsinger Host: Ben Horton Editor: Jamie Reed Sound Services  Music: Jamie Reed Sound Services Recorded and produced by Chatham House

Leadership Beyond Borders
What Privacy Legislation can we expect in 2022?

Leadership Beyond Borders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 60:00


Behaviors show that people don't alter privacy settings online, they don't complain when their phone numbers are asked for and they certainly don't insist on encrypted e-mail. As we were propelled into a completely digital world in 2020, the issue of privacy became even more apparent. Tracking and tracing, made us question data protection, and we revisited everything. The year 2022 will prove to be a big year in protection, data, and digital services. The EU moving to regulate AI with prohibited, high risk and low risk categories. There will be changes in with the Digital Market Act and Digital Services Act that are made to give businesses a fairer playing field and consumers more transparency. Globally, even countries like China are putting in privacy policies similar to GDPR. So where are we headed? In this episode, what kind of privacy legislation is on the horizon for 2022. We speak with an expert who is following the trends in digital sector and regulations in the EU and worldwide. .

That Tech Pod
How Dating Apps Keep Your Personal Info Safe With Hinge's Data Privacy Expert Anna Togia

That Tech Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 51:45


Today on That Tech Pod, Laura and Gabi chat with Anna Togia. Anna leads Product Data Privacy, Security & Compliance at Hinge, the dating app designed to be deleted. Anna's extensive experience in cultivating a culture and awareness around Privacy by Design, means users can focus on going on great dates while knowing their data remains safe and protected.Prior to Hinge, Anna was the Product Lead for Privacy at Cvent, an Event Management SaaS company, where she focused on supporting customers & leading product teams through the implementation of GDPR, CCPA and other Privacy & Compliance requirements, policies and procedures.Follow That Tech Pod: Twitter-@thattechpodLinkedIn: LinkedIn.com/thattechpodwebsite: thattechpod.com.

AskAlli: Self-Publishing Advice Podcast
How Do I Grow My Email List? Other Questions Answered by Orna Ross and Michael La Ronn in our Member Q&A Podcast

AskAlli: Self-Publishing Advice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 51:57


How do I grow my email list? This is among the questions answered on our #AskALLi Members Q&A hosted by Michael La Ronn, author of science fiction and fantasy novels as well as author self-help books; and ALLi Director, author, and poet Orna Ross. Other questions include: I acquired the rights to my book from my publisher, but they won't take my books down from sale. What do I do? If I upload my book to the British Library, does that violate Amazon's KDP Select Exclusivity clause? What language should I use on my website for GDPR and privacy policies? Is there a boilerplate template somewhere? How does Amazon count pre-orders? Does a pre-order count immediately or when your book goes live?" And more! Our Members Q&A Podcast is brought to you by specialist sponsor Kobo Writing Life, a global, independent ebook and audiobook publishing platform that empowers authors with a quick and easy publishing process and unique promotional opportunities. To reach a wide audience, create your account today! We'd like to thank Kobo for their support of this podcast.  Find more author advice, tips and tools at our Self-publishing Author Advice Center: https://selfpublishingadvice.org, with a huge archive of nearly 2,000 blog posts, and a handy search box to find key info on the topic you need. And, if you haven't already, we invite you to join our organization and become a self-publishing ally. You can do that at http://allianceindependentauthors.org. Now, go write and publish! About the Hosts Michael La Ronn is the author of over 30 books of science fiction & fantasy and authors self-help books. His books include the Galaxy Mavericks series and Modern Necromancy series. You can now find his new writing course on Teachable. Orna Ross launched the Alliance of Independent Authors at the London Book Fair in 2012. Her work for ALLi has seen her named as one of The Bookseller's “100 top people in publishing”. She also publishes poetry, fiction and nonfiction, and is greatly excited by the democratising, empowering potential of author-publishing. For more information about Orna, visit her website: http://www.ornaross.com

The Data Diva E57 - Olivia Holder and Debbie Reynolds

"The Data Diva" Talks Privacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 50:26


Debbie Reynolds “The Data Diva” talks to Olivia Holder, Senior Privacy Counsel, GitHub. We discuss privacy in the public sphere, children's privacy and the importance of the UK Age Appropriate Design Code, data localization trends in data privacy regulation globally, local financial incentives as part of data localization efforts, the challenge of code re-use in app development, IoT and the Metaverse, Facebook's move to delete Biometric data and global trends in facial recognition, interoperability and the use of API' her future concerns about privacy, how privacy professionals can obtain buy-in to get resources and cooperation, privacy professionals an as diplomats, developer's difficulties incorporating privacy,  increase in privacy publicity, US Federal and local privacy legislation, private right of action and pre-emption as a barrier to omnibus privacy legislation, the global influence of GDPR and her hopes for Data Privacy in the future.

The Stack Overflow Podcast
Feeling insecure about your code's security?

The Stack Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 16:55


This “Trojan source” bug (get it?) could threaten the security of all code.In its annual report on its user community, GitHub found that developers appreciate automation, reusing code, and remote work. (No surprises there.) Ceora explains how automation and code reuse are game changers for independent developers and how this logic is spreading to big tech companies, too.GitHub's first Chief Security Officer has the company focused on keeping your repo secure.GDPR  makes you legally responsible for data someone else shares with you. That's just one of the reasons it's not a good idea to solicit personal information through a form and then read those secrets on TikTok.

The Stack Overflow Podcast
Feeling insecure about your code's security?

The Stack Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 16:55


This “Trojan source” bug (get it?) could threaten the security of all code.In its annual report on its user community, GitHub found that developers appreciate automation, reusing code, and remote work. (No surprises there.) Ceora explains how automation and code reuse are game changers for independent developers and how this logic is spreading to big tech companies, too.GitHub's first Chief Security Officer has the company focused on keeping your repo secure.GDPR  makes you legally responsible for data someone else shares with you. That's just one of the reasons it's not a good idea to solicit personal information through a form and then read those secrets on TikTok.

Tech Gumbo
Women leaving Tech?, Ransomware gangs buy Zero-Day flaws, Ransomware mistake, Stopping Grinch Bots, WhatsApp gives up data, Apple & Google fined

Tech Gumbo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 21:24


News & Updates- 1/3 of Women in Tech thinking about leaving the Tech sector, Ransomware gangs have made enough money to buy Zero-Day flaws worth 8 figures, When hit by Ransomware- the 1st thing not to do, Lawmakers trying to stop Grinch Bots, Apple & Google fined for GDPR violations

Data Privacy Detective - how data is regulated, managed, protected, collected, mined, stolen, defended and transcended.

Our prior podcast episodes detailed how China, Russia, and to a lesser extent India have created barriers to the free flow of personal information across borders. Data localization, sometimes called data nationalization, is the practice of governments to restrict or regulate closely how personal information of their citizens can be collected or shared outside a country. This podcast episode looks at how Australia, a free-market country, is handling personal data transfers. Australia has no broad data localization requirements. But it restricts the export of medical information about its residents. Electronic health records with personally identifiable information cannot be transferred or processed outside Australia. Australia's Privacy Act, an early national data privacy law (1988), is comprehensive and different from GDPR. Collecting personal information is possible only if “reasonably necessary,” so does not require express consent. But Australia is protective of its citizens' privacy interests. A 2021 order of Australia's regulator against Clearview ordered it to cease collection of facial biometrics and destroy existing images of Australian citizens. Clearview argued with no success that the images were publicly available (and so did not constitute personally protected data) and that Clearview is a U.S. company with no establishment in Australia. If a free-market oriented country like Australia engages in data localization and the extraterritorial reach of its laws, what does this mean for the internet, global data business, and the privacy of people? Tune into this discussion in our fourth episode about data localization. If you have ideas for more interviews or stories, please email info@thedataprivacydetective.com.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1804: Digital Maturity and Customer Experience With Optimizely CEO Alex Atzberger

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 28:06


With Google's plan to delay killing third-party cookies until 2023, many businesses are breathing a sigh of relief that they no longer have to scramble to plan out their consumer data collection practices.   However, as the world moves toward increased consumer data privacy measures backed by legislation like the GDPR and at the local state levels in Colorado and California, the death of third-party data is inevitable and businesses need to get ahead to succeed. Alex Atzberger, CEO of Optimizely, shares why companies need to personalize based on the behaviors behind content consumption, even if the visitors are unknown. He also reveals how to build trust brands should do the following:    Offer loyalty programs, as seen recently by McDonald's and Chipotle, where customers can receive points for purchases that translate into freebies later on   Track the content your customers are engaging with to see what's resonating, even if the customer is anonymous    Glean customer feedback on their preferred channels and ensure you're engaging with them, on ones they favor   We also discuss how Gen Z and Millennials start their shopping journeys on social media apps, but most leave the apps to purchase on 3rd party sites like Amazon.

Decrypted Unscripted
Daniel Barber: CEO of DataGrail | What Are Companies Doing to Protect Your Data? - Episode 37

Decrypted Unscripted

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 39:44


Daniel Barber, CEO of DataGrail, joins Dominique and David to describe how he sees company compliance with the GDPR and CCPA, oversights, mistakes, and best practices. He delves into the disconnect between individuals' perceptions of their privacy rights and how those can clash with business objectives. He talks about how the business community is responding to the Chinese data privacy law that went into effect on November 1, 2021, and the dramatic impact of that legislation. DataGrail is aimed at assuring companies comply with the GDPR, CCPA, and all other privacy statutes. Daniel argues strongly for transparency in data usage and security and is a major influencer in the privacy and data management space. DataGrail made headlines in March 2021 in TechCrunch, DataGrail snares $30M Series B to help deal with privacy regulations.https://techcrunch.com/2021/03/10/datagrail-snares-30m-series-b-to-help-deal-with-privacy-regulations/

Growing Your Firm | Strategies for Accountants, CPA's, Bookkeepers , and Tax Professionals
What an Outsourcing Expert Says You Need to do Before Hiring a Firm

Growing Your Firm | Strategies for Accountants, CPA's, Bookkeepers , and Tax Professionals

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 22:55


"Accountants change lives, but not by producing a set of accounts" This philosophy has driven everything I work towards. By way of background I qualified as an ICAEW Chartered Accountant and a Chartered Tax Adviser. I started with a regional practice, Rabjohns LLP (now Bishop Fleming) in Worcester before joining Ernst & Young and KPMG where I worked up to management. After over a decade of professional experience, I decided to develop a professional accountancy outsourcing company and this has been a driving passion since I started the business in 2003. I am permanently based in the UK and available for our clients to speak to about their customer experience. We enable forward thinking accountants in practice increase profits and deliver better service to clients by delivering accounting and tax compliance services from our offshore centres, enabling firms to deliver more value-added services. Our World-Class delivery systems ensure that firms receive consistent service. We also provide back-office accounting services for large plc corporate clients including accounts payable and receivable. Our team care passionately about delivering a high quality service to our clients across the UK, Australia and North America and this approach is driven through all aspects of our business, delivering world-class service driven through technology. We lead change in our Industry and are certified for Information Security for ISO27001:2013, the latest security standard for our industry and ISO9001:2015 for Quality Management. Our systems are also designed to comply with GDPR requirements and are certified to BS10012 for Personal Information Management. We are the first specialist Accountancy Outsourcer in the World to hold the latest International Quality, Security and Business Continuity Standards. If you'd like to explore how AdvanceTrack can help your Accountancy firm, use the link below to book your Discovery meeting.

Serious Privacy
Predictions, Worries, and Wisdom from IAPP Brussels

Serious Privacy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 36:49


This week on Serious Privacy, Paul Breitbarth and K Royal take to the streets, so to speak, at the IAPP global conference in Brussels. Well, Paul did and K benefitted. Join us as we hear the thoughts, predictions, and worries of fabulous privacy professionals. [Paul relayed the comments that he received - it was humbling & heartwarming, so thank you! As much as you appreciate us, we return the respect tenfold.]Predictions and worries include thoughts on AI, using data for good, awareness of our digital beings, children's privacy, Brexit, joint enforcement, and other wildly exciting privacy / data protection topics. Most of these are top of mind for many of us... or are they?A big thank you to all of our guests for this episode:Alexander Hanff Hanff & CoAndreea Lisievici VolvoAnna Pouliou DeloitteAoife Sexton TruataBojana Bellamy CIPLCaroline Olstedt Carlström CirioEstelle Massé Access NowGabriela Zanfir-Fortuna Future of Privacy ForumRob van Eijk Future of Privacy ForumTrevor Hughes IAPPUpcoming Privacy Shield webinar 1 DECAs always, if you have any questions or comments, please contact us at seriousprivacy@trustarc.com. If you like our podcast, please do rate and comment in your favorite podcast app. We also have a LinkedIn page for Serious Privacy.

Support is Sexy Podcast with Elayne Fluker | Interviews with Successful Women Entrepreneurs 5 Days a Week!
801: 5 Things You Need to Know about Cybersecurity with Jessica Robinson of Purepoint International

Support is Sexy Podcast with Elayne Fluker | Interviews with Successful Women Entrepreneurs 5 Days a Week!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 53:00


Episode Summary: In this episode of Support is Sexy, Elayne Fluker invites Jessica Robinson, the Founder & CEO of PurePoint International whose main purpose is to support leaders to create inner security, so they can create outer security for their clients. In this episode, Jessica talks about how her protective nature led her to the cyber security field and how she felt different since nobody looked like her, Jessica's desire to guide leaders into cyber security in a creative way that is not only based on data protection, but in a sense of humanity that involves the vulnerability of the person. She talks about the implications for us by being constantly exposed to the internet and how to be able to read those red flags on the internet.   Jessica Robinson Jessica Robinson is a writer and Founder & CEO of PurePoint International. She has worked with a top 40 company and with the 2015 US Open. PurePoint International, a holistic boutique security firm, is the #1 security company for women-owned & women-led businesses globally. PurePoint International helps CEOs prevent data breaches by bridging the gap between physical and cyber security. With their unique business model and launch of their new innovative training, Safe Spaces Organizational, and Leadership Training, PurePoint was recently awarded the JCI Philippines-New York ICON Award for International Affairs and Women's Security. Jessica supports clients with CISO/DPO consulting, incident response and remediation (implement SIEM, IDS, DLP), cyber security board governance, cyber security awareness training, data protection and privacy, regulatory compliance, and standards (NYCRR 500 DFS, GDPR, HIPPA, NIST). PurePoint International provides data security, cyber risk, privacy, and information governance consulting services for insurance financial services, law firms, health services, social enterprises, international non-profits, and women-founded, owned, or led businesses. Jessica is also on the board of the authentication technology company Netlok, Board Chair of World Pulse, and co-leads the Racial Equity Committee for Women in Cybersecurity (WiCyS). Insights from this Episode When did Jessica fall in love with entrepreneurship How she got introduced into cyber security The importance of learning skills such as coding  PurePoint's approach to cyber security How does PurePoint involve a sense of humanity to cyber security 5 things everyone should know about cyber security What a VPN does and its importance The urgency of a password manager The biggest mistakes the companies do regarding cyber security The meaning of the s after the http What it means to be a consciously secure entrepreneur Stay Connected: Jessica Robinson Instagram: Jessica Robinson LinkedIn: Jessica A. Robinson Twitter: Jessica Robinson PurePoint LinkedIn: PurePoint International Website: https://the-purepoint.com/ Elayne Fluker Instagram: @elaynefluker LinkedIn: Elayne Fluker Support is Sexy Instagram: @supportissexy Subscribe to Support is Sexy + download each episode on Spotify and ‎Apple Podcasts   This episode was produced and managed by Podcast Laundry. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

How to Fix the Internet
Who Controls Online Speech?

How to Fix the Internet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 35:38


The bots that try to moderate speech online are doing a terrible job, and the humans in charge of the biggest tech companies aren't doing any better. The internet's promise was as a space where everyone could have their say. But today, just a few platforms get to decide what billions of people see and say online. What's a better way forward? How can we get back to a world where communities and people decide what's best for content moderation, rather than tech billionaires or government dictates?  Join Daphne Keller, from Stanford's Centre for the Internet and Society, in conversation with  EFF's Cindy Cohn and Danny O'Brien about a better way to moderate speech online. In this episode you'll learn about: — Why giant platforms do a poor job of moderating content—What competitive compatibility (ComCom) is, and how it's a vital part of the solution to our content moderation puzzle— Why machine learning algorithms won't be able to figure out who or what a “terrorist” is, and who it's likely to catch instead— What is the debate over “amplification” of speech, and is it any different than our debate over speech itself? —Why international voices need to be included in discussion about content moderation—and the problems that occur when they're not—How we could shift towards “bottom-up” content moderation rather than a concentration of power  

The Data Diva E56 - Peter Barbosa and Debbie Reynolds

"The Data Diva" Talks Privacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 42:18


Debbie Reynolds “The Data Diva” talks to Peter Barbosa, CEO of Opsware Data. We discuss the importance of digital Data Mapping, data flows in cross-functional uses, regulatory fines for data privacy breaches and misunderstandings, the importance of having a data retention plan to mitigate risk, the challenges of rapidly increasing third-party risk, the dangers of third parties who are granted excess access, GDPR and other data protection regulations attempt to determine outline shared responsibility for third-party data transfer, Covid-19 vaccine passports and the New York State Excelsior Pass in the US, the challenge of the digital divide and people without means having less data agency, lack of adoption of businesses to obtain devices to check vaccine status using the Excelsior Pass, and his hopes for Data Privacy in the future

In House Warrior
Is China's New Personal Information Privacy Law the New GDPR With Catherine Zhu of Foley & Lardner and Host Richard Levick of LEVICK

In House Warrior

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 28:46


Is China's New Personal Information Privacy Law the New GDPR? Catherine Zhu, a data privacy and technology transactions attorney with Foley & Lardner joins host Richard Levick of LEVICK to discuss China's first comprehensive law for the protection of individual personal information. The new Personal Information Protection Law (PIPL) which took effect November 1, 2021, is the first comprehensive law in China for the protection of personal information of individuals in China. Given that China makes up almost a fifth of the world's population, this means the PIPL's privacy regulatory framework will soon apply to one in five individuals on the planet. Ms. Zhu argues that while some aspects appear to be based off the EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) global companies need to understand the material distinctions between these two privacy protection frameworks.

Serious Privacy
Dr. K: Privacy Compliance in US Universities

Serious Privacy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 38:40


This week on Serious Privacy, Paul Breitbarth welcomes K Royal, the recently-approved PhD graduand (yes, it's a word) fresh from her dissertation defense on Privacy Complaince in US Universities. Many of our listeners likely participated in the nearly-anonymous Delphi Method part of her research, where privacy professionals around the world answered a series of questions to determine critical parts about privacy in the university setting. These included triggers, program elements, and risk factors. Her PhD is in public affairs, a fitting match for privacy law, from the University of Texas at Dallas, the School of Economic, Political, and Policy Sciences.Join us as we discuss the substance of privacy law at US universities, some common misperceptions, but also the difference in the PhD process between the US and Europe. Some of your favorite topics come up, such as CCPA, GDPR, and HIPAA. Also, her research involves the complexity of managing privacy law in a complex environment, bringing in Complexity Theory as a framework. Complex Adaptive Systems was used in terms of privacy law by Zhang and Schmidt when considering China's privacy law back in 2015 in their paper Thinking of data protection law's subject matter as a complex adaptive system: A heuristic display.As always, if you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at seriousprivacy@trustarc.com. In addition, if you like our podcast, please do rate and comment on our program in your favorite podcast app. We also have a LinkedIn page for Serious Privacy, so please follow for more in-depth discussion.

MoneyBall Medicine
Seqster's Ardy Arianpour on How To Smash Health Data Siloes

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 58:48


Your medical records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. And not only are they inscrutable—they're often mutually (and deliberately) incompatible, meaning different hospitals and doctor's offices can't share them across institutional boundaries. Harry's guest this week, Ardy Arianpour, is trying to fix all that. He's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster, a San Diego company that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place. The big goal guiding Seqster, he says, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare. Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.If you've ever gotten a copy of your medical files from your doctor or hospital, you probably know these records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. They aren't designed to be clear or user-friendly for patients. In fact, it's usually just the opposite.The data itself is highly technical. And on top of that, there's the inscrutable formatting, which is dictated by whatever electronic medical record or “EMR” system your provider happens to use. But the problem isn't just that EMR data is incomprehensible.It's also that different EMRs are often incompatible with each other.So if you're being treated by multiple providers, it can be really tricky to share your data across institutional boundaries. That's why medicine is one of the last industries that still uses old-fashioned fax machines. Because sometimes a fax is the only way to send the data back and forth.But my guest today is trying to fix all that.His name is Ardy Arianpour, and he's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster.It's a company in San Diego that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster quote-unquote “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place.The big goal guiding Seqster, according to Ardy, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.At the moment, however, consumers can't sign up for the service directly. Seqster's actual customers are players from inside the healthcare industry. For example, a life science companies might hire Seqster to help them make the experience of participating in a clinical trial more user friendly for patients.Or a health plan might use a Seqster dashboard to get patients more involved in their own care.Seqster did let me do a test run on my own medical data as part of my research for this interview. And I was impressed by how quickly it pulled in data that normally lives in a bunch of separate places. I'm hoping Seqster and other companies in this space will continue to make progress.Because, frankly, I think poor patient access to health data and the lack of interoperability between EMRs are two of the biggest factors holding back improvements in healthcare quality.If we can finally get those two things right, I think it can help unlock the data-driven healthcare revolution that I describe in my new book, The Future You. Which, by the way, is out now in paperback and ebook format at Barnes & Noble and Amazon.When we spoke back in September, Ardy and I talked about better EMRs and many other things. And now here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, welcome to the show. So, it's good to have you here, and you know, for everybody who doesn't know your story and the story of the company, I'd love to, you know, start covering some basics like, you know, the when, the what, the how, the why. What's the founding story of Seqster and what was the problems that you were really trying to go out there and solve when you started the company in 2016?Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry. Always been a fan. I think we've known each other for quite some time, but it's been a long time since we've ran into each other since the genomic and precision medicine days. So great to see you. I hope you and your family are well and yeah, look, Seqster is super special and there's a secret story, I guess, that never has been told. It really starts way beyond 2016 when I founded the company. So I spent 15 plus years in DNA sequencing, next gen sequencing genomic market. And during that time in the 2000s to early 2010s, I was fortunate enough of being part of some amazing endeavors and organizations that allowed my team and I to take some risk. And when you take risk, when you're in biotech, pharma, precision medicine, genomics, bioinformatics, you learn new things that most people don't learn because you're you're you're, you know, trailblazing, I guess you could say. And we were able to do that back with one of my old companies where we were able to launch the first clinical exome test, launch the first BRCA cancer panels, launch the first next gen sequencing panels in a CLIA lab. Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it wasn't about the testing. It was all about the data, and we didn't realize that till later and we kept on seeing that wow genome data is really only one set of all the other data pieces, right? I think the genomics folks, me being a genomics guy, I guess you could say, for a decade and a half, we're so forward thinking that we forget about the simple things within science, and we never really thought, Oh, collect your medical data and pair it with your genomic data. We never really thought there would be a wearable out there. That data was going to be siloed, too. We never thought there was going to be, you know, many different medical devices and instruments that would be Bluetooth and sensor enabled, where there would be data that would be siloed. Claims data, pharmacy data. Never even crossed our minds. So, you know, when you put this all together, my inspiration with Seqster was actually really simple. And when I founded the company, I wanted to combine the genomic data with your EMR medical data as well as your wearable data, because in 2016, the tailwinds of those other, you know, services was really taken off.Harry Glorikian: Right. Totally understand it. And you know, as we were talking about before I hit record, it's like it was funny because I was just talking to another company that's working on NLP and they're able to look at, you know, papers and see drugs being used in different, you know, medical conditions. And then they figured out, well, they needed to tap into the unstructured data of a medical record to really, like, add the next layer of value to it. So, you know, there's a lot of activity going on about there. But how do you guys, how do you, how do your co-founders, you know, Zhang and Dana play into like the science, the technology and what's the sort of angle that you guys have taken to solve this problem? Or what's your idea on how to fix it? I'm not saying it's been solved yet, because that would be a Herculean task in and of itself. But how are you guys approaching it that? Is a little different than the. You know, maybe any any of your other you would you would consider anybody else out there, the working on this?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, look for us we spent a lot of time understanding the power of data. But how what makes Seqster different is no one knows the power of the patient better than us. We've spent time with our platform with, you know, tens of thousands of patients: rare disease patients, oncology patients, parents, autoimmune disease patients, patients that have that are seeing functional medicine folks. Patients that were having issues sharing data through telemedicine, clinical trial patients. All these sorts of patients are very different. At Seqster we focused on putting the patient at the center of health care in order to smash all the data silos from their medical institutions to their wearable technology that they wear to the DNA testing that they get and even maybe a COVID test or a vaccine. How do you bring a 360-degree patient view? And you know, you tried the system, so I think you got a small teaser of how we can do that and we've really cracked this large problem. It is Herculean, I believe, and a lot of people believe because it's interoperability, it is the number one problem in all of health care.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I had the pleasure of trying it and imported my data and was able to see, you know, individual pieces. I mean, I made some suggestions on what might make it easier for me to hone in in different areas, right, and have the system highlighting different things. But I guess each data stream is being brought in separately and then at some point you're going to create a master dashboard above it, because now each one is separate from when I go into each record, right, When I go into my medical record, it gives me one set of data with my lab results and everything else and the notes, and then it pulls in my wearable data separately that I have to look at, right? So you've got to look at it separately. It doesn't. Then I guess the next step would be creating a master sort of view of how everything would look in a sort of I don't want to say integrated, but at least a timeline view of the world. But. You know, following up on the the sort of the what question, you know, how do you sort of combine data from different EMRs, tests, apps, devices in a sort of scalable, repeatable way? I mean, it seems like to date, that's been a hugely manual process, and I can imagine you could figure out every provider's ontology and then create a table that shows what's equivalent to. And but you know, there's got to be sort of a translation scheme that would be required that that provides some constant readjustment as the main providers tweak and evolve their own systems, right? Because if the provider is tweaking their system, your system has then got to adapt to changes that are happening in that end. So how are you guys managing all that craziness?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. So I think it all and you hit on so many points, I'll try and cover them if I remember them all. Look, the number one thing for us is we can connect to any data source. It doesn't matter. And you saw it. And just before I continue, just tell the audience how fast, how fast, how long did it take for your data to be populated after you connected it?Harry Glorikian: Oh, it was. I mean, yeah, as soon as I created it, I could see that it was, you know, it was digesting and then populating. And, you know, I was just I was watching it as a matter of fact, when I was on the phone with your person, that was helping me. Yeah. At first I said, Oh, it's not there. And then a couple of seconds later, I'm like, Oh no, it's showing up, right? So it was happening in, I don't want to say real time, but it was happening as as we were watching it evolve, right? It was sort of it was. It was almost like watching time lapse.Ardy Arianpour: And that's actually a great way. That's a great way to actually describe it. We created the time lapse of all your health data. Now let's get to the what and the how. So we connect to any health data source. The patient is fully in control. You own your data, you control it. It's all consented by you. We don't own your data and we connect to every single medical record. And that's huge that we've achieved nationwide coverage. We didn't know what data you have, but we're you're able to connect to it. Why? Because our team, which our engineering team gets all the credit for six years now, almost since founding of the company we have written, I don't know, seven million lines of code, that standardizes and harmonizes all of the ICD 9, ICD 10, SNOMED codes and every single lab result to every single wearable terminology, from biking to cycling to, you know, you name it, VitaminDB, you know, characterized in 40 different ways. You know, we're harnessing data to improve patient lives at scale. We built it for scale because you can't do it by the traditional method of just faxes and PDFs. Now, you know, being able to do that is not a bad thing.Ardy Arianpour: We can bring that service into our platform as well. It's already integrated, but that type of service takes 30 to 60 days and it's static data. It's not real time right now. If Harry goes, I don't know, you go on a bike ride and you fall and you go to the E.R. and you had whatever data connected automatically in your sister portal, it'll be populated without you even touching Seqster. That's how our real time data works and another way that we're totally differentiated than anything else in the marketplace. I was never a fan of API businesses because they're just data in data out. I truly wanted us to create a patient engagement platform, a PEP right, or a patient relationship management system, what I call a PRM instead of a CRM. And that's what we created with Seqster. So that is beyond an API, beyond just data. We're visualizing the data, as you saw. We really nailed the longitudinal health record or the individualized health record. And I think it's, I always say this, health data is medicine. The reason why it's medicine is because our platform has saved patient lives.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, how do you, how are you handling the free form notes, right, because I noticed that I could look at all my notes, but they weren't necessarily, it wasn't pulling from the note and sort of making sense of it. I mean, I could look at all of it and it was all in one place. But the the system wasn't necessarily processing it, sort of. I was talking to Jeff Felton from ConcertAI and they do a lot of sort of, their big thing is the NLP that sort of tries to choose chew through that, which is not trivial, you know, yesterday today, context matters in health care.Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. Look, if we created the the the Tesla of health care, let's just say, right, we're we're changing the game. From static data to real time data. Ok. Well, you're talking about is, are you going to create a helicopter as well? Right, OK. And all right. So, no, we're not going to go create the helicopter. Is there going to be an electric helicopter by Tesla? There's no market for that, right? So that's why they're not doing it now. I'm not saying there's not a market for NLP. It's just the fact that we'll go ahead and partner with a third party NLP provider. And we already have we have like four of them and they all have their strengths and weaknesses because it's not a one size fits all thing. And you know, we can already run OCR, you know, over the free text and pull certain ontology information out. And then, you know, when you partner with an NLP company, once you have a system that can capture data, you could do anything. So people always ask me, Are you going to get into AI? It's just the buzzword. There's a million A.I. companies. What have they really done right in health care? It's not really there. Maybe for imaging they've done some things, but it's more of a buzzword. AI only becomes valuable if you have a system, Harry, that can instantly populate data, then you can run some great artificial intelligence things on it. So NLP, AI, OCR, all those things are just many tools that can add. Now, in your experience, you only got to see about 5 percent of the power of Seqster, and that probably blew you away, even though it was five percent of the power. Because you probably never -- I don't know, you tell me, have you ever been able to collect your data that quickly? It took, what, less than a minute or two?Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, thank God, I don't have a lot of data. So, you know, just when I tap into my my health care provider, you know, my data is there and it's funny, I always tell people, being a not exciting patient is a really good thing in one way, and it's a really bad thing because you can't play with all the data. But you know, like even when I did my genome, it's an extremely boring genome.Ardy Arianpour: My question is it's not about it being exciting or not, because thankfully you're not a chronically ill patients. But imagine if you were and how this helps, but take a step back. I'm just asking the speed, yes, and the quality of the presentation of the data that seeks to you. It was less than what hundred seconds?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Well, it was very quick. And I've already it's funny because I texted my doctor and I was like, I need to talk to you about a couple of these lab results that look out of out of norm, right? And they weren't anything crazy. But I'm just curious like, you know, how do I get them in norm? I'm just I'm always trying to be in in the normal band, if I can be.Ardy Arianpour: So it's interesting you say that because as a healthy individual. You know, and even a chronically ill patient, it doesn't matter. The best way to actually QC data is through visualization, and this is what this is. That's foundational to interoperability. So we hit on semantic and structural interoperability with our, you know, backend engine that we've created to harmonize and standardize the data. We built many different types of retrievers and then we parse that data and then it's standardized and harmonizes it. But that visualization, which some people call the Tableau of health data, you know that we've created when they see it, is really, we got to give the credit to the patients. We had so many patients, healthy ones and unhealthy ones that told us exactly how they want it to look. We did this on the genomic data, we did this on the wearable data. We did this on the medical device data and we have some great new features that can superimpose your clinical data with your fitness data on our integrated view and timeline.Harry Glorikian: Oh, that? See, now that would be, you know, another level of value, even for a healthy patient, right to be able to see that in an integrated way. I made a suggestion, I think that when a panel shows up is. You know, highlight the ones that are out of Norm very quickly, as opposed to having to look at, you know, the panel of 20 to find the one that's out of whack, just either color them differently or reorient them so that they're easier to find. But those are simple changes just from a UI perspective. But so. How would you describe that that Seqster creates value and say translates that into revenue, right? I'm just trying to figure out like, what's the revenue model for you guys? I know that you're I can actually, I'm not even sure if I can sign up for it myself. I would probably have to do it through a system if I remember your revenue model correctly. But how do you guys generate revenue from what you're doing?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, I'll share another secret on your show here from the founding of Seqster. My dream was to empower seven billion people on our little mothership here called Earth to have all their health data in one place. And I had a direct to consumer model in 2016. The market wasn't really ready for it, number one. Number two, it was going to cost $500 million worth of marketing to just get the message out for people to know that it exists. So long story short, in 2016, you know, when I founded the company, not that many people wanted to talk to us. They thought we were just like nuts to go after this problem. 2017, we got some calls from some investors, we raised some great seed funding after I personally put in some money in in 2016 to get the company going. And then in 2018, I got a call from Bill Gates and that was when everything changed. Bill called and wanted to meet in person, I was supposed to get 30 minutes with him. And the reason why he called is because our first beachhead was with Alzheimer's patients. My grandmother, both my grandmothers, passed away due to Alzheimer's disease. Both my maternal and paternal grandmothers and being a caregiver for my mom's mom and being very close to her since she raised me, I learned a lot about a multigenerational health record, so I actually filed patents in 2016 on a multigenerational health record because I wanted to have my grandma's data, my mom's data, my data, and be able to pass it on to research as well as to generations down my family.Ardy Arianpour: Long story short there, Bill gets all the credit for telling me after I showed him our platform, "You got to take this enterprise. You guys built something that Google Health failed at and Microsoft Vault Health Vault failed at." And it's funny we're talking about this. Look, Google just dismantled their health division again. Why? Because tech companies just don't get it. They have a lot of money. They have a lot of power. They've got a lot of smart people. But they they they don't know where, I'll give you an example. It's like a tourist with a lot of money coming into a city. You don't know where the really good local bar is, right? Why is that? You don't know where the really good, you know, slice of pizza is. You're going to go to the regular joints that everyone finds on TripAdvisor and whatever. You know your friends told you, but if you're a local, you know where to get the authentic cocktails and the authentic, you know, drinks and food. Why? Because you've lived and breathed it in the city. So we've lived and breathed it right. And so we know what not to do. It's not about knowing what to do in health care or in genomics or in biotech. It's actually knowing what you shouldn't be doing. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: And knowing I got to tell you, there's some problems where I'm like, OK, I know exactly who to call for that problem, because there aren't, you know, they're not falling off trees in that particular problem. There's a small handful of people that understand that problem well enough that they can come in and sort of surgically help you solve that problem. And you can have all the money in the world and have all the smart people you want. Doesn't mean they're going to be able to solve that particular problem, especially in health care, because it's so arcane.Ardy Arianpour: And it's getting, you know, this is a problem that is growing like cancer, interoperability. Just on this 20 minute conversation with you it has grown by hundreds of millions of dollars. Do you know why? Because data is being siloed.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And I think, look, I've always I've said this on, you know, whatever show or and I've actually I've written letters to Congress. You know, I think this this needs to be mandated because expecting the large EMR companies to do anything is a waste of time. They're not going to do it on their own if their feet are not put to the fire and it changes. And honestly, I believe that if anything will stop the innovation of health care or slow it down is the EMR systems. You know, if you don't have the data, you can't do the work.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. But you know what people don't understand. And not to go off that tangent, but I'll get back to the business model in a second to answer that question because I just recalled in my mind here that I didn't answer that. Look, people don't understand that at least the EMR companies, even though they're like Darth Vader, you know, they needed. They've put some foundation there at least. If that wasn't there, we would be in a much worse situation here, right?Harry Glorikian: Correct, but if Satya Nadella hadn't really changed Microsoft, really redone it right, it wouldn't be the company it is now, and I think they [the EMR companies] are just back in the dark ages.Ardy Arianpour: Of course, I totally agree. I'm surprised, actually. Microsoft, as an example, didn't come up with their own EMR system and launch it to the hospitals to go, compete with the servers and all scripts and Epics of the world. If I was Microsoft, that's what I would do. I would have enough money in power, know exactly what to do. I would take a system like Seqster and I would explode it in a good way and be the good guys and have it completely open source and open network. But that's a whole cocktail conversation if anyone's listening on the on the podcast that wants to talk about that. Give me a call or shoot me an email or find me on LinkedIn.Ardy Arianpour: Let me go back to the business model real quick so people understand. So direct to consumer was what I wanted to do. We built it for the consumer, for the patients. It was the smartest and dumbest thing I ever did. Let's go to why it was the dumbest thing first, because it was really, really hard. It was the smartest because we would not be where we are today. You wouldn't have called me to talk on your podcast and all these other great, you know, amazing people that want to hear about how we're, you know, cracking the code on interoperability now and changing the health care system, changing clinical trials, changing decentralized trials with our system.Ardy Arianpour: Why? Well, it's because our system was built by patients. Right, and so it's a patient centric, real time, real world data platform that layers in engagements for both the providers, the payers, the pharma companies and any other enterprise that white labels our platform. We have both iOS and Android SDK and Web available. It gets fully branded. We're the Intel Inside with the Salesforce.com business model. It's a Software as a Service service that we offer to enterprises. Patients never pay for the service. And we do give VIP codes to chronically ill patients and VIPs, you know, journalists, podcasters and to be honest, anyone who emails me that wants to try it. I've been always giving on that. That costs us time and money, and I'm happy to do it because it's my way of giving back to the community and health care because I know our team and I have built a system that have saved lives. It's been covered by the news multiple times.Harry Glorikian: So, so in essence, a large provider comes, buys the access to the system and then offers it to its patient population to utilize to aggregate all this information, right? How can the platform stay patient centric if the patients aren't directly paying for it?Ardy Arianpour: Ok, very simple. All of these enterprises in health care, whether that's Big Pharma, right, or Big Oayer from Pfizer to Cigna, to United Healthcare group to Humana to even Amazon, right, to other tech companies, they all want to go down a patient centric way. It's just what's happening. You know, I've been talking about this since 2016 because we pioneered patient centric interoperability. That's what we did. That's what Seqster did. That's that's what we set out to do. And we did it. Some, you know, a lot of people say they can do it. Very few actually. Do we fit in that model now, right? And you had the experience yourself. And I think the first time I saw patient centric ads was. 2020. No, sorry. Yeah, 2020, JP Morgan Health Care Conference in January, just three months before the lockdowns and the pandemic started. It was the first time I went to Johnson & Johnson's afterparty in downtown San Francisco. And saw a huge banner saying, you know, blah blah blah, patient centricity. It's the 22nd century, you know, whatever. So they add a bunch of ads that were all patient centric, and I looked to my co-founder, Dana, and I'm like, Look at this, these guys finally caught on. I wonder if they've been, because we've been in discussions with a lot of these folks, long story short, it's not because of Seqster, I think it's just the market was headed that way. We were so far ahead of the market and there was no tailwinds. Now it is all there. And the pandemic afterwards accelerated digital health, as I say, by 7 to 10 years.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you enjoy hearing from the kinds of innovators and entrepreneurs I talk to on the show, I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is out in print and ebook format from Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Just go to either site and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian. Thanks. And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So the platform combines EHR, genetic, and fitness data, so. Why did you start with those three?Ardy Arianpour: So we started with those three, and I'll get to that, but we also do pharmacy, social determinants of health, and claims data as well. So we've added three other very large pillars. We can connect to any data source. We've created a universal interoperability platform that's patient centric that brings real time, real world data. And we're just super excited about all the business opportunities and the big pain points that we're solving for enterprise as well as for the patient. Why did we start with genomics, EMR, fitness. Ok. Here's the story. So I named the company Seqster after actually going on a five or six mile run in downtown San Diego, coming back and watching The Italian Job. And in the movie The Italian Job, it's one of my favorite movies, actually. I love that movie. I could just keep watching it over again, the real Napster was in the movie, and I used to be a Napster user where, you know, it was the way of actually pulling all your music and having it kind of in one place. Not really exactly Seqster's model, Seqster's model is is much more legal because it's patient centric. Yes, Napster was kind of stealing the data, right? So long story short, I was trying to think of a company name and I'm like, Oh my God. I don't know what hit me. I'll remember that moment like it was yesterday, Harry. Sequster came up because I had dived into DNA sequencing. We are doing everything that you can on next gen sequencing. And so I was like, Wow! Seqster. S-E-Q-S-T-E-R.Ardy Arianpour: And I went on GoDaddy.com. I bought it for $9.99. And the story started from right then. It was just me and the website. No co-founders, no onee else. I was just thinking, this is a great name. Now, you fast forward to why it's medical data plus genomic data, plus fitness data, to begin with. Well, the genomic data was an easy one because, right, I have 15 years underneath my belt on genomic sequencing technologies and clinical diagnostics and doing a lot of great things for patients in that arena. And I knew that it couldn't just be the genome, right? That's where the medical data came in because we knew and I never knew that we would be able to actually build something that would be able to pull it on together. I knew it was going to be really tough. I didn't think it was going to be this tough. We would have never done it if I knew that it was this tough. It's so great that we did because we solved it. But if you go back and say, "Ardy, would you do it again if you knew it was going to be this tough?" I wouldn't, because it's really, it's not the number two problem, it's the number one problem. And we're just, you know, I'm a peon. I'm a very small dot. I'm not anyone special. I'm just very passionate about solving this problem. That's it. And so is my team, and we got a great team and we've execute on. So great.Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it was my idea. I was forcing the wearable and fitness data because I was interested in that. And when the Apple Series One Watch came out, it was very limited, but I saw how it was going to change, you know, just connection of data. And my team being bioinformaticians and from the genomics world were so against bringing it in, I mean, I could show you emails of fights about me saying, get fitness data in here. They were not interested. I forced it on them. And then next thing you knew, clinical trials. One of the biggest things was how do you bring sleeping data and wearable data to x y z data? And that market started taking off. Decentralized trials. You can't even do it if you don't have wearable data. And so everyone started saying, you know, OK, you were right. That was one. I get one big pat on the back. And then we realized we can't be limited to just those three pillars. So what are the next three that we can work on? And that was claims data so we can marry it with the EMR and medical data for payers. And then we ran into pharmacy data. We just signed our first digital pharmacy deal three weeks ago with Paragon Health. And if we didn't have those capabilities, we wouldn't have the business opportunities. And the social determinants of health data being our last integrations comes in very handy for various different use cases.Harry Glorikian: So, three sort of things, right? You know, you combine all this data. What can you learn that wasn't obvious before? How do you translate into better health outcomes for consumers or, say, smarter decision making by consumers, right, so those are two potentially different ways to look at it.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. So one word for you: Seqster's longitudinal health record drives health economics, outcomes, research. It drives it.Harry Glorikian: Is that your clients doing that, you doing that, a third party group coming in?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. We don't do that. We're just the patient engagement and data aggregation operating system that gets implemented for enterprise. And then the enterprise can run the analytics on top of it. They can, you know, take all of the raw data. So we're the only 21 CFR Part 11 compliant platform too. We're fully FDA compliant, Harry. It took us 19 months working with the FDA in order to get our compliance letter in September, October of last year, 2020. So about a year ago. And not only are we HIPAA compliance, not only are we High Trust certified and 256 bit encrypted on all the data that comes in, but having that FDA compliance sets us apart number one. Number two, because we're not an API, we have FHIR fully integrated. We have an API for sharing data, but we're not an API business. We're a SaaS business in health care, in digital health. We can make any company a digital health company. Let's say it's Coca-Cola, and they want to empower their 200,000 employees. They could launch a Coca-Cola Seqster white label in 72 hours to 200,000 employees. That's what we've created. Now, take that and imagine that now within pharma, within precision medicine, within clinical trials, within the payer network, which we're the only platform that's CMS ONC interoperability compliance from the Twenty First Century CURES Act as well.Harry Glorikian: So let me let me see if I... I'm trying to figure out like the angle, right? So I mean, ideally for interoperability, if we talk about the highest level right, you really want to get Epic, Cerner, Kaiser, et cetera, all in a room right? And get them to agree to something. Which is like an act of God.Ardy Arianpour: Some people say, we're doing, you know, it's not my words, but again, a figure of speech, people say, we're doing God's work.Harry Glorikian: But stepping back here for a second, what I see you guys doing is actually giving a platform to the patient and the patient is then connecting the record, not necessarily the systems themselves allowing for interoperability to take place.Ardy Arianpour: So yes, but you're speaking of it because of the direct to consumer experience that you had. The experience we gave you is much different than the experience from the enterprise side. We have a full BI platform built for enterprise as well. Right. And then we have the white label for the enterprise where they launch it to a million patients.Harry Glorikian: That's what, I'm trying to think about that, right? So. Coca-cola says, like, going down your example, Coca-Cola says, "Love to do this. Want to offer it to all of our employees." We make it available to them. But it's the employee that has to push the start button and say, yes, I want my electronic medical record to be integrated into this single platform, right?Ardy Arianpour: But that's that's an example with Coca-Cola. If we're doing something with Big Pharma, they're running a clinical trial for 500,000 COVID patients, as an example. They're getting data collection within one day versus two months, and guess what, we're going to be driving a new possible vaccine. Why? Because of the time it takes for data collection at scale. We empower patients to do that and they get something back. They get to track and monitor all their family health.Harry Glorikian: Right. So so it's sort of, you know, maybe I'm being dense, but sort of the same thing, right? Big Pharma makes it available to the patient. The patient then clicks, Yes, I want to do this and pull in my medical records to make it all everything to be in one place. Yes.Ardy Arianpour: Yes. And I think it's about the fact that we've created a unique data sharing environments. So that's, you know, Harry and Stacey and John and Jennifer and whoever, you know, with whatever use case can share their data and also consent is built with E-consent and digital consent is built within that process. You don't share anything you don't want to share.Harry Glorikian: Right. So let me see if I got this correct. So Seqster is providing a translation and aggregation between systems through a new layer of technology. Not creating true interoperability between systems, right?Ardy Arianpour: Yes. There's a spider web. And. We have untangled the spider beb in the United States of America. We've done all the plumbing and piping to every single health institution, doctor's office clinic, wearable sensor, medical device pharmacy, the list goes on and on, Harry.Harry Glorikian: So let's... Another question. So how does the 21st Century CURES Act of 2016 relate to your business? I think you know you've said something like Seqster has become law, but I'm trying to. I'm trying to understand, what do you mean when you say that?Ardy Arianpour: So when we founded Seqster, we didn't know there was going to be a Twenty First Century CURES Act. We didn't know there was going to be GDPR. We are GDPR compliance before GDPR even came out. Right? Because of our the way that we've structured our business, number one. Number two, how we built the platform by patients for CMS ONC interoperability, you know, final rulings and the Twenty First Century CURES Act, which is, they're synonymous. We worked hand in hand with Don Rucker's team and Seema Verma on the last administration that was doing a lot of the work. Now a wonderful gentleman, Mickey Tripathy has taken the role of ONC, and he understands, you know, the value of Seqster's technology at scale because of his background in interoperability. But what was interesting in the two years that we worked with HHS and CMS was the fact that they used Seqster as the model to build the rules. I was personally part of that, my team was personally part of that, you know, and so we were in private meetings with these folks showing our platform and they were trying to draft certain rules.Ardy Arianpour: We didn't know that they were going to be coming out with rules until they did. And then that's when high level folks in the government told us specifically on calls and also even at Datapalooza when I gave a keynote talk on on Seqster, when Don Rucker did as well right before me. You know, we're sitting in the speaker room and folks are like, "You're going to become law in a month." And this was in February of 2020. March 9th, those rules dropped. I was supposed to give a keynote talk at HL7,  at HIMMS. HIMMS got cancelled in 2020. I just got back from HIMMS 2021 in Vegas just a week and a half ago. It was fantastic. Everyone was masked up. There was only three cases of COVID with 10,000 people there. They did a great job, you know, regulating it. You had to show your vaccine card and all that good stuff. But you know, I would have never thought Seqster becomes law when we were founding the company. And so this is really special now.Harry Glorikian: So what does success look like for Seqster?Ardy Arianpour: It depends how you measure it. So we're in the Olympics. It's a great question. Here's my answer to you. We're in the Olympics just finished, right? So we started out in track and field. We were really good at running the 400 Meters and then somehow we got a use case on the 4x1 and the 4x4. And then we did really well there, too. And then because of our speed, you know, we got some strength and then they wanted us to get into the shot put and the javelin throw and then we started winning there, too. And then somehow, now people are calling us saying, "Are you interested in trying to swim?" We got the 100 meter butterfly. Well, we've never done that. So success for us is based off of use cases. And every use case that we deal with, within clinical trials and pharma, we've define 24 distinct use cases that we're generating business on. Within the payer community now, because of the CMS ONC Twenty First Century Cures Act, there's a major tailwind. Within life insurance for real time underwriting, there's, you know, a plethora of folks that are calling us for our system because of the patient engagement. So this patient centricity for us has been a central pillar, and I've never allowed anyone in our company, whether it's the board or our investors or employees, you know, get sidetracked from that. We've been laser focused on the patients and success at impacting patient lives at scale.Harry Glorikian: So as a venture guide, though, right, like I'm going to, there's only so much money on so much time to tackle, so many different opportunities, right? So it's there is a how do we create a recurring revenue stream and keep plugging along and then generate either enough revenue or raise enough money to do more? And so just trying to think through that for what you guys are trying to do, I get the 4x100 and the swimming. But all of that takes money and resources right to be able to prove out, of course.Ardy Arianpour: And here's another thing we're in a different state. Look, my team and I had a major exit before. We built a billion dollar company out of $3 million. And even though we weren't founders of that company, you know, I was the senior vice president and we we did really well. So, you know, that allowed us to not take salaries that allowed us to take our money and put it into doing something good. And we did that in 2016 to seed it. And then afterwards, I raised, you know, millions of dollars from folks that were interested in, you know, this problem and saw that our team had a track record. And I actually was not interested, Harry, in raising a Series A because of our experience, but we kept on getting calls. And then just six months ago, we announced, you know, our series a funding. Well, we actually announced it in March, I think it was, but we closed our Series A in January of this year and it was led by Takeda Pharma, Anne Wojcicki's 23andMe and United Healthcare Group's Equian folks that created Omniclaim and sold to UnitedHealth Group Omni Health Holdings.Ardy Arianpour: So check this out. Imagine my vision in 2016 of having medical data, genomic data fitness data. Well, if you look at the investors that backed us, it's pretty interesting. What I reflect on is I didn't plan that either. We got amazing genomic investors. I mean, it doesn't get better than getting Anne Wojcicki and 23andMe. Amazing female entrepreneur and, you know, just the just the force. Secondly, Takeda Pharma, a top 10 pharma company. How many digital health startups do you know within Series A that got a top 10 pharma? And then also getting some payer investors from UnitedHealth Group's Omniclaim folks and Equian OmniHealth Holdings. So this is to me, very interesting. But going to focus our focus has been pharma and clinical trials. And so Takeda has been phenomenal for us because of, you know, they they built out the platform and they built it out better for us and they knew exactly what to do with things that we didn't know. And with things that patients didn't know on the enterprise, you know, Takeda did a phenomenal job. And now other pharma companies are utilizing our platform, not just Takeda.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, they want their data aggregation. They want as much data on the patient aggregated in one place to make sense of it.Ardy Arianpour: So not necessarily that they actually want to empower patients with a patient centric engagement tool. That's pharma's number one thing right now, the data part, obviously is important, but empowering patient lives at scale is the key, and that's that's our mission. And so, yeah, that's that's a whole 'nother cocktail conversation when I see you soon hopefully in a couple of weeks.Harry Glorikian: Hopefully as life gets, or if it gets back to normal, depending on the variants, you know, we'll hopefully get to meet him in person and have a glass of wine or a cocktail together. So it was great to speak to you. Glad we had this time, and I look forward to, you know, hearing updates on the company and, you know, continually seeing the progress going forward.Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry, for having me. Big fan of Moneyball, so thank you to you and your organizers for having me and Seqster on. If anyone wants to get in touch with me personally, you can find me on LinkedIn or you can follow Seqster at @Seqster. And again, thank you so much for. For having a great discussion around, you know, the the insights behind Seqster.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Thank you.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode.  You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview. 

If You Market
149#: European B2B Lead Generation in the Age of GDPR

If You Market

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 53:18


Do you know everything you need to about GDPR?  This week on the If You Market podcast we talk with Byron Crowell about how to generate leads in the European Union under GDPR data privacy laws. It's not just lead generation though, GDPR may be required whether you're doing lead gen in Europe or not. We discuss the various aspects of compliance and both the positives and negatives of GDPR on business.  Byron Crowell is the CEO & Founder of Solution Publishing - After growing up in Tampa and playing college football at VMI, Byron ventured West and spent 20 years in the heart of the technology startup scene. In 1999, he built the first internet-based mystery shopping company, co-founded RetailEyes in 2002 which was sold to a UK-based conglomerate in 2011. However, his first business love has always been B2B marketing and technology via Solution Publishing which he founded in 2001. Since moving his family back to Tampa, Byron is on a mission to bring west coast venture startup energy and experience to his hometown. He also loves the Buccaneers and Lightning and is an active youth hockey supporter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Deep Dive Radio Show and Nick's Nerd News
The US could finally be getting it's own GDPR!

The Deep Dive Radio Show and Nick's Nerd News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 6:35


The US could finally be getting it's own GDPR! by Nick Espinosa, Chief Security Fanatic

Tierra de Hackers
42. WiSpear, direcciones IPv4, acelerómetros, Amazon One, Google Bombing y pompompurin vs FBI

Tierra de Hackers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 126:57


Una multa por violación de GDPR a una empresa de Chipre, revela la capacidad de espionaje masivo que se puede compactar dentro de una furgoneta… Casos de apoderación fraudulenta de direcciones IP en Norte América y África, y una nueva propuesta del IETF para hacer pública parte del la red privada localnet. Los datos del acelerómetro de tu móvil son accesibles a todas las aplicaciones y pueden revelar muchísima información sobre ti. Amazon One, una tecnología para gobernarlos a todos, para encontrarlos, para atraerlos a todos y atarlos al poder de Amazon. Utilizan ads maliciosos en Google para engañar a los usuarios de Opensea a entregar la información privada de sus carteras de criptomonedas y robarles los fondos. Las intrépidas aventuras de pompompurin, el atacante que envió miles de correos electrónicos en nombre del FBI, filtró la base de datos de ActMobile.com y más recientemente datos de usuarios de Robinhood.com. Notas y referencias en tierradehackers.com Twitch: twitch.tv/tierradehackers Youtube: youtube.com/tierradehackers

Serious Privacy
Oh Canada, you, too? About Quebec's new law (Jenifer Stoddart and Constantine Karbaliotis)

Serious Privacy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 37:27


This week on Serious Privacy, Paul Breitbarth and K Royal jump back across the ocean to North America. While everyone is focused on the Chinese Personal Information Protection Law that was passed on August 20 and went into effect November 1, 2021, Quebec quietly passed Bill 64, (C-11) “An Act to modernize legislative provisions as regards the protection of personal information.” It received assent on September 22, 2021, with a majority of its provisions coming into force over the next two years. Joining the podcast today are two experts in Canadian privacy law, Jennifer Stoddart and Constantine Karbaliotis. Jennifer was the Privacy Commissioner of Canada from 2003 to 2013 and previously served as the Chair of the Commission d'accès à l'information du Québec from 2000 to 2003 and has also held positions on the Human Rights Commissions of Canada and Québec. Constantine is likewise no slacker when it comes to privacy law, having nearly 20 years experience in both the private and public sector, helping companies comply with complex privacy laws from US, Canada, and the EU.Join us as we discuss the ins and outs of the new Quebec law, the complications you might see, the necessary steps you need to take to be compliant. In the conversation, we will also discuss some of the nuances with integrasting privacy programs and how GDPR impacts Canadian activities.As always, if you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at seriousprivacy@trustarc.com. In addition, if you like our podcast, please do rate and comment on our program in your favorite podcast app. We also have a LinkedIn page for Serious Privacy, so please follow for more in-depth discussion.

All In with Rick Jordan
Meta, Facebook, Google…The Future of Data Privacy | Punit Bhatia | Cyber

All In with Rick Jordan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 29:54


About Episode: Meet Punit Bhatia, an industry expert on Privacy. Listen in on the conversation around Facebook, Google and many other platform's on how they gather their consumer's privacy data. Does your social media account know you better than yourself?We Meet: Punit Bhatia, EK AdvisoryEpisode References: Facebook/Meta - https://tinyurl.com/jcmpn5n5Aston Martin - https://www.astonmartin.com/en-us/Ferrari - https://www.ferrari.com/en-USBMW - https://www.bmw.com/GDPR - https://tinyurl.com/rx735utyCCPA - https://tinyurl.com/4xawnx9dThe Great Hack (Cambridge Analytica scenario) - https://www.netflix.com/title/80117542Situational Ethics by Rick Jordan - https://tinyurl.com/cwt2c3fmSection 230 - https://www.eff.org/issues/cda230Connect:Connect with Rick: https://linktr.ee/mrrickjordanConnect with Punit: https://punitbhatia.com/Universal Rate & Review: https://lovethepodcast.com/allinwithrickjordanSubscribe & Review to ALL IN with Rick Jordan on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/RickJordanALLINAbout Punit Bhatia: My name is Punit Bhatia from Brussels, Belgium. I am an active speaker and guest lecturer at Solvay Brussels School of Economics and Management. I'd like to consider myself as a leading privacy expert as I have worked with businesses in over 30 countries through online as well as in-person training and consulting. I do direct mentoring with CEO's and help them identify, manage privacy risks and implement strategies to data privacy. I run a business related to "Data Privacy/GDPR". Primarily the business goals are to provide expert advice, pragmatic actions and convert complex legal topics to common terms. I keep my clients updated on the risks of the latest AIs, Cybersecurity matter and any other data privacy relevant to their line of business. I have also published 3 GDPR books and am currently working on one.

The Bitcoin.com Podcast
Alain Brenzikofer, CTO and Co-founder, Integritee Network

The Bitcoin.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 43:41


In development since 2018, Integritee AG's solution enables sensitive business or personal data to be securely handled in an interoperable blockchain ecosystem. Using a hybrid of blockchain technology and hardware-enabled trusted execution environments, it enables businesses to securely process sensitive data, aiding compliance with privacy laws like GDPR.Alain Brenzikofer is the CTO and Co-founder of Integritee Network. He recently joined the Bitcoin.com News Podcast to talk about the technology and the business.

A Shark's Perspective
#305 - The Murky and Unfamiliar Waters of Calling Consumers

A Shark's Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 43:27


Conversation with Michele Shuster, a founding partner of Mac Murray & Shuster where she advises clients on proactively managing federal and state consumer protection demands; the Regulatory Counsel to LeadsCouncil; and the General Counsel to the Professional Association for Customer Engagement (PACE).

Paul's Security Weekly
The Supreme Counsel - PSW #716

Paul's Security Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 195:59


This week, we kick off the show with an interview featuring Roger Grimes, Data-Driven Defense Evangelist, KnowBe4, who joins to discuss the Evolution and Maturity of the Cybersecurity Industry! Then, Matt Linton, Chaos Specialist at Google, joins to talk about What Exactly Is an Incident Commander, Anyway! In the Security News: Its still not illegal to look at HTML source code, Nobelium strikes again, npm infections, gas is cheap in Iran, if you can get it, Google Tensor, going beyond the transport layer with HTTPS, buying a power plan, EBCIDIC and GDPR, how children can infect parents, signing your rootkit, dates are hard, something smells funny and bird poop in your antenna!   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/psw716 Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/psw for all the latest episodes!   Visit https://securityweekly.com/acm to sign up for a demo or buy our AI Hunter! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly

Rocketship.fm
Antitrust: Data Privacy & Ownership

Rocketship.fm

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 33:03


Today, we're diving into the deep and dark world of data and privacy. The internet is filled with bad actors intent on harvesting data with intents varying from selling to the highest bidder to influencing elections. Big tech companies like Facebook and Google are able to track everything we do online (and offline). Do we even have privacy anymore? Thankfully, there are companies actively working to make it easier for us, the consumers, to control our data and governments are not only enacting data privacy laws like GDPR, there is a growing movement around actual ownership of our data and taxing companies who use it and profit off of it - returning proceeds back to the people.  So how do we move forward in a world where data is the new oil? That and more in today's episode of Rocketship.fm. *** This episode is brought to you by: Vidyard: The Top Video Tool for SaaS Marketing and Sales http://vidyard.com/rocketship NetSuite: NetSuite by Oracle is a scalable solution to run all of your key back office operations. Go to netsuite.com/rocketship today. Blinkist: Rocketship.fm is now on Blinkist! Listen to 12 minute episodes with no ads! Get seven days free when you check out Blinkist. Indeed: Indeed is the job site that makes hiring as easy as 1-2-3. Get started with a free $75 sponsored job credit at indeed.com/rocketship. BetterHelp: Unlimited Professional Counseling via Online Chat, Video or Phone Anytime, Anywhere. Get 10% off when you visit betterhelp.com/rocketship. Fundrise: Fundrise makes investing in private real estate as easy as investing in stocks, bonds, or mutual funds. Go to fundrise.com/rocketship today. Airfocus: The home for products and the people who build them. Airfocus is an easy-to-use and flexible product management platform that combines product strategy superpowers with modularity. Visit airfocus.com/rocketship and try it for free today. WIX: When your agency partners with Wix, you unlock an entire digital ecosystem for creating, managing and growing your business online. Head over to Wix.com/Partners and reimagine what your agency can accomplish. *** This show is a part of the Podglomerate network, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. We encourage you to visit the website and sign up for our newsletter for more information about our shows, launches, and events. For more information on how The Podglomerate treats data, please see our Privacy Policy.    Since you're listening to Rocketship, we'd like to suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows surrounding entrepreneurship, business, and careers like Creative Elements and Freelance to Founder. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices