Podcasts about JetBlue

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Airline in the United States

  • 622PODCASTS
  • 866EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about JetBlue

Latest podcast episodes about JetBlue

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show: 01.19.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 60:33


5G's Crimes Against Humanity   Richard Gale and Gary Null PhD Progressive Radio Network, January 19, 2022     The roll out of the new C-Band 5G service by AT&T and Verizon scheduled for January 19, has raised alarms for major airline executives who have warned that it will create “catastrophic” interference with flight navigation systems and pilot safety during take off and landing.  The risks will be greater during bad weather. Among the warnings are major disruptions in commerce and supply chain, the overriding of aircrafts' electronic safety systems and radio altimeters, and the grounding of flights that will leave “tens of thousands of Americans grounded.” According to CNN, the airlines estimate that upwards to 1,000 flights will be disrupted daily. The 5G threat is particularly heightened in low-visibility conditions. Chief executives from American Airlines, United, Delta, Southwest and Jet Blue have demanded that 5G be blocked within a two-mile radius of major US airports. FedEx and UPS have also joined the airlines' complaints. Foreign airlines such as Dubai's Emirates, Air India, Japan Air, Lufthansa and British Airways have already changed or canceled flights to the US. Two of the world's largest plane manufacturers, Airbus and Boeing, have also issued warnings.    This has become an ongoing battle between the Federal Aviation Administration and the private telecomm industry and its Washington lobbyists. The FAA has been warning about 5G interruption of planes' navigation systems for quite some time.  The telecomm industry's unwillingness to budge is most disturbing because the Biden administration has already permitted 90 percent of wireless tower deployment to roll out as scheduled.  It is only in the vicinity of major airports where the FAA and airlines demand restrictions due to safety concerns. However, as we have reported for the past several years, the telecomm giants, notably AT&T and Verizon, and its leading media spokespersons at CNN and the New York Times, have undermined and denied 5G's risks, especially to human health and the environment, ever since wireless technologies were first commercialized.   5G is destined to be a permanent fixture across the nation. There is barely a chance to prevent it. The thousands of medical and environmental studies confirming high EMF's dangers and the petitions signed by thousands of international scientists to halt its deployment are unequivocally ignored or worse ostracized and canceled.  It is estimated that there are over 10,000 peer-reviewed clinical studies mentioning serious molecular biological injury and defects to organs, neurons, cells and cellular function, and DNA damage to plants, animals and humans alike.  Between August 2016 and September 2018 alone, over 400 new studies on electromagnetic radiation risks were compiled by public health Professor Joel Moskowitz at the University of California at Berkeley.   Despite the pandemic, lockdowns and social distancing have not hindered 5G's progress to connect every American into its spider's web.  In December 2019, T-Mobile reached its goal of nationwide 5G coverage of over 1.3 million square miles (34 percent of the US) and AT&T reached its milestone to reach 179 million people. The 5G roll out is also crucial for international globalists to usher in the Fourth Industrial Revolution.  The World Economic Forum's presentation, “Why is 5G Important for the Fourth Industrial Revolution,” outlines the multi-trillion dollar impact advanced connectivity will have on manufacturing, wholesale and resale, smart cities and homes, public services, transportation, real time banking, finance and insurance, agriculture and forestry, micro chip surveillance, real estate, education, mining, health and medicine.   We must not hold any false hopes that the Biden administration will ultimately side with the airlines' safety concerns. During the 2020 election, the Biden campaign received $97 million from the Communications/Tech sector versus Trump's $18 million.  Alphabet (Google), Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, Apple, AT&T and Comcast overwhelmingly contributed to Biden's war chest.   The American public is being bamboozled with blatant falsehoods to embrace 5G as a necessary and innovative technology that will benefit and improve our lives. But the real truth is the exact opposite.    The following information has been abbreviated from scientific literature that is fully validated and has been stated by international experts such as Drs. Devra Davis and Martin Pall about EMF's adverse effects to government leaders and national legislators repeatedly. This outline was presented by Dr. Martin Pall, a Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry and Medical Sciences at Washington State University to the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Pall is recognized worldwide as an expert in EMF and 5G's detrimental effects on biological systems and the diseases associated with wireless technologies.   Lower Fertility:  Alters the structure of the testes and ovaries, lowers sperm count and the number of egg follicles, increases spontaneous abortion and lowers the levels of three sex hormones. Neurological and Neuropsychiatric Effects:  There has been a dramatic increase in the following conditions since the advent of mobile phones, the internet, and wireless technologies:  insomnia, fatigue, depression, headaches and cognitive dysfunction, anxiety, and loss of memory. Animal studies have shown that EMFs produce major changes in brain structure, which is likely happening to everyone who has extensive daily exposure to EMFs Cellular DNA Damage:  There are three types of DNA damage observed in EMF exposure:  single and double DNA breaks and oxidized DNA bases.  These can cause cancer and mutations in the sexual germ lines. Apoptosis:  EMFs contribute to programmed cell death that in turn leads to reproductive and neurodegenerative disorders. Oxidative Stress:  Free radical damage that has been associated with numerous health conditions including cancer, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic inflammation, Parkinson's, multiple sclerosis, cellular death and aging Endocrine Effects: According Dr. Pall, every hormonal system in the body is adversely affected by EMF exposure. Excessive Intracellular Calcium:  Ca2+ is critical for cellular activity Cancer:  There are 35 separate scientific reviews of the body of peer-reviewed literature providing evidence that EMFs increase carcinogenesis, promote and progress tumor development and contribute to metastasis.   There are also other medical conditions that have been shown to be associated likely with EMF exposure:   Cardiac Effects.  EMFs interfere with the electrical control of the heart that can produce tachycardia, bradycadia, arrhythmia and abnormal heart palpitations. Early Onset of Alzheimer's and Dementia:  In recent years and in parallel with increased EMF exposure, signs of symptoms associated with Alzheimer's are being observed in people age 30 and younger. Dr. Pall has called this "digital dementias." ADHD and Autism:  The epidemic in ADHD and autism witnessed in each younger generation may be caused by late prenatal and early post-natal EMF exposure. Each of these neurological conditions is associated with the increase of calcium over-penetrating cell linings due to EMF pulsations and disrupting synapse formations.   Everyone will be affected by 5G's radiation. But it will not require three decades to observe its injurious effects. Unlike cigarettes, nobody has a choice whether you wish to be exposed to 5G or not. 5G's EMF radiation is all-pervasive.    The mainstream media, in particular the New York Times, which has a collaborative agreement with the leading 5G provider Verizon, have no intention to warn the public about any of the scientific findings mentioned above. There is a growing consensus in the scientific and medical community that 5G will usher an epidemic of disease never before witnessed in human history. It is too difficult to make forecasts. Nevertheless, if the past and current research on EMF's adverse effects on health and the environment during the past 50 years are any indication, we are entering a new epoch of disease and neurological disorders that humanity is completely unprepared to handle.    This is a consequence of what happens when an entire nation is trapped into carelessly trusting elected presidents and legislators whose campaigns are bankrolled by the Telecomm giants and Silicon Valley, and a media empire ruled by serial liars and masters of disinformation campaigns for private corporate interests. This is vulture capitalism at is worse.  

Miles to Memories Podcast
Grand Hyatt Kauai Still Impresses, Joe Wins A Medal At Disney, DoorDash Delivery Tips & Tricks

Miles to Memories Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 51:49


Episode Description In this episode of the Miles to Memories podcast we talk about Shawn's trip to Hawaii and why the Hyatt Regency Kauai is still a favorite. We also discuss Joe getting his medal on at Disney and Mark gives his DoorDash delivery tips and tricks and overview of the program. Episode Notes 4:35 - Jetblue flight cancellations 7:23 - New Mosaic perk 10:50 - runDisney 18:48 - Dealing with Hawaii covid regulations 24:17 - Grand Hyatt Kauai 29:35 - AA flight upgrades 35:38 - Door Dashing   Enjoying the podcast? Please consider leaving us a positive review on your favorite podcast platform! You can also connect with us anytime at podcast@milestomemories.com.  You can subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Sticher, Spotify, TuneIn, Pocket Casts, or via RSS. Don't see your favorite podcast platform? Please let us know! Music: Rewind by Jay Someday | https://soundcloud.com/jaysomeday Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License

Business Wars Daily
Omicron Sends Flight Schedules Into a Tailspin

Business Wars Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 3:51


Today is Monday, January 10, and we're looking at JetBlue vs. Alaska Airlines.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Noticiero Univision - Edición Nocturna
Poderosa tormenta en el norte de California genera desastres

Noticiero Univision - Edición Nocturna

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 20:29


Reducen la sentencia al camionero Rogel Aguilerra Mederos a 10 años de prisión.Incendios forestales en Denver Colorado, ordenan a miles de personas a ser evacuadas.JetBlue anunció la reducción de casi 13 vuelos diarios.En Nueva York más de una quinta parte de los policías están de baja por el covid 19.El presidente Biden haría cambios sobre algunas medidas sobre visas para el 2022.Las solicitudes de subsidio por desempleo disminuyeron.

Dot Today
The JetBlue Email

Dot Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 2:33


Fair warning that our plans may be disrupted.

KFI Featured Segments
@GaryAndShannon (12/30) - What's Happening

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 7:07


Prince Andrew's lawyers reportedly in ‘emergency talks' after Maxwell guilty verdict // American Nurses Association are concerned about the reduced Covid isolation guidelines // Former CNN producer is under investigation for alleged crimes involving minors // Jet Blue cancels flights through the middle of January // Tesla recalls a couple of their models.

Marketplace Minute
Jobless claims fall to a 52-year low - Midday - Marketplace Minute - December 30, 2021

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 1:50


The four week claims average fell to its lowest level since 1969; Putin highlights Nord Stream 2, before talks with Biden; widespread flight cancellations continue; JetBlue cancels flights to mid-January

I'M SUPER EXCITED with Rory James
A Splash On The Scene! - Topics: Insecure, Cardigan, New York, Home Alone, The Wizard Of Oz, High Anxiety, Joe Biden, The Babysitter's Club

I'M SUPER EXCITED with Rory James

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 63:08


This week, Rory and Laurie's plans for a holiday celebration spectacular get thrown into chaos as New York City COVID cases surge and President Ro's office announces a dramatic decision. Rory rocks out to the JetBlue hold music and confronts a mean lady in Old Navy, while Laurie reports from live on the ground in NYC. Plus, John Candy sings “polka polka… polka… polka twist?” Subscribe and follow us at @superexcitedpod Follow Rory: @itsRORYjames Follow Laurie: @laurielamartina

Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness
Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness - Update

Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 0:50


Hello listeners, subscribers, fans and everybody in the Teen Canteen. I apologize for not reaching out sooner but, in the immortal words from the band Disturbed, I was, “Down with the Sickness.” That’s right. I had the thing. Now I don’t know if it was the Omni Magazine, JetBlue, Lambda Lambda Lambda (Tri-Lambs) or the original, rich, chocolatey CocoRona version. What I do know is it knocked me on my arse. I had episodes all laid out for the weeks that have passed so I may still finish those and slowly get caught up. Because the lasting fatigue and headaches are still a real pain, just hang in there with me and look for those alerts when new shows are up and running. Thank you all for a being here and enjoying Norm Nathan’s Vault of Silliness. Talk to you all soon.

Algo Pa’ Contar
80. JetBlue, Puerto Rico, y Marvel

Algo Pa’ Contar

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 51:10


En este episodio el crew habla sobre.... mejor dicho el Peter da un RANT sobre su experiencia con JetBlue y sobre los horrores que lo hizo pasar, Hablamos sobre como Puerto Rico se ah levantado y a manejado el COVID, y al final damos unos pequeños thoughts sobre Marvel y las series y películas que an salido reciente. NO SPOILERS!!!!!! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/algopacontar/message

Live From The 405 Podcast
Live From The 405, Episode 324

Live From The 405 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 78:54


The flight to Florida was just PLANE CRAZY, LOLLL!!!! Hinge fringe. Gas caps and near misses. Spider Man 3, round 2. William Russ fuss. No forks for Furleys. Merry Christmas, lovers!

Black and White Sports Podcast
NBA & Bulls Legend DENNIS RODMAN Has POLICE called by WOKE Jet Blue Airlines for NOT WEARING MASK!

Black and White Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 7:22


NBA & Bulls Legend DENNIS RODMAN Has POLICE called by WOKE Jet Blue Airlines for NOT WEARING MASK! Website: www.blackandwhitenetwork.com Get your MERCH here: https://teespring.com/stores/blackandwhitesports Follow Black and White Network on Odysee: Black and White Sports: https://odysee.com/@blackandwhitesports Black and White News: https://odysee.com/@blackandwhitenews Black and White Entertainment: https://odysee.com/@blackandwhiteentertainment Follow us on Rumble: Black and White Sports: https://rumble.com/user/BlackandWhiteSports Black and White News: https://rumble.com/user/BlackandWhiteNews Email: blackandwhitesports2019@gmail.com Check out the podcast site here for all of the live streams: https://anchor.fm/blackandwhitesports Please support Black and White Sports for as low as .99 per month here: https://anchor.fm/blackandwhitesports/support Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/blackandwhitesports Join us and become a channel member today as we fight against Woke sports. Click the JOIN button or the link in the description and support us. Just starts at $4.99 per month and cancel anytime. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC73b_bf7j4fgTnBNRTqKKTA/join Check Out blackandwhitenetwork.com for More Exclusive Content from Us. Entertainment, Politics, Sports! 3 Membership levels Available As Well As Free Video Content & Articles!

Behind the Line
Fake LeBron James Claims People Get Offended If He Keeps It Real

Behind the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 9:16


LeBron James posted another cryptic message to Instagram over the weekend. In the post...LeBron James claimed that being fake has become so accepted...that people now get offended when others keep it real. We react to the irony of this message coming from LeBron James. We highlight numerous instances...where LeBron James has been fake.  We also discuss the altercation between Dennis Rodman and Jet Blue. Dennis Rodman had the police called on him...because he refused to properly wear his mask on the flight.

Pencil Leadership with Chris Anderson
Use Creativity to Improve Business

Pencil Leadership with Chris Anderson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 24:51


From working with Hollywood and music stars like Woody Harrelson and Rod Stewart, Nir discovered something that may shock you: These creative superstars aren't all that different from you or me! It's just that they have mastered a method of repeatable and predictable creativity -- a type of creativity that anyone can learn. And it turns out that's the same type of creativity can be used in businesses and careers everywhere! Nir has taught thousands of leaders and individuals around the globe how to harness the power of creativity to improve profitability, increase sales, boost customer service and ultimately create more meaning in their work. Nir has spent the last two decades working on a formula to codify creativity for working with clients such as AT&T, Microsoft, Ace Hardware, NFL Network, EA Sports, Suzuki, Activision, and JetBlue business. That formula is found in 'The Creator Mindset,' a book that has been translated into two languages and released worldwide by McGraw/Hill business in August of 2020.Support the show (https://paypal.me/pencilleadership)

American Consequences With Trish Regan

As the world reacts to the Omicron variant, airlines are bracing for yet another turbulent time… And according to Ben Baldanza, economist and former CEO of Spirit Airlines, the industry is currently undergoing a massive change.  Legacy airlines are struggling with high oil prices, significant travel restrictions, and a total loss of the business class customers... But that doesn't mean there aren't investing opportunities in this space as companies like JetBlue, Spirit, and Frontier become more focused on regional travel. The smart money, Ben tells Trish, will be re-thinking how it can invest in the airline sector…  Plus, this former airline CEO details exactly when you should buy your plane tickets to secure the cheapest rates, and how purchasing a package is often the ultimate deal.   Join Trish and Ben for an in-depth discussion about the changes ahead for the airline industry.

Tearsheet Podcast: The Business of Finance
How Goldman Sachs leverages partnerships to bring innovative products to consumers and SMBs

Tearsheet Podcast: The Business of Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 27:29


This following is part of a new series we're running. It's called the Big Bank Theory, and it's all about the future of banking. We see three options going forward: in the march towards digital, people will gravitate towards the digital arms of incumbent banks, give their business to new upstart challenger banks, or the biggest opportunity, which is to bank with the brands they love. The following series includes content from Tearsheet's Big Bank Theory Conference, held in November 2021. Welcome to the Tearsheet Podcast. I'm Zack Miller. Abhinav Anand was chugging along in senior risk roles at Discover when he received a call 5 years ago. That call, from Goldman Sachs, changed the trajectory of his life and the nature of the bank he would eventually join. As part of the early Marcus team, Abhinav went into startup mode. A consumer lending product would kick off a stream of new financial products for consumers and small businesses. As part of the Marcus distribution plan, the team would pursue a DTC strategy combined with strategic partnerships with top brands like Apple, Amazon, Walmart, and JetBlue. Anand joined us at The Big Bank Theory Conference to discuss the partnership journey Goldman Sachs embarked on to massively ramp Marcus and its transformation to a retail bank. Here's my conversation with Goldman Sachs managing director, Abhinav Anand.

Frequent Miler on the Air
Aeroplan Encourages Gaming: Ready Player 1?

Frequent Miler on the Air

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 65:22


Air Canada's Aeroplan rewards program has unveiled a new credit card for the U.S. market. And, surprise... the card seems custom built for "gaming"! Ready to play? 0:01:00 Mailbag Double header Mea Culpa: Wyndham 10K, JetBlue pooling 00:05:00 Mattress Running the Numbers: Swagbucks 0:09:20 Main Event: Aeroplan encourages gaming. Ready player 1? 0:56:13 Post Roast: Nick is sad that Greg picked Richard Branson over him 0:57:23 Question of the week: Why earn cash back instead of transferable points?

Airlines Confidential Podcast
111 - David Neeleman, Founder & CEO, Breeze Airways

Airlines Confidential Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 60:05


This week: David Neeleman, Founder, Breeze Airways, JetBlue, & More; Dubai Air Show new aircraft orders; AA & United talk holiday staffing at Skift; Listener Q's: Should the EAS program be terminated? From Australia: Is Qantas & it's LCC successful? Complaint: Alaska Airlines Charged $125 to seat my grandson next to me - Fine or Whine? Plus a tribute and shout-out.

Vertical Guidance
Episode #14: Rob Haglund, Former Delta Airlines Captain

Vertical Guidance

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 46:41


On this week's podcast, we hosted Rob Haglund. Rob had a very long and successful aviation career. He started out his professional career with Delta at age 25. He worked with Delta until retiring at the age of 52. Rob then wanted to get back into the industry so he started working for Jet Blue, then over to Compass, and then ended his career by going back to Delta, as a captain on the MD80. Rob's vast experience in the industry gives him a fantastic viewpoint on the industry today. He offers insight on how to have a successful aviation career as well as how to avoid complacency once you reach your dream job. Rob gives tremendous advice on staying motivated through the ups and downs. Our favorite quote was "It goes fast, just enjoy the ride."

Make Climate Cool Again
RE:REPORT on Jetblue

Make Climate Cool Again

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 39:55


I need a coffee and a new glasses prescription after reviewing Jetblue's long 2019/2020 ESG report in size 5 font. BUT I think what was most interesting to me was how Jetblue is preparing for the future by assessing their climate risks and opportunities. Also I had no idea that they were the first carbon neutral airline (for domestic flights) in the US. Jetblue also alludes to a medium term timeline for carbon pricing or a carbon tax. That's a big hint for all of us of what could be coming down the pipeline. Pun intended. There is some really great data throughout the report and highly organized charts on topics that some businesses could really learn and benefit from when it comes to preparing for the future. Did I know I was reading their future goals? No. But I do know their investment strategy and I'll take that to the bank. My biggest criticism for this report is to make a 10 page summary of this report designed for regular people who want to learn more and take sustainability lessons and apply them to their jobs. And also, carbon neutral isn't enough. Feel free to check it out yourself if you have some free time or a family holiday you want to get out of: https://www.jetblue.com/magnoliapublic/dam/ui-assets/p/2019_2020_JetBlue_ESG_Reporting.pdf TEAM: Host: Sara Miltenberger, RSTR Media & Strategy Music: Jake Huffman Creative Artwork: Groove Street Creative --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/makeclimatecool/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/makeclimatecool/support

Milenomics ² Podcast - No Annual Fee Edition
Episode 59: Citi Transfer Partner Changes, New Routes, and a $500 Tip of the Week

Milenomics ² Podcast - No Annual Fee Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 23:54


We discuss the addition of Wyndham/Vacasa as a Citi ThankYou Point transfer partner, ZIPAIR from LAX to Tokyo, Frontier leaving Newark, and a $500 brokerage bonus from "Tastyworks." Let's get right into it. Citi TYP Shakeup: AA Out (for now?) Wyndham In Wyndham 1:1 from Premier/Prestige, 5:4 from lower level cardsWyndham opens up Vacasa rentals--and really is a wonderful option for family travelEarlier this year I attempted to open a Wyndham Business card but was unsuccessfulNow, 3x on Fluz or 2x on WU purchases are really nice vehicles for Vacasa rentals Because of Cash out options, TYP transferred over should ideally have a 1cpp or higher value (1.25 for a DC or lower card) to even just break even Vacasa prices by the bedrooms (15k per)--which gives outsize value opportunities (2-3cpp) ZIPAIR Announced LAX-Tokyo Route (link) Very affordable, especially for kidsWhat's this mean for flights to Japan for tourism?It's amazing how investment continues to pour into the travel space despite trying timesDiscuss where this sort of thing fits in compared to using mileshttps://www.zipair.net/en3x weekly service6 and below fly for 13,000 YEN each way ($115) Frontier Leaving EWR, 16 slots up for grabs (Link: WA) Is this a loss for EWR? What would it take for us to fly Frontier? (nonstop, good times)JetBlue, Spirit United seen as winners?Fun Fact: Slots were to remain unused, saving 1.2 minutes per day of delays The added competition is seen to allow fares to drop $15-$36. “Tastyworks” $500 Brokerage Bonus Direct link$500 bonus for funding w/$10,000 and holding for 3 monthsDoesn't seem that trading is a requirement?Make sure GIVE_ME_FIVE_2021 is applied as the referral codeBonus posted for us 24 hours after funding (is that a world record?) We pushed a couple news items for the paid show this week. Join us at patreon.com/milenomics for further discussion on these and more, plus access to a thriving Slack community.

How to Get an Analytics Job
Analytics Engineering with Jetblue Data Engineer Reid Williams

How to Get an Analytics Job

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 81:06


Check out Marketing Analytics Case Study Course: https://learn.silvertoneanalytics.com/cartflows_step/marketing-analytics-case-study-landing/Enter the promocode "Youtube" to get 20% off.Join our discord:https://discord.gg/hMueC9hmEjIn this livestream Reid is going to talk all about Data Engineering, the analytics interview process and the tools he uses day to day as an analyst.Welcome to the How to Get an Analytics Job channel. Discover how you fit into the analytics marketplace, what skills you should build, and how to land your analytics dream job. Analytics agency owner John David Ariansen and Economics Department Chair Dr. Hall will give you tips and tricks to land your dream job and level up your analytics career.Check Out Our PlaylistsHow to Get an Analytics Job Podcast:https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBvzkZLydYX0D28bbnfRCV6M4zMQrhXsdGreensboro College Analytics Lecture Series : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBvzkZLydYX2UenX5FGME-n-KDjvKmeKpLooking to land an analytics job? Sounds like you need a solid resume... Sign up for our email list to get a free analytics resume guide: https://mailchi.mp/df01df1e8856/analyticsjobFollow us on LinkedIn:John David Ariansenhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/johndavidariansen/Daniel Hallhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/daniel-hall-088b1115/Want to learn some analytics skills? Check out John David's courses below:Tableau Desktop Specialist Guidehttps://www.udemy.com/course/tableau-desktop-specialist-certification-guide/?referralCode=AC6F2FDED8C5A0040276Power BI Top Skillshttps://www.linkedin.com/learning/power-bi-top-skills/top-skills-for-power-bi

Science of CX
Michael Lawder : AI, Chat and Contact Center Agents Evolve

Science of CX

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 40:26


Michael leads the Customer Experience team at ASAPP. He works with customers like JetBlue, American Airlines, and Dish to help them implement AI solutions that augment and automate human work, empowering people to be their best. Prior to joining ASAPP, Michael served as SVP of Customer Care at Samsung, and held executive CX leadership roles at Electronic Arts and Apple. Key Takeaways.  Taking care of your agents. Employee satisfaction = Customer satisfaction Machine learning. How to elevate your agents into highly specialized roles by leveraging technologyAttrition levels in Call Centre Agent roles. Why they're so high, what they cost, and what can be done to reduce them. Empowering your employees with the right tools for work.  Connect with Michael  Website - https://www.asapp.com/  LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/paul-cowan-154208/  Twitter - https://twitter.com/michael_lawder?lang=en  Email - ml@asapp.com

Market Adventures: The Journey to Financial Freedom
Hidden Trading Strategies: The Lone Wolf [Repost Ep 132]

Market Adventures: The Journey to Financial Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 9:02


Visit the Website: https://marketadventures.co Free Discord. Join today: marketadventures.co/community Price generally moves in trends Stocks in a particular class or sector tend to move in trends too. Almost simultaneously. If FB has a good day, 9 times out of 10 so does Snapcaht and Pinterest. If American Airlines has a bad day, typically Jetblue, Southwest and other airlines follow. But what happens when a stock in a particular sector or group moves in contrast to the broader movement of its brethren stocks. Using this signal when trading may present opportunities to enter or red flags to exit It can serve as a screen for your watchlist when looking for future plays. Remember, as you begin searching for answers to life's challenges, don't seek security, seek adventure. seek security, seek adventure Welcome to the Market Adventures Podcast where I believe everyone should be able to participate and secure their future using the stock market – so I build simplified content to empower and enrich everyone. My name is Alex Cunningham and we live in a society where financial education is not prioritized. Because of this, I've decided to document my journey to creating financial freedom through the stock market for my family and teaching you to do the same. Financial freedom can mean something different for each of us and, not surprisingly, there are many different vehicles one can use to get there. It's important to understand who you are and what you want when deciding which vehicle is right for you. The stock market is a great vehicle for those who want freedom from the physical and social burdens of traditional business. Newsletter: https://marketadventures.substack.com/welcome Instagram: http://instagram.com/marketadventurespodcast Twitter: http://twitter.com/investingpod Price generally moves in trends Stocks in a particular class or sector tend to move in trends too. Almost simultaneously. If FB has a good day, 9 times out of 10 so does Snapcaht and Pinterest. If American Airlines has a bad day, typically Jetblue, Southwest and other airlines follow. But what happens when a stock in a particular sector or group moves in contrast to the broader movement of its brethren stocks. Using this signal when trading may present opportunities to enter or red flags to exit It can serve as a screen for your watchlist when looking for future plays. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/marketadventures/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/marketadventures/support

The Founder Hour
Alex Wilcox | JSX and the Future of Aviation

The Founder Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 66:29


Alex Wilcox is the co-founder and CEO of JSX, formerly known as JetSuiteX, an independent air carrier based in the United States that describes itself as a “hop-on jet service” offering short-haul flights between and within Arizona, California, Florida, Nevada, Texas, and Utah.Before JSX, Alex founded JetSuite (not to be confused with JetSuiteX). He also worked at several different airlines and was a founding executive of JetBlue Airways.We spoke with Alex all about his upbringing, the various jobs he had and the lessons he picked up along the way, his experience managing a rock and roll band early in his career, what he hopes to accomplish with JSX, the behind the scenes of launching an airline startup, his vision for the future of aviation, and more.SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER & STAY UPDATED > http://bit.ly/tfh-newsletterFOLLOW TFH ON INSTAGRAM > http://www.instagram.com/thefounderhourFOLLOW TFH ON TWITTER > http://www.twitter.com/thefounderhourINTERESTED IN BECOMING A SPONSOR? EMAIL US > partnerships@thefounderhour.com

Over A Pint Marketing Podcast
Stacey Nash Will Make You A Better Storyteller

Over A Pint Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 48:27


#28 The word storyteller is overused by too many folks that don't really know much about storytelling.    That's not the case with Stacey Nash. This woman has got the goods! Check out this lineup of clients she has worked on:    ✅ Harley Davidson ✅ Northwestern Mutual  ✅ Lousiana State University  ✅ Jet Blue   And that's just a start!   Stacey's work also includes NBC Olympics, A&E's Accused: Guilty or Innocent, Crossfit Games, Soledad O'Brien's Matter of Fact along with various shows on VH1, MTV and Bravo.   The Wall St. Journal has called her work -- check this -- “strangely riveting.”    Yeah, she knows a thing or two about how to tell a story! And in this episode, we dig into her approach and how she does what she does! Plus you get to find out her two favorite documentaries.   Stacey is an amazing talent and was a pure joy to interview!    You can reach out to her at: www.nashrightnow.com   ✅ Connect with Kurt at: Kurtl@celticinc.com ✅ Connect with Pat at: pmcgovern@ascedia.com ✅ Connect with Brian at: BrianM@celticinc.com   ✅ Stacey's Pint: Southern Tier Pumpking ✅ Kurt's Pint: Raised Grain, Black Walnut Stout ✅ Pat's Pint: New Glarus, Kid Kolsch

Frequent Miler on the Air
Bon Voyage to Marriott Bonvoy | Ep122 | 10-30-21

Frequent Miler on the Air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 66:08


00:52 Giant Mailbag Double Header 1:11 Giant Mail 1: About that JetBlue elite status offer... https://frequentmiler.com/jetblue-mosaic-status-with-15k-spend-from-10-1-to-12-31/ 3:27 Giant Mail 2: Marriott's nonsensical note 4:50 What crazy thing...did Hyatt do this week? 10:35 Mileage running the numbers: Is it worth spending to status with American Airlines? https://frequentmiler.com/american-airlines-revamps-program-earn-elite-status-through-credit-card-and-flight-spend/ 23:18 Main Event: Is it time to say Bonvoyage to Marriott Bonvoy? https://frequentmiler.com/marriott-to-drop-award-chart-add-free-night-top-off-extend-free-nights-status/ https://frequentmiler.com/marriott-answers-wishes-and-dashes-hopes-on-my-mind/ 43:56 Are the Marriott credit cards still worth it? https://frequentmiler.com/marriott-card-eligible/ 49:41 Post Roast: Nick's questionable picks https://frequentmiler.com/the-best-single-credit-card/ 56:00 Question of the Week: How important is trust when chasing deals? https://frequentmiler.com/rideshare-missed-event-protection-how-the-point-card-is-heating-up/ https://frequentmiler.com/x1-card-review-up-to-4x-everywhere-its-here-its-real/ https://frequentmiler.com/earn-120-when-opening-varo-account-depositing-25/ https://frequentmiler.com/100-fidelity-bonus-w-new-account-and-50-deposit/ Join our email list: https://frequentmiler.com/subscribe/ Music credit: Annie Yoder

Skift Airline Weekly Lounge
JetBlue‘s Hopes, Boeing‘s Struggles

Skift Airline Weekly Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 26:21


Earnings season continues, with JetBlue, Hawaiian, and Spirit rounding out the U.S. carriers. Once again, all eyes are on the fourth quarter of this year and the first quarter of next year. Ned Russell and Madhu Unnikrishnan chew over why JetBlue has reason for hope. Meanwhile, the best thing that anyone can say about Boeing is that its loss narrowed, and the Airline Weekly team looks at what's going on with the airframer. Finally, Avianca had its day in court.

Curiosity Daily
New Twist on Merlin, Giraffe Hearts, What Carbon Neutral Means

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 15:43


Learn about “carbon neutral” policies; a new twist on the legend of Merlin; and the giraffe's bizarre circulatory system. What does it mean for a company to be carbon neutral? by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Jeff in Saint Paul)  Bernoville, T. (2021, June 8). What is the difference between carbon-neutral, net-zero and climate positive? - Plan A Academy. https://plana.earth/academy/what-is-difference-between-carbon-neutral-net-zero-climate-positive/  Nguyen, T. (2020, March 5). Starbucks, Microsoft, JetBlue, and other companies want to be carbon-neutral. What does that mean? Vox; Vox. https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2020/3/5/21155020/companies-carbon-neutral-climate-positive  Umair Irfan. (2020, February 27). Carbon offsets, the popular climate change mitigation tactic, explained. Vox; Vox. https://www.vox.com/2020/2/27/20994118/carbon-offset-climate-change-net-zero-neutral-emissions  Reuters Staff. (2020, January 6). JetBlue to become carbon neutral in 2020. U.S. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-jetblue-environment/jetblue-to-become-carbon-neutral-in-2020-idUSKBN1Z5237  Carbon Neutral vs. Net Zero: let's get the terminology right! — ClimateSeed. (2015). Climateseed.com; ClimateSeed. https://climateseed.com/blog/carbon-neutral-vs-net-zero-let-s-get-the-terminology-right   We just found one of the earliest manuscript fragments of the Merlin legend, with a new take by Cameron Duke  Bristol manuscript fragments of the famous Merlin legend among the oldest of their kind. (2021). Bristol.ac.uk. http://bristol.ac.uk/news/2021/september/bristol-merlin-update.html Schultz, I. (2021, September 3). Rare, Early Version of the King Arthur Legend Translated by Researchers. Gizmodo; Gizmodo. https://gizmodo.com/rare-early-version-of-the-king-arthur-legend-translate-1847610935   Durn, S. (2021, September 16). Found: An Early Merlin Tale, Hidden for Centuries. Atlas Obscura; Atlas Obscura. https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/medieval-merlin-manuscript-discovered  Smithsonian Magazine, & Gershon, L. (2021, September 17). Rediscovered Medieval Manuscript Offers New Twist on Arthurian Legend. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/rediscovered-medieval-manuscript-offers-new-twist-on-arthurian-legend-180978705   More from zoologist Bill Schutt:  Pick up "Pump: A Natural History of the Heart" https://www.workman.com/products/pump  Website: https://billschutt.com/  Follow @BillSchuttBooks on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BillSchuttBooks Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BillSchutt1/  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CCW Digital: A Customer Service Online Platform
Ep. 160: Google's Rob Lawson On The Future Of Business Messaging

CCW Digital: A Customer Service Online Platform

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 21:26


CCW Digital's Matt Wujciak and Google's Rob Lawson discuss how Google has turned Search, Maps and more into a conversational experience with Business Messages. Before Google, Rob started (and sometimes sold) companies focussed on mobile advertising, games, communities and messaging. In this fireside chat, you'll learn: -Different mobile commerce trends -Emerging consumer behaviors in messaging -How to meet customers where they are (and so much more). Rob also touches on how brands like Walmart, Vodafone, Dish, Levi's and JetBlue are successfully using business messaging for customer care, sales/acquisition, and marketing.

KGO 810 Podcast
October 28, 2021: Nikki Medoro - Mixing it up with travel deals, sports betting, and a living wage

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 17:33


The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro explores a variety of stories including Jet Blue's big fare sale, Costco and Starbucks raising their minimum wages, and Warrior star Steph Curry's call to a death row inmate. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nightly Business Report
Buy the beaten-downs, turbulence ahead?, and earnings action

Nightly Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 45:06


Markets are hovering near record highs, and one strategist says he's looking to some beaten-down names like Boeing & Facebook to find more gains. He'll explain what's got him looking past the negative headlines, and seeing potential upside for both stocks. Plus, JetBlue just beat analyst estimates, but issued weaker-than-expected guidance for next quarter citing fuel and labor cost pressures. We'll speak with the CEO. And, some big names report earnings after the bell today. We'll bring you the action, the story and the trades on Ford, eBay and Sunnova in today's Earnings Exchange.

Radio Cayman News
6PM News for 15 October 2021

Radio Cayman News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 9:53


Jetblue resumes regular flights to Grand Cayman. Today's Covid 19 update. Advice for Employers about their Employees Covid 19 Vaccination Status information. #rcnews #radiocayman #caymanislands --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rcnews/message

The Other Side Of Potential
Episode 160: The Creativity Mindset with Nir Bashan

The Other Side Of Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:01


This week we are excited to welcome world-renowned creativity expert, Nir Bashan, founder and CEO of The Creator Mindset and author of The Creator Mindset: 92 Tools to Unlock the Secrets to Innovation, Growth, and Sustainability, to talk about the integral role that creativity has to play in business. His company, The Creator Mindset, offers a range of services, from conducting workshops, consulting, and coaching, to keynote speeches at conferences and corporate events. Their history boasts a prestigious list of clients, including AT&T, Microsoft, ACE Hardware, The NFL Network, EA Sports, Suzuki, Activision, and JetBlue.In our conversation with Nir, we discuss how a disciplined approach to creativity can reveal innovative solutions for achieving growth and sustainability in any business, whether you're a huge corporation, or still hustling as a solo entrepreneur. Nir has helped countless businesses around the world harness the power of creativity to not only improve profitability, increase sales, and elevate customer service, but also, crucially, to uncover the deeper meaning in their work. Tuning in, you'll hear Nir break down his process by relating the story of a client who owned a pizza franchise, and he unpacks how they were able to elevate the meaning of their company through simple creative exercises. We also hear about Nir's book, The Creativity Mindset, and delve into the two decades he dedicated to establishing a formula that would codify creativity.Nir's approach to creativity is practical and accessible. It allows businesses to balance their technical prowess and dedication to analytics, with creativity, and elevate it through innovation and lateral thinking. Creativity need not be confined to the arts, and we are all attuned to creativity simply through our ability to solve a multitude of problems every day, we just need to learn how to recognize it. To learn more about how you can apply The Creative Mindset to your business, tune in today!What you'll learn about in this episode:Introducing today's guest, Nir BashanHow Nir came to be interested in creativity and innovation, particularly in the context of business.How Nir came to write The Creator Mindset, a book about the ‘how' of creativity.Nir's definition of creativity and how it applies to business.The creativity and innovation that has occurred in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.A glimpse into Nir's observations on the creative process.How Nir helped a pizza franchise elevate their thinking through a simple creative process.Why creativity is a discipline, like any other.Nir's approach to finding the balance between generating creativity and identifying feasible ideas.Nir's small but mighty team and how they support companies.Why Nir's business model is structured to empower companies to be self-sufficient.Nir's book, The Creator Mindset: 92 Tools to Unlock the Secrets to Innovation, Growth, and Sustainability and how to access it.Hear Nir's advice for anyone who is feeling stuck in their business.

Hitting The Mark
David Neeleman, Founder & CEO, Breeze Airways (JetBlue, and others)

Hitting The Mark

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 27:22


David Neeleman is the Founder of 5 airlines and changed the way people experienced surprise and delight by flying JetBlue. During the pandemic, he launched his latest airline brand, Breeze, and I sat down with David to talk about what branding means to him, what makes great company culture, how a book inspired the JetBlue brand, and his preferred airline naming process (in the case of JetBlue the name was derived the Friday before a Monday launch).Needless to say, an episode that is packed with insights from a truly amazing brand builder I believe all of us are thrilled to hear from on the subject of branding.

Cranky Talk
Cranky Talk: DOJ vs BlueMerican Partnership

Cranky Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 27:08


We're talking about Jetblue and American's partnership and why DOJ is suing them!    DOT agreement    Want to sponsor the Cranky Network Awards? Email cna-sponsor@crankyflier.com

Inside Outside Innovation
Ep. 266 - David Schonthal, Professor at Northwestern University & Coauthor of The Human Element on Gaining Traction with New Ideas

Inside Outside Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 20:22


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with David Schonthal, Clinical Professor and Director of Entrepreneurship Programs at the Kellogg School of Management and Coauthor of the new book, The Human Element: Overcoming the Resistance That Awaits New Ideas. David and I talk about what keeps ideas from gaining traction and what you can do to avoid friction and resistance to new ideas. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat to what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with David Schonthal, Clinical Professor and Director of Entrepreneurship Programs at Northwestern University and Coauthor of The Human ElementBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation, I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today, we have David Schonthal. He is a Clinical Professor and Director of Entrepreneurship Programs at Northwestern University and Coauthor of the new book, The Human Element: Overcoming the Resistance that Awaits New Ideas. Welcome to the show, David. David Schonthal: Thanks, Brian. Nice to be here. Brian Ardinger: Hey, I'm excited to have you here. You have spent a lot of your career thinking about and watching what it takes to make new ideas happen. You've spent time at IDEO. You were co-founder of Matter, which is that 25,000 square foot innovation center in Chicago. Has some venture capital experience and that. And I thought we could start by telling the audience how you got into the innovation space in the first place. David Schonthal: By accident is the answer. It's sort of a long story, but I wound up becoming the COO of a medical device company in San Diego, California based on a radical shift from what I was doing before, which is tax software in London. To make a long story short, one of my former bosses called me up when I was just at my lowest point with tax and the UK, no offense to the UK, but it was winter, and it was like dark 18 hours out of the day. And he called me up and all of a sudden, I just, all I remember is him saying, yada, yada, yada San Diego, yada yada, yada. I was like, oh please.He's like, would you like to know what the business is? I was like, no, not important. So, I wound up going and being the head of operations for an early stage medical device company. And then basically from that point forward was just bit with the bug around bringing new ideas to market either in the startup space, through entrepreneurship or venture capital or in the corporate space through design and innovation.Brian Ardinger: And you've got a new book called the Human Element. I would imagine it packs a lot about the things that you've learned over that career. Since you've spent a lot of time seeing how early ideas get traction or not, what is the most striking problem that you see most people making when it comes to kicking off an idea?David Schonthal: I think maybe the best place to start is by most innovators and entrepreneurs' instinct that the idea is the thing that needs to be addressed. So, if a new product or service or strategy isn't being adopted by the market, most innovators instincts says well, let's make the product a little better. Let's change the way we talk about it. Let's drop the price. Let's promote it differently. And they make the thing or the strategy or the movement, the center of their attention. And in the course of my career, I've worked on some really amazing, I mean, some terrible, but also some really amazing innovations and products and services. And I was always surprised by how, even though clearly if these things were adopted into the market, they would make the world a better place, no matter how much we tweaked or change the idea that wasn't always the key to success of getting it introduced.And so about four years ago, turned my attention to thinking about what is it that stands in the way of change and partnered up with one of my colleagues at Kellogg, who was a behavioral psychologist named Loran Nordgren. And together we've been studying this problem from both the applied side, as well as the theoretical side.And that was the genesis of the book, which is that our instincts about innovation are too heavily biased on making the thing more appealing and not focused enough on helping the market adopt it by removing the friction that stands in the way. Brian Ardinger: Yeah. I love that. You kind of start off the book, this battle between what do you call fuel and friction. The idea that a lot of times, just to make an idea better, all you have to do is add more facts or more features or try to get more folks bought into it. But really, it's a lot about how do you eliminate the frictions around that? So, in the book you talk about four frictions. Let's outline and tell the audience how they can avoid them.David Schonthal: Sure. So, if you think about a new idea, like an airplane leaving the ground or a projectile flying through the air. Fuel, to your point Brian, are all of the things that propel that idea forward. The need that the customer has, features and benefits, promotional strategies, but like an airplane leaving the ground there are also forces that stand in the way, whether it's wind resistance or sheer or gravity. And so, the book is really focused on these forces, these headwinds of innovation and the four that we specify in the book, the four frictions, our number one inertia, which is our desire as human beings to tend to stick with the status quo. Despite the fact that we know the status quo might be imperfect, our habits are surprisingly powerful. And so, recognizing that inertia is a play anytime you're trying to get somebody to change from what they're doing today, to what you'd like them to do tomorrow. Effort is the second one. All of the ambiguity, all of the costliness, all of the exertion required to get somebody to make that change. The third friction is emotion. All of the anxiety and fear that comes along with changing from something that you do today to something you do tomorrow. And you might not think that emotion comes into play for small things, but emotion comes into play when you're buying a pack of gum or when you're putting on a new shirt.And then the fourth is what we call reactants, which is people's aversion to being changed by others. And each of them show up in varying degrees, depending on what you're working on in spotting them appropriately forecasting them ideally, so that they can be muted and mitigated is really the key. Brian Ardinger: And a lot of those frictions, they're almost not necessarily irrational, but they're definitely not something that you can take an economic model and say, well, clearly there's a cost benefit analysis and everybody should end up on this side of it because of the cost benefit analysis. But there's a lot of underlying things. And it seems a lot of this frictions around ambiguity or being comfortable with failure. How can you get folks more comfortable with that environment of ambiguity? David Schonthal: There's a couple of things that are packed into that question. Number one, ambiguity maps to the friction of effort. Effort we assume is like exertion, which is how much time and money will it take me to make a change. But you're pointing out appropriately that the other way effort comes in is ambiguity or a lack of clarity about how to go about doing something.And sometimes that ambiguity can be so overwhelming that people are afraid to get started because they don't necessarily know how to get started. We talk in the book about a couple of methodologies specifically around helping people with ambiguity. One is around road mapping in simplification. Oftentimes our desire to get people to change is to like keep adding or keep making something better, add facts or add arguments to get somebody to change from what they're doing, to what you'd like them to doing.I mean, just look at vaccines. For example, in the states. Like there's no ambiguity about the evidence that vaccines help protect against severe illness. There is no ambiguity. There is no doubting, the fact that if you get vaccinated, it will make the world a safer place. But that doesn't stop people from having resistance to that idea.And one thing might be around the ambiguity about how to go about getting a vaccine. One might be around the perceived effort of getting a vaccine. The fear about getting a vaccine. And so understanding why people do or don't do the things that they do is really the key to addressing it. So simplification, streamlining, making unfamiliar ideas more familiar. Oftentimes innovators have this instinct that because their idea is new and radical. We need to highlight its newness and its radicalness is part of its allure. Oftentimes that actually works against us because the newer and more radical something seems the less familiar it is. And the more anxiety we have about how we're going to start to use it. And the great example of that comes from Apple. And if you're old enough audience to remember the introduction of the Macintosh OS. In addition to creating a new machine, one of the things that Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak created was a created was a new operating system for how computers are used. And unlike PCs or DOS-based systems, which you really needed to learn the language of computers in order to do something on a computer, Steve Jobs and other great innovators tend to have their products and services operate the way the rest of your world works.So, when you're working on an Apple home screen, you're working on a desktop. And when you're creating a document and you want to store that document, you put that document in a folder. And when you want to get rid of it, you drag it into the trashcan. And these might seem sort of like cute user interface principles, but these were deliberately designed to make something wildly unfamiliar to people who had never worked on a computer to immediately feel more comfortable with it because it works, sounds, and it feels the way the rest of your world works. So even though something is new, doesn't mean that it should be projected as radically.Brian Ardinger: So, if I'm a new innovator or I'm a startup entrepreneur, I've got a new idea I want to start building that out. Do you recommend mapping out these particular frictions or how do you find out what your audience or what your customers are fearful about? David Schonthal: That's a great question. There are a couple of tools we bring to life in the book. One is called a Friction Map, which is anticipating the frictions that might stand in the way of your new ideas. So, it is a document that you can fill out with your team. Where you forecast based on some clear questions that are asked in the Map. What is the relevance? What is the amount of inertia that might be present? What's the amount of effort, friction that might be present? Emotional friction that might be present in reactants? And then there's another framework around remedies. How might you take each of these frictions, test them in the market, but also test possible remedies to overcome. And the more you can bring this into your design process.So, people will fill out a Business Model Canvas based on Osterwalder's work, or they'll fill out a Horizons Framework as they're forecasting what opportunities might exist. We also recommend filling out a Friction Map, which is what are the forces of resistance that might stand in the way. And what might we prototype to overcome those forces as a way of introducing this product or service or strategy.Brian Ardinger: And then do you go out and actually test those assumptions? David Schonthal: Absolutely. Each of them can be prototyped. And yes, testing them with different audiences, testing different ways of communicating or making unfamiliar things familiar. Or identifying the sources of emotional friction so that they can be addressed in the messaging, and the way products are communicated. All are easy enough to test in low fidelity and oftentimes save us a lot of effort down the road when it comes to scaling offers up. Brian Ardinger: One of the other things I liked about the book is that you have not only these frameworks, that people can understand the methodology and that around it, but you also bring out some case studies in the book. And one of them is around Flyhomes, which is a startup company that built a new business model in the real estate space, designed to address some of the frictions in the market. So, can you talk a little bit about that case study? David Schonthal: It's a great story. So Flyhomes, for those of you who are living in the United States while you're watching this can appreciate, we are in the midst of a bananas housing market, residential housing market. Debt has never been cheaper. Inventory has never been lower. And as a result, desirable homes are just flying off the market almost the same day that they're listed, which creates a whole conundrum for people who are trying to buy homes, particularly first-time home buyers. Because when inventory is low, typically the offers that get accepted by sellers, particularly when they have multiple offers, are all cash offers or offers that are perceived to be low risk. And low risk offers are ones that don't have contingencies attached to them. Don't have home sale contingencies. Don't have loan contingencies. In order to compete, in order to get a home buyer, you have to either bring all cash to the table or convince sellers that despite the fact that they've got these contingencies, that there's actually a high degree of certainty, that something will close.Flyhomes is a business that helps address this problem by making all buyers, all cash buyers, they have focused their business model on removing the friction that stands in the way of somebody buying a home in simultaneously removing the friction that stands in the way of a seller accepting the new one offer forum.They didn't start this way. Flyhomes began, in fact, the namesake doesn't come from homes flying off the market. It came from the fact that Stephen Lane and Tushar Garg who were young entrepreneurs, started the business by thinking, all right, in the world of real estate tech, in the world of residential real estate tech, the big names or the new market innovations where things like Trulia and Zillow and Redfin, that had two primary value propositions.One we're either going to take all home inventory off the MLS that exists only for real estate agents, and we're going to democratize it and make it so that anybody who's interested in looking at homes can see all available inventory, which is great. And then the second thing they typically did was discount brokerage. Meaning that if you worked with one of their agents, you would get cash back, they would discount their service fee and you would get some of that back in a rebate. And Steve and Tushar figured there was probably more that could be done in this market. And they being millennials themselves in doing some research, found that millennials, in addition to wanting to own homes, also desired travel, adventure, freedom.And why is it that when we make big purchases on electronics or appliances on a credit card, we get all the benefits that come with a credit card, like points and travel miles. Why don't we get something like that with homes? And so, they created a product called Flyhomes, which is for every dollar you spend on the purchase of a new home, up into a half a million dollars, you would get points on an airline.And they partnered with Alaska and Jet Blue. And Jet Blue actually sent out this mass email to all their frequent flyers saying we're now in this arrangement with Flyhomes, buy a home through Flyhomes get up to 500,000 frequent flyer miles on Jet Blue. In the first day, thousands of people signed up for the platform.And Steve and Tushar looked at themselves like this is going to be huge. And then nothing. Like nothing happened. Nobody was buying a home through Flyhomes. Nobody was actually using the service. There was enough alure or to the idea that got people interested to like check it out and sign up. But that wasn't actually helping people make the progress. They really wanted to make, which wasn't getting 500,000 airline points. It was actually getting the home that they wanted. Flyhomes could address the real problem or address the real progress. All of these bells and whistles wouldn't make things easier. It would just be bells and whistles for the sake of bells and whistles.So almost at the point of going out of business, they decided to pivot. And because they both had their real estate license started selling real estate. And by studying people in this kind of ethnographic way and actually getting out and selling real estate as realtors, they understood that the problem wasn't the points in adventure.The problem was is that people desired homes in competitive markets that they were unable to access. And after two or three chances of putting in bids and having those bids rejected, people were just giving up on real estate all together. And so Steve and Tushar decided that if they could help address the problem of democratizing the ability for home buyers to buy homes in really competitive markets, that would be a revolutionary change. That would really change the game. And so, they pivoted over from points to friction removal. And today. Flyhomes is growing like crazy. They do billions of dollars a year in transactions. They just raised a really big Series C at $150 million. It's all because they changed their business model from fuel addition to friction removal.Brian Ardinger: Excellent example. Now you've got a number of them in the book and that. What other hidden gems in the book that people should be excited about when they pick it up? David Schonthal: I think the most interesting stories and we try to have as many of them as possible in the book, so the ones that are counterintuitive. Like the ones that really check our biases and our assumptions about what we think the right way to do something is relative to what the science and the data tells us. And one of the things that I think readers who read this book will find is that in many cases, our instincts about what we ought to do to affect change are actually in some ways the opposite of what we ought to do to impact change.And we actually start the book off with a really fun story about the world's most successful car salesperson. A guy named Ali Reda, who works in suburban Detroit, in Dearborn, Michigan. Who outsells every other average car dealer in the United States, by a factor of 12 to one. He single-handedly sells as many as 1500 cars a year, which is more than most dealerships sell in total.And when you study Ali, and when you interview him and when you understand how he approaches car sales, that is so much different than his peers, what you learn is that he just frames his job radically different than every other salesperson. And I won't divulge too much about the secrets of how, but there's lots of examples in this book about how people who go left when everybody else goes right. And to succeed, but it's not just that they go left, it's understanding the psychology of what it is that they're doing differently than enables them to experience that success. Which is really, I think the beautiful thing about partnering with Loren on this is not only do we have examples about how these things work in practice, but we can also help people understand why they work psychologically.Brian Ardinger: So, you've been in this innovation industry for quite a long time. What are some of the biggest changes that you've come across and how do you see the innovation space kind of evolving? David Schonthal: That is a, the ability for people to create new ideas and make them real has never been easier. The cost of starting a new business, the cost of creating a new product or service with digital technology has enabled everybody who once had an idea on a napkin sketch.You now have the ability to make that sketch into something real and tangible and available in the market. And what I find now is, we've got a different problem, which is that the world is flooded with new ideas and flooded with new technologies. And whereas before it used to be hard to make an idea into a real thing. Now it's getting people to notice and pay attention and actually adopt your real thing. And one of the ways that we think about doing it is spending a lot of money on marketing and advertising and SEO and SEM. And yes, that's part of building awareness. But we don't often think about awareness as being one side of the equation. The other side is how do you make it easy for people to say yes. Well, one of the things we noticed about new products and services, particularly when you're creating a new consumer product is people will learn about it. They'll even go to the website, they'll put it in their cart, but at the moment before they check out, they'll abandon their cart, which means you've done half the job, right.You've gotten them interested to come to the site at the beginning. You've gotten them interested enough in the features and benefits to actually add that, or imagine that in their lives, but something is holding them back from actually pulling the trigger. And I think, now we've created a world where making the idea come to life has never been easier. But how do we make sure that it's easy for people to adopt that into their lives so that they can say yes, and to get noticed in that way. It's no longer about features and benefits. Now it's just about making things as frictionless and as effortless as possible for people to adopt. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: And the great thing about that is that's becoming easier as well. And people like yourself are helping in that process. So, David, thank you for coming on Inside Outside Innovation, to tell us a little bit about some of the secret sauce behind all that. I encourage people to pick up The Human Element. If people want to find out more about yourself or the book, what's the best way to do that? David Schonthal: HumanElementBook.com is a landing page that shares information about the book. You can find me on the Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Management faculty page, just Google my name, David Schonthal. And usually, you can find me there and I'd love to hear from you. Brian Ardinger: Well, thank you David, for being on the show and look forward to continuing the conversation as the years and the innovation evolve. David Schonthal: Thanks Brian. Me too. It was great to be here. Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Inside Outside
Ep. 266 - David Schonthal, Professor at Northwestern University & Coauthor of The Human Element on Gaining Traction with New Ideas

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 20:22


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with David Schonthal, Clinical Professor of Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Northwestern University and Coauthor of the new book, The Human Element. David and I talk about what keeps ideas from gaining traction and what you can do to avoid friction and resistance to new ideas. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat to what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with David Schonthal, Clinical Professor of Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Northwestern University and Coauthor of The Human ElementBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation, I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today, we have David Schonthal. He is a Clinical Professor of Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Northwestern University and Coauthor of the new book, The Human Element: Overcoming the Resistance that Awaits New Ideas. Welcome to the show, David. David Schonthal: Thanks, Brian. Nice to be here. Brian Ardinger: Hey, I'm excited to have you here. You have spent a lot of your career thinking about and watching what it takes to make new ideas happen. You've spent time at IDEO. You were co-founder of Matter, which is that 25,000 square foot innovation center in Chicago. Has some venture capital experience and that. And I thought we could start by telling the audience how you got into the innovation space in the first place. David Schonthal: By accident is the answer. It's sort of a long story, but I wound up becoming the COO of a medical device company in San Diego, California based on a radical shift from what I was doing before, which is tax software in London. To make a long story short, one of my former bosses called me up when I was just at my lowest point with tax and the UK, no offense to the UK, but it was winter, and it was like dark 18 hours out of the day. And he called me up and all of a sudden, I just, all I remember is him saying, yada, yada, yada San Diego, yada yada, yada. I was like, oh please.He's like, would you like to know what the business is? I was like, no, not important. So, I wound up going and being the head of operations for an early stage medical device company. And then basically from that point forward was just bit with the bug around bringing new ideas to market either in the startup space, through entrepreneurship or venture capital or in the corporate space through design and innovation.Brian Ardinger: And you've got a new book called the Human Element. I would imagine it packs a lot about the things that you've learned over that career. Since you've spent a lot of time seeing how early ideas get traction or not, what is the most striking problem that you see most people making when it comes to kicking off an idea?David Schonthal: I think maybe the best place to start is by most innovators and entrepreneurs' instinct that the idea is the thing that needs to be addressed. So, if a new product or service or strategy isn't being adopted by the market, most innovators instincts says well, let's make the product a little better. Let's change the way we talk about it. Let's drop the price. Let's promote it differently. And they make the thing or the strategy or the movement, the center of their attention. And in the course of my career, I've worked on some really amazing, I mean, some terrible, but also some really amazing innovations and products and services. And I was always surprised by how, even though clearly if these things were adopted into the market, they would make the world a better place, no matter how much we tweaked or change the idea that wasn't always the key to success of getting it introduced.And so about four years ago, turned my attention to thinking about what is it that stands in the way of change and partnered up with one of my colleagues at Kellogg, who was a behavioral psychologist named Loran Nordgren. And together we've been studying this problem from both the applied side, as well as the theoretical side.And that was the genesis of the book, which is that our instincts about innovation are too heavily biased on making the thing more appealing and not focused enough on helping the market adopt it by removing the friction that stands in the way. Brian Ardinger: Yeah. I love that. You kind of start off the book, this battle between what do you call fuel and friction. The idea that a lot of times, just to make an idea better, all you have to do is add more facts or more features or try to get more folks bought into it. But really, it's a lot about how do you eliminate the frictions around that? So, in the book you talk about four frictions. Let's outline and tell the audience how they can avoid them.David Schonthal: Sure. So, if you think about a new idea, like an airplane leaving the ground or a projectile flying through the air. Fuel, to your point Brian, are all of the things that propel that idea forward. The need that the customer has, features and benefits, promotional strategies, but like an airplane leaving the ground there are also forces that stand in the way, whether it's wind resistance or sheer or gravity. And so, the book is really focused on these forces, these headwinds of innovation and the four that we specify in the book, the four frictions, our number one inertia, which is our desire as human beings to tend to stick with the status quo. Despite the fact that we know the status quo might be imperfect, our habits are surprisingly powerful. And so, recognizing that inertia is a play anytime you're trying to get somebody to change from what they're doing today, to what you'd like them to do tomorrow. Effort is the second one. All of the ambiguity, all of the costliness, all of the exertion required to get somebody to make that change. The third friction is emotion. All of the anxiety and fear that comes along with changing from something that you do today to something you do tomorrow. And you might not think that emotion comes into play for small things, but emotion comes into play when you're buying a pack of gum or when you're putting on a new shirt.And then the fourth is what we call reactants, which is people's aversion to being changed by others. And each of them show up in varying degrees, depending on what you're working on in spotting them appropriately forecasting them ideally, so that they can be muted and mitigated is really the key. Brian Ardinger: And a lot of those frictions, they're almost not necessarily irrational, but they're definitely not something that you can take an economic model and say, well, clearly there's a cost benefit analysis and everybody should end up on this side of it because of the cost benefit analysis. But there's a lot of underlying things. And it seems a lot of this frictions around ambiguity or being comfortable with failure. How can you get folks more comfortable with that environment of ambiguity? David Schonthal: There's a couple of things that are packed into that question. Number one, ambiguity maps to the friction of effort. Effort we assume is like exertion, which is how much time and money will it take me to make a change. But you're pointing out appropriately that the other way effort comes in is ambiguity or a lack of clarity about how to go about doing something.And sometimes that ambiguity can be so overwhelming that people are afraid to get started because they don't necessarily know how to get started. We talk in the book about a couple of methodologies specifically around helping people with ambiguity. One is around road mapping in simplification. Oftentimes our desire to get people to change is to like keep adding or keep making something better, add facts or add arguments to get somebody to change from what they're doing, to what you'd like them to doing.I mean, just look at vaccines. For example, in the states. Like there's no ambiguity about the evidence that vaccines help protect against severe illness. There is no ambiguity. There is no doubting, the fact that if you get vaccinated, it will make the world a safer place. But that doesn't stop people from having resistance to that idea.And one thing might be around the ambiguity about how to go about getting a vaccine. One might be around the perceived effort of getting a vaccine. The fear about getting a vaccine. And so understanding why people do or don't do the things that they do is really the key to addressing it. So simplification, streamlining, making unfamiliar ideas more familiar. Oftentimes innovators have this instinct that because their idea is new and radical. We need to highlight its newness and its radicalness is part of its allure. Oftentimes that actually works against us because the newer and more radical something seems the less familiar it is. And the more anxiety we have about how we're going to start to use it. And the great example of that comes from Apple. And if you're old enough audience to remember the introduction of the Macintosh OS. In addition to creating a new machine, one of the things that Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak created was a created was a new operating system for how computers are used. And unlike PCs or DOS-based systems, which you really needed to learn the language of computers in order to do something on a computer, Steve Jobs and other great innovators tend to have their products and services operate the way the rest of your world works.So, when you're working on an Apple home screen, you're working on a desktop. And when you're creating a document and you want to store that document, you put that document in a folder. And when you want to get rid of it, you drag it into the trashcan. And these might seem sort of like cute user interface principles, but these were deliberately designed to make something wildly unfamiliar to people who had never worked on a computer to immediately feel more comfortable with it because it works, sounds, and it feels the way the rest of your world works. So even though something is new, doesn't mean that it should be projected as radically.Brian Ardinger: So, if I'm a new innovator or I'm a startup entrepreneur, I've got a new idea I want to start building that out. Do you recommend mapping out these particular frictions or how do you find out what your audience or what your customers are fearful about? David Schonthal: That's a great question. There are a couple of tools we bring to life in the book. One is called a Friction Map, which is anticipating the frictions that might stand in the way of your new ideas. So, it is a document that you can fill out with your team. Where you forecast based on some clear questions that are asked in the Map. What is the relevance? What is the amount of inertia that might be present? What's the amount of effort, friction that might be present? Emotional friction that might be present in reactants? And then there's another framework around remedies. How might you take each of these frictions, test them in the market, but also test possible remedies to overcome. And the more you can bring this into your design process.So, people will fill out a Business Model Canvas based on Osterwalder's work, or they'll fill out a Horizons Framework as they're forecasting what opportunities might exist. We also recommend filling out a Friction Map, which is what are the forces of resistance that might stand in the way. And what might we prototype to overcome those forces as a way of introducing this product or service or strategy.Brian Ardinger: And then do you go out and actually test those assumptions? David Schonthal: Absolutely. Each of them can be prototyped. And yes, testing them with different audiences, testing different ways of communicating or making unfamiliar things familiar. Or identifying the sources of emotional friction so that they can be addressed in the messaging, and the way products are communicated. All are easy enough to test in low fidelity and oftentimes save us a lot of effort down the road when it comes to scaling offers up. Brian Ardinger: One of the other things I liked about the book is that you have not only these frameworks, that people can understand the methodology and that around it, but you also bring out some case studies in the book. And one of them is around Flyhomes, which is a startup company that built a new business model in the real estate space, designed to address some of the frictions in the market. So, can you talk a little bit about that case study? David Schonthal: It's a great story. So Flyhomes, for those of you who are living in the United States while you're watching this can appreciate, we are in the midst of a bananas housing market, residential housing market. Debt has never been cheaper. Inventory has never been lower. And as a result, desirable homes are just flying off the market almost the same day that they're listed, which creates a whole conundrum for people who are trying to buy homes, particularly first-time home buyers. Because when inventory is low, typically the offers that get accepted by sellers, particularly when they have multiple offers, are all cash offers or offers that are perceived to be low risk. And low risk offers are ones that don't have contingencies attached to them. Don't have home sale contingencies. Don't have loan contingencies. In order to compete, in order to get a home buyer, you have to either bring all cash to the table or convince sellers that despite the fact that they've got these contingencies, that there's actually a high degree of certainty, that something will close.Flyhomes is a business that helps address this problem by making all buyers, all cash buyers, they have focused their business model on removing the friction that stands in the way of somebody buying a home in simultaneously removing the friction that stands in the way of a seller accepting the new one offer forum.They didn't start this way. Flyhomes began, in fact, the namesake doesn't come from homes flying off the market. It came from the fact that Stephen Lane and Tushar Garg who were young entrepreneurs, started the business by thinking, all right, in the world of real estate tech, in the world of residential real estate tech, the big names or the new market innovations where things like Trulia and Zillow and Redfin, that had two primary value propositions.One we're either going to take all home inventory off the MLS that exists only for real estate agents, and we're going to democratize it and make it so that anybody who's interested in looking at homes can see all available inventory, which is great. And then the second thing they typically did was discount brokerage. Meaning that if you worked with one of their agents, you would get cash back, they would discount their service fee and you would get some of that back in a rebate. And Steve and Tushar figured there was probably more that could be done in this market. And they being millennials themselves in doing some research, found that millennials, in addition to wanting to own homes, also desired travel, adventure, freedom.And why is it that when we make big purchases on electronics or appliances on a credit card, we get all the benefits that come with a credit card, like points and travel miles. Why don't we get something like that with homes? And so, they created a product called Flyhomes, which is for every dollar you spend on the purchase of a new home, up into a half a million dollars, you would get points on an airline.And they partnered with Alaska and Jet Blue. And Jet Blue actually sent out this mass email to all their frequent flyers saying we're now in this arrangement with Flyhomes, buy a home through Flyhomes get up to 500,000 frequent flyer miles on Jet Blue. In the first day, thousands of people signed up for the platform.And Steve and Tushar looked at themselves like this is going to be huge. And then nothing. Like nothing happened. Nobody was buying a home through Flyhomes. Nobody was actually using the service. There was enough alure or to the idea that got people interested to like check it out and sign up. But that wasn't actually helping people make the progress. They really wanted to make, which wasn't getting 500,000 airline points. It was actually getting the home that they wanted. Flyhomes could address the real problem or address the real progress. All of these bells and whistles wouldn't make things easier. It would just be bells and whistles for the sake of bells and whistles.So almost at the point of going out of business, they decided to pivot. And because they both had their real estate license started selling real estate. And by studying people in this kind of ethnographic way and actually getting out and selling real estate as realtors, they understood that the problem wasn't the points in adventure.The problem was is that people desired homes in competitive markets that they were unable to access. And after two or three chances of putting in bids and having those bids rejected, people were just giving up on real estate all together. And so Steve and Tushar decided that if they could help address the problem of democratizing the ability for home buyers to buy homes in really competitive markets, that would be a revolutionary change. That would really change the game. And so, they pivoted over from points to friction removal. And today. Flyhomes is growing like crazy. They do billions of dollars a year in transactions. They just raised a really big Series C at $150 million. It's all because they changed their business model from fuel addition to friction removal.Brian Ardinger: Excellent example. Now you've got a number of them in the book and that. What other hidden gems in the book that people should be excited about when they pick it up? David Schonthal: I think the most interesting stories and we try to have as many of them as possible in the book, so the ones that are counterintuitive. Like the ones that really check our biases and our assumptions about what we think the right way to do something is relative to what the science and the data tells us. And one of the things that I think readers who read this book will find is that in many cases, our instincts about what we ought to do to affect change are actually in some ways the opposite of what we ought to do to impact change.And we actually start the book off with a really fun story about the world's most successful car salesperson. A guy named Ali Reda, who works in suburban Detroit, in Dearborn, Michigan. Who outsells every other average car dealer in the United States, by a factor of 12 to one. He single-handedly sells as many as 1500 cars a year, which is more than most dealerships sell in total.And when you study Ali, and when you interview him and when you understand how he approaches car sales, that is so much different than his peers, what you learn is that he just frames his job radically different than every other salesperson. And I won't divulge too much about the secrets of how, but there's lots of examples in this book about how people who go left when everybody else goes right. And to succeed, but it's not just that they go left, it's understanding the psychology of what it is that they're doing differently than enables them to experience that success. Which is really, I think the beautiful thing about partnering with Loren on this is not only do we have examples about how these things work in practice, but we can also help people understand why they work psychologically.Brian Ardinger: So, you've been in this innovation industry for quite a long time. What are some of the biggest changes that you've come across and how do you see the innovation space kind of evolving? David Schonthal: That is a, the ability for people to create new ideas and make them real has never been easier. The cost of starting a new business, the cost of creating a new product or service with digital technology has enabled everybody who once had an idea on a napkin sketch.You now have the ability to make that sketch into something real and tangible and available in the market. And what I find now is, we've got a different problem, which is that the world is flooded with new ideas and flooded with new technologies. And whereas before it used to be hard to make an idea into a real thing. Now it's getting people to notice and pay attention and actually adopt your real thing. And one of the ways that we think about doing it is spending a lot of money on marketing and advertising and SEO and SEM. And yes, that's part of building awareness. But we don't often think about awareness as being one side of the equation. The other side is how do you make it easy for people to say yes. Well, one of the things we noticed about new products and services, particularly when you're creating a new consumer product is people will learn about it. They'll even go to the website, they'll put it in their cart, but at the moment before they check out, they'll abandon their cart, which means you've done half the job, right.You've gotten them interested to come to the site at the beginning. You've gotten them interested enough in the features and benefits to actually add that, or imagine that in their lives, but something is holding them back from actually pulling the trigger. And I think, now we've created a world where making the idea come to life has never been easier. But how do we make sure that it's easy for people to adopt that into their lives so that they can say yes, and to get noticed in that way. It's no longer about features and benefits. Now it's just about making things as frictionless and as effortless as possible for people to adopt. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: And the great thing about that is that's becoming easier as well. And people like yourself are helping in that process. So, David, thank you for coming on Inside Outside Innovation, to tell us a little bit about some of the secret sauce behind all that. I encourage people to pick up The Human Element. If people want to find out more about yourself or the book, what's the best way to do that? David Schonthal: HumanElementBook.com is a landing page that shares information about the book. You can find me on the Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Management faculty page, just Google my name, David Schonthal. And usually, you can find me there and I'd love to hear from you. Brian Ardinger: Well, thank you David, for being on the show and look forward to continuing the conversation as the years and the innovation evolve. David Schonthal: Thanks Brian. Me too. It was great to be here. Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Church of Lazlo Podcasts
Friday 09.24.2021 - The Church Of Lazlo Podcast

Church of Lazlo Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 96:54


​Yo! Happy Friday! Lets celebrate by opening these GIANT cans of beer Lazlo brought! *Almost half of all Americans say they are working their dream job. That's a lot of people. How many dream jobs can there be? *Doomscrolling! Q Anon is allegedly spreading anti Semitism, fifteen people got shot at a Kroger in Tennessee, R Kelly's jury is deliberating, a Jet Blue passenger becomes violent when he can't get his cell phone to work,  kid kayaks to school because we've run out of school busses, a minister allegedly assaulted kids at a bus stop, an airplane got stuck in power lines, and an eleven year-old kid goes to work with his mom. *Nick Wright is on the show! He's got a big surprise for us and we make our NFL picks for the weekend. *Slimfast needs Lazlo's advice about how kids should respond to bullies. Lazlo suggests full prison rules for 4th graders. *Did you have family bonding activities when you were a kid? Do you have any with your kids? May we suggest random dance parties in your living room? *Is Lazlo getting paid by big pharma to promote vaccines? The answer is obviously no but some people are too conspiratorial to reason with.  *We read messages from @churchoflazlo instagram. Wow, a lot of you have had your houses raided by the police. *Have a great weekend! Stop by lazlo.church if you get a minute. See you Monday! -Everybody Wang Chung!!! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Marketplace Morning Report
How is the economic recovery actually going?

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 9:34


In light of China real estate developer Evergrande’s debt issues and the markets trending upward, Susan Schmidt joins us for our economic discussion to help us break down how players in the market might be absorbing all this. The BBC reports on China’s pledge to stop building new coal-fired power plants abroad. The Department of Justice has taken issue with what it sees as an alliance between JetBlue and American Airlines. And, we take a look at the economic dynamics behind China’s shopping malls.

Marketplace All-in-One
How is the economic recovery actually going?

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 9:34


In light of China real estate developer Evergrande’s debt issues and the markets trending upward, Susan Schmidt joins us for our economic discussion to help us break down how players in the market might be absorbing all this. The BBC reports on China’s pledge to stop building new coal-fired power plants abroad. The Department of Justice has taken issue with what it sees as an alliance between JetBlue and American Airlines. And, we take a look at the economic dynamics behind China’s shopping malls.

Marketplace Minute
U.S. doubles COVID vaccine donations - Midday - Marketplace Minute - September 22, 2021

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 1:50


The Biden Administration is doubling the United States commitment to donate COVID vaccines to developing nations; Heavily-indebted Chinese property developer Evergrande says it will make debt payment tomorrow; Justice Department files antitrust lawsuit against American, JetBlue alliance; General Mills beats earnings forecasts on strong pet food demand

Marketplace Minute
House passes debt ceiling, government funding bill - Morning Brief - Marketplace Minute - September 22, 2021

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 1:50


The vote was along party lines with Republicans opposed, fate of bill uncertain in Senate; Biden to meet with Democratic lawmakers amid divisions over size of spending plans; Justice Department sues to stop American, JetBlue partnership - September 22, 2021

POLITICO Dispatch
Ds and Rs agree: We hate Biden's migration policy

POLITICO Dispatch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 12:20


Bipartisanship? POLITICO's Sabrina Rodriguez explains why both sides of the aisle are mad at Biden for his handling of the Southern Border. Plus, Rep. Adam Schiff says the panel investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection is preparing to issue subpoenas. And the Justice Department plus several states sue to block a joint venture between American Airlines and JetBlue. Sabrina Rodriguez is a national political correspondent for POLITICO. Jeremy Siegel is a host for POLITICO Dispatch. Irene Noguchi is the executive producer of POLITICO audio. Jenny Ament is the senior producer of POLITICO audio. Raghu Manavalan is a senior editor for POLITICO audio. Read more: It's not just Republicans. Everyone's mad at Biden over migration. Take part in our 2021 podcast survey.

Leadership and Loyalty™
2/2 Creativity is a 3 Simple Steps Process; Nir Bashan

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 33:13


Strategic thinking and innovation are hot subjects, but what you may not have considered is, they are, in and of themselves, results. They are the result of creativity! How can you and your team develop The Creator Mindset? . . . Our guest is Nir Bashan. Nir is a creative person who has spent a lifetime debunking the myth that creativity is for just a select few. He has spent a lifetime breaking down the walls of creativity to allow anyone to enter. Nir worked with Hollywood stars, like Woody Harrelson, and music stars, like Rod Stewart. What Nir discovered was something that may shock you: these creative superstars aren't all that different from you or me! It's just that they have mastered a method of repeatable and predictable creativity -- a type of creativity that anyone can learn. And, it turns out, that same type of creativity can be used in businesses and careers everywhere! Nir has taught thousands of leaders and individuals around the globe how to harness the power of creativity to improve profitability, increase sales, boost customer service, and ultimately, create more meaning in their work. Nir has worked with clients such as AT&T, Microsoft, Ace Hardware, NFL Network, EA Sports, Suzuki, and JetBlue. He has spent the last two decades working on a formula to codify creativity for business. That formula is found in his bestselling book, The Creator Mindset. Website: www.nirbashan.com Social Media: https://twitter.com/Nir_Bashan https://www.linkedin.com/in/nirbashan https://www.instagram.com/nirbashan https://www.facebook.com/nirbashan1 . . . . When you're curious about how to tap into what drives meaning in your life and create meaningful transformation in the lives you touch. Take a look at DovBaron.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Leadership and Loyalty™
1/2 The Creator Mindset: Nir Bashan

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 28:44


Strategic thinking and innovation are hot subjects, but what you may not have considered is, they are, in and of themselves, results. They are the result of creativity! How can you and your team develop The Creator Mindset? . . . Our guest is Nir Bashan. Nir is a creative person who has spent a lifetime debunking the myth that creativity is for just a select few. He has spent a lifetime breaking down the walls of creativity to allow anyone to enter. Nir worked with Hollywood stars, like Woody Harrelson, and music stars, like Rod Stewart. What Nir discovered was something that may shock you: these creative superstars aren't all that different from you or me! It's just that they have mastered a method of repeatable and predictable creativity -- a type of creativity that anyone can learn. And, it turns out, that same type of creativity can be used in businesses and careers everywhere! Nir has taught thousands of leaders and individuals around the globe how to harness the power of creativity to improve profitability, increase sales, boost customer service, and ultimately, create more meaning in their work. Nir has worked with clients such as AT&T, Microsoft, Ace Hardware, NFL Network, EA Sports, Suzuki, and JetBlue. He has spent the last two decades working on a formula to codify creativity for business. That formula is found in his bestselling book, The Creator Mindset. Website: www.nirbashan.com Social Media: https://twitter.com/Nir_Bashan https://www.linkedin.com/in/nirbashan https://www.instagram.com/nirbashan https://www.facebook.com/nirbashan1 . . . . When you're curious about how to tap into what drives meaning in your life and create meaningful transformation in the lives you touch. Take a look at DovBaron.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Pointe To Rise
Power in stories and storytelling a conversation with Kelly McAuley

Pointe To Rise

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 54:09


Kelly McAuley is a dance educator and creative director living in the greater Boston area. She is a daughter, granddaughter and great-granddaughter of dance studio owners. She always thought her family was in the dance studio business, however, Kelly today is exploring what she now understands her family's legacy to be;- the business of dance. Kelly calls up on 15 years as a professional writer to help dance professionals discover the power of storytelling on the stage. She has written for Dance Spirit and brands like JetBlue, Jack Daniels, Dunkin, and the National Geographic Channel. Kelly is a graduate of Oklahoma City University and Boston University and has been teaching the colleges of the Fenway dance for more than 10 years. In this episode, she shares all about her professional writing in dance and the importance of storytelling within dance. Kelly provides insight on how best to position yourself as a dancer, dance teacher, and studio owner, and the importance of professionally running dance as a business. Thank you for listening, So much ♥, Susanne Pointe To Rise links below:

Swish Edition
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot

Swish Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 32:29


Dale and Scott are talking about Britney's new freedom ring; a Bob Ross controversy; the California political shit-show; no one will stop placing bets on the next James Bond; Bill Maher, Pat Sajak, and Vanna White will continue; Roomba can now detect poop; a woman calls in a bomb threat in order to catch her plane; you can go to a real Queen's Ball as seen on “Bridgerton;” and, lots more pop culture silliness.

CNBC's
Airlines Surge Despite CuttingGuidance, and Live NFL Games Coming Straight to Your Gate!

CNBC's "Fast Money"

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 51:46


United, American, JetBlue and Southwest shares all taking flight today, even as the airlines cut guidance due to the spread of the delta variant. What's behind the move and what's next for the industry. Plus with just hours to go before the kickoff for the 2021/22 football season, we talk to the CEO of one company that just inked a major distribution deal with the NFL.

Miles to Go - Travel Tips, News & Reviews You Can't Afford to Miss!
JetBlue To London Is Fantastic! Here's Why

Miles to Go - Travel Tips, News & Reviews You Can't Afford to Miss!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 42:15


We have a new way for you to reach us with your questions. You can text us at (571) 293-6659‬. Listen for your question on a future show! We've been hearing for years that JetBlue will be flying to London. It's finally here and it's awesome. Seth Miller from Paxex.Aero was on the inaugural flight and has now flown both the economy class product and the new Mint Studio. He's sharing a boatload of information with us about why this is the product you want to fly the next time you go across the pond. I also answer a listener question about COVID-19 testing abroad. If you have a question you can e-mail me at ed@pizzainmotion.com. And, you can also find me on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram and ask your question there. If you enjoy the podcast, I hope you'll take a moment to leave us a rating. That helps us grow our audience! Hope you enjoy the show!