Podcasts about hipaa

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

United States federal law concerning health information

  • 1,065PODCASTS
  • 2,660EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 10, 2022LATEST
hipaa

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about hipaa

Show all podcasts related to hipaa

Latest podcast episodes about hipaa

WBSRocks: Business Growth with ERP and Digital Transformation
WBSP363: Grow Your Business by Understanding Salesforce Commerce's Capabilities, an Objective Panel Discussion

WBSRocks: Business Growth with ERP and Digital Transformation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 61:40


When it comes to enterprise platforms, it's hard to meet the expectations from all fronts: performance, customization, developer experience, and functionality. Most platforms can perhaps check a couple of these boxes. Salesforce Commerce Cloud might be able to check a lot of them. That's probably the reason it's the leading platform for enterprises. It has deep industry-specific capabilities in both B2B and B2C space. For example, localized OEM-managed sites for dealers. Or, a HIPAA-compliant web store for hospitals and healthcare facilities. Some people may argue that headless should be able to solve the customer needs of most industries.But some of these features could be so deep that unless your data model supports it, it might be harder to build on vanilla platforms. So, where does Salesforce Commerce Cloud stand as of today in comparison to the headless and legacy platforms?In today's episode, we invited a panel of cross-functional experts for a live interview on LinkedIn who brings significant expertise to discuss Salesforce Commerce Detailed Independent Review. We discussed their strengths and weaknesses and where they might fit in the eCommerce architecture for both B2B and B2C business models. Finally, we compared their B2B and B2C capabilities and the flexibility of each solution.For more information on growth strategies for SMBs using ERP and digital transformation, visit our community at wbs.rocks or elevatiq.com. To ensure that you never miss an episode of the WBS podcast, subscribe on your favorite podcasting platform.

1st Talk Compliance
The Dobbs Opinion, the Repealing of Roe, & the Impact on the Privacy & Security of Patient Information – Audio Version of the Webinar

1st Talk Compliance

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 73:45


Rachel V. Rose, JD, MBA, principal with Rachel V. Rose – Attorney at Law, P.L.L.C., Houston, TX presents this very timely subject for us.The Dobbs Opinion repealed fifty years of precedent under Roe. The implications of the Opinion extend beyond women's reproductive rights and impact the privacy rights of all Americans. The purpose of this webinar is to explain the key aspects of the Dobbs Opinion related to privacy from both the Majority and the Dissent's perspective, address the current legislative initiatives, HHS Guidance, and Executive Orders, as well as appreciate the role HIPAA plays in navigating Dobbs.

Talk Ten Tuesdays
OCR Warning: Patient Right of Access to Medical Records Can't be Denied

Talk Ten Tuesdays

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 31:09


The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) of the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) is warning healthcare providers about the mandatory compliance with the HIPAA Right of Access promulgated in the 21st Century CURES Act. So far, enforcement actions bring to 38 the number of financial penalties against HIPAA-covered entities for failing to provide patients with timely access to their medical records.During the next live edition of the long-running Talk Ten Tuesdays, nationally recognized professional coder,  auditor and consultant Terry Fletcher, reports on the do's and don'ts of withholding patient requests for their protected health information. Fletcher will also delve into the penalties and legal exposure that awaits those who are non-compliant.Other segments during the live broadcast include the following:Coding Report: Laurie Johnson, senior healthcare consultant with Revenue Cycle Solutions, LLC will report on the latest coding news.News Desk: Timothy Powell, CPA will anchor the Talk Ten Tuesdays News Desk.RegWatch: Stanley Nachimson, former CMS career professional-turned-well-known healthcare IT authority, will report on the latest regulatory news coming out of Washington, D.C.Journaling John: John Zelem, MD, FACS, founder and CEO for Streamline Solutions Consulting, will continue with his journal entry.TalkBack: Erica Remer,MD, founder and president of Erica Remer, MD, Inc. and Talk Ten Tuesdays co-host, will report on a subject that has caught her attention during her popular segment.  

All Things Private Practice Podcast
Episode 45: Giving Yourself Permission to "Do ALL The Things" [featuring Marquita Johnson]

All Things Private Practice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 42:38


It's easy to minimize what we do as therapists and look at all the years of schooling, experience, and skills as something anyone can do, but there is so much value in what you offer to the world (and what you can offer to yourself if you just give yourself permission to create and live the life you want). In this episode, I talk with Marquita Johnson, therapist, dating coach, motivational speaker, business speaker, author, and amazing single mom, about her experiences building a business, caring for and conserving energy as an entrepreneur, and giving permission to herself to create and seize life-changing opportunities. We talk about: how Marquita brought dreams to reality by giving herself permission to break the mold and take the leap to follow passions and ideas how boundaries and roadblocks are things that you often set for yourself because of impostor syndrome, but you can tear them down how the question, "can I do it?" is often a sign for Marquita that she probably should how doing something first (or new) can be a catalyst for change and people to follow how each therapist has uniqueness and value in the way they do therapy (and that's their secret sauce and superpower) Marquita's passion for working with millennials balancing mommyhood as a single parent with entrepreneurship More about Marquita: Marquita Johnson is a graduate of Mercer University with a Master of Science in Community Counseling and Master of Divinity. Marquita received her undergraduate degree from Georgia State University in Psychology & Sociology. She is a licensed professional counselor in Georgia, nationally certified counselor, board certified tele-mental health counselor, and certified professional counselor supervisor. Marquita is also a brainspotting practitioner. Her specialties include women issues, dating, divorce, spirituality, and step-families. Currently, Marquita enjoys private practice work and supporting the Faculty & Staff Assistance Program at Emory University. She is currently pursuing her doctoral degree in Counselor Education and Supervision at Walden University. -------------------------------------------------------

Philip Teresi Podcasts
Friday 8/5 Hour 2

Philip Teresi Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 37:29


A look at fundraising for local political races. An update on Monkeypox. Meta and several major US hospitals are being sued for violating HIPAA laws. The Alaska Airlines flight connecting Fresno Yosemite International airport to LAX will be suspended starting 9/6, leaving United Airlines as the only provider of that route. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Friday 8/5 Hour 2

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 37:29


A look at fundraising for local political races. An update on Monkeypox. Meta and several major US hospitals are being sued for violating HIPAA laws. The Alaska Airlines flight connecting Fresno Yosemite International airport to LAX will be suspended starting 9/6, leaving United Airlines as the only provider of that route. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dental Code Advisor
Episode 9 - The Latest in Hipaa, Osha and CDC Concerns

Dental Code Advisor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 23:41


Join Dr. Greg Grobmyer as he speaks with Attorney, former dental assistant, and Dental Compliance expert Olivia Wann about CDC guidelines, OSHA compliance, and HIPPA concerns.

Talk Recovery Radio
Bruce Rosenberg and Steven Hall

Talk Recovery Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 53:27


Talk Recovery Radio This week on Talk Recovery Radio we have 2 amazing guests. First on the show we welcome Bruce Rosenberg, co founder of Rosenberg Law, Bruce has made a name for himself in the area of healthcare fraud litigation defense. Second on the show is Steven Hall, a person in long term recovery sharing his personal story of recovery from addiction. Catch it all on Facebook Live on Talk Recovery's Facebook page. About Bruce Rosenberg Bruce Rosenberg is a founding partner of Rosenberg Law, P.A. With over 30 years of experience litigating in New York and Florida, Mr. Rosenberg now concentrates his practice in healthcare regulatory compliance and civil racketeering litigation. He has successfully litigated a wide array of cases on behalf of healthcare professionals and businesses. Mr. Rosenberg also frequently advises other general practice and criminal attorneys on issues of corporate compliance, HIPAA privacy compliance, contracts, medical staff issues, and billing issues. Before specializing in healthcare law, Mr. Rosenberg represented insurance companies in subrogation cases and with defense issues. This experience allows him to serve healthcare providers more efficiently and effectively. His working knowledge includes complex commercial litigation, acquisitions, assignments, joint ventures, partnerships, civil defense of banking and leasing institutions as well as banking compliance. Mr. Rosenberg is an active member of the Sarasota Bar Association. He also currently serves on the Florida Bar Technology Committee. Rosenberg Law Socials Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Website DRUG ADDICTION/SUBSTANCE ABUSE REHAB COVERAGE The Affordable Care Act (ACA) eliminated addiction from the list of preexisting conditions, thus ensuring health insurance coverage for alcohol and drug rehabilitation services; this is because the ACA sought to improve access to medical health services during a time of rising widespread mental health issues. The ACA classified addiction treatment as an "essential medical benefit". Pursuant to the ACA, insurance plans cover addiction evaluation and treatment medication, alcohol and drug testing, anti-craving medication, clinic and home health visits, family counseling, certain interventions, and medical detox programs. Plans obtainable through the Health Insurance Marketplace provide varying degrees of coverage for rehabilitation–60% for Bronze plans, 70% for Silver plans, 80% for Gold plans, and 90% for Platinum plans. As a result, the ACA makes addiction treatment more affordable and allows patients to select a greater range of rehabilitation services. However, inpatient programs may be excluded by ACA/public plans. Since the passage of the ACA, private plans offer varying levels of coverage for rehabilitation. State laws that regulate private plans typically require insurance providers to cover substance abuse treatment and other mental health rehab services. Though costlier than public insurance, private insurance ordinarily provides more options for treatment coverage than public plans, especially for alcohol and drug addiction rehab. However, some private plans do not cover substance abuse rehab, which makes public plans more favorable in those circumstances. Note that the difference between drug addiction and substance abuse–substance abuse is using a substance in a way not intended or more often/in higher amounts than necessary, while addiction is a chronic illness in which a person experiences neurochemical changes causing psychological dependence on a drug. OFF-LABEL PRESCRIPTIONS Insurance companies can sometimes deny coverage when physicians prescribe drugs–this occurs when the prescription is for an ailment omitted from the label, meaning that though the drug treats the ailment for which the drug has been prescribed, the drug was not specifically approved for treating said ailment. Although the practice of off-label prescriptions is lawful and happens all the time, insurance providers deny coverage, except in limited circumstances where physicians provide convincing peer-reviewed research in favor of their prescription. Even in cases where a physician can convincingly provide backing for the off-label prescription, insurance companies may deny coverage at their discretion. Steven's Personal Story Steven made his way down from the West Kootenays to a residential treatment center in the lower mainland, he completed a 12-step based program which was 60 days in duration. Once he completed the program, he began to volunteer at the treatment facility and today is an employee there. His own experience and struggles with addiction and mental health, coupled with working in the field, has given Steven fresh perspectives on the impact addiction has had on his community, friends, family, and himself. By entering recovery, Steven was able to stabilize on medications, receive counselling and build a strong support network of friends and professionals that help him daily to overcome his own struggles. Steven is a strong believer that there is hope in recovery and a strong community of like-minded individuals can bring a solution to British Columbia's growing substance   misuse epidemic and overdose crisis. By creating more safe spaces in our community that provide access to professional mental and physical health care services, Steven believes everyone is capable and worth recovery from addiction.

The Big Story
Meta's HIPAA Violations And The Rise Of MMM

The Big Story

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 35:09 Very Popular


Meta just got sued over an alleged violation of HIPAA. But where exactly does the health privacy law apply? With the recent overturn of Roe v. Wade, it's more important than ever for digital advertisers to understand how HIPAA protects (and doesn't protect) the use of sensitive health data in ad campaigns. Plus: Understanding the resurgence of MMM and the rise of incrementality measurement.

The Podcast by KevinMD
Patient-initiated collaborative texting

The Podcast by KevinMD

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 20:23


"Nearly three-quarters of consumers say they prefer texting with a business if an actual human is the returning texts — no bots need reply. But the rise of artificial intelligence has led to further advances in smart texting, including the ability to answer simple questions — such as “when is my next appointment?” — without human intervention. Texts regarding certain actions like prescription refills or payment questions can be automatically routed to the correct department for follow-up. Because of privacy concerns, texting in a medical setting must occur on a HIPAA-compliant platform, but solutions exist today where secure text communications flow to the patient record and enable video calls and the ability for patients to pay their bills by text." Keith Dressler is a health care executive. He shares his story and discusses his KevinMD article, "3 reasons practices should implement patient-initiated collaborative texting." Did you enjoy today's episode? Rate and review the show so more audiences can find The Podcast by KevinMD. Subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out. Click here to earn 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 CME for this episode. Also available in Category 1 CME bundles. Powered by CMEfy - a seamless way for busy clinician learners to discover Internet Point-of-Care Learning opportunities that reward AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Learn more at about.cmefy.com/cme-info

Acquired
From NFL to Startup COO to Congressman Regulating Crypto (with Rep. Anthony Gonzalez)

Acquired

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 120:59 Very Popular


This episode is a first for Acquired: we're joined by a sitting US Congressman (from Ben's home state of Ohio!), Republican House Representative Anthony Gonzalez. Anthony serves on the House Financial Services Committee and is deeply involved in crypto and Web3 regulation, as well as on the Climate and Science, Space & Technology Committee where he oversees NASA among many other agencies. His also has an absolutely incredible story — his family immigrated from Cuba to Ohio, he played in the NFL, he was COO of an Investment Group of Santa Barbara backed startup, and he was one of a small number of Republican congresspeople who voted to impeach former President Donald Trump after the events January 6th. If you want more Acquired, you can follow our public LP Show feed here in the podcast player of your choice (including Spotify!). Links: Schoolhouse Rock “I'm Just a Bill” Sponsors: Thanks to Vanta for being our presenting sponsor for this special episode. Vanta is the leader in automated security compliance – making SOC 2, HIPAA, GDPR, and more a breeze for startups and organizations of all sizes. You might say they're like the “AWS of security and compliance”! Everyone in the Acquired community can get 10% off using this link. Thank you as well to Brex and to Tiny. ‍Note: Acquired hosts and guests may hold assets discussed in this episode. This podcast is not investment advice, and is intended for informational and entertainment purposes only. You should do your own research and make your own independent decisions when considering any financial transactions.

Security In Five Podcast
Episode 1239 - NIST Releases New Implementation Guide For HIPAA

Security In Five Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 6:02


The HIPAA Security Rule is a supportive rule to HIPAA focused on more of the technical security aspects of the privacy rule. NIST released an updated draft of a guide to help people understand and implement controls for the security rule. Source - https://nvlpubs.nist.gov/nistpubs/SpecialPublications/NIST.SP.800-66r2.ipd.pdf Be aware, be safe. *** Support the podcast with a cup of coffee *** - Ko-Fi Security In Five Don't forget to subscribe to the Security In Five Newsletter. —————— Where you can find Security In Five —————— Security In Five Reddit Channel r/SecurityInFive Podcast RSS Twitter @binaryblogger YouTube, Stitcher Email - bblogger@protonmail.com

Data Protection Breakfast Club
"Discussing the Nahra Conjecture" w/ Kirk Nahra, Co-Chair, Big Data Practice, Cybersecurity and Privacy Practice at WilmerHale

Data Protection Breakfast Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 44:05


Andy & Pedro discuss all things privacy with Kirk Nahra, the Mt Rushmore of Data Privacy. A noted HIPAA pro Kirk has been in the privacy game since the beginning and continues to lead. In 2021 Kirk won the Vanguard Award from the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) which recognizes one IAPP member each year who demonstrates exceptional leadership, knowledge and creativity in privacy and data protection. Learn more about the community that helps General Counsels in their day to day, TechGC (https://www.techgc.co/) Follow Andy on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andy-dale-7705b83/ Follow TechGC on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/techgc

Fortune's Path Podcast
Chris Gann – Only Fools are Certain

Fortune's Path Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 62:48


Chris Gann started in product development when he was very young, working in healthcare EDI at the dawn of HIPAA while promoting his punk band. Chris taught himself to use the resources available and "read recipes" to make new products. "I learn through doing," says Chris, "and it can be hard to give direction to others when you learn through doing." Today Chris is a leader of other product managers. When he's hiring he looks for disposition and character over direct product experience. Curiosity is the big thing for Chris. "If you already know the answer, then you're not a product manager," says Chris. Being engaged and grit are close seconds to curiosity for Chris. Chris loved playing bass in bands and feels that product managers are like bass players  – they make everyone around them sound better. Chris knows he's the right fit for product management because he's comfortable working between worlds; a negotiator with everyone else's perspective in his head. Chris can see all sides equally and believes  "objective truth is not a thing to be found." Chris feels more rewarded by curiosity then by knowing. Tom and Chris talk about the differences between committing to a course of action and making a final decision. Chris and Tom then get into a discussion of free will and agency versus determinism. "There's the grand sense of things, and there's what you're forced to live in," says Chris, a sentiment that works for product managers prioritizing work and people prioritizing things in their life. Chris and Tom wrap up by talking about strategy, how to help people say "no" to bad ideas and unproductive work, and how important expertise in a discipline other than product management is import for product managers.

The Group Practice Exchange
Episode 194 | Scaling with HIPAA with Liath Dalton

The Group Practice Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 25:57


Hey Group Practice Listeners! Another exciting episode is out today! I'm back once more with Liath— Person Centered Tech's deputy director and co-owner to talk about people's intimidation of HIPAA compliance, and how both employers and employees can work effectively around it the PCT way.   In this episode we cover: Why inaccurate perceptions of HIPAA can be intimidating. The PCT's way of compliance process is aligned with scaling your business. HIPAA compliance in five supportive steps. Technical versus behavioral measures in setting up a system. Where should a scaling group practice start with HIPAA security risk analysis.    Links Mentioned in this episode: Person Centered Tech PCT Contact Info   This episode is sponsored by TherapyNotes. TherapyNotes is an EHR software that helps behavioral health professionals manage their practice with confidence and efficiency. I use TherapyNotes in my own group practice and love its amazing support team, billing features, and scheduling capabilities. It serves us well as a large group practice owner. Do you ever wish for a financial therapist who could relieve you from the last few months' bookkeeping, talk you off the edge when you're running into issues with Quickbooks, or help you work through a profit plan for growth? GreenOak Accounting does just that! GreenOak Accounting is an accounting firm that specializes in working with group practices. Their value goes WAY beyond bookkeeping; they can help you get on track for financial success. Schedule a free consultation by going to http://greenoakaccounting.com/tgpe

Get out of Teaching
Get Out of Teaching Podcast Season 6, Episode 1, Nate Beer (The Insurance Pioneer)

Get out of Teaching

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 35:27


For the last 15 months, Nate Beer - The Insurance Pioneer has been helping individuals, families & small businesses in over 30 US states save money on their monthly premiums all while improving their overall level of health, dental & vision coverage. His background of over 7 years in restaurant management ensures that you, the client, will always receive the highest degree of customer satisfaction & care. With flexible scheduling, you can book a date/time of your choosing at the link below and start the initial dialogue with Nate. Find out today how he can "pioneer" you into your next career while taking the stress out of setting up your family's benefits! *Products & eligibility subject to change, licensed in 31 US states. All information disclosed is strictly confidential and compliant with all HIPAA regulations*https://theinsurancepioneer.setmore.com/https://www.facebook.com/theinsurancepioneernate@theinspioneer.com——Aired on July 27th 2022—— For show-notes and other resources, visit https://www.larksong.com.au/podcast For Resumé Revamp go to https://www.larksong.com.au/product/resume-revampJoin the Private Membership Community: https://get-out-of-teaching.mn.co/plans/215722?bundle_token=e5b3992f42660ee5c07517bcfbd449aa&utm_source=manualFor all podcast episodes, visit https://getoutofteaching.buzzsprout.com/ Get Out of Teaching website (Larksong): https://www.larksong.com.au Join the ‘Get Out of Teaching!' Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/getoutofteaching Listen and subscribe on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/get-out-of-teaching/id1498676505 Connect with me on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/elizabeth-diacos-career-transition-coach-for-education-leaders-get-out-of-teaching/ Connect with me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/elizabeth.diacos This podcast is a member of the Experts on Air podcast network https://expertsonair.fm/

Women Winning Divorce with Heather B. Quick, Esq.
Legally Preparing Your Children for College

Women Winning Divorce with Heather B. Quick, Esq.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 48:09


"Women Winning Divorce" is a radio show and podcast hosted by Heather Quick, CEO and Owner of Florida Women's Law Group. Each week we focus on different aspects of family law to help guide women through the difficult and emotional legal challenges they are facing. Heather brings over 20 years of law experience that advocates and empowers women to achieve happier and healthier lives. Join Heather each week as she discusses family law issues including divorce, custody, alimony, paternity, narcissism, mediation and more.   This program was created to provide tips and insight to women with family law issues. It is not intended to be legal advice because every situation is different.   Visit us at https://www.womenwinningdivorce.com/ for more resources.Text us at 904-944-6800 for a copy of Heather's Top 5 Divorce Tips.   If you have questions or a topic you would like Heather to cover, email us at  marketing@4womenlaw.com

Dark Rhino Security Podcast
SC S6 E10 VillageMD, 3rd Party risk, Cyber Insurance, and Walgreens,

Dark Rhino Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 40:53


Jake is the SR. Director of Security Strategy at VillageMD. He has over 20 years of IT and Security experience building, operating, and enhancing: Risk Management, Security Awareness, and governance. He has worked with many "C-suite" executives and boards of directors. He is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh Katz School of Business 00:00 Introduction 02:04 VillageMD 03:28 Walgreens and the Minute Clinic 05:01 How has Cyber security changed the Healthcare business? 07:50 Why is patient healthcare data worth more money than credit card information? 10:30 Making the data less valuable 16:50 What are some policy positions we could take? 18:57 What is motivating bad actors to get healthcare data? 22:50 Cyber insurance 26:40 3rd party risk 30:05 Doctors and mobile devices vs HIPAA? 39:10 More on Jake To learn more about Jake Belcher visit https://www.linkedin.com/in/jakebelcher/ To learn more about Dark Rhino Security visit https://www.darkrhinosecurity.com SOCIAL MEDIA: Stay connected with us on our social media pages where we'll give you snippets, alerts for new podcasts, and even behind the scenes of our studio! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/securityconfidential/ Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Dark-Rhino-Security-Inc-105978998396396/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/darkrhinosec LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dark-rhino-security Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCs6R-jX06_TDlFrnv-uyy0w/videos

CTEK Voices: The Risk Perspective
OCR Guidance: HIPAA Privacy Rule & Disclosures of PHI Relating to Reproductive Health Care

CTEK Voices: The Risk Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 12:50


In this episode of The Risk Perspective, we speak with Andrew Mahler, former OCR Investigator and CynergisTek's VP of Privacy and Compliance about the recently issued OCR guidance on patient privacy in the wake of The Supreme Court decision on Roe. Listen for a debrief of the OCR's guidance that addresses: How federal law and regulations protect individuals' PHI and provides clarification on disclosure laws  Information about what's protected, and what's not when using health information apps on smartphones. Episode Resources:  The guidance on the HIPAA Privacy Rule and Disclosures of Information Relating to Reproductive Health Care  The guidance on Protecting the Privacy and Security of Your Health Information When Using Your Personal Cell Phone or Tablet Information on filing a complaint if you believe that a HIPAA-covered entity or its business associate violated your health information privacy rights or committed another violation of the Privacy, Security, or Breach Notification Rules Subscribe to CTEK Voices: The Risk Perspective on Apple iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform. Remember to like and subscribe to The Risk Perspective, and don't forget to leave your comments for feedback and topic suggestions!

Angel Invest Boston
Ryan Hess - Timely Data, Better Care

Angel Invest Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 29:36


Angel Scale Biotech: Learn More Gathering scattered medical data about a patient and giving it to the doctor in time for a visit is Connective Health's aim. Founder, Ryan Hess, updates us on the progress of his startup in improving care and lowering costs. Sponsored by Purdue University entrepreneurship and Peter Fasse, patent attorney at Fish and Richardson. Highlights: Sal Daher Introduces Ryan Hess Connective Health: The Problem It's Solving Patient Info Doctors Are Missing and Why It Matters "... it's something a provider wants to see because they want that short story..." Connective Health's Next Step "... if it is a provider that is about to deliver treatment and there is an entity that has your data, that entity, as long as it's under the realm of HIPAA, can provide that data to the provider..." Advice to the Audience Topics: discovering entrepreneurship, founding story

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
598: The Implication of the Dobbs Verdict for Physical Therapists

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 66:22


In this episode, Founder of Enhanced Recovery After Delivery™, Dr. Rebeca Segraves, Co-Founder of Entropy Physiotherapy, Dr. Sarah Haag, Owner and Founder of Reform Physical Therapy, Dr. Abby Bales, and Co-Owner of Entropy Physiotherapy, Dr. Sandy Hilton, talk about the consequences of overturning Roe v. Wade. Today, they talk about the importance of taking proactive measure in communities, and the legal and ethical obligations of healthcare practitioners. How do physical therapists get the trust of communities who already don't trust healthcare? Hear about red-flagged multipurpose drugs, advocating for young people's education, providing physical therapy care during and after delivery, and get everyone's words of encouragement for healthcare providers and patients, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “Our insurance-based system is not ready to handle the far-reaching consequences of forced birth at a young age and botched abortions.” “We do need to know abortive procedures so that we can recognize when someone has been through an unsafe situation.” “We really need to take into consideration the ramifications of what this will do.” “This is not good healthcare and we need to do more.” “We're going to have to know our rules, our laws, and what we're willing to do and go through so that we can provide the care that we know our patients deserve.” “We're looking at the criminalization of healthcare. That is not healthcare.” “We know who this criminalization of healthcare is going to affect the most. It's going to affect poor, marginalized people of color.” “We can no longer choose to stay in our lane.” “We need to have a public health physio on the labour and delivery, and on maternity floors.” “We don't get to have an opinion on the right or wrongness of this. We have a problem ahead of us that is happening already as we speak.” “We need to create more innovators in our field, and education is the way to do that.” “This is frustrating and new, and we're not going to abandon you. We're going to figure it out and be there to help.” “Our clinics are still safe. We are still treating you based on what you are dealing with, and we will not be dictated by anybody else.” “If you need help, there is help.” “If we believe in the autonomy of an individual to know all of the information before making a decision, then we still believe in the autonomy of an individual to know all of the information that is best for their body.” “This affects everyone. We're dedicated to advocating for you.”   More about Dr. Rebeca Segraves Rebeca Segraves, PT, DPT, WCS  is a physical therapist and Board-Certified Women's Health Clinical Specialist who has served individuals and families within the hospital and home during pregnancy and immediately postpartum. She has extensive experience with optimizing function during long-term hospitalizations for high-risk pregnancy and following perinatal loss and pregnancy termination. In the hospital and home health settings, she has worked with maternal care teams to maximize early recovery after delivery, including Caesarean section, birth-related injuries, and following obstetric critical care interventions. She is the founder of Enhanced Recovery After Delivery™, an obstetrics clinical pathway that maximizes mental and physical function during pregnancy and immediately postpartum with hospital and in-home occupational and physical therapy before and after birth. Her vision is that every person will have access to an obstetric rehab therapist during pregnancy and within the first 6 weeks after birth, perinatal loss, and pregnancy termination regardless of their location or ability to pay.   More About Dr. Sarah Haag Dr. Sarah Haag, PT, DPT, MS graduated from Marquette University in 2002 with a Master of Physical Therapy. She went on to complete Doctor of Physical Therapy and Master of Science in Women's Health from Rosalind Franklin University in 2008. Sarah has pursued an interest in treating the spine, pelvis with a specialization in women's and men's health, becoming a Board-Certified Women's Health Clinical Specialist in 2009 and Certification in Mechanical Diagnosis Therapy from the McKenzie Institute in 2010. Sarah joined the faculty of Rosalind Franklin in 2019. In her roles at Rosalind Franklin, she is the physical therapy faculty liaison for the Interprofessional Community Clinic and teaching in the College of Health Professions. Sarah cofounded Entropy Physiotherapy and Wellness with Dr. Sandy Hilton, in Chicago, Illinois in 2013. Entropy was designed to be a clinic where people would come for help, but not feel like ‘patients' when addressing persistent health issues.   More About Dr. Abby Bales Dr. Abby Bales, PT, DPT, CSCS is the owner and founder of Reform Physical Therapy in New York City, a practice specializing in women's health and orthopedic physical therapy. Dr. Bales received her doctorate in physical therapy from New York University and has advanced training through the renowned Herman and Wallace Pelvic Rehabilitation Institute, Grey Institute, Barral Institute, and Postural Restoration Institute, among others. She also holds her Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist certification from the NSCA and guest lectures in the physical therapy departments at both NYU and Columbia University, as well as at conferences around the country. Dr. Bales has a special interest in and works with adult and adolescent athletes with a history of RED-S (formerly known as the Female Athlete Triad) and hypothalamic amenorrhea. A lifelong athlete, marathon runner, and fitness professional, Dr. Bales is passionate about educating athletes, coaches, and physical therapists about the lifespan of the female athlete. Her extensive knowledge of and collaboration with endocrinologists, sports medicine specialists, pediatricians, and Ob/gyns has brought professional athletes, dancers, and weekend warriors alike to seek out her expertise. With an undergraduate degree in both pre-med and musical theatre, a background in sports and dance, 20 years of Pilates experience and training, Dr. Bales has lent her extensive knowledge as a consultant to the top fitness studios in New York City and is a founding advisor and consultant for The Mirror and the Olympya app. She built Reform Physical Therapy to support female athletes of all ages and stages in their lives. Dr. Bales is a mom of two and lives with her husband and family in New York.   More About Dr. Sandy Hilton Sandra (Sandy) Hilton graduated with a Master of Science in Physical Therapy from Pacific University in 1988. She received her Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from Des Moines University in 2013. Sandy has contributed to multiple book chapters, papers, and co-authored “Why Pelvic Pain Hurts”. She is an international instructor and speaker on treating pelvic pain for professionals and for public education. Sandy is a regular contributor on health-related podcasts and is co-host of the Pain Science and Sensibility Podcast with Cory Blickenstaff. Sandy was the Director of Programming for the Section on Women's Health of the American Physical Therapy Association from 2012 - 2017. She is now on the board of the Abdominal and Pelvic Pain special interest group, a part of the International Association for the Study of Pain.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Roe v Wade, Abortion, Trauma, Sexual Trauma, Pregnancy, Advocacy, Pelvic Health, Healthcare, Education, Treatment, Empowerment,   To learn more, follow our guests at: Website:          https://enhancedrecoverywellness.com                         https://enhancedrecoveryafterdelivery.com                         https://www.entropy.physio                         https://reformptnyc.com Instagram:       @sandyhiltonpt                         @reformptnyc                         @enhancedrecoveryandwellness Twitter:            @RebecaSegraves                         @SandyHiltonPT                         @Abby_NYC                         @SarahHaagPT LinkedIn:         Sandy Hilton                         Sarah Haag                         Abby Bales                         Rebeca Segraves   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:07 Welcome to the healthy, wealthy and smart podcast. Each week we interview the best and brightest in physical therapy, wellness and entrepreneurship. We give you cutting edge information you need to live your best life healthy, wealthy and smart. The information in this podcast is for entertainment purposes only and should not be used as personalized medical advice. And now, here's your host, Dr. Karen Litzy. Hey everybody,   00:36 welcome back to the podcast. I am your host, Karen Litzy. And on today's episode, I am very fortunate to have for pretty remarkable physical therapists who also happen to be pelvic health specialists. On to discuss the recent Supreme Court ruling in the dobs case that overturned the landmark ruling of Roe vs. Wade. How will this reversal of Roe v Wade affect the patients that we may see on a regular basis in all facets, facets of the physical therapy world. So to help have this discussion, I am very excited to welcome onto the podcast, Dr. Rebecca Seagraves and Dr. Abby bales and to welcome back to the podcast Dr. Sandy Hilton, and Dr. Sarah Hague. So regardless of where you fall on this decision, it is important that the physical therapy world be prepared to care for these patients. So I want to thank all four of these remarkable physical therapists for coming on to the podcast. Once the podcast starts, they will talk a little bit more about themselves, and then we will get right into our discussion. So thank you everyone for tuning in. And thanks to Abby, Rebecca, Sandy, and Sarah.   02:03 I, my name is Rebecca Seagraves, I'm a private practice pelvic health therapist who provides hospital based and home based pelvic health services and I teach occupational and physical therapists to provide their services earlier in the hospital so that women don't have to suffer.   02:20 Perfect Sarah, go ahead.   02:22 I am Sarah Haig. And I'm a physical therapist at entropy physiotherapy in Chicago, and I'm also assistant professor and at a university where I do get to teach a variety of health care providers.   02:35 Perfect, Abby, go ahead. My name is Abby bales. I'm a physical therapist, I specialize in pelvic health for the pregnant and postpartum athlete. I have my practice in New York City called perform physical therapy, and I do in home visits and I have a small clinic location.   02:54 Perfect and Sandy. Go ahead.   02:56 Sandy Hilton. I'm a pelvic health physical therapist. I'm currently in Chicago with Sara entropy. And I'm in Chicago and online. Because we can see people for consultations wherever they are, and we may be needing to do more of that.   03:13 So the first question I have for all of you lovely ladies, is how will the recent Supreme Court ruling in the dobs case, which was overturning Roe v. Wade? How is that going to affect people who give birth that we see in our clinics in the hospital setting in an outpatient setting in a home setting? So let's start with Sara, go ahead. I'll start with you. And then we'll just kind of go around. And and and also feel free to chime in and you know, the conversation as you see fit? Got?   03:58 That's such a big question. And I get to go first. So the question was how, how is this decision going to affect people who give birth? And I would say it just it affects everyone in in kind of different ways. Because I would say what this will undoubtedly do is result in us seeing people who didn't want to give birth. And and I think, you know, the effects of that are going to be far reaching and that we I think maybe we in this little group can have an idea of, of the vastness of this decision, but I think that even we will be surprised at what happens. I think that how it will affect people who give birth. Gosh, I'm kind of speechless because there's so many different ways. But when we're looking at that person in front of us with whatever they need to do For whatever they need assistance with after giving birth, we're going to have to just amplify exponentially our consideration for where they are and how they felt going into the birth, how they got pregnant in the first place. And, and kind of how they see themselves going forward. We talk about treating women in the fourth trimester. And it's, I mean, I'm in that fourth trimester, myself, and I can tell you that it would be harder to ask for help. And I'm really fortunate that I, that I have that I do have support, and that I do have the ability to seek help. I have a million great friends that I can reach out to for help, but I'm just how the how it's gonna affect the women, I'll say, I'm scared, but it's not about me. I'm very concerned for other women who won't be able to access the care that they that they need.   06:05 Yeah, Sandy, go ahead. What do you think? How do you feel this decision will affect people who can give birth, especially as they come to see physical therapist, whether that be during pregnancy? As Sarah just said, the fourth trimester, or perhaps after a procedure, or abortion that maybe didn't go? Well? Because it wasn't safe?   06:30 Yeah, so I work a lot with pain. One of my concerns is, but what is the future gonna hold for some people who did not want to be pregnant not added some sort of convenience or concern for finances, both of which, you know, your spot in life determines whether or not you have the the ability to raise another person at that moment. So there are individual decisions that people should make, in my opinion, but also, there's the if something happens to you, that you did not give permission to happen. And then you are dealing with the consequences. In this instance, pregnancy, and you happen to have back pain or have hip pain, or have a chronic condition, or a pelvic pain history, where you didn't not want to be pregnant. How's that going to affect the pain and the dysfunction that you're, you are already happening? And will it sensitize people to worse outcomes and recovery afterwards, because this is a, you know, there's a perceived injustice scale, I want to pull that back out. I hadn't been using it very often in the clinic just didn't seem to change the course of care. But I think that when I'm working with the people pre post, during pregnancy, I think I'm going to pull my perceived injustice scale back out and see if that might be a nice way to find out. If I need to hook someone up to a counselor, a financial counselor, psychologist, sexual therapist, anyone who might be able to support this person, we already don't have good support systems for pregnancy. I just am astounded at how much what a bad choice it is to add more need to a system that isn't currently handling the demand. I know we're gonna need to get creative because these people will need help. But I am a little awestruck at the possible quantum s we're gonna walk into   08:51 an abbey you had mentioned before we started recording about you know, some of the folks that you see that may have a history of different kinds of trauma, and how that may affect their abilities are to kind of wrap their head around being pregnant and then being forced to give birth because now they don't have any alternative. So how do you feel like that's going to play out in the physical therapy world, if they even get to physical therapy if they even get to a pelvic health therapist?   09:34 Yeah, that's, that's one of the things that I was I was thinking about as everyone was chiming in was, we really are just at the precipice in our niche of our profession, where people who give birth are seeking or even hearing about pelvic health and postpartum care, pregnancy care there. Just barely hearing about it. And my I have, you know, a concern, a very deep concern that these people will go into hiding if they have had an abortion in the past, because are we obligated to report that, and what is the statute of limitations on that, and the shame that they might feel for having had an abortion, or having had give birth and didn't want to, and the trauma that my patients who have, for the most part, not everyone who have wanted pregnancies that either the birth is traumatic, the pregnancy is traumatic, they get to a successful delivery, or they have a loss during the pregnancy, the trauma that they are experiencing, and for the most part, I'm seeing adults, and I cannot comprehend children, because it's this gonna be a lot of children who are forced to give birth, or who are having unsafe abortions, and the trauma that they're going to experience, and how, how much it takes for a person who has sexual trauma or birth trauma to get to my clinic, how these young people how these people who feel that shame, I don't know how they're going to get to me, or any of us, except for a real team based approach with pediatricians, with hospitals, with OB GYN, with your gynecologist with people who might see them first before us. I just don't know how they get to us to be able to treat and help treat that trauma. And like Sandy said, that pelvic pain that might be a result of the trauma if if it's unwanted sexual intercourse, I just don't know how we get to them. And that is something that we struggle with now, with, for the most part, wanted pregnancies. And I don't know how we get there. And I don't think we're prepared as a profession. for that. I think the advocacy for getting ourselves into pediatricians offices into into family medicine offices, is going to be so crucial in getting to these patients. But there aren't enough of us. We are not prepared. And our insurance based system is not ready to handle the far reaching consequences of forced birth at a young age and botched abortions. It is not ready to handle that.   12:52 Rebecca, go ahead. I'm curious to hear your thoughts around this because of your work in acute care systems.   13:00 Absolutely. I believe that I'm beyond the argument of whether this is right, or whether this is wrong. I think that as a profession, we're going to have to quickly change to a mindset of can we be prepared enough to handle what Abby was saying the amount of trauma, the amount of mental health I think, comes to mind when when someone's autonomy is taken away from them in any regard. I was very vocal as to how dangerous it was to force, you know, mandates on people even last year. And now here we are, we're at a point in our profession where we have to now separate our own personal beliefs and be committed to the oath of doing no further harm because this will result in harm, having treated individuals after an unplanned cesarean section or a cesarean hysterectomy, because of severe blood loss. They had no choice in those procedures. And they had no choice in the kind of recovery or rehabilitation they would get. I had to fight an advocate for our services, physical and occupational therapy services to be offered to individuals. So when you're looking someone in the eye who has lost autonomy over their body as last choice has gone through trauma that changes you it changes me really as a profession, even on this a professional or even on this issue. I'm now pivoting as quickly as I can't decide, do I have the skills that's going to be needed to address maybe hemorrhage events from an unsafe abortion that's performed? Maybe the mental health of having to try All across state lines so that you can find a provider that will treat you maybe the, you know, the shame around, you know, even finding Well, you know, is there a safe space for me to be treated for my pelvic health trauma from you know, maybe needing to carry this pregnancy longer than then I would have wanted to, there's, there's so much around this that we really have to start looking at with a clinical eye with a very empathetic or sympathetic eye as pelvic health therapists because of the fact that there's so few of us. And because now we're in a scenario where there will be more people who will be needing services but not knowing who to turn to. So my my biggest hope from this conversation, and many more that we'll have is that there's some how going to be a way to designate ourselves as a safe space for anyone, no matter what choice they've made for their body, period, I'm really done with being on one end of the spectrum with this, I'm a professional that doesn't have that opportunity to just, you know, be extreme on this, I advocate for the person and for their choice over their body period.   16:17 I think we need to, and it's just beautifully, beautifully said, the the getting getting some small systemic procedures in place in the communities we live in, is most likely the first step is reach out to the pediatricians and the chiropractors and the massage therapists and the trainers and the school athletic trainers and whoever you find that can have a connection with people and let them know on an individual basis. So like how do you tell people hey, I'm a trustworthy clinic to come to is not usually by writing it on your website. But if you can make connections in your community and be a trusted provider, that's going to go further, I suspect. I'm assuming there's going to be a fair bit of mistrust. And we have to earn it once it's lost. We've got to earn it back. So yeah, I like the proactiveness of that.   17:22 I, I totally agree on something you said Sandy sparked something that I would love for a health care lawyer to start weighing in on is we want, I am a safe space. I think every patient I have ever met who sees me cries. And I hold I hold that part of what I do. Very close to me, it's it's an honor to be someone that my patients open up to. And I know all of you on this call feel the same way because we we are that place that they they I love hearing birth stories. I love it. Even it just gives me an insight into that person into that experience. I feel like I'm there with them. And I understand better what they have gone through. But what happens when the legal system is going to come for us? Or them through us? What happens to that? How do we continue to be a safe space where they can share their sexual trauma, their birth trauma, their birth history, their pregnancy history, their menstruation, history, their sexual history? All of those really, really intimate things? How do we continue to be that for our patients?   18:56 I think we've had to do this I've had to do this previously, for in some very, in situations of incest in for the most part, we need a trigger warning on this. But, you know, there you have an individual that is a minor, or, or for some reason not independent that is being abused in what is supposed to be their safe space. And then that person, the abuser can be like, Oh, look, I'm helping you get better. And they're actually not safe. So there's some things and if the person you're treating is a minor, that adult has access to their records. And so I've worked in places not I don't know how to do with an EMR but I've worked in places where we have our chart that we write down the official record and sticky notes, which are the things that will not get put in the official record. But we need to have written down so people know it. And we've had to do that in situations where the patient wasn't safe. We all knew the patient wasn't safe. was being worked on to get them safe, but they were not yet safe. And you had to make sure there was nothing in their records that was going to make them more unsafe. I don't know how to do it as an EMR, if someone has a clever way to do that, that'd be great. Or we go back to EMR plus paper charts.   20:18 Even to to add to your point, Abby, if we're looking now at possible, you know, jurisdiction, you know, lead legal their jurisdiction or subpoena of documentation, you know, after having intervened for someone who may have had to make a choice that their state did not condone? Yeah, no, I, I'm completely, you know, on guard against that now, and that those are things that I'm thinking about now and thinking about, well, what would my profession do? Would we back, you know, you know, efforts on Capitol Hill to advocate for, you know, someone who, who has lost their, their autonomy, or lost their ability to, to at least have a safer procedure, and we've had to intervene in that way. You know, I think about that now, and I, that makes me fearful that this is such a hot topic issue that, you know, we might not as an organization want to choose size, but we as professionals on the ground as pelvic health therapists, I don't think that we have that luxury and turning someone away. And so So yeah, I think more conversations like this need to be had so that we can form a unified front of at least, you know, pelvic health specialists that can really help with the the after effects of this.   21:38 And I think a big barrier to that legal aspect of it is, you know, what is our legal responsibility. And what happens, if we don't do XYZ is because a lot of the laws and a lot of these states, some of these trigger laws and other laws being that are being passed, the rules seem to be a bit murky. They're not clear. And so I agree, I think the APTA or the section on pelvic health needs to come out with clear guidelines as to what we as healthcare professionals, can and should do. But here's the other thing that I don't understand and maybe someone else can. What about HIPAA? Isn't that a thing? Where did the HIPAA laws come in to protect the privacy between the provider and the patient? And I don't know the answer that I'm not a lawyer, but we have protection through hip isn't that the point of a HIPAA HIPAA laws? I don't know what   22:44 you would think so. But unfortunately, one of the justices who shall not be named has decided that abortion does not fall under HIPAA, because it involves the life of another being in so I can only state what has been stated or restate. But yes, the those are the very things that I'm afraid we're up against as professionals.   23:12 Yeah, I think they're going to try to make us mandatory reporters. for it. I think they're gonna try to make all healthcare we are mandatory. For some things, the thing that's good for some things. Yeah, the   23:24 thing that bothers me about that is the where I'm in Illinois right now, Illinois is a designated, look, we're not, we're not going to infringe on people's right to health care. Just great. But some of the laws and I've lost track, I was trying to keep track of how many have are voting on or have already voted on laws that would have civil penalties, penalties of providers from other states, regardless of the Practice Act of that provider, to be able to have a civil lawsuit against that provider. So that's fun. And then we go back to what ABBY You had mentioned before we started recording about medicine, that that is considered an abort efficient, I have a really hard time with that word. But that is also used for other conditions that we see in our clinics for pain for function and things like that. And then where's our role?   24:33 Right, so does someone want to talk about these more specific on what those medications are and what they're for? So that people listening are like, Okay, well, what medications, you know, so do you want to kind of go into maybe what those medications are, what they're for and how they tie back into our profession. Because, you know, a lot of people will say, well, this isn't our lane. So we're trying to do these podcasts. so people understand it's very much within our lane.   25:03 Well, I yeah, it's just from a pharmacology standpoint, the one of the probably most popular well known drugs that's used for abortion is under the generic name of Cytotec misoprostol, and that's a drug that's not only only used for abortion, but if individual suffers a miscarriage is used to help with retained placenta and making sure that the uterus clears. What other people don't know is is also used for induction. So the same drug is used for three or four different purposes. It's also used for postpartum hemorrhage. So measle Postel, or Cytotec is a drug as pelvic health therapists we should be very familiar with. And we should be familiar with it. Not only you know, for, you know, this this topic, but it's also been a drug that's been linked with the uterus going into hyperstimulation. So actually putting someone at risk for bleeding too heavily. And all of this has a lot of implications on someone's mental health, who's suffered a miscarriage who's gone through an abortion that maybe was not safely performed, which I have had very close experience with someone who's been given misoprostol Cytotec, it didn't take well, she continued bleeding through the weekend, because she lived in a state where emergency physicians could opt out of knowing a board of medications. So as professionals, we do need to know, a board of procedures so that we can recognize when someone has been through an unsafe situation it is, it is our oath as metal as medical professionals to know those things, not to necessarily have a stance on those things that will prevent us from providing high quality and safe care.   26:52 Another one of the medications is methotrexate, and it's used to treat inflammatory bowel disease. And as public health specialists, we'd see people who have IBD, Crohn's and Colitis, who have had surgery who are in flareups who are being treated like that treated with that medication. And it is again used in in abortions. And when you're on that medication, you have to take pregnancy tests in order to still be able to get your prescription for that medication. And as a person who I myself have inflammatory bowel disease and have been on that medication before, I can tell you that you don't go on those medications lightly. It is you are counseled when you are of an age where you could possibly get pregnant, and taking those medications. And it's very serious to take them. And you also have to get to a certain stage of very serious disease in order to take that it's not the first line of defense. So if we start removing medications, or they start to be red flagged on EMRs, or org charts, and we become mandatory reporters for seeing that medication, God forbid, on someone's you know, they're when they're telling us what type of medications they're taking, that there would be an inquiry into that for for any reason is just it's it's horrifying. I mean, it's, we treat these patients and they trust us, and we want them to trust us. But as we get farther and farther down this rabbit hole of, of going after providers, pharmacists, people who help give them information to go to a different state, I just it is. Like I said before, the breadth and the depth of this decision, reverberates everywhere. And if if PTS think that they are in orthopedic clinics, that they are somehow immune from it, you're absolutely not. And for those clinics who have taken on or encourage one of their one of their therapists to take on women's health because it's now a buzz issue. It's really cool. You are now going to see that in your clinic. And you know, like Rebecca was saying before, you know any number of us who have really strong and long term relationships with patients who are pregnant who are in postpartum I have intervened and sent patients to the hospital on the phone with them because they have remnants of conception and they have a fever and someone's blowing them off and not letting them into the IDI and sending them home. And we we are seeing those patients, they have an ectopic they're, they're bleeding, is it normal, they're calling me they're not calling their OB they can't get their OB on the phone. They're texting me and saying what should I do? And they have that trust with me and what happens when they don't? And they're bleeding and they're not asking someone that question and they don't know where to go for help. And so I know I took this in a different direction and we talked about pharmacology, but I just thing that I have those patients whose lives I have saved by sending them to the emergency department, because they are sick, they have an infection, they are bleeding, they have an ectopic, it is not normal. And I don't know what happens when they no longer have that trust with us not not because we're not trustworthy, but because they're scared.   30:26 The heavy silence of all of us going   30:31 you know, it's, it's not wrong. And I think the like, it just keeps going through my head. It's just like, so what do we do? I mean, Karen, you mentioned like, it'd be great if somebody came out with a list of, of guidance for us. And I just, that just won't happen. Because there's different laws in different states, different practice acts in different states. And no one, you know, like you even if you talk to a lawyer, they're going to say, this would be the interpretation. But also, as of yet, there's no like case law, to give us any sort of any sort of guidance. So that was a lot of words to say, it's really hard. I can tell you in Illinois, like two or three weeks ago, I'd be like, like, I'm happy, I feel like Illinois is a pretty safe space. We have, we have elections for our governor this year. And I have never been so worried, so motivated to vote. And so motivated to to really make sure to talk to people about it's not just like this, this category or this category, it's like we really need to take into consideration the ramifications of what this will do, I think there was a lot of this probably won't affect me a whole lot. But I think I'm guessing I think a lot of us on this call maybe I think all of us on all of us on this call, have lived our lives with Roe v. Wade. And, as all of this is coming up, and just thinking about how it impacts so many people, and how our healthcare system is already doing not a good job of taking care of so many people, the fact that we would do this with no, no scientific, back ground, no support scientifically. Like I pulled up the ACOG statement, and, and they condemn this devastating decision. And I really, I was like, it gave me gave me goosebumps. And this was referred to in our art Association's statement. And it makes me sad that we didn't condemn it. Hope that's not too political. But I'm really sad that we didn't take a stronger stance to say, this is not good health care. And we need to do more. Again, and that's like, again, so many words, to say we're gonna have to make up our own minds, we're gonna have to know, our rules, our laws and what we're willing to do, and go through, so that we can provide the care that we know our patients deserve. And that's going to be really hard. Because, you know, if I talk to someone, and if I call Rebecca in Washington State, she's going to have something different than if I talk to Abby in New York. And you know, that so it'll be, it'll be really hard even to find that support. That support there's going to be so much support, I think, from this community, but that knowledge and that, that confidence, we have to pull together so we have to pull together with all the other providers, but also we're gonna have to sit down and figure this out to   33:59 the clarity. So it's, I think a practical step forward would be each state to get get, like, every state, come up with a thing. So pelvic health therapists in that state come up with what seems to work for them get a lovely healthcare lawyer to to work with them with it. And then we could have a clearinghouse of sorts of all of the state statements. I don't know that that needs to go through a particular organization. I I know that they're in the field of physical therapy, two thirds of PTS aren't members. And we need this information to be out there for every single person so that they know   34:44 that we'll have to be grassroots there's I don't think that there's going to be widespread Association support from anywhere. But that being said, I think it's a great idea.   34:58 What are we going to do about it? Hang on issues that are too divisive, you're absolutely right, individual entities are going to have to take this on and just put those resources out to therapists who need them need the legal support, need the need to know how and how to circumvent issues in their states. And, you know, like I said before, even how to just provide that emotional support, there's going to be needed for their, their, their patients, so, and that's okay, if the organizations that were part of are not willing to take a heavy stance, you know, even like last year, if you're not willing to take a heavy stance, on an issue where someone feels their autonomy, and their choice is being threatened, then it's okay, well, we'll take it from here. But, you know, that's, that's really where these grassroots efforts come from and abound, because there are a group of individuals who are willing to say, No, this is wrong. And I'm going to do something about this so that our future generations don't have to suffer.   36:02 Yeah, and I think, you know, we're really looking at the criminalization of health care.   36:09 That is not healthcare.   36:12 And we also know who this criminalization of healthcare is going to affect the most. And it's going to affect poor, marginalized people of color, it is not going to affect the wealthy white folks in any state, they'll be fine. So how do we, as physical therapist, deal with that? How do we, how do we get the trust of those communities who already don't trust health care, so now they're going to stay away even more, we already have the highest mortality, maternal mortality rates in the developed world, I can only imagine that will get worse because people, as we've all heard today are going to be afraid to seek health care. So where do we go from here as health care providers? I,   37:10 Karen, you're speaking something that's very near and dear to my heart, I act as if you had to take this on, I am very adamant that we can no longer choose to stay in our lane, we do not have that luxury. And I as a black female, you know, physical therapist, I don't have the luxury to ignore that because of the color of my skin, and not my doctor's degree, not my board certification and women's health, you know, not my faculty position, I when I walk into a hospital, and I either choose to give birth or have a procedure, I will be judged by none other than the color of my skin. That is what the data is telling me is that I am three times likely to have a very severe outcome. If I were to have a pregnancy that did not go as planned or or don't choose a procedure, you know, that affects the rest of my function in my health. And so given the data on this, you're absolutely right there, there is going to be very specific populations that are going to receive the most blowback from this. And as a pelvic health therapist, I had to go into the hospital to find them, because I knew that people of color and of marginalized backgrounds, were not going to find me in my clinic. And we're not going to pay necessarily private pay services to receive that care. But I needed to go where they were most likely to be and that was the hospital setting or in their home. And so, again, as a field of a very dispersed and you know, not very many of us at all, we're going to have to pivot into these areas that we were not necessarily comfortable in being if we're going to address the populations that are going to be most affected by the decisions our lawmakers are making for our bodies.   39:11 You know, there's something that I think about, often when I hear this type of conversation come up in, in sexual health and in in whenever I am speaking with one of my patients and talking about their menstruation history, and, and them not knowing how their body works from such a young age is I just wonder if we should be offering programs for young people like very young pre ministration you know, people with uteruses and their parents, and grandparents and online, online like little anonymous. Yep. nonnamous   39:51 for it's just   39:52 Yes. Yes, it's it's just, you know, Andrew Huberman talks a lot about having data Back to free content that scientific, that's factual. And I think about that a lot. And I think, to my mind, where I go with this, because I do think about the lifespan of a person, is that creating something that someone can access anonymously at any age, and then maybe creating something where it's offered at a school? You know, it's it's ministration health. And it doesn't have to be under the guise of, you know, this happened with Roe v. Wade, but this it could be menstruation, health, what is a person who menstruating what can you expect? What you know, and going through the lifespan with them, but offering them? You know, I think I think about this with my own children, as our pediatrician always asks the question of the visit, who is allowed to see under your clothes who is allowed to touch you? And it's like, you and my, I have a five year old. So it's Mom, when when when I go number two, a mom or dad when I go number two? And that's it. And you know, I think about that, and I think about how we can educate young people on a variety of things within this topic, and kind of include other stuff, too, that's normal, not normal, depending on their age. Absolutely, there   41:22 was what I was excited about in pelvic health. Before this was people like Frank to physician and his PhD students and postdocs are working on a series of research about how if we identify young girls that are starting their period, and having painful periods, treat them and educate them, then that they will not go on to have as much pelvic pain conditions and issues in the future. So we look at the early childhood events kind of thing, but also period pain. And How exciting would it be if we could get education to young girls about just how their bodies work. And to know that just because you all your aunties have horrible periods doesn't mean that you're stuck with this, just like maybe they just didn't know, let's help you out and constipation information and those basic health self care for preventative problems. So I was super excited about all that. And now it's like, oh, now we have to do it. Because in that we can do little pieces of information. So people have knowledge about their body, that's going to be a little bit of armor for them, that they're going to need and free and available in short, and you know, slide it past all the YouTube sensors. This is this is doable, but it's gonna take time money doing, but we can do it. Well, it sounds like, ladies,   42:52 we've got a lot of work to do. One other thing I wanted to touch upon. And we've said this a couple of times, but I think it's worth repeating again and again and again. And that's that expanding out to other providers. So it's expanding out, as Rebecca said, expanding out to our colleagues in acute care, meaning you can see someone right after a procedure right after birth right after a C section. And, and sadly, as we were saying, I think we they may start seeing more women, I'm not even set children under the age of 18. In these positions of force birth on a skeletally immature body. So the only place to reach these children would be maybe in that acute care setting. How what does the profession need to do in order to make that happen? And not not shy away from it, but give them the information that they need. Moving forward?   44:07 I was just gonna say that I've given birth in the hospital twice. Not at any time was I offered a physical therapist, or did a physical therapist come by and I am in New York City. I gave birth in New York City, planned Solarians because of my illnesses. And nobody came by I did get lactation nurses, any manner of people who were seeing me I was on their service. But that has been something that we needed anyway. We mean to have a pelvic health physio on the labor and delivery and on the maternity floors, who is coming by educating as to what they can start with what they can expect. When can they have an exam if they want to have one? Who is a trusted provider for them to have one. And we need to get the hospitals to expand acute care, physical therapy to labor and delivery and, and the maternity floors. As a routine, it's not something you should have to call for, it should be routine clearance for discharge the same way you have to watch the shaking baby video to get discharged.   45:27 I'm happy older than all of you. I don't have it either. But taking baby video is not something that even existed back in the day. But that makes sense. I mean, I once upon a time was a burn therapist, and I was on call at a regional Trauma Center. And you know, it's like you're needed your, your pager goes off, because that's how long ago it was. And you just came in, did your thing, went back home went back to bed. There is no reason other than lack of will, that PTS couldn't be doing that right now.   46:03 I'm now of the opinion where it's unethical to not offer physical or occupational therapy within 24 to 48 hours of someone who had no idea who did not have a planned delivery the way they expected it who has now and a massively long road to recovery. After a major abdominal surgery, I'm now of the opinion that is unethical for our medical systems to not offer that those rehabilitative services. And I've treated individuals who had a cesarean section but suffered a stillbirth. So the very thought of not providing services to someone who has any kind of procedure that's affecting, you know, their their their not only their pelvic health, but their mental function. That to me is now given the you know, these these, this recent decision on overturning Roe v Wade, is now now we're never, you know, either we're going to now pivot again as pelvic health therapists and start training our acute care colleagues, as we did with our orthopedic colleagues, as we've done with, you know, our neurology colleagues, whatever we've had to do as pelvic health therapists to bring attention to half of the population, you know, who are undergoing procedures, and they're not being informed on how to recover, we will have to start educating and kind of really grow beyond just the clinics and beyond what we can do in our community or community. But we are going to have to start educating our other colleagues in these other settings, we don't have a choice, we know too much, but we can't be everywhere. And not all of us can be in the hospital setting, we're going to have to train the individuals who are used to seeing anything that walks through the door and tell them get over to the obstetric unit. Okay, there's someone there waiting for you.   48:06 Yeah, I totally agree. I mean, when I think back I remember as a student working in acute care and how we had someone who's dedicated to the ICU, we had someone dedicated to the medical floor, we had somebody who was dedicated to the ortho floor, and most of the time they had their OCS, their, their, the one for for, for ICU care, the one for NeuroCare, or they have a specialty. And I think it is just remnants of the bygone era of it's natural, your body will heal kind of BS from the past. It's just remnants of that and it's just, we don't need the APTA to give us permission to do this, this is internal, this is I'm going into a hospital, and I'm presenting you with a program. And here is what this what you can build this visit for here's the ICD 10 code for this visit here is here is here are two people who are going to give you know, one seminar to all of your PT OTs, to you know, so that you are aware of what the possible complications and when to refer out and that kind of thing. And then here are two therapists who are acute care therapists who are going to also float to the maternity floor one of them every day, so that we can hit the we can get to these patients at that point, and that is just that's just people who present a program who have an idea, who get it in front of the board that that it is not permission from anybody else to do it. And, you know, it really it fires me up to to create a world in which you know, when you know people who are the heads of departments and chairs and you know on the boards of directors You know, being in big, big cities or small cities, when you know those people, you know, you can, your passion can fire them up. And if you can fire people up, and you can advocate for your patients and you can in that can spread, you can make that happen. And this is, you know, I feel radicalized by this, I mean, I'm burning my bra all over the place with this kind of thing. And I just feel like, if we can, if we can get to young people, and if we can get to day zero, of delivery, day one, post delivery, or post trauma, then then maybe we can make a dent, maybe we can, maybe we can try, maybe we can really make a go of this for these people. Because, like I keep feeling and saying I, we are not prepared for the volume.   50:54 If individuals are going to be forced to carry a pregnancy, that they may not want to turn because it's affecting their health, we're going to have to be prepared for this. Again, this is not an option really, for us as pelvic health therapists, because we know what's down the road, we've seen mothers who have or you know, or individuals who have suffered strokes or preeclampsia or seizures, or, you know, honestly, long term health issues because of what pregnancies have done to their body. And now if they want the choice to say, you know, I'm not ready, they don't have it anymore. So we really don't have a choice. We have to start expanding our services into these other settings, making our neurologic clinical specialists in the hospital, see people before they have a stroke before they have a seizure actually provide services that can help someone monitor their own signs and symptoms after they've had now a procedure or given birth or even had, you know, a stillbirth, unfortunately, because the doctor had to decide, well, yes, now we will perform the abortion because you know, your health is like on the cliff, I mean, we're going to be seeing these and we just have to prepare. And if it's not our organizations that are laying the foundations, we will, we'll take it from here,   52:15 we need to reach out across so many barriers, like athletic trainers, they're gonna see the young girls, they're gonna see their track stars that is not reds, it's pregnancy. And it could be a very short lived traumatic pregnancy, in girls that are just not develop. They're developed enough to get pregnant, they're not developed enough to carry a healthy baby to term. Kind of just makes me like. But Rebecca is right as we don't get to have an opinion on the right or wrongness of this, we have a problem ahead of us now, that that is happening already, as we speak, that people are going to need help. I love that we have more technology than my grandma did when she was fighting this battle. And we have YouTube and we have podcasts and we have ways to get information out. But we need to use every single one of them in our sports colleague or athletic trainer colleagues. They need to know the signs. Because they may be the ones that see it first.   53:21 Yeah. And Sarah as being the most recent new mother here. What kind of care did you get when you were in the hospital?   53:36 I was sitting here thinking about that. And I mean, I will say that the care I had while I was there, that I had an uncomplicated delivery in spite of a very large baby. And I was fortunate enough to leave the hospital without needing additional help. But I wasn't offered physio. Nobody really they're just really curious to make sure you're paying enough. And that's about it if you're the mom and my six week visit was actually telehealth and that was the last time I had contact with a health care professional regarding my own health so it is minimal even if you're a very fortunate white woman in a large metropolitan area and but I'm working now further north and with a pro bono clinic clinic and in an area where we do a lot of work with communities of color and I'm I'm like I honestly don't even know the hospitals up here yet. But I'm gonna I have so many post it notes of things that are gonna start happening and start inquiring because Rebecca like we need to get into the hospitals like if if I can Do that. And honestly, up until now, like my world and entropy was, and pre this decision was it, there's so many people out there who need help with pelvic issues in general, like we can do this forever. And we set our clinic up so that people who weren't doing well in the traditional health care system could find us and afford us. At least some people could, I realized that it wasn't in companies, encompassing everybody who could possibly need help, but we were doing trying to figure out another way. And so again, like, like, again, the offer of assistance I got was minimal. But also I didn't need much. And I was in a position where also, I knew I could, I could ask for it if I wanted it. And I could probably get it if I needed it. And I'm just thinking about, again, some of the communities I'm interacting with now, in some of my other roles and responsibilities, and I cannot wait to take a look and see, how can we get in there? How can we be on that floor? How can we? What What can we make, make happen like, because it needs to happen, these are these, this is the place where I'm scared to start seeing the stats,   56:21 wouldn't it be amazing if you can get the student clinic part of that somehow somehow and get, you know, young beyond that bias, but younger, most younger but but like the physicians the the in training the PTs and training the PAs the you know, and get like Rebecca had said, let's get let's get the team up to speed here, because there aren't enough pelvic health therapists already. And they're heavens, we need, we need to get everybody caught up.   56:58 And there's so much I was telling you that being around student health care, providing your future health care providers is really energizing and also really interesting. I mean, the ideas that come up with in the in the connections they make and and the proposals they make are just amazing. But two things that I've noticed that I think probably we run into in the real world, real world, outside school world as well, is one. The that's being able to have enough people and enough support to keep it sustainable. So you have this idea, you have the proposal, you made the proposal, how are we going to keep it going and finding the funding or the energy or the volunteers to keep it going. Things ebb and flow, you get a great proposal, you're like yes. And then I literally today was like, I wonder what's up with that one, because it was an idea for a clinic to help was basically for trans people to our tree transitioning and might not have the support that they need. And also I was reached, they come up here for women's health clinic. And I'm going to reach out to them now. Because this again, this decision changes that because it is a pro bono clinic that they would like to set this up in and before it was going to be much more more wellness. And now it could turn out to be essential health care. So that's one thing. But then the other thing is still the education, that in school, we're not taught about what everyone else can do. And I think again, figuring out a way to make sure that future physicians really know what physical therapists have to offer, especially in this space. Most people know that if their their shoulder, their rotator cuff repair, they should send them to pt. But really, we need to get in with OB GYN news, we need to get in with the pediatricians. And I don't want to say unfortunately, but in this regard, unfortunately, we're going to have to really make sure that they know what we're doing. And again, I'm already kind of trying to think like how can we make this just part of how we do health care.   59:20 So I think I'm following in your footsteps by going into education and by by being a part of our doctor of physical therapy programs. You know, I especially chose the program in Washington state not because you know, of just the the the opportunity to teach doctors or incoming doctors but it was also an opportunity to teach doctors of osteopathic medicine and occupational therapy therapists. It was you know, very intimate program and opportunity to make pelvic health or women's health or reproductive health apart of cardiopulmonary content, a part of neurology content, a part of our foundations a part of musculoskeletal and not a special elective course that we get two days of training on, I had the opportunity to literally insert our care, our specialized and unique care and every aspect of the curriculum, as it should be, because we are dealing with, you know, more or less issues that every therapist generalists or specialists should be equipped to handle. So in the wake of Roe v Wade, to me, this is an opportunity unlike any other for pelvic health therapists to really get into these educational spaces where incoming doctors are, you know, MDS or PA programs, or NP programs are our therapy practices, and start where students are most riled up and having those ideas so that they can go out and become each one of us, you know, go into hospitals and say no, to obstetric units being ignored, go into hospitals and give and services to physicians. You know, we need to create more innovators in our field and education is the way to do that.   1:01:12 I just wrote down check Indiana and Ohio, and then I wrote border clinics, because Because Illinois is a it's like a not a prohibition state. Having so many flashbacks, because Illinois, is, is currently dedicated to maintaining health care access for everyone. We have cities that are on the border. And I was thought of that when you were talking, Sarah, because you're up next to Wisconsin now. But we have we have the southern part of the state and the western part of the state. And those those border towns are going to have a higher influx than I will see in Chicago, maybe. But I would anticipate that they would,   1:01:56 you know, and again, this is where laws are murky. Every state is different. It's I mean, it's a shitshow. For lack of better way of putting it I don't think there's any other way to put it at this point. Because that's kind of what what we're dealing with because no one's prepared, period. So as we wrap things up, I'll go around to each of you. And just kind of what do you want the listeners to take away? Go ahead, Sandy,   1:02:33 this is this is frustrating and new, and we're not going to abandon you. We're gonna figure it out and be there to help.   1:02:41 I would say that our clinics are still safe, it is still a safe place for you to open up and tell us what you wouldn't tell anybody else. It's still safe with us. And we still have you as an entire person with all of your history. We are still treating you based on what you are dealing with and not. We will not be dictated by anybody else. Our care won't be mandated or dictated by anybody. Sarah, go ahead.   1:03:22 What I would say is I would echo your safe. If you need help, there is help. And I'm sorry, that that this just made it harder than it already was. And I would say to healthcare providers, please let remember, let us remember why we're doing what we're doing. And, you know, we do need to stand up, we do need to continue to provide the best care for our patients. Because to be honest, I've been thinking like, I think it's a legal question. It's a professional question. But ultimately, if we can't give the best care possible, I'm not sure I should do this.   1:04:01 Ahead, Rebecca,   1:04:02 for our health care providers, in the wake of Roe v. Wade, being overturned, wherever we are, you know, as an organization or on our stance, if we believed in the autonomy of an individual to know all of the information before making a decision, then we still believe in the autonomy of an individual to know all of the information that is best for their body. And that is the oath that's the that's the that's the promise that we've made as professionals to people that we're serving, and to the people that we're serving to those who are there listening to this. You have safe spaces with providers that you trust and we're going to continue to educate one another, our field and also you we're going to put together resources that really bring During this education to your families so that you don't have to feel like you're in the dark and you're alone. This is not something that is per individual or per person. This affects everyone. And we're dedicated to advocating for you.   1:05:18 Perfect, and on that we will wrap things up. Thank you ladies so much for a really candid and robust discussion. I feel like there are lots to do. I think we've got some, some great ideas here. And perhaps with some help and some grassroots movements, we can turn them into a reality. So thank you to Rebecca to Sarah to Abby and to Sandy, for taking the time out of your schedules because I know we're all busy to talk about this very important topic. So thank you all so so much, and everyone thanks so much for listening, have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.   1:06:03 Thank you for listening and please subscribe to the podcast at podcast dot healthy, wealthy smart.com And don't forget to follow us on social media    

All Things Private Practice Podcast
Episode 39: Honoring & Updating Your Boundaries [featuring Latasha Matthews]

All Things Private Practice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 36:46


Setting healthy boundaries is one of the best gifts you can give yourself. In this episode, I talk with Latasha Matthews, a boundaries expert, about embracing changes in the seasons of your life and updating boundaries to match them, how childhood trauma can affect the way you position your boundaries, how boundaries impact and are impacted by relationships, the importance of creating space for nothingness, and more. Latasha shares stories about her own shifting and evolving boundaries and how it has impacted her life journey. More about Latasha: Latasha Matthews is known as America's Emotional Wellness Expert. She is the Co-founder of Pieces That Fit, Inc. and the CEO and Clinical Director of Illumination Counseling and Coaching, LLC. Latasha is well versed in providing individual, couples, adolescent, and family therapy in her group practice in Lawrenceville, GA. Latasha has an extensive background in business, human resources, and training. With over 15 years' experience as a Licensed Professional Counselor, life coach, speaker, and author, she utilizes a Family Systems approach, which considers how a particular system impacts an individual person, organization, or situation. In addition to Latasha's clinical experience, she also provides continuing education for clinicians and holds the position of adjunct professor at several universities. Latasha is an advocate for emotional wellness and balance. She is the author of The Dumping Ground, which was on the Bestseller's list in 2016. In 2021, Latasha created: Say Yes to your No boundary-setting affirmation Cards for women, men, couples, families, teens, and business owners. She believes that boundary setting can reduce stress and people-pleasing, and provide increased self-advocacy. Latasha has trained thousands of individuals globally on the importance of setting healthy boundaries. She has received numerous awards, written numerous article publications, and has been awarded countless speaking opportunities for her advocacy work supporting healthy boundaries. Lastly, Latasha also holds certifications in DEI and DEI and ethical leadership, which she will utilize to help corporations understand the impact the DEI has on mental health. Latasha's website: https://latashamatthews.com/ (latashamatthews.com)

News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv 7 11 shooting 2 suspects arrested in string of SoCal robberies that left 2 dead, 3 injured Indiana doctor who shared 10 year olds abortion story did not violate HIPAA, officials say Atlanta area DA tells Georgia GOP chair he could be indicted in election probe Man exonerated for Malcolm X assassination sues City of New York for 40 million First on CNN DHS inspector general told Jan. 6 panel he went to Mayorkas about Secret Service cooperation Biden says he will act on climate change after Manchin opposes legislation Nova Scotia shooting Gunmans partner describes night of terror Heatwave National emergency declared after UKs first red extreme heat warning Mexican drugs lord Rafael Caro Quintero arrested reports Ukraine war Four year old Liza killed by Russian attack on Vinnytsia Tory leadership rivals trade blows over tax and spending Jayland Walker Autopsy shows black man shot or grazed 46 times Ivana Trump, ex wife of former president Trump, found dead Biden Says He Told Saudi Prince He Blames Him for Khashoggi Murder Saudi Arabia Biden raised Khashoggi murder with crown prince Ukraine war British man Paul Urey held by separatists dies As Jayland Walkers autopsy report is released, lawyer asks of Akron Where is the public apology Europe heatwave Thousands escape wildfires in France, Spain and Greece Sri Lanka swears in Ranil Wickremesinghe as acting leader after mass protests House passes bills to codify abortion rights and ensure access

Business RadioX ® Network
Erik Boemanns With Improving Atlanta

Business RadioX ® Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022


Erik Boemanns is Vice President of Technology at Improving Atlanta, as well as the office's CISO. As a non-practicing attorney and technologist, Erik brings a unique perspective to technology and compliance. He's led several organizations through their compliance journeys (PCI-DSS, SAS 70, HIPAA, and SOC 2), as well as their enterprise technology. Connect with Erik […]

Atlanta Business Radio
Erik Boemanns With Improving Atlanta

Atlanta Business Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022


Erik Boemanns is Vice President of Technology at Improving Atlanta, as well as the office's CISO. As a non-practicing attorney and technologist, Erik brings a unique perspective to technology and compliance. He's led several organizations through their compliance journeys (PCI-DSS, SAS 70, HIPAA, and SOC 2), as well as their enterprise technology. Connect with Erik […] The post Erik Boemanns With Improving Atlanta appeared first on Business RadioX ®.

Pro-Life America
Episode 108 | The Left Scrambles To Come Up With Roe v Wade's “Plan B”

Pro-Life America

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 20:20


Topics Discussed:Leftist claims “Unborn child' is an 'Orwellian' phrase meant 'to short-circuit our ability to think and speak about human existence…”The proposed “Floating Abortion Clinic”Biden's emergency ordersThe rape of a 10-year-old Ohio girl that's making national headlines Links MentionedLeftist writer Jill Filipovic says 'Unborn child' is an 'Orwellian' phrase meant 'to short-circuit our ability to think and speak about human existence and life with necessary complexity' - The BlazeFloating abortion clinic proposed in Gulf of Mexico to bypass bans - The Clarion LedgerWomen on Waves Abortion Ship CampaignsSafeAndLegal.comBiden signs abortion rights executive order amid pressure - PoliticoJoe Biden May Declare Federal Emergency to Make Sure Babies are Killed in Abortions - LifeNewsBiden lashes out at reporter asking about Democrats opposed to him running again: 'Read the polls, Jack!' - The BlazeArrest made in rape of Ohio girl that led to Indiana abortion drawing international attention - The Columbus DispatchOhio 10-year-old's alleged rapist is Guatemalan illegal immigrant: ICE source - Fox NewsMan charged in rape of 10-year-old girl who had to travel for abortion - Washington PostOur Child Predator InvestigationsRate & Review Our Podcast Have a topic you want to see discussed on the show? [Submit it here.]To learn more about what Life Dynamics does, visit: https://lifedynamics.com/about-us/Support Our Work Be Sure To Follow Life Dynamics:Our WebsiteFacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube   

Walk-Ins Welcome
Ep. 35: HIPPA Is Expanding - Interview with Ron Shoe with SIP Oasis

Walk-Ins Welcome

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 29:24


HIPAA is a term well known in the medical world. Did you know that it is expanding? In today's episode, we interview Ron Shoe with SIP Oasis. He talks about how cybersecurity is playing a bigger role for small businesses and HIPAA can have an even larger impact than ever before. Connect with Ron and SIP Oasis here: https://www.sipoasis.com/ Learn more: https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/doj-announces-new-initiative-to-use-2830143/ Have a question or a story we should feature as an episode? Email us at hello@urgentcaremarketingpros.com Intro/Outro Music by Devin Smith https://open.spotify.com/artist/4UdQjNXnACFE2VpkEoP8v2?si=pDx5jsgtRFOtwrpMOKOkuQ Stay connected with Urgent Care Marketing Pros! https://urgentcaremarketingpros.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/urgentcaremarketers Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/urgentcaremarketingpros/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/urgent-care-marketing-pros YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9nwkAwIyiVvsLTWGoeRbWA

The Center Collaborative: Creative Solutions in Behavioral Health and Criminal Justice
# 26 What You CAN Say: An Explanation of Privacy Laws

The Center Collaborative: Creative Solutions in Behavioral Health and Criminal Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 49:18


OCBHJI wanted to turn the usual approach to privacy law training (i.e., HIPAA and CFR 42, part 2) on its head - we didn't find the typical training centered on jargon and what you can't say very helpful and figured neither did you. The result is this privacy laws radio play presented via our podcast. The radio play focuses on scenarios to demonstrate what you can say, not just what you can't say. The Center collaborated with GOBHI employees while drafting the script and during production. We are excited to provide a tool that helps make privacy laws understandable, accessible, and, hopefully, somewhat entertaining. Please note that these situations concern potentially sensitive topics in mental health crisis response. None of the characters in our narrative vignettes are based on real people or events—any similarity to actual people, living or dead, or actual events, is purely by chance. To view a full transcript of this episode, visit https://www.ocbhji.org/privacy-laws Contents: 3:54 Observable Behaviors 5:32 Information Outside the Clinical Setting 6:08 Law Enforcement is Not Constrained by HIPAA or Part 2 7:22 Minimum necessary information disclosure in a crisis situation 9:37 Disclosures with HIPAA vs CFR 12:41 Gunshot wounds, stabbings, and certain other physical injuries - 45 CFR 164.512 (f)(1)(i) 16:11 Identification and location purposes - 45 CFR 164.512 (f)(2) 18:43 Averting Harm - 45 CFR 164.512 (j)(1)(i) 24:14 Victim of a Crime - 45 CFR 164.512(f)(3) 26:36Crime occurs on the premises - 45 CFR 164.512 (f)(5) 29:03 Crime away from the premises -  45CFR 164.512 (f)(6) 29:50 A Court order or court-ordered warrant - 45 CFR 164.512(f)(1)(ii)(A)-(B) 33:18 Administrative request or an administrative subpoena or investigative demand or other written request from a law enforcement official - 45 CFR 164.512(f)(1)(ii)(C) 35:30 Healthcare Facility Notification of Blood Alcohol Level or Presence of Cannabis or Controlled Substance in Blood - ORS 676.260 36:45 Mobile Crisis Call For more information about the intersection between criminal justice and behavioral health in Oregon, please reach out to us through our website at http://www.ocbhji.org/podcast and Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/OCBHJI/. We'd love to hear from you. Notice to listeners: https://www.ocbhji.org//podcast-notice

Trend Lightly
Prolapsed Judgement

Trend Lightly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 114:04 Very Popular


Addison Rae's dad got caught being a dirty dog, Doja Cat tried to use a teenager as Match.com, Caroline Calloway spent $40,000 on gardening equipment, and Howie Mandel's bestie got caught with his ass out. LINKS EXTREMELY NSFW: UNCENSORED VIDEO OF HOWIE MANDEL'S PROLAPSED ANUS TIKTOK The Rise of the #GentleMinions - why are teens in suits getting banned from theatres? The Face conducts a deep report  Distinguished gentlemen arrive at the theatre Mumsnet Minions  Doja Calls out Noah Schnapp IG LIVE “she's acting as if Noah violated her HIPAA rights

Stand in the Gap Radio Podcasts

HIPAA laws which most people still think is in place to protect their health privacy is actually in reality doing just the opposite. How is this happening?

Help Me With HIPAA
Cyber Insurance Applications Are Intense - Ep 363

Help Me With HIPAA

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 54:17


When you're shopping for cybersecurity insurance, the applications can be intense. You'll need to provide a lot of details about your current security protections, and you may be asked to complete a security audit. This is because insurance companies want to be sure that they're not insuring businesses that aren't doing everything they can to protect themselves from cyber attacks. This episode we discuss what questions you may encounter on your cyber insurance applications.

Digital Conversations
The Art and Science of Delivering Conversational Patient Engagement

Digital Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 22:11


The technology behind Conversational AI is maturing rapidly across all sectors as consumers increasingly relying on language to interact with their devices. The labor shortage that plagues most industries has set the stage for technology that powers digital conversations, and the sector that may benefit most is healthcare. Anil Nair, Chief Technology Officer at Lifelink Systems, is developing conversational systems that can handle the millions of routine, administrative interactions that patients must deal with related to treatment and prescriptions. In this episode, Anil shares his perspective on what it will take to bring Conversational AI into the digital healthcare experience, while preserving the important, personal relationships between patients and their caregivers. The conversational platform of tomorrow will provide a mix of interoperability, analytics, and NLP with advanced design capacity that considers the “grammar” of digital interactions, and allows providers and life science companies to optimize each engagement to deliver results.

The Remote Real Estate Investor
Investing in residential assisted living with Isabelle Guarino-Smith

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 30:26


Isabelle Guarino-Smith, the CEO of RAL (Residential Assisted Living Academy). She has spoken across the country and has been featured in magazines & articles nationally. She was named both “Future Leader” in the Senior Housing industry and “Top Senior Housing Influencer” under 30. Isabelle is a sought-after coach and trainer for all things "RAL"! Isabelle's goal is to carry on her father's legacy by training investors & entrepreneurs how to... "Do Good & Do Well". In today's show, Isabelle shares her investment story and the many benefits of investing in residential assisted living. Episode Link: https://residentialassistedlivingacademy.com/ --- Transcript   Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: Hey, everyone, welcome to another episode of the Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum, and today I'm joined by Isabelle Guarino-Smith, and she's going to be talking to us today about all of the things we need to know and be aware of if we're going to get started investing in the residential assisted living space. So let's get into it.   Isabelle, welcome to the podcast. Thank you so much for taking the time to hang out with me. I appreciate you coming on.   Isabelle: Of course, happy to be here. Thanks for having me.   Michael: Oh, it's my pleasure and I'm super excited to chat with you today because we're talking about residential assisted living, which is a newer topic for the remote real estate investor. But before we get into that, give us a quick insight who you are, where you come from, and what is it you're doing in real estate today?   Isabelle: Yeah, I'm the CEO of residential assisted living Academy. We basically teach and train people all across the country how to own and operate their very own residential assisted living homes. We've been in the industry for now, this is our 10th year, we own and operate three care homes ourselves out of Phoenix, Arizona and I say we because it's a family business, I work with all my siblings, most of their partners, so I love that aspect, too…   Michael: So amazing and so you are teaching people how to own and operate versus residential assisted living facilities that is so interesting. So why are you I mean, why residences living? Why, what got you involved in it to begin with?   Isabelle: Yeah, so we actually got involved because my grandmother fell and broke her hip and the doctor called and it's like, she can't go home alone. She needs 24/7 care, help with activities of daily living? She was in upstate New York, and we were in Arizona, and it's like, okay, what are we gonna do? You know, and so a lot of families find themselves in a situation like this, where all of a sudden, poof, a loved one needs help and it's like, are you gonna quit your job and take care of them 24/7? Are you gonna give them in home care, which is insanely expensive or are you going to put them into a…   Michael: Dreaded H word?   Isabelle: Right, the H word, you're like, oh, no. So we were faced with that dilemma. We searched and hunted for like a place we even felt competent or comfortable with up there for her and found nothing that we liked, we were just grossed out of a lot of the options, and came back to Arizona, kind of found a residential assisted living home here. My dad was always a real estate investor. So he talked with the business owner and just asked her like, hey, would you be willing to sell and she's like, yeah, bought the real estate, bought the business had no idea what we were getting into, but got into it, so she could live there for free and he's like, all figured out how to run the business and over the course of the next couple years, my whole family jumped in got involved was like, We love this industry because not only is there great cash flow, but you're offering an incredible opportunity to like the community, the families, you're providing jobs, it was just so impactful and it was like, man, this feels so much better than so many other real estate investment opportunities.   Michael: I love it. It's kind of like the parents that have their kid go to school, and then they buy him a house so they could live rent free and end up becoming landlords like, oh, this is kind of cool. Yeah. Oh, that's awesome. So tell us what kind of services should someone's thinking about getting involved in the industry? Yeah, I'll take I'll use myself as an example. Like, I have no idea how the medical industry works. I just know there's a ton of red tape and dealing with medical insurance companies is a nightmare and a half. So do I need to become a medical expert as someone that wants to get involved in this industry?   Isabelle: Great question and the answer is no. We are real estate investors, I have zero medical background. I am not a caregiver by nature. If I was I probably would have taken care of my grandmother, you know, so? Absolutely not what we teach is how to own the real estate and own the business, you're still going to hire a licensed administrator who's going to run all of the day to day and they're going to hire the licensed caregivers who are going to care for the seniors. So you're really running the business in a way that you're hands off. I visit the home once every other month and talk on the phone with my manager like once a week maybe so we're definitely teaching how to do it as passively as possible.   Michael: Okay, okay. Love it and can you give us an idea let's talk numbers because people I think love numbers they can wrap their head or round numbers, let's dig in. So it sounds expensive. But just from what I've heard about how much people are paying to stay in these types of facilities, so give us an idea. If someone is just getting started, wants to wants to get involved, but doesn't have a several million dollars, you just tell us what some of the numbers look like from a purchasing standpoint, from a revenue standpoint, expense perspective.   Isabelle: So I always say it depends what route you want to take to get involved, right. Some of our students like in the Midwest, they want to buy land and build custom homes from the ground up, there's still land to buy out there and so they'll, they'll do that. So that's obviously the cost of the land and then building it that could take anywhere from a year to two years and be pretty expensive. But then the home is perfectly suitable and custom done and yeah, pretty those homes that I've been into are like incredible, they're so gorgeous. Another way you can get involved is buying a single family home and converting it to become an assisted living home. So that might be adding on square footage, more bedrooms, bathrooms, or it might be ramps, guardrails, light minor renovations, it just depends on how the home started. I like to say three to 500 square feet per person is comfortable. So if you have 10 residents, minimum 3000 square foot home upwards of 5000 is pretty comfortable for that.   Michael: Okay, that's a great kind of metric to go off of, and then that bed bath count does that play into that as well?   Isabelle: Most seniors are going to want private bedrooms, private bathrooms, but you can get away with like one or two shared options within the home, but as many private privates as you can, is better, the other ways you could get involved is buying an existing one, like I shared with you, we did so you buy the real estate by the business, you're up and running cash flowing day one and then the fourth one is maybe you don't have as much cash and you're going to lease the home, from someone who's retrofitted, got it licensed, it's ready to go and you're going to lease it from them, and just pay them, you know, the lease fee every month, and you're going to run the business and they own the real estate. So that's another way you could get involved but numbers wise cashflow I know you're in California, yeah?   Michael: Yes.   Isabelle: Okay, so California average, the state average is about $5,000 per month per resident is how much it costs to live in an assisted living home right now. But San Francisco's average is closer to like 6800 per month per person and that's for an average home and I told you, my grandmother, those average homes were yucky. I didn't want my goldfish there. Let your mother so let's say most of these homes that we're teaching our students do, they're more upscale, they're like luxury. They're beautiful homes. So let's say you have six residents there in California, and they're all paying $8,000 a month to live in your home. This is not unheard of, this happens all the time. That's 48 coming in each month, right? 48,000 but let's minus 15,000 for a mortgage or lease because you're in San Fran, it's expensive. Yeah, so 15,000 can get you a pretty nice home that could house six people comfortably right? Minus about 20,000 in your expenses, that's including your staff, including, you know, everything else that you need insurance activities, food, cable, everything, that's still leaving you with $13,000 of monthly net on that home. So it's very, very lucrative and that's what just six residents, every state varies between six and 16 on your maximum amount allowed, so if you get hired…   Michael: Oh my gosh, wow… But I'm like, yeah, for those that watching, I gotta pick my jaw up off the floor, because I've just gasping here. So it's about talk to us about like, you mentioned, you'd hire that third party licensed person that would then administrator, thank you, and then they go hire all the staff. So can you I mean, how do you find these people? Do you just like indeed.com or monster.com, third party administrator for RLS?   Isabelle: Yeah, you can definitely use job search engines, you can honestly go to licensing schools. So there's like caregiving, schools and administrative schools and you can get a fresh list of graduates. You can also just talk to other homeowners in the area and say like, Hey, is there anyone you know, looking for a job or things like that? It's a really tight knit community. So networking is like vital and we have our first manager, we asked around and found a guy, and we loved him. He was amazing, he moved on and started his own business, and we were so happy for him to do that and now we have a wonderful gal who oversees all three of our properties. So once you find a good one, they're really with you for a long time and you can lock them in and just share the vision of what you're looking to create and then they'll get excited about it too because they're really running all the day to day like they feel a lot of ownership for the business. You know um, so it's good to have them like on your team and getting excited and involved in stuff.   Michael: Totally and you can, you would feel confident to go to them saying, hey, I know nothing about this business. But I understand real estate investing, I understand numbers, like you're going to do all of the stuff and I'm going to be like the money and kind of deal structuring person…   Isabelle: You can go to them like that, or I would encourage you to come to our training first to learn everything. So that way, you're not walking in so blindly because you know, a lot of the things that you're going to be asking them to do, like, I want you to have some form of background knowledge just so that you're not coming from, like, you have no idea if they're doing it right or wrong, like you want some knowledge. So we teach and train all those different aspects of it. So at least you have a base knowledge. So when you go to them, you know, what you're looking for, and can kind of help guide them in that way. But you don't need to know the English intricacies of their job at all.   Michael: Okay, all right. Love it and where can people find out about that training?   Isabelle: Yeah, so a great free place to start is RAL101.com. We've got books, webinars, you could have a discovery call with me, I'll chat with you all about it but RAL 101 is a great place to kind of get started.   Michael: Love it, so I've got a million questions, we're gonna try to get through as many as we can on the show. Zoning comes to mind, because this is different than a traditional single family home with a single resident, what are some things that you need to be aware of at a high level because I can imagine market to market is different but what are some things we should be aware of?   Isabelle: It's still zoned residential and I know everyone is like, but you're running a business here and it's like, yeah, but an Airbnb is the same and that's not zoned any differently. So it's still zoned residential. It's still in a residential neighborhood. It's just there's a license on the physical property that it will vary state by state what is required or isn't required. More or less, if you've got to be Tom Cruise to get out of the house that is not SR safe, right? We want to make sure that it's like grandma's. We want to make sure grandma can get in and out nice and safe. You know, the hallways are wide enough the doorways that there's windows and accessible egress, and different things of that nature. But you'll get the home physically licensed through the state and they will approve based on square footage and safety and things of that nature. Occasionally, they'll ask for things like fire suppression system and it to me it's like put it in if that's if that's a requirement. Just do it. Like I you know, keep it safe. We want our grandma's safe.   Michael: Right, right. We want our grandma's and our goldfish is safe. Yeah. So how much if someone's looking at an existing home? I know you mentioned retrofitting is maybe one of the ways someone can get involved in the business. What should people be looking for? I know you mentioned 300 to 500, square foot bed, bath count private, private, what are some other things that people should be keep an eye out for?   Isabelle: Demographics are key in our industry. So you want to make sure that you're in an area where there's a large amount of 50 to 70 year olds, who are upper middle class and typically home owners. That demographic is what we call daughter Judy. That's usually who's paying for mom or dad to live in your home. So she you're marketing to her you want the home close to her because she's usually searching for the home choosing the home paying for the home and coming to visit mom, so she doesn't want to go 45 minutes outside of town, just because it's cheaper. She wants to go five minutes on her way home from work to visit mom or dad. So demographics is vital in our industry and really kind of doing that market research to determine what area and then even deeper like what neighborhood what, what like literal area is she in, you know, and really kind of narrowing down in that way.   Michael: Okay and then what about some property specifics are single level homes better are we want pools to be like Jacuzzis. Talk to us a little bit about some of the physical attributes, physical aspects of the home.   Isabelle: Definitely one story is a lot easier if you do multi-level like we have a guy in Jersey who's got a four story home and he added an elevator, right? We have some people in Texas who have elevators so you can do an elevator. It's just if you can get a single story home, that's obviously better and easier. It's just an extra fee. But some states and cities it's like that's impossible. Like you know, they all have multilevel homes, you're just going to have to deal with it. The three to 500 square feet and then don't think like oh, let's cram all these people in a home like you still want it to be a home. You want a living room, a dining room, a kitchen. If you can add in a library, a movie theater, a hair salon, different amenities like that. That's awesome and that's a major selling feature or factor to you. You want the backyard to maybe have some rose gardens or walking past a swimming pool won't get used very often. but it's a feature and you could you better pointed out to daughter, Judy, when you come to tour Look, grandma can be swimming and enjoying. So there's a lot of different things that they'll use more, and they'll use less but no matter what you're going to market them all and make sure that you're pointing them out and featuring them as amenities if you have it.   Michael: Okay and in terms of the actual care of the individuals, who are the residents? How do you decide or determine how much care to offer or what additional care offerings you have, like, I know there are a specific system living locations for like memory care, or for then different needs. So how do you determine what yours looks like?   Isabelle: So when someone comes to tour the home, you'll do? Well, you won't, the administrator will do an assessment with that senior to determine their level of care. So are they awake at night? Are they a two person assist, right, do they need help walking or is it just they forget their medication sometimes or like you mentioned? Is it a memory care thing, like, are they physically fine, but they're not mentally there anymore. So there's different varying levels of that they'll do that assessment with the senior in the family, when they first come into the home to make sure that we can accommodate them that we're able to do this, you know, and that it is going to be a good fit for them because you don't want a house full of people who have a super high level of care, that's going to be tough on your staff, right, you want to make sure that if you have one or two people who are super high, maybe everybody else has kind of less level of care. as they age and live in the home, their level of care will change and it will, you know, go up and down depending on all sorts of things. So you'll want to redo those assessments with the family and if anything has drastically changed, their rate to live in the home may also change because the level of care and then the type of physical bedroom that they are going to be in Is it a private, private, private, shared, shared, that's going to determine their rate to live in the home.   So you're going to want to be doing those assessments with the senior maybe every six months or something. There's usually doctors who can come to the house who can help do an assessment with you and kind of determine you know if it's a good fit, but we don't want to be on nursing home level doctors IVs gurneys. No, you can't we that's legally you shouldn't be doing that. That's not what you're licensed for, you can get licensed for memory care and we have a lot of students who have memory care homes who focus on those with Alzheimer's or dementia and those residents actually charge you charge more if you're a memory care home about 500 to $1,500 per month more, if that's how you're licensed because the home has to have different physical requirements like locks and things of that nature and the caregivers have to have an extra license level. So because of those things, it actually costs more to live in a memory care home. So a lot of our students like to go that route.   Michael: Okay, and that makes total sense and you touched on it, but I just want to circle back to it, that at what point does your licensure stop and say ABA level of care does it need to be hey, you now need to go do something additional.   Isabelle: It's really like there's only two way people leave the house they pass on you know to the other life or they go to a nursing home. So once you need doctors IVs gurneys, you know, you're hooked up that we can't accommodate that anymore. So basically, once something like that happens, where it's a true like medical need, where they need to be in a hospital, we can't help that anymore.   Michael: Got it and as far as like day to day stuff, I know the administrator is going to be taking care of a lot of this but are we providing three meals a day activities, like what is the day to day look like? Are people free to come and go as they choose?   Isabelle: Definitely three meals a day snacks on tap whatever they want to need, right? They can pull up to the little fridge and get whatever they want. It's not like a big facility where it's like lunchtimes at noon and it's like, no, if you're not hungry, you're not hungry. We'll feed you when we want to feed you and when a new resident comes in, we always ask them what's your favorite food and we'll add it to the menu, you know…   Michael: Like a tech startup?   Isabelle: Yeah, beer on tap perfect.   Michael: Happy hours.   Isabelle: Yeah. No, we do, we like to have fun with them and we like to let them enjoy. Especially food so important for seniors when your health is like taken from you. If you've ever had a health scare or family member has a health scare, it's like, that's all you think about like forget what you're wearing that day or what you're driving, it's like, oh my gosh, that's all consuming and that's their lives, you know, like it's painful for them to walk and, you know, they're hurting and whatever and so, like food, that's such a simple thing that makes you so happy when it tastes delicious and it looks beautiful and it's really important to have great food in the homes and whatever food they want and need. Activities wise, we do have activities that come to the home, we've got pet therapy, SR yoga, music therapy, we do all sorts of fun stuff in there, just contractors who will come and do a little, you know, class or interaction with the with the residents and it's really cute and fun and, and I love that.   Michael: I've man, I love it too. That's great. If someone is listening and thinking that these types of homes are a great fit for maybe someone in their family, or maybe for them as an individual, can you walk us through what the payment looks like? So IE is their insurance? Can this be built through insurance.   Isabelle: So about 10% of the population has long term care insurance, so not many people, but if you do have it, they will pretty much take care of your family to live in a home like this, which is excellent. That means the family or you don't have to pay anything. So if you don't have long term care insurance, get it because we're all going to need it. The only other ways really that people pay for these homes is if you served in a time of war, you might have VA benefits. If you have Medicare Medicaid, but they don't pay very much about $1,800 a month, but it might help supplement and then cash IRAs investments, paying off their needle selling their home and using that money and letting their kids figure it out a lot of people rely on their kids and it's God Children.   Michael: Daughter Judy…   Isabelle: Yeah, daughter, Judy.   Michael: Yeah. Okay, interesting, interesting and from a kind of, again, again, kind of getting back to the numbers and how to physically do these deals, and I'm sure you cover it in your academy, but we'd love to get a little bit of a preview or like, can you go to a bank and say, hey, bank, I'm gonna buy this property. Oh, and by the way, I'm not going to put a traditional long term tenant in place, I'm going to put in five tenants in place, and I'd be paying 1000, they're paying five grand each, like, how does that work?   Isabelle: Because the will first it's going to be like, you know, when you're purchasing a home, it's like personal secondary investments. So you're purchasing onto that investment category. So they know that you're not going to be living in it as your primary, you know, house, which is fine and that's one way to get the loan. A lot of people use different ways to fund these projects. They'll use SBA loans, some government funding. Sometimes people will use syndication, crowdfunding, private money, hard money, all sorts of different stuff. But you can get a bank loan to get started, you know, in this industry, specifically for the house, that is fine and, and it happens all the time. But the seniors in the home, they're technically not tenants. So like, you don't deal with the eviction moratorium at all. They're residents, and they're signing a residency agreement. So if they're no longer fit, you can kick them out, you have all the right in the world to kick them out. Because it's a very strict document. That's basically saying, we can only provide XYZ and you have to do XYZ and if you don't, it's right there, you're out not that we're kicking a lot of Grammys out…   Michael: To the curb…   Isabelle: I remember when COVID happened and so many of my single family rental friends were like, I'm screwed. Like, no one's paying me. I have all these homes, like I'm just screwed right now and I was like, dang, that sucks. Like, we're not having that issue because I mean, even looking at our world right now, things are getting a little scary, right? Like people are like, where should I invest? What's safe? What's recession resistant? I love Airbnb. But like Airbnb, that's what you do, when money is flowing. The when you're ready to go on that vacation, when you have extra money to spend and you're going to do all this stuff. Soon as money's tight, you're not going on that trip to La Jolla, you're not going to Europe, like you cut back on those things. necessities are always good to invest in because they're not going to go away. No matter if money is high or low. It doesn't affect it. So your mom or dad's care needs and home isn't necessity, you're not going to not pay for that. Like, we don't have that issue and it's pretty wild, because so many people are like, how does the recession affect you guys and it's like, what recession like no one stops paying for their mom or dad like, you just don't, especially at the higher end level. You don't it's pretty incredible.   Michael: Wow, so okay, talk to me again about the residency agreement versus considering them tenants because I want to convert all my tenants over to resident agreements like ASAP. How does that work?   Isabelle: Because we're taking care of them physically because there is that I don't want to say medical but there's that component of care. You're not only paying for the home, you're paying for the care as well. So that's kind of where that falls into place is that it's not that I'm you're just leasing this property from me and you have all these rights and stuff. No, it's the care component combined and that's kind of our saving grace in that regard.   Michael: Got it, got it. Okay…. Yeah. Maybe people like foot massages? I don't know. We'll have to see. We'll take a poll.   Isabelle: You can add in.   Michael: Yeah, exactly. Exactly! Alright, well, Isabel, I mean, we've talked about all of the great things. I think all of the Silver Linings give us what the downsides. What are the risks? What keeps you up at night?   Isabelle: Yeah, I think in any business, always, the difficult thing is people, right, and people across the board from the seniors, families, right, the expectations that they have, and making sure that you're accommodating to them, and things of that nature, all the way down to your staff, making sure that they show up, they're happy, they're enjoying their time, and they're representing you and your brand well, so I think people in any business is always going to be your most difficult or keep you up at night item, right because it's just, it's challenging and if you're anything like me, I'm very type A I like to be controlling, it's hard to run a passive business where somebody else is representing you. You're always worried. Are they representing me, right? Are they saying everything right? Are they doing everything? Right? So I think it's just learning a little bit to like, let go let things happen. You've got your policies in place, you've got your cameras in place, you can check in as much as you want but also, it's just going to drive you crazy. If you do so, just let it go a little bit.   Michael: Yeah, yeah. without violating any like HIPAA laws requirements, can you give us like your most outrageous family interaction story?   Isabelle: Oh, yeah. Okay, we had a family, this is the only family that we've ever asked to, hey, you're gonna have to move the senior, the only family in 10 years and 10 years in three homes. 10 years. That's pretty crazy. So okay, this family, um, they were very boisterous and loud. So they would come over and be like, tell our chefs get out the kitchen, we're cooking, and start cooking their traditional food, and there'd be like 10 or 12 of them and they would just like take over and start cooking and they would curse and they would scream, put on their music and be really loud and we were like, What is going on? Like, no, you're welcome to come over and join us for a meal but like you don't kick out my chef who I'm paying like, and they're like little coke, it's fine. You get out the night off but then they're like cursing and saying like, and it's like that's no that's not happening.   So we had a convo with them, hey, this can't happen anymore. You if you want to bring over food to share with everyone love it, love that. So, you know, then they do that but then it's you know, still the cursing the loud music that this it's disrupting the home and the other residents so we had to have more conversations with them and eventually say, this is no longer the fit for you guys, which sucked because the senior was precious and nothing was wrong with them like and so but it's like, like, that's just not going to fly in our house maybe in another house. That's fine but hear it was not a good fit and yeah, so that's my own. That's my one that experience.   Michael: Wow, that's pretty impressive and 10 years and three homes.   Isabelle: I know. Isn't that crazy?   Michael: That's awesome. Yeah, okay Isabelle. This has been so much fun. Anything else you think folks should be aware of to that should they should be aware of as they're interested in learning more.   Isabelle: I definitely want to share this live where you want invest where makes sense. If your market is not good to invest in right now or ever. Don't worry, you can do this remotely. 31% of RAL owners are remote owners. So it's totally possible and if you're remote, it does keep you more hands off because you can't just run over to the house if something's going on, you know, you're maybe a flight away or whatever and so you have to deal with things on Zoom or on the phone and figure things out that way so it does encourage you to be even more hands off if you are remote so I do I always like to share that especially I know you're in California and it can be a tough market so...   Michael: Preach to sabel I love it. This is the it's the perfect it's the perfect tagline for the real estate investor. Yes, we love it. We love it. If people want to learn more about you or RAL Academy where's the best place for them to do that?   Isabelle: RALacademy.com is a great place to learn more about us and RAL one on one if you want to chat with me more schedule a discovery call and I'd love to chat with you guys.   Michael: Amazing. Well thank you so much for this as well. This was awesome, really appreciate you coming on.   Isabelle: Happy to be here, thanks for having me.   Michael: You got it, take care.   Okay, everyone, that was our show a big thank you to Isabelle coming on super interesting insights and perspective and a very interesting asset class that I'm gonna have to go take a closer look at. As always, if you liked the episode, we'd love to hear from you a rating or review our big helps, and we look forward to seeing the next one. Happy investing…

Digital Conversations
The Art and Science of Delivering Conversational Patient Engagement

Digital Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 22:11


The technology behind Conversational AI is maturing rapidly across all sectors as consumers increasingly relying on language to interact with their devices. The labor shortage that plagues most industries has set the stage for technology that powers digital conversations, and the sector that may benefit most is healthcare. Anil Nair, Chief Technology Officer at Lifelink Systems, is developing conversational systems that can handle the millions of routine, administrative interactions that patients must deal with related to treatment and prescriptions. In this episode, Anil shares his perspective on what it will take to bring Conversational AI into the digital healthcare experience, while preserving the important, personal relationships between patients and their caregivers. The conversational platform of tomorrow will provide a mix of interoperability, analytics, and NLP with advanced design capacity that considers the “grammar” of digital interactions, and allows providers and life science companies to optimize each engagement to deliver results.

5 Things
Person of interest in custody after shooting in Chicago suburb

5 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 9:40 Very Popular


At least six people are dead. Plus, health reporter Adrianna Rodriguez looks at whether HIPAA can protect against anti-abortion laws, a hearing is scheduled for a lawsuit to stop a Mississippi abortion law, health enterprise reporter Ken Alltucker explains how some hospitals don't comply with price listing and Wimbledon singles quarterfinals begin.(Audio: Associated Press)Episode Transcript available hereAlso available at art19.com/shows/5-ThingsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Killing IT Podcast
Episode 171 - Remote Deepfakes, Roe v. Wade: Data Privacy, G7 funds Cybersecurity

The Killing IT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 30:34


Episode 171 - Remote Deepfakes, Roe v. Wade: Data Privacy, G7 funds Cybersecurity     Topic 1: “More” people are using Deep Fakes to apply for remote tech jobs. File under, “you thought the world couldn't get any weirder.”...   The employment crisis has borned a new adversary: Deepfake remote workers. Thankfully, their sole intent isn't to steal your job. Sort of. While these deepfake applicants are actively participating in the employment process, the function of the deepfake is to phish data where it otherwise could not. This includes, job interviews, resume data, job questions, etc.  That said, as more information is gathered via the onboarding process, the easier it becomes to synthesize a perfect candidate. And if hired, this would mean access to sensitive company data.  And considering heightened labor shortages, deepfakes may have the same hiring potential as anyone else in the pool.  People Are Using Deepfakes to Apply for Remote Tech Jobs: https://www.businessinsider.com/people-applying-remote-tech-jobs-using-deepfakes-fbi-2022-6   Topic 2: Roe v Wade: Law change implications on data privacy https://www.theverge.com/2022/6/25/23181689/online-abortion-information-ban-roe-wade-section-230-first-amendment What does overturning Roe Vs. Wade mean for privacy and data ownership law surrounding menstrual cycle tracking apps? And does HIPAA protect you as an individual or does it protect the company that owns your medical information? We discuss the legal protection or lack thereof surrounding the new implications of Roe V. Wade in the digital landscape.    Topic 3: G7 funding cybersecurity . . . and setting the U.S. as the standard-bearer.  We're the good guys, right? So we should obviously write the rules. However, if we continue to "cut-off" those within the realm of what we as westerns deem as the good guys, we might create an even badder....well, bad guy.  Key State Official Warns of ‘Peril' as US Pursues Cybersecurity Goals at G7 - Nextgov: https://www.nextgov.com/cybersecurity/2022/06/key-state-official-warns-peril-us-pursues-cybersecurity-goals-g7/368664 See also: https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2022/04/28/fact-sheet-united-states-and-60-global-partners-launch-declaration-for-the-future-of-the-internet/  Sponsor Memo: Acronis Are you still relying on a frustrating patchwork of legacy solutions? Modernize your cybersecurity and data protection with Acronis Cyber Protect Cloud. It's a single solution that combines backup, anti-malware, and endpoint protection management. As an MSP, you can easily improve clients' security posture, eliminate complexity, and generate more recurring revenue. Learn more about Acronis Cyber Protect Cloud at Acronis.com. Keywords / tags :-)

Kosher Money
Why Millions of People Lose Their Money When They Die & How To Avoid It (with Allan Gibber, Esq.)

Kosher Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 90:24 Very Popular


This is an important episode.Estate planning is the management of a person's estate DURING a person's life in the event the person becomes incapacitated or dies. It's not a whole lot of fun to think about, but one can save their family a whole lot of grief if they properly take care of merical directives, healthcare proxies, a will, a trust, HIPAA release forms and more. Fret not: there are people whose sole job is to help you with all of this.* TIME STAMPS *00:00 Intro02:32 Who is Allan Gibber?03:49 Is Estate Planning Just for the Rich?07:57 Planning Wisely 10:10 The List of Items11:20 Medical Directives, Healthcare Proxy & HIPAA Release Form20:40 Aging Gracefully with Parents 22:50 Power of Attorney29:30 Trusts & Wills35:36 Updating & Storing Important Information 41:00 Sponsor42:46 County & State Laws48:20 Knowing How to Spot the Right Estate Planner51:28 Fees of an Estate Planner52:30 Allen Gibber's Contact Info 53:30 Structuring Family Businesses & Equity Splits1:00:30 Sponsor Message1:02:15 Informing Family of Your Decisions1:06:10 Turning a Secular Will into a Religious Will1:27:00 An Important Parting Message1:28:06 OutroSPONSORS OF THIS EPISODE• Colel Chabad: Get a FREE pushka (charity box) from this great non-profit helping feed Israel's neediest. Simply visit https://www.ColelChabad.org/Pushka & https://www.ColelChabad.org/KosherMoney to make a much-needed donation. • Approved Funding: Looking to purchase a home? Looking to refinance? You need to speak to Shmuel Shayowitz at https://www.ApprovedFunding.com/Mortg... to make sure you do it right. Tell him we say hi!To contact Allan, email AJG@NQGRG.com or call 410-332-8580.Follow us on social media for more content:TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@livinglchaimInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/livinglchaim/Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/livinglchaimLinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/living-lchaim As a reminder, all investment strategies and investments involve risk of loss. Nothing contained in this episode or any of our episodes and videos should be construed as investment advice. Got it? Good!Submit your questions to hi@LivingLchaim.comYou can WhatsApp us questions, comments & voice notes: 1-914-222-5513WhatsApp us feedback and you'll get first access to episodes!Our new and free call-in-to listen feature is here:

The Readout Loud
215: Medical privacy post-Roe, fixing clinical trials, & the next Covid vaccines

The Readout Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 34:09


How do you stop a Covid surge? Why are clinical trials so white? And what are the limits of HIPAA? Our colleague Eric Boodman joins us to discuss whether an oft-cited federal law can shield reproductive health data from state law enforcement in the wake of Roe v. Wade being overturned. Then, STAT's Angus Chen calls in to relate the story of an ambitious study and the quest to finally make clinical trials more equitable. We also explain a momentous FDA meeting and the debate over just what the Covid-19 vaccines of the future should contain.

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More
1st Talk Compliance: Document Management with Rachel V. Rose , Esq

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 24:21


Host Catherine Short welcomes Houston attorney Rachel V. Rose, JD, MBA to discuss document retention and legal holds. A multitude of laws, including HIPAA, requires certain types of documents be kept for a certain period of time. How does document retention play out for public companies subject to SOX and what should companies do in the event of a legal hold or a preservation request? They discuss laws that are relevant to healthcare industry participants, as well as compliance suggestions, and steps to take when either a legal hold or a preservation request arrives. To stream our Station live 24/7 visit www.HealthcareNOWRadio.com or ask your Smart Device to “….Play Healthcare NOW Radio”. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen

Passionate Pioneers with Mike Biselli
Building Infrastructure to Scale Provider Services with Cavan Klinsky

Passionate Pioneers with Mike Biselli

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 30:26


This episode's Community Champion Sponsor is Catalyst. To virtually tour Catalyst and claim your space on campus, or host an upcoming event: https://www.catalysthealthtech.com/ (CLICK HERE) --- Understanding firsthand the importance of preventive healthcare after undergoing a crucial operation in high school, our next guest has made it his mission to solve this core pain point for the industry. As the paradigm in healthcare delivery shifts, it's time for the industry to answer the call of what people are demanding and seeking for their care.  Cavan Klinsky, CTO of Healthie, joins us to discuss the company's white-label and API platform, which serves as the underlying infrastructure for digital health companies and health and wellness organizations striving to deliver accessible, digital-first healthcare. Join us to learn how Healthie's HIPAA-compliant software is elevating telehealth business management so healthcare providers everywhere can focus on offering a preventative, personalized care experience that leads to better health outcomes. Let's go! Episode Highlights: How Cavan met his co-founder and got involved in the health and technology space. Healthie's mission to help power the digital health revolution. What the pandemic did for Healthie and the greater virtual health movement. How Healthie's platform will help scale virtual care initiatives so they can focus on delivering high-quality healthcare.    About Our Guest:  Cavan Klinsky is the Chief Technology Officer & Co-Founder of Healthie, where he spearheads the development of the company's comprehensive white-label and API platform, empowering health and wellness professionals to grow their businesses and build digital-first relationships with clients. He works closely with Healthie's startups to integrate into other tools used in the growing digital health ecosystem.  From writing the first line of code to scaling an application that powers millions of requests each day, Cavan has built Healthie's strong, scalable foundation that powers digital health's future. A self-taught developer from an early age, Cavan has freelanced for different startups, small businesses, and non-profits with a focus on building minimum viable products, and during high school co-founded Gevva, the “First Search Engine to Focus on Getting Things Done”. Cavan completed his first year of college at the University of Pennsylvania, where he met his Healthie co-founder, before dropping out to build Healthie. Links Supporting This Episode: Healthie website: https://www.gethealthie.com/ (CLICK HERE) Cavan Klinsky LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cavan-klinsky-4a630940/ (CLICK HERE) Cavan Klinsky Twitter page: https://twitter.com/klinskyc (CLICK HERE) Clubhouse handle: @mikebiselli Mike Biselli LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikebiselli (CLICK HERE) Mike Biselli Twitter page: https://twitter.com/mikebiselli (CLICK HERE) Visit our website: https://www.passionatepioneers.com/ (CLICK HERE) Subscribe to newsletter: https://forms.gle/PLdcj7ujAGEtunsj6 (CLICK HERE) Guest nomination form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScqk_H_a79gCRsBLynkGp7JbdtFRWynTvPVV9ntOdEpExjQIQ/viewform (CLICK HERE)

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross
HIPAA Regulations Regarding Medical Records

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 38:39


Jill Schlesinger on the bear markets/ return to office/ filling vacant office space // Paging Dr. Cohen -- HIPAA regulations regarding medical records // Hanna Scott rounding up recent King County criminal sentencings // Dose of Kindness -- Ruby the Rescue Dog // Shannon Drayer on the Mariners-Angels brawl // Phil Talmadge - former SCOW Justice - live on the SCOTUS Bremerton prayer decision See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

All Things Private Practice Podcast
Episode 33: Taxes... Not As Scary As You Think [Featuring Jennie Schottmiller]

All Things Private Practice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 40:19


In one of the most helpful episodes I've ever recorded, Jennie Schottmiller and I discuss "All Things Taxes and Accounting." If you need EASY-to-make-sense-of tax advice or want to listen to Jennie Schottmiller and I go down our own ADHD rabbit holes, this episode is for you! Jennie and I talk about... Small business startup FAQs Accounting 101 Very common accounting errors How to ask for tax help without feeling ashamed Tangible steps you can take starting today to make your business run smoothly Business Startup 101 Jennie gives out tons of FREE tax advice and even makes talking about accounting FUN. Once you realize that accounting is just numbers on pieces of paper, it's a lot easier to feel less intimidated by them. Putting your systems in place helps make your business and your life run a lot more smoothly. Jennie is an accountant and mental health therapist, basically making her a unicorn in the field. She runs one of the most helpful FB groups around, "Simple Profit For Mental Health Clinicians." More About Jennie: Jennie Schottmiller is a licensed marriage and family therapist (LMFT) and licensed Certified Public Accountant (CPA) in Pennsylvania. In 2007, Jennie left accounting to focus on health and family. She became a marriage and family therapist in 2010. Soon after opening her private therapy practice, Jennie realized that many of her peers struggled with accounting, tax, budgeting, and cash management. In addition to her clinical practice, she now runs Simple Profit offering free resources as well as a membership to provide education and support in managing business tasks.  Connect with Jennie Schottmiller at: https://www.simpleprofit.com

Science Friday
HIPAA Explained, Trans Research, Queer Scientists. June 24, 2022, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 47:07 Very Popular


What Does HIPAA Actually Do? HIPAA, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, is name dropped a lot, but frequently misunderstood. Many are surprised to find that the “P” stands for portability, not privacy.  Misunderstandings about what's protected under the law go way deeper than its name. The law outlines protections only for health information shared between patients and health care providers. This means that any personal health data shared with someone who is not specifically mentioned in the law is not covered.  If a period tracking app shares personal health information with Facebook, that's not a violation of HIPAA. Neither is asking for someone's vaccination status.  Guest host Maddie Sofia talks with Tara Sklar, professor of health law and director of the Health Law & Policy Program at the University of Arizona, to explain what's actually covered under HIPAA.   “Research By Us And For Us”: How Medical Research Can Better Serve Trans Communities Trans medical care isn't new or experimental, and study after study has shown that transition-related procedures—such as hormone therapies and surgeries—are incredibly safe and effective. But most long-term studies on trans health focus on the first few years after transitioning, leaving unanswered questions about the years after. Similar to members of other marginalized groups, trans people have long been treated like “case studies,” rather than potential experts when it comes to scientific research. So while researchers have studied trans bodies for decades, they haven't always asked trans people what they need to know about their own bodies, such as: If I'm pursuing medical transition, how will my bone density change after years of taking estrogen? If I take testosterone, will I also need to get a hysterectomy? How will my hormonal and surgical options affect my fertility?  Now, a new wave of medical research—led by trans medical experts themselves—is trying to fill in those blanks and address the needs of trans communities. Guest host Maddie Sofia speaks with Dr. Asa Radix, the senior director of research and education at Callen-Lorde Community Health Center, and Dallas Ducar, nurse practitioner and founding CEO of Transhealth Northampton. They talk about the state of research on trans health, and how studies can better address the needs of the trans and gender diverse communities.   Food Pantry Venison May Contain Lead Iowa requires warning labels about the possible presence of lead in shot-harvested venison. Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska do not. A walk-in freezer about two stories high sits in one corner of a warehouse owned by a food bank called Hawkeye Area Community Action Program Inc. in Hiawatha, Iowa. Chris Ackman, the food bank's communication manager, points to the shelving racks where any donated venison the organization receives is typically stored. Known as the Help Us Stop Hunger, or HUSH, program, the venison is donated by hunters from around the state, and Ackman says the two-pound tubes of ground meat go pretty quickly, lasting only a few months. “It's a pretty critical program, I think, because there are a lot of hunters in Iowa,” he said. “And, it's well enjoyed by a lot of families as well.” Similar programs around the country have been applauded as a way for hunters to do something they enjoy while also helping feed those in need. Iowa hunters donate around 3,500 deer a year through the program. From the hunters, the deer goes to a meat locker, where it's ground, packaged and shipped off to food pantries around the state. But before it hits the shelves, Iowa officials require a warning label on the venison package. The label reads: “Lead fragments may be found in processed venison. Children under 6 years and pregnant women are at the greatest risk from lead.” Then, in bold type, the label notes: “Iowa has not found cases of lead poisoning from lead in venison,” along with a number to call for more information. Iowa stands out among Midwestern states in requiring a label warning about the potential hazard of lead ammunition and the fragments it can leave behind in shot-harvested game meat like venison. Donated venison in Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska come with no similar warning label. Read more at sciencefriday.com. Museum Exhibit Celebrates Queerness In Science Last year, the California Academy of Sciences debuted “New Science: The Academy Exhibit,” which celebrates 23 incredible LGBTQIA+ scientists. The folks in this exhibit are challenging the exclusionary practices that are all too common in scientific spaces, with the aim of creating a more inclusive and welcoming environment. It is a celebration of queerness in science. Guest host Maddie Sofia talks with the curator of this exhibit, Lauren Esposito, who is a curator of arachnology at the California Academy of Sciences and founder of 500 Queer Scientists, based in San Francisco. They discuss the exhibit, the importance of LGBTQIA+ representation in STEM, and, of course, arachnids. The exhibit is free and open to the public at the California Academy of Sciences, and it is also available online.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs at sciencefriday.com.      

Caveat
What new major cyber regulatory changes are coming?

Caveat

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 45:22


Blaise Wabo, Healthcare and Financial Services Director at cybersecurity firm A-LIGN joins Dave to discuss major cyber regulation changes coming to ISO, SOC2, HIPAA, CMMC, NIST Cybersecurity Framework and PCI. Ben shares an interesting federal case on the legal defense of a gentleman forgetting his tablets passcode which landed him in trouble. Dave has an opinion from the EFF on Apple's newest restrictions when it comes to tracking. While this show covers legal topics, and Ben is a lawyer, the views expressed do not constitute legal advice. For official legal advice on any of the topics we cover, please contact your attorney.  Links to stories: UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE THIRD CIRCUIT UNITED STATES OF AMERICA v. MICHAEL ANTHONY DASHEM Facebook Says Apple is Too Powerful. They're Right. Got a question you'd like us to answer on our show? You can send your audio file to caveat@thecyberwire.com or simply leave us a message at (410) 618-3720. Hope to hear from you.

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast
On Generosity, Integrity, Raising the Goal, and Doing it NOW!

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 34:09


Joe Soltis, CEO, ChoiceLocal (Cleveland, OH)   Joe Soltis is CEO at ChoiceLocal, which Joe describes as “the top performing franchise growth engine” with a “money back guarantee.” The agency offers a wide scope of services for franchisors and franchisees of over 50 brands, enabling them to provide “Fortune 500 level customer service, results, strategy, and ROI on the franchisee level” for a “small and medium size business price.”  Large clients might be parent companies of franchise systems, franchisors owning 20 or more franchise systems where each system may have from 20 to 200 franchisees – and up to as many as 6,000 internal franchise units. Small franchise systems may have 10 units. For these smaller clients, the agency facilitates franchise development, consumer, new customer, location, company, and digital talent recruitment marketing. Joe says hiring is a challenge, especially in the franchise space. The agency needs to understand its client's hiring needs, the kind of candidates it desires, and the historical hire rates to know the number of applicants to target . . . then reverse engineer the hire rate/cost per quality candidate by channel and implement the most effective marketing strategy to ensure future growth. Joe says they use the same channels as they do for consumer marketing (in a different order), plus some that are recruitment specific. Joe notes that franchise operations need to beware . . . a lot of agencies will lock clients into proprietary technology solutions . . . that don't fit. ChoiceLocal strives to find the right tools for each client to build a “win-win” ecosystem where franchisor, franchisee, and the agency all win. He says it's important that the tool providers are companies sensitive to client needs, adaptable to a changing market, and willing to invest in “making sure that you can use their tool to provide the best in the world customer service to your end customers.” Joe started his career working his way up for 10 years in a company that grew to serve Fortune 500 companies. At a time of great personal loss, he changed the direction of his life. In his words, I always said I wanted to be successful so that I could help people, and that day it changed to “I don't want to just build something; I want to help people and I want to do it now. I don't want to be successful so that I can help people later. I want to do it now.” Joe started ChoiceLocal with the mission “to help others” – the agency's franchisor and franchisee partners, agency teammates (to make their dreams and aspirations reality), and people in the community.  Joe structured the agency with the goal of having employees work their 40-hours, then “unplug and leave work at work.” With a teammate Net Promoter Score in the 70s (far exceeding the “good” score, which is in the 30s), the agency has been a Top Workplace in Northeast Ohio for the past five years. When Covid struck, the agency created a ChoiceLocal Economic Stimulus Package to help its customers “grow through the downturn,” an initiative that Joe estimates saved 30 franchisees from going out of business.  Giving back to the community is “baked into” the agency's DNA, with 10% of profits dedicated t