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United States federal law concerning health information

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  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about hipaa

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Latest podcast episodes about hipaa

The Dentalpreneur Podcast w/ Dr. Mark Costes

IRIS strives to be the number one IT partner for dental and medical practices, as well as other highly regulated companies. Reggie Stevens, CEO, and Tyler Thomas, Senior Cloud Engineer, join us today to unpack how they can help in our practices. Some of the services they provide include: maintaining HIPAA compliance and network security through around the clock network monitoring, improved utilization and efficiency of network devices, regularly scheduled IT reviews to keep you on the cutting edge, as well as on-site support as needed. EPISODE RESOURCES www.irissol.com https://www.voicesofdentistry.com/ - use code "COSTES10" for 10% off! Subscribe to The Dentalpreneur Podcast Visit the Dentalpreneur Podcast website Write a Review on iTunes Dental Success Network

The Rare Life
74: Sarah's Story

The Rare Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 43:04


When Sarah was assigned to care for baby Zariah in the NICU, she fell in love with her. When Zariah's birth parents neglected to visit or be involved, it was clear that Zariah would need a foster home, and eventual adoption. Sarah immediately knew she was meant to be her mother. Convincing her husband Steve was another story. Because of HIPAA laws, he wasn't allowed to meet Zariah until they were officially her foster parents. Miraculously, he agreed. After several months as a family, Zariah passed away as a result of a tragic trach accident with her home health nurse. In this episode, Sarah shares their journey with Zariah, and all the love they share. Links: Follow Sarah on Instagram @adoptive.foster.medical.mama. Answer this month's question. See pics of Sarah and fam. Join Parents of Children with Rare Conditions FB group.

Dilettante Ball
472 - Cryolophosaurus

Dilettante Ball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 23:45


What's crappening in this episode: Support us on Patreon (Now with Discord)! HIPAA violations, Cobra Kai, The Matrix, Home Alone, Pangea, Power Rangers, If you'd like to play along at home click here.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2751 - Abolishing the American Caste System w/ Sheryll Cashin

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 60:23


Sam and Emma host Sheryll Cashin, professor at the Georgetown University Law Center, to discuss her recent book White Space, Black Hood: Opportunity Hoarding and Segregation in the Age of Inequality, on how the residential caste system built up around race and geography has ingrained itself into US cities, becoming central to how we imagine our neighborhoods and cities operating. They begin by focusing on the geographical element, as Professor Cashin looks to Baltimore to explore how the migration of escaped and freed slaves to the North saw cities resort to a contain and segregate tactic, tightly grouping Black folks into neighborhoods separated by infrastructure and investment, both in what is built, via the construction of highway boundaries, and in what isn't, with a complete desertion of public infrastructure. Looking into the 21st Century, Cashin explores how even under Black mayors and majority-Black city councils cities like Baltimore saw the residential caste system expanded and reinforced, discussing the role of Maryland Governor Larry Hogan in putting a stop to the aptly named “red line” to connect poorer neighborhoods to downtown and the suburbs, and re-investing the money entirely into rich white areas. After discussing this element of boundary maintenance, Professor Cashin, Sam, and Emma look to how this segregation also promotes opportunity hoarding, by not only keeping wealth and infrastructure down in Black neighborhoods, regardless of economic makeup, but also by forcing them to subsidize opportunity in wealthier neighborhoods. Lastly, they touch on the role of stereotype-driven policing and surveillance and how this works to reinforce both of the previous two elements, before they wrap up by discussing Sheryll Cashin's ideas on abolition and repair, working to reverse the destructive policies that have defined our metropolitan development over the last century and a half. Sam and Emma also touch on Ron DeSantis's tactical “if I can't see it, it doesn't exist” strategy with invisible viruses. And in the Fun Half: Sam finally gets some video proof that not all Pats fans absolutely suck, Emma compliments Sam's “soy-boy professor” look, and the crew discusses the HIPAA violation that is a Tinder date asking DeSantis his STD status. John from SA, Kowalski from NE, and Ronald Raygun hit us with back to back to back regulars as they tackle Wisconsin gerrymandering, defeatism, and ideal FBI-Plant Dave Ramsey, respectively. Bro Flamingo also discusses how the Activision culture of abuse has been swept under the rug, and an anonymous caller discusses his experience with the disgusting gas pollution coming from the abandoned Fresh Kills landfill in Staten Island, plus, your calls and IMs! Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on May 15th HERE: https://thewilbur.com/artist/majority-report/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here:  https://madmimi.com/signups/170390/join Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Check out today's sponsors: Shopify: Run a business? Supercharge your knowledge, your sales, and your success with Shopify: the all-in-one commerce platform to start, run, and grow your business. Shopify gives entrepreneurs the resources once reserved for big business — so upstarts, start-ups, and established businesses alike can sell everywhere, synchronize online and in-person sales, and effortlessly stay informed. Go to https://www.shopify.com/free-trial?utm_campaign=paid_audio_-_podcast_-_amer_-_united_states_-_all_-_experimential_-_english_-_awareness&utm_source=podcast&utm_medium=audio&utm_term=majority  for a FREE fourteen-day trial and get full access to Shopify's entire suite of features. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/literaryhangover Check out The Nomiki Show on YouTube. https://www.patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada. https://www.patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at https://www.twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere. https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere  Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

Bridge the Gap: The Senior Living Podcast
Technology and Podcasting

Bridge the Gap: The Senior Living Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 12:37


Raising Tech hosts Amber Bardon and Rachel Lugge join BTG for a recap of the launch of the Parasol Alliance podcast plus announce a new company brand of transforming technology culture in senior living.Raising Tech Podcast here.VIP Ignite Experience 2022 details here.Powered by supporting partners OneDay, Propel Insurance, Enquire, LTC REIT, Solinity, and The Bridge Group ConstructionYouTube Instagram Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Lucas McCurdy, @SeniorLivingFan Owner, The Bridge Group Construction; Senior Living Construction Renovation - CapEx - Reposition   Joshua Crisp, Founder Solinity; Senior Living Consultation - Management - Development - MarketingProduced by Solinity Marketing.

Pharmacy Podcast Network
Ransomware: HIPAA Breaches | Pharmacy Compliance Guide

Pharmacy Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 30:46


Ransomware is a major threat to any and all computer networks. All companies large, small, healthcare, nonhealthcare can be impacted by it. Ransomware is a cyber-attack where the user cannot obtain access to their system. They are criminal acts that much be treated as one, swift action must be taken to protect your system and your patients PHI.  Join Jeff Hedges from the Pharmacy Compliance Guide and Becky Templeton from R.J. Hedges & Associates, as they discuss Ransomware, how to determine a HIPAA breach, what to do if you are a victim of Ransomware, how to report cyber-attacks, how to report a breach due to ransomware attack, how cyber insurance may help, what kind of fines may be associated with a cyber-attack, and the real steps to prepare for an OCR inspection. Learn more about how to protect your pharmacy from Ransomware threats: https://www.rjhedges.com/blog/topic/podcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

In this episode, host Ericka Adler, Roetzel Shareholder and Health Law Practice Group leader, is joined by fellow Roetzel Attorneys Christina Kuta and David Hochman, Shareholder, to provide guidance on resolutions healthcare practices should be making as they head into the New Year. They break down what practices should be reviewing and updating as they finish year-end planning including: COVID mandates, Stark compliance, HIPAA training, updating employee handbooks, statutory deadlines for 401K plans, medical record audits, and review of practice contracts. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More
Healthcare Upside/Down: Enabling Family Chief Health Officer with Kristin Begley

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 26:27


S1E6: Enabling Family Chief Health Officer host Dr. Nick talks to Kristin Begley, Chief Commercial Officer for Wildflower Health. Does the healthcare system know you? Do they really know you in the same way that Amazon, Pandora or Netflix does? Are you like me and find yourself drawn to the ‘recommended for you' section on websites to see what else might be of interest or relevant to your life and world? In healthcare the system is not only tone deaf but many times a one size fits all approach with little customization. The family Chief Health Officer is an integral part of solving our health and wellness problems. For many of the underserved communities and groups like the Medicare mums by the time any support services and groups are aware the opportunity to intervene and make a difference might be long past. Finding these individuals early enough and identifying their personal Chief Health Officer in their family group, connecting the dots, and empowering these individuals makes for better health, better outcomes and lower costs of care. Your better pill to swallow is to enable the positive impact of the family network in your health community. If that's your family then supporting and integrating that individual to empower them. For healthcare systems and payors, it means facilitating that network. Drop the barriers, oftentimes placed in the false name of HIPAA – if the individual authorizes access of their information to someone else, another system or partner that process has to be so easy even a 5 year old could do it and it has to happen quickly. To stream our Station live 24/7 visit www.HealthcareNOWRadio.com or ask your Smart Device to “….Play HealthcareNOW Radio”. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen

On The air
Improving Communication in Occupational Therapy Via a Digital Tracking & Monitoring System (Episode 125)

On The air

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 42:31


Laura Simmons is the CEO and Founder of Theratrak, a company that offers a digital platform enabling allied health professionals including occupational therapy practitioners to more efficiently track participant progress in between treatment sessions. She is also a passionate pediatric occupational therapist working with families of children living with a range of disabilities in early intervention. Laura has worked in the private health sector in Australia for almost 10 years, and in this time she has noticed a distinct lack of innovative technology solutions targeting the ongoing care of clients outside of direct therapy and how this is impacting the client's overall treatment. As a leader of a team of occupational therapists, Laura wants to improve the healthcare system from the inside out to support the growth of younger therapists everywhere. As mentioned in the interview, TheraTrak is looking for partners in the United States to pilot their HIPAA certified digital tracking system. On this episode, we talk about Laura's work in the field and how she developed TheraTrack as well as how COVID-19 impacted pediatric therapy practice in Australia as compared to in the U.S.To connect with Laura:Email - laura@theratrak.coTwitter - https://twitter.com/laura1simmons Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/theratrak Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/theratrak/LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/theratrak/ Website/blog - https://www.theratrak.co/ https://www.theratrak.co/

AHLA's Speaking of Health Law
Making Risk-Based Decisions About Managing Cybersecurity and HIPAA Compliance

AHLA's Speaking of Health Law

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 53:54


While spending on cybersecurity is increasing for many health care organizations in 2022, the investment is likely not enough to keep pace with rapid digitization and the growing number of cyberattacks occurring across the industry. With limited time and resources, how should organizations be thinking about prioritizing efforts to manage cybersecurity and related HIPAA compliance matters in the year ahead? Jon Moore, Chief Risk Officer and Senior Vice President of Consulting Services, Clearwater, and Joy Easterwood, Attorney, Johnson Pope, discuss risk-based cybersecurity and compliance decision making and explore the regulatory and business impacts of those decisions. Sponsored by Clearwater.

Kessler Foundation Disability Rehabilitation Research and Employment
What It's Like to Volunteer in a Research Study

Kessler Foundation Disability Rehabilitation Research and Employment

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 43:17


Ever wonder what it's like to become a participant in a clinical research study? This podcast outlines all aspects of recruitment, vetting, protocols, and considerations for joining a study and dispels common misconceptions often fostered by Hollywood movies or TV shows. Jessica Ganga, Communications & Digital Media Coordinator at the Foundation, moderates a panel of research coordinators for mobility, spinal cord injury (SCI), stroke, and traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the Foundation's recruitment manager. They share how volunteers help Kessler Foundation further its clinical research on advancing treatments, which impact the lives of individuals with disabilities worldwide. Volunteers are the heart of our research! Learn more about the panel: Rachel Byrne, Senior Research Coordinator (SCI) https://kesslerfoundation.org/aboutus/Rachel%20Byrne Kate Goworek, Research Coordinator (Mobility) https://kesslerfoundation.org/aboutus/Kathleen%20Goworek Jenny Masmela, Senior Research Coordinator (Stroke) https://kesslerfoundation.org/aboutus/Jenny%20Masmela Sam Schmidt, Research Recruitment Manager https://kesslerfoundation.org/aboutus/Samantha%20Schmidt Angela Smith, Senior Research Coordinator (TBI) https://kesslerfoundation.org/aboutus/Angela%20Smith Frequently Asked Questions about the Foundation's Research - https://kesslerfoundation.org/research-faq Volunteers are the heart of our research! Interested in joining a study? For more information on in-person and tele-studies, go to https://kesslerfoundation.org/join-our-research-studies Definitions/Keywords ================================================= What is spatial neglect? Patients who have had a stroke or traumatic brain injury may have a neurological syndrome called spatial neglect, which affects their ability to pay attention to their surroundings and body parts on the less affected side (the left side for patients with right brain injury). Spatial neglect is disabling. Patients may 'forget' to shave, groom, or dress the left side of their bodies. They also have major problems with driving, reading, and balance. https://kesslerfoundation.org/research/stroke/rehabilitation/spatial-neglect/caregiver https://kesslerfoundation.org/research/stroke/rehabilitation/spatial-neglect/professional What is KF-NAP®? Kessler Foundation Neglect Assessment Process (KF-NAP®) is an assessment tool that may help clinicians detect the presence of spatial neglect and measure the severity of the syndrome. What is KF-PAT®? Kessler Foundation Prism Adaptation Treatment (KF-PAT®) is implemented in occupational therapy for post-stroke spatial neglect. Including prism adaptation treatment in standard of care for patients with post-stroke spatial neglect improved functional and cognitive outcomes. What is MRI contrast There are two major types of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans: with contrast and non-contrast. The main distinction is that for contrast MRIs, a dye (gadolinium-based) is given to the patient intravenously before the scan. Contrast is often order by a physician who wants to highlight a particular part of the body. What is HIPPA? The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) is a federal law that required the creation of national standards to protect sensitive patient health information from being disclosed without the patient's consent or knowledge. For more information, go to https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/privacy/index.html ================================================= Tuned in to our podcast series lately? Join our listeners in 90 countries who enjoy learning about the work of Kessler Foundation. Be sure to subscribe to our SoundCloud channel “KesslerFoundation” for more research updates.

The Cloud Pod
146: The Google CyberCAT is Out of the Bag

The Cloud Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 57:10


On The Cloud Pod this week, Oracle finally has some news to share. Plus Log4j is ruining everyone's lives, AWS suffers a massive outage post re:Invent, and Google CAT releases its first threat report.  A big thanks to this week's sponsors: Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. JumpCloud, which offers a complete platform for identity, access, and device management — no matter where your users and devices are located.  This week's highlights

Future Hindsight
Technocracy and the Social Contract: Latanya Sweeney

Future Hindsight

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 41:47


Technology in the Social Contract Increasingly, the design of new technology determines the way our society functions and the way we live. Simple design flaws like the lack of a mute button on Sony Camcorders ended up changing our laws on surveillance. We don't elect the people that build our global technology landscape. In addition, once the technology is successful in the marketplace, its design is replicated without question. More Equitable Algorithms Algorithms have the power to harm us beyond individual privacy issues, in ways we don't always see, such as their ability to discriminate based on race and even violate the integrity of an election. However, we're not powerless in shaping how that landscape affects us. It's important to prioritize our interests as citizens as opposed to the business interests of an online platform. Section 230 Section 230 is an old law that allows online platforms immunity from the impact of third-party content, meaning sites like Facebook are not liable for the posts created by anyone that uses it. It's a blanket protection that recognizes the platforms as neutral. However, these online platforms are not neutral because they make decisions regarding what ads are shown or which posts are promoted. Essentially, Section 230 creates protections for online services that do, in fact, influence the public. FIND OUT MORE: Latanya Sweeney is the Daniel Paul Professor of the Practice of Government and Technology at the Harvard Kennedy School. She has 3 patents, more than 100 academic publications, pioneered the field known as data privacy, launched the emerging area known as algorithmic fairness, and her work is explicitly cited in two U.S. regulations, including the U.S. federal medical privacy regulation (known as HIPAA). Dr. Sweeney is a recipient of the prestigious Louis D. Brandeis Privacy Award, the American Psychiatric Association's Privacy Advocacy Award, an elected fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics, and has testified before government bodies worldwide. She earned her PhD in computer science from MIT in 2001, being the first black woman to do so, and her undergraduate degree in computer science from Harvard University. Dr. Sweeney creates and uses technology to assess and solve societal, political and governance problems, and teaches others how to do the same. You can follow Dr Sweeney on Twitter at @LatanyaSweeney

First Bite: A Speech Therapy Podcast
170: Ethics for PFD: Evaluations through Treatment

First Bite: A Speech Therapy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 52:42


Guest: Erin Forward, MSP, CCC-SLP, CLC - Today on the First Bite Podcast we are running through some very important information for our community and listeners! We will be tackling the subject of ethics for Pediatric Feeding Disorders and going over some of the new PFD codes that have been introduced. We also offer some helpful examples and implications, as well as the best resources for you to get on top of this important stuff! Even with the best intentions, you can find yourself in some tricky situations if the regulations are not adhered to, and putting in the time and energy to stay abreast of the field's standards is very necessary. We talk about the best practices to using the codes, including coding backward from what you are officially and specifically treating, to concerns around communication and confidentiality, and much more! So to hear all about where to start with staying HIPAA compliant and offering the best service to those special small clients, join us on the show today!

In Scope - The Healthcare Security Podcast
A Conversation with Suchi Pahi: Why HIPAA Compliance is Difficult

In Scope - The Healthcare Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 24:16


In this episode, Mike welcomes Suchi Pahi, a data privacy and cybersecurity attorney. Join us as they talk about the complexities of implementing and understanding HIPAA particularly for organizations brand new to the healthcare space.

Pedo Teeth Talk
Build your dental assistant team…. Hear from the expert!

Pedo Teeth Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 26:28


Listen to the great podcast from Mary Govoni. Mary brings nearly 50 years of experience in dentistry to the team. She is a Certified Dental Assistant, and a Registered Dental Hygienist, with experience in general and specialty practices both clinically and as an administrator. Mary is a former dental assisting educator and was a partner in a successful dental staffing service. For the past 30 years, Mary has focused on speaking and consulting with dental teams on infection prevention, OSHA compliance, HIPAA compliance, ergonomics, chairside efficiency, and team communication and development. Mary has published numerous articles in professional journals. She is a Past President of the American Dental Assistants Association and serves on the Corporate Council for Dimensions of Dental Hygiene, is a member of the Academy of Dental Management Consultants, the Speaking and Consulting Network and the Organization for Safety Asepsis and Prevention.

Ignite Digital Marketing Podcast | Marketing Growth Tips | Alex Membrillo
#40 - The Marriage Between AI and Digital Advertising

Ignite Digital Marketing Podcast | Marketing Growth Tips | Alex Membrillo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 30:21


In the past five years, there has been tremendous growth in the world of digital advertising. Machine learning and algorithms continuously improve to help digital advertisers reach and engage the right audience. The key is finding the perfect balance between artificial intelligence and marketers' ingenuity. They each have their unique strengths and role in developing effective digital advertising campaigns. Our hosts, SVP of Healthcare Marketing, Lauren Leone, Director of Paid Media, Nicholas Van Winkle, and Director of PPC, Alex Kemp discuss how far digital advertising has come, tips on how to improve your digital advertising strategy, how to use first-party data in a HIPAA compliant way, and how to distinguish when to use AI versus a marketer. Find out on this episode of Ignite! Twitter https://twitter.com/CardinalDM Facebook https://www.facebook.com/CardinalDigitalMarketing LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/cardinal-digital-marketing/mycompany/  

Optimal Business Daily
438: Getting Rejected Led to Starting My Own Business: One Man's Journey to Year-Round Summer Camp by Blake Boles

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 8:55


Blake Boles with Chris Guillebeau talks about how getting rejected led to starting his own business Episode 438: Getting Rejected Led to Starting My Own Business: One Man's Journey to Year-Round Summer Camp by Blake Boles Chris Guillebeau is a New York Times bestselling author and modern-day explorer. He is the author of 5 books and his daily podcast, Side Hustle School, is downloaded more than 2 million times a month. Every summer in Portland, Oregon, Chris hosts the World Domination Summit, a gathering of creative, remarkable people with thousands in attendance. Chris is also the founder of Pioneer Nation, Unconventional Guides, the Travel Hacking Cartel, and numerous other projects. During a lifetime of self-employment that included a four-year commitment as a volunteer executive in West Africa, he visited every country in the world (193 in total) before his 35th birthday. The original post is located here: https://chrisguillebeau.com/blake-boles/  Laika's platform builds and automates compliance for standards like SOC 2 and HIPAA, with hands-on expertise each step of the way. OSD listeners get 20% off when joining at Heylaika.com/osd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Optimal Business Daily
437: Finding More Time to “Do” Leadership by Laura Stack of The Productivity Pro on Time Management Skills

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 10:52


Laura Stack of The Productivity Pro talks about finding more time to "do" leadership Episode 437: Finding More Time to “Do” Leadership by Laura Stack of The Productivity Pro on Time Management Skills Laura Stack, MBA, CSP, CPAE is an award-winning keynote speaker, bestselling author, and noted authority on employee and team productivity. She is the president of The Productivity Pro, Inc., a company dedicated to helping leaders increase workplace performance in high-stress environments. Stack has authored eight books, including FASTER TOGETHER: Accelerating Your Team's Productivity (Berrett-Koehler 2018). She is a past president of the National Speakers Association, and a member of its exclusive Speaker Hall of Fame (with fewer than 175 members worldwide.) Stack's clients include Cisco Systems, Wal-Mart, and Bank of America, and she has been featured on the CBS Early Show and CNN, and in the New York Times. The original post is located here: https://theproductivitypro.com/blog/2012/11/finding-more-time-to-do-leadership/  Laika's platform builds and automates compliance for standards like SOC 2 and HIPAA, with hands-on expertise each step of the way. OSD listeners get 20% off when joining at Heylaika.com/osd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing
NTEB PROPHECY NEWS PODCAST: Anthony Fauci Says People Need To Be Forcibly Vaccinated For The 'Communal Good' That 'Supersedes Choice'

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 97:33


On this episode of the NTEB Prophecy News Podcast, if 2020 was the year of chaos and confusion, and 2021 was the year of medical fascism, then it's looking more and more like 2022 will be the year of the forcible penetration of your epidermis with the the oh-so-hot needle tip of the government injection. And it's not just Anthony 'Angel of Death' Fauci who's calling for it, Bill Gates is, the nation of Israel is, Canada is, and the whole of the European Union is. I will also keep asking this question until someone can give me a decent answer, why didn't Trump fire Fauci when he had the chance to? Why was he allowed to not only remain but to solidify his power base? Amazing how fast that things like HIPAA violations and 'my body, my choice' vanished, isn't it? Don't blink or you'll miss it, that's how fast it's all happening. In a move surprising no one, Anthony Fauci said on MSNBC yesterday "I would prefer, and we all would prefer that people would be voluntarily getting vaccinated, but if they're not gonna do that, sometimes you've got to do things that are unpopular, but that clearly supersede individual choices..." And there you have it, Fauci telling you that even if Omicron doesn't sicken anyone, and no one dies from it, you will be vaccinated for it because, well, they're going to make you take it. This isn't about a virus, this is about vengeance, and the soon-coming Antichrist. https://www.nowtheendbegins.com/nteb-prophecy-news-podcast-anthony-fauci-calling-for-forced-vaccinations-for-communal-good/

Optimal Business Daily
436: 1 Thing You Need To Know To Save You From Your Email Inbox by Nir Eyal of Nir And Far on Work Productivity

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 9:31


Nir Eyal of NirAndFar tells you the one thing you need to know to save you from your email inbox Episode 436: 1 Thing You Need To Know To Save You From Your Email Inbox by Nir Eyal of Nir And Far on Work Productivity Nir Eyal writes, consults, and teaches about the intersection of psychology, technology, and business. The M.I.T. Technology Review dubbed Nir, “The Prophet of Habit-Forming Technology.” Nir founded two tech companies since 2003 and has taught at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford. He is the author of the bestselling book, Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products. In addition to blogging at NirAndFar.com, Nir's writing has been featured in The Harvard Business Review, TechCrunch, and Psychology Today. Nir is also an active investor in habit-forming technologies. Some of his past investments include: Eventbrite, Product Hunt, Pantry, Marco Polo, Presence Learning, 7 Cups, Pana, Symphony Commerce, Worklife (acquired by Cisco) and Refresh.io (acquired by LinkedIn). Nir attended The Stanford Graduate School of Business and Emory University. The original post is located here: https://www.nirandfar.com/email-inbox-office-hours/  Laika's platform builds and automates compliance for standards like SOC 2 and HIPAA, with hands-on expertise each step of the way. OSD listeners get 20% off when joining at Heylaika.com/osd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

PCTY Talks
Future Employment Law Perspective with Louis Lessig

PCTY Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 34:00


Make sure your office is ready for the year 2022 and beyond. This episode is chock-full of information to get you up to speed on the newest considerations, whether you're new to labor and employment law or just need a refresher!  As recommended, companies should consult with legal counsel to determine the best course of action for addressing employment law issues In this episode of PCTY Talks, Louis Lessig and host Shari Simpson discuss: Mental Health ADA Substance Abuse Domestic Violence Arbitration and Mediation Guest: Louis Lessig, Labor and Employment Litigator, Keynote Speaker, Training Evangelist, Counseling, Negotiations with Brown & Connery, LLP Louis Lessig is an attorney specializing in labor and employment litigation, counseling, negotiations training & speaking. Louis represents clients in all types of employment matters, including but not limited to claims of discrimination, harassment, hostile work environment, wage and hour irregularities, and retaliation under FMLA, Title VII, ADA, ADEA FLSA, HIPAA, NLRA, NJFLA, NJLAD, CEPA, PHRA, and the common law, in state and federal courts as well as before administrative agencies. Louis has been a featured speaker at many events, including for the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), SHRM State Council Conferences, Tri-State Human Resource Management Association, and several other organizations both in the private and public sectors. Louis is a SHRM Senior Certified Professional (SHRM-SCP) and holds a Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) Certification from the HR Certification Institute. Louis holds a JD from the Widener University School of Law and a BA in Human Resources with a concentration in entrepreneurial studies from Muhlenberg College. Louis has also served as a Barrister in the Sidney Reitman Employment Law American Inn of Court and spent time as an adjunct professor at the Comey Institute for Industrial Relations at St. Joseph's University. He is admitted to practice in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia. As well as admitted to practice before the Supreme Court of the United States, the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, United States District Court for the District of New Jersey, and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Mentioned in the Episode: Louis Lessig Contact Info LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/louislessig/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/LouisLessig Website: https://www.louislessig.com/ Job Accommodation Network (JAN): https://askjan.org/

Optimal Business Daily
435: Customers Given Too Many Choices are 10x Less Likely to Buy AND The Advantage of No Funding by Derek Sivers

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 8:44


Derek Sivers shares two short posts about the downsides of giving customers too many options and the advantage of no funding Episode 435: Customers Given Too Many Choices are 10x Less Likely to Buy AND The Advantage of No Funding by Derek Sivers Originally a professional musician and circus clown, Derek Sivers created CD Baby in 1998. It became the largest seller of independent music online, with $100M in sales for 150,000 musicians. In 2008, Derek sold CD Baby for $22M, giving the proceeds to a charitable trust for music education. He is a frequent speaker at the TED Conference, with over 5 million views of his talks. Since 2011 he has published 34 books, including “Anything You Want” which shot to #1 on all of its Amazon categories. The original posts are located here: https://sive.rs/jam & https://sive.rs/nofund  Laika's platform builds and automates compliance for standards like SOC 2 and HIPAA, with hands-on expertise each step of the way. OSD listeners get 20% off when joining at Heylaika.com/osd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Employment Law This Week Podcast
#WorkforceWednesday: HIPAA, Employee Privacy Protections, and COVID-19

Employment Law This Week Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 5:16


Regulations for employee COVID-19 vaccination or testing remain in limbo, but many employers are crafting policies to ensure that they are keeping employee vaccination and testing information confidential, regardless of what happens in the courts. Attorney Denise Dadika tells us more. Visit our site for this week's Other Highlights and links: https://www.ebglaw.com/eltw236. Subscribe to #WorkforceWednesday - https://www.ebglaw.com/subscribe/. Visit http://www.EmploymentLawThisWeek.com. The EMPLOYMENT LAW THIS WEEK® and DIAGNOSING HEALTH CARE podcasts are presented by Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. All rights are reserved. This audio recording includes information about legal issues and legal developments.  Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments.  These informational materials are not intended, and should not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances, and these materials are not a substitute for the advice of competent counsel. The content reflects the personal views and opinions of the participants. No attorney-client relationship has been created by this audio recording. This audio recording may be considered attorney advertising in some jurisdictions under the applicable law and ethical rules. The determination of the need for legal services and the choice of a lawyer are extremely important decisions and should not be based solely upon advertisements or self-proclaimed expertise. No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers.

Optimal Business Daily
434: Why Your Team Doesn't Care: The 4 Ways You're Crushing Your Culture by Christine Comaford of Smart Tribes Institute

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 9:57


Christine Comaford tells you the 4 ways that you're crushing your team's culture Episode 434: Why Your Team Doesn't Care: The 4 Ways You're Crushing Your Culture by Christine Comaford of Smart Tribes Institute Christine Comaford is a Leadership and Culture Coach who specializes in applied neuroscience, which helps her clients achieve tremendous results in record time. She is a human behavior expert, a leadership columnist for Forbes.com, and the New York Times bestselling author of Power Your Tribe, SmartTribes and Rules for Renegades. The original post is located here: https://smarttribesinstitute.com/why-your-team-doesnt-care-the-4-ways-youre-crushing-your-culture/  Laika's platform builds and automates compliance for standards like SOC 2 and HIPAA, with hands-on expertise each step of the way. OSD listeners get 20% off when joining at Heylaika.com/osd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #79: FOQUS...On Discourse, Technology and Aphasia Rehabilitation: In Conversation with Brielle Stark

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 37:30


During this episode, Dr. Janet Patterson, Research Speech-Language Pathologist at the VA Northern California Healthcare System, speaks with Dr. Brielle Stark about the Distinguished Aphasia Scholar USA Award from the Tavistock Trust, technology, and aphasia rehabilitation, measuring discourse, and FOQUSAphasia. In today's episode you will hear about: Applications of technology to aphasia treatment, including provision of virtual care, Ideas for measuring discourse in a clinical environment, and FOQUSAphasia     Dr. Janet Patterson:  Welcome to this edition of Aphasia Access Podversations, a series of conversations about community aphasia programs that follow the LPAA model. My name is Janet Patterson, and I am a research speech-language pathologist at the VA Northern California Health Care System in Martinez, California. Today I am pleased to be talking with Dr. Brielle Stark, who is an assistant professor in the Department of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. Dr. Stark was a Gates Cambridge Trust scholar during her doctoral work, which focused on the effectiveness and feasibility of iPad-delivered speech-language therapy in adults with post-stroke aphasia. Using MRI, she also evaluated the neural correlates of inner speech in this population. During her postdoctoral fellowship, she researched brain and genetic biomarkers related to acquired language difficulties and language improvements following transcranial direct current stimulation in post-stroke aphasia. Presently, she's interested in modeling and predicting language reorganization recovery in acquired adult language disorders and in older adults, using structural and functional brain markers acquired from MRI. Brie is a co-founder of FOQUSAphasia, which brings together experts to improve the research on spoken discourse, specific to aphasia. Finally, she's interested in the relationship between manual gesture and language and communication and brain injury. In 2021, Brie was named a Distinguished Aphasia Scholar USA by the Tavistock Trust UK. The trust aims to help improve the quality of life for those with aphasia, their families and care partners. Congratulations on this honor Brie, and welcome to Aphasia Access Podcast.   Dr. Brielle Stark:  Pleasure to be here and finally to meet you in person. I say that with quotes since we're on a video, but close enough.    Janet: Agreed. I feel the same Brie. You were named to Tavistock Trust Distinguished Scholar in 2021. Congratulations again, as you have joined a talented and dedicated group of individuals. How has the Tavistock Award influenced your work in aphasia, both your clinical and research efforts?   Brie: Yeah, first, I was super humbled to join this group I admire all of the prior and current Tavistock Trust Award winners and also work with quite a few of them. It's a privilege to be a part of this group. But, you know, for me, something I've always thought about is, we can do science for science's sake, but for me, it's a lot more meaningful when we can make the science create meaningful outcomes for people with aphasia, include people with aphasia in designing the studies, and giving feedback on the studies. That's something I've tried to do throughout my career and hopefully am getting better and better at the more I do it. For me, that's the main point, is that we're doing science that's meaningful. That's our lab motto as well.   Janet: Isn't that so important now, because we read a lot of publications about treatments or ideas or assessments, but then they become very difficult to implement in the clinic. That's the whole world of implementation science, in fact we were talking about that just a little bit earlier, the challenge of implementing a treatment that we read about.   Brie: It's so difficult, and I have so much respect for people who work in the field of implementation science. I've dipped my toes into it and then promptly run away on a few occasions. At some point, I'll be brave enough to go back there. As a researcher without a clinical license, I often rely on clinicians to really feed back to me, is this worthwhile? Can we do this? Is this feasible? That's a really important part of my research and what my lab does, trying to make sure we're doing things that are useful.   Janet: Good for you because that is so very important. One of your research interests is technology, as it can be used with individuals with aphasia. As I mentioned earlier, this encompasses a broad range of topics such as iPads speech-language pathology, transcranial direct current stimulation, virtual treatment, and in particular, I want to highlight mentoring women in technology. Across all of these, is there a theme or an idea, or how do you see technology, such as you're using, influencing our clinical and research work with persons with aphasia?   Brie: Yeah, I love technology. Absolutely. I'm a member of a group here at Indiana University called the Center for Women and Technology. I've learned a lot through that group. For me, technology is a fantastic means of communication. Throughout my years, working with older adults as well as people with aphasia, you know, technology can really overcome a lot of barriers that are there for individuals. My prime example is that kind of feeling of aloneness, when you're recovering from a stroke when you're living with aphasia, and technology has a huge impact and kind of remediating that in many ways. So that's what got me interested in doing the iPad therapy many, many years ago. And it's kind of kept me interested, because I think we're moving toward a world where we want to create as many opportunities to communicate as possible. I think technology is one way to do that -not the only way, but definitely one way to do that.   Janet: You investigated telehealth and delivering therapy through telehealth didn't you, if I recall correctly,   Brie: We did a diagnostic mostly through a virtual platform. But the goal is actually, and we just recently got funding to do more of a telehealth model, we just recently finished a design where we were testing its feasibility. We brought people back for two different time points about a week apart. We wanted to make sure that people were comfortable with the task, we had everything lined up in terms of delivering things well, and also reliably amongst our testers. Now that we have that in place, and we just recently pushed out a paper on our actual methods, we're really excited to use it for an actual telehealth purpose.   Janet: Telehealth is so important, I think, and you know, at the VA, we've done quite a bit of that, in both assessment and treatment. I know that there can be significant challenges if the person doesn't have enough bandwidth, if they can't turn on their computer even. I applaud you for jumping into this arena to try to figure out the reliability and how valuable technology can be.   Brie: It is a tough one, I think our biggest hurdle to overcome has actually been the encryption on some of these HIPAA compliant conferencing apps where you just have to jump through about 12 different hoops to make sure you're logged in, you're not a robot, you're not someone who's going to, as they say, hack the conversation. We've had a few issues with that. But the other issue is obviously technology doesn't overcome all of the issues with reaching certain populations. I live in Indiana, I live in a relatively rural part of Indiana and still high-speed internet is not everywhere around here. We're not reaching everyone, but it's definitely one means of reaching more people.   Janet: I think so too, you know, you hear people saying, well, nobody puts down their phones these days, everybody's nose is buried in technology. I used to think that maybe that was a bad thing, but I'm not so sure now, especially when you mentioned earlier about using technology to address isolation that may occur with people with aphasia.   Brie: Yeah, I agree. I think it's a fine line between technology being an opportunity versus the only opportunity. I think we need to just make sure it's available if that is the preferred method. For many, I mean many in our clinic here, it's not the preferred method, so having the opportunity is quite nice. We recently had one of our participants in our aphasia group here move out of state, but wanted to stay in touch with their friends, so they often use technology to make sure that they can keep in touch with the group back here in Indiana. I think that's a great way to show when it is useful, even though that's not maybe their preferred method.   Janet: Well, good, I hope you keep going along this line of clinical research. Let me turn to another topic that's of interest to you - language organization in the brain. You've been looking at both neurotypical individuals and persons with aphasia. What are some of the findings from this area of work? And then, how do you see them as an application in our efforts in aphasia rehabilitation?   Brie: Yeah, that's a great question. I absolutely love neuroscience, it's one of the things I love teaching as well and I have that opportunity here with our masters SLP students, which is my favorite. For me, the first thing I was interested in was just a better understanding of how our brain actually does language. That is such a complicated question. For me, I came into it very much from that theoretical point of view, and a lot of my earlier work still looks at that, and I collaborate with people who are still really looking at that. More recently, I've been focused on to what extent can we learn something about the brain that tells us about some potential for recovery, or in some cases, a potential for decline? It's so important to try and figure out as much as we can, not necessarily to predict anything, but to improve our ability to tailor our treatments and to have candid discussions with people we're working with. I'm a pretty firm believer that we're never going to predict who's going to recover and who's going to decline because I think there are too many personal factors at play. But I think brain information can give us a lot of really useful things. An example being we've done some work with some collaborators on leukoaraiosis, which is white matter disease, mostly in older adults. it's pretty typical and many older adults, but it seems to be pretty prevalent in people who have had strokes as well. The extent to which there is more leukoaraiosis, in addition to, and even in most cases, is a better predictor than lesion volume itself, in stating whether someone will decline in their language abilities or not. It's this idea that there's something going on at the overall brain health level, that's important to understand. It's not just the stroke that's going to affect how someone is able to recover, for example. I think that's helped us think a little bit more globally about why we care about the brain and how we can use it in helping us understand these patterns.   Janet:  Your research is still at the early stages, and not yet with direct application to an individual sitting in front of you, right?   Brie: That's right. That's right. I think we I think we have a long way to go. Honestly, I think it's a design question, as well as a feasibility question. What I mean by that is the variability in people with aphasia is very large, right? We have individuals with different ages, who had strokes at young versus old age, who had different brain health factors. Then also, you have such different presentations of aphasia. It gets difficult, I think, to model brain changes when you have such variability. If you look at all of the work that's out there in neuroscience, it's lots of group studies of typical young adults. There is not very much variability in behavior there compared with what we're working with in terms of people who have language disorders. We have a long way to go, I think in making sure that we're answering the right questions and using the right designs, but I think we're getting closer.   Janet: I agree with that. I'll be looking forward to some of your work. Looking from the behavioral standpoint, as you mentioned, people with aphasia are so variable, not only in their type of aphasia, or their aphasia characteristics, but also in their personal characteristics, their interest in treatment, their ability to get to the clinic, their technology experience. All of these factors, this variability, contributes, I think, to a person's success or lack of success in treatment, and in general, in coping and living with aphasia. Taking all that into consideration when you're looking at brain function and language organization is very important.   Brie: Absolutely. Brain is one piece of the puzzle, right? And it doesn't, it certainly doesn't explain everything. I always chat with my students about the fact that motivation is so hard to quantify, to your point. I don't think that's something we're ever going to figure out as a brain basis, right? Someone's personal motivation to go to therapy, as you stated, or someone's environment, which is something we encounter a lot, like what's their social network like? What's their support system like? We're never going to be able to answer those questions with brain data alone. I think it's important to have that holistic point of view where you do understand the other factors at play. That's also why I like this LPAA model because there's an understanding of all of these factors contributing to the single person. I like that idea of designing studies in that way, as well.   Janet: We've been doing a bit of work investigating motivation, a couple colleagues and myself. We just keep going down this path and finding ourselves almost coming back to where we started, and not so much full circle, but full spiral because we seem to be back at the same point, but we're better, we're a little further advanced in our knowledge, but it's so difficult to understand the concept of motivation. I think that, as you mentioned a few minutes ago, clinicians or anybody really, but when we think about people who are working with people with aphasia, we tend to say, well, that person is motivated, or they're not motivated, but we haven't measured their motivation, we don't know what contributes to it. All of these factors, then are just part of what the brain does is it tries to reorganize itself and think through language and live with aphasia.   Brie: Absolutely, and kudos to you. That sounds like an intimidating research question.   Janet: It is, believe me, it certainly is. Let's turn now to discussing discourse production and analysis and aphasia, which I know has come to the forefront in your work lately. This topic, I think, has a long and storied history, long history. Despite many publications on this topic, clinicians and researchers remain in disagreement, or they lack clarity on the best way forward to use discourse analysis in a meaningful way in aphasia rehabilitation and clinical research. How did you become interested in discourse measurement in aphasia?   Brie: Yeah, that's a great question, and also a great synopsis of the history. I think there is an extremely long history and discourse is so fascinating because it is so interdisciplinary. I mean, discourse is interesting to people in linguistics, psychology, neuroscience, communication sciences and disorders, philosophy, it just goes across a lot of different disciplines. For me, I have always been interested in communication that looks like real life. Even in my Ph.D., I started focusing on it, reading a bit more about it, that continued through my postdoc, when I had an opportunity to do more independent research. Now in my assistant professor position, I decided that even though it scared me a little bit, I was going to tackle this. This scare is still real, but it's definitely fun. The people who are interested in discourse are some of the best people I've ever met. They're up for the challenge. That's why I've continued to really push, what I think is a kind of a difficult ball, up a hill, over these past few years. I'm interested in using discourse as a more natural outcome of therapy, but also a more natural outcome of just how people communicate, how we can actually talk about how people communicate. I'm all for naming outcomes as well, I think there's a place for those, I think there's a place for individual outcomes like that. I think discourse has a long way to go before it can come to the same standard and be used in the same way as a lot of the outcomes we have out there.   Janet: Isn't discourse what we do? When we tell jokes, when we tell stories, when we have conversations, when we connect any kind of speech, when we talk to ourselves. It is what we do. But it's so variable. You're right, there are so many challenges in trying to figure it out. I'm glad you're rolling that ball up the hill, and you have a lot of help to get that ball to the top one of these days.   Brie: I thank goodness for the help. Something I've just chosen to tackle is, and I'm really interested in, is how discourse changes according to the scenario that we're in. I really am interested in that. You know, the tasks that we give people to elicit language, how different is a discourse going to be if they're restricted to looking at a picture versus when they have to bring in some autobiographical memory, when they're talking about themselves, when it's emotional. That's something I'm super interested in, and I've done a lot of research on that. I'd like to now include people with aphasia in building those meaningful tasks. What do individuals with aphasia feel like elicits the language that reminds them the most of themselves? Some of the feedback we get is, “you are making me tell Cinderella again?” That type of feedback makes me feel like we're probably not asking the right question to get the best language sample from this person. That's something we're pursuing, my colleague and I, we're going to start really just asking the questions such as, “What do you feel like most resembles how you communicate on a daily basis”   Janet: There are several different kinds of discourse, we all we all know that. I just think about the life of anyone, the life of a person with aphasia, they want to tell a joke, or they want to tell a story, they want to whisper an endearment to a person who is close to them, they want to order coffee at the coffee shop, all those are such different kinds of discourse. Maybe they're not long, just a few words, but they are discourse. They do carry with them different requirements to be able to be successful in that. So good job for you for going in that direction.   Brie: I think it's really interesting. I think the other side of that is what do we extract from the discourse to actually demonstrate what we're looking for, right? I've chosen over the past few years, just because of my personal interest, to look at more linguistic things, an example is mean length of utterance. I work with colleagues, a Tavistock Trust winner, like Dr. Jessica Richardson, who works more on the functional side, you know, how many main concepts is someone producing? I think we're starting to get a better idea of what to actually pull out of the discourse to match what we think we want to measure. I think we're getting better at that, and that's something that I want to keep pushing for.   Janet: Good. I hope you do. I think that you're doing that through FOQUSAphasia. You're a co-founder of FOQUSAphasia. By the way, for our listeners, the link to FOQUSAphasia will appear on the Show Notes that accompany this podcast. It's FOQUSAphasia.com, right?   Brie: Yep, that's it.   Janet: You can access it that way. Anyway, you are co-founder of FOQUSAphasia, which is a group of researchers and clinicians who value the evidence derived from spoken discourse, and who want to improve the state of research, which will eventually translate into improved evidence-based practice for assessment and treatment of spoken discourse and aphasia. Tell me a bit about FOQUSAphasia, and the work this group is doing to support discourse analysis,   Brie: I would love to, it was co-founded by about four of us, gosh, back in 2019, actually, at a Clinical Aphasiology Conference in beautiful Montana. We decided that we wanted a venue where people could (1) network with others interested in this area, and (2) band together to actually achieve some of the goals that all of us clearly shared. As an example, we have one group that focused on best practices, and right after this meeting, I'm going to submit a paper from this group that's actually looking at standards for reporting on discourse. Similar to the Roma Consensus that Dr. Sarah Wallace worked on and spearheaded, and that you were involved, we went through a similar expert panel. We wanted to figure out how to enhance reproducibility, replicability, and the ability to just make assumptions across papers and discourse, what actually needed to be the bare minimum thing were reporting and had studied. That's what we asked people. We're going to put out a list of what we think is necessary and recommended to help create that foundation for the spoken discourse studies. We actually made it a little bit broader than just post-stroke aphasia, we were thinking more adult language acquired disorders. That's coming soon and it's one example of a band of people working together to try and achieve a goal. Another one has been highlighting early career researchers and clinicians in our lecture series. We've had a lot of people working on their Ph.D.'s, at a postdoc level, or people like me in their early career, come and talk about what they're doing with discourse. That's been really well received, we get lots of people coming to those and they're all archived for free on our YouTube channel as well. That's been great for visibility and getting people connected.   Janet: How can someone join FOQUSAphasia?   Brie: It's totally free. If you go to FOQUSAphasia.com, which is spelled FOQUSAphasia.com - Q stands for Quality - you can join us a member and then that gets you access to our forum, and also our mailing list. We send out upcoming events. and also use the forum to advertise studies to find other collaborators for grants, for projects. It's very much meant to be a clinician and researcher home for people who are interested in discourse from a variety of backgrounds.   Janet:  I've been on the site and I very much like some of the explanations you give about discourse, and how you describe the questions and the concerns that people have as we investigate it. I'm enthusiastic about FOQUSAphasia and hope that some of our listeners will join it and become part of this discussion as we figure out how better to think about discourse measurement. As I mentioned, I think Brie, I believe discourse comprehension and production is important, just in life, but especially it's important as we think about aphasia rehabilitation, because it is the heart of communication and connects us in so many ways. As FOQUSAphasia and other aphasia researchers around the world grapple with this complex topic and think about how best to measure discourse in individuals with aphasia. Are there pearls of wisdom you might offer to our listeners that they can put into practice tomorrow as they assess and treat their clients with aphasia?   Brie:  Well, that's a deep question. I think, yes. For me, the biggest thing is to come at it from a point of view of what is my treatment targeting, and what measure would be the most appropriate outcome? All of us have had linguistic training. We've taken psychology classes, we've taken all sorts of classes to let us think about the fact that if we're trying to measure something related to improved grammar, for instance, we should probably be thinking about a discourse that's going to be a little bit more robust in the type of things we're asking an individual to do and the type of grammar they're trying to produce. A good example is that there are a lot of treatments out there that are really focused on, let's say, word finding, semantic feature analysis, for example. If we're thinking of the best way to approximate word finding and discourse, we probably want to give people a sufficiently difficult example to try and make them probe for new words, right? So compared to giving them a picture that they're just looking at and just naming things, maybe we want to increase that difficulty a little bit and have some different prompts that we can ask them and measure. I know that sounds so simple, and so intuitive, but I don't think it happens a lot. I think people rely on using, for example, the picture description from the Western Aphasia Battery (Kertesz, 2006) as outcome, without thinking about if it is actually going to show improvement for the reasons I just stated? I think that's just having that critical thinking of what am I actually expecting, will help us to approach this. There are also some great perceptual tools that are now coming out. There's something called the Core Lexicon Checklist (e.g., Dalton et al, 2020) that's great to use on the ground. When you're looking for lexical access, that's a great one that's just come out. And I think those perceptual tools are going to keep getting better because we know that people who are on the ground in the clinic don't have a whole lot of time to sit there and analyze and transcribe everything. I think there are a lot of us trying to create tools right now that we can actually implement.   Janet: I think about some of the tools we have for discourse analysis, and they are very good. But as you mentioned, they take an enormous amount of time. These tools take a lot of time, far more time than a busy clinician has to analyze discourse. So what are we left with if we don't have a tool that we can use quickly and easily, and reliably to show the change in our patients as a result of therapy?   Brie: Yeah, I think what we're left with is unfortunately, an inability to reproduce a lot of these findings that are being published. You read a lot of these very well-done studies that are case studies or use several different people, and you just can't reproduce them, because the measures that they used either weren't reliable, to your point, or they didn't provide enough information about those measures in the paper. That's something I often encounter. For me, it's really thinking more from a research point of view of are we doing something that's useful, that can be implemented. I also want to be a little patient and say I think it's going to take a little bit of time for us at the research level to make the shift and make sure it's implementable. We need to keep moving forward, keep pushing it, but I think we're going to have to really give ourselves a little bit of time. I know that's an annoying answer. But I don't want to rush into it either.   Janet: I don't think it's annoying as much as it is realistic. For so long, people have just, as we talked about earlier, measured discourse in whatever way they wanted to or whatever way seemed appropriate at the moment. But now, if the goal is to try to be focused, reliable, valid, and really make a contribution in a meaningful, clinically meaningful way, it will take time to make sure that there's reliability, and that the advice that comes out of those actions is solid for clinicians?   Brie: Absolutely. I really do think, and I am going to say the ball analogy again, I think the ball is rolling. I think it's rolling quickly, because there are some great people working on these things all across the world at the moment. There are tons of groups that are not only improving outcome measures. I also want to point out, there are some groups that are creating treatments that are specific to discourse. The treatment itself is discourse oriented, and that has not been a focus for many, many years. Discourse has always been the outcome, but not necessarily the thing being treated. There is pretty substantial change, I think, coming and I'm really excited about it.   Janet:  You're right, and I'm glad that you mentioned treatments for discourse, because truly discourse has typically been used as pre-post testing, to show that there's been some sort of change, and that's fine. What has to happen and harking back to your interest in the language organization in the brain, what has to happen, so that the discourse itself can improve. Maybe the therapy has to be about the discourse, or some aspect of it, rather than having discourse be the pre-post measurement.   Brie: That's exactly it, and I think you'll find pretty much across the board it is so rare for therapies to, “generalize to discourse”, and I think we're thinking about it wrong. I think we're thinking that because we're training naming, we should see an outcome in word retrieval. But then we're forgetting that we've also chucked in the fact that we're requiring them now to use grammar. We're also requiring them to draw on some memory processes, and maybe some executive function, when we're asking them to do these discourse outcomes. If we train that also during treatment, I think it's going to make a lot more sense that we should be able to measure those things, that outcome   Janet: That's exactly right. Those are all the things we think about in research design. Not just research design leading to a study, but also clinical research design for what you're going to do with your patient, as you plan their treatment for aphasia.   Brie: Absolutely, and so much credit to clinical decision-making. Again, I have the benefit of a lot of time, and I give a lot of credit to people who make these decisions on very, very little time. I think it's going to be incredible to see how we can finally implement things in the research setting and really making them worthwhile for the clinician as well.   Janet: We just talked about clinical decision-making and for me, I think about mindful clinical decisions. People make clinical decisions all the time. I'd like to see them make those decisions based on evidence, not just the evidence in the literature, but also, thinking back to the evidence-based triangle, the characteristics the patient brings to the table for aphasia? Then adding in what you're learning about discourse, how do we find the best ways to measure the changes, to treat individuals with aphasia, and then measure the changes in discourse in persons with aphasia?   Brie: Yeah, absolutely. I like that. I'm going to use that mindful clinical decision-making now.   Janet: Well, good, go right ahead because that's what it's all about. People make decisions all the time. But if they don't do it mindfully, then you don't know why you've made that decision, or what you might expect. And I think mindful clinical decision-making helps us deliver the most effective and efficient treatment that we possibly can, which, of course is important for all of us and our patients with aphasia and their families.    Brie, your scientific and academic career has provided many interesting experiences and relationships for you, including recognition as a Tavistock Distinguished Scholar in the United States. Many of our listeners are research scientists, and many more are aphasia clinical specialists seeing patients on a daily basis. As we bring this podcast interview to a close, what advice or lessons learned, or interesting observations from your work in discourse measurement, and the use of technology with persons with aphasia, might you share with our listeners?   Brie: My biggest pearl of wisdom, I'm just going to make this very personal, is hearing and listening to the people around you. I really learned so much not only from my peers and the people who are my actual mentors, those that I would consider true mentors in the sense that I've worked for them or they're slightly more advanced than I am. I've learned equally as much from my peers as from my students and from the clinicians that I work with and lastly, from the people with aphasia, who are included in the study. We're just recently running this big study on inner language, how people with aphasia speak to themselves, why they do it, and how it creates a sense of self. I would never have approached this idea without having feedback from one specific person with aphasia that I worked with back in England. He said, “I have the world's richest inner experience, but it just I can't get it out”. That's been a seed in my head for about 10 years. So I just highly recommend just listening and being really open to what people want and what's important to them. I think that's going to be a key thing for driving forward meaningful research.   Janet: We'll keep that in mind. I think that's very important. A couple of studies have come out recently, and you mentioned this earlier as well, about asking people with aphasia and their families, what's important in research, what's important in the way we designed this particular study? Listening to them, and then incorporating those comments into your research design.   Brie: That's right. It's so motivational as well. I come from a very scientific training, I've studies neuroscience, psychology, and all of these things that have taught me how to think about design, but it really doesn't teach me what is meaningful, right? What do people want, what do they need, and so that listening is really important.    Janet: The difference between statistically significant and clinically significant or clinically meaningful, which is not always an easy gap to navigate.    Brie: It's not. That difference is sometimes huge, and sometimes not, but I think it's really valuable to know the difference.   Janet: It's true.    This is Janet Patterson, and I'm speaking from the VA in Northern California, and along with Aphasia Access, I would like to thank my guest Brie Stark for sharing her knowledge and experience with us as she and her colleagues investigate discourse and virtual assessment and treatment, and the use of technology in aphasia. You can find references, links, and the show notes from today's podcast interview with Brie at Aphasia Access under the Resource tab on the homepage. On behalf of Aphasia Access, we thank you for listening to this episode of the Aphasia Access conversations podcast project. For more information on Aphasia Access, and to access our growing library of materials, please go to www.aphasia.access.org. If you have an idea for a future podcast topic, please email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org Thank you again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access.     Reference Dalton SGH, Kim H, Richardson JD, Wright HH (2020). A Compendium of Core Lexicon      Checklists. Seminars in Speech and Language, 41(1), 45-60

Optimal Business Daily
433: Marketing to the Bottom of the Pyramid by Seth Godin on Market Inefficiency & Capitalism

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 10:59


Seth Godin talks about marketing to the bottom of the pyramid Episode 433: Marketing to the Bottom of the Pyramid by Seth Godin on Market Inefficiency & Capitalism Seth is an entrepreneur, best-selling author, and speaker. In addition to launching one of the most popular blogs in the world, he has written 19 best-selling books, including The Dip, Linchpin, Purple Cow, Tribes, and What To Do When It's Your Turn (And It's Always Your Turn). His most recent book, This is Marketing, was an instant bestseller in countries around the world. Though renowned for his writing and speaking, Seth also founded two companies, Squidoo and Yoyodyne (acquired by Yahoo!). By focusing on everything from effective marketing and leadership, to the spread of ideas and changing everything, Seth has been able to motivate and inspire countless people around the world. In 2013, Seth was one of just three professionals inducted into the Direct Marketing Hall of Fame. In an astonishing turn of events, in May 2018, he was inducted into the Marketing Hall of Fame as well. He might be the only person in both. The original post is located here: https://seths.blog/2010/09/marketing-to-the-bottom-of-the-pyramid/  Laika's platform builds and automates compliance for standards like SOC 2 and HIPAA, with hands-on expertise each step of the way. OSD listeners get 20% off when joining at Heylaika.com/osd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Optimal Business Daily
432: Build Brand Credibility with the “Halo Effect” by Erin Blaskie on Psychology of Learning & Marketing

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 9:19


Erin Blaskie tells you how to build brand credibility with the "halo effect" Episode 432: Build Brand Credibility with the “Halo Effect” by Erin Blaskie on Psychology of Learning & Marketing Erin Blaskie has helped numerous businesses come online, establish their web presence and create community. Erin's primary expertise is in creating solid systems and processes for businesses but she also leads clients to leverage the power of the Internet to nurture community, create culture and inspire change. She is a TEDx speaker and a Google Certified Speaker and speaks all around the world. The original post is located here: https://www.erinblaskie.com/blog/branding-halo-effect  Laika's platform builds and automates compliance for standards like SOC 2 and HIPAA, with hands-on expertise each step of the way. OSD listeners get 20% off when joining at Heylaika.com/osd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Criminology Academy
Ep. 34 Grad Life: FERPA not HIPAA: Being a TA, an RA, and Service with J^3

The Criminology Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 72:50


If you are new, welcome!  If you're not, welcome back! This week we don't have a guest. Jenn and Jose discuss what it is like being a teaching assistant, a research assistant, and engaging in service for the field and our department as graduate students. *We say HIPAA violation a few times in the episode, we mean FERPA*    You can find us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram @TheCrimAcademy. Please visit our website www.thecriminologyacademy.com. Whether or not you have an iPhone or iTunes, please rate and review us there. These are the lifeblood of the podcast. Thanks for listening!

LegalEagle Radio
This Video Is A HIPAA Violation! (According to Wrong People)

LegalEagle Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 14:36


Everyone is wrong about HIPAA. Even you. But especially footballers. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

This Week in Health IT
Newsday – 2021 on Capitol Hill: A Health IT Update from CHIME's Mari Savickis

This Week in Health IT

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 39:53


December 6, 2021: Healthcare can't move forward without regulatory guidelines. Health IT leaders need to be in the know. https://www.linkedin.com/in/mari-savickis-42b9817/ (Mari Savickis), Vice President, Public Policy at https://chimecentral.org/ (CHIME) joins us today to discuss interoperability, de-identified data, 21st Century Cures, HIPAA, National Patient Identifier and cybersecurity. Plus the year that was in Washington, DC. HIPAA is so antiquated, but we adhere to it like it's the 10 Commandments. Is there any movement towards redoing it? Language prohibiting the HHS from developing a patient identification standard was removed from the House Labor bill for the 1st time in the Senate. And the FTC clarified their Health Breach Notification rule to include third-party applications that collect consumer's health information under privacy protections. Key Points: 00:00:00 - Intro 00:04:30 - Advocacy led by CHIME's public policy team resulted in https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/7898 (HR 7898) law giving providers credit for cybersecurity best practices 00:09:00 - https://patientidnow.org/ (Patient ID Now) 00:25:00 - CHIME public policy launched the https://infoblockingcenter.org/ (InfoBlockingCenter.org) in 2021. A convenient site to find free resources, FAQs, articles, archived webinars, and cheat sheets to prepare you for compliance. 00:27:00 - All sectors are facing cybersecurity staffing shortages 00:27:30- 3 out of 4 hospitals operate without a designated security leader 00:31:30 - Cyber insurance has gone up by almost 50%  Questions or comments? Please reach out to policy@chimecentral.org Stories: https://chimecentral.org/chime-applauds-federal-trade-commissions-actions-to-secure-consumer-health-data/ (CHIME Applauds Federal Trade Commission's Actions to Secure Consumer Health Data) https://chimecentral.org/survey-of-chime-and-aehis-membership-finds-widespread-cybersecurity-impacts-on-healthcare-need-for-more-government-support/ (Survey of CHIME and AEHIS Membership Finds Widespread Cybersecurity Impacts on Healthcare; Need for More Government Support) https://www.scmagazine.com/feature/leadership/attracting-retaining-healthcare-cisos-maybe-its-not-a-money-problem?mkt_tok=MTg4LVVOWi02NjAAAAGAo4u8i8iqAiGUONUvupwyrwgmJbvhbKMxVTkTwZRSoCMHN7yqps3a1mFTTQ3bSrWqWCUTfcS3Ejusk3Sv160bh1qrp_hwtuhfDgLA-Q (Attracting, retaining healthcare CISOs: Maybe it's not a money problem - SC Media)

Tcast
What's the Price for Good Health?

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 29:45


Research and data are paramount if we want to improve physical, mental, and emotional wellbeing across the board. These not only concern those who are already struggling with illness; healthcare should also focus on being preventive, rather than waiting for people to get sick. However, the longstanding institutions that we rely on actually create a roadblock for researchers to do their job. Instead of keeping the population healthy, institutions are merely waiting for the people to get sick. In such a set-up, are we truly maximizing the capabilities and technologies that we have developed for the good of humanity? In today's episode, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby talk about exchanging healthcare data and its importance to the world. Join them as they listen to comments made by Lex Fridman and David Sinclair on bioinformatics and more. Challenging the Data Barrier in Bioinformatics   To gain research info regarding healthcare, companies must first collect data. Data collection gives us the opportunity to detect certain diseases, their properties, and how the human body reacts to these. Perhaps the biggest obstruction that bioinformaticians face are the privacy and ethical concerns when collecting data. Because health institutions aren't able to disclose and share data regarding their patients, research slows down. With TARTLE, you have the chance to purchase datasets to help your bioinformatics research or any study for that matter. Data that is being collected by TARTLE is consensually gathered, as users share their information for financial incentives. Data collection through TARTLE is also ethical because companies are buying ownership from consenting owners. Through this, the privacy and ethical barrier brought on by HIPAA is no longer an issue. TARTLE benefits everybody. It gives users the power and knowledge on selling their data while paying them for doing so. It also offers companies massive amounts of datasets that they're able to use, like medical research. Insurance Companies and Their Impact on Data Collection   In the podcast, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby listen to a video of David Sinclair discussing his checkup with a doctor. Through this, we discover that proactively collecting data about one's self gives doctors better insight into your health, more than they ever could with a simple consultation. In addition to this, we find out that doctors may opt to not perform lab tests that are not immediately needed, or if you do not have a family history for a particular disease. They are disallowed by insurance companies who do not want to spend on anything preventive. Insurance companies only shell out money when someone is already sick. Insurance companies are only incentivized to save money. Therefore, preventative healthcare becomes impossible for those of a lower socioeconomic profile, and thus cannot afford private lab results. A Proactive vs. Reactive Approach on Healthcare Development The TARTLE marketplace is one of the means for preventative healthcare to grow and develop. Because insurance companies aren't incentivized from giving away data, nor are hospitals allowed to. Because hospitals are a reactive system, we are not able to act on someone or gather data until someone is already sick. That is why preventative care is so important. Sickness is better understood, and hopefully lessened, in a world where we are encouraged to actively look out and test for our own health.  Hospitals are part of a system that's economically driven, forcing people into two-dimensional systems that prioritize money before the well-being of a person. The system views unique individuals not as people, but as numbers and statistics without uniqueness.  The metric that medical institutions should focus on is the maintenance of a disease-free population. How long someone is being kept healthy or how long someone lives should be the defining statistic that healthcare systems should prioritize. Not only this, but a deeper understanding of preventative measures is a must, that will not only lengthen the life expectancy of every individual, but empower those same individuals with the ability to sell their data. Through a higher volume of data acquisition, researchers and companies can better develop better ways to prevent sickness and disease.   What's your data worth? www.tartle.co     TCAST is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!  

Agent Survival Guide Podcast
What Are Insurance Agents Responsible for Under HIPAA?

Agent Survival Guide Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 9:59


  At the Agent Survival Guide Podcast, we'll help you stay HIPAA compliant! Find out what you're responsible for under HIPAA regulations.   Read the text version.   Download the PDF   Mentioned in this episode:   HHS Minimum Necessary Requirement HHS: New rule protects patient privacy, secures health information HHS Summary of the HIPAA Security Rule Is Your Agency Ready for a HIPAA Audit? Why Every Agency Should Work for HIPAA Compliance   More episodes you'll like:   2022 Medicare Part A & B Premiums and Deductibles Are Your Medicare Marketing Materials Compliant? Do's and Don'ts of Medicare Compliance Social Media Privacy Tips for Insurance Agents What Agents Can't Say During Medicare Sales Appointments   Articles to Share with Your Clients:   Here's What Medicare Costs in 2022 The Value of Family Recipes What Does It Mean to be a Caregiver?   Ritter Insurance Marketing eBooks & Guides:   Agent Survival Kits: Beginners or Experts Social Media Marketing for Insurance Agents The Complete Guide to Client Loyalty and Retention   The latest from Ritter's Blog:   4 Ways Medicareful Living Can Help Your Sales Strategy Halfway Through AEP: Reflect & Renew Your Medicare Sales Strategies Offer Clients Cancer Insurance Featuring Coverage For Genomic Sequencing   Subscribe & Follow:   Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Overcast Podbean Spotify Stitcher   Connect on social:   Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Instagram Sarah's LinkedIn Sarah's Instagram  

On Her Terms Defined
Did COVID Change HIPAA & Employee Rights? feat. Irnise Williams

On Her Terms Defined

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 52:32


There's so much misinformation related to just about any and everything related to COVID-19. And now with more employers requiring masks, COVID vaccination proof or testing, the debates and half-truths are only intensifying. HIPAA has become the new buzzword in connection to COVID and employee rights and protections. But how much of the discussion has been accurate?On today's episode, nurse attorney Irnise Williams educates us on the protections HIPAA offers employees for COVID related matters. In addition, nurse attorney Irnise Williams explains: Key info about the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) including: what private health information HIPAA generally protectswhich employers and companies are subject to HIPAAwhat employee COVID related information is not protectedNecessity and prevalence of mandatory vaccinations and immunization status disclosures.How vaccines, including the ones for COVID-19, work. Potential COVID-19 liability for employers. Legality of employer mask, vaccine, and/or testing mandates. Resources available for business owners seeking growth and sustainability. CONTENT WARNINGSNone.GUESTAttorney Irnise WilliamsThe Law Office of Irnise F. Williams, LLC- https://iwilliamslaw.com/- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yournurselawyer- Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/yournurselawyer/RESOURCESCenters for Disease Control - https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html National Institutes of Health COVID-19 - https://covid19.nih.gov/ Occupational Safety and Health Administration Coronavirus Disease - https://www.osha.gov/coronavirusFOR MORE INFORMATION Listen and subscribe to SheConfidential on your favorite podcast app. Visit https://sheconfidential.com/ for complete episode details including guest information and discussion highlights Follow on Instagram and Facebook @she.confidentialNOTEThe information provided on SheConfidential pertaining to your health or wellness, relationships, business/career choices, finances, or any other aspect of your life is not intended to be a substitute for individual consultations, professional advice, diagnosis or treatment rendered by your own provider.ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSEpisode artwork and video production by Eye AM Media https://www.eyeammedia.com/. Follow on Instagram @eyeammedia

1st Talk Compliance
Recent Developments in Health Information Privacy: HIPAA Right of Access, NPRM, & Information Blocking: Audio Version of the Webinar

1st Talk Compliance

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 53:54


First Healthcare Compliance hosts Sheba Vine, Attorney and Senior Manager in the Global Privacy Office at Exact Sciences Corporation, for an interactive discussion on “Recent Developments in Health Information Privacy: HIPAA Right of Access, NPRM, & Information Blocking.” This presentation will review recent developments including OCR Enforcement Highlights, HIPAA Right of Access & Ciox Health Decision, NPRM, and 21st Century Cures Act Information Blocking Regulation. The post Recent Developments in Health Information Privacy: HIPAA Right of Access, NPRM, & Information Blocking: Audio Version of the Webinar appeared first on First Healthcare Compliance.

Ruthless
Smug Gets Rona Again

Ruthless

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 90:00


The fellas do a HIPAA violation, discuss the Omicron variant, and welcome Chris Christie for an interview.

Optimal Business Daily
424: The E-Mail Productivity Curve by Cal Newport of Study Hacks on Being Consistently Productive & Email Inbox Zero

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 8:46


Cal Newport talks about the e-mail productivity curve Episode 424: The E-Mail Productivity Curve by Cal Newport of Study Hacks on Being Consistently Productive & Email Inbox Zero Cal Newport is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Georgetown University, who specializes in the theory of distributed algorithms. He previously earned his Ph.D. from MIT in 2009 and graduated from Dartmouth College in 2004. In addition to studying the theoretical foundations of our digital age as a professor, Newport also writes about the impact of these technologies on the world of work. His most recent book, Deep Work, argues that focus is the new I.Q. in the knowledge economy, and that individuals who cultivate their ability to concentrate without distraction will thrive. The original post is located here: https://www.calnewport.com/blog/2015/06/18/the-e-mail-productivity-curve/  Laika's platform builds and automates compliance for standards like SOC 2 and HIPAA, with hands-on expertise each step of the way. OSD listeners get 20% off when joining at Heylaika.com/osd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Optimal Business Daily
423: 4 Secrets to Mastering Affiliate Marketing With a Small Blog by Jen Hayes on Making Money Online

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 10:24


Jen Hayes tells you 4 secrets to mastering affiliate marketing with a small blog Episode 423: 4 Secrets to Mastering Affiliate Marketing With a Small Blog by Jen Hayes on Making Money Online A few years ago, Jen and her husband were buried in $117,000 of student loan debt. Now, they've paid off over $100k of debt, and they're on track to have the rest paid off by the end of this year. Join their email list to get exclusive tips on how to save money, earn more, and live like no one else. The original post is located here: https://www.jenhayes.me/4-secrets-to-mastering-affiliate-marketing-with-a-small-blog/  Laika's platform builds and automates compliance for standards like SOC 2 and HIPAA, with hands-on expertise each step of the way. OSD listeners get 20% off when joining at Heylaika.com/osd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Productive Therapist Podcast
Intake Call Example : Protecting Client PHI

Productive Therapist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 5:36


HIPAA compliance is a vital part of any therapy practice. Sometimes people call a therapy practice looking for information about another adult. Sometimes they may have a compelling reason for calling. How can you handle these types of calls professionally while still complying with HIPAA? In this episode, I share with you a unique sample intake call that will show you how. This is one of many training calls in our Therapy Intake Pro training and support program for intake coordinators. Click to listen now!

Optimal Business Daily
422: 10X Your Success Rate With This Monthly Planning Process by Michael Mehlberg on Productivity & Getting Things Done

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 10:04


Michael Mehlberg helps you 10x your success rate with a monthly planning process Episode 422: 10X Your Success Rate With This Monthly Planning Process by Michael Mehlberg on Productivity & Getting Things Done Michael Mehlberg is an entrepreneur and certified agile project manager who specializes in productivity and organization systems. His blog has been called "The Owners Manual to an Awesome Life" and helps high-achieving entrepreneurs master their life and business - crushing their goals, living their passion, and finding purpose, balance, and excellence in all they do. The original post is located here: https://michaelmehlberg.com/blog/2018/10/9/10x-your-success-rate-with-this-monthly-planning-process  Laika's platform builds and automates compliance for standards like SOC 2 and HIPAA, with hands-on expertise each step of the way. OSD listeners get 20% off when joining at Heylaika.com/osd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Optimal Business Daily
421: Podcasting Strategies for Speakers and Experts AND What Happens When You Compare Yourself To Others by Kate Erickson

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 9:28


Kate Erickson of EOFire shares two short posts covering podcasting strategies and the risks of self-comparison Episode 421: Podcasting Strategies for Speakers and Experts AND What Happens When You Compare Yourself To Others by Kate Erickson John Lee Dumas is the founder and host of Entrepreneurs On Fire, an award winning podcast where he interviews inspiring Entrepreneurs every Monday and drops value bombs every Thursday. His goal with Entrepreneurs On Fire is to deliver the inspiration and strategies you need to FIRE UP your entrepreneurial journey and create the life you've always dreamed of. The original posts can be found here: https://www.eofire.com/podcasting-strategies-for-speakers-and-experts/ & https://www.eofire.com/what-happens-when-you-compare-yourself-to-others/  Laika's platform builds and automates compliance for standards like SOC 2 and HIPAA, with hands-on expertise each step of the way. OSD listeners get 20% off when joining at Heylaika.com/osd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Serious Privacy
Dr. K: Privacy Compliance in US Universities

Serious Privacy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 38:40


This week on Serious Privacy, Paul Breitbarth welcomes K Royal, the recently-approved PhD graduand (yes, it's a word) fresh from her dissertation defense on Privacy Complaince in US Universities. Many of our listeners likely participated in the nearly-anonymous Delphi Method part of her research, where privacy professionals around the world answered a series of questions to determine critical parts about privacy in the university setting. These included triggers, program elements, and risk factors. Her PhD is in public affairs, a fitting match for privacy law, from the University of Texas at Dallas, the School of Economic, Political, and Policy Sciences.Join us as we discuss the substance of privacy law at US universities, some common misperceptions, but also the difference in the PhD process between the US and Europe. Some of your favorite topics come up, such as CCPA, GDPR, and HIPAA. Also, her research involves the complexity of managing privacy law in a complex environment, bringing in Complexity Theory as a framework. Complex Adaptive Systems was used in terms of privacy law by Zhang and Schmidt when considering China's privacy law back in 2015 in their paper Thinking of data protection law's subject matter as a complex adaptive system: A heuristic display.As always, if you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at seriousprivacy@trustarc.com. In addition, if you like our podcast, please do rate and comment on our program in your favorite podcast app. We also have a LinkedIn page for Serious Privacy, so please follow for more in-depth discussion.

Optimal Business Daily
420: 7 Powerful Techniques to Turn Your Career Dreams into Reality by Karl Staib of Dig To Fly on Inner Dialog

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 9:21


Karl Staib shares 7 powerful techniques to turn your career dreams into reality Episode 420: 7 Powerful Techniques to Turn Your Career Dreams into Reality by Karl Staib of Dig To Fly on Inner Dialog Karl Staib is an author that seeks out growth at every turn. It's why he writes. He wants to process his thoughts and emotions, learn from them and share them with the world. He grew up in a little town in Pennsylvania called Pipersiville. He moved to Austin, TX in this mid twenties and now he is living in San Antonio with his wife and two boys. If you enjoy his writing, he encourages you to reach out to him at DigToFly.com. He wants to hear about how you've learned to grow from your own struggles. When his father passed it was focusing on gratitude that helped him get through one of the most difficult times in his life. It taught him the importance of bringing gratitude to every single situation. Whether it's a difficult situation like his father's death or amazing one like drinking ice cold tea by the river with his son. That's why he wants to bring more gratitude into the workplace. His work inside a fortune 500 company that regularly ranks in top 10 for best place to work has shown him the importance of gratitude and how it increases productivity and communication. If you want to learn more just go to DigToFly.com. He is also a big fan of traveling, meditation, Yoga, hikes in lush terrain and his family. The original post is located here: https://digtofly.com/7-powerful-techniques-to-turn-your-career-dreams-into-reality/  Laika's platform builds and automates compliance for standards like SOC 2 and HIPAA, with hands-on expertise each step of the way. OSD listeners get 20% off when joining at Heylaika.com/osd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

MoneyBall Medicine
Seqster's Ardy Arianpour on How To Smash Health Data Siloes

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 58:48


Your medical records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. And not only are they inscrutable—they're often mutually (and deliberately) incompatible, meaning different hospitals and doctor's offices can't share them across institutional boundaries. Harry's guest this week, Ardy Arianpour, is trying to fix all that. He's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster, a San Diego company that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place. The big goal guiding Seqster, he says, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! 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Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare. Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.If you've ever gotten a copy of your medical files from your doctor or hospital, you probably know these records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. They aren't designed to be clear or user-friendly for patients. In fact, it's usually just the opposite.The data itself is highly technical. And on top of that, there's the inscrutable formatting, which is dictated by whatever electronic medical record or “EMR” system your provider happens to use. But the problem isn't just that EMR data is incomprehensible.It's also that different EMRs are often incompatible with each other.So if you're being treated by multiple providers, it can be really tricky to share your data across institutional boundaries. That's why medicine is one of the last industries that still uses old-fashioned fax machines. Because sometimes a fax is the only way to send the data back and forth.But my guest today is trying to fix all that.His name is Ardy Arianpour, and he's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster.It's a company in San Diego that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster quote-unquote “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place.The big goal guiding Seqster, according to Ardy, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.At the moment, however, consumers can't sign up for the service directly. Seqster's actual customers are players from inside the healthcare industry. For example, a life science companies might hire Seqster to help them make the experience of participating in a clinical trial more user friendly for patients.Or a health plan might use a Seqster dashboard to get patients more involved in their own care.Seqster did let me do a test run on my own medical data as part of my research for this interview. And I was impressed by how quickly it pulled in data that normally lives in a bunch of separate places. I'm hoping Seqster and other companies in this space will continue to make progress.Because, frankly, I think poor patient access to health data and the lack of interoperability between EMRs are two of the biggest factors holding back improvements in healthcare quality.If we can finally get those two things right, I think it can help unlock the data-driven healthcare revolution that I describe in my new book, The Future You. Which, by the way, is out now in paperback and ebook format at Barnes & Noble and Amazon.When we spoke back in September, Ardy and I talked about better EMRs and many other things. And now here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, welcome to the show. So, it's good to have you here, and you know, for everybody who doesn't know your story and the story of the company, I'd love to, you know, start covering some basics like, you know, the when, the what, the how, the why. What's the founding story of Seqster and what was the problems that you were really trying to go out there and solve when you started the company in 2016?Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry. Always been a fan. I think we've known each other for quite some time, but it's been a long time since we've ran into each other since the genomic and precision medicine days. So great to see you. I hope you and your family are well and yeah, look, Seqster is super special and there's a secret story, I guess, that never has been told. It really starts way beyond 2016 when I founded the company. So I spent 15 plus years in DNA sequencing, next gen sequencing genomic market. And during that time in the 2000s to early 2010s, I was fortunate enough of being part of some amazing endeavors and organizations that allowed my team and I to take some risk. And when you take risk, when you're in biotech, pharma, precision medicine, genomics, bioinformatics, you learn new things that most people don't learn because you're you're you're, you know, trailblazing, I guess you could say. And we were able to do that back with one of my old companies where we were able to launch the first clinical exome test, launch the first BRCA cancer panels, launch the first next gen sequencing panels in a CLIA lab. Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it wasn't about the testing. It was all about the data, and we didn't realize that till later and we kept on seeing that wow genome data is really only one set of all the other data pieces, right? I think the genomics folks, me being a genomics guy, I guess you could say, for a decade and a half, we're so forward thinking that we forget about the simple things within science, and we never really thought, Oh, collect your medical data and pair it with your genomic data. We never really thought there would be a wearable out there. That data was going to be siloed, too. We never thought there was going to be, you know, many different medical devices and instruments that would be Bluetooth and sensor enabled, where there would be data that would be siloed. Claims data, pharmacy data. Never even crossed our minds. So, you know, when you put this all together, my inspiration with Seqster was actually really simple. And when I founded the company, I wanted to combine the genomic data with your EMR medical data as well as your wearable data, because in 2016, the tailwinds of those other, you know, services was really taken off.Harry Glorikian: Right. Totally understand it. And you know, as we were talking about before I hit record, it's like it was funny because I was just talking to another company that's working on NLP and they're able to look at, you know, papers and see drugs being used in different, you know, medical conditions. And then they figured out, well, they needed to tap into the unstructured data of a medical record to really, like, add the next layer of value to it. So, you know, there's a lot of activity going on about there. But how do you guys, how do you, how do your co-founders, you know, Zhang and Dana play into like the science, the technology and what's the sort of angle that you guys have taken to solve this problem? Or what's your idea on how to fix it? I'm not saying it's been solved yet, because that would be a Herculean task in and of itself. But how are you guys approaching it that? Is a little different than the. You know, maybe any any of your other you would you would consider anybody else out there, the working on this?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, look for us we spent a lot of time understanding the power of data. But how what makes Seqster different is no one knows the power of the patient better than us. We've spent time with our platform with, you know, tens of thousands of patients: rare disease patients, oncology patients, parents, autoimmune disease patients, patients that have that are seeing functional medicine folks. Patients that were having issues sharing data through telemedicine, clinical trial patients. All these sorts of patients are very different. At Seqster we focused on putting the patient at the center of health care in order to smash all the data silos from their medical institutions to their wearable technology that they wear to the DNA testing that they get and even maybe a COVID test or a vaccine. How do you bring a 360-degree patient view? And you know, you tried the system, so I think you got a small teaser of how we can do that and we've really cracked this large problem. It is Herculean, I believe, and a lot of people believe because it's interoperability, it is the number one problem in all of health care.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I had the pleasure of trying it and imported my data and was able to see, you know, individual pieces. I mean, I made some suggestions on what might make it easier for me to hone in in different areas, right, and have the system highlighting different things. But I guess each data stream is being brought in separately and then at some point you're going to create a master dashboard above it, because now each one is separate from when I go into each record, right, When I go into my medical record, it gives me one set of data with my lab results and everything else and the notes, and then it pulls in my wearable data separately that I have to look at, right? So you've got to look at it separately. It doesn't. Then I guess the next step would be creating a master sort of view of how everything would look in a sort of I don't want to say integrated, but at least a timeline view of the world. But. You know, following up on the the sort of the what question, you know, how do you sort of combine data from different EMRs, tests, apps, devices in a sort of scalable, repeatable way? I mean, it seems like to date, that's been a hugely manual process, and I can imagine you could figure out every provider's ontology and then create a table that shows what's equivalent to. And but you know, there's got to be sort of a translation scheme that would be required that that provides some constant readjustment as the main providers tweak and evolve their own systems, right? Because if the provider is tweaking their system, your system has then got to adapt to changes that are happening in that end. So how are you guys managing all that craziness?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. So I think it all and you hit on so many points, I'll try and cover them if I remember them all. Look, the number one thing for us is we can connect to any data source. It doesn't matter. And you saw it. And just before I continue, just tell the audience how fast, how fast, how long did it take for your data to be populated after you connected it?Harry Glorikian: Oh, it was. I mean, yeah, as soon as I created it, I could see that it was, you know, it was digesting and then populating. And, you know, I was just I was watching it as a matter of fact, when I was on the phone with your person, that was helping me. Yeah. At first I said, Oh, it's not there. And then a couple of seconds later, I'm like, Oh no, it's showing up, right? So it was happening in, I don't want to say real time, but it was happening as as we were watching it evolve, right? It was sort of it was. It was almost like watching time lapse.Ardy Arianpour: And that's actually a great way. That's a great way to actually describe it. We created the time lapse of all your health data. Now let's get to the what and the how. So we connect to any health data source. The patient is fully in control. You own your data, you control it. It's all consented by you. We don't own your data and we connect to every single medical record. And that's huge that we've achieved nationwide coverage. We didn't know what data you have, but we're you're able to connect to it. Why? Because our team, which our engineering team gets all the credit for six years now, almost since founding of the company we have written, I don't know, seven million lines of code, that standardizes and harmonizes all of the ICD 9, ICD 10, SNOMED codes and every single lab result to every single wearable terminology, from biking to cycling to, you know, you name it, VitaminDB, you know, characterized in 40 different ways. You know, we're harnessing data to improve patient lives at scale. We built it for scale because you can't do it by the traditional method of just faxes and PDFs. Now, you know, being able to do that is not a bad thing.Ardy Arianpour: We can bring that service into our platform as well. It's already integrated, but that type of service takes 30 to 60 days and it's static data. It's not real time right now. If Harry goes, I don't know, you go on a bike ride and you fall and you go to the E.R. and you had whatever data connected automatically in your sister portal, it'll be populated without you even touching Seqster. That's how our real time data works and another way that we're totally differentiated than anything else in the marketplace. I was never a fan of API businesses because they're just data in data out. I truly wanted us to create a patient engagement platform, a PEP right, or a patient relationship management system, what I call a PRM instead of a CRM. And that's what we created with Seqster. So that is beyond an API, beyond just data. We're visualizing the data, as you saw. We really nailed the longitudinal health record or the individualized health record. And I think it's, I always say this, health data is medicine. The reason why it's medicine is because our platform has saved patient lives.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, how do you, how are you handling the free form notes, right, because I noticed that I could look at all my notes, but they weren't necessarily, it wasn't pulling from the note and sort of making sense of it. I mean, I could look at all of it and it was all in one place. But the the system wasn't necessarily processing it, sort of. I was talking to Jeff Felton from ConcertAI and they do a lot of sort of, their big thing is the NLP that sort of tries to choose chew through that, which is not trivial, you know, yesterday today, context matters in health care.Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. Look, if we created the the the Tesla of health care, let's just say, right, we're we're changing the game. From static data to real time data. Ok. Well, you're talking about is, are you going to create a helicopter as well? Right, OK. And all right. So, no, we're not going to go create the helicopter. Is there going to be an electric helicopter by Tesla? There's no market for that, right? So that's why they're not doing it now. I'm not saying there's not a market for NLP. It's just the fact that we'll go ahead and partner with a third party NLP provider. And we already have we have like four of them and they all have their strengths and weaknesses because it's not a one size fits all thing. And you know, we can already run OCR, you know, over the free text and pull certain ontology information out. And then, you know, when you partner with an NLP company, once you have a system that can capture data, you could do anything. So people always ask me, Are you going to get into AI? It's just the buzzword. There's a million A.I. companies. What have they really done right in health care? It's not really there. Maybe for imaging they've done some things, but it's more of a buzzword. AI only becomes valuable if you have a system, Harry, that can instantly populate data, then you can run some great artificial intelligence things on it. So NLP, AI, OCR, all those things are just many tools that can add. Now, in your experience, you only got to see about 5 percent of the power of Seqster, and that probably blew you away, even though it was five percent of the power. Because you probably never -- I don't know, you tell me, have you ever been able to collect your data that quickly? It took, what, less than a minute or two?Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, thank God, I don't have a lot of data. So, you know, just when I tap into my my health care provider, you know, my data is there and it's funny, I always tell people, being a not exciting patient is a really good thing in one way, and it's a really bad thing because you can't play with all the data. But you know, like even when I did my genome, it's an extremely boring genome.Ardy Arianpour: My question is it's not about it being exciting or not, because thankfully you're not a chronically ill patients. But imagine if you were and how this helps, but take a step back. I'm just asking the speed, yes, and the quality of the presentation of the data that seeks to you. It was less than what hundred seconds?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Well, it was very quick. And I've already it's funny because I texted my doctor and I was like, I need to talk to you about a couple of these lab results that look out of out of norm, right? And they weren't anything crazy. But I'm just curious like, you know, how do I get them in norm? I'm just I'm always trying to be in in the normal band, if I can be.Ardy Arianpour: So it's interesting you say that because as a healthy individual. You know, and even a chronically ill patient, it doesn't matter. The best way to actually QC data is through visualization, and this is what this is. That's foundational to interoperability. So we hit on semantic and structural interoperability with our, you know, backend engine that we've created to harmonize and standardize the data. We built many different types of retrievers and then we parse that data and then it's standardized and harmonizes it. But that visualization, which some people call the Tableau of health data, you know that we've created when they see it, is really, we got to give the credit to the patients. We had so many patients, healthy ones and unhealthy ones that told us exactly how they want it to look. We did this on the genomic data, we did this on the wearable data. We did this on the medical device data and we have some great new features that can superimpose your clinical data with your fitness data on our integrated view and timeline.Harry Glorikian: Oh, that? See, now that would be, you know, another level of value, even for a healthy patient, right to be able to see that in an integrated way. I made a suggestion, I think that when a panel shows up is. You know, highlight the ones that are out of Norm very quickly, as opposed to having to look at, you know, the panel of 20 to find the one that's out of whack, just either color them differently or reorient them so that they're easier to find. But those are simple changes just from a UI perspective. But so. How would you describe that that Seqster creates value and say translates that into revenue, right? I'm just trying to figure out like, what's the revenue model for you guys? I know that you're I can actually, I'm not even sure if I can sign up for it myself. I would probably have to do it through a system if I remember your revenue model correctly. But how do you guys generate revenue from what you're doing?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, I'll share another secret on your show here from the founding of Seqster. My dream was to empower seven billion people on our little mothership here called Earth to have all their health data in one place. And I had a direct to consumer model in 2016. The market wasn't really ready for it, number one. Number two, it was going to cost $500 million worth of marketing to just get the message out for people to know that it exists. So long story short, in 2016, you know, when I founded the company, not that many people wanted to talk to us. They thought we were just like nuts to go after this problem. 2017, we got some calls from some investors, we raised some great seed funding after I personally put in some money in in 2016 to get the company going. And then in 2018, I got a call from Bill Gates and that was when everything changed. Bill called and wanted to meet in person, I was supposed to get 30 minutes with him. And the reason why he called is because our first beachhead was with Alzheimer's patients. My grandmother, both my grandmothers, passed away due to Alzheimer's disease. Both my maternal and paternal grandmothers and being a caregiver for my mom's mom and being very close to her since she raised me, I learned a lot about a multigenerational health record, so I actually filed patents in 2016 on a multigenerational health record because I wanted to have my grandma's data, my mom's data, my data, and be able to pass it on to research as well as to generations down my family.Ardy Arianpour: Long story short there, Bill gets all the credit for telling me after I showed him our platform, "You got to take this enterprise. You guys built something that Google Health failed at and Microsoft Vault Health Vault failed at." And it's funny we're talking about this. Look, Google just dismantled their health division again. Why? Because tech companies just don't get it. They have a lot of money. They have a lot of power. They've got a lot of smart people. But they they they don't know where, I'll give you an example. It's like a tourist with a lot of money coming into a city. You don't know where the really good local bar is, right? Why is that? You don't know where the really good, you know, slice of pizza is. You're going to go to the regular joints that everyone finds on TripAdvisor and whatever. You know your friends told you, but if you're a local, you know where to get the authentic cocktails and the authentic, you know, drinks and food. Why? Because you've lived and breathed it in the city. So we've lived and breathed it right. And so we know what not to do. It's not about knowing what to do in health care or in genomics or in biotech. It's actually knowing what you shouldn't be doing. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: And knowing I got to tell you, there's some problems where I'm like, OK, I know exactly who to call for that problem, because there aren't, you know, they're not falling off trees in that particular problem. There's a small handful of people that understand that problem well enough that they can come in and sort of surgically help you solve that problem. And you can have all the money in the world and have all the smart people you want. Doesn't mean they're going to be able to solve that particular problem, especially in health care, because it's so arcane.Ardy Arianpour: And it's getting, you know, this is a problem that is growing like cancer, interoperability. Just on this 20 minute conversation with you it has grown by hundreds of millions of dollars. Do you know why? Because data is being siloed.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And I think, look, I've always I've said this on, you know, whatever show or and I've actually I've written letters to Congress. You know, I think this this needs to be mandated because expecting the large EMR companies to do anything is a waste of time. They're not going to do it on their own if their feet are not put to the fire and it changes. And honestly, I believe that if anything will stop the innovation of health care or slow it down is the EMR systems. You know, if you don't have the data, you can't do the work.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. But you know what people don't understand. And not to go off that tangent, but I'll get back to the business model in a second to answer that question because I just recalled in my mind here that I didn't answer that. Look, people don't understand that at least the EMR companies, even though they're like Darth Vader, you know, they needed. They've put some foundation there at least. If that wasn't there, we would be in a much worse situation here, right?Harry Glorikian: Correct, but if Satya Nadella hadn't really changed Microsoft, really redone it right, it wouldn't be the company it is now, and I think they [the EMR companies] are just back in the dark ages.Ardy Arianpour: Of course, I totally agree. I'm surprised, actually. Microsoft, as an example, didn't come up with their own EMR system and launch it to the hospitals to go, compete with the servers and all scripts and Epics of the world. If I was Microsoft, that's what I would do. I would have enough money in power, know exactly what to do. I would take a system like Seqster and I would explode it in a good way and be the good guys and have it completely open source and open network. But that's a whole cocktail conversation if anyone's listening on the on the podcast that wants to talk about that. Give me a call or shoot me an email or find me on LinkedIn.Ardy Arianpour: Let me go back to the business model real quick so people understand. So direct to consumer was what I wanted to do. We built it for the consumer, for the patients. It was the smartest and dumbest thing I ever did. Let's go to why it was the dumbest thing first, because it was really, really hard. It was the smartest because we would not be where we are today. You wouldn't have called me to talk on your podcast and all these other great, you know, amazing people that want to hear about how we're, you know, cracking the code on interoperability now and changing the health care system, changing clinical trials, changing decentralized trials with our system.Ardy Arianpour: Why? Well, it's because our system was built by patients. Right, and so it's a patient centric, real time, real world data platform that layers in engagements for both the providers, the payers, the pharma companies and any other enterprise that white labels our platform. We have both iOS and Android SDK and Web available. It gets fully branded. We're the Intel Inside with the Salesforce.com business model. It's a Software as a Service service that we offer to enterprises. Patients never pay for the service. And we do give VIP codes to chronically ill patients and VIPs, you know, journalists, podcasters and to be honest, anyone who emails me that wants to try it. I've been always giving on that. That costs us time and money, and I'm happy to do it because it's my way of giving back to the community and health care because I know our team and I have built a system that have saved lives. It's been covered by the news multiple times.Harry Glorikian: So, so in essence, a large provider comes, buys the access to the system and then offers it to its patient population to utilize to aggregate all this information, right? How can the platform stay patient centric if the patients aren't directly paying for it?Ardy Arianpour: Ok, very simple. All of these enterprises in health care, whether that's Big Pharma, right, or Big Oayer from Pfizer to Cigna, to United Healthcare group to Humana to even Amazon, right, to other tech companies, they all want to go down a patient centric way. It's just what's happening. You know, I've been talking about this since 2016 because we pioneered patient centric interoperability. That's what we did. That's what Seqster did. That's that's what we set out to do. And we did it. Some, you know, a lot of people say they can do it. Very few actually. Do we fit in that model now, right? And you had the experience yourself. And I think the first time I saw patient centric ads was. 2020. No, sorry. Yeah, 2020, JP Morgan Health Care Conference in January, just three months before the lockdowns and the pandemic started. It was the first time I went to Johnson & Johnson's afterparty in downtown San Francisco. And saw a huge banner saying, you know, blah blah blah, patient centricity. It's the 22nd century, you know, whatever. So they add a bunch of ads that were all patient centric, and I looked to my co-founder, Dana, and I'm like, Look at this, these guys finally caught on. I wonder if they've been, because we've been in discussions with a lot of these folks, long story short, it's not because of Seqster, I think it's just the market was headed that way. We were so far ahead of the market and there was no tailwinds. Now it is all there. And the pandemic afterwards accelerated digital health, as I say, by 7 to 10 years.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you enjoy hearing from the kinds of innovators and entrepreneurs I talk to on the show, I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is out in print and ebook format from Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Just go to either site and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian. Thanks. And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So the platform combines EHR, genetic, and fitness data, so. Why did you start with those three?Ardy Arianpour: So we started with those three, and I'll get to that, but we also do pharmacy, social determinants of health, and claims data as well. So we've added three other very large pillars. We can connect to any data source. We've created a universal interoperability platform that's patient centric that brings real time, real world data. And we're just super excited about all the business opportunities and the big pain points that we're solving for enterprise as well as for the patient. Why did we start with genomics, EMR, fitness. Ok. Here's the story. So I named the company Seqster after actually going on a five or six mile run in downtown San Diego, coming back and watching The Italian Job. And in the movie The Italian Job, it's one of my favorite movies, actually. I love that movie. I could just keep watching it over again, the real Napster was in the movie, and I used to be a Napster user where, you know, it was the way of actually pulling all your music and having it kind of in one place. Not really exactly Seqster's model, Seqster's model is is much more legal because it's patient centric. Yes, Napster was kind of stealing the data, right? So long story short, I was trying to think of a company name and I'm like, Oh my God. I don't know what hit me. I'll remember that moment like it was yesterday, Harry. Sequster came up because I had dived into DNA sequencing. We are doing everything that you can on next gen sequencing. And so I was like, Wow! Seqster. S-E-Q-S-T-E-R.Ardy Arianpour: And I went on GoDaddy.com. I bought it for $9.99. And the story started from right then. It was just me and the website. No co-founders, no onee else. I was just thinking, this is a great name. Now, you fast forward to why it's medical data plus genomic data, plus fitness data, to begin with. Well, the genomic data was an easy one because, right, I have 15 years underneath my belt on genomic sequencing technologies and clinical diagnostics and doing a lot of great things for patients in that arena. And I knew that it couldn't just be the genome, right? That's where the medical data came in because we knew and I never knew that we would be able to actually build something that would be able to pull it on together. I knew it was going to be really tough. I didn't think it was going to be this tough. We would have never done it if I knew that it was this tough. It's so great that we did because we solved it. But if you go back and say, "Ardy, would you do it again if you knew it was going to be this tough?" I wouldn't, because it's really, it's not the number two problem, it's the number one problem. And we're just, you know, I'm a peon. I'm a very small dot. I'm not anyone special. I'm just very passionate about solving this problem. That's it. And so is my team, and we got a great team and we've execute on. So great.Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it was my idea. I was forcing the wearable and fitness data because I was interested in that. And when the Apple Series One Watch came out, it was very limited, but I saw how it was going to change, you know, just connection of data. And my team being bioinformaticians and from the genomics world were so against bringing it in, I mean, I could show you emails of fights about me saying, get fitness data in here. They were not interested. I forced it on them. And then next thing you knew, clinical trials. One of the biggest things was how do you bring sleeping data and wearable data to x y z data? And that market started taking off. Decentralized trials. You can't even do it if you don't have wearable data. And so everyone started saying, you know, OK, you were right. That was one. I get one big pat on the back. And then we realized we can't be limited to just those three pillars. So what are the next three that we can work on? And that was claims data so we can marry it with the EMR and medical data for payers. And then we ran into pharmacy data. We just signed our first digital pharmacy deal three weeks ago with Paragon Health. And if we didn't have those capabilities, we wouldn't have the business opportunities. And the social determinants of health data being our last integrations comes in very handy for various different use cases.Harry Glorikian: So, three sort of things, right? You know, you combine all this data. What can you learn that wasn't obvious before? How do you translate into better health outcomes for consumers or, say, smarter decision making by consumers, right, so those are two potentially different ways to look at it.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. So one word for you: Seqster's longitudinal health record drives health economics, outcomes, research. It drives it.Harry Glorikian: Is that your clients doing that, you doing that, a third party group coming in?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. We don't do that. We're just the patient engagement and data aggregation operating system that gets implemented for enterprise. And then the enterprise can run the analytics on top of it. They can, you know, take all of the raw data. So we're the only 21 CFR Part 11 compliant platform too. We're fully FDA compliant, Harry. It took us 19 months working with the FDA in order to get our compliance letter in September, October of last year, 2020. So about a year ago. And not only are we HIPAA compliance, not only are we High Trust certified and 256 bit encrypted on all the data that comes in, but having that FDA compliance sets us apart number one. Number two, because we're not an API, we have FHIR fully integrated. We have an API for sharing data, but we're not an API business. We're a SaaS business in health care, in digital health. We can make any company a digital health company. Let's say it's Coca-Cola, and they want to empower their 200,000 employees. They could launch a Coca-Cola Seqster white label in 72 hours to 200,000 employees. That's what we've created. Now, take that and imagine that now within pharma, within precision medicine, within clinical trials, within the payer network, which we're the only platform that's CMS ONC interoperability compliance from the Twenty First Century CURES Act as well.Harry Glorikian: So let me let me see if I... I'm trying to figure out like the angle, right? So I mean, ideally for interoperability, if we talk about the highest level right, you really want to get Epic, Cerner, Kaiser, et cetera, all in a room right? And get them to agree to something. Which is like an act of God.Ardy Arianpour: Some people say, we're doing, you know, it's not my words, but again, a figure of speech, people say, we're doing God's work.Harry Glorikian: But stepping back here for a second, what I see you guys doing is actually giving a platform to the patient and the patient is then connecting the record, not necessarily the systems themselves allowing for interoperability to take place.Ardy Arianpour: So yes, but you're speaking of it because of the direct to consumer experience that you had. The experience we gave you is much different than the experience from the enterprise side. We have a full BI platform built for enterprise as well. Right. And then we have the white label for the enterprise where they launch it to a million patients.Harry Glorikian: That's what, I'm trying to think about that, right? So. Coca-cola says, like, going down your example, Coca-Cola says, "Love to do this. Want to offer it to all of our employees." We make it available to them. But it's the employee that has to push the start button and say, yes, I want my electronic medical record to be integrated into this single platform, right?Ardy Arianpour: But that's that's an example with Coca-Cola. If we're doing something with Big Pharma, they're running a clinical trial for 500,000 COVID patients, as an example. They're getting data collection within one day versus two months, and guess what, we're going to be driving a new possible vaccine. Why? Because of the time it takes for data collection at scale. We empower patients to do that and they get something back. They get to track and monitor all their family health.Harry Glorikian: Right. So so it's sort of, you know, maybe I'm being dense, but sort of the same thing, right? Big Pharma makes it available to the patient. The patient then clicks, Yes, I want to do this and pull in my medical records to make it all everything to be in one place. Yes.Ardy Arianpour: Yes. And I think it's about the fact that we've created a unique data sharing environments. So that's, you know, Harry and Stacey and John and Jennifer and whoever, you know, with whatever use case can share their data and also consent is built with E-consent and digital consent is built within that process. You don't share anything you don't want to share.Harry Glorikian: Right. So let me see if I got this correct. So Seqster is providing a translation and aggregation between systems through a new layer of technology. Not creating true interoperability between systems, right?Ardy Arianpour: Yes. There's a spider web. And. We have untangled the spider beb in the United States of America. We've done all the plumbing and piping to every single health institution, doctor's office clinic, wearable sensor, medical device pharmacy, the list goes on and on, Harry.Harry Glorikian: So let's... Another question. So how does the 21st Century CURES Act of 2016 relate to your business? I think you know you've said something like Seqster has become law, but I'm trying to. I'm trying to understand, what do you mean when you say that?Ardy Arianpour: So when we founded Seqster, we didn't know there was going to be a Twenty First Century CURES Act. We didn't know there was going to be GDPR. We are GDPR compliance before GDPR even came out. Right? Because of our the way that we've structured our business, number one. Number two, how we built the platform by patients for CMS ONC interoperability, you know, final rulings and the Twenty First Century CURES Act, which is, they're synonymous. We worked hand in hand with Don Rucker's team and Seema Verma on the last administration that was doing a lot of the work. Now a wonderful gentleman, Mickey Tripathy has taken the role of ONC, and he understands, you know, the value of Seqster's technology at scale because of his background in interoperability. But what was interesting in the two years that we worked with HHS and CMS was the fact that they used Seqster as the model to build the rules. I was personally part of that, my team was personally part of that, you know, and so we were in private meetings with these folks showing our platform and they were trying to draft certain rules.Ardy Arianpour: We didn't know that they were going to be coming out with rules until they did. And then that's when high level folks in the government told us specifically on calls and also even at Datapalooza when I gave a keynote talk on on Seqster, when Don Rucker did as well right before me. You know, we're sitting in the speaker room and folks are like, "You're going to become law in a month." And this was in February of 2020. March 9th, those rules dropped. I was supposed to give a keynote talk at HL7,  at HIMMS. HIMMS got cancelled in 2020. I just got back from HIMMS 2021 in Vegas just a week and a half ago. It was fantastic. Everyone was masked up. There was only three cases of COVID with 10,000 people there. They did a great job, you know, regulating it. You had to show your vaccine card and all that good stuff. But you know, I would have never thought Seqster becomes law when we were founding the company. And so this is really special now.Harry Glorikian: So what does success look like for Seqster?Ardy Arianpour: It depends how you measure it. So we're in the Olympics. It's a great question. Here's my answer to you. We're in the Olympics just finished, right? So we started out in track and field. We were really good at running the 400 Meters and then somehow we got a use case on the 4x1 and the 4x4. And then we did really well there, too. And then because of our speed, you know, we got some strength and then they wanted us to get into the shot put and the javelin throw and then we started winning there, too. And then somehow, now people are calling us saying, "Are you interested in trying to swim?" We got the 100 meter butterfly. Well, we've never done that. So success for us is based off of use cases. And every use case that we deal with, within clinical trials and pharma, we've define 24 distinct use cases that we're generating business on. Within the payer community now, because of the CMS ONC Twenty First Century Cures Act, there's a major tailwind. Within life insurance for real time underwriting, there's, you know, a plethora of folks that are calling us for our system because of the patient engagement. So this patient centricity for us has been a central pillar, and I've never allowed anyone in our company, whether it's the board or our investors or employees, you know, get sidetracked from that. We've been laser focused on the patients and success at impacting patient lives at scale.Harry Glorikian: So as a venture guide, though, right, like I'm going to, there's only so much money on so much time to tackle, so many different opportunities, right? So it's there is a how do we create a recurring revenue stream and keep plugging along and then generate either enough revenue or raise enough money to do more? And so just trying to think through that for what you guys are trying to do, I get the 4x100 and the swimming. But all of that takes money and resources right to be able to prove out, of course.Ardy Arianpour: And here's another thing we're in a different state. Look, my team and I had a major exit before. We built a billion dollar company out of $3 million. And even though we weren't founders of that company, you know, I was the senior vice president and we we did really well. So, you know, that allowed us to not take salaries that allowed us to take our money and put it into doing something good. And we did that in 2016 to seed it. And then afterwards, I raised, you know, millions of dollars from folks that were interested in, you know, this problem and saw that our team had a track record. And I actually was not interested, Harry, in raising a Series A because of our experience, but we kept on getting calls. And then just six months ago, we announced, you know, our series a funding. Well, we actually announced it in March, I think it was, but we closed our Series A in January of this year and it was led by Takeda Pharma, Anne Wojcicki's 23andMe and United Healthcare Group's Equian folks that created Omniclaim and sold to UnitedHealth Group Omni Health Holdings.Ardy Arianpour: So check this out. Imagine my vision in 2016 of having medical data, genomic data fitness data. Well, if you look at the investors that backed us, it's pretty interesting. What I reflect on is I didn't plan that either. We got amazing genomic investors. I mean, it doesn't get better than getting Anne Wojcicki and 23andMe. Amazing female entrepreneur and, you know, just the just the force. Secondly, Takeda Pharma, a top 10 pharma company. How many digital health startups do you know within Series A that got a top 10 pharma? And then also getting some payer investors from UnitedHealth Group's Omniclaim folks and Equian OmniHealth Holdings. So this is to me, very interesting. But going to focus our focus has been pharma and clinical trials. And so Takeda has been phenomenal for us because of, you know, they they built out the platform and they built it out better for us and they knew exactly what to do with things that we didn't know. And with things that patients didn't know on the enterprise, you know, Takeda did a phenomenal job. And now other pharma companies are utilizing our platform, not just Takeda.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, they want their data aggregation. They want as much data on the patient aggregated in one place to make sense of it.Ardy Arianpour: So not necessarily that they actually want to empower patients with a patient centric engagement tool. That's pharma's number one thing right now, the data part, obviously is important, but empowering patient lives at scale is the key, and that's that's our mission. And so, yeah, that's that's a whole 'nother cocktail conversation when I see you soon hopefully in a couple of weeks.Harry Glorikian: Hopefully as life gets, or if it gets back to normal, depending on the variants, you know, we'll hopefully get to meet him in person and have a glass of wine or a cocktail together. So it was great to speak to you. Glad we had this time, and I look forward to, you know, hearing updates on the company and, you know, continually seeing the progress going forward.Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry, for having me. Big fan of Moneyball, so thank you to you and your organizers for having me and Seqster on. If anyone wants to get in touch with me personally, you can find me on LinkedIn or you can follow Seqster at @Seqster. And again, thank you so much for. For having a great discussion around, you know, the the insights behind Seqster.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Thank you.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode.  You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview. 

Optimal Business Daily
419: Should You Use Clickbait to Get People to Read Your Stuff by Margo Aaron of That Seems Important on Marketing Ethic

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 8:21


Margo Aaron of That Seems Important questions whether or not you should use clickbait to get people to read your stuff Episode 419: Should You Use Clickbait to Get People to Read Your Stuff by Margo Aaron of That Seems Important on Marketing Ethic Margo Aaron is a proud graduate of Emory University, Columbia University and altMBA where she won the prestigious Walker Award. In 2017 she founded The Arena, the first virtual coworking space for solopreneurs. She's a regular contributor to Inc and lives in Jersey City as a Daywalker. The original post is located here: https://www.thatseemsimportant.com/marketing/clickbait-headlines/  Laika's platform builds and automates compliance for standards like SOC 2 and HIPAA, with hands-on expertise each step of the way. OSD listeners get 20% off when joining at Heylaika.com/osd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Optimal Business Daily
418: The Psychology of a Billion-Dollar Enterprise App: Why is Slack So Habit-Forming by Nir Eyal & Ciara Byrne

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 10:12


Nir Eyal and Ciara Byrne of NirAndFar talk about why Slack is so habit-forming Episode 418: The Psychology of a Billion-Dollar Enterprise App: Why is Slack So Habit-Forming by Nir Eyal & Ciara Byrne Nir Eyal writes, consults, and teaches about the intersection of psychology, technology, and business. The M.I.T. Technology Review dubbed Nir, “The Prophet of Habit-Forming Technology.” Nir founded two tech companies since 2003 and has taught at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford. He is the author of the bestselling book, Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products. In addition to blogging at NirAndFar.com, Nir's writing has been featured in The Harvard Business Review, TechCrunch, and Psychology Today. Nir is also an active investor in habit-forming technologies. Some of his past investments include: Eventbrite, Product Hunt, Pantry, Marco Polo, Presence Learning, 7 Cups, Pana, Symphony Commerce, Worklife (acquired by Cisco) and Refresh.io (acquired by LinkedIn). Nir attended The Stanford Graduate School of Business and Emory University. The original post is located here: https://www.nirandfar.com/habit-forming/  Laika's platform builds and automates compliance for standards like SOC 2 and HIPAA, with hands-on expertise each step of the way. OSD listeners get 20% off when joining at Heylaika.com/osd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More
HealthLaw HotSpot: Faheem Ahmad - HIPAA Technical Audits: Protecting your Practice

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 25:16


Host Ericka Adler, Roetzel shareholder and Health Law Practice Group Leader, is joined by Faheem Ahmad, Service Manager at Technical Doctors, for a discussion of the importance of HIPAA compliance. Faheem offers important steps to make sure your practice meets the technical requirements of HIPAA and shares his experience about what can go wrong. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen/

Group Practice Tech
Episode 223 [Practice Management] The PCT Way, What It Is and Why It Works

Group Practice Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 60:30


Welcome solo and group practice owners! We are Liath Dalton and Roy Huggins, your co-hosts of Person Centered Tech. In our latest episode, we're talking about The PCT Way.  We discuss how we developed The PCT Way; simplifying HIPAA compliance needs; minimizing financial cost as well as time, energy, anxiety, and cognitive overhead; meeting your practice needs and client needs in a way that's efficient and reliably HIPAA compliant; systems vs. frameworks; solo vs. group practice needs; system bloat; the five primary steps of The PCT Way (service selection, HIPAA training, device security, risk analysis, and building your HIPAA security compliance manual); new features on the Person Centered Tech website; why HIPAA compliance is optional; and being proactive with the PCT Way.  Listen here: https://personcenteredtech.com/group/podcast/ Stay tuned for future episodes! For more, visit our website. Resources The PCT Way for Group Practices - a system for making your *whole* practice work. Learn more, and start for free. Group Practice Care: PCT Way is the system. Practice care is the service that supports you through it. Celebratory Launch + Black Friday + Cyber Monday Sale. Save up to 25% on Group Practice Care (annual) *and* role-based staff HIPAA, ethics, and teletherapy trainings (CE for clinical staff trainings). Build Your Team -- add your team and assign and track their HIPAA Security Tasks, including: Our nationally respected, role-based HIPAA and privacy ethics training built for mental health staff (CE for clinical staff) Vital, relevant security awareness training Personal device securing (BYOD) and registration Automate kind reminders when needed Track your team's progress and completion status Manage your team with separate, revocable logins, assigned content, and detailed training logs so you can stay on top of your team's HIPAA compliance tasks — without the drama.

The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life
400% YoY Growth HIPPA Compliant ChatBot Breaks $60k MRR, $15m Valuation

The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 19:33


HIPAA compliant intelligent chat

Law and Candor
Getting Personal—Wearable Devices, Data, and Compliance

Law and Candor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 27:37


In the final episode of the season, co-hosts Bill Mariano and Rob Hellewell review a New Yorker piece by Kyle Chayka about the beauty and uncanniness of AI-created images delivered by the Twitter handle @images_ai.The co-hosts then bring on Thora Johnson of Orrick for a riveting discussion about the rise in wearable devices and the personal data they're collecting. They discuss the fascinating innovation in health-related technology and apps and the significant data compliance, privacy, and cybersecurity issues that are accompanying it. Some key questions from their conversation include: Beyond the more well-known wearable devices and health-related apps, what others are out there and what types of data are they collecting?The proliferation of data these devices and apps are generating have created a unique set of intersecting compliance, security, and privacy challenges—what are some of the most critical to understand?How can teams mitigate the risk of a cyber breach? And in the event it does happen, what are best practices in terms of responding to a breach?What should attorneys and legal teams know about the FTC's recent announcement that it plans to “vigorously” enforce its 2009 Health Breach Notification rule?What regulatory issues related to apps collecting genetic information that people should be aware of?The season ends with key takeaways from the guest speaker section. If you enjoyed the show, learn more about our speakers and subscribe on the podcast homepage, rate us on Apple and Stitcher, and join in the conversation on Twitter.Related LinksBlog Post: AI and Analytics: New Ways to Guard Personal InformationBlog Post: Cybersecurity Defense: Biden Administration Executive Order a Great Start Towards a More Robust National FrameworkPodcast: Reducing Cybersecurity Burdens with a Customized Data Breach WorkflowTwitter: https://twitter.com/images_aiAbout Law & CandorLaw & Candor is a podcast wholly devoted to pursuing the legal technology revolution. Co-hosts Bill Mariano and Rob Hellewell explore the impacts and possibilities that new technology is creating by streamlining workflows for ediscovery, compliance, and information governance. To learn more about the show and our speakers, visit the podcast homepage.