Podcasts about Software development

Creation and maintaining of programs and applications

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Latest podcast episodes about Software development

Creating Wealth through Passive Apartment Investing
EP#306 Achieving financial goals by investing in real estate with Kavitha V. Baratakke

Creating Wealth through Passive Apartment Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 28:18


Kavitha Baratakke, Founder of Cherry Street Investments is an Austin-based Real Estate Investor with over 12 years of real estate investing experience. Prior to real estate, she spent almost 20 years as a Technology Professional working for IBM and Atlassian in various roles across Software Development, Customer Services, Partner Relations and Technical Account Management. Kavitha brings strong project management, problem-solving and presentation skills from her Technology background to Real Estate.  As an investor, Kavitha has successfully acquired, rehabbed, managed, owned and operated several single-family and multi-family investment properties in the Central Texas area. She sponsors real estate syndications in Multifamily, Build-to-Rent, Townhome Communities, Senior Living and Land Banking investments. She prefers strong growth markets like Austin, DFW, San Antonio, Phoenix, and Atlanta.Key highlights- Know your sponsorer & location before investing in syndication- Investing in assets with bigger profit margins- Educate yourself before you invest- Positioning yourself to attract capital- Common mistakes while raising capitalFollow Rama on socials!LinkedIn | Meta | Twitter | InstagramConnect to Rama KrishnaE-mail: info@ushacapital.comWebsite: www.ushacapital.com

Make/Shift
Creating a Vision, Establishing a Team, and Measuring Success With Digital Transformation

Make/Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 24:11


Arno covers the importance of creating a vision and establishing a team to execute a plan to achieve digital transformation. Arno talks about how his experience at Mendix influences his interactions with customers and vice versa, and finally, how he measures the value of digital transformation projects.

The People Stack Podcast
Episode 287: Who Are Your Friends? They Could be Making or Breaking Your Tech Career.

The People Stack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 41:07


Who do you surround yourself with and what is their energy? This is a critical question to ask yourself, especially if you want to create a tech career full of virtuous & ludicrous joy & prosperity. In this episode, I help you add even more intention to your choices around connections & relationships - so that you can build your dream career! Give this podcast a listen right now!

#StoriesByScrimba Podcast
Code Like Nobody Is Watching: On Community, Learning, and Finding the Right Culture Fit, With Scrimba Student James

#StoriesByScrimba Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 53:45


Web and Mobile App Development (Language Agnostic, and Based on Real-life experience!)

What inferences can we possibly draw from a movie that can be relevant to software development? Well, here's my take (even if a contrived one) :) #snowpal #projectmanagement #homepagedesign Happy Sunday. Happy organizing on https://snowpal.com.

Remote Ruby
Tip Tapping Around & The Rails Foundation

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 50:39


[00:02:28] Jason dives right in talking about Tiptap, a text editor for the web.[00:06:05] The controversial Twitter is brought up, as well as Reddit, Mastodon, and Ruby Social.[00:07:04] We go back to Tiptap the database, as Jason goes in depth into active ActionText and what he's exploring now.   [00:10:28] Jason mentions Tiptap will let you send HTML and explains why he likes the flexibility, and he shares his ideas of wanting to build Ruby Objects to represent each type of node.  Andrew and Chris share their thoughts on his ideas. [00:14:06] Phlex comes into the discussion and Jason explains how he incorporated it.  We learn about Joel releasing a markdown renderer for Flex and what he did with it, and we learn about using Pretty Print.  [00:24:00] Chris talks about a Twitter post from Javan Makhmali regarding chromium having an exception inside of the source code to deal with a weird situation with Trix.[00:25:01] Trix v2.0.0 just came out this past week and Chris also tells us about a weird thing about ActionText being in the HTML format when it gets saved.   [00:29:50] Chris explains why SGIDs are undervalued because there's so much cool stuff you can do with them.[00:35:40] The guys discuss The Rails Foundation big announcement, the corporate members that funded it, and what its mission is.  [00:41:21] Andrew has some thoughts to share on some derogatory posts from people in the community about The Rails Foundation post.  [00:47:05] Chris brings up some valid points with how the Ruby community is still getting a lot of investment improvements and we need to keep making the push to encourage people to build new stuff and be excited about Ruby.Panelists:Jason CharnesChris OliverAndrew MasonSponsor:HoneybadgerLinks:Jason Charnes TwitterChris Oliver TwitterAndrew Mason TwitterTiptapJSON Pretty PrintquicktypeJavan Makhmali Twitter postRich text editors exhibit strange auto-correct insertion/correction behaviors without user input (bugs)The Rails Foundation kicks off with one million dollars (The Rails Foundation)Ruby Radar NewsletterRuby Radar TwitterRuby for All Podcast

DevOps and Docker Talk
HashiCorp Vault for Kubernetes

DevOps and Docker Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 54:41


Bret is joined by Rosemary Wang from HashiCorp to show off Vault for Kubernetes, an an open source secrets provider.Rosemary is a return guest and does her usual fantastic job at explaining the complex topics around storing secrets, who needs Vault and why, running Vault on Kubernetes, the Vault storage backend and so much more.Streamed live on YouTube on September 29, 2022. Includes demos.Unedited live recording of this show on YouTube (Ep #186)★Topics★Vault websiteHashiCorp CloudRaft storage for Vault, how Raft worksExample repo: HashiCorp Vault for Development Teams★Rosemary Wang★Rosemary on TwitterRosemary on Linkedin★Join my Community★Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us and fellow students on our Discord Server DevOps FansHomepage bretfisher.com ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Remote Ruby
BridgetownConf, Pagination, HTTP/3 & Actionable Errors

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 39:33


[00:01:21] We hear about Andrew's talk at BridgetownConf.[00:07:31] Since Chris is getting up so early these days, he talks about how productive he feels programming early mornings and late nights, and Andrew shares how addicting it can be to slip into the zone and end up working into the wee hours of the night.   [00:08:47] Chris brings up a college memory and having different sleep schedules, and he gives an update from last week's convo about the new updated missing template error page.[00:15:29] Andrew had a problem last week with passing params around. He wonders if Chris has run into weird issues with Turbo and Pagy, and then explains the problem he had hoping someone out there can help him fix it. Any takers?[00:20:18] We find out some issues Chris had with pagination stuff.[00:21:39] Chris brings up 37signals and a new blog where they had a new pagination thing posted.[00:23:48] Andrew mentions Planet Scale blogging about something new for pagination called, FastPage.[00:25:23] There's conversation on having support, working on tickets, and what the new Hatchbox does better now since Chris made some changes. [00:28:50] Chris has been playing with the new Caddy supports HTTP/3 for fun. [00:33:20] Find out about the show Hak5 that still exists, and the guys go down memory lane sharing stories from high school and college.Panelists:Chris OliverAndrew MasonSponsor:HoneybadgerLinks:Jason Charnes TwitterChris Oliver TwitterAndrew Mason TwitterPagy-GitHub37signalsPlanetScalePlanet Scale Blog- Introducing FastPage: Faster offset pagination for Rails appsHak5 ShowsRuby Radar NewsletterRuby Radar TwitterRuby for All Podcast

Make/Shift
Addressing Digital Transformation With Low-Code and Intelligent Automation

Make/Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 26:20


Madhu covers how organizations leverage Intelligent and Connected Automation with low-code to drive business change. He talks about the different categories of projects that organizations consider with these technologies and the associated challenges. Finally, Madhu covers how to manage change during digital transformation efforts.

Software Engineering Unlocked
Collaborative debugging with Fiberplane

Software Engineering Unlocked

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 43:51


​This episode is sponsored by Fiberplane. Your platform for collaborative debugging notebooks!Episode Resources:Try Fiberplane hereFiberplane websiteFiberplane DocsNP-hard Ventures About Micha Hernandez van LeuffenMicha Hernandez van Leuffen is the founder and CEO of Fiberplane. He previously founded Wercker, a container-native CI/CD platform that was acquired by Oracle. Micha has dedicated his career to improving the workflows of developers. Read the whole episode (Transcript)[If you want, you can help make the transcript better, and improve the podcast's accessibility via Github. I'm happy to lend a hand to help you get started with pull requests, and open source work.][00:00:00] Michaela: Hello and welcome to the Software Engineering Unlocked Podcast. I'm host, Dr. McKayla, and today I have the pleasure to talk to Micha Hernandez van Leuffen. He is the founder and CEO of Fiberplane. He previously was the founder of Wercker, a container native CI/CD platform that was acquired by Oracle. Micha has dedicated his career to improving the workflow of developers, so he and I have a lot to talk about today.I'm really, really happy that he's here today and he's also sponsoring today's episode. Welcome to the show. I'm happy that you're here, Micha.[00:00:36] Micha: Thank you for having me. Excited to be on the show.[00:00:38] Michaela: Yeah, I'm really, really excited. So, Micha, I wanted to start really from the beginning. So you are the CEO of Fiberplane and you are the founder of Wercker, which you already sold.So, can you tell me a little bit about how you actually started to this entrepreneur journey of yours and what brought you to the developer experience area.[00:01:03] Micha: Yeah, sure thing. So I have a background in computer science and I did my so, I'm originally from Amsterdam, but I did my thesis at USF.And the topic was autonomous resource provision using software containers. This was all before Docker was a thing, you know, the container format that we now know and love. And I sort of got excited by that field of, of so containers and decided to start a company around it. That company was Worker, so container native CI/CD platform.So we helped developers build tests and deploy their applications to the cloud. We went, I would say, so we went through various iterations of the platform. You know, eventually, you know, we started off with Lxc as a container format and then eventually ended up, you know, having to, to platform on Docker.And Kubernetes. But, you know, it was quite a, quite a journey. So that company eventually got acquired by Oracle to bolster their cloud native strategy. And then, you know, spent a couple years in a Bay area as a VP of software development focusing on their cloud native efforts.Tried to do a little bit of open source there as well, and then, you know, move back to Europe. And so sort of started thinking about what's. Did some angel investing. We're still doing some angel investing as well actually in the sort of same arena. So developer tools, infrastructure building blocks for tomorrow.So I run a, a small precede seat fund with to other friends of mine. But then also started, you know, thinking about what to build next. And you know, we can get into that, but sort of from our experience at running work or this sort of large distributed. Sort of fiber plane was, was born.[00:02:26] Michaela: Cool. Yeah. And so how, how was the acquisition for you? I, from the time I'm, you said you were studying at the university, but then did you write out of university, you know, start worker or maybe already while[00:02:40] Micha: you were Yeah. More or less studying? Yeah. Yeah, more or less just out of university. So it was around 20, 20 12, 20 13.And then, you know, expanded the team. Of course we got an office in San Francisco and, and London. And then 2017 we got acquired by Whirlpool. Oh,[00:02:56] Michaela: very cool. Wow. Cool. So, and you were the, you were the founder of that and also probably cto, CEO. At, at the beginning you were one person shop, or was this, or have this idea and I get some funding and I already, you know, have a team when I'm starting out, or was it more bootstrapped way?How, how was that?[00:03:16] Micha: Yeah, yeah. We both gates, both fiber plane and, and, and worker. We got some funding early on. Then eventually got a CTO. For worker was one of the co-founders of, of OpenStack. So also, you know, very early in the, in that sort of, mm-hmm. container and, and cloud infrastructure journey.And then if for fiber plane, Yeah. There, there's no cto. I'm. I'm both CEO and cto, I guess[00:03:38] Michaela: at the same time. Yeah. Cool, cool. Can you tell me a little bit about fiber plane? What is fiber plane? You know, what does, what does it has to do with containers and with developer experience? What, what kind of of a product is it?[00:03:51] Micha: Yeah, sure thing. So, so guess coming back to the worker days, right? So we, we, you know, we're running this distributed system cic cd, so we were also running users arbitrary code. You know, any, any sort of job could happen on the platform on top of Kubernetes, inside of containers. So one of the things that, you know, stuck with me was it was very hard to always sort of debug the system, like figure out what's really going on when we had some kind of issue.You know, we've going back and forth between metrics, logs, traces, trying to figure out what is the root cause of an issue. So sort of that, that was sort of one thing. So we're thinking a lot about, you know, surely there must be a better way to, to, to help you on this, on this journey. . The other thing that I started thinking about a lot was sort of just challenge the assumption of the dashboard, mm-hmm.So if you think about it, like a lot of the monitoring observability tools are modeled after the dashboard, like sort of cockpit like view of your infrastructure. But I'd say that those are great for the known knowns. So dashboard is great. You set it up in advance, you know exactly what's gonna go wrong.These are the things to monitor. These are the things, you know, to keep tabs on. But then reality hits and you know, the thing that you're looking at, at the dashboard is not necessarily a thing that's. Going wrong. Right? So started thinking a lot about you know, what, what is a better form factor to support that sort of more investigative explorative debugging of your infrastructure.And not to say that dashboards don't have their place, right? It's like still that sort of cockpit view of your infrastructure. I think that's a, a good thing to have. But for debugging, you might wanna sort of more explorative a form factor that also gives you actionable intelligence. I think the other thing that you see a lot with dashboards, like everybody's monitoring everything and now you get a lot of signal and a lot of inputs, but not necessarily the actionable intelligence to figure out what's going on.So that's sort of the other piece where it, then the other, like, the third like I would say is collaboration sort of thing that stuck with. Was also like we've come to enjoy tools like Notion, you know, Google Docs obviously. You know, in the design space we got Figma where collaboration is built in from the get go and it is found that it was kind of odd how in the developer tools and then sort of specifically DevOps.We don't really have sort of these collab collaboration not really built in. Right. If you think about it you know, the status quo of, of you and I debugging an issue is we get on, you know, we get on a. You share your screen you open some dashboard and we started talking over it or something.Right. And so it's, and it's, you know, I guess sort of covid accelerated his thinking a bit, but you know, of everybody going remote you know, how can you make that experience more collaborative?[00:06:22] Michaela: Mm-hmm. . So it's in the incident space, it's in the monitoring space, and you want to bring more collaboration.So how does it work? Yeah,[00:06:32] Micha: yeah, yeah, exactly. So what's your solution now? Yeah. Now I've explained sort of the in inception. Yeah. But yeah, but what is it? What is it? Right. So it's, it's it's a notebook form factor. So very much inspired by data science, right? Like rc, like Jupiter. Yeah, we can Jupyter Notebooks.Yeah. Think of, think of that form factor. Mm-hmm. . We don't use Jupyter or anything like that. We've written everything from scratch. But it's a sort of, yeah, a notebook form factor and you know, built in with collaboration. So you can add, mention people like you would on Slack. You can leave, you know, comments or discussions and all and all that.But where it gets interesting, we've got these things called providers, which are effectively plugins. So they're web assembly bundles, which we can sort of dive into into that as well. But they're providers that connect to your infrastructure, right? So we have, for instance, a provider for Elastic Search for your logs.We have a provider for Prometheus for your. And it allows you to connect to these observability systems and kind of pull 'em together into one form, factor the notebook, and then, you know, start collaborating around that. Mm-hmm. . So, you know, imagine if Notion and Datadog would have a baby . Yeah.That's kind what you get. Yeah.[00:07:41] Michaela: That's cool. So I can imagine that. Let's. I'm on call and hopefully I'm not alone. A call. You are also on call, right? Yeah, and so we would open a fiber plane notebook.[00:07:52] Micha: Hopefully we're in the same time zone and we don't need to like wake up in the middle of that. Yeah.[00:07:57] Michaela: Hopefully. Yes. And then we want to understand. How the system is behaving. And so we are pulling in observers. These are data sources. Yeah. More or less. Right. And then we can do some transformation with those data. Data sources or[00:08:12] Micha: Yeah, yeah. That, yeah, exactly. That, that might be the case. The other thing that we integrate with is, for instance, PagerDuty.So an alert goes off indeed we are on call, but an alert goes off and we have this PagerDuty integration. And subsequently a notebook is created for us already. Mm-hmm. . Okay. Maybe, maybe even with, you know, some, some charts and logs that are already related to the service that might be down.Okay. So depend, So depending on the alert, obviously you're, as you know, you're as good as how you've instrumented your alerts. But say we've written some good alerts, we now have a notebook ready to go. Based off a template. So that's another thing that we, that we have as well, which is this template mechanism.And now, you know, we're ready to, to, to go in, get in into things and start debugging. So we might have a checklist, you know you look at the metrics, I'll look at the logs, sort of this action plan. We pull in that data we start a discussion around it. Mm-hmm. , hopefully we come, we come to the, to the, you know, the root cause of, of our issue.[00:09:11] Michaela: Okay. And so this discussion and this pulling in data, this happens all in the notebook. Can you explain me a little bit more, and also our listeners Exactly. When we are on this, you know, on this call now, having a fiber plane notebook in front of our, what do we see, right? How does that, how does the tool look?[00:09:28] Micha: It's, it's very similar to, I would say, like a Notion Page or a Google Doc page. Mm-hmm. . So we've got like different, different headings. The other thing that we have is, so you might have a title for a notebook, right? You know, the billing, the billing API is now. The other thing that we have is sort of this, this time range.So maybe usually when there's an issue, you know, we've seen this behavior over the last three hours, so we can sort of have that time range locked into place. So we only want to see our. For the last three hours. And that means that any chart that we plot or any log that we pull in will adhere to that global timeframe.So that's what we see. Mm-hmm. . We have support for labels, so, you know, obviously big fans of Kubernetes and, and Promeus. So we, you know, labels are. A first class primitive on the platform. So you're able to sort of populate the notebook with the labels that might maybe be related to our service.Right? So it's a US East one, which is our region. It might, you know, say service is the billing. It might be, you know, environment is production. And the status of our incident is, mm-hmm. ongoing, stuff like that. So we have, we've got, go ahead.[00:10:34] Michaela: Cool. Yeah. And, and so is it then from top to bottom we are writing and we are investigating and we are writing out down the questions that we have and the investigation.Yeah, exactly. We do.[00:10:44] Micha: Yeah. Yeah. And so, so[00:10:45] Michaela: we might have, Is it an Yeah. Is it Yes,[00:10:48] Micha: we our work? Yeah. Yeah. It's sort of Exactly. And I think in the most ideal use case, right. And I do it most ideal scenario, you're kind of like writing your postmortem as you go along. That's what[00:10:59] Michaela: I, I was thinking exactly that.Right. And then maybe next time I'm on call again and I get PagerDuty and something is down, it's again, billing. Can I search in the fiber plane notebooks to find, you know, what we did last time and then[00:11:13] Micha: Exactly. So you'll, you'll search, jump to the conclusion . Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Hopefully, hopefully if you, if you experience, you know, the same issue multiple times at some point, we'll, we'll, you know, do a little commit on GitHub and we, we fix our, fix our, Yeah.Do. But yeah, indeed, so you can search Yeah. Cool. On the notebooks and see if you've, you know, ran into similar issues. So that's, you know, it's great for building up this, this system of record, right. This knowledge base of mm-hmm. . Mm-hmm. . Of infrastructure issues and, and incidents. And it's also great for onboarding, right?If a new person joins, like, this is our process. These are some of examples that we've run into you know, have a look. And now you've got a sense for you know, how we, how we handle things and some of the issues that we've investigated. Yeah. Cool. One more thing on the, on the product. So the other, so, you know, sort of explained the, the notebook form factor.We've got these providers, right, that pull in data. From different, different data sources like Elastic Search or, or Prometheus. The other thing that we have is a command line interface which is called fp. Mm-hmm . And apart from, you know, being able to create notebooks from your terminal and you know, even invite people from the terminal, all this sort of usual stuff that you would, you know, expect from interacting with an API, with, with a product like this, there's two other things that we do.So one is a command called FP Run. And it allows you to, if you are typing a command like cube, ctl logs for a specific pod, you can pipe that the output of that command to a notebook. And why that is useful is of course, you know, when we're de debugging this issue, you and I, and you're start typing things in your terminal.I have no idea what you just did. And this is a way sort of to capture that. So you're piping these these, these outputs from your, the stuff that you're typing into your into your. into the notebook. And the cool thing is, you know, in, on your laptop you just, you know, sort of see text, right?Monospace output. But for certain outputs such as the cube CTL logs command, we actually know the structure of the data and we're actually capable of formatting that in the notebook in the structured manner that you can start filtering on, on the logs and you know, select certain columns and sort of highlight even certain loglines for prosperity that you say, Hey, these are the culprits, these are the things that you need to take into, into consideration next.So we have this sort of command line interface companion, and the other thing that it does, you're actually capable of running a long, like, sort of same use case as it just, I mentioned, but like a long running recording, like you actually record your entire shell session session as you're debugging this thing and all the output gets piped into the notebook.Cool. Cool. And[00:13:46] Michaela: so I have two questions for fiber plane. One. Is the software engineer the right person to interact with you know, fiber plane or is it the site reliability engineer that's really designed, you know, or the tool is designed[00:14:03] Micha: for? Yeah, it's, it's, that's an excellent question. So I think one, one site reliability engineers, you kind of see in more larger organizations, right, where you start splitting up your teams.I will say, I think at the end of the day, right, is if you're an engineer, you've built the service, now you need to maintain it now you need to operate it like it's, it's your baby, right? You need to, you probably know best how that system behaves than anybody else. So indeed I would say that, yeah, the target group is, you know, developers.Mm-hmm. .[00:14:40] Michaela: And so the other question that I had around fiber plane is also. When we are on this call and we are writing in this notebook, how does the whole scenario look like? Are we still on a call, like, do we have Zoom or, you know, Google meet open, or are we really in the, in the fiber plane document just writing, Or are we sitting next to each other?You know, what, what's the traditional, Is there a traditional scenario or is this all possible with fiber plane? How would you recommend using[00:15:09] Micha: it? Yeah, Yeah. Yeah. Not a, not a great question. Right. I think back in the day, it would be that, you know, we maybe sit in the same office and I scoot over and we start looking at a, at a screen, right?And start typing together. Mm-hmm. . The reality is, of course, we're all doing remote work now, and we might not be in the same room. So I do think people will still use a Zoom call or a Google meet you know, as a companion to talk over stuff. I think, you know, people will still communicate in Slack and sort of start chatting back and forth.But I think what we hope to achieve with fiber plane is like the pasting of screenshots, right? Well, if you take a screenshot of some kind of chart in your dashboard and you put it in Slack and you know, somebody yells, Oh, that's not the, that's not the thing that you should be looking at. You should, you know, like all that sort of slack glue That, you know, it's our, our goal to do away with that.[00:15:59] Michaela: Yeah. And, and the slack blue is also very problematic for the search. At least I'm never able to find it again. Right. It's like is in the dark, super in[00:16:07] Micha: the dark area. Yeah. Super ephemeral. Yeah. Yeah. You can't, can't go back in time easily. And, and you know, how did we solve this last time? So again, like building up that system of record, I think.[00:16:17] Michaela: Yeah. Very cool. And so how long are you now working on fiber plane already?[00:16:23] Micha: So we've been working on it for about two years now. Which is a, is a, is a long time. I think as a sort of, you know, one of the things that we've, I guess, sort of discovered along the way that we're kind of like building two startups at the same time, Right?We're doing a notion or like a, a rich text, collaborative rich text editing experience, which is kind of like a startup on its own. Mm-hmm. . And we're building sort of this infrastructure product. So it's, you know, it's taken quite some time and, and energy to, to get the product to where it is now.[00:16:54] Michaela: Yeah. And do you have already users? Is it like can people that listen today, can they hop on fiber plane already or.[00:17:02] Micha: It's, it's in it's been in private beta, mm-hmm. , but I think by the time this gets aired it's will be in public beta and people can sign up and take it for a spin. And, you know, we would love to get feedback on, on our roadmap, right?And Okay. People can suggest what other types of providers we need to support, what are types of integrations we, you know, would love to, to have that convers.[00:17:23] Michaela: Cool. Yeah. So is there, There is the provider side. Is there something else that you want feedback on that you are exploring[00:17:30] Micha: maybe. . Yeah. Yeah. So we've got the providers that's one thing.We've got sort of our templating stack. Mm-hmm. So curious to sort of see how people sort of start codifying their knowledge, right? What's, what, what kind of processes people have to debug their infrastructure and sort of run their incidents or write their postmortems. So curious to see what people come up with there.Other types of integrations. Right? So we have as I said, sort of PagerDuty what other type of, sort of alert, alert to notebook or other types of external systems that we need to plug in with. I would love to get some feedback on that as well. Yeah,[00:18:04] Michaela: I think I had page Bailey over on the podcast.She's from GitHub and she was she was also, they were releasing something with copilot and you know, For data scientists, some, some spaces here. And she also said like, well, we really need input from the users, right? So try it out, you know, tell us how it's working. I think it's so valuable, right, to see not only like you have your vision and obviously.It's going one way, but then if you have your users, sometimes they take your product and they use it in a very different, you know, way than you anticipate it, which can be very informative. Right. I dunno. You have done two startups already. Have you seen that? And how do you react to it? Do you instrument the data a little bit?How do you realize that people are using your product in a different. . Yeah.[00:18:50] Micha: So, so obviously we have metrics and analytics on sort of usage patterns of the, of the product. But I think, I think that data is excellent, right? But also qualitative data is, mm-hmm. , especially at this stage is probably even better, right?Where you can get somebody on a call and, you know, tell us about your use case. Tell, tell us about the problem that you're trying to solve here and how can we be, be helpful in like what types of integrations should we support? I think sort of the difference between. Worker, I would say, and, and fiber plane is that, you know, worker was a pretty confined piece of surface area, right?Cic, c d the whole goal is so you either have a, you know, a green check mark next to your build or a red check mark next to your build. Like it either, you know, failed or passed. And we need to sort of do that fast for you, get, get that result quick. Mm-hmm. . And with fiber plane, it's a more. I think that the interesting thing here is like, it's a, it's a more explorative and a sort of rich design space, right?It's this notebook, which already you, you know, you can start typing and text and images and headings and check checklists and whatnot, right? It's a very open form factor and design space. And then of course, with the integrations, it can even, you know, be richer. So I'm very curious into your point, right what direction people will pull the product into.Cause you can take it into all sorts. Use cases and scenarios. Yeah,[00:20:05] Michaela: exactly. And I think as a founder also, or as the design team, product team, it's it's also a little bit of a balancing act, right? So how far, you know, let me, are we going with what the user are doing with our product and where are we setting some boundaries that they can't do everything right?So there's also often the talk about opinionated products, right? That you can actually do one thing and on one thing only, and we have an opinion on, you know, how. Supposed to use our product. And you know, we try to, if we see people deviate from that, we try to put an end to it. And then there's the other way where you say, Well, you know, if you take fiber plane and you do X with it and we haven't thought about this maybe, you know, we are okay with it.Or maybe we even support that path, right.[00:20:48] Micha: Yeah, I think, I think we're more on indeed on the, on the ladder, right? I think what we've sort of, we talk about this a lot internally, sort of everything is a building block. You know, you've, we've got the notebook, you've got these different cell types, you've got providers, you've got templates.Mm-hmm. You've got the command line interface. So like for us, like everything is a building block and we, we actually want to retain that flexibility. Not be too prescriptive. Cause maybe you have a, a if you think about sort of the, the incident debugging or, or investigating your infrastructure, like you might have a certain process, I might have a completely different process and we need to be able to facilitate, you know, these different workflows.So, you know, thus far sort of our, our thinking around the product has been everything is a building block. And it should be this sort of flexible form factor that people can pull into into different scenarios and use. I mean,[00:21:36] Michaela: we have infrastructure as code, right? And we have like security as code.Maybe we have debugging as code. Maybe, you know, this is what's coming next. Can, can you envision that, that it's going in this direction? Because while we have building blocks, maybe right now it's not you know, programming language for debugging, but it could go a little bit into the distraction, right?No code coding for debugging.[00:22:02] Micha: Yeah, we've actually, we've, we've had some of, of that sort of discussion internally as well. If you think about the templates right. To, to some extent that is a, you know, we use J Sonet as a, as a sort of language, but we sort of codified them in a certain way and you can, you could argue that the templates is, you know, sort of a programming language for at least, you know, that debugging process, right?Yeah, exactly. Right. Yeah. And. And, and we, you can take that even further and make it kind of like statically typed and make it adhere to, you know, certain rules and maybe even have control flow. So I think that, that there's, there's a piece there. And then maybe, you know, obviously we have you know, some YAML configuration on how you set up your providers, right?Like how to connect to your infrastructure. So there's some, you know, observability as code in mm-hmm. in that realm. Yeah. Yeah. I think that'll be an interesting part of the journey, right? Like to figure out can we, and some even.[00:22:55] Michaela: Yeah, in some parts should be well, don't repeat yourself, right?Like, for example, pulling in these providers, configuring that, you know, I get the right data. This would actually be something that I'm, you know, pulling in again. And probably that's what your templates do, right? So you say billing, oh, and then check, check, check, check, check. I have, you know, all my signals here and they're configured in a way that it's useful.And then for this investigation, hopefully, One at a type thing, right? So I'm investigating, and as we, as we talked before once I realized what's going on, hopefully in my postmortem I'm going to, you know, make sure that this is not happening again. So this code probably is not going to be reused that often.Maybe some, you know, some ideas from it, but hopefully we won't reproduce the same sect completely exact thing again.[00:23:44] Micha: Yeah. Cool. Yeah, that's, that's a super great point. And I think coming back, sort of the early part of the conversation around dashboards, right? I think thus far what we've sort of experienced as, you know, engineers ourselves, like, I think, I think we probably had sort of a phase around information gathering.Like all these dashboards are great for information gathering, but now with Kubernetes and containers and microservices like the, the, the number. Services that we're running and the complexity has increased. So I think, I think there's sort of an opportunity for more exactly what you're describing. So it's more about action, right?Mm-hmm. , what? What are we doing? We want to have the information, we want actionable intelligence that informs us what to do.[00:24:20] Michaela: Yeah, yeah, exactly. Because now I'm looking at this dashboard and I'm seeing the signals. But then everything else is outside of, you know, this realm, right? So what actions do I take?Do I go, go to the console? Do I restart that service? You know, or, you know, whatever I'm doing. And, and it's also vanishing, right? So I'm doing it, but then. Who can see it, What I did. Right? Yeah, exactly. And so now we are capturing this, which is very nice, and then we can learn from it Right. Postmortems as well.Yeah. So I looked a little bit through your blog and and, and your Twitter, and you were also talking about blameless postmortems. So how do you think about psychological safety? How should people. In an organization look at on call and incident management to really make it sure that we are ending the blame game.Right. You probably have some thoughts about that as well, because you're working in this area.[00:25:19] Micha: Yeah. I, I think it's important to, and you like not have put any blame on any person. Right. It, it is a, and I guess sort of, you know, that's also why we're building this product. It is a collaborative process to debug an issue or resolve an incident.Like, and what you want to achieve is to put the entire team in the best possible position to solve the issue at hand and and, you know, a support structure around it. So, you know, coming back to the product, like being able to, to open discussions. Point people in the, in the, in the right direction.[00:25:52] Michaela: So maybe also if it's easier to find a problem to root cause it, and, you know, incidents become no issue or at least a lesser issue. So maybe the blame game is not that important. Can, can we say it that way?[00:26:08] Micha: I think so. Yeah. Yeah, yeah. If, if, you know, if the process becomes repeatable and we codify that and we collaborate on it and we build up that, again, that system of record and knowledge base I think that, you know, puts us in a safer position to, to solve the next one.That's[00:26:25] Michaela: true. Yeah. Another thing that I was thinking of when I looked through, you know, fiber plane and what it does is KS engineering and I thought like what KS engineering is where you try to prevent not only the knowns, but also the unknowns, right? So really think about, you know, what, what could go wrong and then, you know, make a fallback so that your system is reliable.Or, you know, if this database goes down that not the whole system goes down, but only a part of it and so on. Do you think that KS engineers can act. Source or, you know, use those notebooks that you're creating as input for knowing, you know, what we should actually look at and, Yeah.[00:27:02] Micha: Well, I think it, well, one thing I think it'd be a great provider yeah.integrating with, with, with, you know, one or many of the, the chaos engineering services out there. I think it's a great way to train your team, right? You, we plug in some K engineering provider. The, the provider communicates with your infrastructure and such, pulling out wires from from, you know, your, your system.And then now go ahead and start, you know, debugging this issue and mm-hmm. and you know, use different templates and you can, you know, sort of trial all sorts of different issues. I think it'd be super fun. Yeah.[00:27:37] Michaela: Yeah. So Micha, one thing that I also saw is that some of your of fiber plane is open source.So what's your vision for open sourcing that are, you know, are some parts being open source? Can people help with the building fiber plane?[00:27:51] Micha: Yeah, great question. So right now what we've open sourced is a project called fp bind Gen. So this is actually of SDK bindings, generat. For how you would create full stack web assembly plugins.So this is what we use to build our own elastic search and our Prometheus plugins. So we've, we've open sourced that. It's on GitHub we've already got some, quite some feedback on it. So, but would love some more. And then going forward we'll be open sourcing sort of our templating stack the proxy.Which sort of sets which you install inside your cluster and sort of sets up the secure connections between the providers and your infrastructure and then the fabric plane managed service. And then the command line interface that I mentioned will also be open source. So expect more to hear from us on the open source front.[00:28:36] Michaela: Yeah, Cool. I think that's so important, especially for developer tooling, that people can also really get it into their hands and then help, you know, shape the, or make the best product for their, for their environments that they have. I think this is such a success strategy.[00:28:50] Micha: Yeah, exactly. And you know, we, as I said, we would love to get feedback on the, on the providers and the, the plugin model, but maybe even, you know, once we open source the the, the provider stack would be great if people maybe come up with crazy ideas.Right? You can think of any type of provider that you could surface data inside of, inside of the notebook. Yeah. Doesn't need to be observability or like monitoring data. Like could be. Yeah.[00:29:14] Michaela: Cool. Yeah, I'm super excited. What, you know, what will come out of that. Yeah. So I want to come back a little bit to your founding story because I know a lot of people are interested in developer tools and, you know, and, and Startup founding as well.And you did it twice already, right? And maybe several more times in your life, I dunno. But right now we know of two instances. Yeah. There, there. So, and and also for fiber plane, you already got funding, right? Several million dollars. And so how do you do. How do you do it out of Europe is also some of my questions that I have because I think it's a little bit a different game here in Europe than it's in Silicon Valley.Yeah. It doesn't look like, you know, opportunities around the corner everywhere. I, I have been studying in the Netherlands, so I know that actually Netherlands is really a good place, I think for, for tech startups and, you know, also a little bit out of the universities I saw there like You know, you get a little bit of help and, and, and funding and things like this, but still, I would assume it's harder than in Silicon Valley.So how did you make it work? How did you get funding? You also said that worker had some funding at the beginning. Yeah.[00:30:26] Micha: Yeah. It's a good question. Well, how did we do the second time around, to be honest, Because it's the second time. Yeah. It was a bit easier. I mean, it's never, It's, Yeah. Yeah. It's obviously, you know, never as easy.But it was definitely easier. I do think in Europe, if I also compare it to the worker days to where we are now, Like I do think the funding climate and sort of the, the, the, the thinking around startups has improved a lot, right? There's there's more funding out there, there's more feess. I think more importantly though, what we've seen is that now.Sort of the European unicorns have exited or gone ipo. And we have actually more operators inside of Europe that have experience in either founding a startup are able to sort of start doing angel investing or have worked at multiple startups and we have just more operating experience you know, versus honestly like bankers, right?That That, you know, help you out or are, are investing in you? So actually the, the, the funds that funder does were Crane Venture Partners which is actually a seed fund out of London that's actually focused on developer tools and infrastructure. So I would highly recommend, you know, talking to them.If you're thinking about, you know, building a developer tool company and you need some funding, of course my own fund is also focused on developer tool. So shameless plug there on MP Hard Ventures. You can just Google that and find me. And then we have North Zone, which is a, you know, very like multi-stage fund.Also out of, well actually quite different geographies and Notion Capital out of out of London as well. Okay. We've got some have several micro VCs, several things. Yeah. We have somebody funded West Coast Alana Anderson was doing with base case capitals investing in a lot of infrastructure and enterprise startups and Max Cloud from System one in Berlin.Is another one. So yeah, we have a good crew of, you know, a diff different experience and sort of different stage type of funding as well.[00:32:19] Michaela: Yeah. This was my next question that I had for you. It's probably not only about the money, you said experience, right? It's also about the knowledge that people have, right.How to do things. Probably, yeah. The people that they know, right? So that they can Yeah. To be Yeah, exactly. Can consider the right people have the right network and so.[00:32:36] Micha: Yeah, I think, I think the most, yeah, it's is, is introductions, but it's also. You know, if you, if you think about the, the funds that actually do developer tools, right?So they, in their portfolio, they, they've seen, you know, startups trying over and over to tackle some kind of go to market issue or trying to build an open source, mm-hmm. company, right? So they have some, some pattern matching and some, some knowledge about, you know, what to do and what, what not to do.Of course, it's all advice, but it's good to sort of have some people in your corner that have at least seen this, these types of companies being built. Over and over again. Right. That's, and then, and then other VCs have more experience in, you know, more, more like how to build up or scale up a sales organization and thinking about how to run a SaaS company.So yeah. Different experience from different, different funds.[00:33:20] Michaela: And so now you listed quite a lot of different investors. Do you reach out to each one of them or do you have like a whole group meeting and they're all in there and you ask them for advice? , how does it[00:33:33] Micha: Yeah. No, it's, it's sort of one on one chats, right?Either over, over chat or, you know, we meet up for coffee or, or or breakfast, mm-hmm. . But yeah, we try to do that on a, on a regular cadence. And then of course, when, you know, something exciting happens, such as our launch know, we try to group them together and get them all on the same page around the same time.Or of course if an issue arises, Right, which could also be the case. Yeah. And then sort of all hands on deck and everybody in the same room or zoom.[00:34:01] Michaela: And what about your biggest struggle on your, on your entrepreneurial journey, maybe now with fiber plane or maybe with Worker? Did you ever think that, you know, worker, when you started it, did you think that somebody is going to buy this and.This is going to be huge.[00:34:16] Micha: Yeah. Yeah. I think, I think the ambition was always there. Mm-hmm. . And, but, and, and sort of that drive to just make better developer tools. I think that sort of, that, you know, that's been true for all the companies or all too. Yeah, that's,[00:34:30] Michaela: Yeah. And what[00:34:32] Micha: I struggle. Yeah. Yeah. So I think, I think as I think for fiber plane now, it's not necessarily a struggle, it's just the real, which this mission of this flexible form factor, just the fact that we're doing sort of two startups at the same time has been sort of mm-hmm. An interesting thing to to build now, right? You're doing this rich, collaborative, rich tech editor and trying to build this infrastructure oriented company, and I think that's been yeah, just an interesting experience with building out a team.You know, the technology and the product that we.[00:35:01] Michaela: Yeah. Yeah. So maybe can you tell me a little bit more about again, if people want to hop over to Fiber plane now and try it out how does that work? Do you have to, you know is there a sign up? Is there a waiting list? I mean, you said probably when this airs there is a public beat, but still do you have to, you know, what do you have to reach out to you, you give me a demo or I just fill in my credentials and I'm off togo.[00:35:25] Micha: you can just sign, sign up with Google and then you're off to the races. And then of course, if you want a demo and sort of get some more, more more help or onboarding we're happy to help you and get on a call and walk you through it. But yeah. Okay, cool. Try playing com. Is there[00:35:40] Michaela: also a, Yeah, is there a video or something that we can look[00:35:44] Micha: at?Yes. The, the website and there's a video.[00:35:50] Michaela: Okay. I will link that so that people can go Yeah. And it will explain everything to them. Right. What about pricing? Whatever pricing? Yeah. You have already some idea around pricing. Yeah.[00:36:01] Micha: We've got some ideas on how to charge, but I think right now for us, it's important to get the product market fit, mm-hmm.and as such, you know, get, get the feedback. From these companies and these teams using the product. So we'll introduce pricing at a later stage. So for now it's, it's free to use, mm-hmm. . And you just give us your time and your feedback, and then Yeah, we're grateful.[00:36:20] Michaela: Yeah. And what about my data?Is it safe with you? Like, do you have some visibility into my data or do I send it over to[00:36:29] Micha: you? Yeah, so we actually so the way the, the providers work the plugins, so they actually get activated through a proxy. So we install a proxy inside of your cluster. The proxy sets up a secure bidirectional tunnel from your infrastructure to the fiber plane managed service.And then we do, for that specific query, we do store the data that's related to that query. So of a result, we do store that in the notebook. And yeah, we probably will come up with sort of more enterprisey ideas around how to self host[00:36:59] Michaela: it, Right? Or something[00:37:01] Micha: as an example. Yeah, yeah, yeah. But again, we'd love to get some feedback on that.[00:37:07] Michaela: How that works. Right? Yeah. Okay, cool. So yeah, that sounds really good. I think you, at least my questions, , you could answer them all, but maybe my listeners have questions and then they can send them to you. I think you will be, Yeah. Quite happy, right?[00:37:22] Micha: A hundred percent. At mes on Twitter, m i e s and at fiber, playing on Twitter, fiber playing.com.Sign up, take it for spin, shoot us a message. Yeah, sounds.[00:37:33] Michaela: Yeah. Yeah, it sounds super interesting. I hope that a lot of my listeners will do that, and I will link everything in my show notes that we, you know, talked about your, your Twitter handle and everything so that people can reach you. And I hope you get a lot of questions and people give it a spin and give it a try and send you their use cases,And yeah. I hope you all the best with your product. Thank you so much for being on my show today Micha. And yeah. Thank you. Bye.[00:37:59] Micha: Thank. Thank you for having me.[00:38:01] Michaela: Yeah, it was really great. Bye bye[00:38:04] Micha: bye.[00:38:06] Michaela: This was another episode of the Software Engineering Unlocked Podcast. If you enjoyed the episode, please help me spread the word about the podcast.Send episode to a friend via email, Twitter, LinkedIn. Well, whatever messaging system you use, or give it a positive review on your favorite podcasting platform such as Spotify or iTune. This would mean really a lot to me. So thank you for listening. Don't forget to subscribe and I will talk to you in two weeks.

The People Stack Podcast
Episode 286: Stress: The Inevitable & Glorious Gift of Leading

The People Stack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 40:20


The bold truth is that we all feel stress. And particularly for badass leaders, you might experience stress every day. And that doesn't need to lead to struggle. In words - what if stress is a GIFT?! Check out this episode right now to embrace this new paradigm.

The One Away Show
Natalie Kaminski: One Armageddon Away From Software Development

The One Away Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 52:15


With more than 20 years of experience in the technology industry, Natalie Kaminski is a dynamic and resourceful web and mobile technology entrepreneur. She is currently the CEO and founder of JetRockets, which builds unique software solutions to help clients achieve their business goals.   Natalie's journey to successful founder isn't a particularly common one. She was born in Russia and grew up in Ukraine and then Israel. She arrived in Minneapolis at 18, working to put herself through college and a programming certificate. Over the next decade, she gained experience across programming, project management, quality assurance, business analysis, and finally as the COO of a small software development company. She left that position because she'd always had an entrepreneurial streak, always planned to start her own business; now was the time. JetRockets was born of circumstance and gumption. When a connection asked for a recommendation for a software development firm, Natalie didn't hesitate to volunteer her own (as yet nonexistent) team. JetRockets now boasts a team of 65+ across the globe and is growing rapidly, building staff and revenue 100% year over year.    Outside of JetRockets, Natalie builds both tech products and communities. She is the Co-Founder of OneTribe.team, a leave management platform for hybrid and remote teams, which will soon launch publicly. Natalie is also a member of Chief and of Entrepreneurs' Organization, and she holds an Executive MBA from the Quantic School of Business and Technology. Natalie lives in Brooklyn with her husband and two daughters. Read the show notes on Arcbound's Podcast Page: https://arcbound.com/podcasts/    Find Arcbound here: Homepage: Arcbound.com Services/Work with Us: https://arcbound.com/work-with-us/ About: https://arcbound.com/about/ Founders Corner: https://arcbound.com/category/founders-corner/ Connect: https://arcbound.com/connect/

#StoriesByScrimba Podcast
Hired by Coca Cola! How Michael Learned Coding on Work Breaks and Changed Careers at 51

#StoriesByScrimba Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 33:48


React Native Radio
RNR 252 - Ionic's React Native Portals with Josh Thomas

React Native Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 30:30


Ionic's Josh Thomas joins the podcast to talk about their new React Native Portals feature, allowing for highly performant microfrontends in React Native apps. This episode brought to you by Infinite Red! Infinite Red is a premier React Native design and development agency located in the USA. With five years of React Native experience and deep roots in the React Native community (hosts of Chain React and the React Native Newsletter), Infinite Red is the best choice for your next React Native app.Helpful Links:PortalsPortals docsConnect With Us!React Native Radio - @ReactNativeRdioJamon - @jamonholmgrenJosh - @jthoms1Mazen - @mazenchami

The Boutique with Collective 54
Episode 99 – How a Software Development Firm Tripled Revenue in 18 Months by Using The $10,000/Hour Rate Rule

The Boutique with Collective 54

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 18:18


Growing and scaling a professional services firm requires management of the firm's lifecycle. On this episode, Gregory Hausheer, CEO at Lightmatter, shares how he is evolving the firm through 5-year phases to grow revenue, and how his firm is focused on productizing and tech enabling services.

Remote Ruby
Hey Alexa, Chris Needs Some Sleep

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 36:32


[00:01:03] Chris explains how he built a Rails app for Alexa to keep track of feeding times for the baby. [00:06:21] Chris and Andrew chat about the pros of having lights in and around the house with WiFi connected, the cons with programing them, and Andrew explains if you're putting something on Lambda, you can only use Ruby 2.7.[0011:24] This Week in Rails updates is the PR for improving the text for the no template message, as Chris explains.  [00:19:20] We hear a quick thought Andrew has for actionable error.[00:20:32] Andrew's tells us about the Turbo work and some esbuild API exploration he's been working on.[00:24:37] Chris and Andrew discuss using Source Maps.[00:27:44] Andrew explains why esbuild is dope, and even though it's a learning curve, he trusts where they're going. Also, he tells us what he likes most about esbuild.[00:30:21] Chris tells us how he made an esbuild Rails esbuild plugin.[00:31:49] The guys discuss the news about how Shopify acquired Remix.   [00:32:44] Andrew brings up a conference Vercel had recently, a new feature that was announced from a React Core maintainer with the Next team being involved, and the discussion that happened on Twitter. Panelists:Chris OliverAndrew MasonSponsor:HoneybadgerLinks:Jason Charnes TwitterChris Oliver TwitterAndrew Mason TwitterThis Week in Rails-Improve the “missing template” error pageShopify acquires Remix to bolster its storefront design tools (TechCrunch)esbuild Ruby Radar NewsletterRuby Radar TwitterRuby for All Podcast

DevOps and Docker Talk
Service Mesh in Docker Desktop with Meshery

DevOps and Docker Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 50:11


Bret is joined by Lee Calcote and Nic Jackson, co-authors of the Service Mesh Patterns book, to discuss service mesh for Docker Desktop and Compose apps with the new Meshery extension for Docker desktop.They talk about what service mesh is and go into the new Measure extension for Docker Desktop, which is a CNCF sandbox project. One of its bigger features is to help you try out different service meshes and test them with only a few clicks. They also cover other features of their tools, such as the beta of MeshMap which helps you visualize your clusters and apply better practices to your service mesh.Streamed live on YouTube on September 22, 2022. Includes demos.Unedited live recording of this show on YouTube (Ep #185)★Topics★Learn Service MeshMeshery Docker Extension MeshMap Service Mesh Patterns Book★Nic Jackson, Principal Developer Advocate, HashiCorp★Nic on TwitterNic on LinkedinNic Jackson on YouTube Shipyard website★Lee Calcote, Founder and CEO, Layer5★Lee on TwitterLee on Linkedin★Join my Community★Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us and fellow students on our Discord Server DevOps FansHomepage bretfisher.com ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Make/Shift
Delivering Digital Transformation Project Success

Make/Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 34:17


Johan will cover specific examples of what digital transformation can mean to different industries. Johan talks about the four main areas of digital transformation and how to think of that as a framework for how you approach change in your organization, the pros and cons of a bottom-up versus a top-down approach to transformation projects, and finally, advice around change management and how to lead your team to success.

#StoriesByScrimba Podcast
Homeschooler, College Dropout, Developer and Master Networker: Crush Your Career with Madison Kanna

#StoriesByScrimba Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 49:01


Stories from the Hackery
Wilson Bell - Web Development Cohort 57

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 8:13


Wilson Bell graduated with Web Development Cohort 57. I had no prior experience with coding prior to having NSS recommended to me by friends that thought I would do well at it. One of the main things that drew me to the program was growing up doing a lot of mechanical work on my family's farm and always enjoying the trial and error process of diagnosing and solving a problem or making something work that previously didn't. Coding provides much of that same experience, you're presented with an issue and you use the tools and knowledge at your disposal to come up with a logical solution. I've greatly enjoyed the variety of personalities that exist in the Software Development world and cannot wait to meet more and contribute my own unique insight to a team.

React Native Radio
RNR 251 - Examining React Native 0.70

React Native Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 33:59


In this episode, Mazen and Robin review RN 0.70 to see what's new, what's broken, and everything in between. Mazen also continues his quest to get Robin hooked on sports-ball. This episode brought to you by Infinite Red! Infinite Red is a premier React Native design and development agency located in the USA. With five years of React Native experience and deep roots in the React Native community (hosts of Chain React and the React Native Newsletter), Infinite Red is the best choice for your next React Native app.Helpful Links:RNR 238 - Accessibility in React Native with Lizzi Lindboehttps://reactnative.dev/blog/2022/09/05/version-070https://reactnative.dev/blog/2022/07/08/hermes-as-the-defaulthttps://github.com/facebook/react-native/blob/main/CHANGELOG.mdhttps://reactnative.dev/docs/next/the-new-architecture/landing-pageConnect With Us!React Native Radio - @ReactNativeRdioRobin -  @robin_heinzeMazen - @mazenchami

Remote Ruby
Kevin Newton on Ruby Parser, SyntaxTree, Prettier Ruby and a sneak peek!

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 50:22


[00:01:52] Jason and Andrew catch up on what they've been working on. Apparently, they've both been working on making Dynamic Open Graph Images. Andrew used Vercel and Jason took a different route.[00:05:11] Kevin details the recent news about rewriting Ruby Parser.[00:07:50] If you're new to Ruby or not familiar with Parser, Kevin explains what a Parser is how it's used in Ruby. [00:09:54] We find out how SyntaxTree works with what Kevin's doing now on Ruby Parser.[00:13:00] If you haven't heard of mruby, PicoRuby, Natalie, Rutie, Artichoke, and Sorbet, Kevin explains them.[00:13:42] With each of the implementations, Jason wonders if they have to bring CRuby with it or if they're having to write their own Parsers each time, and Kevin explains there's different projects that have taken different approaches and what JRuby did.[00:15:38] Kevin tells us the three goals he's got going forward with a new Ruby Parser he's working on. [00:19:28] Jason wonders if the JRuby team or other people that have been implementing their own flavors of Ruby, hinted that they would use this new Parser.[00:22:42] Kevin explains what SyntaxTree does right now and the most valuable thing it provides. [00:25:51] With the new Parser, we find out if Kevin has to make any changes to SyntaxTree to support reading the results.[00:29:33] We learn if Meta programming make this type of work difficult and Kevin explains how his tooling will make it much easier to deal with syntax errors. [00:34:00] Jason opens up and tells us he's never felt like a real programmer, and Kevin brings it all out in the open telling Jason that he is a real programmer and explains how everyone is just in a different domain.[00:36:40] Kevin announces he's working with Prettier Ruby, Prettier 3 is almost ready, and he explains why there's not a lot of reasons to use Prettier Ruby anymore.[00:42:51] Kevin announces that Stripe, GitHub, and Shopify are putting a lot of money into Ruby, and he explains how huge his team is at Shopify working on so many parts of the Ruby ecosystem and working on what the future of Rails could look like. Also, someone on his team created a reimagined version of unicorn, called pitchfork.[00:48:58] Kevin explains thinking about programming as a skill and not a job.[00:49:39] Find out where you can follow Kevin on the web. Panelists:Jason CharnesAndrew MasonGuest:Kevin NewtonSponsor:HoneybadgerLinks:Jason Charnes TwitterChris Oliver TwitterAndrew Mason TwitterKevin Newton TwitterKevin Newton GitHubKevin Newton WebsiteSyntaxTree GitHubVercelYacc: Yet Another Compiler-CompilermrubyPicoRubyNatalie RutieArtichokeSorbetJRubyTruffleRubySyntaxTree-node.rbpitchforkRuby For All PodcastRuby Radar NewsletterRuby Radar Twitter

Stories from the Hackery
Christian Suriano - Web Development Cohort 57

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 6:14


Christian Suriano graduated with Web Development Cohort 57. I wrote my first line of code when I was thirteen, and knew from that moment on that coding was the right path for me, after graduating Highschool I spent the last few years working in Nashville. I discovered Nashville Software School and knew it would suit my learning style perfectly, I decided to take the leap into a new career and sign up, Software Development is the perfect direction for me to go with my problem solving abilities, and love for continued learning.

Strap on your Boots!
Episode 159: Zero to CEO: How to help software development teams succeed within your organization with Jaxon Repp

Strap on your Boots!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 14:41


In this episode of Zero to CEO I talk to Experienced Technology Executive Jaxon Repp about how to help software development teams succeed within your organization. Jaxon and I discuss the tools and technologies that developers work with day-to-day that contributes greatly to their frustration. These tools were originally developed years ago to solve complex problems without regard for simplicity of use. As such, there needs to be a major shift to developer-focused products, not just tools that sort the problem at hand. When you resolve these problems it can greatly influence the success of the software development teams within your company. We talk about the what, why, and how of distributed databases. We also cover the tools and technologies that cause frustration to developers and the whole team. And finally, Jaxon discuss how there needs to be a major shift to developer-focused products, not just tools that sort the problem at hand. So tune in to learn more!

Remote Ruby
Development Workflows with Collin Jilbert

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 44:51 Very Popular


[00:00:39] Go Rails and Discord went crazy for Go Rails this morning, Collin talks about putting out the fires. This reminds Andrew of the issue he had with his dotfiles once. Admit it, we've all been there before! [00:05:31] Collin is enjoying his minimal config setup lately. Andrew talks about how he likes using Znap! to help him with his dot files and reduce his shell's startup time.[00:06:43] Andrew talks more about minimalizing his setup by getting rid of aliases he's not using every couple months, as well as plugins. It's hard to stop hoarding those plugins! [00:07:13] Collin really only uses Vim but has a lot of theme plugins, and the plugins he does have tend to be from Tim Pope.  [00:08:26] Both Collin and Andrew dive deeper into aliases. Collin, he's runs his pretty lean and just uses some mnemonics for Rails commands. Andrew did a lot of house cleaning and now just has a handful for very basic things for Rails and Git.[00:14:06] Andrew discusses functions and thinning the herd. One that he does love is the GitHub labels he made. Andrew talks about how great the GitHub CLI is, and if you haven't checked it out in a while, PLEASE DO.[00:17:59] Andrew recently switched his terminal to Warp, a Rust based terminal. Find out why he's almost as excited about Warp as he is when DoorDash shows up with Chick-fil-a. [00:19:48] The boys talk tmux and Andrew tells us the NUMBER 1 reason why he uses it. Tell us if you've had this happen. Ha! And have we told you how much Andrew loves Warp? He tells us more things it can do to make your life easier.[00:25:39] Collin moved to Vim about six months ago and talks about making the move over to it. Andrew tried it in the past, and he thinks it's time to board the Vim train again. Like he says, and this applies to anything new you bring into your workflow, “You just need to dive in, take your time, and you're gonna be moving slow at first.”[00:28:11] The whole Vim talk evolves into remapping your keyboard to prevent your fingers from contorting.  [00:34:49] After Andrew talks about some of his go to VSCode plugins, Collin wants to know more about his VSCode setup and layout. Andrew talks more about some of the plugins he likes, like Customize UI, and how he likes to keep his VSCode looking clean.[00:36:31] Let's talk monitor setups: Multiple, single, full screen. Find out Collin and Andrew's setup. Collin shares a keyboard shortcut he uses to manage his windows.[00:40:00] One last thing…whether you prefer Alfred or Raycast, it's time to replace your Spotlight. Andrew talks about the benefits it has in his workflow and Collin, who doesn't need another tool, is intrigued. [00:43:23] So, let's summarize it for you. If you're new to coding…bookmark this spot. Learn it, know it, live it. Panelist:Andrew MasonGuest/Panelist:Collin JilbertSponsor:  HoneybadgerLinks:Jason Charnes TwitterChris Oliver TwitterAndrew Mason TwitterCollin Jilbert TwitterZnap!VimtpopewarptmuxRails Fast NavRails Flip-FlopMake VSCode Awesome E-BookCustomize UIBetterTouchToolAlfredRaycast

DevOps and Docker Talk
Cilium and eBPF with Liz Rice

DevOps and Docker Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 55:09 Very Popular


Bret is joined by Liz Rice, Chief Open Source Officer at Isovalent, the makers of Cilium, to discuss Cilium and eBPF. Liz Rice is back to give us more insight into eBPF and the Cilium project. Isovalent is the company that created and manages the Cilium Project, which does an increasing number of things for Kubernetes, including networking, CNI support, security, advanced networking stuff, and observability, as well as other things like load balancing. Liz is one of my go-to experts on how low-level Linux internals work. She's been speaking about container internals since the early days of Docker.Streamed live on YouTube on September 8, 2022.Unedited live recording of this show on YouTube (Ep #183)★Topics★Cilium websiteIsovalent websiteeBPFNetwork Policy Editor★Liz Rice★Liz Rice on TwitterLiz Rice's websiteBooks on Containers, eBPF, Kubernetes and Go★Join my Community★ Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us and fellow students on our Discord Server DevOps FansHomepage bretfisher.com ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

React Native Radio
RNR 250 - React Native Firebase: TL;DR;

React Native Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 46:45


Regardless if you're a junior developer, or a seasoned code wizard, you're going to love this episode! Today, the hosts walk through React Native Firebase and it's amazing capabilities.This episode brought to you by Infinite Red! Infinite Red is a premier React Native design and development agency located in the USA. With five years of React Native experience and deep roots in the React Native community (hosts of Chain React and the React Native Newsletter), Infinite Red is the best choice for your next React Native app.Connect With Us!React Native Radio - @ReactNativeRdioJamon - @jamonholmgrenMazen - @mazenchamiRobin - @robin_heinze

Breaking Changes
Diversity Matters When It Comes To Being API-First at Workday, Mamta Suri, Former Senior Manager Software Development for Time Tracking at Workday

Breaking Changes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 56:49


In this episode of the Breaking Changes podcast, Kin Lane is joined by Mamta Suri, Former Senior Manager Software Development for Time Tracking at Workday, talking about the importance of diversity and business alignment across API operations, but halfway through our interview Mamta turned the tables and began interviewing Kin Lane about what he has learned about APIs doing the show.

The Veteran (Semi) Professional
Ep. 167: Teaching Veterans to Code and Enter the World of Software Development with Code Platoon

The Veteran (Semi) Professional

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 51:31


Code Platoon is an awesome organization that works with veterans to get them started in what can be an extremely lucrative and rewarding career: software development.  They also have a great story that involves the founder's son getting every Call of Duty game ever....for free. 

Make/Shift
Introducing Make/Shift Season 2

Make/Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 0:45


Digital transformation requires you to look at the intersection of technology, processes, and human interaction. Mike Tarentino, Director of Digital Transformation, helps our customers to work with technology seamlessly by optimizing and improving processes. On season 2 of our Make/Shift podcast, Mike will chat with experts on how low-code can help with your digital transformation.

Remote Ruby
Rails SaaS and a Shaved Stache

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 30:29 Very Popular


[00:04:11] Jason and Andrew have a chat about seeing Drew Bragg at the Rails SaaS Conference and things they enjoyed about it.[00:07:50] We hear about all the talks at the conference from Nadia Odunayo, Joe Masilotti, Michael Buckbee, Don Pottinger, Adam Pallozzi, and Saron Yitbarek.[00:15:27] We learn why the guys had to leave the intergalactic cantina early, and they tell us about more of the talks from Todd Dickerson, Colleen Schnettler, Evan Phoenix, and Mike Coutermarsh.[00:21:26] Jason's explains his fun talk on the Rails Renaissance, find out why Andrew sat up front for it, and the last talk from Andrew Culver, who went through a lot of Bullet Train things.  [00:24:12] Jason gives a shout-out to Paula, the makeup artist, and we hear what she did to Jason's mustache.[00:26:19] Andrew gives a big shout-out to Andrew Culver who organized the conference and making it so much fun. [00:26:56] Jason announces he's finally working on his Active Record Course stuff now, and Andrew tells us about how he's been working on Kredis.[00:28:23] We end with a story about how Jason slipped out of the shower and now has a bruise the size of an IHOP pancake on his leg.Panelists:Jason CharnesAndrew MasonSponsor:  HoneybadgerLinks:Jason Charnes TwitterAndrew Mason TwitterRails SaaS Conference TwitterAndrew Culver TwitterRemote Ruby Podcast-Episode 185: Aaron & Colleen from HammerstoneHi-ChewRuby Radar NewsletterRuby Radar TwitterRuby for All Podcast

DevOps and Docker Talk
Kubescape Kubernetes Security with ARMO

DevOps and Docker Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 45:21 Very Popular


Going to KubeCon? Me too! We're planning a meetup on my Discord server #kubecon channel.The Loot Box is Live! Get your DevOps and tech-inspired t-shirts, mugs, and more.Bret is joined by Shauli Rozen, CEO and Co-Founder of ARMO, creators of Kubescape. Kubescape is a K8s open-source tool providing a multi-cloud K8s single pane of glass, including risk analysis, security compliance, RBAC visualizer, and image vulnerability scanning.I'm a fan of tools like this and specifically of Kubescape, which I use and recommend to my clients. The scanner can scan your YAML manifests of your Kubernetes resources. It can scan your live Kubernetes clusters. And it can scan the YAML in your Git repos, as well as the images themselves that you're deploying to Kubernetes. As ARMO calls it, it's a single pane of glass into your Kubernetes security. Streamed live on YouTube on September 1, 2022. Includes demos.Unedited live recording of this show on YouTube (Ep #182)★Topics★Kubescape's GitHub K8s Security Dashboard ARMO website★Shauli Rozen★Shauli on Twitter★Join my Community★Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us and fellow students on our Discord Server DevOps FansHomepage bretfisher.com ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

React Native Radio
RNR 249 - A Redux Maintainer's Thoughts on RTK vs MST

React Native Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 54:52


This week Jamon and Mazen are joined again by Mark Erikson to discuss RTK vs MST  and some of the benefits and downsides they each have.This episode brought to you by Infinite Red! Infinite Red is a premier React Native design and development agency located in the USA. With five years of React Native experience and deep roots in the React Native community (hosts of Chain React and the React Native Newsletter), Infinite Red is the best choice for your next React Native app.Helpful Links:Gist with interesting early discussions on GHReactifluxRTK docs Modern ReduxRTK 1.0Redux Essentials Connect With Us!React Native Radio - @ReactNativeRdioJamon - @jamonholmgrenMazen - @mazenchamiMark - @acemarke

Cyber Security Inside
121. Why It's Hard to Integrate Software Development and Security

Cyber Security Inside

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 23:47


In this episode of Cyber Security Inside, Camille and Tom dig into the relationship between software development and security with Harshil Parikh—Founder and CEO of Tromzo. They talk about how software development and security have evolved, structuring and automating the SDL, and the future outlook of software development in relation to security.    To find more episodes of Cyber Security Inside, video interviews, and blogs on cybersecurity topics, visit our website at https://cybersecurityinside.com.   The views and opinions expressed are those of the guests and author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Intel Corporation.

DevOps and Docker Talk
Slim and Secure Container Images with Slim.ai

DevOps and Docker Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 48:33 Very Popular


Going to KubeCon? Me too! We're planning a meetup on my Discord server #kubecon channel.The Loot Box is Live! Get your DevOps and tech-inspired t-shirts, mugs, and more.Bret is joined by Martin Wimpress and Pieter van Noordennen from Slim.ai to discuss some ways to slim down your Docker images and reduce the attack surface of your containers in the process.Many companies and projects have tried to do similar things before - Slim Images, Alpine Images, Distro List, Build Packs, and even Docker tried a few years back, to create intelligence and guidance around migrating legacy apps into slim production quality images. Those efforts were scrapped in 2019. The dual mandate of generating Docker images - easy to understand and as minimal as possible, with the lowest CVE vulnerability count - was not achieved by any of those projects. Automation and intelligence like Slim.ai is the future of building container images and also the future of complex monoliths and legacy apps with a lot of dependencies.Streamed live on YouTube on July 28, 2022. Includes demos.Unedited live recording of this show on YouTube (Ep #180)★Topics★Docker SlimSlim.ai★Martin Wimpress★Martin Wimpress on Twitter★Pieter van Noordennen★Pieter van Noordennen on Twitter★Join my Community★Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us on our Discord Server DevOps FansHomepage bretfisher.com ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Remote Ruby
Behind The Scenes at GoRails with Collin Jilbert

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 77:24 Very Popular


While Jason and Andrew are conferencing it up at the Rails SaaS Conference, Chris thought it would be a great idea to have Collin Jilbert join him, so he didn't have to go solo today. Chris and Collin catch up and discuss what they've been working on with Pay, we hear about a new beginner series of making a Ruby Gem Collin's been working on for Screencasts, and Chris tells us about a Screencast he did on OmniAuth coming out soon, that is worth watching. Also, we'll find out some good things happening with Hatchbox, some changes with Simple Calendar to make it more functional, and Chris trying figure out some caddy configuration JSON nested stuff. So go ahead and download this episode now!

React Native Radio
RNR 248 - Introducing Ignite v8: Maverick!

React Native Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 41:54


Ignite, the popular React Native boilerplate and CLI, has a new version out, code-named “Maverick”, and it has dozens of improvements! The hosts explore what's new in this latest version of Ignite.This episode brought to you by Infinite Red! Infinite Red is a premier React Native design and development agency located in the USA. With five years of React Native experience and deep roots in the React Native community (hosts of Chain React and the React Native Newsletter), Infinite Red is the best choice for your next React Native app.Helpful Links:Maverick AnnouncementConnect With Us!React Native Radio - @ReactNativeRdioJamon - @jamonholmgrenMazen - @mazenchamiRobin -  @robin_heinze

The Freedom Chasers Podcast
The Secret To Achieving Financial Freedom Through Real Estate Investing and Software Development

The Freedom Chasers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 49:33


Bryce Matheson is a house flipper and a serial entrepreneur. He has done some crazy transactions! He bought an abandoned house and a shed from a man who was in jail for grand theft (only to find out that someone was living in the shed without the owner's knowledge)! He now is getting more into the private lending space! In college he studied IT and became very knowledgeable in that subject! He has put that education to good use in the business field! He has created 3 software programs for real estate investors and lenders to utilize. On this episode of The Freedom Chasers Podcast we talk to Bryce Matheson about flipping houses, investing in real estate, lending, and building software. Join us as we talk about Bryce's journey to financial freedom!How to reach Bryce Matheson: Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/brycematheson/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/BryceMathesonWebsite: https://brycejmatheson.com/web-hosting-course/Quotes: “That's kind of where I tasted the blood in the water and that's where it just started.”“There were too many of those little things that added up.”“All those little things added up and ultimately that's, I think that's the problem and it came back to bite us.”“The banks have the biggest buildings for a reason.” - Matt “All of these different methods are tools in your toolbelt that you can use to make money.“Mostly just because it's kind of like the headache tax.”“I'm not going to just say no to free money.”“All too often people are afraid of taxes.”“There's very little downside but there's all the upside.”“I have to say “no” more than I say “yes” ”.Concepts:Bryce bought a broken down house from a guy who was in jail for grand theft! He had to communicate with him by letters!Bryce bought his house a couple years ago and he met his wife because of real estate investing!Bryce used to study IT in college but then switched to real estate when he decided to buy a house!Sometimes people over think about the house they're looking at and can think themselves out of the idea of buying the house.Bryce has a good strategy. When he gets money, he pays things he has off and invests in real estate.To not flip and sell a property, Bryce said that the interest rates would have to be super high! Bryce has started to get into lending! Right now Bryce is only lending to people locally.Bryce has a lot of opportunities but he's found that most of the time he has to say no. He wants to say no more than yes so that he's not so swamped with ideas!Time Stamps:0:00- Introduction0:31- Craziest Real Estate story or Transaction8:56- What got you into Real Estate?11:53- What was the transition into Real Estate?13:28- What was the next step?16:14- What do you like about flipping more?18:05- What did you do wrong the first time?19:57- What did you do with your cash?22:31- What would it take to hold a property and not flip it?25:52- What are the headaches of being a lender?27:10- Do you lend locally?28:45- What is your tax strategy?30:57- What is rentastic?33:01- What is the work process?26:46- What do you recommend for getting into the business of coding?41:44- What does the next 6-12 months look like for you?43:27- What is your money tracking system? 46:12- Note servicing company? 47:10- Non performing notes?48:22- What is the best way to reach out to you?49:10- ENDING

Engineering Culture by InfoQ
VR Environments for Collaborative Software Development

Engineering Culture by InfoQ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 30:06


In this podcast, Shane Hastie spoke to Jonathan Schneider and the development team from Moderne about their experiences using an immersive VR environment for collaborative software development. Read a transcript of this interview: https://bit.ly/3T2jC5A Subscribe to our newsletters: - The InfoQ weekly newsletter: https://bit.ly/24x3IVq - The Software Architects' Newsletter [monthly]: https://www.infoq.com/software-architects-newsletter/ Upcoming Events: QCon San Francisco: https://qconsf.com/ - Oct 24-28, 2022 - Oct 2-6, 2023 QCon Plus online: https://plus.qconferences.com/ - Nov 29 - Dec 9, 2022 QCon London https://qconlondon.com/ - March 26-31, 2023 Follow InfoQ: - Twitter: https://twitter.com/InfoQ - LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/infoq - Facebook: https://bit.ly/2jmlyG8 - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/infoqdotcom/ - Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/infoq

Maintainable
Andrea Goulet - Empathy-Driven Software Development

Maintainable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 54:49


Robby has a chat with Andrea Goulet, the CEO of Corgibytes, a software development shop dedicated to maintaining and modernizing software applications. Named by LinkedIn as one of the top ten professionals in software under 35, Andrea is the host of the podcast Legacy Code Rocks, is the author of the forthcoming book, “Empathy-Driven Software Development”, has co-founded several successful technology companies, and has taught over 50,000 students how to turn soft skills like empathy and communication into software skills.Through her newest venture, Heartware.dev, she is on a mission to operationalize empathy for tech teams and keynotes frequently about building a business based on balance, empathy, and trust; the perils of the technical/non-technical divide; and the technical philosophies around working with legacy code. Andrea says that the maintainability of software comes down to trust and while she doesn't find the term technical debt useful, she uses it in instances where it's being widely used especially in software remodeling projects. From her experience, the term is not useful at all when dealing with business-minded people who view debt differently.She points out that the success of a project is always highly dependent on the project owner and the team working on their project having shared goals as they approach the writing of software. Robby and Andrea will also dive into why we should avoid deferring to other people and defaulting to being ticket takers, how empathy has different definitions, avoiding us vs them thinking, and so much more. Stay tuned and enjoy!Book Recommendations:Set Boundaries, Find Peace: A Guide to Reclaiming Yourself by Nedra Glover TawwabHelpful Linkshttps://twitter.com/andreagoulethttps://heartware.devhttps://corgibytes.comComing in 2023! Empathy-Driven Software Development by Andrea GouletSubscribe to Maintainable on:Apple PodcastsOvercastSpotifyOr search "Maintainable" wherever you stream your podcasts.Join the discussion in the Maintainable Discord Community

Remote Ruby
Andy Croll on First Ruby Friend, RubyConfMini and more

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 44:03 Very Popular


[00:03:02] Andy tells us some details about RubyConf Mini coming up in November, as well as RubyConf in Houston, TX.[00:08:10] Jason wonders if RubyConf Mini is unique to this year or if it's something that Andy could see happening in the future.[00:12:35] We hear more about the Ruby Friends program that Andy started and he explains how it was born out of frustration.[00:18:29] Find out how many people are currently in the Ruby Friends program and benefit of being a mentor.[00:21:25] Jason talks about how refreshing it's been being a mentor, meeting all the friends along the way, and his new Ruby friend.[00:24:04] Andy explains the key things in a mentor/mentee relationship to make it work.[00:26:02] We find out if Andy's been able to get all the applicants looking for mentorship paired up with someone.[00:27:56] Andy mentioned he was not trying to fix the hiring process yet, and Jason wonders if he's thought about it.[00:32:00] Chris brings up how he started making videos to help newer people when he was only a few years into doing Rails, and Andy talks about how videos are a different kind of learning and a great book he read called, Sustainable Web Development with Ruby on Rails. [00:34:31] The conversation turns to the guys discussing Authentication and Authentication Zero. [00:41:28] Jason talks about the app he built earlier this year and how he went with the Rails has secure password approach.[00:42:18] Find out all the places you can follow Andy on the web.Panelists:Jason CharnesChris OliverGuest:Andy CrollSponsor:HoneybadgerLinks:Jason Charnes TwitterChris Oliver TwitterAndrew Mason TwitterAndy Croll WebsiteAndy Croll TwitterOne Ruby Thing- NewsletterChats in the Cupboard PodcastCoverageBookWhy's (poignant) guide to RubyRubyConf MiniRubyConf Houston, TXFirst Ruby FriendRemote Ruby Podcast-Episode 190: Junior Devs, Mentoring, and Training with Adam CuppySustainable Web Development with Ruby on Rails by David Bryant CopelandAuthentication Zero-GitHubRuby Radar NewsletterRuby Radar Twitter

DevOps and Docker Talk
Carvel Tools for Kubernetes

DevOps and Docker Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 60:15 Very Popular


Going to KubeCon? Me too! We're planning a meetup on my Discord server #kubecon channel.The Loot Box is Live! Get your DevOps and tech-inspired t-shirts, mugs, and more.Bret is joined by Dmitriy Kalinin and John Ryan, software engineers at VMWare, to show off the many Carvel project tools.Carvel provides a set of reliable, single-purpose, composable tools that aid in your application building, configuration, and deployment to Kubernetes. The Carvel project includes tools for templating, image building and tracking, secrets management, app deploying and more. The tool list includes ytt, kapp, kapp-controller, kbld, imgpkg, vendir, and kwt.Streamed live on YouTube on July 14, 2022.Unedited live recording of this show on YouTube (Ep #178)★Topics★Carvel websiteCarvel on Twitter★Dmitriy Kalinin★Dmitriy Kalinin on Twitter★John Ryan★John Ryan on Twitter★Join my Community★Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us on our Discord Server Vital DevOpsHomepage bretfisher.com ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★