Podcasts about Initial

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  • 2,569PODCASTS
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  • 39mAVG DURATION
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  • Oct 14, 2021LATEST
Initial

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Best podcasts about Initial

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Latest podcast episodes about Initial

Bloomberg Businessweek
U.S. Initial Jobless Claims Drop to Lowest Since March 2020

Bloomberg Businessweek

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 28:49


Dr. Penny Wheeler, President and CEO at Allina Health, discusses the impact of Covid in the Midwest. Bloomberg News U.S. Economic Reporter Reade Pickert breaks down initial jobless claims and the U.S. economic outlook. Bloomberg News Senior Investigative Reporter Jason Grotto shares the details of his Bloomberg Businessweek story How Wealthy New Yorkers Are Getting a Steal on Property Taxes. And we Drive to the Close with Bloomberg Markets Reporter Abigail Doolittle. Hosts: Carol Massar and Tim Stenovec. Producer: Paul Brennan. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Enterprise Hardcore Podcast
Episode 43- Dan Butson (Something Sacred, Canvas, Initial Doubt)

Enterprise Hardcore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 87:57


For Episode 43 I had yet another opportunity to reconnect with an old friend that I hadn't spoken to in a long time. Dan Butson played guitar for a handful of Rochester area bands from 1995-2002 before moving to New Orleans. We talk about the bands Dan played guitar in (Initial Doubt, Something Sacred, and a few other locals).  He also talks about his experiences living in New Orleans for most of the last two decades. Some of these include selling records to Trent Reznor and performing at Mardi Gras. We also talk about the music scene in New Orleans, hurricanes, wrestling and plenty of other relevant topics. Towards the end of our discussion, Dan talks briefly about someone named Hollise Murphy that passed away recently tragically due to Covid. There was a piece about him on No Echo recently. The link is below. https://www.noecho.net/features/hollise-murphy-new-orleans-hardcore-hero --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/enterprise-hardcore-podcast/support

Heartland POD
The Delta, Ep. 10: Quarantine & A Piece of Cake

Heartland POD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 22:42


Nicholas (host) goes back to school and shares his return to school after quarantine and being diagnosed with COVID. Initial thoughts from his Quarantine time on the couch:- Privatization of public schools produces isolation-like quarantine of students from exposure to ideas and diversity- Returning to the classroom reveals that school has changed due to the pandemic beyond the "good old days" of lecture and obvious solutionsDNA Cookbook:Nicholas gives a short "science cocktail party" lecture story about his grandmother's favorite cake compared to how proteins like antibodies are made from mRNA vaccines.

SBS World News Radio
Report finds UK government's initial COVID response cost thousands of lives

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 3:32


The MP inquiry says government ministers failed to question their scientific advisers and a dangerous mentality took hold where ministers felt pressured to conform.

Sun Devil Source Report: An ASU Football Podcast
Review of ASU Football's 28-10 win over Stanford

Sun Devil Source Report: An ASU Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 56:31


On this latest episode of The Sun Devil Source Report Podcast, host Ethan Ryter is joined by site publisher Chris Karpman and reporters Jacob Rudner and Carson Breber as they discuss Arizona State's 28-10 win over Stanford on Friday. Covered on this episode: -- Initial takeaways from ASU's win against the Cardinal -- Discussion about the Sun Devil running game and how effective it was -- How senior tight end Curtis Hodges has impressed as of late and missed opportunities and points by the offense and sophomore quarterback Jayden Daniels -- Discussion about the ASU secondary and how they caused Stanford freshman quarterback Tanner McKee to throw three interceptions -- How the Sun Devil defense kept Stanford to only 13 total net rushing yards -- A poor day from the special teams unit and what to take from it -- Discussion of how we feel about where ASU is at the midpoint of the season in comparison to our expectations at the start of the season You can listen to the latest episode up above. Subscribe to the show on iTunes, Soundcloud, Stitcher and your other favorite places to listen to podcasts.

Patrick Miner's Podcast
Medicine as your Food and Food as your Medicine

Patrick Miner's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 27:06


Donald Starzinski,  M.D., Ph.D. has had the privilege of  education in both  Western and Eastern Medicine. Initial undergraduate work at the University of Minnesota  was in Engineering and Social Sciences.  Doctoral Studies resulted in a Ph.D. in Psychopharmacology with his thesis involving and aggression.Subsequent medical (M.D.) training led to a Neurology Residency and related Board Certification. Eastern Medical education has included Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine studies with Board Certification by the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture. He is also involved in ongoing education with American Meditation Institute. Professional activities have included an initial Private Practice in general Neurology and the more prominent subsequent practice of Neurorehabilitation involving complicated brain injured individuals. Duties have included consultation, direct patient care, Clinical co-ordination and teaching. Dr. Starzinski also enjoyed a small Private Practice of Integrative Medicine.Since his recent retirement, dr. Starzinski is a developing a career in teaching  and writing, emphasizing Integrative Health and Wellness.Dr. Starzinski has given every indication to  future episodes.

B2B Mentors
How to Leverage Research & Thought Leadership to Get New Customers

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 40:54


John Busby serves as Centerfield's Chief Marketing Officer & Managing Director. In addition to corporate marketing, John leads the content, editorial, research, video and PR teams for the Consumer Guides division, which helps millions of in-market consumers choose and purchase the right product or service through brands like BroadbandNow and SafeHome. Prior to joining Centerfield, John was Head of Analytics for Amazon's grocery delivery service and responsible for business intelligence, data science and automated reporting. Prior to Amazon, John was Senior Vice President of Analytics and Marketing at Marchex. John began his career in product management for InfoSpace, Go2net and IQ Chart. He holds a Bachelor of Science from Northwestern University.Follow John on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnmbusby/Learn more about Centerfield here: https://www.centerfield.com/Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeIf you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.comEpisode Summary:John Busby, Chief Marketing Officer and Managing Director at Centerfield, joins Connor to talk about customer acquisition, essential marketing skills, and the impact of market research. Learn the ins and outs of the customer acquisition business model, the critical role of innovation and technology, and how to get straight to the [pain] point when you reach out to potential customers.Key Takeaways:Customer acquisition combines B2B and B2C marketing. B2B comes in when the company pursues new brand partners to sell the customer acquisition service, and then they deploy B2C techniques to pursue new business for their brand partners. Strategies include paid searching, social media marketing, paid ads, and leveraging an established web presence for the brand partner's benefit.The customer acquisition business model demands constant innovation because it requires improved performance every month to maintain the brand partner relationship. Creativity is necessary, but you also need technology and data analytics.Initial contact efforts should directly address a potential customer's problem or industry pain point right off the bat. If the subject line of an email doesn't inspire them to open it, your future emails are automatically relegated to the junk folder.Hope you enjoyed this episode of B2B Mentors! Make sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast platform. Leave us a 5-star review, so your friends and colleagues can find us too. B2B Mentors is brought to you by activeblogs.com. Head over to our Content Trifecta page to schedule a chat with Connor about custom marketing content solutions for your company and the Content Trifecta effect!

Locked On 49ers - Daily Podcast On The San Francisco 49ers
RAPID REACT: Trey Lance Starting Debut in Loss to Cardinals

Locked On 49ers - Daily Podcast On The San Francisco 49ers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 46:17


Initial takeaways and game balls for Week 5. The San Francisco 49ers lose their third-straight, this time at the hands of the Arizona Cardinals 17-10. How Trey Lance performed in his first career start. Should the rookie remain the starter when Jimmy Garoppolo is healthy? Is Kyle Shanahan dropping the ball on 4th downs? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Irish Tech News Podcast
Initial NFT Offerings with Steve Good and Dreams Quest

The Irish Tech News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 29:05


Sleighing the Dragon's Lair, Creating Heroes, and Initial NFT Offerings with Steve Good and Dreams Quest Steve Good is co-founder of Dreams Quest and best selling author of Be Left Behind. Steve is also an accomplished entrepreneur with board level experience working with start-ups and corporates. He is also crypto veteran who started in 2016 and has worked with over 75 projects as a marketing and business development consultant. He has spent over 20 years in Fintech as a business executive working with Tier 1 banks.Prior to working in blockchain, he has worked for notable companies such as Deloitte and Infosys as well as building and selling his own FinTech firm in London, UK. He has been responsible for running major IT programs for his clients by delivering a range of IT and digital solutions and services to major Tier 1 banks across the front, middle and back office.Steve is also a public figure, keynote speaker, and has been featured in numerous articles including BuzzFeed, CNBC, and How-To Geek. Jamil Hasan is a crypto and blockchain focused podcast host at the Irish Tech News and spearheads our weekend content “The Crypto Corner” where he interviews founders, entrepreneurs and global thought leaders. Prior to his endeavors into the crypto-verse in July 2017, Jamil built an impressive career as a data, operations, financial, technology and business analyst and manager in Corporate America, including twelve years at American International Group and its related companies. Since entering the crypto universe, Jamil has been an advisor, entrepreneur, investor and author. His books “Blockchain Ethics: A Bridge to Abundance” (2018) and “Re-Generation X” (2020) not only discuss the benefits of blockchain technology, but also capture Jamil's experience on how he has transitioned from being a loyal yet downsized former corporate employee to a self sovereign individual. With over sixty podcasts under his belt since he joined our team in February 2021, and with four years of experience both managing his own crypto portfolio and providing crypto guidance and counsel to select clients, Jamil continues to seek opportunities to help others navigate this still nascent industry. Jamil's primary focus outside of podcast hosting is helping former corporate employees gain the necessary skills and vision to build their own crypto portfolios and create wealth for the long-term.

Les Nuits de France Culture
La Nuit Paul Signac 1/11 : Charlotte Hellman : "Le choc initial de Signac pour prendre la plume c'est la lecture du journal de Delacroix"

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 32:05


durée : 00:32:05 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Philippe Garbit, Albane Penaranda, Antoine Dhulster - La Nuit Paul Signac - Entretien 1/3 avec Charlotte Hellman à l'occasion de l'exposition "Paul Signac collectionneur", au Musée d'Orsay, et de la parution de son "Journal", dont elle est l'éditrice, chez Gallimard. - réalisation : Virginie Mourthé - invités : Charlotte Liebert Hellman arrière-petite fille de Paul Signac.

WSJ Minute Briefing
Pfizer Seeks FDA Approval for Covid-19 Vaccine in Young Children

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 2:18


Plus: U.S. stocks jump after Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer says a deal was reached to extend the federal debt limit to December. Initial jobless claims drop for first time in four weeks. Trenae Nuri reports. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Marketplace Minute
Weekly jobless claims decline to 326,000 - Midday - Marketplace Minute - October 7, 2021

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 1:50


Initial state unemployment claims declined for the first time in four weeks; Microsoft says Russia responsible for 58% of detected state-backed hacking; Pfizer seeks U.S. authorization to administer Covid-19 vaccine to children 5 to 11; United expanding domestic flight schedule ahead of holiday season

Financial Issues
First Time Initial Unemployment Claims Down

Financial Issues

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 94:00


Tolbert, Krueger & Brooks Podcast Podcast
10-6 Greg Cosell gives initial impression of Trey Lance and what went wrong against Seattle

Tolbert, Krueger & Brooks Podcast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 26:50


Greg Cosell, Senior Producer NFL Films and ESPN NFL Match-up analyst joined the guys and talked about the 49ers loss last week and what he thought of Trey Lance's performance last week and what he expects out of the offense if he's at the helm running it  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KNBR Podcast
10-6 Greg Cosell gives initial impression of Trey Lance and what went wrong against Seattle

KNBR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 26:50


Greg Cosell, Senior Producer NFL Films and ESPN NFL Match-up analyst joined the guys and talked about the 49ers loss last week and what he thought of Trey Lance's performance last week and what he expects out of the offense if he's at the helm running it  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Increments
#32 - Climate Change I: Initial Thought-Crimes

Increments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 51:00


After the immensely positive response to our previous episode on the Weinstein brothers - thanks @robertwiblin! - we thought we would keep giving the people what they want, and what they want is a long discussion on climate change. Specifically, the subject for today is: "The State of the Climate Debate". We touch on: The near perfect partisan split on climate change Will there be a climate apocalypse? The promise of nuclear energy as a solution The limitations of renewables Energy portfolios The rebound effect Degrowth economics Activist tactics and fear mongering Whether The Environment has become A Deity in environmentalist circles We expect very little pushback on this episode. References Apocalypse Never (https://smile.amazon.com/Apocalypse-Never-Environmental-Alarmism-Hurts/dp/0063001691?sa-no-redirect=1) by Michael Shellenberger. Greta Thunberg encouraging you to panic (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RjsLm5PCdVQ&ab_channel=GuardianNews) Thunberg's double crossing of the Atlantic in sailboat (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voyage_of_Greta_Thunberg) The Rebound Effect (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/277338331_The_rebound_effects_of_switching_to_vegetarianism_A_microeconomic_analysis_of_Swedish_consumption_behavior) Quotes But real climate solutions are ones that steer these interventions to systematically disperse and devolve power and control to the community level, whether through community-controlled renewable energy, local organic agriculture or transit systems genuinely accountable to their users. -- Naomi Klein in the Nation (https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/capitalism-vs-climate/) Even if nuclear power were clean, safe, economic, assured of ample fuel, and socially benign, it would still be unattractive because of the political implications of the kind of energy economy it would lock us into. -- Amory Lovins, quoted from Forbes piece (https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelshellenberger/2019/02/14/the-real-reason-they-hate-nuclear-is-because-it-means-we-dont-need-renewables/?sh=17c63299128f) by Michael Shellenberger Send us panic-induced email at incrementspodcast@gmail.com.

Sun Devil Source Report: An ASU Football Podcast
Review of ASU's 42-23 win over UCLA

Sun Devil Source Report: An ASU Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 57:00


On this latest episode of The Sun Devil Source Report Podcast, host Ethan Ryter is joined by site publisher Chris Karpman and reporters Jacob Rudner and Carson Breber as they discuss Arizona State's 42-23 road win against UCLA on Saturday. Covered on this episode: -- Initial takeaways from ASU's win against the Bruins -- Breaking down the explosion of the Sun Devil passing game including sophomore quarterback Jayden Daniels and sophomore wide receiver Ricky Pearsall -- Discussion around the return of freshman running back DeaMonte Trayanum and how he and junior running back Rachaad White performed on the ground -- How the pass defense performed without senior safety Evan Fields as sophomore Kejuan Markham replaced him in the starting lineup -- The performance of the run defense with junior defensive end Tyler Johnson being limited and how redshirt freshman defensive lineman Anthonie Cooper possibly had his best game in a Sun Devil jersey -- Breaking down ASU's special teams and what should be taken away from its performance You can listen to the latest episode up above. Subscribe to the show on iTunes, Soundcloud, Stitcher and your other favorite places to listen to podcasts.

Bond & Beyond
Dossier #68: No Time To Die - initial report

Bond & Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 93:16


The long wait is finally over. After six years, more than half a decade, 72 full months... you can finally find out what we think of No Time To Die. This is not our full review, which will save for a much later viewing, but our initial impressions of the long-awaited 25th James Bond film and Daniel Craig's final outing. Needless to say, there are spoilers abound! We discuss the highs and lows of No Time To Die, speculate about the future of 007, and try to process our surprisingly mixed feelings at what is perhaps the boldest Bond film to date. We would also love to know your thoughts, so email us via bondandbeyondpod@gmail.com. You can find us on Facebook (just search 'Bond & Beyond'), Twitter (@bondbeyondpod) and all our episodes are at bondbeyondpod.tumblr.com.

The Morning Roast with Bonta, Kate & Joe

Bonta and Shasky share their initial reaction to the 49ers going 2-2 on the season after losing to the Seattle Seahawks. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pints & Polishing...an Auto Detailing Podcast
How to Handle Prospective Clients and How Do We Engage With Prospects After Initial Contact?

Pints & Polishing...an Auto Detailing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 51:17


On this episode Marshall, Shawn, and Greg discuss how to handle prospects in your business. Not only how to make a first impression but how to continue the relationship after initial contact. Acting professional during the initial sales period and how do I close a deal without being overly aggression is a topic the guys tackle. This is an episode that really sheds light on how to deal with the sales process to help you close more deals and grow your business. As always thank you for listening and being a part of the community.

Marketplace Minute
Initial jobless claims rise for the third straight week - Midday - Marketplace Minute - September 30, 2021

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 1:50


Initial state unemployment claims totaled 362,000; Kia, Hyundai recall 550,000 vehicles for wrong turn signals; Merck to purchase Acceleron Pharma for $11.5 billion; Amazon reaches settlement with two fired workers who criticized warehouse conditions

The Scrub Life - a podcast for, and about, Surgical Technology.
An Initial Accreditation Story w/Chris Ahearn

The Scrub Life - a podcast for, and about, Surgical Technology.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 88:21


Chris Ahearn, Director of the Suffolk County Community College Surgical Technology Program - New York shares his experience and insight through obtaining CAAHEP Initial Accreditation. For more information to include show notes, please visit: thescrublifepodcast.wordpress.com

What the Hell Is Going On
WTH was behind our COVID failure? Dr. Scott Gottlieb on his new book “Uncontrolled Spread,” the catastrophic initial response, and the lessons learned from the COVID pandemic

What the Hell Is Going On

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 54:39


Since the United States recorded its first Covid-19 related fatality in February 2020, over half a million Americans have died from the virus, and an estimated 43 million total cases have been reported in the country. How was America so unprepared for this pandemic? And how can we ensure that we are prepared for the next public health disaster? Dr. Scott Gottlieb once again joined Marc and Dany to discuss his new book “Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic.” He also talks about the current reality of the Delta variant and what a future with endemic COVID may look like. Dr. Gottlieb is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. He returned to AEI in 2019 after serving as the 23rd Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. He has a medical degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine and did his residency in internal medicine at the Mount Sinai Medical Center. https://www.aei.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Transcript-Final-WTH-Gottlieb-9.28.21.pdf (Download the transcript here. )

Screaming in the Cloud
Corey Screws Up Logstash For Everyone with Jordan Sissel

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 43:34


About JordanJordan is a self proclaimed “hacker.” Links:Twitter: https://twitter.com/jordansissel TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by “you”—gabyte. Distributed technologies like Kubernetes are great, citation very much needed, because they make it easier to have resilient, scalable, systems. SQL databases haven't kept pace though, certainly not like no SQL databases have like Route 53, the world's greatest database. We're still, other than that, using legacy monolithic databases that require ever growing instances of compute. Sometimes we'll try and bolt them together to make them more resilient and scalable, but let's be honest it never works out well. Consider Yugabyte DB, its a distributed SQL database that solves basically all of this. It is 100% open source, and there's not asterisk next to the “open” on that one. And its designed to be resilient and scalable out of the box so you don't have to charge yourself to death. It's compatible with PostgreSQL, or “postgresqueal” as I insist on pronouncing it, so you can use it right away without having to learn a new language and refactor everything. And you can distribute it wherever your applications take you, from across availability zones to other regions or even other cloud providers should one of those happen to exist. Go to yugabyte.com, thats Y-U-G-A-B-Y-T-E dot com and try their free beta of Yugabyte Cloud, where they host and manage it for you. Or see what the open source project looks like—its effortless distributed SQL for global apps. My thanks to Yu—gabyte for sponsoring this episode.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at VMware. Let's be honest—the past year has been far from easy. Due to, well, everything. It caused us to rush cloud migrations and digital transformation, which of course means long hours refactoring your apps, surprises on your cloud bill, misconfigurations and headache for everyone trying manage disparate and fractured cloud environments. VMware has an answer for this. With VMware multi-cloud solutions, organizations have the choice, speed, and control to migrate and optimize applications seamlessly without recoding, take the fastest path to modern infrastructure, and operate consistently across the data center, the edge, and any cloud. I urge to take a look at vmware.com/go/multicloud. You know my opinions on multi cloud by now, but there's a lot of stuff in here that works on any cloud. But don't take it from me thats: VMware.com/go/multicloud and my thanks to them again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I've been to a lot of conference talks in my life. I've seen good ones, I've seen terrible ones, and then I've seen the ones that are way worse than that. But we don't tend to think in terms of impact very often, about how conference talks can move the audience.In fact, that's the only purpose of giving a talk ever—to my mind—is you're trying to spark some form of alchemy or shift in the audience and convince them to do something. Maybe in the banal sense, it's to sign up for something that you're selling, or to go look at your website, or to contribute to a project, or maybe it's to change the way they view things. One of the more transformative talks I've ever seen that shifted my outlook on a lot of things was at [SCALE 00:01:11] in 2012. Person who gave that talk is my guest today, Jordan Sissel, who, among many other things in his career, was the original creator behind logstash, which is the L in ELK Stack. Jordan, thank you for joining me.Jordan: Thanks for having me, Corey.Corey: I don't know how well you remember those days in 2012. It was the dark times; we thought oh, the world is going to end; that wouldn't happen until 2020. But it was an interesting conference full of a bunch of open-source folks, it was my local conference because I lived in Los Angeles. And it was the thing I looked forward to every year because I would always go and learn something new. I was in the trenches in those days, and I had a bunch of problems that looked an awful lot like other people's problems, and having a hallway track where, “Hey, how are you solving this problem?” Was a big deal. I missed those days in some ways.Jordan: Yeah, SCALE was a particularly good conference. I think I made it twice. Traveling down to LA was infrequent for me, but I always enjoyed how it was a very communal setting. They had dedicated hallway tracks. They had kids tracks, which I thought was great because folks couldn't usually come to conferences if they couldn't bring their kids or they had to take care of that stuff. But having a kids track was great, they had kids presenting. It felt more organic than a lot of other conferences did, and that's kind of what drew me to it initially.Corey: Yeah, it was my local network. It turns out that the Southern California tech community is relatively small, and we all go different lives. And it's LA, let's face it, I lived there for over a decade. Flaking as a way of life. So yeah, well, “Oh, we'll go out and catch dinner. Ooh, have to flake at the last minute.” If you're one of the good people, you tell people you're flaking instead of just no-showing, but it happens.But this was the thing that we would gather and catch up every year. And, “Oh, what have you been doing?” “Wow, you work in that company now? Congratulations, slash, what's wrong with you?” It was fun, just sort of a central sync point. It started off as hanging out with friends.And in those days, I was approaching the idea of, “You know what? I should learn to give a conference talk someday. But let's be clear. People don't give conference talks; legends give conference talks. And one day, I'll be good enough to get on stage and give a talk to my peers at a conference.”Now, the easy, cynical interpretation would be, “Well, but I saw your talk and I figured, hey, any jackhole can get up there. If he can do it, anyone can.” But that's not at all how it wound up impacting me. You were talking about logstash, which let's start there because that's a good entry point. Logstash was transformative for me.Before that, I'd spent a lot of time playing around with syslog, usually rsyslog, but there are other stories here of when a system does something and it spits out logs—ideally—how do you make sure you capture those logs in a reliable way so if you restart a computer, you don't wind up with a gap in your logs? If it's the right computer, it could be a gap in everything's logs while that thing is coming back up. And let's avoid single points of failure and the rest. And I had done all kinds of horrible monstrosities, and someone asked me at one point—Jordan: [laugh]. Guilty.Corey: Yeah. Someone said, “Well, there are a couple of options. Why don't you use Splunk?” And the answer is that I don't have a spare princess lying around that I can ransom back to her kingdom, so I can't afford it. “Okay, what about logstash?” And my answer was, “What's a logstash?” And thus that sound was Pandora's Box creaking open.So, I started playing with it and realized, “Okay, this is interesting.” And I lost track of it because we have demands on our time. Then I was dragged into a session that you gave and you explained what logstash was. I'm not going to do nearly as good of a job as you can on this. What the hell was logstash, for folks who are not screaming at syslog while they first hear of it.Jordan: All right. So, you mentioned rsyslog, and there's—old is often a pejorative of more established projects because I don't think these projects are bad. But rsyslog, syslog-ng, things like that were common to see for me as a sysadmin. But to talk about logstash, we need to go back a little further than 2012. So, the logstash project started—Corey: I disagree because I wasn't aware of it until 2012. Until I become aware of something it doesn't really exist. That's right, I have the object permanence of an infant.Jordan: [laugh].That's fair. And I've always felt like perception is reality, so if someone—this gets into something I like to say, but if someone is having a bad time or someone doesn't know about something, then it might as well not exist. So, logstash as a project started in 2008, 2009. I don't remember when the first commits landed, but it was, gosh, it's more than ten years ago now.But even before that in college, I was fortunate to, through a network of friends, get a job as a sysadmin. And as a sysadmin, you stare at logs a lot to figure out what's going on. And I wanted a more interesting way to process the logs. I had taught myself regular expressions and it wasn't finding joy in it… at all, like pretty much most people, probably. Either they look at regular expressions and just… evacuate with disgust, which is absolutely an appropriate response, or they dive into it and they have to use it for their job.But it wasn't enjoyable, and I found myself repeating stuff a lot. Matching IP addresses, matching strings, URLs, just trying to pull out useful information about what is going on?Corey: Oh, and the timestamp problem, too. One of the things that I think people don't understand who have not played in this space, is that all systems do have logs unless you've really pooched something somewhere—Jordan: Yeah.Corey: —and it shows that at this point in time, this thing happened. As we start talking about multiple computers and distributed systems—but even on the same computer—great, so at this time there was something that showed up in the system log because there was a disk event or something, and at the same time you have application logs that are talking about what the application running is talking about. And that is ideally using a somewhat similar system to do this, but often not. And the way that timestamps are expressed in these are radically different and the way that the log files themselves are structured. One might be timestamp followed by hostname followed by error code.The other one might be hostname followed by a timestamp—in a different format—followed by a copyright notice because a big company got to it followed by the actual event notice, and trying to disambiguate all of these into a standardized form was first obnoxious, and secondly, very important because you want to see the exact chain of events. This also leads to a separate sidebar on making sure that all the clocks are synchronized, but that's a separate story for another time. And that's where you enter the story in many respects.Jordan: Right. So, my thought around what led to logstash is you can take a sysadmin or software IT developer—whatever—expert, and you can sit them in front of a bunch of logs and they can read them and say, “That's the time it happened. That's the user who caused this action. This is the action.” But if you try and abstract and step away, and so you ask how many times did this action happen? When did this user appear? What time did this happen?You start losing the ability to ask those questions without being an expert yourself, or sitting next to an expert and having them be your keyboard. Kind of a phenomenon I call the human keyboard problem where you're speaking to a computer, but someone has to translate for you. And so in around 2004, I was super into Perl. No shocker that I enjoyed—ish. I sort of enjoyed regular expressions, but I was super into Perl, and there was a Perl module called Regexp::Common which is a library of regular expressions to match known things: IP addresses, certain kinds of timestamps, quoted strings, and whatnot.Corey: And this stuff is always challenging because it sounds like oh, an IP address. One of the interview questions I hated the most someone asked me was write a regular expression to detect an IP address. It turns out that to do this correctly, even if you bound it to ipv4 only, the answer takes up multiple lines on a screen.Jordan: Oh, for sure.Corey: It's enormous.Jordan: It's like a full page of—Corey: It is.Jordan: —of code you can't read. And that's one of the things that, it was sort of like standing on the shoulders of the person who came before; it was kind of an epiphany to me.Corey: Yeah. So, I can copy and paste that into my code, but someone who has to maintain that thing after I get fired is going to be, “What the hell is this and what does it do?” It's like it's the blessed artifact that the ancients built it and left it there like it's a Stargate sitting in your code. And it's, “We don't know how it works; we're scared to break it, so we don't even look at that thing directly. We just know that we put nonsense in, an IP address comes out, and let's not touch it, ever again.”Jordan: Exactly. And even to your example, even before you get fired and someone replaces you and looks at your regular expression, the problem I was having was, I would have this library of copy and pasteable things, and then I would find a bug, and edge case. And I would fix that edge case but the other 15 scripts that were using the same way regular expression, I can't even read them anymore because I don't carry that kind of context in my head for all of that syntax. So, you either have to go back and copy and paste and fix all those old regular expressions. Or you just say, “You know what? We're not going to fix the old code. We have a new version of it that works here, but everywhere else this edge case fails.”So, that's one of the things that drew me to the Regexp::Common library in Perl was that it was reusable and things had names. It was, “I want to match an IP address.” You didn't have to memorize that long piece of text to precisely and accurately accept only regular expressions and rejects things that are not. You just said, “Give me the regular expression that matches an IP.” And from that library gave me the idea to write grok.Well, if we could name things, then maybe we could turn that into some kind of data structure, sort of the combination of, “I have a piece of log data, and I as an expert, I know that's an IP address, that's the username, and that's the timestamp.” Well, now I can apply this library of regular expressions that I didn't have to write and hopefully has a unit test suite, and say, now we can pull out instead of that plain piece of text that is hard to read as a non-expert, now I can have a data structure we can format however we want, that non-experts can see. And even experts can just relax and not have to be full experts all the time, using that part of your brain. So, now you can start getting towards answering search-oriented questions. “How many login attempts happened yesterday from this IP address?”Corey: Right. And back then, the way that people would do these things was Elasticsearch. So, that's the thing you shove all your data into in a bunch of different ways and you can run full-text queries on it. And that's great, but now we want to have that stuff actually structured, and that is sort of the magic of logstash—which was used in conjunction with Elasticsearch a lot—and it turns out that typing random SQL queries in the command line is not generally how most business users like to interact with this stuff, seems to be something dashboard-y-like, and the project that folks use for that was Kibana. And ELK Stack became a thing because Elasticsearch in isolation can do a lot but it doesn't get you all the way there for what people were using to look at logs.Jordan: You're right.Corey: And Kibana is also one of the projects that Elastic owned, and at some point, someone looks around, like, “Oh, logstash. People are using that with us an awful lot. How big is the company that built that? Oh, it's an open-source project run by some guy? Can we hire that guy?” And the answer is, “Apparently,” because you wound up working as an Elastic employee for a while.Jordan: Yeah. It was kind of an interesting journey. So, in the beginning of logstash in 2009, I kind of had this picture of how I wanted to solve log processing search challenges. And I broke it down into a couple of parts of visualization—to be clear, I broke it down in my head, not into code, but visualization, kind of exploration, there's the processing and transmission, and then there's storage and search. And I only felt confident really attending to a solution for one of those parts. And I picked log processing partly because I already had a jumpstart from a couple of years prior, working on grok and feeling really comfortable with regular expressions. I don't want to say good because that's—Corey: You heard it here first—Jordan: [laugh].Corey: —we found the person that knows regular expressions. [laugh].Jordan: [laugh]. And logstash was being worked on to solve this problem of taking your data, processing it, and getting it somewhere. That's why logstash has so many outputs, has so many inputs, and lots of filters. And about I think a year into building logstash, I had experimented with storage and search backends, and I never found something that really clicked with me. And I was experimenting with Leucine, and knowing that I could not complete this journey because that the problem space is so large, it would be foolish of me to try to do distributed log stores or anything like that, plus visualization.I just didn't have the skills or the time in the day. I ended up writing a frontend for logstash called logstash-web—naming things is hard—and I wasn't particularly skilled or attentive to that project, and it was more of a very lightweight frontend to solve the visualization, the exploration aspect. And about a year into logstash being alive, I found Elasticsearch. And what clicked with me from being a sysadmin and having worked at large data center companies in the past is I know the logs on a single system are going to quickly outgrow it. So, whatever storage system will accept these logs, it's got to be easy to add new storage.And Elasticsearch first-day promise was it's distributed; you can add more nodes and go about your day. And it fulfilled that promise and I think it still fulfills that promise that if you're going to be processing terabytes of data, yeah, just keep dumping it in there. That's one of the reasons I didn't try and even use MySQL, or Postgres, or other data systems because it didn't seem obvious how to have multiple storage servers collecting this data with those solutions, for me at the time.Corey: It turns out that solving problems like this that are global and universal lead to massive adoption very quickly. I want to get this back a bit before you wound up joining Elastic because you get up on stage and you talked through what this is. And I mentioned at the start of this recording, that it was one of those transformative talks. But let's be clear here, I don't remember 95% of how logstash works. Like, the technology you talked about ten years ago is largely outmoded slash replaced slash outdated today. I assure you, I did not take anything of note whatsoever from your talk regarding regular expressions, I promise. And—Jordan: [laugh]. Good.Corey: But that's not the stuff that was transformative to me. What was, was the way that you talked about these things. And there was the first time I'd ever heard the phrase that if a new user has a bad time, it's a bug. This was 2012. The idea of empathy hadn't really penetrated into the ops and engineering spaces in any meaningful way yet. It was about gatekeeping, it was about, “Read the manual fool”—Jordan: Yes.Corey: —if people had questions. And it was actively user-hostile. And it was something that I found transformative of, forget the technology piece for a second; this is a story about how it could be different. Because logstash was the vehicle to deliver a message that transcended far beyond the boundaries of how to structure your logs, or maybe the other boundaries of regular expressions, I'm never quite sure where those things start and stop. But it was something that was actively transformative where you're on stage as someone who is a recognized authority in the space, and you're getting up there and you're sending an implicit message—both explicitly and by example—of be nice to people; demonstrate empathy. And that left a hell of an impact. And—Jordan: Thank you.Corey: I wound up doing a spot check just now, and I wound up looking at this and sure enough, early in 2013, I wound up committing—it's still in the history of the changelog for logstash because it's open-source—I committed two pull requests and minutes apart, two submissions—I don't know if pull requests were even a thing back then—but it wound up in the log. Because another project you were renowned for was fpm: Effing Package Manager if I'm—is that what the acronym stands for, or am I misremembering?Jordan: [laugh]. We'll go with that. I'm sure, vulgar viewers will know what the F stands for, but you don't have to say it. It's just Effing Package Management.Corey: Yeah.Jordan: But yeah, I think I really do believe that if a user, especially if a new user has a bad time, it's a bug, and that came from many years of participating at various levels in open-source, where if you came at it with a tinkerer's or a hacker's mindset and you think, “This project is great. I would like it to do one additional thing, and I would like to talk to someone about how to make it do that one additional thing.” And you go find the owners or the maintainers of that project, and you come in with gusto and energy, and you describe what you want to do and, first, they say, “What you want to do is not possible.” They don't even say they don't want to do it; they frame the whole universe against you. “It's not possible. Why would you want to do that? If you want to make that, do it yourself.”You know, none of these things are an extended hand, a lowered ladder, an open door, none of those. It's always, “You're bothering me. Go away. Please read the documentation and see where we clearly”—which they don't—“Document that this is not a thing we're interested in.” And I came to the conclusion that any future open-source or collaborative work that I worked on, it's got to be from a place where, “You're welcome, and whatever contributions or participation levels you choose, are okay. And if you have an idea, let's talk about it. If you're having a bad time, let's figure out how to solve it.”Maybe the solution is we point you in the right direction to the documentation, if documentation exists; maybe we find a bug that we need to fix. The idea that the way to build communities is through kindness and collaboration, not through walls or gatekeeping or just being rude. And I really do think that's one of the reasons logstash became so successful. I mean, any particular technology could have succeeded in the space that logstash did, but I believe that it did so because of that one piece of framework where if a new user has a bad time, it's a bug. Because to me, that opens the door to say, “Yeah, you know what? Some of the code I write is not going to be good. Or, the thing you want to do is undocumented. Or the documentation is out of date. It told you a lie and you followed the documentation and it misled you because it's incorrect.”We can fix that. Maybe we don't have time to fix it right now. Maybe there's no one around to fix it, but we can at least say, “You know what? That information is incorrect, and I'm sorry you were misled. Come on into the community and we'll figure it out.” And one of the patterns I know is, on the IRC channel, which is where the logstash real-time community chat… I don't know how to describe that.Corey: No, it was on freenode. That's part of the reason I felt okay, talking to you. At that point. I was volunteer network staff. This is before freenode turned into basically a haven for Nazis this past year.Jordan: Yeah. It was still called lilo… lilonet [crosstalk 00:20:20]—Corey: No, the open freenode network, that predates me. This was—yeah, lilo—Jordan: Okay.Corey: —died about six years prior. But—Jordan: Oh, all right.Corey: Freenode's been around a long time. What make this thing work was that I was network staff, and that means that I had a bit of perceived authority—it's a chat room; not really—but it was one of those things where it was at least, “Okay, this is not just some sketchy drive-by rando,” which I very much was, but I didn't present that way, so I could strike up conversations. But with you talking about this stuff, I never needed to be that person. It was just if someone wants to pitch in on this, great; more hands make lighter work. Sure.Jordan: Yeah, for sure.Corey: And for me, the interesting part is not even around the logstash aspects so much; it's your other project, fbm. Well, one of your other projects. Back in 2012, that was an interesting year for me. Another area that got very near and dear to my heart in open-source world was the SaltStack project; I was contributor number 15. And I didn't know how Python worked. Not that I do now, but I can fake it better now.And Tom Hatch, the guy that ran the project before it was a company was famous for this where I could send in horrifying levels of code, and every time he would merge it in and then ten minutes later, there would be another patch that comes in that fixes all bugs I just introduced and it was just such a warm onboarding. I'm not suggesting that approach and I'm not saying it's scalable, but I started contributing. And I became the first Debian and Ubuntu packager for SaltStack, which was great. And I did a terrible job at it because—let me explain. I don't know if it's any better now, but back in those days, there were multiple documentation sources on the proper way to package software.They were all contradictory with each other, there was no guidance as to when to follow each one, there was never a, “You know nothing about packaging; here's what you need to know, step-by-step,” and when you get it wrong, they yell at you. And it turns out that the best practice then to get it formally accepted upstream—which is what I did—is do a crap-ass job, and then you'll wind up with a grownup coming in, like, “This is awful. Move.” And then they'll fix it and yell at you, and gatekeep like hell, and then you have a package that works and gets accepted upstream because the magic incantation has been said somewhere. And what I loved about fpm was that I could take any random repo or any source tarball or anything I wanted, run it through with a single command, and it would wind up building out a RPM and a Deb file—and I don't know what else it's supported; those are the ones I cared about—that I could then install on a system. I put in a repo and add that to a sources list on systems, and get to automatically install so I could use configuration management—like SaltStack—to wind up installing custom local packages. And oh, my God, did the packaging communities for multiple different distros hate you—Jordan: Yep.Corey: —and specifically what you had built because this was not the proper way to package. How dare you solve an actual business problem someone has instead of forcing them to go to packaging school where the address is secret, and you have to learn that. It was awful. It was the clearest example that I can come up with of gatekeeping, and then you're coming up with fbm which gets rid of user pain, and I realized that in that fight between the church of orthodoxy of, “This is how it should be done,” and the, “You're having a problem; here's a tool that makes it simple,” I know exactly what side of that line I wanted to be on. And I hadn't always been previously, and that is what clarified it for me.Jordan: Yeah, fbm was a really delightful enjoyment for me to build. The origins of that was I worked at a company and they were all… I think, at that time, we were RPM-based, and then as folks tend to do, I bounced around between jobs almost every year, so I went from one place that—Corey: Hey, it's me.Jordan: [laugh]. Right? And there's absolutely nothing wrong with leaving every year or staying longer. It's just whatever progresses your career in the way that you want and keeps you safe and your family safe. But we were using RPM and we were building packages already not following the orthodoxy.A lot of times if you ask someone how to build a package for Fedora, they'll point you at the Maximum RPM book, and that's… a lot of pages, and honestly, I'm not going to sit down and read it. I just want to take a bunch of files, name it, and install it on 30 machines with Puppet. And that's what we were doing. Cue one year later, I moved to a new company, and we were using Debian packages. And they're the same thing.What struck me is they are identical. It's a bunch of files—and don't pedant me about this—it's a bunch of files with a name, with some other sometimes useful metadata, like other names that you might depend on. And I really didn't find it enjoyable to transfer my knowledge of how to build RPMs, and the tooling and the structures and the syntaxes, to building Debian packages. And this was not for greater publication; this was I have a bunch of internal applications I needed to package and deploy with, at the time it was Puppet. And it wasn't fun.So, I did what we did with grok which was codify that knowledge to reduce the burden. And after a few, probably a year or so of that, it really dawned on me that a generality is all packaging formats are largely solving the same problem and I wanted to build something that was solving problems for folks like you and me: sysadmins, who were handed a pile of code and they needed to get it into production. And I wasn't interested in formalities or appeasing any priesthoods or orthodoxies about what really—you know, “You should really shine your package with this special wax,” kind of thing. Because all of the documentation for Debian packages, Fedora packages are often dedicated to those projects. You're going to submit a package to Fedora so that the rest of the world can use it on Fedora. That wasn't my use case.Corey: Right. I built a thing and a thing that I built is awesome and I want the world to use it, so now I have to go to packaging school? Not just once but twice—Jordan: Right.Corey: —and possibly more. That's awful.Jordan: Or more. Yeah. And it's tough.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: And this gets back to what I found of—it was rare that I could find a way to contribute to something meaningfully, and I was using logstash after your talk, I'd started using it and rolling it out somewhere, and I discovered that there wasn't a Debian package for it—the environment I was in at that time—or Ubuntu package, and, “Hey Jordan, are you the guy that wrote fpm and there isn't a package here?” And the thing is is that you would never frame it this way, but the answer was, of course, “Pull requests welcome,” which is often an invitation to do free volunteer work for companies, but this was an open-source project that was not backed by a publicly-traded company; it was some guy. And of course, I'll pitch in on that. And I checked the commit log on this for what it is that I see, and sure enough, I have two commits. The first one was on Sunday night in February of 2013, and my commit message was, “Initial packaging work for Deb building.” And sure enough, there's a bunch of files I put up there and that's great. And my second and last commit was 12 minutes later saying, “Remove large binary because I'm foolish.” Yeah.Jordan: Was that you? [laugh].Corey: Yeah. Oh, yeah, I'm sure—yeah, it was great. I didn't know how Git worked back then. I'm sure it's still in the history there. I wonder how big that binary is, and exactly how much I have screwed people over in the last decade since.Jordan: I've noticed this over time. And every now and then you'd be—I would be or someone would be on a slow internet connection—which again, is something that we need to optimize for, or at least be aware of and help where we can—someone would be cloning logstash on an airplane or something like that, or rural setting, and they would say, “It gets stuck at 76% for, like, ten minutes.” And you would go back and dust off your tome of how to use Git because it's very difficult piece of software to use, and you would find this one blob and I never even looked at it who committed it or whatever, but it was like I think it was 80 Megs of a JAR file or a Debian package that was [unintelligible 00:28:31] logstash release. And… [laugh] it's such a small world that you're like, yep, that was me.Corey: Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Let's check this just for fun here. To be clear, the entire repository right now is 167 Megs, so that file that I had up there for all of 13 minutes lives indelibly in Git history, and it is fully half of the size—Jordan: Yep.Corey: —of the entirety of the logstash project. All right, then. I didn't realize this was one of those confess your sins episodes, but here we are.Jordan: Look, sometimes we put flags on the moon, sometimes we put big files in git. You could just for posterity, we could go back and edit the history and remove that, but it never became important to do it, it wasn't loud, people weren't upset enough by it, or it didn't come up enough to say, “You know what? This is a big file.” So, it's there. You left your mark.Corey: You know, we take what we can get. It's an odd time. I'll have to do some digging around; I'm sure I'll tweet about this as soon as I get a bit more data on it, but I wonder how often people have had frustration caused by that. There's no ill intent here, to be very clear, but it was instead, I didn't know how Git worked very well. I didn't know what I was doing in a lot of respects, and sure enough in the fullness of time, some condescending package people came in and actually made this right.And there is a reasonable, responsible package now because, surprise, of course there is. But I wonder how much inadvertent pain I caused people by that ridiculous commit. And it's the idea of impact and how this stuff works. I'm not happy that people are on a plane with a slow connection had a wait an extra minute or two to download that nonsense. It's one of those things that is, oops. I feel like a bit of a heel for that, not for not knowing something, but for causing harm to folks. Intent doesn't outweigh impact. There is a lesson in there for it.Jordan: Agreed. On that example, I think one of the things… code is not the most important thing I can contribute to a project, even though I feel very confident in my skills in programming in a variety of environments. I think the number one thing I can do is listen and look for sources of pain. And people would come in and say, “I can't get this to work.” And we would work together and figure out how to make it work for their use case, and that could result in a new feature, a bug fix, or some documentation improvements, or a blog post, or something like that.And I think in this case, I don't really recall any amount of noise for someone saying, “Cloning the Git repository is just a pain in the butt.” And I think a lot of that is because either the people who would be negatively impacted by that weren't doing that use case, they were downloading the releases, which were as small as we can possibly get them, or they were editing files using the GitHub online edit the file thing, which is a totally acceptable, it's perfectly fine way to do things in Git. So, I don't remember anyone complaining about that particular file size issue. The Elasticsearch repository is massive and I don't think it even has binaries. It just has so much more—Corey: Someone accidentally committed their entire production test data set at one point and oops-a-doozy. Yeah, it's not the most egregious harm I've ever caused—Jordan: Yeah.Corey: —but it's there. The thing that, I guess, resonates with me and still does is the lessons I learned from you, I could sum them up as being not just empathy-driven—because that's the easy answer—but the other layers were that you didn't need to be the world's greatest expert in a thing in order to credibly give a conference talk. To be clear, you were miles ahead of me and still are in a lot of different areas—Jordan: Thanks.Corey: —and that's fine. But you don't need to be the—like, you are not the world's greatest expert on empathy, but that's what I took from the talk and that's what it was about. It also taught me that things you can pick up from talks—and other means—there are things you can talk about in terms of technology and there are things you can talk about in terms of people, and the things about people do not have expiration dates in the same way that technology does. And if I'm going to be remembered for impact on people versus impact on technology, for me, there's no contest. And you forced me to really think about a lot of those things that it started my path to, I guess, becoming a public speaker and then later all the rest that followed, like this podcast, the nonsense on Twitter, and all the rest. So, it is, I guess, we can lay the responsibility for all that at your feet. Enjoy the hate mail.Jordan: Uhh, my email address is now closed. I'm sorry.Corey: Exactly.Jordan: Well, I appreciate the kind words.Corey: We'll get letters on this one.Jordan: [laugh].Corey: It's the impact that people have, and someti—I don't think you knew at the time that that's the impact you were having. It matters.Jordan: I agree. I think a lot of it came from how do I want to experience this? And it was much later that it became something that was really outside of me, in the sense that it was building communities. One of the things I learned shortly after—or even just before—joining Elastic was how many folks were looking to solve a problem, found logstash, became a participant in the community, and that participation could just be anything, just hanging out on IRC, on the mailing list, whatever, and the next step for them was to get a better paying job in an environment they enjoyed that helped them take the next step in their career. Some of those people came to work with me at Elastic; some of them started to work on the logstash team at some point they decided because a lot of logstash users were sysadmins.And on the logstash team, we were all developers; we weren't sysadmins, there was nothing to operate. And a lot of folks would come on board and they were like, “You know what? I'm not enjoying writing Ruby for my job.” And they could take the next step to transition to the support team or the sales engineer team, or cloud operations team at Elastic. So, it was really, like you mentioned, it has nothing to do with the technology of—to me—why these projects are important.They became an amplifier and a hand to pull people up to go the next step they need to go. And on the way maybe they can make a positive impact in the communities they participate in. If those happen to be fpm or logstash, that's great, but I think I want folks to see that technology doesn't have to be a grind of getting through gatekeepers, meeting artificial barriers, and things like that.Corey: The thing that I took, too, is that I gave a talk in 2015 or'16, which is strangely appropriate now: “Terrible ideas in Git.” And yes, checking large binaries in is one of the terrible ideas I talk about. It's Git through counter-example. And around that time, I also gave a talk for a while on how to handle a job interview and advance your career. Only one of those talks has resulted in people approaching me even years later saying that what I did had changed aspects of their life. It wasn't the Git one. And that's the impact it comes down to. That is the change that I wanted to start having because I saw someone else do it and realized, you know, maybe I could possibly be that good someday. Well, I'd like to think I made it, on some level.Jordan: [laugh]. I'm proud of the impact you've made. And I agree with you, it is about people. Even with fpm where I was very selfishly tickling my own itch, I don't want to remember all of this stuff and I also enjoy operating outside of the boundaries of a church or whatever the priesthoods that say, “This is how you must do a thing,” I knew there was a lot of folks who worked at jobs and they didn't have authority, and they had to deploy something, and they knew if they could just package it into a Debian format, or an RPM format, or whatever they needed to do, they could get it deployed and it would make their lives easier. Well, they didn't have the time or the energy or the support in order to learn how to do that and fpm brought them that success where you can say, “Here's a bunch of files; here's a name, poof, you have a package for whatever format you want.”Where I found fpm really take off is when Gem and Python and Node.js support were added. The sysadmins were kind of sandwiched in between—in two impossible worlds where they are only authorized to deploy a certain package format, but all of their internal application developer teams were using Node.js and newer technologies, and all of those package formats were not permitted by whoever had the authority to permit those things at their job. But now they had a tool that said, “You know what? We can just take that thing, we'll take Django and Python, and we'll make it an RPM and we won't have to think a lot about it.”And that really, I think—to me, my hope was that it de-stresses that sort of work environment where you're not having to do three weeks of brand new work every time someone releases something internally in your company; you can just run a script that you wrote a month ago and maintain it as you go.Corey: Wouldn't that be something?Jordan: [laugh]. Ideally, ideally.Corey: Jordan, I want to thank you for not only the stuff you did ten years ago, but also the stuff you just said now. If people want to learn more about you, how you view the world, see what you're up to these days, where can they find you?Jordan: I'm mostly active on Twitter, at @jordansissel, all one word. Mostly these days, I post repair stuff I do on the house. I'm a stay-at-home full0 time dad these days, and… I'm still doing maintenance on the projects that need maintenance, like fpm or xdotool, so if you're one of those users, I hope you're happy. If you're not happy, please reach out and we'll figure out what the next steps can be. But yeah. If you like bugs, especially spiders—or if you don't like spiders and you want to like spiders, check me out on Twitter. I'm often posting macro photos, close-up photos of butterflies, bees, spiders, and the like.Corey: And we will, of course, throw links to that in the [show notes 00:38:10]. Jordan, thank you so much for your time today. It's appreciated.Jordan: Thank you, Corey. It's good talking to you.Corey: Jordan Sissel, founder of logstash and currently, blissfully, not working on a particular corporate job. I envy him, some days. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment in which you have also embedded a large binary.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Lead with Jake Tapper
Top generals contradict Biden in contentious hearing, admit they wanted 2,500 troops to remain in Afghanistan; Biden hosts key Dem senators as agenda hangs in the balance; Pfizer gives FDA initial data on COVID vaccine for kids ages 5-11;

The Lead with Jake Tapper

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 36:28


Senators press generals on Biden's decision to pull all troops; Milley, Mackenzie: we assessed that 2,500-3,500 troops should stay; Milley: U.S. credibility damaged by Afghanistan withdrawal; Pelosi reverses course, plans to hold infrastructure vote Thursday even if massive budget bill is not done; Progressive Dems angry with Pelosi on infrastructure reversal; Moderate Dems raise concerns about cooperate tax hikes; Sanders urges House Dems to vote “no” on infrastructure until budget deal passes; WH: Biden thinks meeting with Sinema “moved the ball forward”; Pediatric group: kids make up nearly 27% of current nationwide cases; NYC mayor: 45% jump in vaccinations since mandates announced; Parents protest after court rules in favor of mask mandate in TN school district; WH: 400,000 Americans received booster shots this past weekend; CDC: 55.4% of U.S> now fully vaccinated; Ex-FDA chief: Delta COVID surge could end by Thanksgiving; Ex-FDA chief: COVID likely to become a “persistent menace”; Gabby Petto's family calls on her fiancé to turn himself in; Petito's mother becomes emotional: “she's with us”; Brian Laundrie's parents say they don't know where he is; Grisham book explains Trump's secretive Walter Reed trip in 2019; Former press secretary describes Trump's “terrifying” temper in new book; New tell-all book details lewd behavior from Trump; To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Construction Genius
ESOP Excellence: An Insider's View of Executing an Employee Ownership Plan

Construction Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 40:41


What does it take to execute an ESOP successfully?    To get a clear perspective about this topic, I talk with Herb Sargent, the President and CEO of an ESOP, Sargent Corporation, a construction company based in Maine. This podcast addresses some of the following essential points:   the importance of distinguishing your runway for ownership transition and management or leadership transition to execute an ESOP successfully; the importance of identifying the why and why Herb's “why” is unique; how you go about the process of exploring an Aesop and why understanding the mechanics of an ESOP is essential; identifying a mentor in your particular construction vertical so that you can look at the pros and cons of an ESOP structure I believe this episode will significantly benefit those interested in the mechanics in the implementation of an ESOP in their construction companies. Tune in to this today!     Discussion Points: 0:00 Introduction  3:55 Herb Sargent's background and how he got into ESOP  6:09 Options when you decide to get out of construction  6:51 Herb's emotional response to the sale of H.E. Sargent  8:17 How the sale of H.E. Sargent influenced Herb's future decisions  9:18 Herb's experience starting his own company  10:14 Why Herb bought back H.E. Sargent  12:49 The motivation behind purchasing H.E. Sargent  14:29 The decision to do ESOP  16:10 Separating the ownership transition from the management transition  17:16 Ensuring smooth turnover   18:15 Where Herb found models and mentors for the ESOP transition  19:36 How employees can start buying into the ESOP  23:09 ESOPs struggle when owners just want to make money  25:36 How seasonality of the business affect people's ability to build value in the ESOP 28:51 Starting an internal podcast  30:45 Communicating the ESOP life to employees  31:30 Initial steps to take if you're considering ESOP  35:37 Working hard to build credibility with your crew  35:52 Herb's journey in finding the next CEO of his company  37:59 BONUS: Herb's restaurant recommendation in Stillwater, Maine    About the Guest:  Herb Sargent is the President and CEO of Sargent Corporation. It is an employee-owned earthwork construction company that traces its beginning to 1926 in Alton, Maine. They have nearly 400 employees working in seven states, specializing in commercial, industrial, and institutional site preparation, landfill construction, utility projects, airports, athletic facilities, and wind power access.    Resources:  Check out Sargent Corporation's website https://sargent.us/employee-owned/   Herb's restaurant recommendation https://masonsbrewingcompany.com/    Do Your Project Executives Need to Become Better Leaders?    Book a 10-minute call with Eric Anderton to see if/how he can help (https://10minutes.youcanbook.me/)    Connect with me on LinkedIn. For more podcast episodes, you may also visit my website. Tune in and subscribe to the Construction Genius: A Leadership Master-Class Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher. Thank you for tuning in! 

BackWards & In High Heels, The Podcast
The Pen Sisters Initial Interview: Leo Sullivan Presents

BackWards & In High Heels, The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 59:47


Have a publishing nightmare? --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/backwards--in-high-heels/message

MPR News Update
Timberwolves new owners offer some initial assurance the team will stay in Minnesota

MPR News Update

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 4:21


Timberwolves new owners offer some initial assurance the team will stay in Minnesota, but are already talking about the need for a new arena. This is an evening update from MPR News, hosted by Tim Nelson. Music by Gary Meister.

Locked On Giants – Daily Podcast On The San Francisco Giants
Giants blow past 100 wins, set franchise HR record, reduce magic number to 5

Locked On Giants – Daily Podcast On The San Francisco Giants

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 30:21


On today's Locked On Giants podcast, host Ben Kaspick details the San Francisco Giants' dominant sweep in Denver, as they blew past the 100-win mark, set the franchise's all-time home run record, and reduced their magic number to win the NL West to five. Any combination of Giants wins and Dodgers losses that sums to five means the Giants win the NL West. The Giants dominanted in Denver in part thanks to excellent pitching. In 27 innings, Giants pitchers struck out 34 and walked one. Kevin Gausman was back to his dominant self, striking out 11 and walking none in six excellent innings. Gausman finding himself just before the playoffs would be a huge development for the Giants. However, the club is also dealing with a major injury scare. Self-declared "Captain" Brandon Belt was hit by a pitch in the thumb while squaring to bunt on Sunday. Initial scans were inconclusive, so Belt is going to have x-rays in the Bay Area on Monday. The Giants absolutely need Belt right now, as he has been carrying the team offensively. Belt is in elite company with his power and on-base skills over the last couple of seasons, and his defense is a huge asset as well. Watch Daily on YouTube http://bit.ly/LOGYouTube Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Feedstuffs Precision Pork
FEEDSTUFFS PRECISION PORK Market Report – September 24

Feedstuffs Precision Pork

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 6:00


In this episode of Feedstuffs Precision Pork, Dave Bauer, senior market analyst for Cargill, offers some hog market perspective and market highlights for the week as well as provides things to think about in the week ahead.We are officially into fall but looking around the Midwest, the combines have yet to be fully engaged. Initial discussions are quite typical with those saying production will be up and others saying it will be down. Based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's latest production numbers from September 10, corn and soybeans both are still thought to making a good showing this season. Time will tell, says Bauer.These are uncertain times, and it will pay dividends to be well-prepared. If you have questions on this week's recap or want to discuss something not covered, feel free to ASK DAVE at David_Bauer@cargill.comPlan today for tomorrow's success.Follow Feedstuffs Precision Pork on your favorite podcast platform or find it on www.Feedstuffs.com and www.NationalHogFarmer.com

American Institute for Economic Research
Weekly Initial Claims for Unemployment Benefits Rise Again as Continuing Claims Fall By Robert Hughes

American Institute for Economic Research

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 3:37


“Weekly initial claims for unemployment benefits rose for a second consecutive week, likely a result of the recent surge in new Covid cases. However, a tight labor market and a record number of open jobs should support a downward trend, but the path may be extended and more volatile.” – Robert Hughes

Mr. Worldwide and His Bride: Living Your Best Life
136 - INITIAL STEPS TO TAKE WHEN YOU ARE 1ST DIAGNOSED

Mr. Worldwide and His Bride: Living Your Best Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 26:10


In this episode we dive deep into what we did when we first were diagnosed.  Tips that can help you too! Don't forget to share this with someone who is going through it.   1. To access my document on some of the changes Ive made you can get it here -> https://mailchi.mp/b609cecd4c0f/cancer 2. Here's Chalenes latest episode on her nightmare experience with her recent surgery -> https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/plastic-surgery-nightmare-volume-3-were-just-getting/id911042029?i=1000532140331 3. To join my cancer group for women: https://www.facebook.com/groups/womeninpink Connect with me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jendelvaux/ If you need help starting your health/fitness journey reach out!  You can email me at coachjennyd@gmail.com The Journal I use-> https://pushjournal.com/?rfsn=4086660.6edc3&utm_source=refersion&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=4086660.6edc3 HEALTH FAVORITES: 1. Organifi - www.organifishop.com -> Use JEND at check out to save 15% off. 2. Shakeology (My favorite flavor is Plant based Chocolate) - https://www.teambeachbody.com/shop/b/shakeology?referringRepID=756017 3. My favorite bar out there! MidDay squares

The Roofer Show
242: How To Improve Your Sales Process with Kyle Hunt (Part 1)

The Roofer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 55:40


The easiest way to generate more revenue is to increase your close rate. In today's interview with contractor business coach Kyle Hunt, we discuss tips in each area of your sales process: The Initial Phone Call: What you must do to make a great first impression, 5 Powerful Words When Talking With A Roofing Prospect, The In-Person Meeting: How to prepare, what to bring, and the approach you should take, and No Project Left Behind: Your lead tracking, sales pipeline, and follow-up system. Get ready for this fast-paced and informative conversation to help you close more sales! What you'll hear in this episode: Business coach & consultant for business contractors Passion for helping business owners with proven, practical, simple, effective marketing and sales help You can't be all things to all people Niching down to what's more profitable Why contracting is such a hard business Seeing the forest in spite of the trees People are willing to mentor If you're feeling stuck, reach out and ask for help Initial phone call with a new prospect – what to do before, during, and after “This Is How We Work” Giving full, undivided attention It's the little things Why you should take a few minutes to research before you call Getting in the right mind-set What a project discovery sheet is What's the goal of this call? Making sure they're doing most of the talking Taking a minute after the call to consider what worked and what didn't work Every meeting should have an agenda and a specific time An appointment confirmation email and what it should contain Be willing to try new things! Connect with Kyle! Remodel Your Marketing Remodelers Community – Facebook Page Remodelers on the Rise Podcast Kyle's Email Resources: Check Out My NEW Website: The Roofer Coach Download My FREE 1-Page Business Plan Text Me @ (510) 612-1450 – Say Hi! I would love to hear your feedback, pros & cons! **Please leave me a review on iTunes!** ~Please Share My Podcast With Other Contractors~ THE ROOFER SHOW SPONSOR INFO: Need Help Answering the Phone Or Online Chat? Find Out How Ruby Receptionists Can Help Bring In Leads!! Or Call Ruby at (844) 326-7829 Check out their app!

Marketplace Minute
Initial jobless claims rise for second week - Midday - Marketplace Minute - September 23, 2021

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 1:50


Americans filed 351,000 claims last week; wealthiest U.S. households pay an average 8% effective federal tax rate, economic analysis finds; unruly passenger incidents decline 50%, FAA says; Salesforce boosts revenue forecasts

Lippert Academy for Leadership
Business Agility

Lippert Academy for Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 42:00


On this episode of The Lippert Built to Lead Podcast, Sarah Rice, Corporate and Community Impact Specialist, speaks with Amish Shah, CEO of Kem Krest, about business agility. Amish shares how the pandemic helped him transition his business, how he brought leadership together to execute it. He also talks about how he stayed strong while he dealt with the fear and anxiety and how the company adapted during the unprecedented time.   “Where agility starts is really understanding the lack of agility you might have in certain areas. It's like understanding the gaps.” -Amish Shah [15:19]   What You Will Learn: [00:??] Meet Amish [01:19] How the pandemic helped him transition his business [09:49] Initial phase of bringing leadership group together [15:45] How they adapted through the pandemic [19:55] How a leader stays strong while dealing with the fear and anxiety [24:28] A new direction for the company [33:36] What Amish would redo [35:56] His home life   Resources: Visit our website: https://www.lci1.com/academy Email us: academy@lci1.com

Fitness Marketing Mastery
The Perfect Facebook Ads Formula for Fitness & Health Businesses

Fitness Marketing Mastery

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 51:04


How would you like a Facebook ad formula that works? Yes, please, right?! No matter if you're brand new to paid advertising, only thinking about it, but haven't done any yet, or you're a veteran but have noticed a huge change (for the worse) recently, listen to this episode. It will help you think about thinks in a way that makes it far less mysterious. When I first began running ads I would have loved to have a Facebook ads formula. I was fortunate enough to have access to a mastermind group and expert resources to begin. This is one area few personal trainers or gyms feel good about. There is always the question of whether or not you're spending too much, not enough, and what to change or test to get better results. This episode will help you identify a plan. My Guest: Jono is an award-winning international speaker, bestselling author, podcast host, the co-founder and director at Fitness Education Online and the admin of the one of the largest Facebook Groups in the world for Fitness Professionals (Fitness Education Online Community). Jono is the current Fitness Australia Educator of the Year and a former Exercise New Zealand Educator of the Year Finalist. Questions we cover in this episode: How much spend for a 1 million revenue from an ad? Is Facebook still a viable advertising source? How has Facebook advertising changed? To listeners overwhelmed with the idea of setting up Facebook ads, you say? Where does a listener start? What about the difference in boosting posts vs using Ads Manager? What is the perfect Facebook Ads formula? Facebook Ads for Fitness & Health Pro Example from the show Initial investment = initial sale $500 ad spend $10 leads Close rate 10% $500 cost of program (start of customer value) Zero percent of local businesses run effective Facebook ads. -Jono Petrohilos Formula for $5 leads Photo – small group of people all smiling and having fun after the workout No: no smiles, working out/working hard, exercise photos, too professional, really fit and good looking Headline – mention the suburb, Copy – challenges work, 6-12 weeks, urgency e.g. 12-week challenge kicks off 8th of August TOWN location. Click for more. Lead Generator Ad (no website required) Targeting – no interests required, distance/age/gender keep below 150,000 people for a small radius There you have it, the perfect Facebook ads formula for health & fitness professionals Connect with Jono: www.fitnesseducationonline.com.au FB Group: www.facebook.com/groups/fitnesseducationonline IG: www.instagram.com/fitnesseducationonline Through Sept 30. Code: comebackstrong20 allows 20% off one of 2 options. 

The Epstein Chronicles
Gabby Petito: Initial Autopsy Report Shows That Gabby Died As A Result Of Homicide

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 23:07


The initial autopsy results came back today and they confirmed what most people have been speculating: Gabby died via homicide. As of now no cause of death has been revealed. to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comSource:https://abcnews.go.com/US/body-found-grand-teton-confirmed-gabby-petito-death/story?id=80124838

Beyond The Horizon
Gabby Petito: Initial Autopsy Report Shows That Gabby Died As A Result Of Homicide

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 23:07


The initial autopsy results came back today and they confirmed what most people have been speculating: Gabby died via homicide. As of now no cause of death has been revealed. to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comSource:https://abcnews.go.com/US/body-found-grand-teton-confirmed-gabby-petito-death/story?id=80124838

Daybreak Drive-IN
September 21, 2021: New political lines get initial OK

Daybreak Drive-IN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 2:24


ALSO: Biden preps UN speech... Wentz twisted both anklesSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Locked On 49ers - Daily Podcast On The San Francisco 49ers
RAPID REACT: 17-11 Win vs Philadelphia Eagles in Week 2

Locked On 49ers - Daily Podcast On The San Francisco 49ers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 43:16


The San Francisco 49ers defeated the Philadelphia Eagles 17-11. Eric was in the building as the Niners improved to 2-0. Initial takeaways, highlights and game balls. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Peep The Play Podcast
'PEEP THE PLAY PODCAST' EPISODE 31 : ON SEASON(2021-22 NFL INITIAL LOOKS)

Peep The Play Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 83:05


Fellas & ladies, wait no more because Peep The Podcast comes around once more during times where NFL organizations kick off annual competition so since Week 1 of helmet clashing has gone by, say welcome back Money Mal all while assuring the big homie Will feels introduced properly along with GMar on their highly appreciated features that covers different trajectories of pro football squads in 2021. (0:00) Damage assessment by our panel through all six divisions spanning both conferences should temper fans emotions following first game action from newly extended 17 scheduled regular season contests each year (5:58) When coverage explaining every match during these next few days was completed on wax, not too much debate came up about whether some squads may win or lose against opponents put across them (47:56) Fantasy lovers should hear some names hit centerstage(1:09:50) Most people can agree that bills chose serious monthly violence towards grown people spanning all continents but your collaboration hosts Will and Mal dole out solutions for taking gridiron organizations while increasing Sunday pockets(1:18:11) ​

The Don Tony Show / Wednesday Night Don-O-Mite
The Don Tony Show 9/25/21: WWE Extreme Rules Predictions; Bryan Danielson On Tribalistic Fans; Homicide Makes AEW Debut

The Don Tony Show / Wednesday Night Don-O-Mite

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 92:33


RUNNING TIME: 1 Hours 33 Minutes Hosted by Don Tony Topics Discussed: WWE Extreme Rules PPV Predictions... AEW Grand Slam Rampage 9/24/21 and WWE SmackDown 9/24/21 recap... Homicide makes his AEW debut... Shane Thorne debuts a new character (which he created)... Bryan Danielson addresses tribalistic wrestling fans across social media... Initial thoughts on Chris Kanyon: Dark Side Of The Ring episode w/TV rating... Impact Wrestling rating... Update on custom Daffney License Plates and photos... And, the pump has arrived! DT will blow up and 'beat up' the 1998 WCW Bill Goldberg Electronic Talking Battlin' Bop Bag and more.. Enjoy the show! WWE Smackdown Results 09/24/2021: Shane Thorne def Austin Theory (Dark Match)... Keith Lee def Matthew A Raz (Dark Match)... Kacy Catanzaro and Xia Li def Dakota Kai and Aliyah (Dark Match)... King Nakamura (c) def Apollo Crews (Intercontinental Title Match)... Zelina Vega def Liv Morgan... Nikki A.S.H def Natalya... Roman Reigns (c) def Montez Ford (Non-Title Match) AEW Grand Slam Rampage Results 09/24/2021: CM Punk def Powerhouse Hobbs... Adam Cole & The Young Bucks def Christian Cage & Jurassic Express (Jungle Boy & Luchasaurus)... Men Of The Year (Ethan Page & Scorpio Sky) def Chris Jericho & Jake Hager... Santana & Ortiz & Lucha Brothers (Penta El Zero Miedo & Rey Fenix) def Hardy Family Office (Isiah Kassidy, Marq Quen, The Butcher & The Blade)... Penelope Ford def Anna Jay... Eddie Kingston & Jon Moxley def Lance Archer & Minoru Suzuki (Lights Out Tag Team Match) CLICK HERE to WATCH the VIDEO episode of THE DON TONY SHOW 09/25/2021 RIGHT CLICK AND SAVE to download the AUDIO episode of THE DON TONY SHOW 09/25/2021 CLICK HERE for the COMMERCIAL FREE AUDIO episode of THE DON TONY SHOW 09/25/2021 CLICK HERE for the COMMERCIAL FREE VIDEO episode of THE DON TONY SHOW 09/25/2021 CLICK HERE to LISTEN ONLINE to THE DON TONY SHOW 09/25/2021  CLICK HERE to WATCH the VIDEO episode of AMA Q&A w/ DON TONY (#39) 09/23/2021 RIGHT CLICK AND SAVE to download the AUDIO episode of AMA Q&A w/ DON TONY (#39) 09/23/2021 CLICK HERE for the COMMERCIAL FREE AUDIO episode of AMA Q&A w/ DON TONY (#39) 09/23/2021 CLICK HERE for the COMMERCIAL FREE VIDEO episode of AMA Q&A w/ DON TONY (#39) 09/23/2021 CLICK HERE to listen to AMA Q&A w/ DON TONY (#39) 09/23/2021 online CLICK HERE to WATCH the VIDEO version of WEDNESDAY NIGHT DON-O-MITE 9/22/21 Episode 106 RIGHT CLICK AND SAVE to download the AUDIO version of WEDNESDAY NIGHT DON-O-MITE 9/22/21 Episode 106 CLICK HERE for the COMMERCIAL FREE AUDIO version of WEDNESDAY NIGHT DON-O-MITE 9/22/21 Episode 106 CLICK HERE for the COMMERCIAL FREE VIDEO version of WEDNESDAY NIGHT DON-O-MITE 9/22/21 Episode 106 CLICK HERE to listen to WEDNESDAY NIGHT DON-O-MITE 9/22/21 Episode 106 online CLICK HERE to WATCH the VIDEO episode of BREAKFAST SOUP RAW 09/20/2021 RIGHT CLICK AND SAVE to download the AUDIO episode of BREAKFAST SOUP RAW 09/20/2021 CLICK HERE for the COMMERCIAL FREE AUDIO episode of BREAKFAST SOUP RAW 09/20/2021 CLICK HERE for the COMMERCIAL FREE VIDEO episode of BREAKFAST SOUP RAW 09/20/2021 CLICK HERE to access previous episodes for all the shows! ================= DON TONY IS NOW ON INSTAGRAM, YOUTUBE, AND TWITCH! CLICK HERE to SUBSCRIBE TO DON TONY's YOUTUBE CHANNEL CLICK HERE to SUBSCRIBE TO DON TONY's TWITCH CHANNEL CLICK HERE to JOIN DON TONY's INSTAGRAM CHANNEL ================= REMINDER: 'WEDNESDAY NIGHT DON-O-MITE' RETURNS *LIVE* WEDNESDAY (09/29/2021) at 10:05PM EST immediately following AEW Dynamite on YOUTUBE (CLICK HERE) WND covers AEW, NXT, NWA. MLW, Impact Wrestling, NJPW, ROH, and much more. In other words, everything except WWE Raw and Smackdown. =============== REMEMBER, 'RETRO DON TONY AND KEVIN CASTLE EPISODES' ARE NOW EXCLUSIVELY ON PATREON (as of Sept 1, 2020). By signing up to DTKC Patreon, you'll gain access to all episodes of 'Don Tony And Kevin Castle Show' from 2017 to Summer 2020. PLUS, you can enjoy our Patreon Exclusive shows such as 'Breakfast Soup' hosted by Don Tony and Missionary, 'Castle Chronicles' hosted by Kevin Castle, 'Blah Blah Blah' hosted by Don Tony and more.  Plus ad-free episodes of all non Patreon shows including The Don Tony Show, Wednesday Night Don-O-Mite, PPV Recaps and more. And, you also have exclusive access to lost episodes of 'The Minority Report' from 2004/2005, select vintage episodes of 'The Masked Maniac Show', and retro Blackhearts Hotline reports from 2001/2002. You can join the family for as little as $2! CLICK HERE to visit the Patreon page and gain access now! =============== Special thanks to our ASSOCIATE PRODUCERS and SPONSORS (below). These are very special friends of our shows and their help and loyalty is greatly appreciated! ASSOCIATE PRODUCERS: 'TCB' Tighe C Bowers Paul Bielawski J580CHPmalicious erockV1 Derek Brewer Naeem Khalifa Brandon Foley Chris Henry Chatsiteforums.com Seth Washington Whisperer Rob Garcia Akane CM Black Pixels Jacob Esten Stel Johnny Morin  Michael Westphal  Roger 'Saul Goodman' Rubio Don Tony's Political Advisor (Anna) Jeffrey Collins Cockboy Joseph Nykoluk Cherry Jesus Hassan AL-Hashmi Brent Webster Aaron Kloss Alton Ehia Anthony Smith James Gruesome Bob O Mac CJ Uehara Kress Mann James Diehl 'SwitchBabe' Courtney Summers  Tim Everhardt Murrell Coombes Jr Keith Lee John Garcia Maddog No Good Larry Traylor Tommy Pockesci Chris Lumnah SPONSORS TEXAS PODCAST MASSACRE Awesome Horror Film Themed Podcast SHOOT THE DEFENCE Soccer fans! Excellent podcast talking soccer by fans, for fans! (Twitter: @ShootTheDefence) ELOMIN SHA: DISPLATE STORE Pop Culture Artwork CRISIS IN THE TOYVERSE PODCAST (Website: ComicCrusaders.com) RAUL ROMO'S HOUSE OF CARDS PRO WRESTLING CARDS, VINTAGE PACKS, & MORE ON EBAY! ================= DON TONY IS NOW FEATURED ON PANDORA!) Pandora Radio has launched an all new Podcast section, which features a very limited number of shows. And we are proud to announce we were chosen to be one of them! If you haven't experienced Pandora Radio, try it out. And if you are already a subscriber, you can now stream our entire library! Remember, at this time, all Podcasts on Pandora are available only thru their Phone App. CLICK HERE to listen to The Don Tony Show, Wednesday Night Don-O-Mite, older episodes of DTKC SHOW, BwB, TWIWH, and more on Pandora thru your mobile phone now! =============== THE DON TONY SHOW / DELI MAN / BREAKFAST SOUP / MATARRAZ T-SHIRTS ON SALE!Pro Wrestling Tees has launched the only source for T-Shirts of' The Don Tony Show, Deli Man, Breakfast w/ Blasi, Breakfast Soup, and even Matarraz Shirts! Please visit our T-Shirt store now. More designs will be added shortly. CLICK HERE to visit our T-Shirt Store now! ===============  PROGRAMMING NOTE: WWE EXTREME RULES 2021 REVIEWYour PPV recap of 'WWE Extreme Rules 2021' will air Sunday September 26, 2021 immediately following the LIVE PPV. PROGRAMMING NOTE: BREAKFAST SOUP RAWYour next episode of 'Breakfast Soup RAW' will air Monday September 27, 2021 LIVE at 11:05PM EST following WWE Raw. PROGRAMMING NOTE: WEDNESDAY NIGHT DON-O-MITEYour next episode of the 'Wednesday Night Don-O-Mite' will air Wednesday September 29, 2021 LIVE at 10:05PM EST. PROGRAMMING NOTE: AMA / ASK DON TONY Your next episode of 'Q&A With Don Tony' will air Thursday September 30, 2021 LIVE at 10:05PM EST. PROGRAMMING NOTE: THE DON TONY SHOWYour next episode of 'The Don Tony Show' will air SATURDAY October 2, 2021 LIVE at 8:00PM EST. =============== CLICK HERE FOR STITCHER CLICK HERE FOR ITUNES CLICK HERE FOR PODBEAN CLICK HERE FOR IHEARTRADIO CLICK HERE FOR BLUBRRY CLICK HERE FOR IPHONE,IPAD, & IPOD TOUCH APP

On Iowa Podcast
No. 5 Iowa 30, Kent State 7: Initial takeaways | The Final Score

On Iowa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 10:59


The Gazette's Leah Vann and Mike Hlas share their takeaways from https://www.thegazette.com/hawkeye-football/iowa-football-vs-kent-state-score-live-updates-analysis-how-to-watch-on-tv-and-online/ (No. 5 Iowa's 30-7 win over Kent State.)

Guys On The Sideline
Episode 104_Initial NFL Hot Takes

Guys On The Sideline

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 40:33


The Guys are back in mid-season form as they share their impressions of the kickoff to the NFL Season. Jeff is giddy about his Cardinals, Chris can't stop gloating about the Silver and Black, and Tyler is trying to stay calm with his Packers. Trending all across the NFL scene in three, two, one. Enjoy.

War Whiskey Podcast
War Whiskey Podcast Season 3: Episode 1, 2003-2005 Deployment Stories: The Initial Call (Feat. Chris Autry)

War Whiskey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 28:19


War Whiskey Podcast is Back!! In this episode, Justin is joined by his long-time friend and fellow veteran, Chris Autry, as they take a journey down memory lane and discuss the famed 2004-2005 deployment to Iraq. They discuss the initial notification call and the emotions and events that followed. Like, Listen and Subscribe!

The 411 on Wrestling Podcast
WWE NXT 2.0 Reaction: Bron Breakker, Tommaso Ciampa, More

The 411 on Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 26:33


In this episode of the 411 On Wrestling Podcast, 411's Blake Lovell discusses the WWE NXT 2.0 debut episode, Bron Breakker's potential, Tommaso Ciampa capturing the NXT title, and much more.*Intro*1:08 Initial reaction to WWE NXT 2.0*2:45 Bron Breakker*7:01 Tommaso Ciampa wins NXT title*16:04 Other NXT 2.0 thoughtsDonate to the GoFundMe for Larry Csonka's family: https://www.gofundme.com/f/larrymania-living-on-in-his-girlsJeremy's WWE NXT Review: https://411mania.com/wrestling/jeremys-wwe-nxt-review-9-14-21/Cook's WWE NXT Review: https://411mania.com/wrestling/cooks-wwe-nxt-2-0-review-9-14-21/Hall's WWE NXT Review: https://411mania.com/wrestling/halls-nxt-review-9-14-21/Subscribe to 411Mania on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7BzHOcmD2ebYPseQwfMZEQFollow Blake on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/wrestleblake

Patriots Unfiltered
Patriots Unfiltered 9/2: Initial 53-Man Roster Reaction

Patriots Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 118:34


Tune-in as we offer our analysis of the initial New England Patriots 53-man roster. We recap of the moves that happened including several reports that are not official yet. Plus, we continue to react to Cam Newton being released and Mac Jones seemingly taking over the starting QB job.

The Al Galdi Podcast
Episode 135: Washington Football Team sets its initial 53-man roster and much more

The Al Galdi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 65:54


08:54 - Washington Football Team: analysis of who the WFT kept and cut for its defensive position groups on the initial 53-man roster, including Troy Apke making the team but Jimmy Moreland and Jeremy Reaves being released 28:26 - Washington Football Team: analysis of who the WFT kept and cut for its offensive position groups on the initial 53-man roster, including Jaret Patterson and Sammis Reyes making the team and Peyton Barber and Antonio Gandy-Golden being released 42:52 - Nationals: react to Victor Robles being optioned to Triple-A Rochester, Patrick Corbin getting rocked again and more from a 12-6 loss to the Philadelphia Phillies and the Toronto Blue Jays designating ex-Nat Brad Hand for assignment 01:00:36 - Orioles: thoughts on a second consecutive good outing for Keegan Akin and more from a 4-2 win at the Toronto Blue Jays Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Bleeding Green Nation: for Philadelphia Eagles fans
At the Podium: Howie Roseman and Nick Sirianni on the release of the Eagles' initial 53-man roster

Bleeding Green Nation: for Philadelphia Eagles fans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 30:22


Eagles General Manager Howie Roseman and Head Coach Nick Sirianni spoke with the Philly media after the release of the team's initial 53-man roster. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ben Greenfield Fitness
The Confusing Gut Killer That Fogs Your Brain, Strips Your Body Of Nutrients & Strips The Fun Out Of Food: Everything You Need To Know About Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Ben Greenfield Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 68:41


bengreenfieldfitness.com/ibdpodcast While recently in Los Angeles at the Ancestral Health Symposium, I had the pleasure of a long, sunshine walk with several of the speakers and presenters. Perhaps you already heard my chat that I recorded with Chris Kelly as part of that trip.  But I also met a couple of new friends who are real ninjas when it comes to something called "IBD" (inflammatory bowel disease). On my left side during the walk was Andrew Kornfeld (andrew@ibd.coach), who holds degrees in Neuroscience and Psychology from UC Santa Cruz and is an award-winning educator, organizer, and published author. Andrew has Crohn's disease, and over the course of a decade and a half has developed a tailored and evidence-based protocol that allowed him to achieve robust, lasting clinical remission from his IBD. Andrew founded IBDCoach so others with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis could benefit from the strategic lessons and research he has conducted in his personal pursuit of health. And on my right side was Amy Loftus (amy@ibd.coach), who holds a B.A. in Biological Anthropology and an M.A. in Education from the University of California, Berkeley, and works alongside Andrew to run the operations and educational arm of IBDCoach. Amy combines her decade of K-12 classroom teaching experience, her work as a software engineer at a Silicon Valley health tech startup, and her years as an IBD spouse to empower IBDCoach members and their families with the resources they need to achieve their remission goals. Founded in 2019, IBDCoach is the brainchild of Andrew and Amy, who are on a mission to change healthcare by tackling inflammatory bowel diseases including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis in a capacity never attempted before. In their program, members work to achieve long-lasting remission through immersive science education, community support, and a unique form of health coaching that emphasizes strategic, patient-driven, and patient-empowered actions. IBDCoach is the first program of its kind to provide comprehensive scientific information in one accessible location as an essential adjunct to standard medical care. Initial results from dozens of clients are highly positive including amelioration in symptoms and disease activity, reduced inflammatory markers, lifelong friendships formed, and lives changed for the better. The founders of IBDCoach, Andrew Kornfeld and Amy Loftus, have both personal and professional experience with inflammatory bowel diseases. If you or someone you know is struggling with inflammatory bowel disease, you can check out Andrew and Amy's work at ibd.coach. In this episode, you'll discover: -Andrew and Amy's experiences with IBD...07:00 -Predisposing factors that may make someone susceptible to IBD...13:30 -How IBD causes drastic consequences to health and the body...17:40 -The best test to determine if you have or potentially have IBD...20:55 -3-step model to treat IBD: -Step 1: Reduce inflammation...26:11 -Step 2: Nourish the microbiome...33:10 -Step 3: Repair the barrier...39:24 -How neuroplasticity affects causes and treatments for IBD...45:10 -How the IBD coach program works...48:36 -Biggest mistakes people make when diagnosing or treating IBD...50:00 -The best diet when you have IBD...52:07 -Using HRV tracking to consume food wisely...59:36 -The epidemic in America that misses the front page news...1:03:15 -And much more!... Upcoming Events: Las Vegas Keto Expo (October 15-16, 2021). Ben will be speaking at the Las Vegas Keto Expo along with 13 other keto experts. The first 300 guests to register here will get a free drink chip for the poolside party and a free t-shirt. Keep up on Ben's LIVE appearances by following bengreenfieldfitness.com/calendar Episode sponsors: -Ra Optics -Paleo Valley Beef Sticks -Kion Oregano -Organifi Green Juice bengreenfieldfitness.com/ibdpodcast