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The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Lasik, Fitness After Cancer, Essential Tremor | THRR123

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 38:48 Very Popular


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://boriquagato.substack.com/p/eu-physics-denial-has-come-home-to Podcast Questions: 1. LASIK [17:19] Mark says: Hi Robb and Nikki, On last week's episode Robb mentioned getting LASIK. I don't think I've heard this mentioned on the podcast before. I'm short-sighted (-4.00), and have long been considering LASIK. But, something about it just makes me feel squeamish. Robb, how much research into the procedure did you have to do before getting comfortable with it? Are there any major thoughts/findings from your research worth sharing? And, you being someone who's active and does BJJ, did you consider LASEK (ek) over LASIK (ik), which I've read is often preferred by military personnel/police/boxers/the like (anything high impact). From an article in The Times (UK): "Unlike the most common form of laser eye surgery, Lasik, the operation used on military personnel, Lasek, does not involve slicing a flap in the cornea because there is a slim chance that a hard blow could dislodge the flap. Boxers, police officers and those with a very active lifestyle are also advised to opt for Lasek." How was your recovery – being able to get back into physical activity? Any and all thoughts that might help me overcome my squeamishness would be much appreciated! Mark 2. Returning to fitness after cancer [29:48] Greg says: Hey Robb and Nikki, I have a friend who has just finished an extensive round of chemo treatments. He wants to know what would be the best way to pursue getting back in shape and getting his health in order post-chemo. Are there any specific things he should focus on in terms of diet and exercise? Thanks for everything you do. 3. Essential Tremors [32:25] Sandy says: I have heard you mention several times on Podcasts that you are finding some relief from your essential tremors with lions mane. I would love to do my own experiment to see if this would help me. What form of lions mane would you suggest? What dosage would you shoot for? How long did it take until you saw some relief? All of the drugs I have tried for my tremors gave me side effects that were worse than the tremors themselves. So I had given up. This is the first time in a long time I have felt hopeful. Thanks for what you do! Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript at this episode's blog page https://robbwolf.com/2022/09/16/lasik-fitness-after-cancer-essential-tremor-thrr123/

Spoken By Elswyth - Erotic Mistress Hypnosis Sessions
4.22 Free Femdom “Forest Bathing” Hypno Session

Spoken By Elswyth - Erotic Mistress Hypnosis Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 38:10


I know you will enjoy this Forest Bathing experience. It includes the perfect amount of Femdom. And it takes place in the Shared Headspace, where you're used to handing over the reigns to me. Transcript You may have noticed that this is a long podcast session. That's because we're doing a full-length session called Forest […] The post 4.22 Free Femdom “Forest Bathing” Hypno Session appeared first on Spoken By Elswyth.

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT
#12 How is food poverty impacting the poorest people in Britain?

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 37:23


Today, I'm joined by Hannah who has chosen the text we'll be talking about this week: 1) Pasta, bread and crisps among biggest UK budget food price increases https://www.theguardian.com/business/2022/may/30/pasta-bread-and-crisps-among-biggest-uk-food-price-increases I recommend you read this news article before listening to the conversation (that's what this podcast is all about, after all) but the chat will still make sense if you don't! Hannah works in sustainability within the TV industry and helped set up a food waste charity in Lewisham, South East London where she lived. Download the Transcript: You can download the transcript for this episode here: www.rhiannonelt.com/deep-talk-podcast If you want to use the transcript and/or the podcast audio for more focussed language practice, you'll find a whole host of self-study activities on my website to help you. Get in Touch: Join my mailing list here: www.rhiannonelt.com Follow me on Instagram: @rhiannonelt Email me: info@rhiannonelt.com

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Billionaires, Regenerative Ag, and BS | Salty Talk 043 | THRR

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 57:18 Very Popular


Salty Talk is a special edition of Healthy Rebellion Radio. Each week on Salty Talk Robb will do a deep dive into current health and performance news, mixed with an occasional Salty conversation with movers and shakers in the world of research, performance, health, and longevity. For the full the video presentation of this episode and to be a part of the conversation, join us in The Healthy Rebellion online community. WARNING: These episodes may get “salty” with the occasional expletive. Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here   Show Notes: This is the third installment of our "fireside chat" with Diana Rodgers. In this salty talk Robb and Diana unpack George Monbiot's recent Guardian piece in which he claims that the literally WORST food that humans can produce is….wait for it….pastured, organic meat. Yes, worse than monocropping, worse than round up and synthetic fertilizer, pastured meat is, in Monbiot's eyes, the worst. We also looked at a recent Mathew Crawford piece that considers director and Hollywood bigwig, James Cameron's efforts to run organic farms in New Zealand. Cameron has invested tens of millions of dollars into various meat alternative projects and is unabashedly anti-meat. Well, Cameron's farms were failing until he did this one weird trick….tune into the episode to discover the ironic punchline to that story! Mathew Crawford article: How Much Did Hollywood Know About the Plandemonium Ahead of Time? George Monbiot article: The most damaging farm products? Organic, pasture-fed beef and lamb Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript on the blog page for this episode at https://robbwolf.com/2022/08/26/billionaires-regenerative-ag-and-bs-salty-talk-043-thrr/

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Gut Microbiome With No Colon And Daily Antibiotics , Queasy While Running | THRR121

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 56:38 Very Popular


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: CDC (quietly) removes a massive claim on vaccine safety Podcast Questions:   1. Gut microbiome & antibiotics [36:36] Alex says Hi Robb! I've heard you talk about the importance of a healthy gut microbiome and the impact it has on other areas of the body (mental health, etc). I wanted to get your opinion on potential solutions for promoting a healthy gut microbiome in less than ideal circumstances. I have ulcerative colitis and I've had my colon removed as well as some of my small intestine, I have been on antibiotics and steroids daily for about 1.5 years to deal with ongoing inflammation issues. I assume that the antibiotics wipe out any good gut bacteria I have on a daily basis, and I struggle to get any answers from my medical team on what I can do to maintain any sort of good gut bacteria. I've tried probiotics, but assume they're counteracted by the antibiotics. Any suggestions or resources you think may help? Thanks for all you do! Alex Prescribing an antibiotic? Pair it with probiotics Saccharomyces boulardii to Prevent Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea: A Randomized, Double-Masked, Placebo-Controlled Trial 2. Queasy running [48:12] Eric says: Hi Robb - my wife and I are huge fans and she suggested I write to see if you had any thoughts on this. I've been an athlete my entire life and always a runner. Lately I've experienced nausea about a mile into my runs. I'm not running hard, in fact it's really just as I'm getting warmed up. I'm breathing harder, but not like race-hard - if that makes sense. We are huge LMNT fans and I consistently consume at least 6000mg of sodium daily. Particularly in the summer heat. I don't experience this any other time other than when I start to run. If I stop for a few min, the feeling generally passes and I can go on with my run. I've looked at what I'm eating prior to my runs and (1) nothing has really changed, even though this feeling is relatively recent and (2) I don't see anything that I think would make me nauseous. I'm a pretty consistent and clean eater. Could this be an electrolyte issue?? For reference: I'm 5'9” 165lbs, lean/muscular. We eat low carb (my wife follows Dr Bernstein) so I eat similarly but include dairy & berries Would greatly appreciate any thoughts you might have on what could be causing this. Thanks for all you - and Nicki - do to keep us informed and entertained! Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript at this episode's blog post at https://robbwolf.com/2022/08/19/gut-microbiome-with-no-colon-and-daily-antibiotics-queasy-while-running-thrr121/

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT
#11 How are toxic workplaces leaving us burnt out?

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 35:40


Today, I'm joined by Anna who has chosen the texts we'll be talking about this week: 1) A Toxic Work Culture Is Forcing High-Performing People to Quit https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/toxic-work-culture-forcing-high-performing-people-quit-tim-denning/?trackingId=CqTCoCpw9oKthtgbDBYD2A%3D%3D Extra Reading (also chosen by Anna): 2) Do you feel burnt out? It's not just about working too much https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/feb/01/burnout-not-just-about-working-too-much 3) Your work is not your god: welcome to the age of the burnout epidemic https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2022/jan/06/burnout-epidemic-work-lives-meaning I recommend reading these articles before listening to the conversation (that's what this podcast is all about, after all) but the chat will still make sense if you don't! Download the Transcript: You can download the transcript for this episode here: www.rhiannonelt.com/deep-talk-podcast If you want to use the transcript and/or the podcast audio for more focussed language practice, you'll find a whole host of self-study activities on my website to help you. Get in Touch: Join my mailing list here: www.rhiannonelt.com Follow me on Instagram: @rhiannonelt Email me: info@rhiannonelt.com

TalkIn' Serbian Advanced
TalkIn' Serbian Advanced - Episode 05 - 6 Pieces of advice from Jordan Peterson in Belgrade

TalkIn' Serbian Advanced

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 19:01


Whether you're a Jordan Peterson fan or not, one can't deny he's a brilliant man who has helped many people worldwide.Chris and I are huge JP fans and have had the privilege to listen to him live in Belgrade. It was actually our anniversary present for ourselves.During the talk, Dr. Peterson answered many questions and gave much advice on career, family, immigration, and self-improvement. In the podcast, Chris and I talk about the details we remember from this event and what caused an impression on us.Chapters00:18 Introduction04:05 First part07:20 Second part10:20 Third part11:45 Fourth part14:15 Fifth part15:35 Sixth part18:05 Bye, byeThere are a lot of advanced words you might have not heard before. Be aware of the topics and the vocabulary you would use when talking about them in your native language. As always, we prepared a TRANSCRIPT which can help you follow us while we speak. You can also acquire a vocabulary list and exercise sheet. These would definitely help you memorize the words and constructions from the episode. TRANSCRIPT You can get the transcript of our conversation in Serbian for a small donation on Patreon. Your support means a lot to us and helps us make more episodes. https://www.patreon.com/talkinserbianWhat can you get on our Patreon page beside the transcript?Depending on the tier you choose, you can get:• a 4-page vocabulary list. We listed a lot of high-level words from the episode. For the first time we also made a list of all the expressions used in the conversation. You definitely won't find those in a dictionary. • a worksheet with 4 exercises to see what you learnt from the episode + a bonus exercise for those who are not afraid of a challenge.All of these you can find on the following link: https://www.patreon.com/talkinserbianIf you just want to support us, you can also do it at https://www.buymeacoffee.com/TALKINSERBIAN Whether you want to support us on these channels or not, we want to thank you for coming here. We truly want to make learning Serbian as easy as possible and listening to our podcast helps others find us too.If you like what we do, help us spread the word and get to more people. You can subscribe to our channel and give us a like. Also, we would be really excited to hear your impressions and ideas for new episodes. Leave a comment below or get in touch through • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/talkinserbian/• Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/talkinserbian/• TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@talkingserbianHvala!We hope this episode helps you not only learn Serbian but also make improvements in your daily life. Let us know which piece of advice you like the most.

Woodland Walks - The Woodland Trust Podcast
10. Peckham Rye Park with Charity Wakefield

Woodland Walks - The Woodland Trust Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 24:49


Charity Wakefield's passion for the natural world shone through when we caught up at her local green space. I met the actor, environmentalist and Woodland Trust ambassador at Peckham Rye Park to talk about trees, wildlife and acting. Charity explains how nature has made her happy since the tree-climbing, den-building days of her childhood. She is concerned that people have lost their connection with the environment, but is hopeful for the future and encourages us to recognise that we can all make a difference. She believes in ‘people power'. We also talk eco-friendly fashion, filming comedy-drama The Great and climbing a tree to learn her lines in Lewisham! Don't forget to rate us and subscribe! Learn more about the Woodland Trust at woodlandtrust.org.uk Transcript You are listening to Woodland Walks, a podcast for the Woodland Trust, presented by Adam Shaw. We protect and plant trees for people to enjoy, to fight climate change and to help wildlife thrive. Adam: Charity Wakefield is an actor, environmentalist and Woodland Trust ambassador. She starred in BBC One's production of Rapunzel, Constance in The Three Musketeers at the Bristol Old Vic, and Elaine in the Graduate at the New Vic. She had a lead role as Marianne Dashwood in Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility and has been in Doctor Who, the Halcyon, Bounty Hunters, amongst other productions. And she's now starring in the TV series, The Great about Catherine the Great. Well, I met her at her local park to talk about acting and the importance of the natural world. Charity: So now we are at Peckham Ride Park, which has been my local park for most of my time in London. I now have a baby so there's lots of kinds of mother and baby groups around the area. I have lots of friends here still. Adam: Are you a country girl or did you grow up in the city, or? Charity: Erm, I, I never thought of myself as a country girl. I did grow up though in and around East Sussex. I used to live in a couple of different places down there. We moved a bit as a kid. Adam: Sorry, why don't you, you grew up in the country, why did you not think of yourself as a… Charity: I don't know Adam: You know you thought of yourself as you felt your inner urban woman early on? Charity: I just don't think I grew up with any sense of identity if I'm honest, because I also live a little bit in Spain when I was very small. And like I said we moved around quite a lot. So actually I'm an actress and I trained at drama school and going to drama school at the time of going to university for most people if you do that, that was the first time I really had this interest to work out where I was from, or you know you kind of try to identify yourself by telling each other, and also drama school, in particular, you're looking at different kind of life experiences and personality traits, because it's material for you, right? So, you start kind of realising ‘oh I that this background or that background'. Yeah, for me, being from the countryside just meant desperate driving as soon as I can. I could drive about a week after my birthday because I had secret driving lessons with friends and my dad and stuff. Yeah, I guess I have always loved the countryside and I sort of you know had friends you know the family were farmers and we used to go and make camps in the woods. Adam: Well, that's good, and talking of woods we seem to be, what's down there? That's a very wooded area, shall we go, you lead on, but shall we go down there? Or Charity: This is the Common, this is Peckham Ride Common, and erm I think it was, has been around for at least a couple of hundred years and it's a really big open space with some really huge trees in the middle. They're probably like, lots of them are London planes and oak trees, and I think this section we're about to walk into was actually sort of closed off at the beginning I think it was a big common and this was owned by an estate. A sort of family estate and then opened a bit later which is why as you can see it is much more formal Adam: I was going to say, so we are leaving a sort of really a very large green area with the Shard poking its head above the trees, so your urban environment, but walking into this much more formal sculptured… Charity: And actually you can walk the whole perimeter of this, and this is quite close to the road here but the other side is as you can see really big open and free, so it must have been quite weird at sort of the end of the 1800s, I suppose that kind of bridge between a really rich family that owned this huge part of the park in the middle, so this is yeah, now we are under these beautiful red-leaved trees, you probably know what that tree is? [Laugh] Adam: No, no, no, no, let's not embarrass each other by [Laugh] Charity: [Laugh] Okay no tree testing Adam: No tree testing [Laugh] Charity: Okay Adam: Well, this is, this is beautiful, so let's… there's a lovely, lovely bench with a dedication actually, some flowers connected to that. So why don't we have a sit down here and just have a chat? So, first of all, you mentioned you went to drama school, what drama school was it? Charity: I went to the Oxford School of Drama, which was the smallest, most obscure place I could have probably have found [Laugh] but it probably was the best place for me actually. It's funny, sometimes what's for you won't pass you as they say, erm a tiny drama school in the middle of the north of Oxfordshire. Acting is really hard and part of it is the marathon of it and the difficulties of getting jobs and everybody says this but failing continually and feeling like you haven't actually achieved things perfectly. In the theatre that means doing a show and there being some moments during the night where you think ‘uh that didn't work out right' and you have to be that kind of person that is interested in those kinds of faults and failures and wants to try different things and fix things and part of gaining that resilience is what I think drama school is all about. Adam: I mean apart from, I do want to talk to you more about your acting, but apart from that you do have what I see as quite a close connection to nature, reading a lot of your social media and learning about your activities, so tell me a bit about that, what is it? What is that connection and why do you feel it? Charity: I think growing up, albeit in a kind of little village or a town, but kind of in the countryside it was quite… it was a bit freer back then, I think it was different days, the early 80s. being allowed to sort of wander off, with friends and go into kind of woodlands and stuff. I think, I just feel very happy when I am in nature and I am interested in the differences, everything is growing and changing all the time. And it was interesting I went to LA once, and I thought this is so strange to me because the seasons aren't so apparent. Particularly when you live in the countryside your so kind of affected by those changes and erm I really love animals and I love knowing the circle of life, like where those animals came from, how they're are fed, what they do naturally, and then getting older you start to understand a bit more about the history and human history and how we have you know got to where we are today the kind of beginnings of farming and how society functions and unfortunately we are at a point now where we've outgrown ourselves, and how do we kind of pair that back? How do we get back? Adam: When you say we've outgrown ourselves what do you mean? Charity: I think humans have outgrown ourselves in a sense I think Adam: In what sense? Charity: In the sense that we've lost track I think of the essence of how you, I think yeah, we've lost track of how life is interconnected with nature. Because we're pushing technology further and further and some people are saying the answer is to eventually get into space rockets and go and start a new community on Mars and to me that's mad because I feel like we have everything that we need on this planet. And we just need to reconnect everything. Adam: Why do you think that disconnection has happened then Charity: Yeah well, I think it's a big question. Because I think it happens on so many levels. I think that there is a disconnect with people who are very very fortunate and have a hell of a lot of money, and in some ways don't notice the effect that their companies or their personal lives might be having on the environment because they are so loaded that they get given their food people and they probably never see plastic packaging to know that it exists because they are just delivered things Adam: Right Charity: and they don't really realise the impact that they're having, they're living kind of you know the high life Adam: Sure, do you think we're all living that sort of life? Charity: No, I don't Adam: Or it's just the 1%, or the quarter of the 1%? Charity: No, I don't, I think there are lots of people that are the absolute opposite. They haven't got the time, the money and the education to be able to do anything about it even if they did notice that there is an issue. Adam: And yet it is curious that isn't it, because and yet David Attenborough the national hero, his television programmes are all watched, and you know Charity: But they're not watched by everybody. Adam: They're not watched by everybody but there seems… I mean I get the feeling that you know there's this weird thing where everybody's talking about the environment and very concerned about it, even if perhaps if we're not changing our lifestyle, but my, my sort of view is that people do get it even if they're not changing their behaviour. You, you feel differently, I think. Charity: I think that there's, I think there's lots of people on those both extremes that don't get it at all and I also see lots and lots of people living on the poverty line, particularly where I live in the Borough of Lewisham, who are, and I know some people are working crazy hours and don't have time to think about it. About any kind of impact, and certainly don't have time to do complicated recycling or and they don't have the budget to be able to shop in a kind of, what we would probably on our middle-class wage perceive as a kind of eco conscious way. And because what's difficult is even if you do do that it's very hard to sort of balance what is the best consumer choice to make. As we all know, so we're in a difficult way, but what I do believe is that I believe in people power, and I as you say David Attenborough has made a huge impact and it is much more in the mainstream, hugely so in the mainstream in the last couple of year, and I do think its down to kind of lockdown and people staying at home and having the chance to stop and think and reconnect with their immediate environment but whether that's in a high-rise flat looking out listening to the lack of airplanes, being able to hear nature more, or somebody that's got, you know, fifty acres and has decided to buy a diamond Jubilee woodland for the Woodland Trust, you know, that there, I think we are kind of you united as we are the people who had a chance to stop and listen and look and then it's about people that are in positions of power and money to give us a direction to go in. to give us a positive idea Adam: So, apart from being intellectually being engaged with this, you're worried about it, you're clearly worried about it, you do a lot of things. Charity: mmm Adam: actually, so tell me about the lots of things you do Charity: err well I really love… I've always…So, fashion is a part of my job in the sense that I have to wear lots of different clothes, and um for my work Adam: well then you were recently in The Great Charity: That's right so I do a TV show, period TV show, and so I Adam: So, there's lots of costumes Charity: there's lots of costumes, I don't really have control over where those costumes are made and bought, but sometimes I do so, for example, if I'm producing a film or if I'm in a low-budget theatre production, I might provide my own clothes for that theatre production, and if producing then I am certainly in charge of deciding where we can get clothes, so for example, we go to charity shops and second-hand places because there is so much stuff in the world already. And I try to do that in my personal life. Adam: But do you have a label, a fashion label? Charity: No, nothing like that no Adam: But you, but you talk a lot about conscientious fashion on social media Charity: Yeh, I do because erm, …. Erm I am looking for the word, influencers! And stuff like that because I get approached for things like that and so I'm very conscious that If I am going to be in front of any kind of camera people are going to make a judgment or think that might be a good idea to wear, so I try to conscious about what I'm wearing if in the public in any way. And really that's just an extension of my real life, I've always shopped in charity shops, when I was growing up that was because we didn't have any money, so my clothes were given to me by other families, or when I first started to work, which was around fourteen, I worked in a strawberry farm – that was my first job! And my second job was in another strawberry farm, picking strawberries and my third job was the same strawberry farm but in the grocery shop. Adam: Okay, you got promoted! Charity: Promoted Adam: Promoted out of the fields! Charity: Absolutely, literally up the hill Adam: and Charity: I've become extremely aware of how difficult it is to manage woodland, and I didn't even know that as a concept, I just thought that big areas or parkland or woodland or farmland, I had not concept really of how that was looked after, and that's one thing that I think is I don't know, its both inspired me and made me realise what a huge challenge it is to be able to reforest large areas and the other fact of everything being so slow – trees reaching their maturity at such a slow rate – and that being a very difficult kind of challenge to sort of ask people to become involved with because I think when you're asking people to you know kind of sympathise with a charity or donate money to a charity in some ways its more difficult to say this is an extremely slow process but we need your help urgently… so it has been interesting to learn about that side of things. And I've also been deeply shocked and saddened about how many of our ancient woodlands and hedgerows and trees that are still being cut down in this country, partly for huge roadways but partly for new buildings and farmland and that does feel quite urgent to me. But yeah I've learnt a lot. I think one of my favourite things has been seeing the tree listening which I put on my Instagram if anyone wants to have a look Adam: So, tell me about tree listening. Charity: so, there's a way to hear the water being filtered up and down trees and it's the most beautiful sound and to me, it's a sound that I could go to sleep to. I keep thinking, I must try and find if there's a recording online that I can grab and put on my phone to listen to at night-time. And it gives you that sense of the tree being alive in the here and now. Trees grow so slowly it's sometimes quite difficult to think if the as, as kind of, living in the same time zone as us. So, hearing that, that's a very present sound really, I don't know, it makes you… it makes you want to hug the tree even more [laugh] Adam: Are you a bit of a tree hugger? Charity: Yeah, yeah, I am! Adam: Do people spot you in Peckham? Strange woman hugging trees? Charity: I do sometimes do that, the weird thing is, this was, I was in a different park in Lewisham, and I'd actually climbed the tree because I just felt like it and I also had some lines to learn. And it was quite an empty park and I thought well this is fine, and I was in a tree learning my lines and a lady came and she saw my bags on the floor and she was so freaked out she just looked up and saw me in this tree, and I have to say it was a weird sight. I have to really say Adam: [Laugh] Charity: This is so weird, I'm an actress and I don't know what I'm doing, sorry Yeah, I just, yeah, I love…I think it was also, when I was growing up, a bit of a place to kind of go and hide, you know if you're kind of stressed out or worried as a kid, and rather than run away, go and climb a tree and be up really high – it completely changes your perspective. Adam: Has having a child changed your perspective at all? Charity: I think it just strengthened my love of nature because it's the first thing that you teach kids about. All of the books that people give you are all about spotting different animals and trees, and the sunshine and the bees, everything he loves is related to outdoors, I mean that's, it's his first summer, he's fifteen months old and erm I've moved to a new house recently and been trying to work the garden a bit because it was very very overgrown. So, it's been my great pleasure to be outside and doing lots of digging and his first proper words has been digging, dig, dig, because he heard me say digging and he just started saying dig, dig, dig. [Laugh] Adam: Fantastic Charity: He said that before mummy or daddy. Adam: So, are you optimistic, I mean all those things you talked about erm are you optimistic that the world for your child will actually, things will get better during his early life? Or not? Charity: I feel burdened with the worry of it, and I try to not think about it, because the world is huge and there's only so much, I can do. I do feel optimistic in the human endeavour and human invention and ingenuity. But I am sad that it's going to get to a point of huge environmental catastrophe before real change is made by our governing bodies. But then if you look back at the pictures just pre-industrial revolution of these thousands and thousands of huge billowing chimney pots in London and you know, they're not there now, and the world is a lot greener than it was then, at least in cities. So, I kind of, yeah, I have hope otherwise you know… what's the point? Adam: I mean it's interesting isn't it, there's… I often think about how to shape the narrative here because I think often the narrative of ecology and the environment is one of ‘there's an impending disaster' you know ‘it's all terrible' and I'm not saying that's not true, but I think it's hard for people to engage with because it's like ‘well what, what can I do about that?' and I think it was, hopefully, I got this right, I think it was Barrack Obama who wrote a book on it called the Audacity of Hope and you talked about hope and it is this sort of weird thing, actually to be hopeful is an extraordinary thing, it is audacious to be hopeful and that might be, might be a better message actually, that there is this big challenge and actually the audacity of hope in what can, can we do, individually? Individuals can make a difference. You know yes joining the Trust and what have you, and doing other things, and planting a single tree Charity: I think you also have to look after yourself as a human in the world. Try to give yourself time and love and energy. Then you'll be in a really good spot to be able to help other things and other people and the environment. It's very difficult like I say if you're on the breadline and you're exhausted to actually have the headspace and the energy to do stuff. And you know, and so those people that are unable to do that we need to, I do believe, socially we need to enable people to be able to care for the environment. If you're in a position where you do have enough money, and you do have enough time, and you still feel worried, then there's tons you can do on a day-to-day level. And I actually think that action is much more infectious than talking. I know we're talking here today, but the best thing that I have probably ever done is about two or three years ago I just wrote on Twitter I'm giving up plastic for the month of January, this was before it was kind of fashionable to that and rather than saying everyone should do this, everyone should do that, I just said ‘this is what I'm doing'. I didn't even talk about it. I just said ‘I'm gonna do this' and so many of my friend's a couple of months later said ‘oo you said that and actually, I tried it as well', they didn't even talk to me about it they just kind of tried it. They started, whenever they came over, they said ‘we I didn't bring, I didn't buy any plastic because I knew you weren't interested' I thought wow! You just actually have to put a stick in the mud sometimes and say this is what I'm doing, and try to have the energy to stick to it, and of course, we have… we can't be perfect… the world is set up in a certain way at the moment as consumers, as everything is wrapped in plastic, it's very difficult to get around without, you know in lots of places, without a car because public transport has a lot to be desired and it's expensive, but if you can try to support things that are doing the right thing, that will slowly, slowly build, and if you can have joy in that, that builds as well. Adam: It is interesting to me, we tend to do what our friends do, or people we know do, so, and that's why a single person can make a difference isn't it because, a friend will copy you. And suddenly what you do isn't a single thing, it's a big thing. That's, that's amazing. So, look we're in this park which is very nice. I'm not sure I've met one leaf yet; we're meant to be walking around and I lazily dragged you to this chair! But, have you, I mean there's lots of Woodland Trust places outside of London, they are quite close but also quite far. Have you been to many? Are there any that stick in your mind? Charity: I've been to Hainault, and I've been to Langley Vale. What I would love to do is go to Scotland, I know there's lots of work happening there at the moment and I'd really like to visit, it's really interesting to see the difference between a very very ancient woodland and something that's quite newly developed, and I know that there are some places that the Woodland Trust are trying to connect two different forests, and I think, is it the pine martin (?) that they are trying to get to, sort of, repopulate? And it's very difficult to do that because they like travelling and so you have to have a long distance in between, you know, one dense forest and another dense forest for them to actually want to stick around. So, I would kinda like to see that in action. Adam: Well, the Langley Vale Forest, I have just been to, and it features in our previous podcast. All the commemoration of the First World War. Which I think was one of the most interesting and sort of, I don't know, shocking, I don't know, because there's a lot of… it commemorates really terrible events, but in a sort of, living memory, which I thought was really forceful. And that's I think one of the more interesting podcasts so if you listen to this one, but also that one, I also thought that one was great. So, it's amazing to sort of talk to you about this, but as you were saying, you are an exceptionally busy actor as well, so you're doing… is The Great still in production? Charity: It is, we're filming season three at the moment. Adam: Wow, so how many programmes in a season? Charity: so, there's ten episodes in each season, and the first two have come out via Hulu, and, in America and STARZPLAY, the first season was out on Channel 4 a couple of years ago and the second season is coming out this summer, on Channel 4, and we're filming season three. So, um, it's a lot of fun, it's very silly and it was lovely to be doing something, I was so lucky to be working during the last lockdown, albeit with really rigorous Covid protocols in place, we managed to get it done. Adam: Well fantastic, I will watch out for the next season! And all of your stuff on social media and everything. It's been a real pleasure talking to you Charity, thank you very much! Charity: Thanks. Well thanks to Charity for taking me on a tour of her local small, wooded area in South London, and do remember if you want to find a wood near you, well the Woodland Trust has a website to help. Just go to woodlandtrust.org.uk/findawood. Until next time happy wandering. Thank you for listening to the Woodland Trust Woodland Walks. Join us next month when Adam will be taking another walk in the company of Woodland Trust staff, partners, and volunteers and don't forget to subscribe to the series on iTunes, or wherever you're listening to us, and do give us a review and a rating. And why not send us a recording of your favourite woodland walk to be included in a future podcast? Keep it to a maximum of five minutes and please tell us what makes your woodland walks special. Or send an email with details of your favourite walk and what makes it special to you. Send any audio files to podcast@woodlandtrust.org.uk and we look forward to hearing from you.

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Fruit Sugar, Tired From BJJ | THRR119

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 29:58 Very Popular


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://www.diagnosisdiet.com/full-article/new-study-claims-red-meat-increases-risk-for-heart-attacks-and-strokes Podcast Questions:   1. Sugar & Fruit [11:17] Justin says: Hello Rob and Nicki, I read Wired to Eat and Sacred Cow and listen to your podcast every week. Your books and podcast have been such a blessing to my health journey. Thank you. I have a question regarding fruit and sugar. I eat clean (no processed carbs / sugar / avoid seed oils) and mainly follow the Paleo path with the exception  of pastured butter / cheese. I also practice daily intermittent fasting with a six hour eating window. I have cut out all added sugar (sweets, soda, etc) but typically have a bowl of organic blueberries, mixed fruit (pineapple, strawberries, etc) with chia seed pudding made with coconut milk after my lunch and dinner. Does the natural sugar in these fruits have a negative effect with regards to inflation and heart disease? Thanks so much for all you do. Justin 2. Jiu Jitsu and Nutrition [19:16] Strawberry (Yes my name is Strawberry) says: Overly exhausted the day after Jiu Jitsu grappling. I know you are a purple belt (which kudos!!) so I'm sure you have some real experience and great suggestions. I believe being this tired, I am not doing something right. In a nut shell I avoid bread and flour (unless my daughter makes cookies) I have a spoon of honey with my matcha or smoothie I avoid big meals first thing in the morning, I break my fast about 10-1030am, I'll have a handful of nuts, a smoothie with collagen (add fruit seldom). I have 2 cups of coffee a day My meals consist of veggies, proteins, and fat.  If there is a carb, its more at dinner time. I get out side as much as possible (an hour or more a day) (With diet, I'm no saint, so I know it's not perfect like above, but that is about 80% of the time) I read before bed (books not screens!) The days I know I'm going to go train, I do eat breakfast and try to fit in some extra food. Training is at night, we're done rolling by 8pm. I'M FREAKING TIRED!   My goal is to be energized and go to class 3 times a week. When I'm tired, I am grumpy, and my husband or kids don't deserve that !! They like an energized happy mama ^_^ Any suggestions? (-Follow up email after asking her some basic questions-) Welp… I don't count calories or carbs. (Maybe that's my problem) I'll have complex carbs at night and especially after training (potato's, pasta, homemade bread). I'll add 1/2 banana or a handful of frozen strawberries to a smoothie during the day. I'll sneak in extra carbs sometimes but not often.    Lunch, will typically be salad/veggie with protein and high fat. (Nuts, with olive oil on salad, etc) I got a free sample of LMNT from Roll Model camp and I'm going to purchase more cause it does help. Last night I had a pack right after class and I feel good today! I worship my sleep. My family picks on me because I think 930pm is late. But on nights I'm training I may not get to sleep til midnight from cooling off! Sadly my gym doesn't have morning classes. The high intensity seems like my body needs to chill out for quite sometime. We got our sauna running (last 2 weeks) and after training I go in there and it helps but not always. I avoid screens cause it does fuck up my sleep but my husband,( his love language is watching shows together) so I'll watch a show with him from time to time after class or weekends. With the summer, the kids home and husband, I'm trying to not always be a “stick in a mud” if you know what I mean? Sorry this was long winded!  But it's actually helping me realize a few things….   Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript (pasted text and PDF both) at https://robbwolf.com/2022/08/05/fruit-sugar-tired-from-bjj-thrr119/

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT
#10 How have children's language skills been impacted by Covid?

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 35:03


Today, I'm joined by Jo who has chosen the text we'll be talking about this week: 1) Speaking Up for the Covid Generation https://ican.org.uk/media/3753/speaking-up-for-the-covid-generation-i-can-report.pdf I recommend you read this report before listening to the conversation (that's what this podcast is all about, after all) but the chat will still make sense if you don't! Don't be scared by the word “report” - it's a very easy read - lots of pictures and bright colours! Jo is a primary school teacher, working in Surrey, in the South East of England. RESET YOUR MINDSET: Sukhi (my guest from last week) and I are running a two-week coaching event in August 2022 and you can find out more here: https://www.rhiannonelt.com/interested-summer-re-set Download the Transcript: You can download the transcript for this episode here: www.rhiannonelt.com/deep-talk-podcast If you want to use the transcript and/or the podcast audio for more focussed language practice, you'll find a whole host of self-study activities on my website to help you. Get in Touch: Join my mailing list here: www.rhiannonelt.com Follow me on Instagram: @rhiannonelt Email me: info@rhiannonelt.com

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Chronic Wasting Disease In Deer, Digestion Woes, Avoiding Organic Foods | THRR118

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 38:18 Very Popular


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://twitter.com/davidludwigmd/status/1552636115139514368 Podcast Questions: 1. Chronic Wasting Disease in Deer and Elk [15:52] Kristi says: Hi Robb and Nicki, I have a new fear just when I am already worried about the future of meat, transportation, the economy, etc. I bought some elk liver from a ranch that sells grass-fed bison, elk, and beef. I went to fry it, and it did not smell the same as bison or beef liver. And while I'm sure that's just how elk liver smells, I started worrying about chronic wasting disease(CWD), which Joe Rogan brought up on the March 2020 episode with the infectious disease epidemiologist, Michael Osterholm. (The episode that in my mind started off the covid pandemic.) I ended up throwing away the elk meat, and then looked into chronic wasting disease more. So far, no known cases have spread to humans as vCJD (variant Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease), but that was also true of mad cow disease, and I'm sure chronic wasting disease showing up in humans will take longer since way fewer people eat elk or deer. I am in one of the areas of North America where chronic wasting disease is present, and since I bought the meat from a farm, the elk is apparently tested (they send away the heads to get tested), however it says this doesn't guarantee they're free of CWD. Now I think I should just stick to beef/bison, since the downside of Jakob Creutzfeldt disease is so terrible, but I was also thinking if I do this I shouldn't even buy bison or beef from the same farm, since prions are notoriously hard to destroy, and would stick around on the butchering equipment. Do you have any knowledge or insight on this topic? Am I overreacting? Thanks and keep up the great work with the show. 2. Digestion Woes [23:40] Kelly says: Hi Robb and Nicki, hoping you can help me with everyone's favorite topic, poo! I'll cut to the chase. My BMs are a 6-7 on the Bristol stool chart, every day. Usually 3 times per day, and all before 9 am. This has been going on for a few months now. I don't have any stomach pain or bloating, just really liquid poo. My diet is good, I eat mostly red meat, eggs, fruit, white rice, and I don't exclude dairy or gluten because I've never had any sensitivity to it, but maybe that's a good place to start? I do drink alcohol a couple times per week, but haven't noticed a difference when I remove alcohol. I am also a coffee drinker, but I hope that's not the culprit! Just looking for your thoughts on the best place to start, anything I should ask my doctor to run test-wise? I had an IgG test done a couple years ago and that didn't show anything to avoid except things like chia seeds and some random things like that. Thank you both for all you do, me and my hubs listen every week and appreciate your common sense approach to health and recent policy topics. Robb and Nicki for President! 3. Organic? [29:08] Mark says: Hi Robb & Nicki, I've read Wired & Eat & Sacred Cow & drink LMNT (love, chocolate salt in goat milk is a favorite). I've been reading some of the comments from the FarmBabe basically that she now goes out-of-the-way "not" to buy/eat food labeled Organic (she seems not to like StoneyField or at least would like them to stop spreading misinformation) .  I've also read some of her battles with "Bobby" aka FlavCity.  It's hard to sort out if what she's saying is true or if as a non-organic farmer she's biased in any way.  Any insight would be helpful, especially considering current food prices.  I seem to always want to buy Organic, am I wasting my money? All the best, Mark Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript at the blog page: https://robbwolf.com/2022/07/29/chronic-wasting-disease-in-deer-digestion-woes-avoiding-organic-foods-thrr118/

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT
#09 What's wrong with the question 'Where are you from?'?

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 32:36


Today, I'm joined by Sukhi who has chosen the texts we'll be talking about this week: 1) 4 Reasons Asking 'Where Are You From?' Is Offensive https://www.huffpost.com/archive/ca/entry/asking-where-are-you-from-offensive_b_10802722 2) What's Wrong with Asking “Where Are You From?” https://hbr.org/2020/10/whats-wrong-with-asking-where-are-you-from I recommend you read these articles before listening to the conversation (that's what this podcast is all about, after all) but the chat will still make sense if you don't! Sukhi is an English teacher and coach and you can follow him on social media at @english.language.everyday Sukhi and I are running a two-week coaching event in August 2022 and you can find out more here: https://www.rhiannonelt.com/interested-summer-re-set Download the Transcript: You can download the transcript for this episode here: www.rhiannonelt.com/deep-talk-podcast If you want to use the transcript and/or the podcast audio for more focussed language practice, you'll find a whole host of self-study activities on my website to help you. Get in Touch: Join my mailing list here: www.rhiannonelt.com Follow me on Instagram: @rhiannonelt Email me: info@rhiannonelt.com

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Dutch Farmer Protest | THRR117

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 37:55 Very Popular


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://twitter.com/evavlaar/status/1544390286184431616?s=11&t=AJwHkRBi5NFXXZkMYkU41w https://www.reuters.com/markets/commodities/fertiliser-ban-decimates-sri-lankan-crops-government-popularity-ebbs-2022-03-03/ Chris Martenson podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-peak-prosperity-podcast/id462415188?i=1000568934553 Podcast Questions: 1. Dutch Farmer Protest [9:19] Hi Robb and Nicki - First I'm sure you're wondering why I send you guys so much periodic email and don't just join THR. It's nothing against you guys (you're pretty dang awesome), I've been a member in the past and it was lovely, but I find it's too easy to let myself get sucked into the online communities and spend too much time with my phone in front of me. So I join for an occasional challenge or reset and then give a good Irish goodbye for a while. Anyway, something that came across my brain this week that made me furrow my brow. Have you heard about what is going on in the Netherlands? While I've heard gobs about reducing carbon emissions, this is the first I've heard anything about reducing nitrogen emissions and the Dutch government seem keen to force plenty of people to give up their livelihoods and food security to do it: this is the article I saw https://www.politico.eu/article/police-fire-dutch-farmer-protest-nitrogen-emission-cut/ (I found myself immediately cheering on the farmers but am trying to get some more info and perspective). Is nitrogen emission that big of a problem? Or is this just the next thing down the pike from carbon blinders? What gives?  Would love your thoughts. Thanks for the fiesty banter and witty analysis that I love you guys for. Keep on. Cheers, Christin ------------ “The honest message … is that not all farmers can continue their business,” the government admitted in a statement last month. https://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory/explainer-dutch-farmers-protesting-emissions-85848026 The ruling coalition wants to cut emissions of pollutants, predominantly nitrogen oxide and ammonia, by 50% nationwide by 2030. Ministers call the proposal an “unavoidable transition” that aims to improve air, land and water quality. They warn that farmers will have to adapt or face the prospect of shuttering their businesses. “The honest message ... is that not all farmers can continue their business,” and those who do will likely have to farm differently, the government said in a statement this month as it unveiled emission reduction targets. Livestock produce ammonia in their urine and feces. The government in the past has called on farmers to use feed for their animals that contains less protein as a way of reducing ammonia emissions. The problem is compounded in the Netherlands, which is known for its intensive farming practices, with large numbers of livestock kept on small areas of land. Fertilizer ban decimates Sri Lankan crops as government popularity ebbs https://www.reuters.com/markets/commodities/fertiliser-ban-decimates-sri-lankan-crops-government-popularity-ebbs-2022-03-03/ Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript at this episode's blog page: https://robbwolf.com/2022/07/22/dutch-farmer-protest-thrr117/

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Beef Warning Label, GABA, Paleo-Era Life Expectancy | THRR114

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 41:38 Very Popular


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour:

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Sauna Sweating, Celiac Testing, Generational Health Effects | THRR111

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 32:27 Very Popular


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://www.medestheticsmag.com/news/news/21219423/vegan-diets-negatively-impact-surgical-wound-healing Podcast Questions: 1. Is Sweating More Better or Not? [8:41] BJ says: Robb/Nicki, Long time listener and sharer of all things Robb Wolf.  Your books and podcasts are the easiest to read and listen to.  I appreciate that, being a guy whose biggest hobby is learning/understanding health, but who barely survived Biology 101.  Also, thank you for being open to new ideas and evolving over your career.  It's reassuring to know that you and Nicki are willing to change your stance on an issue regarding a particular food, diet, politics, whatever.  When I read Wired To Eat and was introduced to the term "hyper palatable", a lot of pieces of the puzzle fell into place for me. I'm a 47 year old male, 5'8", 165lbs.  I've eaten all the diets over the years...that include meat.  Never considered vegetarian or vegan.  Been as heavy as 210+.  Pretty good health markers today.  Admittedly, I still pray that one day you'll promote an all pizza and french fry way of eating. Okay, so I've always liked getting in the sauna (not steam room) at the gym.  I believe it provides similar benefits to cold therapy, but cold therapy is...so cold!! I've envied other who guys who would walk in and start sweating immediately (like within a few minutes).  It has always taken me about 10-15 minutes to bead up and start sweating.  I figured it had a little to do with how often they get in, versus me doing it a couple times per week at most. I recently had a sauna built in my home.  I've been getting in it regularly for just a month, and have noticed a significant increase in how quickly I begin to sweat.  Yes, I think I've got my room a bit hotter than at the gym, but not much.  I'm really enjoying it and it feels great but it's got me thinking.  Is sweating "easier" really a positive effect?  Or, am I just convincing myself of this like how people try to believe that eating 6 meals a day is how we're supposed to eat to rev up our metabolism?  That idea (so many daily meals) has never made sense to me...why not leave my car running overnight or while I'm at work so it's good and warmed up when I'm ready to drive again...just doesn't make sense. It's not causing me to sweat all day in normal circumstances.  I don't feel warmer or uncomfortable through the day.  In the mornings, I don't want to take a super hot shower like I always have, but that doesn't seem like a big deal. So, to sweat more or not to sweat more?  Whatcha think? Hoping I didn't leave too much for you to...unpack...before being able to share your thoughts.  Ha!  Best wishes to you and your family. Sincerely, BJ David 2. Celiac or not: is it worth testing to know for sure? [14:03] Becky says: I've been 100% gluten-free for the last year - ever since my DNA consult with Dr. Anthony Jay where I believe his exact words were "avoid gluten like the plague". Prior to that, I was occasionally having gluten when out (never at home) but have been eating a paleo-style diet for the last 5+ years. I've done a little research on the test for celiac which requires you to eat gluten in order to measure the antibodies in the blood. It sounds terrible to make myself sick eating gluten (even as much as I miss some good French bread) in order to confirm or deny whether or not I have celiac disease. However, I am wondering if it is worth it to be tested to confirm if I have it. Besides avoiding gluten, is there anything else I should be aware of or alter in my lifestyle if I confirmed that I have celiac disease? Thank you! 3. Sugar Effects Occurring Generations Later Theory [22:39] John says: Robb, I thought of something yesterday.  If I'm reading the theory correctly, the obesity effects of sugar could take a couple of generations to manifest (i.e. each subsequent generation is affected worse as seen in increasing obesity rates). If that's so, why did the nutritional transition (~10,000 years ago) manifest instantly in height, bones, teeth, disease, etc and then the human race slowly adapted (hemochromatosis, lactose tolerance, amylase increase, etc)? It seems that the sugar generational effects theory is going in reverse of the human adaptation seen in the great nutritional transition. Cheers!   Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript on this episode's blog page at https://robbwolf.com/2022/06/03/sauna-sweating-celiac-testing-generational-health-effects-thrr111/

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
The Real Deal In Brazil with Diana Rodgers - Salty Talk 042 | THRR

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 57:30 Very Popular


Salty Talk is a special edition of Healthy Rebellion Radio. Each week on Salty Talk Robb will do a deep dive into current health and performance news, mixed with an occasional Salty conversation with movers and shakers in the world of research, performance, health, and longevity. For the full the video presentation of this episode and to be a part of the conversation, join us in The Healthy Rebellion online community. WARNING: These episodes may get “salty” with the occasional expletive. Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here   Show Notes: This is the third installment of our "fireside chat" with Diana Rodgers. Diana and I talk frequently, usually comparing notes on some of the insanity (and bright spots) we see we see in the food and regenerative ag space. Each time we talk we usually say "we should have recorded that!" So now we are. We dig into her recent trip to Brazil and talk about how the developing world may end up being the model for what truly regenerative/sustainable food systems look like. The short story is it's not likely to be 100% White Oak Pastures but also not 100% traditional industrial ag/animal husbandry. Optimizing these systems, both in terms of food production, improving economics and systems integration will require a lot of flexibility and creativity. Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes   Transcript: You can find the transcript in the blog post at https://robbwolf.com/2022/05/20/the-real-deal-in-brazil-with-diana-rodgers-salty-talk-042-thrr/

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Orange Juice Cereal, Kidney Stones, Sunlight Allergy | THRR108

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 36:37 Very Popular


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://tropicanacrunch.com/ Podcast Questions:   1. Comment on air travel and risk of infection for your reference. [12:23] Marti says: Hi Robb, Just listened to the latest podcast, great stuff that you and Nikki are doing! You had mentioned that there should have been a study done regarding air travel and I believe the main reason there wasn't one done is because from previous tuberculosis studies they already knew the possibility of transmission was very low on airplanes. I can't seem to find the study I wanted to share, but here is a link to get you started on the research if you are so inclined: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20185096/. There is also this: https://www.cdc.gov/tb/topic/populations/travelers/default.htm. If you aren't familiar with TB, it is highly contagious, and the leading infectious disease killer in the world. So, for them to not be concerned about TB patients on airplanes, but concerned about covid, well.......... You see where I am going with this, and as you know the masks are useless. Again, great podcast, cheers! Marti R   2. Kidney stones [14:43] Brian says: Hi Robb and Nicki - I recently had a stone (ow!!) and my tests came back showing high uric acid. My doctor recommended that I cut back dramatically on my (admittedly) high meat consumption and other paleo-friendly foods. Any suggestions for lowering uric acid levels while maintaining current food consumption? I consume minimal alcohol and sugary foods and intermittent fast. Thank you!!   3. Diet and or supplements for sun allergy (photosensitivity) AKA Polymorphous Light Eruption (PMLE)? [18:41] Joe says: Hi Robb and Nicki, Thanks for all of your great content! Do you know of any supplements, food options, or other treatments to help with a sun allergy, also known as photosensitivity and Polymorphous Light Eruption (PMLE)? This article describes the condition pretty well, based on my experience: https://www.health.harvard.edu/a_to_z/sun-allergy-photosensitivity-a-to-z I'm pretty sure I'm now on my third year of PMLE. Last year when it started, I spoke to my doctor on the phone (due to no face-to-face appointments during covid) and sent her a photo and she said it was probably photosensitivity. I was prescribed an antihistamine called fexofenadine (180 mg) which I'm not sure helped either way. I was also referred to a dermatologist but by the time the appointment came through, some months later, it had already cleared up, so I canceled the appointment as there was nothing to see. The red, sore, itchy rash only appears on my face (so far). We've just had our first good week of sun here in the UK and after some time at the beach, I now have it on my face. Last year it went away after about a month and then didn't really come back for the rest of the summer. I had to stay out of the sun a lot for that first month though, which was a pain. I see beta carotene is recommended on some sites as a treatment or preventative but in doses of 180 mg a day. I've seen it on sale at 15 mg doses. Would 180 mg a day be safe (or turn me orange)? From what I've read, photosensitivity or PMLE is potentially a histamine issue. Are there diet changes that could help? I also get hayfever and eczema, which I think are in the same family. Thanks again for all the great content you two put out there. Joe Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript for this episode on its blog page at

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Covid Immune Depletion, Baby Food, Remembering Brian Tait | THRR107

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 36:37 Very Popular


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: Gluten-free diet can ameliorate the symptoms of non-celiac autoimmune diseases  Podcast Questions: 1. Anthony J Leonardi and Covid/Vaccine Immune Depletion and Reinfection [19:00] Kristi says: Hi Robb and Nicki, Very long time listener. Thank you so much for your show and for dipping into different topics, I love it. My question is, do you know anything about Anthony J Leonardi? He has apparently done a lot of work on and talked about some sort of immune depletion that is caused by both covid and the covid vaccines: called T-cell exhaustion. Something similar to AIDS as far as I currently understand. He has also talked about the "fraud" of the Great Barrington Declaration, I guess because of people getting severe covid reinfections. Although I have a bit of scientific background, the papers linked to me are beyond my knowledge, and the fraud claim is a bit baffling to me. I'm wondering if you have looked into this at all or know anything about either the T-cell exhaustion or the reinfections. https://www.drugtargetreview.com/news/81320/t-cell-exhaustion-may-limit-long-term-immunity-in-covid-19-patients/ https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciimmunol.abe4782 https://twitter.com/fitterhappierAJ/status/1514199036319834124?s=20&t=CjqEIQspcmpJBTV3kCTBsw Thanks, Kristi Herlein   2. Early Eating Habits of 8 months - 18 months? [32:23] Getty says: Hey Robb, All the usuals, you've been super helpful and changed my life, been on and off your stuff for 8+ years.  Also, my bad if someone has asked this before over the many years. My wife and I welcomed our first born in June of 2021, breastfeeding and been introducing pureed fruits/veggies at home for the past two months.  Now we are heading into the pincer grip stage and curious on any recommendations on companies that have products that are quality for the lifestyle.  Cheerios are obviously not on the table, but the ease of something in that arena would be appreciated. Keep up the great work and been loving LMNT Getty Serenity Kids Puffs - Get 15% off your first order with code ROBBWOLF Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript on the episode's blog page here https://robbwolf.com/2022/04/22/covid-immune-depletion-baby-food-remembering-brian-tait-thrr107/

The W. Edwards Deming Institute® Podcast
Kevin Cahill's Reflections on Dr. Deming and the Deming Institute (April 2022)

The W. Edwards Deming Institute® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 66:11


Kevin Cahill, President and Executive Director of the Deming Institute, reflects on growing up with Dr. Deming, learning about his grandfather's impact on the world, and his own Deming journey. Kevin also describes The Deming Institute's origins, the DemingNEXT initiative, and using Deming in the real world. (Please note: the punctuation errors in this description are due to Libsyn's system.) SHOW NOTES Books mentionedThe New Economics and Out of the Crisis, both by Dr. Deming (available via www.deming.org) Transform Your Business with Dr.Deming's 14 Points, by Andrew Stotz 0:00:36 Growing up in the Deming family 0:04:29 Watching If Japan Can, Why Can't We? with my grandfather 09:07 Kevin's own Deming journey 14:21 The origins of The Deming Institute 21:35 Why Deming, why now   39:14 Introducing DemingNEXT 46:06 Andrew's Deming journey 53:34 Deming in the real world TRANSCRIPT You can download the complete transcript here. Andrew Stotz: My name is Andrew Stotz, and I'll be your host as we continue our journey into the teachings of Dr. W. Edwards Deming. Today, I'm here with featured guest, Kevin Cahill. Kevin, are you ready to share your Deming journey? Kevin Cahill: Absolutely, Andrew. Excited to be here, looking forward to it. AS: Yeah. Well, I think we gotta kick this off by introducing you. Tell us what is your connection to Dr. W. Edwards Deming. KC: Well, I'm very fortunate to be his grandson, and also very fortunate that as I grew up in the Washington DC area, I got to spend a tremendous amount of time with my grandparents, my grandfather, Dr. Deming, and his wife, Lola Deming, who also assisted him in his work for many, many years, and got to know them growing up. And so, it was absolutely fascinating to see this man that I knew as a kindly, gentle, soft-spoken man who worked out of the small basement of his house in Washington DC, not in a big office, this little, tiny basement that used to flood in the rainy season and was just very, very small. And I always wondered what he did because everything that I saw was just figures and numbers and all this stuff, and he never talked about work. When we were together with him on Thanksgivings and Christmases, he was always talking about family and what it was like with my mother and her sisters growing up. So, a very different perspective of who this man was. That all changed at one point in my life but growing up, it was a very different kind of relationship. AS: You know, my first connection with your grandfather was when I was like 24, and I was just in awe, but I was also in terror because I watched him pretty strict, pretty tough when he was dealing with people that just had nonsense questions in some cases, or had the wrong idea, and he really needed to straighten them out in one way or another. And it's kind of surprising, but now that I think about it, in our families, we don't bring that toughness necessarily into the family. Is that the case? KC: That was the case. We never noticed that. He would sit at the dining room table, and he would just be quiet at the head of the table, and occasionally he'd pull this little notebook out and make some notes. I always wonder what he was writing. I found out later. Something came to mind, and then, occasionally, in the middle of the dinner, he would say... He would have this great story about my mother or something that he had. He would tell us growing up, and he just burst into this fantastic laughter of his, and it was so much fun. And we really didn't know what he did. We knew he traveled, and we knew that... Like I said, growing up, we would get scrap paper from his office, and it always just had sheets of numbers on the one side, and my brother and I would always joke that, man, "I'll tell you the one thing we don't wanna do in life is grow up and do what he's doing." [chuckle] AS: That's tough stuff, whatever it is he's thinking about. And I'm just curious. What was his relationship with his wife, Lola? KC: Oh, she was just this terrific lady. They met, and they actually worked together. I believe was at the Fixed Nitrogen Lab in Washington DC, and they co-wrote some papers together. She had a master's degree in mathematics at a time, early in the last century, when women just didn't have advanced degrees, and she helped him for decades with his work. And I remember seeing a lot of photos of her traveling with him to Japan and around the world. That was absolutely fascinating. She was just a brilliant woman in her own time, and with what she was able to do in terms of helping him. And she doesn't get enough credit for what she did to assist him. AS: And before we get into the Institute, I just wanna understand your own personal journey in life. You developed... You saw that stuff, and you thought, "I'm not gonna study that." But tell us just a little bit about your own personal journey in your education and in your work life. KC: Sure. So like I said, I didn't really know much about what he did. But when I was a freshman in college, my family had moved away from the DC area to Los Angeles, and I came back for the summer for a job that I had. I called my grandfather, grandmother, and said, "Hey, you have an extra little, tiny room in your house. Is there any chance I could stay there for the summer?" And they, of course, said, "Yes." So, I stayed there for the summer. And in June of 1980, my mother called me and said, "Your grandfather travels around and has been to Japan. They're doing a show on NBC on June 24th, 1980 called, 'If Japan Can, Why Can't We?' And your grandfather is gonna be mentioned in that show for some of the work he's done in Japan." You can imagine how excited. This was at a time when there were three networks, ABC, NBC, CBS. There was no cable. There was nothing. KC: And this was gonna be on prime time. And so she said, "Just make sure your grandfather watches it." And so, that night of 1980, I had to go downstairs and get him in the office and say, "We've gotta go upstairs and watch this show." And so, we all traipsed up to the third floor and sat down on his couch, and my grandfather, my grandmother, and then my grandmother's sister, who was also living at the house, we all sat down to watch the show. And a few minutes into it, you saw my grandfather who was, at the time, almost 80 years old, and he had about a 15-second part in the show, and I just remember being so excited, "Oh my god. That's you. It's so cool." KC: And then there was nothing. That was it. And for the longest time... And you could tell my grandfather was getting very fidgety. He was ready... He mentioned something... He was unhappy with a few things they were saying in the show that he thought were off-base, and he was kind of mumbling a little bit about that. And he was getting ready to leave and go back down and do some work. And then they started talking about a man who was considered the... Helped transform Japan and was considered the key person in that Japanese transformation. And at that point, I looked over to my grandfather, 'cause I hadn't said anything in about 20 minutes, and I said, "Do you know who that is?" KC: And the announcer, he said, "It's Dr. W. Edwards Deming." And it was just this disconnect. This is the man I know, who I grew up with, and the Emperor of Japan has given you credit for the Japanese economic miracle. I still get goosebumps when I think about that moment. I just could not believe it. And then we watched the rest of the show in just stunned silence. And of course, he had some comments, and at the end, they talked about the National Paper Corporation and how he had helped them, and I just remember thinking, "This is gonna change everything." KC: And you know what, Andrew? I was actually a little bit sad because I thought, "He's 80 years old, almost 80. He's probably..." People are gonna call him, but he may not work for more than another year or two. And then I can tell you, it was astounding because, like I said, his office was in the basement, and my grandmother and my great-aunt and I would stand at the top of the stairs, 'cause my grandfather used a speaker phone, and his assistant would say, "Dr. Deming, you've got Don Peterson, the chairman of Ford Motor Company, on the phone. You've got the head of Xerox on the phone." You've got the head of all these different companies, and we're hearing him talk on the speaker phone, and it was just astounding. It was an amazing, amazing period. KC: So at that point, I knew things were gonna change in my life. I just didn't know what or how or anything like that. And as I moved through college and then graduated, I was just amazed that my grandfather was continuing to work and just being quoted on news articles and everything like that, and on TV shows, just continuously. And as I got into the business world in a media business, I knew a little bit about my grandfather's philosophy, some things like how important systems are and understanding that and operational definitions. KC: And there were some of the elements of the 14 points that I understood, breaking down barriers within the organization. And so even as an assistant, what it did, my grandfather's philosophy, even though I couldn't impact anything at the top, what I was able to do within my own sphere of influence was extraordinary in terms of how it helped me move up through the organization at a much, much, much more rapid rate than I would ever have been able to do. And so... AS: And what would you say were the core... What was the core things if you say, you didn't know all of the different things that he said, but there was those core things that really stuck with you. What would you say was the one or two core things, particularly thinking about the listener or the viewer out there who's thinking, "Wow, I would like to be able to make that impact, and I'm not sure how quickly or how much time I have to learn everything." KC: That's a really interesting question. I would say one of the key things that I did was making the system visible that we were actually working in. So, we were a media company that was selling advertising time on TV stations around the country. And we had all this workflow that we had to do, and nobody was making it visible what that flow was. And I remember when I was trained, and I was started off as an assistant to an assistant, and they were training me, all the training was done by memory that somebody else did it. So, a lot of times they were teaching me things that were erroneous that I was trying to do and so, as I got into that position, I made sure that I put that process down so that when I moved up, and I could hand it off to somebody else, they could see what that process was. And some of it was visual, and some of it was work instructions. Other things were like operational definitions of... Somebody was saying, "Hey, can you get this done for me?" "Well, by when?" "By the end of the day?" "By the end of the week?" "By the end of the month? KC: So, there were a lot of little things like that that made a difference in terms of the way, I thought, that helped the other people within the organization, that really made a difference, and helped me move up very quickly within that organization. AS: And then, how did you go from your career to now, The Deming Institute? Maybe you can talk to us about that and tell us about The Deming Institute and the aims of The Deming Institute. KC: As I continued to move up and took on greater roles and responsibilities within this media organization, again, my grandfather and... I would call him and ask him questions about things that I needed help on. I remember one time, in particular, I had an assistant who could not get a particular job done, and we worked on it and worked on it, and I tried to make it visible. I tried to do different things, and I called my grandfather one day. I asked him a question, and I said... And he gave me some page numbers in one of his books to read. He didn't give me the answer; he gave me some page numbers. And it was fantastic because the way I was explaining it to her what needed to be done was the way I understood how it needed to be done and the way I learned. It was not the way she learned. And so, once we had her learn and express this in a different manner, we never had another issue with the job going forward. All this gave me the understanding after I went to one of my grandfather's seminars and continued to read the books. It gave me a sense that I could go out and start my own business. KC: And so, I did with a colleague of mine, and he and I co-founded a software company that provided the sales systems to these companies like I worked for. And without having my grandfather's knowledge, I would never even begun to start a company like that. So, a startup is at such an incredible advantage if you understand the Deming philosophy. Because at the time we started it up, there were two companies that had about 90 share of the market on two different ends of the market. But when we were doing this in 1999, the internet was just starting to hit. And there were, I remember, about 15, 20 different companies that all were trying to get into the same space. Within two years, they were all gone except for two of us. They didn't have the value of understanding what my grandfather had taught, that I had learned from him. And then my partner had in the terms of the way we ran and operated the organization. So, to fast forward, we kept the company for a while, merged it with another company, and then ended up selling it to a big publicly traded company. And in retrospect, I almost wish we hadn't. KC: But by doing that, I ended up at The Deming Institute. And then what was fascinating was I spent two years of what I call penance, staying at that company because of the contract. And Andrew, that was when I saw in just... What I experienced and what we had to put people through, because of the way they looked at things and the way they operated, was just extraordinary in terms of how much it hurt me, how much I knew it was hurting the people that worked for me in the business units that I was running. And I couldn't wait to get out of there. And when I did, I spoke to my mother, Dr. Deming's daughter, Diana Deming Cahill, who founded the Institute with her father and her sister. And I said, "This is an opportunity for me to give back what I have learned from my grandfather," to take an organization that's an all-volunteer organization, that was really focused on maintaining and gaining as many of my grandfather's assets as possible without really saying, "Well, what are we gonna do with all these things now that we have all the videos?" And they did a phenomenal job of getting the videos and articles, and all these different things in getting the organization started. And so, that was kind of the continuation of my journey, was to move into this role and to be one of the leaders in the organization in terms of helping move it forward. AS: So, let's talk about... What you've described in some ways is something that I think anybody that gets deeper into Deming realizes, is that it's really a management philosophy rather than... Like a lot of times for people that don't know much about Deming, but they've heard his name, they go, "Oh yeah, quality, statistical quality control" or something like that. And they miss the whole aspect that it is a way of thinking, it's a way of managing, it's a way of interacting with other people. Like you said, the idea of trying to put yourself in the other person's shoes to make sure... The job of the senior management is to make sure people are trained to the level that they need to be. Maybe you can just talk about the Institute, generally, and that concept of what it is. What is Dr. Deming's teachings? And what is the Institute about? KC: So the Institute, the aim of the Institute, excellent question, is "Enriching society through the understanding of the Deming philosophy." And that can take all sorts of different directions that you might be able to go in. And so what we try to do is, we look at, "Okay. Here's what the aim is; by what method can we achieve that aim? which is what my grandfather always talked about. And we also understand that people out there, like I just mentioned earlier, learn differently. Some people are auditory learners, some people are visual learners, and there's different ways of creating learning environments for people. That's one of the things that I think is great about this podcast, and I'm so thrilled that we're getting back into it and doing that 'cause many people learn by listening to podcasts like this and gain something out of it. Other people need to be in an environment where they're physically there to actually gain something. Others can do it online. Others can do it through webinars, so there's so many different things. So, I believe our responsibility is to utilize what he has given us in a manner that can reach the broadest number of people and have the greatest impact so that they have that yearning for new knowledge. And then when they have that yearning, we have a means by which that they can continue to learn, understand, and apply it. AS: Maybe you can just talk about what's going on with the Institute, but also before you do that, I think for... Not everybody can understand. What is an institute? Is it for-profit? Is it not-for-profit? Are there 100 employees? Is it a few people? Is there a board? Are they volunteers? What is the Institute? KC: Well, I can tell you. I'll talk a little bit about it, but one of the best things I would say, Andrew, is go to www.deming.org, and they can learn a little bit more. But when my grandfather and my mother formed the Institute, they decided to have it be a nonprofit. And I know there was a lot of questions about that because a for-profit organization, there's a lot of things a for-profit organization can do, but there's a lot a nonprofit can do, and I think it was important for my grandfather and my mother that this be something that is a nonprofit, a 501 [c], not-for-profit organization because it also opens a lot of doors. KC: When my colleagues and I and other board members call people, and we're calling from The Deming Institute, a lot of times they'll take that call 'cause they know we're not calling to sell them something and try to sell them a whole bunch of expensive services and things like that. We're calling to help and make a difference. And so, while sometimes there are constraints with the nonprofit that we can and can't do, as you start to look at them, you realize it also opens up a tremendous number of opportunities that we might not also have as a nonprofit. KC: So, we're a nonprofit organization. We have a board that has a number of family members on it besides my mother. My brother is on it. He's vice chairman, my mother is the chairman, and then I'm on it. And then we have several other board members who have been terrific in terms of supporting us. Paula Marshall is on there, Steven Haedrich is on there, Keith Sparkjoy is on there, Kelly Allan. So, we have this fantastic group that provides guidance for us and support for the organization and helps me... I'm also on the board and serve as the president of the board. And we just have this fantastic group. We also have just a outstanding staff right now that has helped propel this forward, whether it's the online learning that we're launching, whether it's our communication, whether it's our administration or fund development, all these different things that we have responsibilities for as a nonprofit. We've just got an unbelievable team, and they all operate virtually. We don't have a single office. We also have this advisory council. We have a Deming fellow and Dr. Ravi Roy who's out there. We have an emeritus trustee board. So, we have a lot of people that worked with my grandfather, and then a lot of others who have this just belief in this philosophy, in these principles, and they know they need to get out there, and they're helping us get it out there. AS: So, before we go on, I think it's kind of important to talk about, "Why Deming? Why Now?" And I'm curious to hear your idea about that. There's all kinds of new books out there. There's all kinds of gurus. There's all kinds of people talking about all kinds of things, "Come on, Kevin, this is old stuff. The world has moved on." Tell us, "Why Deming. Why now?" KC: Andrew, I get that all the time that... Hey, I remember hearing about this guy that helped Japan after World War II, "We're closing on past 75 years on that. Why do we need this guy now? Why do we need this philosophy now?" And what I can tell you is it has worked. Every time it is used in an organization, as they begin that journey and continue down, I never hear that it doesn't work. Now, there are some companies who've tried it, and they're already too far gone to be able to even come back from the abyss that they've already gotten in. As my grandfather put it, "the pit they've already dug themself in," and sometimes you just can't do that. KC: But when these organizations do use this, and we have so many of them that do, it is astounding how it works. And so, the books that you're talking about and all these, what we call, oftentimes, "flavors of the month" that you hear about, just wait five years and see, does anybody really using them anymore, or have they moved on to the next flavor of the month and the next flavor of the month? You go back 20 years and look, a lot of those things are gone, or they've morphed into something completely different where they may have kept the name, and now they've kind of combined a few things to try to keep it going. But the one constant is Deming works and works, and the research shows that it makes a difference. And to me, in this world right now, where we are seeing all these issues with supply, with polarization, with the need to break down barriers, whether it's between countries or within different organizations, there is an answer. Deming, my grandfather, provided that answer, and he showed that pathway. How do you do it, and then how do you get to that next step that, all of a sudden, leads to resolution of these issues that we're facing right now? AS: Yeah, it's a great point, and there's so much there... KC: What do you think? AS: Yeah, it's interesting 'cause I was thinking... The question that we often get, I often get too, I'm sure you get it, it's like, "Well, why isn't this everywhere? Why isn't his teachings everywhere?" And I was thinking about it, and my answer to that is, one of the most powerful things in this world is probably meditation. If you could meditate properly for 30 minutes a day, it would probably calm your mind, and it would make the world a better place and all that. But how many people actually do it? Very few. And I would say that my answer to that is that what Dr. Deming talked about was a transformation. And how many people are ready to make a transformation in their life? It's easier to pick up the flavor of the month and say, "Oh, let's do that, and let's do that," But what he's talking about is moving to a whole other level of starting to think of things as a system. And you and I have talked about caring for the elderly folks in our lives. And nowadays, doctors get more and more specialized, and they can't see the bigger picture. And everything operates in a system, and it's difficult to think in that way. AS: And so, part of what I feel like is that what he's challenging, the challenge that he has put before us, is to start to transform our thinking, to understand statistics, to understand systems, to understand how to acquire knowledge, and to bring this together into something that can really make a difference. And that's not easy. That's a journey. KC: No, it's not easy, and I think you hit it right on the head, Andrew. And I think part of the challenge is, if you're leading an organization, and you came out of, whether it's business school or you moved up through a certain way, well you are leading that organization because you learned how to do it a certain way. Well now, all of a sudden, your organization is having trouble. Because I can tell you right now, and I think it was a Rob Rodin, who worked with my grandfather, said this, "Somebody right now around the corner, around the world, believes they can do what you're doing better, cheaper, and faster than you." KC: And they're just looking at you as an opportunity because you can't innovate as fast anymore. You can't do this as much. I can build a better this, better mouse trap, and all that type of stuff. But the challenge is, is that you've now... If you're leading that organization, you've gotten there. You have gotten to this point by doing it a certain way. Well now, all of a sudden, you're being asked to learn to do something differently, and I think that was... One of the big challenges my grandfather had was that in... When that program aired on June 24th, 1980, there were companies who were in crisis. Don Peterson, who was the Chairman and CEO of Ford when I met with him, when he spoke at one of our conferences at University of Michigan, and he said... KC: One of the things he said to me was, he said, "We were two billion dollars in debt, and we were close to going under, and two years before," I believe it was two years before, "I was named 'CEO of the Year' in the U.S." And he said, "But even for me," he said, "It was so hard for us to change because we'd always done it this way. We always had these already systems in place, and now you're asking us to do these different things." And so, I think sometimes it gets rejected. The other thing that I would say, Andrew, is in 1980, while these companies did Deming at that point, they were in a crisis. And oftentimes, it's not until you're in the crisis that you end up saying, "Hey, I need to do something." And you can listen to podcasts by Paula Marshall and Steven Haedrich, who are on our board, where they were in deep crisis when they came to Deming and now, all of a sudden, they're huge advocates 'cause it not only pulled them out, but it made their organization successful. So oftentimes, it takes a crisis to have people say, "Hey, it's worth looking at something else." AS: It reminds me of one of his quotes, "Learning is not compulsory, neither is survival." And I was thinking, when you were talking about, "Hey, your competitors are learning this," think about the transformation. When we were young, if you saw "Made in Japan" on a product, it meant low quality. And there was a transformation that happened and, all of a sudden, Japan became high quality. Now, think about China. Everything that most people have seen in the, let's say, past 20, 30 years, China, "made in China," was low quality. But they are moving up the quality ladder so fast. And I would argue that, in fact, they haven't really even gotten to some of the Deming teachings of taking that to a real transformation where you start to really bring the quality into the brands and all of that. And there is a possibility that China could go through that transformation, or at least some Chinese companies, just like the Japanese companies did. And then, "ho-hum," I'm sitting in middle America, and I'm realizing, "Whoa, wait a minute. They're transforming. What about me?" And I think that that's a lesson that you're talking about, too, is this idea that, "If you don't wanna learn, other people are learning around you, and by implementing this, you can protect yourself." KC: You make a really good point. That's a very salient point. That's really key that if things are going well for you... And a lot of companies we're looking at before, for example, COVID hit, everything was going well. They weren't planning on a COVID hitting. They weren't... Supply chain was not an issue, and now, all of a sudden, people are having to rethink how they run and operate their business. And I'll tell you, it's fascinating, my colleague, Kelly Allan, and I have... A matter of fact, you went through one of the seminars that he put on, I believe, in Hong Kong if I remember correctly. And when he and I were traveling through the Asia-Pacific region, Singapore area, and we were going to a lot of different companies, one of the questions we would ask... And it happened to me when I started my business, my start-up, and we were struggling for a while, and we sat down at the table one day, there were only about 12 employees in the company, and we were really having a hard time. And we sat down and we talked about, "Does everybody understand what the aim of the business is?" And of course, they knew that... We had put some Deming ideas, and we were using Deming in there, they were like, "Oh yeah, yeah, we know that, Kevin. That's really important that we all know the aim of the business." KC: So, we all wrote down the aim of the business. Well, guess what? All 12 people, including myself, wrote down different aims. So, we were working hard and giving our best efforts towards different aims. Can you imagine how much money, time, energy, and effort were being wasted because, Andrew, you were working for... You thought the aim was this, Kevin thought it was this, somebody else thought it was this. We saw the same thing in these companies as we traveled all around the country and around the world, and we would ask them, "What is the aim?" And these people, it wasn't from lack of... They were all working hard and giving their best efforts, but they all had a different understanding of the aim. Can you imagine how much more efficient and effective you'd be if everybody understood what the aim was? Just that alone... We have never once... Kelly and I together, going into different organizations and talking, never once have we seen one, unless they were a Deming organization, where everybody in that room understood what the aim was, had the same understanding of what the aim was, put it that way. AS: They all had an aim. KC: They all had an aim. Somebody thought it was making money, somebody thought it was selling more products, somebody thought it was... So... AS: It reminds me of this... After many years of myself in the financial world, and I'm advising companies, and I'm... And I had these two clients and... Individually, the CEOs were fascinating and smart and all that. And individually, each member of the team, from both of these companies of the management team, were highly qualified, very experienced in their areas. And one of those companies was doing really well, and the other was doing really poorly. And I just remember thinking about that, and I thought to myself, "Number one, success is, you gotta have the right CEO." And the right CEO or the right leader, let's say, has gotta set the right direction. But more importantly, that's not enough. You can have a great guy, a man or a woman that's great, and they've set the direction. But if you let people fight against each other, you're never gonna get there, so it's that coordination amongst the management teams that's like, that's the magic. And you can't get coordination if everybody doesn't know what's the aim that we're working towards, so that coordination is kind of the systems-thinking aspect of Dr. Deming that I learned. Let's talk about the aim of the podcast. Here we are, and I'm just curious, what are your thoughts on where this podcast goes and what's the purpose? KC: So what I see, the aim of the podcast is also tied into what listeners can expect, and that aim... What I see as the aim of the podcast is raising awareness and understanding of the Deming philosophies and teachings by presenting stories, sharing knowledge of the Deming philosophy, in a variety of different voices and from a variety of different types of organizations. And I think we look to do this by providing real-world examples of what makes Deming such a ground-breaking, unique, and unrivaled successful approach, which we just talked about a little while ago. I think we... We're also going to... And you and I've talked about this, is explore why is Deming different and so much more valuable than the wide variety of improvements and improvement programs and flavor-of-the-months out there? And I think with this podcast, it's really valuable for us to explore the Deming advantage in all of those type of organizations, how it's been implemented in different types of industries and businesses. Because one of the things, Andrew, and you and I have spoken about this before, is a lot of people think, "Well, I'm not gonna do Deming. That's manufacturing. When your grandfather was alive, he focused on manufacturing. It was Ford, it was General Motors, it was Xerox, it was... And all manufacturing companies, and if he wanted it for more than manufacturing, why didn't he spend time?" KC: Well, the thing I would say on that is, that's where the greatest need was at that time, was in the manufacturing. But he spent time; he knew it was important to have this in education, in nonprofit, in government. He started to work, towards the latter part of his life, with Congress several times, trying to get them, as you can imagine how polarized they are, they all wanna help the country, but they all see, "We gotta do it this way or this way. And it's my way or the highway." How do you get to work together, think together, learn together, act together? And so, for us, if we wanna explore that, how it's been implemented in different types of organizations and businesses and industries, and what that transformation is like for these individuals, what challenge... Because it's not all a piece of cake, as you know. What "aha moments" did they have? What challenges were along the ways? Impacts and benefits? And then, talk to people at different stages of their Deming journey. KC: We've got a couple of people that you and I've talked about that are on... That have been doing this... Like Paula Marshall who is the CEO of Bama Companies. She worked with my grandfather. I think she is the only one who not only worked with my grandfather, but has been the CEO all the way through to this day and is still implementing it within her organization. And so, I think the last thing I'd say is we believe that by providing people information and inspiration, they're gonna yearn to learn more, and they're gonna wanna delve deeper into Deming and hopefully apply it in their lives and organizations. And what could be better? AS: Yeah, yeah. And I just wanna highlight that one word. One of the first words that you said is "stories," and this is a great podcast or a great platform for telling stories. We're not gonna go into super technical details about things. We've got great resources, we've got great books, we've got all that stuff. But the stories, and importantly, as you just said, to chronicle the stories of the people who knew Dr. Deming at the time while we have that opportunity, but also all the other people that are going through... And I think the other word that I like is the "journey" and the "transformation," and highlighting that journey and transformation. That's very exciting. So, how do people get the podcast? KC: So, there's a couple of different ways that you can get the podcast going forward. For those of you.. There's many of you that have listened to the podcast in the past. We've had almost 1.6 million podcast... What would you call it downloads or listens? AS: Yeah, downloads. KC: And so, what we're gonna do is we're still gonna make that available just like we always have. But in one of our newer programs, which is called DemingNEXT that we're just launching right now, that program is a subscription program, DemingNEXT. We're gonna put the podcast in there with the video that you and I are talking right now, through Zoom that we're using, so that it will be in there with the video, audio, and then the transcript. And then our producer on the programs, in DemingNEXT, is also putting it in a different format so that you're not just watching a video with the words right next to it, it's in a very, very nice format. I think you saw a sample of that that I sent you the other day, and it's gonna be really cool how it's gonna be accessible through that mechanism so that within that subscription service, you'll be able to see it. But for those who aren't in the subscription, they'll still be able to hear it, just like they always have. AS: So, if somebody is listening to it, let's say they've never really heard that much about Dr. Deming, they're listening and thinking, "This is good stuff. I like what I'm hearing on the podcast." Where do you want them to go so that they get that? Is it... Tell us the website and tell us where they should start. KC: So, what I would suggest is you go to www.deming.org. And then from there, depending upon what you're looking to do, as an individual or with your organization, you're going to see that we have this online program, DemingNEXT, that we're just launching. We have workshops, in-person that we're gonna hopefully going back to soon, seminars in-person. We also have virtual workshops, webinars, some conferences coming up. So, there's a whole different, wide variety of ways that you can learn. But I think one of... The big thing that I would say is the launch of our DemingNEXT program which is an online learning program. It's a blended learning program where we're building in all sorts of webinars into it as a part of it. So, it's not just online. KC: That opens us up to a whole different world that, as you know. You attended a seminar in person in Hong Kong, and I wanted to talk about that in a few minutes, but I don't know how many people were there, maybe 40, 50, 60, whatever that is. It's not 400, 800, 600, that we need to get that pivotal number of people that are learning this stuff, understanding, and applying it. So, the DemingNEXT online is a mechanism for us to be able to do that around the clock, around the world, at any time, with organizations of different sizes where they can use these in their own learning management systems. They can use it in our learning management system. They can use it in working with their consultants who they're... Who are advising. There's all sorts of different ways to do that. AS: So, if someone is listening and think, "My goodness, I need my management team to get, to understand, some of these things," they can use the resources that DemingNEXT, just directly and say, "Hey, you guys, I want you to... Everybody to listen to this particular module," or that type of thing. Or if there's a consultant out there that's helping people implement, they could say, "Wow, why don't I use that as a tool within my toolbox?" So, it sounds like... It's really gonna be something that can be implemented across a company without having to go to a seminar if they can't or whatever. KC: You hit it right on the head because what we have is that... We'll oftentimes have CEOs and executives come with their management teams to a workshop or seminar like the one you went to. Well, then they come to us afterwards and say, "This is fantastic. We're gonna start to implement it, but I've got another 200 people in my company. I don't have the ability to send them to the seminar, or have you bring the seminar to us." Some companies are doing that, but others are saying, "We don't have the ability to do that, yet I want everybody within the organization to have an understanding of the common language, what we're talking about when we talk about a special cause, a common cause, an operational definition, system, system of profound knowledge, understanding variation theory of... Just a basic understanding." KC: And so, that was one of the things that pushed us to develop this DemingNEXT is, to not only have it available for leadership and management, but for all levels of the organization to be able to understand, learn, and apply it, and not to push back. Because that was one of the things, again, going back to Don Peterson and Ford was, even though they sent hundreds of people every month, sometimes thousands, he had 150,000 people around the world, they couldn't send everybody through. And the people that didn't go through were the ones that were a challenge. Not because they wanted to be a problem, but because they didn't understand what was being talked about when management was saying, "Hey, we need to look at our suppliers differently." KC: Well, no, that's not how we do it. And so, it's hard. You know what it's like. When you push against somebody, they push back. They always do. So, what you need to do is provide them a level of understanding, and then it's accepted, and then they're not pushing back and fighting you. They're actually embracing it. And so, that's one of the advantages of using this approach, is that it can be blended learning. It can be done at your own and, like you said, with consultants. We already have a number of consultants that have their own specific external portal tied into our DemingNEXT where they're working with clients in a completely different environment to help support what they're already teaching them. AS: It's exciting. That's a whole other level. When you think about my own Deming journey, I think about, there was limited resources. There are some books, and I found what I could find and that type of thing, but you kinda had to piece it together. And so, I think I'm really excited, and I feel like the journey going forward, it's so important to get this message out. But the ability to get it out now is really there, and so I would say that's really accomplishing the main aim of the Institute. KC: You're right, and for those who are listening who know about it, a lot of my grandfather's videos, writings, case studies, articles, things like that that he did, they're also in there. But we've spent a lot of time using subject matter experts, some of whom worked directly with my grandfather, to help us develop specific courses that are tied into the way adults learn. Adults, a lot of times, don't wanna sit and watch my grandfather go through the red bead experiment for an hour and the lessons of the red beads on a video recording that is 40 years old. The audio is not that great, the video is not that great, but you know what's interesting, Andrew, what we have found is once they go through some of the developed courses that we've worked on, then all of a sudden they wanna learn more. They then go and watch it. They'll spend the hour watching my grandfather do the red beads and lessons of the red beads or talk about the 14 points in these long-form video formats that were acceptable back in the '80s and early '90s. But we need to get them there to be able to say, "I wanna learn and go ahead and do this." AS: Yeah, it's... The method of learning has changed so much. But it's so fun to watch those old videos 'cause you see his reactions, and you see the way he's berating people and making... He was also a very funny guy at times. He would really have some great cracks. [chuckle] KC: Yeah. He really did. Let me ask you a question if you don't mind. How did you come to know about my grandfather, and what was kind of your Deming journey? You and I came across each other years and years ago, but I'd love for the audience to also hear that. AS: So, I was a young guy, studying finance at Cal State Long Beach in Los Angeles, and I got a job at Pepsi in operations in Los Angeles. And Pepsi was also kind enough to pay for my MBA if I got good grades, and I did. And basically, I worked in operations, and I just saw all of these troubles. Now, I happened to be... It was 1989 when I went to work for Pepsi. And I had learned how to use a computer so I could make charts and graphs, and I started charting stuff and putting stuff up on the walls. And I had this habit I've had all my life, is I just chart performance of different people and put it up there, and then I don't say anything about it. And then, I just let people go and look at it, and then they start asking questions. And then you start getting information from that, and so that was kind of where I... And then there was a manager at Pepsi, he's like, "Oh, you're really into statistics." I wasn't necessarily into statistics, but he thought I was, and he said, "You ought to go to listen to this guy." AS: And so, Pepsi flew me in 1990, in October of 1990, to George Washington University and to take the instituting Dr. Deming's methods for management of productivity and quality. And I got 1.44 continuing education credits for it. But I remember... KC: Wow, you got some CEUs. AS: Yeah, I remember going to this event. It was a huge room. I was 23, maybe 24. I was a young guy, all the older people in there. And I just thought, the only thing I'm gonna do is, I'm just gonna go to the front row. And I just sat in the front row listening, and it just... Everything was blowing my mind. I had been working for a year or so in Pepsi, and I'd seen all of the problems we had in the factory, and then here was the solution. And so, I really caught on to that, and I went back and I started to try to implement that. And then, I started to realize what he was talking about. Change has to happen from the top because a young guy trying to make an impact, you can do something, but you can't make a huge impact. And that was kind of my first beginning. And then I got Dr. Deming's book, "Out of the Crisis." I still have the one he signed at that time, and I got a great picture of me with him at that time. AS: And then I went back, and my roommate, Dale, and I used to read chapters and discuss them in my apartment, in our apartment where we lived in L.A. And then another time in 1992, he had a seminar done by quality... What was it called? A quality enhancement seminar. Yes, that was 1992. And so, I got a double dose, and I listened to him and was blown away. I just kept learning. And then I eventually moved to Thailand, and I was a young guy teaching finance, and I went to work in finance. But the point was, my best friend, that he and I were reading those chapters of Dr. Deming's teaching. Dale came, and we set up a company called CoffeeWORKS here in Thailand, and we just really wanted to implement Dr. Deming's teaching. We weren't fanatical about control charts or anything like that. We were operating in pretty much chaos here on the outskirts of Bangkok, but we definitely tried to implement ideas like systems thinking and treating people with respect and dignity and trying to get out fear in the workforce. That's a little bit of my journey. KC: So, how is the company doing? AS: Well, we've survived, and we've survived COVID, that's for sure. And basically, we've been in operation about 28 years. And so, we have about roughly 100 employees, and we're growing, and we're profitable, and we've learned a lot. I would say that also operating in a foreign country has always been a challenge. But I would say we're doing okay, and our objective is to try to make sure that we are making an environment where employees really enjoy their work and feel trust and feel cooperation in particular. KC: And with you saying that, we're hearing in the States, and you're experiencing it, how many... So many companies seem to take it for granted that, hey, the employees are gonna stay because this is really their only job opportunity here, and that has been just spun completely out of control with the advent of COVID. And now, all of a sudden, people are saying, "Wait a second. I wanna be at a company where I feel I can make a difference, and I enjoy being there because I've now realized that life can be pretty darn short, and I need to have, as my grandfather always talked about, joy in work." And we would talk to executives in organizations in years past, a lot of times, we would never bring up joy in work because they didn't see it that way. It was just "grind it out," have these people just work. And now, all of a sudden, there's this realization how important that is, and I think that's another... Once you implement that Deming philosophy, it has an enormous impact on employee retention, on joy in work which is keeping people there, that they wanna stay. They wanna be a part of something where they enjoy being there, and I think that's just one more reason why the Deming philosophy, we talked about it earlier, is still even relevant today, and more so than ever. AS: And that's part of driving out fear, is making a trusting place and Dale's... Now, it's interesting situation in my case. I never worked as an employee in my own company. Dale is the managing director, and we own it equally. But we decided in Thailand, it would be better if I focus my efforts on building my career in the world of finance. AS: Now, this is where I think my experience with Dr. Deming becomes interesting. The first part is that I felt like I really wanted my employees in the coffee business to understand it, and that's the reason why I started taking notes about the 14 points and thinking about how would I explain this. The way he talked, I don't think it's gonna translate very well into Thai language and for Thai people. How do I simplify that? And that's when I started writing the book, "Transform Your Business with Doctor Deming's 14 Points," and ultimately translated it into a Thai language so that the employees would be able to get some access to this and understand it, and that was my only real goal. I did put it up on Amazon. But the main thing was how do I bring this teaching to these people who really didn't know anything about it? KC: Oh, that's interesting, I didn't know that was really the basis for the book. I know there's some companies that we've mentioned already today who actually have purchased your book and use it as kind of a book club type thing that they do with their team members as they go through the one that you wrote. So, that's pretty interesting. I didn't realize that about... With you about the 14 points. AS: Now, the other angle that I think it's been interesting because one of the things that Dr. Deming talked about was the idea of "don't be focused on quarterly results," but isn't that the whole financial world? KC: Well, it's funny 'cause I was just about to ask you. With all your focus on finance and understanding it, you've gotta run up that... Even if you're not a publicly traded company, we talk to organizations that are always focused on that. One of the suppliers that we work with at the Deming Institute, we literally left them about six months ago because you could always tell it was it... I'd always look, and I'd go, I'd start getting the phone call going, and if I hadn't thought about it, it's gotta be the end of the quarter 'cause, man, they're just trying to sell me something now. And they were always trying to gain their numbers, do something by the end of the quarter. And I said, "You know what, I'll let you watch it, as my guest, go through some of the DemingNEXT stuff because as long as your management will do it because you have no idea the impact you're having," and we left them because... KC: And we ended up going with a different vendor because we could see this happening, and it was getting worse and worse. And we were told there was a new CFO that had come in. There was a real focus on, "we've got to get the numbers up." And so, what they ended up doing was cutting customer support because that was an easy one. People like us already had a contract with them for a certain amount of time, and they figured they might be able to get us to renew it. But the impact... Stop. I can keep going on and on. AS: Well, maybe I'll just explain it. I grew up as an analyst in the stock market in Thailand, and I was eventually voted the number one analyst in Thailand. And I was the head of the CFA Society for Chartered Financial Analysts which was an honor of a lifetime. And I had seen, maybe... I've met with maybe a thousand fund managers, and I've taken them to meet with a thousand CEOs. And a CEO asked me, "What would be your advice from everything you learned?" And I just said, "Never listen to analysts. They don't know about your business. They don't know how to run your business, and you have to be very careful. All they wanna do is set a fire of quarterly earnings." Which brings me to, having taught finance all my career, when I walk into a finance class nowadays, I tell the students, the first thing I tell them is, "Finance adds no value." And that puts their head in a spin, particularly, 'cause they're studying that topic, and I said, "What adds value?" AS: And we have a long discussion about what adds value in a business, and I say, "Ultimately it's the products and the service, and finance is a support function just as human resources. And the purpose of finance is to operate as a mirror to reflect management's decisions to help us see the consequences, short term and long-term, of management decisions. And it's when finance starts being the head of the business that you get into trouble." Never make, as I say, "Never make the right finance decision over the right business decision." AS: Always make the right business decision over the right finance decision. So, I've come at finance from a very, very different perspective, and that's allowed me also to help my clients improve their profitability and help them really think about profit very differently than a lot. And that's where I think the combination of my experience with Dr. Deming, as well as my finances, bring me to a place that I really enjoy talking about the finances of a business. KC: Yeah, and I think what you said is really important because if the focus of the company is on... is solely on making a profit, they may make a profit to the detriment of the organization that eventually puts it out of business. I always loved what, I think it was Isaacson's book on Steve Jobs, where he was talking to Jobs about what was really the... I don't think they use the word aim, but what was the aim of the organization? And it wasn't to make money. Apple wasn't there to make money. It was to make insanely great products that help people. And then, the money was a byproduct of it. They sure did well taking that approach. Now, you look at somebody like Enron, for those of you that remember Enron. Well, their goal was to make money. Well, that didn't work out so well. And you can see that the finance, like you said, if that's where it becomes the focus on is how do we just make money, and every decision is based on making money, eventually that is going to bite you big time. And the companies that focus on that are usually gone at some point within a certain amount of time. AS: Yeah, and that's one of the reasons why I feel like Deming is such a critical tool, or critical knowledge, that people need to have now because we're slipping into an era of data. And we are very fast, quickly slipping into this era where a young person graduating from university today may think that their job is setting key performance indicators and tracking them, and you can almost imagine the ideal job... I have a cartoonish picture in my head of a young manager these days with a bunch of screens in front of them and KPIs going. And then they've got this button that sends an electrical shock to the employee who's not hitting their KPIs, and then that's it. There's business and there's management, and I fear that a lot people are feeling like being tough on KPIs is what good management is, and they're lost on that. KC: Well, and I can say if they come in and start to learn Deming, whether it's using DemingNEXT, whether it's using other resources or videos or books or things like that that we have, if their focus is on solely on KPIs, I encourage you. Come in and read and go through and learn some of this, whatever the best way for you to learn is, because it will open up a completely new world in terms of understanding what the impact of those on the organization. KC: And it's usually a detrimental impact. And what the potential is by looking at things a little bit differently, or a lot differently, depending upon where you are, but you're right. There's so much stuff, and you hear about big data all the time, and we've all seen so much. So many journalists, and I always feel bad for them because they're looking at these data figures, whether it was COVID or other different things, and they make interpretations that are oftentimes erroneous. And we see it all the time. Andrew, it must drive you crazy when you see, "Well, the stock market was down yesterday, it must mean this is happening." Two days later, "Well, the stock market is up because this is happening." Talk about not understanding variation and special and common cause and reacting to a common cause as a special cause. It's unbelievable. But once you understand it, you start to see things, and it opens up a completely different world for you. AS: And one part of my business is managing people's money. And for that part of my business and investing, it's so critical what I learned from Dr. Deming about that they're ultimately... What I say is that we can understand the variation and the randomness of a flip of a coin or at the roulette wheel. We understand these core principles of randomness and variation, but we then kind of abandon all that when we go into life, and we don't... We miss that there's this subtle thing happening below the scenes and the outcomes of things that we're seeing. There is a portion of those outcomes being driven by randomness and variation. And if we don't have awareness of that, we will get misled, and it will happen all the time to amateurs in the stock market that will assign special causes to different things. And they get all excited about things, and they miss the whole randomness and variation. And that is a carryover from the world of what Dr. Deming taught in statistics into the world of the markets and investing. KC: Yeah, it's a big problem. I talk to people all the time. And that treating a special cause as a common, you know, common variation as special variation, and vice versa, ends up being huge. And the thing is, we already know it in our lives. We know to get to the grocery store is gonna take us between 9 1/2 minutes and 11 minutes, and the average is, whatever, 10 minutes. But we know we're never gonna arrive there exactly at 10 minutes. We know. And when you ask people, "Why is it?" Well, because there's variation in there. It's 9 1/2 to 11 minutes to get there. Yet they go in their companies and they teach. They, all of a sudden say, "Well, I got there in 9 1/2. Oh my gosh. I got there really quickly." That's great. Okay. Well then, the next time when you get there at 10 1/2, "What did I do wrong?" And they try to fix that instead of understanding that, "Well, wait a second. I know how this works when I go to the store. Why do I not apply the same concepts when I'm in the business?" AS: And every now and then, they come home, and they say, "It took me two hours to go to the store." Oh, what happened?" "Well, I had a flat tire, or there was a fire, and there was a..." And all of a sudden, you start to understand special causes. Now, I think I would like to wrap it up at this point and ask you, do you have any parting words for the audience? What would you like the audience to understand about what's going on at the Institute? What's going on with the podcast? Let's leave them with something exciting. KC: Well, I don't know how exciting this is, but one of the questions that I get right now, Andrew, is what would your grandfather say about DemingNEXT? Because it's completely different. It's not always using just him because there's people out there that tell me, "Unless you're using Deming's exact words, then it's wrong." And I'm like, "No, no." My grandfather, when I look through his books, quoted people all over the place, whether it was Don Wheeler, whether it was Ed Baker, Joyce Orsini, he was always learning. Bill Scherkenbach. He was learning from everybody. KC: And I would say the one question I get a lot now is, what would your grandfather think about DemingNEXT? And I gotta tell you, I believe he would be absolutely thrilled because he would see that as another means, another way that we have done a PDSA Plan-Do-Study-Act where we have tried to improve the means for us to get his message out to a broader audience. And I think he would be absolutely thrilled with what we've done, how we're doing it, why we're doing it. And I believe he would be very excited about what that impact is to get that message out. Because I know when he departed from this earth, I think the thing that probably bothered him the most was he didn't have more time to get his message out. He knew that he was running out of time as he got older, and he formed this organization to get that message out. And I think that, to me, is an important thing, is by what method are we getting this message out that will accommodate the needs of how people learn, understand, interact within their own organizations? AS: Well, ladies and gentlemen, you've heard it from the man who probably is the closest to understanding the ultimate aims of Dr. Deming. Kevin, I wanna thank you for this great time together and sharing your personal experiences, as well as divisions, and the opportunities that I see at the Institute and what you're doing. That concludes another great story from the worldwide Deming community. Remember to go to deming.org, as Kevin has told us, to continue your journey. This is your host, Andrew Stotz, and I will leave you with one of my favorite quotes from Dr. Deming, "People are entitled to joy in work."

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT
#08 Should we try to re-write history?

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 31:30


Today, I'm joined by Calum who has chosen the text we'll be talking about this week: Questions raised about UK landmarks after Bristol statue torn down - Channel 4 News https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVrGaGza0zo I recommend you watch this video before listening to the conversation (that's what this podcast is all about, after all) as it lays out a lot of the context of what we talk about in today's discussion. Calum is an English language teacher based in Lyon, France. He has a Master's in History, and this study influenced his choice of topic today. We are talking about the push to re-evaluate how Britain sees its colonial past, particularly in its commemoration of philanthropists and wealthy merchants who earned their money through the slave trade. Download the Transcript: You can download the transcript for this episode here: www.rhiannonelt.com/deep-talk-podcast Join the Waitlist for the Deep Talk Discussion Program: www.rhiannonelt.com/group-courses Get in Touch: Join my mailing list here: www.rhiannonelt.com Follow me on Instagram: @rhiannonelt Email me: info@rhiannonelt.com

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Protein For Kids, Hyperthyroid Meds Weight Gain, Sleep Struggles | THRR106

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 38:10 Very Popular


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2022/03/the-virus-hunting-nonprofit-at-the-center-of-the-lab-leak-controversy Podcast Questions: 1. Functional Medicine & Where's the Beef? [17:57] Lisa says: I have a double question for the healthy rebellion!  My teenage daughter really doesn't like much meat (I think it's a texture thing she will eat sloppy joes for some reason like a champ as well as fish we catch in the lake) and I'm having a hard time upping her intake.   Is there a decent protein powder I can have her add to her smoothly bowls she's obsessed with while I keep trying the soups and broths you mentioned to another emailer?  The health of our kids is of great concern to me looking at their food choices at school and now that she's mobile and can go buy her own junk. I'd also like to find a functional medicine provider in MN for us but it's daunting whos for real or who's a fake?  My extreme distrust of the main stream medical community as a result of the Vid and my father dying of a massive heart attach after being told he was Soooo Healthy has made it difficult to trust anyone. Thanks Lisa 2. Weight Loss While On Hyperthyroid Medication [26:26] Douglas says: Hi Robb, I am a 56 yr old male recently diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. My doctor has placed me on methimazole 2.5 mg and my numbers look great. The problem is that since being on the medication my weight has gone from 215 to 240 and I am 6'2" tall. I have read many articles stating that it is hard if not impossible to lose weight while on Methimazole. My PA states it is not the medication, but my thyroid that is piling on the pounds. Do you have any recommendations on what I can do start losing weight? I loved your cleared hot podcast and I look forward to hearing from you. Have a great day. 3. Trouble sleeping with delaying breakfast or eating low carb [29:55] Flannery says: Hi, I'm curious to hear your thoughts on why I have trouble sleeping if I don't eat first thing in the morning or if I decrease the carbs in my diet. I'm often not hungry in the morning, but if I skip breakfast or move my first meal to more than about an hour from when I wake up (usually between 6:30 -7:30) I will have significant trouble falling/staying asleep that night. The same thing happens when I shift my diet to include more fat and less carbohydrate as my primary fuel source. I'm a fairly competent food tracker, so I believe I am keeping my calories and protein the same as I make these changes. I've also tried (per your inspiration) increasing my salt intake by about 2g sodium/day (above just salting food to taste) when I delay my first meal or decrease carbs, but it has not improved my sleep. I don't have a huge need to delay breakfast or shift my diet, but some days higher fat/lower carb just sounds better and I'd like to be able to be more flexible with my diet without losing sleep. I'd love to hear your thoughts. Thanks, Flannery Background: -I'm a 33 y.o. active woman (I have a pretty physical job as a farmer and work out 3-4x weekly either rock climbing or barbell strength training). -I'm fairly lean with a body comp I'm happy with (5 '8'' and 125lbs). -I don't think I'm under-eating calories or protein. When I track I seem to maintain on about 2000-2500 kcal and I love protein, typically averaging about 110-140g/daily mostly from meat and greek yogurt. Usually my diet breaks down to about 25% protein, 45% carbs, 30% fat. -I've been eating my own version of paleo/W.A.Price-ish for about 10 years (I include rice and dairy, I don't eat nuts and seeds.) Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript at the episode's blog page: https://robbwolf.com/2022/04/08/protein-for-kids-hyperthyroid-meds-weight-gain-sleep-struggles-thrr106/

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT
#07 Are society's expectations of women fair?

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 31:22


Today, I'm joined by Candelaria who has chosen the text we'll be talking about this week: Societal Expectations: Female Perspective https://kscequinox.com/2018/10/societal-expectations-female-perspective/ I recommend you read this article before listening to the conversation (that's what this podcast is all about, after all) but the chat will still make sense if you don't! Candelaria works both as cabin crew and a freelance copywriter and is a true deep talker! We met when I helped her prepare for her CPE earlier this year. She's passionate about the female experience and women's rights, as you'll hear in this episode! Download the Transcript: You can download the transcript for this episode here: www.rhiannonelt.com/deep-talk-podcast Join the Waitlist for the Deep Talk Discussion Program: www.rhiannonelt.com/group-courses Get in Touch: Join my mailing list here: www.rhiannonelt.com Follow me on Instagram: @rhiannonelt Email me: info@rhiannonelt.com

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Kombucha Sugar, Dementia Prevention, Salt Causing Atherosclerosis Claim | THRR105

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 30:49 Very Popular


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://www.virtahealth.com/blog/remembering-dr-sarah-hallberg Fundraiser: https://www.gofundme.com/f/dr-sarahs-legacy-t2-reversal Podcast Questions: Kombucha - Synergy Brand With NO ADDED Sugar [7:24] Barry says: I'm making my way through your Wired to Eat book, and have started the 30 day reset plan.  What's your advice on consuming 1 bottle of this kombucha per day with no added sugar but 15-20 grams of carbs per bottle from various fruit juices?  Thanks! Paleo and Dementia Prevention [10:39] Rebecca says: Hi Robb. I am a long time fan and we did actually meet at the Keto Conference in Long Beach in 2019. I have a question and hoping you can shine some of your light - which I trust immensely as a healthcare provider. I have been doing more research on dementia prevention and the data is very skewed towards the Mediterranean Diet - which increases whole grains and limits fats and proteins. As someone who believes in Paleo (and keto for certain conditions), what has your research guided you towards for nutritional prevention of dementia? I look forward to your response! https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31996078/ This looks at using mct oil....this might be the easier one to tackle: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHVDMcJn2YE Hypercarnivore Don Matesz Claims We Should Stop Adding Salt [14:48] Borge says: Chose a grabbing subject line there, didn't I? :) Since you are the “salt/electrolyte guy” (you are obviously so much more than that), I just wanted to share this article with you: https://www.fullrangestrength.com/salt-promotes-atherosclerosis.html Don is the author of two books, The Hypercarnivore and more recently Meats & Sweets. Yes, same as with Carnivore Aurelius and Paul Saladino, he's been swayed to add fruits and roots to his carnivore/keto approach. But more recently he started posting about his discoveries about sodium and that we should stop adding sodium to our foods, as it will imbalance the potassium:sodium ratio. I would love to hear your thoughts on this. Maybe it's not important on a carb-based diet, but on a low-carb/keto/carnivore diet where insulin is low it is more important? The research he refers to is all from carb-based diets. https://www.ketogenicforums.com/t/thoughts-on-farewell-to-paleo-post/3932 Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript at this episode's blog page

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT
#06 Are we moving backwards on LGBT rights?

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 27:45


Today, I'm joined by Tadeja who has chosen the text we'll be talking about this week: The Worrying Regression Of LGBT Rights In Eastern Europe https://www.rferl.org/a/lgbt-rights-eastern-europe-backsliding/31622890.html I recommend you read this article before listening to the conversation (that's what this podcast is all about, after all) but the chat will still make sense if you don't! Tadeja is an activist and has been working within the LGBT sector for the past decade. They currently work for Ljubljana Pride on their anti-bullying program. Download the Transcript: You can download the transcript for this episode here: www.rhiannonelt.com/deep-talk-podcast Join the Waitlist for the Deep Talk Discussion Program: www.rhiannonelt.com/group-courses Get in Touch: Join my mailing list here: www.rhiannonelt.com Follow me on Instagram: @rhiannonelt Email me: info@rhiannonelt.com

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
mRNA Vaccine Changing DNA, Long Haul Covid, Balancing Blood Sugar During Pregnancy | THRR103

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 45:44 Very Popular


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: Intracellular Reverse Transcription of Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine BNT162b2 In Vitro in Human Liver Cell Line https://www.biron.com/en/news/health-a-to-z/do-mrna-vaccines-against-covid-19-change-our-dna/ Podcast Questions:   1. Long Haul Covid [19:17] Robert says: Any ideas on treatment strategies for long haul covid. Having daily bouts of fatigue 1 month out as well as muscle aches and brain fog, in addition you can't workout as it makes things worse. I'm carnivores mostly at this time. I'm 70years old 6 ft tall was 202lbs a month ago down to 186lbs now. Thanks very much!! 2. Balancing Blood Sugar During Pregnancy [23:56] Lindsey says: Hi Robb and Nicki, I've learned so much from both of you! I'm 39, 34 weeks pregnant (3rd child) and having blood sugar issues for the first time. A bit of background before pregnancy #3 (I can't help but think all of this may be relevant!): Just before pregnancy, I was at my highest weight at 190 but beginning to lose weight. I have primarily eaten a paleo diet (meat, veggies, no grains, no dairy, my only sugars were occasionally from honey, dates, maple syrup and a very occasional glass of wine) since 2016 with the exception of a short run of stressful family events happening in late 2018, including moving, when our lifestyle sort of took a backseat and wine and fast food intake went up, which is when I gained all of the weight. When I had trouble losing the weight, I saw a functional medicine doc fall 2019 and she did wonders through lab work and FODMAP to help me figure out my hormones were off- high estrogen, high cortisol- I had food intolerances (grains, dairy, sugar, alcohol, and coffee) and my B vitamins were low from malabsorption. Just as I was able to get things back under control, COVID happened. My family tried to maintain our re-established paleo lifestyle and exercised more (we also wondered why this wasn't being shared all over media?!) even through moving again. So, just as I'm beginning to lose weight in 2021, I find out I'm pregnant (yea!). I have felt the absolute best this pregnancy- working out, eating mostly paleo, but adding in whole wheat toast with avocado or nut butter in the morning after eating a protein to add calories (the bread didn't seem to bother me), drinking LMNT on days I work out, etc. I had COVID in January and a stomach bug at the beginning of February and then realized I was dehydrated (drank more LMNT which helped me so much!). Within a week after that, I needed to take my 1-hour glucose test. I could feel I was bombing it the whole hour- my body didn't know what to do with 50 grams of sugar. My blood glucose was 153 from that blood draw (the marker they use here in San Antonio is 140). My doctor wanted me to take the 3-hour glucose test, but I knew fasting and with even more sugar, I was doomed. I asked if I could skip ahead to glucose monitoring. I'm currently on day 3 (numbers below) and here is what I'm curious about: why/how can I have high fasting numbers but normal numbers through the day. Also, on day 3, what are some possible causes of the lower fasting number- was it the potassium in the LMNT? Just drinking more water? Taking out the bread? Not eating dessert like I did the day before (ha)? Are there any other changes y'all recommend? day 1: fasting: 104; after breakfast: 108; after lunch: 113; after dinner: 112   notes: date night- ate 1/3 of a creme brulee day 2: fasting 103; AB: 101; AL 102; AD 114  notes: tried apple cider vinegar in water (1tbsp:1/2 cup) before bed and today I drank LMNT after not drinking it for about 4 days (didn't sound good/couldn't get it down). Felt great after drinking it! day 3: fasting: 88; AB: 114 Sorry this is incredibly long! Thanks for your help. Joyfully, Lindsey Book mentioned: Real Food For Pregnancy: lilynicholsrdn.com Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript posted at https://robbwolf.com/2022/03/18/mrna-vaccine-changing-dna-long-haul-covid-balancing-blood-sugar-during-pregnancy-thrr103/

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT
#05 Should we take life advice from the mega rich?

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 27:00


Prepare for the Episode: Today we're talking about two materials 1) Kim Kardashian's Business Advice: ‘Get Your F**king Ass Up and Work'” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XX2izzshRmI 2) Kim Kardashian Under Fire For Saying Key To Success Is To ‘get Your F***ing Ass Up And Work' https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/kim-kardashian-work-backlash-interview-b2032448.html Download the Transcript: You can download the transcript for this episode here: www.rhiannonelt.com/deep-talk-podcast If you want to use the transcript and/or the podcast audio for more focussed language practice, you'll find a whole host of self-study activities on my website to help you. Get in Touch: Add your name to my Deep Talk discussion program waitlist: www.rhiannonelt.com/group/courses Follow me on Instagram: @rhiannonelt Email me: info@rhiannonelt.com

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT
#04 Why do we wonder about what could have been?

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 28:57


Prepare for the episode: Today, I'm joined by Lorna who has chosen the text we'll be talking about this week: 1) What If You Could Do It All Over? The uncanny allure of our unlived lives. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2020/12/21/what-if-you-could-do-it-all-over I recommend you read this article before listening to the conversation (that's what this podcast is all about, after all) but the chat will still make sense if you don't! Lorna works in higher education, helping universities reach their audiences. She's passionate about education, running, and reading - she's part of a feminist book club! She also runs her own podcast, Destination Unknown, all about people's varied and twisting career paths. You can find Destination Unknown here: https://open.spotify.com/show/5oqoBxz9QB4uFzdYAiMNa4?si=Rj1IsRXpSl2Sc2m5AR8oHg Download the Transcript: You can download the transcript for this episode here: www.rhiannonelt.com/deep-talk-podcast If you want to use the transcript and/or the podcast audio for more focussed language practice, you'll find a whole host of self-study activities on my website to help you. Get in Touch: Join my mailing list here: www.rhiannonelt.com Follow me on Instagram: @rhiannonelt Email me: info@rhiannonelt.com

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer, Bingeing Whole Foods, Tired Vegetarian | THRR102

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 40:26


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: Association between metabolic syndrome and 13 types of cancer in Catalonia: A matched case-control study   Podcast Questions: 1. Hyper palatable perception of normal whole foods Alex says: Really odd case here: A good friend of mine has struggled with binge eating to the point of burping up food for years.  A few years ago at my urging he got tested for sibo(for a collection of other symptoms) and was..very positive.  Now 3 years on he's way better but still doesn't experience palate fatigue with whole food meals unless he restricts to pure carnivore with no seasoning but salt.  What could be going on here? 2. Tired Vegetarian Amerra says: Robb, I am reaching out to you because I have no idea who I should talk to. I have endometriosis and just about 10 years ago read that going vegetarian would help my symptoms. I eased my way in and became a vegetarian. My symptoms did seem to alleviate and initially I felt great. I continued to be a vegetarian. I had two children (2016 & 2018). I understand that being a mom can be tiring however, I'm completely exhausted. I recently stumbled across someone talking about  the lion and the carnivore diets. They stated many of their health issues went into remission. I started researching fatigue and vegetarianism. There seems to be a connection. The problem is, I've been eating this way for so long that the idea of eating meat seriously grosses me out. This is not a moral issue for me or any other connection-just I've eaten this way so long. What do you recommend? Do you have any resources? Are there any health issues in addition to the obvious fatigue that I should get checked for? I would greatly appreciate anything you can share. I did speak with a doctor about this and was evaluated for sleep apnea. The test came back with negative results. After this my doctor stopped following up. Also, to give further information, I am 36 years old. I have no other known health issues. I exercise frequently (although I have a broken back which prevents the type of intense exercise I used to do and love). Thank you, Amerra Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript posted at https://robbwolf.com/2022/03/11/metabolic-syndrome-and-cancer-bingeing-whole-foods-tired-vegetarian-thrr102/

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT

Prepare for the Episode: Today, I'm joined by Bistra who has chosen the video we'll be talking about this week: 1) Walking On Eggshells: Coercive Control in the UK https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cbx2q-hGgAc I recommend you watch this video before listening to our conversation - it's a really powerful mini-documentary on coercive control, a form of domestic abuse. Bistra is an English teacher and you can find her on Instagram @english_with_bistra Download the Transcript: You can download the transcript for this episode here: www.rhiannonelt.com/deep-talk-podcast If you want to use the transcript and/or the podcast audio for more focussed language practice, you'll find a whole host of self-study activities on my website to help you. Get in Touch: Join my mailing list here: www.rhiannonelt.com Follow me on Instagram: @rhiannonelt Email me: info@rhiannonelt.com

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT
#02 How has Covid changed our relationship to death?

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 28:56


Prepare for the Episode: Today, I'm joined by Andrew who has chosen the texts we'll be talking about this week: 1) How coronavirus has transformed the grieving process https://theconversation.com/how-coronavirus-has-transformed-the-grieving-process-136368 I recommend you read this article before listening to the conversation (that's what this podcast is all about, after all) but the chat will still make sense if you don't! Andrew is a minister in the Church of Scotland and lives and works in Aberlour in the north of Scotland. As part of his training, he completed post-graduate studies on Theology and Dementia. Today, we talk about society's relationship to death and grief and how this has changed because of the Covid pandemic. Download the Transcript: You can download the transcript for this episode here: www.rhiannonelt.com/deep-talk-podcast If you want to use the transcript and/or the podcast audio for more focussed language practice, you'll find a whole host of self-study activities on my website to help you. Get in Touch: Join my mailing list here: www.rhiannonelt.com Follow me on Instagram: @rhiannonelt Email me: info@rhiannonelt.com

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT
#01 Should people try to reduce their accent in English?

Deep Talk: Advanced English Discussions with Rhiannon ELT

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 33:19


Prepare for the Episode: Today, I'm joined by Deepika who has chosen the texts we'll be talking about this week: 1) Why some people try to chip away at their accent from CBC News https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/the-accent-effect-toronto-4-1.4407769 2) Accent bias is an unchecked signal of racism in the workplace from Quartz https://qz.com/work/2009963/accent-bias-is-an-unchecked-sign-of-racism-in-the-workplace/ I recommend you read these article before listening to the conversation (that's what this podcast is all about, after all) but the chat will still make sense if you don't! Deepika is an English coach and ELT consultant. You can find her on Instagram @acquireng where she posts language learning advice and raises difficult conversations around native-speakerism and accent-based shame. Download the Transcript: You can download the transcript for this episode here: www.rhiannonelt.com/deep-talk-podcast If you want to use the transcript and/or the podcast audio for more focussed language practice, you'll find a whole host of self-study activities on my website to help you. Get in Touch: Join my mailing list here: www.rhiannonelt.com Follow me on Instagram: @rhiannonelt Email me: info@rhiannonelt.com

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Covid Policies, Creatine and Kidney Function, Immunity and Caloric Intake | THRR097

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 30:21


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour:   Dishonesty about masking kids results in insanity To justify masking kids, proponents relied on bio-plausibility, and cited filtration studies, often performed on mannequins. Of course, the physical properties of a mask on a dummy are not the same as asking a child to wear it for prolonged periods of time. If a cloth mask captures 70% of particles or 80%; you still have no idea whether asking a child to wear that fabric mask (and accepting that use will be imperfect) has a net health benefit to that child or others around them. Universities' Covid Policies Defy Science and Reason Parents and students should challenge dogma with data. https://bariweiss.substack.com/p/universities-covid-policies-defy Dr. Marty Makary is a professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. At these institutions of higher learning and thousands more, science is supposedly held in the highest esteem. So where is the scientific support for masking outdoors? Where is the scientific support for constantly testing fully vaccinated young people? Where is the support for the confinement of asymptomatic, young people who test positive for a virus to which they are already immune on a campus of other immune people? The data simply do not justify any of it. For the past two years, this country has imposed extensive, and often unnecessary, restrictions on over 54 million school-age children, even though they are the least likely group to suffer serious consequences of a Covid infection. Instead, we have damaged their education, kept them from seeing human faces, and treated them as vectors without a right to a normal childhood. College students are not the only young people we have harmed. A recent Brown University study found that “children born during the pandemic have significantly reduced verbal, motor, and overall cognitive performance compared to children born pre-pandemic.” The researchers pointed out that families of lower socioeconomic status were most affected. At the same time, adults have been allowed to socialize barefaced at bars, while children outdoors on playgrounds are still masked. This is nothing short of an abuse of power by adults over a defenseless group. Podcast Questions:   1. Creatine and Kidney Function [23:04] Josh says: Hi Robb and Nikki! Thanks for all you do. The information is so helpful and you are both entertaining to listen to. What is your take on crearine supplements and kidney function? Can creatine supplementation decrease kidney function by increasing creatinine levels or is this just a false indicator as some studies have suggested? https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15273072/ https://pediaa.com/difference-between-creatine-and-creatinine/ 2. Immunity and caloric intake [24:52] Daniel says: Hi team! I have been following your work for years and have been a member of the Healthy Rebellion on and off. Recently I have been eating more calories purposely to put on more weight during a strength phase. However, I have noticed that when I am eating more I am feeling more rundown/get sick more often ie sore throat, etc. When I am not eating as much I typically eat in a smaller feeding window and adhere more towards a higher fat/lower carb lifestyle. When you Google ‘immunity and caloric intake' it literally seems like each clickbait link opposes the other - one says eating less weakens the immune system, the next says the opposite. Do you have any opinion or thoughts on this topic? Are the increased calories causing the body to ‘process more' and therefore create extra work? Or is there no correlation at all and this is just in my head? For context I am 5'10 74 kg eating ~2800 cals/day to add weight with ~160g protein/day. 38 years old. Thanks !   Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript on the blog page at https://robbwolf.com/2022/01/07/covid-policies-creatine-and-kidney-function-immunity-and-caloric-intake-thrr097/

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Infant Leaky Gut, Firefighter Fueling, Excessive Nicotine | THRR095

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 40:43


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: Therapeutic targeting of inflammation in hypertension: from novel mechanisms to translational perspective   1. Young Rebel Eating [11:09] Kevin says: Hi Nicki and Robb, A few podcast ago, Robb mentioned off hand answering a totally different question that leaky gut is actually a good thing in infants and that is why introducing allergens early was a bad idea. Either that or I totally misunderstood what he said. Either way, I am curious around your thoughts on Baby led weaning, exposing new eaters to allergens, and other food considerations when starting your little human out on food. Thanks for all you do to educate 6 people, Kevin 2. Dry Lips [15:22] Jen says: Hi Robb and Nicky!  Thank you so much for all you do!  I've been listening to The Healthy Rebellion Podcast and love learning from you.  I follow a paleoish diet, female of 45 yrs old, 5 feet tall, 130 pounds, and in pretty good health.  However since the beginning of 2021 I've been struggling with extremely dry lips.  I have tried half a dozen products, all help but only a little.  I have to use them upwards of 6 times a day to get close to normal.  I drink around 40 oz of water with some LMNT daily and some decaffeinated (mostly herbal) tea once or twice a day.  I am totally addicted to LMNT!  With the colder weather approaching, it seems to be getting worse.  Really unsure on how to move forward with this pesky annoyance.   Would really appreciate your input.  Thanks so much!! 3. Fueling for Wildland Firefighters [18:45] James: Hi Robb and Nicki! I am a wildland fire crew leader based in Ontario Canada. I am looking for information on how to best fuel myself and my crew for the sometimes gruelling efforts the job demands. I have listened to some of the other episodes regarding to fuelling for hiking and hunting etc., and while I've gleaned some valuable insight, I am aware that the intensity of the job might require a modified approach. Namely more carbs. We are deployable up to 19 days and usually have relative autonomy in fresh food choices, outside of the first 72 hours in which we have preselected, non parishable options. I personally choose the first 24 hours worth of food. While I do my best to fill our bag with canned fish, nuts, jerky and other sources of protein and fat, a sizeable portion contains candy, chocolate and other sources of quick sugar. In other words junk. For the sake of brevity, here is my question: What do you reccommend for innocuous sources of non-perishable carbs that can be consumed on the go? Thank you guys for all that you do, Wishing you the best, James   4. Offering a cautionary tale for excessive nicotine lozenge/gum consumption [25:46] Jack says: I recently quit using lozenges/gum. I began using it in college about 6 years ago for the stimulant/nootropic effect, not as NRT, as I've never smoked or vaped. I was bought into the idea that sure, it was addictive, but other than that it was basically harmless. So I didn't worry that much as my use became more and more excessive, especially since I wasn't using tobacco or inhaling questionable chemicals from vape liquid. I was consuming probably 30-40mg a day. As far as I can tell that isn't that far off from the initial starting dose for NRT. A day or two after quitting I began to notice drastic improvements in my circulation. My hands and feet were alternately tingly and itchy for a few days. My color vision improved, I suddenly noticed shades of blue/green had much more differentiation. Even just taking a hot shower felt incredible because my skin sensation was so improved. After a few days the dead skin on my feet started to peel, as if I was molting like a snake. And I hope my hair will grow in thicker as well, that is one of the main reasons I'm quitting (besides excessive spending on lozenges). And related to my hair, I do weekly microneedling of my hairline along with a daily compounded topical dutasteride/minoxidil/tretinoin formulation (microneedling and tretinoin both enhance the effect minoxidil). My skin heals a lot easier from the microneedling, and I have much less irritation from the tretinoin. I'm currently not the healthiest otherwise which didn't help matters, since I've gained quite a bit during the pandemic. I'm 27, and my fasting glucose a few months ago was 99, so not "clinically pre-diabetic", however in my opinion is definitely worrying for my age. But I never noticed the ill effects it was causing until I stopped. Interestingly, quitting cold turkey wasn't as difficult as I imagined. I didn't really have cravings, likely because it wasn't really tied to a physical ritual like vaping or smoking. But I could only do it because I had the week off from work. I couldn't focus or really do much besides watch videos and stare at the wall. I was grumpy but it wasn't unmanageable, but after a few days it felt like I had a really bad flu, apparently that can be an acute symptom of withdrawal. I could only sleep for a few hours at a time, so I had to do many short sleeps through the day and night. I hope this helps, I think there may be other people out there like me who are consuming extreme doses of nicotine. I recall there was a guy who wrote in a few months ago who used about the same daily dose of snus. 5. Discussions on Freedom [29:48] Ellen says: Hello! I really enjoyed your recent podcast discussion on freedom and the real dangers we are facing if we continue down this path. Thank you! It seems to me that the government wants us to feel alone, afraid, and to accept that we are the minority in our fight for freedom. By sharing your thoughts, I am reminded that we can make an impact if we stick together. We read a book with our nine year old recently that I thought I might share. It is called The Mysterious Benedict Society. Have you read it? There's also a TV show, modeled after the book, on Disney+. It is incredibly interesting and was filled with content to fuel discussions around freedom, control, courage, bravery, etc. and was a very sobering reminder of the challenges we face today. In the book, the antagonist uses radio signals and cell phone towers to send subliminal messages in order to control the minds of the citizenry. I was curious to know if you've read it or had any thoughts. :) Thank you for all that you do! -Ellen Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript at https://robbwolf.com/2021/12/17/infant-leaky-gut-firefighter-fueling-excessive-nicotine-thrr095/

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
On Health And Freedom | Salty Talk 037 | THRR

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 56:34


Salty Talk is a special edition of Healthy Rebellion Radio. Each week on Salty Talk Robb will do a deep dive into current health and performance news, mixed with an occasional Salty conversation with movers and shakers in the world of research, performance, health, and longevity. For the full the video presentation of this episode and to be a part of the conversation, join us in The Healthy Rebellion online community. WARNING: These episodes may get “salty” with the occasional expletive. Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here Show Notes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09maaUaRT4M Vinay Prasad MD How Democracy Ends Florida Dept of Health https://mobile.twitter.com/healthyfla/status/1466174868764958728   Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript for this podcast on its blog page at https://robbwolf.com/2021/12/10/on-health-and-freedom-salty-talk-037-thrr/

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Omicron Variant, Plant Defenses, Extreme Sleep Schedule | THRR094

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 59:41


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: A Heart-Healthy Way to Eat Aim for an overall healthful dietary pattern, the American Heart Association advises, rather than focusing on “good” or “bad” foods. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/29/well/eat/heart-healthy-diet-foods.html https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1161/CIR.0000000000001031 "The committee's advice on protein foods, published during the climate talks in Glasgow, was well-timed. Choosing plant-based proteins over animal sources of protein not only has health value for consumers but can help to foster a healthier planet." https://www.performancemenu.com/article/1384/Robbs-Farewell/?mc_cid=46bc74eeea&mc_eid=f235501518 1. Sleeping and eating on a extremely variable schedule [12:35] Jason says: Hello, Long time listener, first time caller. I have listened to your podcasts on adjusting sleeping and eating cycles when changing shifts, as many first responders do. However, I am trying to locate resources and best practices, for a more dramatically changing schedule. I work as a locomotive engineer for a class one railroad. Truly, I am looking for actionable things I can spread to what I believe is an underserved industry. My co-workers and I are often under rested and unprepared, which can lead to poor dietary and lifestyle choices. Our schedule is extremely unpredictable, we may work a night shift, be off for ten hours and head back in for the afternoon shift. Equally as likely to be off long enough to work another night or even the next day. Unfortunately, there is no way to tell ahead of time, as we get either two hours or one and a half hour notice before our shift begins. These shifts often end up being twelve hours long. As such, there are multiple times a week, where I may be up for over twenty-four hours. In these situations, I am unsure how to even attempt to regulate my eating or trying to sleep when I need to but am not tired. I am forty-six year old male 5'11" 210 lbs. I lift four to five times a week, often when I am tired, and try to get some steady state cardio in daily. A live Q&A would definitely be a great addition to all the work you guys already to, I would like to add that I greatly appreciate everything you do. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.   2. Resistant Starch [18:19] Cheeny says: Worth the hype? Or is it Buck science? I love day old white rice so I'm hoping it's got some merit to it. Thanks!   3. Plant Defenses [19:39] wzrdpow says: Are all plant defense mechanisms antithetical to human health or longevity? Thinking in relation to things like turmeric and sulforaphane.   4. Omicron [26:32] Jenni says: Hey, I'm an MPH, and this completely stumping me. Reports on omicron from the field describe it as a lingering cold with no hospitalizations-Quartz article 11/28/21 (https://qz.com/2095354/what-are-the-symptoms-of-the-omicron-variant/amp/). If that's the case, shouldn't we be happy and not locking down. It was a shift to a less catastrophic influenza that ended the last flu pandemic. We didn't vaccine flu out of existence. I know that we don't have all the data (but seriously that's just a mantra now), but if the symptoms are "basic cold", why is WHO and Fauci (last article I read had him making another reference to "the science" and I'm seriously going to vomit) flipping out? Thank you, Jenni https://www.honestlypod.com/podcast/episode/5bfb867a/is-covid-over-and-other-burning-questions-this-thanksgiving   5. Is the Covid response mass formation or hypnosis? Dr. Mattias Desmet [34:00] Joe says: Hi Robb and Nicki, love your work, thanks for all the excellent content. I came across a few interviews with Dr. Mattias Desmet who thinks that the response to covid can be explained by something called mass formation or mass hypnosis. Here are a few links to some interviews with him where he discusses this: https://jermwarfare.com/blog/mattias-desmet (relatively short and to the point) https://www.thestoryofmepodcast.com/dr-mattias-desmet-psychological-crisis-and-mass-formation/ (more of a discussion on the topic) (I've not listened to any other episodes from these podcasts) A written interview: https://dailysceptic.org/interview-with-mattias-desmet-professor-of-clinical-psychology/ Aubrey Marcus has done an interview with him, too, but I haven't listened to it: https://www.aubreymarcus.com/blogs/aubrey-marcus-podcast/why-people-willingly-give-up-their-freedoms-w-prof-mattias-desmet-aubrey-marcus-podcast Does this sound plausible? Would love to hear your thoughts on this. Thanks, Joe Amy Peikoff discussion with Mattias Desmet - Professor of Clinical Psychology at Ghent University, Belgium: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLhCdU4WXh4 Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript at the blog page for this episode: https://robbwolf.com/2021/12/03/omicron-variant-plant-defenses-extreme-sleep-schedule-thrr094/

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Sleep Trouble After Training, Aging and Belly Fat, Is "Prepping" The Only Solution? | THRR093

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 62:34


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://vinayprasadmdmph.substack.com/p/how-democracy-ends "The pandemic events of 2020-2021 outline a potential pathway for a future democratically elected President of the United States to systematically end democracy.  The course of events leading to this outcome need not be a repeat of the direct assault on the Capitol, but a distortion of risk of illness as a justification for military force and suspension of democratic norms." 1. Cannot Sleep After Hard Training - JiuJitsu and Weightlifting [21:18] Nick says: After a hard JiuJitsu training class (or weightlifting) I always have trouble falling asleep. I also have trouble eating, too. I think it's my adrenaline from hard rolling. I am competitive and this definitely affects my ability to rest. Practice starts at 6 and usually goes to 730-830. Both days I get insomnia if I train really hard. What can I do to relax my mind and body so I can fall asleep within two hours of training? I know carbohydrates play a role. I try not to eat too much during the day because I get drowsy at my desk job. I usually track macros and I began to up my carb intake to see if it helps the issue - it doesn't. For example. Today I ate 131g carbs from organic purple sweet potatoes. (143g protein from organic grass fed beef). All cooked with EVOO & seasoned liberally with Mediterranean Sea Salt, garlic and pepper.  I trained at 6pm. Got home at 830. I know I need food but I cannot eat so I recently I tried forcing myself a shake made up of 35g grass fed whey, 4 eggs, plenty of fruit and 1/2 cup of oats. I am just ranting because I am suffering from this insomnia right now. I just discovered your product LMNT and instantly bought it after reading your story on the Amazon store website. I thought that an electrolyte in balance could be the issue so I'll find out. I consume a lot of salt but maybe I actually don't. Then I found your Instagram and realized I can ask a question so here I am. Thanks for reading this word salad! I am excited to LMNT and resolve this insomnia! 2. Workout intensity, frequency, duration [28:11] Dan says: Robb, I read the Paleo Solution and have found it to be only the tip of the ice berg compared to the value of your podcasts.  Thank you, great stuff. I am looking for more guidance on workout intensity, duration and frequency for improving body comp. I've been doing a crossfit-type of workout at my club for six months.  They call it "Dynamic" but essentially its the same stuff focusing on stability, power and strength in weekly rotations. I usually get in 3-4 of these workouts a week and sometimes a one hour bike ride (18mph) on off days. The workouts are a full one hour with a "melt down" in the last 10 minutes. I generally burn 700-850 calories during that time, ave HR 70-75% with max HR above 90% (according to Polar HRM).  I'm not sure the instructors understand the concept of stress-induced cortisol release and I want to understand it myself. I am wondering if the length and intensity of these workouts are unnecessary beat downs; and/or if I am doing too many in a week. I started in March, weighed 236 and about 29% body fat (6' 0"). I lost 18 pounds over first 3 months with calorie reduction, higher-carb low fat. I then plateaued for 3 months with no changes in eating or workouts. I've been 100% Paleo for two weeks and the weight appears to be coming off again (down to 212 lbs now). Ideal goal is to get to 185-190 at 10% body fat. I hear you guys talk about "Cross fit beat downs" and working out too frequently; I'm not sure if I am falling into that. I am looking for a better reference of what is an optimal body-comp program in terms of intensity, duration and frequency. Any guidance is appreciated. Thank you for what you do. Dan 3. Collagen and Folic Acid [34:47] Kay says: My SIL, who is involved with a MLM supplement company, said that I should not take collagen supplement daily because it will influence folic acid in my body in a negative way.  She said her supplement is only taken for 10 days out of 30.  I have never heard of this.  Any truth? https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/4417592/ 4. Aging and Abdominal Adipose [38:14] Annette says: Would love to hear your comments on abdominal fat.    I am in good health for 65 yrs old.  Always had a "belly" but I am 116 lbs, 5 ft.    Not fat, but my middle holds 6-8 lbs of fat I know is there.  I have a good dietary intake, exercise 3-4 days weekly, 2 of those days are weight training.   I have good abdominal muscles under the fat I can feel.   Can I ever lose this weight?   I am an ICU nurse with a Masters in Critical Care, and I have my adult NP so I am not without a good background education.      I enjoyed one of your books on Paleo; I feel you are a great educational resource. Please advise. 5. Is "Prepping" The Only Solution? [43:37] Richard says: What steps can a person or family take (other than to be as healthy as possible) to mitigate this situation as best we can?  I look at what is happening in Venezuela, for instance, and wonder what I would do in that situation: an almost complete breakdown of society, with hyper-inflation wiping out saving and making income equally worthless.  Is "prepping" the only solution: lots of weapons, years of stored food/water/gas, a bunker mentality?  I'm not sure that is a viable option of the majority of citizens.  So, what are your thoughts on what the average Joe-citizen can do? https://www.foxfire.org/shop/category/books/ Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript on this episode's blog page: https://robbwolf.com/2021/10/29/sleep-trouble-after-training-aging-and-belly-fat-is-prepping-the-only-solution-thrr093/

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Long-Term Blood Donation, Low Body Temperature, EMF Filters and Earthing | THRR092

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 55:05


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: Durability of immune responses to the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine "reports of waning vaccine efficacy, coupled with the emergence of variants of concern that are resistant to antibody neutralization, have raised concerns about the potential lack of durability of immunity to vaccination. We recently reported findings from a comprehensive analysis of innate and adaptive immune responses in 56 healthy volunteers who received two doses of the BNT162b2 vaccination. Here, we analyzed antibody responses to the homologous Wu strain as well as several variants of concern, including the emerging Mu (B.1.621) variant, and T cell responses in a subset of these volunteers at six months (day 210 post-primary vaccination) after the second dose. Our data demonstrate a substantial waning of antibody responses and T cell immunity to SARS-CoV-2 and its variants, at 6 months following the second immunization with the BNT162b2 vaccine. Notably, a significant proportion of vaccinees have neutralizing titers below the detection limit, and suggest a 3rd booster immunization might be warranted to enhance the antibody titers and T cell responses."   1. Low Body Temperature [18:16] John says: Hi, Im trying to figure out if a declining body temp is something I should be focused on. I'm 42 now and a couple years ago I started noticing my daytime temperature was not a consistent 98.6. No big deal I thought until more recently I started having a hell of a time waking up in the morning. After doing some reading on thyroid related issues (which run in my family) I started recording my daily temp. Most days my waking temp is 96.9 - 97.1. During the day it hovers around 97.6. I've done a full suite of thyroid tests multiple times and my Free T3/T4, TSH, Reverse T4, and thyroid antibodies are right where they should be so no obvious issues there. I generally follow a paleo diet but switched to strict keto for a few months this spring and now follow a low carb diet, no gluten. For activity I do have a 40 hr work week at a computer but my spare time involves part time farm work and 2x weekly capoeira classes. When I'm not at the work desk I'm fairly mobile. I'm male, 5'5” and fluctuate between 135-140 lbs. Daily calorie intake is usually around 1500 calories unless I'm burning hard with activity on a given day. Is this just par for the course as we age for some folks? Is my metabolism just slowing down? My energy and muscle mass is still excellent, but I am fascinated with this and wondering if it's anything I should keep paying attention to. Thanks! 2. Long-Term Blood Donation [23:23] Sherry Says: I'm a 61 year old female and a long time listener. I've been donating blood every couple months for several years. My mother had hemochromatosis. I was checked but fortunately do not have it. I know that blood donation helps keep iron levels in check and I like that my body refreshes itself by making new blood. I am wondering though if there's a downside to long-term, ongoing blood donation. I don't want to deplete some limited resource in my bone marrow, or something else like that! Thank you. 3. Wading through Scientific studies [26:32] Paul says: Hi to you both ,question for Rob My question is about the way scientific papers are written and the most effective method you have of screening out junk. I am not a medical professional or scientist. I work in IT and management during which I have developed a skillset around identifying ballshit. Whilst looking through papers in pubmed I find the summaries/ abstracts often very unhelpful or misleading. Then the main body of the paper is often rambling and I frequently find myself skimming details in an attempt to find basic facts about the study which I feel should have been stated clearly at the beginning. Information such as; The purpose of the study; the conclusions (if any); the scientific soundness of those conclusions (eg what kind of test with how many participants, the test cell characteristics and the control cell). Some papers are much better than others. But coming from a business background I am used to information following the following format Title 1 pager (recommendations) Appendix(method ,results,data and caveats) In my experience in business overly obtuse pros often points to deliberate deception or sloppiness. What is your view on this? How do you best navigate scientific papers in your research ? Are there recommendations you have for me so I can be more effective at working through these papers.? Are there services that grade papers with metrics. For example a simple way of filtering those studies without sizeable test cells and control groups. Or do you have any sources you consider to be consistently bad eg specific universities or business etc that you would avoid ? A final question on this topic is In your view what percentage of scientific studies are actually junk? Kind regards Paul Ps Love the show i feel with you both on the mic its very warm an nice, like sitting in front of a fire chatting about health. 4. Sea salt vs Electrolyte [45:30] Matt says: Hey Robb and Nicki. I've been listening to your podcast for a few years now and have definitely enjoyed the new format. Recently I read Sacred Cow, it was by far my favourite book of 2020. I have the paleo solution and wired to eat on my list of books to read at some point this year. To my question. For about a year now in the mornings my wife and I will each put a slice of lemon and 3 big pinches of Celtic sea salt into a big glass of water. Where we really noticed a difference was in the summer heat, when we would sweat. My question is, how is this different then consuming “electrolytes”? Are there any differences that we would notice by taking electrolytes instead of just a good sea salt? I would love to try LMNT one day, but being from Canada doesn't make it as simple. Thank so much for your content. Matt. 5. What's the deal with EMF Filters and Earthing [48:00] Derek says: Hey guys, Love the show. Now straight to my questions. I don't think you have covered this yet, at least not in great detail: 1. What are your thoughts on Earthing? Is this legit? It seems kind of ridiculous and tree-huggerish, but at the same time it has a ring of legitimacy. I've seen different methods recommended - from using grounding mats that you sleep or sit on to just walking around outside barefoot or sleeping on the ground. 2. What about EMF Filters? Again they have some ring of legitimacy, but at the same time seem kooky. Obviously there are waves galore travelling through the air, but is blocking out these waves (if the filters even work) really going to make that much difference? What about just removing electronics from the room. Does that really make that much of a difference? I plan on trying out some of these methods, from the standard remove all electronics from the room, to actually shutting off the breaker for our bedroom, but given that there are so many other factors that could affect how I perceive my sleep quality I thought I would see what you guys think. Without solid research or, at a minimum, convincing anecdotes I am definitely not going to be dropping a few hundred dollars on something like this, but I would really like to know if it actually works. Thanks for all the awesomeness. Keep it up! https://robbwolf.com/2020/04/08/5g-and-coronavirus-salty-talk-004-thrr/ Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript at the blog page for this episode: https://robbwolf.com/2021/10/22/wading-through-scientific-studies-low-body-temperature-emf-filters-and-earthing-thrr092/

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Is Ground Meat Processed Food, Nicotine Adverse Effects, Lifting With Slipped Disk | THRR091

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 50:11


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/12/health/aspirin-heart-attack-stroke.html 1. Peptide uptake orally [12:50] Andreas says: Dear both. First of all thank you both for all that you do. I am very grateful for you weekly courage, «sticking your neck out there», sharing your take on life while crushing main stream «dogma”. Love it, great job – please keep it up. Now, could you please help me understand how all the so called beneficial peptides in animal foods ends up in the human body to deliver any biological function? The human digestion system is very good at breaking down peptide sequences long before they reach their  destination to give any biological function (both spontaneously, non-enzymatically, like stomach acid, and enzymatically by peptidase etc.). Now days, I am experimenting using my chicken eggs as a “delivery vessel” by which I deliver non palatable but highly nutrient dense organ foods to my family indirectly by actively changing the egg nutrient profile(or so I think). The chickens free range and get plenty of sunshine in the summer, eat bugs, greens, wild herbs and berries, while I occasionally feed them organ meats(primarily beef liver and heart), beef tallow etc. They get no plant oils, soy and so on. They love the organ meat and look/act very healthy. I know the fatty acid profile of the eggs will change to a higher percent of for example steric acid (based on research literature), but not sure about the other vitamins, minerals and peptides from their diet actually ends up in the eggs – and so is passed on to my wife and kids. I have no problems eating meats like liver and heart, but they will not touch it, let alone eat it. But they absolutely LOVE my dishes that I preparer from those eggs (like carnivore waffles etc.). But if humans (or chickens) do not absorb many of these nutrients, peptides in a biological active form and increase the nutritional profile of the eggs, well, then the story ends there. A little bit like some expensive skin care products that my wife uses, that proclaim the price I justified with added water soluble vitamins that should be so healthy, but will not ba absorbed unless you eat the damn thing.. Best, Andreas 2. Non-carb processed food, issues? [18:10] Mike says: Hi, can't explain how important you guys have been in my life over the past 12ish years. I've listened to EVERYTHING and implemented SOME (realistically a lot, although I don't really have any health / nutrition / digestive issues so it's more of a favorite-subject/interest of mine than a dire need to make sweeping changes sort of thing). Question: I know ‘processed' foods are worse for us for a number of reasons and that there are different levels of processing (highly processed factory food, steak vs ground meat, blending mainly unprocessed foods to make a smoothie, etc) but my question is, are these processed foods ever better for us than the unprocessed? …or maybe equivalent, mainly when it comes to processed fat/protein. I've wondered for a while, if a quality liverwurst, from USwellness for example, might be an ideal food, despite the baggage it carries along with it ‘processed meat'. THE DEVIL! But let's be realistic here. My understanding of this product is that it's a nose to tail tube of goodness, from a healthy animal, all slapped together, with some spices. All good right? Is there any benefit or detriment to this sort of thing? Does the protein/fat being digested more quickly than if I chewed the component parts individually, really matter?? I know processed sugar becomes a blood sugar issue, but does processed fat/protein have a similar corollary?? Thanks! Side note, I know you always say chew your food and I think this mostly refers to people who have weight control issues and need the chewing/eating/fullness slowdown to moderate their intake. Clearly this is probably one way to answer the above question but is there anything else?? PS: I've often thought of getting a tattoo of the fraction 1/6 somewhere, to signify I was one of six listeners, with the added benefit that nobody else would know why the hell I had it!! Thanks… hopefully this shoots to the healthy rebellion e-mail… couldn't figure out how to ask a question to the new poddy. I joined the rebellion for a month last year and it's great and all but I just realllllllly don't like social media. (It's not you it's me ) 3. Lifting With a Slipped Disk [29:06] Trystan says: Robb and Nicki, Love the podcast! I'll make this short - my wife has had an operation on her back due to a slipped disk, but she's curious to start lifting. What do you guys think? I'm no expert, however it does seem a bit risky. That being said she knows her body and what her back can take more than anyone... Would love to hear your advice on whether lifting with slipped disks could be beneficial or downright dangerous. All the best, and keep up the good work. 4. Cluster Dextrin [40:43] Jackson says: I would love to hear your opinion on this! Thanks 5. Nicotine Adverse Effects? [42:45] Garrett says: Hi Robb & Nikki, 'Been around since the Paleo Solution podcast days, so while I'm not an OG-6 listener, OG-20 is not out of the question. I heard a Q&A episode a while back where a listener asked about the caffeine-nicotine protocol you suggested for special forces, or anyone working odd hours / graveyard shifts to stay moderately alert while still being able to unwind at the end of the day. In a similar vein, on a recent Huberman Lab episode he mentioned the potential benefits of Nicotine in treating Alzheimer's disease. I believe it is universally agreed upon Nicotine is a nootropic / cognitive enhancer. Now to my question - I'm Swedish, and we have quite the 'snus-culture' over there, our spin of dry snuff (tobacco pouches, but without the spitting you see with American dip). I've gravitated towards this as an alternative to drinking, and I should note I've moved to the tobacco free versions containing only nicotine (Zyn is a brand that is making it's ways in the U.S.). However, one can't really drink on the job, whereas the only bad time for some snus is while eating and sleeping, leaving about 16 hours of consumption throughout the day. Is there to your knowledge a 'healthy' range to stay within? In the U.S. they are sold in 3 and 6mg pouches, however the 'good stuff' I can get in Sweden goes all the way up to 20mg. According to a quick Google search, only 10-20% of the content is actually absorbed, meaning the dose "per hit" is up to 4mg. I could be on the high end consuming shy of 50mg per day some days. I've gladly taken in your and Andrew's notes as a compelling argument that I'm functioning better cognitively while staving off Alzheimer's disease, but I have a good feeling there's another side of this story I should heavily consider as for all I know I'm doing damage equivalent to smoking a pack a day, just wrapped in different packaging with different side effects. Appreciate all you do to keep us informed and entertained. -Garrett Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript at the blog page for this episode https://robbwolf.com/2021/10/15/is-ground-meat-processed-food-nicotine-adverse-effects-lifting-with-slipped-disk-thrr091/

Sex, Drugs, and Jesus
Episode #20: Mindful Masturbation, Lasting Longer, And Self-Actualization From Dating Coach David Chambers

Sex, Drugs, and Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 65:35


INTRODUCTION:My guest today is all the way from the UK and he is helping men build confidence, become their true selves, last longer in bed and masturbate like they mean it! His name is David Chambers and he is the host of The Authentic Man Podcast and an accomplished Dating & Intimacy coach. This man is a master of mindfulness and tantric practices and it was a real pleasure to talk about sex with him on my show.  INCLUDED IN THIS EPISODE (But not limited to):·      Expert Advice From A Dating Coach ·      Mindful Masturbation·      Secrets To Men Lasting Longer In Bed·      Self-Love & Self-Mastery Defined·      Why Some Men Sleep With LOTS Of Women·      Why Men STOP Sleeping With LOTS Of Women·      How The Subconscious Mind Rules The Conscious Mind·      Having Sex To Fill Emotional Voids·      Men And The Fear Of Rejection·      Avoiding Commitment·      Communication Barriers During Sex·      Toxic Masculinity CONNECT WITH DAVID:Website & Courses: https://www.theauthenticman.netPodcast: https://www.theauthenticman.net/podcastTwitter: https://twitter.com/iamauthenticmanFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IAmTheAuthenticManInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theauthenticman_/ DE'VANNON'S RECOMMENDATIONS:·      Pray Away Documentary (NETFLIX)       - https://www.netflix.com/title/81040370       - TRAILER: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tk_CqGVfxEs SDJ MEMBERSHIP (FULL EPISODES):·      $2.99 per month.·      Donate any amount for 30 days of access.·      $25 per year.https://www.sexdrugsandjesus.com/membership-account/membership-levels/ TRANSCRIPT:You're listening to the sex drugs and Jesus podcast, where we discuss whatever the fuck we want to. And yes, we can put sex and drugs and Jesus all in the same bed and still be all right. At the end of the day, my name is De'Vannon and I'll be interviewing guests from every corner of this world. As we dig into topics that are too risky for the morning show, as we strive to help you understand what's really going on in your.There was nothing on the table and we've got a lot to talk about. So let's dive right into this episode.De'Vannon: My guest today is all the way from the UK. And he is helping them build confidence, become their true selves last longer in bed and masturbate. Like they mean it, baby yassss!!! His name is David Chambers and he is the host of the authentic man podcast. And he's also an accomplished dating and intimacy coach as well.This man is a master of mindfulness and tantric practices, and it was a [00:01:00] real pleasure to talk about sex with him on my show.Hello, David, the authentic man man's man. How are you doing today? David: I'm feeling, um, I'm feeling really, really kind of grounded and calm. I just, uh, just before we go on about an hour ago, I was laying on a massage table with my Reiki master doing a magic. So I'm now feeling stupid, like relaxed and said, so I'm really feeling, oh De'Vannon: shit, that's how you get ready for, uh, uh, for a fucking interview.You get the Reiki master over there. You get all of this in the house. David: Yeah. Then all the energy get relaxed, save big, De'Vannon: but see that's how your, your podcast intake, man, it starts off that way. Like your voice is so like low and calm. You've got like the massage music going and you're already getting people into the state of hypnosis before you [00:02:00] even much started talking about.What'd he really came there to talk about that day.David: Nevermind. De'Vannon: Okay. So David, tell us about how you got started on the path of being a dating coach. Talk to us about your history and your struggles and everything that led to that path.David: Yeah. Yeah. That's a good question. Um, I, uh, about, um, Let's say 15 years ago, uh, you know, you're young 20 something year old, man. And I was just not as happy with my day in life as I want it to be, you know, like many of us, you know, I'm sure I was 20 odd years old. I was kind of up and coming in my career and my tech career.And I was looking to expand my life and expand my horizons and do new things. And I was finding myself, going to the bars and clubs and meet women who they weren't really interested in. The sort of things I was interested in. They wanted to, you know, go to bars and clubs and maybe buy some handbags and [00:03:00] shoes and holiday and, you know, get drunk, that sort of thing.And I was feeling a little bit tired of that. I felt like I was growing out of that a little bit and I wanted to travel. I wanted to, you know, um, dive into new cultures, try new experiences, do things that push my comfort zone. So I was a bit frustrated with that. I started Googling one night as you do. Um, and I came across a book that promise to teach a man, you know, how to, to, to talk to women, how to talk to a higher quality women.I guess the phrase would have been in those days and a book was the game. Um, so like many amount at that time I picked up, I'd read it, cover to cover in a few weeks. Um, and I, I use some of the techniques. I definitely did. It went out and you know, some of the lines, you know, some of the first pickup, the kind of introductory lines as I probably call them is like, got me.Help me with confidence a lot of the time. So then I, I ended up at a bootcamp and at the end of that boot camp, I turned to the teacher, the head teacher, they had the guy who was running it and said, Hey, I think I could teach this [00:04:00] stuff, you know, on the bootcamp. He said, yeah, I agree. And that kind of started a path of, for about year and a half, doing that on the side, as well as working in my tech job.And during that year and a half, I started to develop to move away from a lot of the stuff that was in the game. I wasn't really that keen on a lot of what was in there to start with, but I started to really develop this idea of like having fun, you know, that, that mystery thing that a lot of men struggle with, especially when they get into a club, like having a good time, having fun with people like smiling, joking, laughing, uh, being in the moment being, you know, open and honest and, and so forth.So I really got into that. And then I got kind of fed up with that whole scene, that whole kind of men trying to pick up women. It become, I started to see there was a really dark side coming across students who didn't love. They didn't love meeting women. They just wanted to take advantage of them. And I didn't sit well with me, cause my, my point of view has been like a deep love and reverence for women.You know, I grew up, I've got four, four sisters sometimes I forget. Um, I've got four sisters, um, and I grew [00:05:00] up with them. So I really have a love for women. So I spent many years after that, just learning about myself, you know, self-dependent work, going to workshops, going to courses, you know, week-long things, things like that even went to a Buddhist monastery to stay for a week, uh, one year just to, you know, learn more about me and I, I had a partner.I was with fast forward a few years from there. Uh, we were together for about four years or we broke up when I was in Bolivia. We were traveling around the world. We traveled all fruit, India Southeast Asia flew over to south America to see the Olympics and broke up in a, in a hotel room in Bolivia, in a little town called.And it all really, for me, stemmed from the idea. And the thing that I struggled with was just speaking about my feelings and emotions and listening to her about taking it personally and making it all about me and what I've done wrong. So what that kind of created was a cycle where I didn't say how I felt, because I didn't want to upset her because I didn't want her to be acting for me.You have to deal with her [00:06:00] emotional reaction. So I was balling up all these feelings, all these desires, things that I wanted, and it just caused the breakdown of a relationship slowly over a year. And I really vowed to myself. Then I said, I'm not going to let it happen again. I don't want that to happen again.So I went on a bit of a journey after that. I kept traveling for about six months, discipline medicine did a lot of meeting new people, a lot of just open Hyde conversation. Um, and then after that I came back to London, uh, a friend of mine, uh, the guy who used to run the podcast with AMAT, he was like, let's do something.Well, this thing, let me, she's like, you know, there's so much data on, is this. Do this, say this where this then say this, then do this and then trick her into doing this. He was like, but we know that doesn't work. Long-term we know that that's very superficial and it doesn't build beautiful relationships.So the podcast was born, uh, originally it was called your thing, dating series, um, spending about day. And you know, in the last few months I've expanded it into and change the name to the authentic man has decided to step away [00:07:00] around Christmas time. So this has all led to a journey of like self-learning self-development growth.Um, Coming into myself, maturing more than anything. And a couple, there's a nother side that runs alongside, this is my love of sex, sexuality, tantra, and things like that. That I've also brought into my work. So now I'm, you know, doing everything from running workshops about masturbation, for play, a tantra for couples, tantric, massage,and the like. So it's really a combination and helped me grow and move forward. So out of my own pain, you know, I've turned this as I often say, your pain can become your gold. And for me, that's really been, been true for me. De'Vannon: Excellent breakdown of you. And I love how you have the small beginnings, as they say, as the Lord says in the Hebrew Bible to despise not the day of small beginnings and, you know, and you came from and where the, where there anybody out there believes in God or not is, you know, a thing, but it's just, it's [00:08:00] just good fucking sense, you know, to despise small beginnings, you know, he didn't get visited.David didn't get discouraged. And you know, he started, you know, he had his heart broken, he went through some shit, uh, you know, he started off helping somebody else and now he's become the guru himself. Now your website is absolutely fantastic. The authentic man.net. And because it's really like a resource and a hub, I love when websites are like that.So it's almost like, you know, Creative website. And you just happen to have some podcast episodes on there because you got everything else too. You got your blog going, you got courses, you design, you got workshop videos coming up and stuff like that. And so we're going to talk all about that in my show notes that I'm going to design for you, but I love it.It's a resource and men can go to you and find out how to become a better man. Um, I wanted to, so I was listening to one of your [00:09:00] podcasts episodes. And you said, uh, an interesting thing about self love. And I wanted to talk about self love, um, up front, because I think a lot of the work you do has that infused.I think all the work you do has used in it. You say something like self love is not always among ourselves. Uh, yeah. And, um, sometimes it requires discipline and self-mastery, which is something else that I came across a lot when I was researching you. So tell us what is self love and self mastery what's in not getting confused with.David: Hmm. I think. Hmm. Hmm. Good question. So, so self love to me is in a real nutshell, and I think for this is it's sometimes I just work with, see what comes up for me in the moment is like, you know, all the love we give to other people, right? For a lot of us, like, or the love that we want from other people, like maybe you want a boyfriend or a girlfriend who's gonna, you know, [00:10:00] take you out for dinner.Who's going to give you foot mass artist. Who's going to cook for you, who is going to, you know, tell you how beautiful you look and you know, all those things give that to you. That is, to me the real basics of self-love all the things you want from outside of you that you crave externally, right? You crave the validation, you crave the love, the feeding, the warmth, give that to yourself on a daily basis every day in some way, you know, like it, as I said before I came here today, I took myself and I went and got some Reiki for my Reiki master.And it's like, that's an act of self love, you know, because I'm giving myself the relaxation and the joy that I love to give to other people. Right. And I give that to myself. It's an act of self-love and where self-discipline kind of comes in, is that when you've go things like, say going to the gym, Now going to the gym can be an act of self-love, right?Because maybe you've decided that, you know, you want [00:11:00] your body to look a certain way or you live in something. You want your body to look a certain way. Maybe you want your body to feel a certain way. You know, you want to feel a certain way in your body. So there's going to take that. You go to the gym or you go to yoga or you do some running or lattes or whatever exercise you choose to do, but you're also going to need some discipline infused into that, right.To keep going, because these sorts of things take discipline and where the self-mastery comes in for me is also looking at yourself and asking questions about who you are and how you feel and what's going on for you. So inside of the example of going to the gym, maybe there's days where you're like, I don't fancy it today.I don't want to go today. And actually I want to go to the cake shop and eat a whole massive cake. That's normally for four people. It could be an act of self love for you to go and eat that cake. And this is where, you know, it's not always easy to tell because if you've been going through. You know, three times a week for four years, and you've never missed a session.But inside of [00:12:00] that, that self-love is giving you what you really desire and need in that moment is to have some cake to sell yourself. You'll sell some love and just have something in you that feels good. Right. But if you are on the flip side of someone, who's been trying to go to the gym for three years and you've gone about four times, right?And it's a normal story for you to want this cake inside that moment, your axis of bluff is to crack your ass to the gym right now, the self-mastery comes in is when you have that for that is like, Hmm, I don't really want to go to the gym and you go, Hmm. What is underneath that for what's going on there?Well, what's my, is there a fear there? Is there a concern? Is there a worry, right. You know, for some of us, if it's like going to the gym, it's like with almost fearful sometimes. If we do this thing, we will change as a person. And how will the world react to me or my family? Not likely my friends, not like me.Will I be less accepted because I changed. Right. And that kind of often sits in quite an unconscious place. So self-mastery, to me, it's like to look at why you do things, why certain things keep happening to you and [00:13:00] why things have happened to in the past. De'Vannon: I think that's a beautiful breakdown. And when you were explaining about the cake and the gym, my mind went to, so, so I have a clothing store called down under apparel and I've, I've worked with models before, and these guys are like zero body fat, eight packs, you know, all of that sort of stuff.And the first photo shoot that I ever did, you know, they showed up with a bag of like jelly. And, um, and they were, and I was like, I couldn't understand, like, I don't get it. You look like that. What's your eating bad. This isn't fair, plain explain, you know, like, bro, we don't do this all the time, but you know, it was like, you know, they had been preparing for, for the photo shoot.So they had been going without, until now they were rewarding themselves with those coveted, just the wheat and everything like that. And you know, you will see the Olympic athletes that they got the Olympics going. Now, as soon as they're done with the Olympics, they're at, McDonald's [00:14:00] getting fast food and everything and all of that and you know exactly what, and that felt that'd probably be so great going into them.You know, they're listening to this and going. Yep. Yep. Yep. Amen. Amen. And amen. And, um, Okay. So I w I would like for you to tell me about like a client success story, of course we won't, we'll call him Joe or whatever the hell you feel like calling him. Now, look, I want something juicy. I want, I want a train wreck case.Somebody was a hot day, um, feisty mess. And then when you looked at him and thought, maybe I can't do nothing with this when I don't know, somebody mess up from the float up is what I want to hear about. And then how, how you help them turn that thing around. David: Mm. A lot of guys that come to me, they're not like in, in real messages, there's not just small tweaks that they need.Right. There's really small tweaks. [00:15:00] So as a client, I had to, not too long ago, he, he hadn't been on a date in a few years. He hadn't had any sort of physical activity to me De'Vannon: that sounded like a train wreck to me. You've put in a nicely, that's what I call messed up from the flow up. Now you say no physical activity.So we hadn't had no sex in like four years. And what you're saying, oh, that's a train wreck. I'm gonna be quiet. Go head on. I just want people to be clear, that's a train wreck. David: So, so yeah, after working for a few weeks together, um, you know, you've got to, to going to like some speed dang events. Right. But he was interested in, so he went to some speeding events and beforehand, you know, we've been talking about conversation, how to show up, how to be playful, how to, you know, be, be the character that he is.And, you know, he goes to the speeding event. I think he leaves there. I mean, he's got like four or [00:16:00] five matches. I think there was like maybe 10 women there, four or five matches. And for him, he was blown away, you know? Cause this was like he's before he's been on date for ages. Right. So now he's like, wait, that's four or five matches.This is a problem I've never had. I don't. We do, I do. I come up with and I was like, well, you can go out with all of them. Right. You know, you don't have to choose in this moment. You know, if you want to go out with them, go out all of them. Right. So there's one, one guy goes to see a few times. And um, I think he goes on a few dates with her and the one day we were talking and he's like, oh, you know, I feel like on the beach was pushing to come back to my place.And I was like, So, so what, what did he do? He was like, no, no, you know, I didn't think it was right, blah, blah, blah. And then we kind of unpack that, right. Because sometimes we have these ideas of what's not right and wrong. It's like, well, what did you want? What did she want? Right. And what was authentically, there was no manipulation about that.So a few days later, um, [00:17:00] he was messaging me in the morning was like, oh, you know, the girl's saying these sorts of things to me. And I was like, what's true for you? What would you really love? You know? And he's like, I'd love to give her a massage. And I was like, okay, cool. Well, you know, talk to her about that.So that evening she goes around to his place. And, uh, I remember being a bit panicked beforehand again, he called and was like, you know, what's going on? He was like, I'm worried, you know, maybe, you know, she doesn't really want that. Maybe this, maybe that. And I said, okay, what's true for you. And what do you sense on her?Right. There's the two things you just feed into those things. Right. Don't get too much into like how things have to be, because things don't have to be any way. And, um, so they get the girl came round and they spent the night together, you know, and they had a good time. So, you know, I was very happy about that.And obviously, you know, it's not always as about getting laid and having sex, but he, they had a really beautiful eating together, massage and stuff like that. And they, they both share some, some kinks as well. So they're able to explore that [00:18:00] swapping together. So that was really beautiful to, to hear. Um, I didn't turn it to relationship for him, but he started to enjoy dating.I think that was the most important thing actually with, for him was after that he started to date. He started to enjoy it. It's like to have fun when he dated. Right. And this is a big thing for all of us to go from just dating, being this chore. Like it's like a job, like it's work. So to go to Ashley, realize that things about connecting with new human beings, we should always be a beautiful expanse.De'Vannon: Man. You're like the best big brother ever. Like that is like, gosh, if I'd had somebody in my life had given me a relationship like that, like that relationship, advice like that when I was younger, maybe I wouldn't have turned into a ho. And, David: um, De'Vannon: but that is absolutely. Incredible because he went from no physical interaction.He was abstaining forward for all kinds of reasons. And then when he did finally do it, you walked him through the anxiety. You were there, you were truly [00:19:00] his coach. I've, I've played sports before. There's nothing like having like a good coach in your corner. So they make you feel like you can do things you ordered or you, you don't think you can.And then that was a pivotal moment from her, for him, because that imprinted upon him, his understanding a different way of being, and that's what it's all about. So you can go from being a train wreck to a super fast training and, uh, and you know, living your best life. I want you to go back to how you were saying, like, in your twenties, you were having, you know, a lot of meaningless sex and everything.A lot of guys are like fucking their way through town, you know, clocking talking girls left and right. And so you said you were seeking for a lot of validation from him, but you really didn't get any validation from it. So. What inclined you to think that as a man, you should be sleeping with a whole bunch of women.And then at what point did you realize that look, this isn't working. David: Yeah, yeah, no, it's a [00:20:00] beautiful question. So really poignant question, because I think it has to start with the fact that I didn't really have a father who was in my life. My dad was, he doesn't actually live that far from even now, but he's not much of a, a present person in my life.Right. He's he's not emotionally able to be with a child. He's not able to really nurture in any way. And I know it's not his fault. You know, I've really spoken to him about this to a certain degree about his upbringing and realize that it really was his, that was like completely absent as a human being.But they're physically, which I think sometimes it's almost worse because you see the person there and you kind of think this is how it should be or this how it shouldn't be, but they don't give you a decent example. So I grew up with a lack of like masculinity, uh, example in my life and all the men have like friends of my mom's friends.I could always look at these men and go, you're not the sort of man that I look up and I should look up to. I always knew I was always like, Nope, you're not sort of managed to look up to. So I didn't have anyone in my life to say, [00:21:00] this is how you be a man. Right. So I remember going to university. Women start to pay attention to me.So I was like, oh, you know, I'll sleep one. And then I was sleeping with two and then I would be really honest and be like, look, I don't want a girlfriend. I wanna, you know, I want to enjoy myself. And I would tell them like, you know, so no one was expecting, I wasn't lying about it. Right. It's especially at the start, it wasn't really crying about it.So then I was like, oh, this is fun. And then other guys are like, oh Dave, you're the man. But they don't usually say those words, but they, you know, you get a lot of man points from, from men. And then on the, another perverse turn of this is that when you are being with a lot of women, other women also become more attracted to you, right?Because they see you with other women and they, they kind of gravitate towards you. So you're in this kind of cycle. And this was for years where, you know, I would go in and out of relationships, but I'd just be like sleeping with a lot of women at any given time, maybe four or five women I'm meeting up with for a number of months.And in many ways it was very flattering and very [00:22:00] validating way of being a man and being a virile, you know, accomplished man, especially in the bedroom. There was a day. And I never forget this day. She was, it was about, probably about 10 years ago, 10, yeah, 10 and 10 and a half years ago. And I slept with this girl and I left them my bedroom.So in the place I'm in now, and I sat on my sofa, which is different in front of you. I'm seeing, and I had some biscuits in the hand and I was eating the biscuits. And at one point I finished the biscuits and I just sat there, staring at the wall and I kind of had my head in my hands and then I laid down and fell asleep on the sofa.Right. But what I was feeling there was this emptiness. I didn't really want to go back into the bedroom with the girl because there was no real connection with me and her. And I was just like, this is empty. You know, this is empty.I was like this isn't, this is empty and it's not making me feel good, but it's externally validating [00:23:00] me. And it's very easy to get very addicted to that external validation. Right. And even get quite addicted to the evacuation of being with a woman and ejaculating and touching them and holding them.Right. It could be quiet and addictive thing. If you've never look at the underlying feeling that's happening, that you're running away from. Because often as a man, if you're just constantly chasing sex, you're chasing the next woman or the next man. Right. You're chasing something, but what's behind you.What are you running away from? Right? This is, we often forget. This is like often we just running away from ourselves and our own feeling of loneliness or worthlessness or, or a desire for connection. And in that moment, I was like, I thought. And I've got like four women I could call up tomorrow and they'd all come to my house, you know, and I felt lonely in those moments.So I started to make changes. Then I started definitely to make changes then in it, you know, sometimes I would say, let's say necessary. I felt I was, there was a point where I worried I was a sex addict, you know, I've, I've been accused by a woman. I was seeing, she was just like, you have an addiction, you know, you don't need to be sleeping with four women.And I really fought [00:24:00] about that for a long time and it worried me. Um, but after that I was like, you know, I don't need to live like this. I don't need to just kind of for want of a better phrase, churn through women in that way. You know? So I kind of left those day behind and you know, there's a couple of times I flirted with that life a little bit, but I was still a lot more conscious of.Am I doing this because this is a really beautiful experience with someone who I'm really enjoying my time with, or am I doing this just because I'm running away from like, you know, looking at my own thoughts and feelings about my own loneliness or my own inadequacy. So, you know, that's that self-mastery pieces again, you know, it's looking at why you're doing something and understanding that instead of just denying it, De'Vannon: that's like how I learned in my, um, kept the therapy training when I got my certification and hypnosis, you know, so much of it revolved around understanding the why behind the why, how we can do things like on autopilot or for all of these great reasons.And the real reason behind it is embedded deep within our [00:25:00] subconscious and then have noses all about breaking through the conscious mind and getting to the root of problem that a lot of times as it is that our upbringing, everything. So a person may be having baby out there being. Or, um, maybe having problems in their relationship at work, all kinds of things.And it's because of something negative anchored in their self and their subconscious in which the subconscious, I think was like 78% of the brain or something like that. And I think the content was only like 12% of our members. I mean, shit, 88%. 12% for the conscious mind of our member directly. So most of what we are doing is being manipulated by experiences that we've had before, until we became up to that.And what you're doing is in that vein of work and your experiences speak to that. So you were able to basically coach yourself, you know, you know, you know, to go to a better state of thinking and [00:26:00] being now. You also said that you avoided commitment and it was due to a deep seated fear of rejection or of choosing the wrong woman.I really want you to talk about the rejection aspect because from my dealings with men and, and y'all have dealt with a lot of them in Monday, mama, no mama. No. Uh, I did. I did with you there too, but I was, I was fucking a whole lot of men when I was like in the military and you know, and all of that as a little bit different, you know, but still I was, you know, trying to fill a void for me.You know, my dad, my dad would refer me to administrate and you know, that wasn't gonna happen. And so, you know, where do you go from there? And now I'm in the military. I'm 17. Don't ask. Don't tell. So I can't really say. Good relationship. I'll get kicked out, but you know, Nick is readily available. So what you gonna do?And so, David: and so,[00:27:00] De'Vannon: and then I was in a college town. I had,I was like 19 and everything, the fire, the fire. And so, um, but a lot of men have this like rejection. I don't know if you would call it a complex or whatever. You know, these big, strong, handsome men are, you know, who a lot of us, a lot of us girls would say, you just, it's always Leah concern, you know, can do no wrong.But when they approach us, they can turn and we can sit and say, Such fear, you know, coming off of men who we didn't would not have put, looked at that way, unless he started acting that way. So where is this fear of rejection coming from? What is it? What did he do with it? [00:28:00] David: Yeah. Yeah. And as you put it, so whoa, like sometimes the men, they think of it, you know, for want of a better word, you can, they come over and you can feel that there's this fear of being rejected.And there's a perverse thing that happens, especially if we're talking about, you know, the, the initial approach where you go over to someone and you're afraid of being rejected. So you speak almost quite timidly. You're not committed to the, you don't feel committed to whatever you're saying. So the person can feel the lack of commitment, but feels.There's something off here. There's a lack of safety in some way. So they then respond in crime. Right? And then the person who's feeling the rejection feels the response that is a bit cagey isn't full-blooded and then experiences rejection, often ejects. That's a very common cycle that happens in a bar or club.For me, it was a bit deeper than that. It wasn't this about the original rejectionist around inside of relationship. Right? Like not being accepted as I was, the rejection of me is like [00:29:00] not being accepted. The fear for me was the BMI relationship and they get to know me and then they would reject me.Right. Which would cause me to want in many ways, it's like to hide certain things, not say certain things about who I was, because if they, if I show them all the bits and pieces that they like. Most of that, they're going to like, and then they can accept me as I am. But the problem inside of that is, is there's a self-rejection that's happening constantly, right?Which wears away at us because we are basically telling ourselves that there's parts of who we are that are bad and wrong and needs to be hidden from other people. And that people will not accept about us and that we don't accept those parts. So there's that city, a cycle of continuous self-rejection of ourselves.It actually makes us feel worse. And also we project that, that rejection on to other people assume that they're doing the same thing to us because ultimately we always see the world for a lens of how we see ourselves. So a lot of the, the, the fear of rejection, isn't it. [00:30:00] That we think of the people who are rejecting us really it's about, we are continually rejecting ourselves, right?So for me, that was just like constant. Like, okay, if I say this, then she'll get upset. And if I say this, you went like that, you know, trying to hide. And it just becomes a very high energy game just to maintain things in a, in a way, instead of what I much prefer to operate in now, which is like, this is who I am.I've accepted who I am, but for the most part, because there's always bits, we're trying to take out the backpack right. And acceptable. This is who I am. I'm accepting. This is, this is how it is. Right. There's things here that could be better. There's things that could be improved. That's okay. But I look at them and I say, yeah, that's a part of who I am.De'Vannon: Okay. So it's about self-acceptance of what, but, okay. So, so when you say a fear of choosing the wrong woman, so is this something that happens once you made some. Improvement in yourself as a man. At what point did he [00:31:00] begin where you, um, avoiding commitment? Cause you were afraid you might pick the wrong girl.David: Um, this was continuous, continuous, like a continuous thing that I would be with the woman for maybe six months a year. And, but I'd also kind of have my half my eye on like, okay, if this doesn't work out, you know, I can still be fine kind of thing. Right. So the fear is that she's not the right woman for me.So if that's that fear is true, that I need to also be like looking out for what's wrong with her constantly, you know, nitpicking finding forth, but also have one eye on the exit. It's like, you know, it's basically like living with one foot out the door, meaning you'll never fully commit to someone. You never give them your all which, which for the other person is horrendous.Right. Cause it, it creates a lot of anxiety for them. But for me doing it, it also creates anxiety for me, for me. But it's also had me on this kind of high alert of always nitpicking back. Something that I [00:32:00] have to really be conscious of now. Right. Is that I give unsolicited advice to my partner now, or I'm like, oh, like even the other day she was cooking.Some planting, um, resonates. I've taught a Swedish woman to cook Jamaican food. So there is some time to see us. She loves it. Right. She's cooking. You're welcome. You're welcome. Bye.And she's, she's cooking the plant in and I'm like, oh, you need to cook that a bit longer. Oh, you should. You should tell him that. And it's like, I have to, then I w I sat down and I say, Hey, I'm leaving. I'm sorry. I'm really sorry, because this is part of this like, oh, you could be better. This is wrong.Something's wrong. And it's something that I still have to manage. Right. So I have to be really aware, it's shine my light of awareness. But in the past it was worst because I wouldn't even, I would be nitpicking at the women I was with verbally, but also be like, well, you know, with all these things, you're definitely not the right one for me to be [00:33:00] with, you know?De'Vannon: Okay. Okay. So that, that kind of echoes whether it echoes what we were talking about with like the hypnotherapy, because what you're saying is you were dealing with her on the surface off of a, an, an inner belief that you had or interferes that you had and stuff like that. I've had to do that to, you know, and, and, and dial it back.Which, which is something hard for somebody who's as extra as Maya this to do, but, but it can be done. It can be done. So hopefully y'all, David: and it helps the relationships as well. Right? De'Vannon: Yeah. And when you do a little less, you know, I used to be, you know, like super critical and stuff like that. And I, I believe that was me speaking forward, the voice of those who were, who have been critical of me in the past, my dad and in the military, the church, you know, and, you know, then I brought that into the relationships and now I'm like, okay, why, why am I doing this?And [00:34:00] so it's always beautiful when we have that moment, you know, like you and I have had where we begin to question why we're doing what we're doing while we're thinking the way we're thinking, where did this come from? And then taking ownership of ownership of it and changing it to.Let's let's have some fun. We're going to talk about some sexual things. Now I want to know what are the secrets for men lasting longer in bed? And you said in my, in my readings of you, that it's not about, um, where you sit on your podcast. I believe it's not about being a porn star and lasting for hours.It's about lasting as long as you want to. David: Yeah, yeah. Yeah. I think we we've watched all this porn, right. Ultimately porn has become. I'll say it's education, you know, rightly or wrongly porn has become our sex education, but that's our generation, right? Because our parents were too scared to talk about sex because they were [00:35:00] clueless to be honest.Right. And you know, the younger generation I'm seeing now, I've got the younger sisters about 10 years or so younger. And at least they have, um, there's a bit more in, in terms of like healthy, uh, sexual kind of education now. So for us there was porn. So we watched porn and most of the porn we watched was, you know, a few minutes long.They were like going as hard as they could for, you know, five minutes, three minutes. And if you're watching, you know, Petra, heteronormative, poor, like me, it's all about the penis in the vagina. The woman is like weathering and screaming all over the place, even though no one's touching the crit risks. No one's done any foreplay.That's right. And that, and that becomes a man's education for sex. You know, a lot of guys, they go into sex and it's like, okay, cool. I need to give this one the best two minutes of their life, you know? And it's not even two minutes of like, oh, not including the floor place. Like no, that's includes the four pay because that's all they've seen.Right. That's the only reality of what sex is. [00:36:00] So I work with guys and it's like, okay, cool. You want to have you, you want to last longer because every man, almost every man you meet is like, yeah, I wouldn't mind last a bit longer. So I usually start with, with the pace. The first thing we do is slow down, slow things down, because as much as we think we're really enjoying a few minutes of hard action, there's actually so much more enjoyment to being hard on.We can slow down. We have a whole body. The, as I say now, I learned from my tantric lenses. Our whole body is an instrument of pleasure. We have all these senses that we can use for erotic pleasure. If we choose to, you know, the taste, the smell, the sound, if we just spend the time to, to drop in, to relax, to breathe and to, to be present.Right? So the first thing is to slow down, like when we in, in the, in the accident as well, and also to build up slowly, it's really important to build up slowly, because if you build up slowly as, as men, our arousal can rise very quickly, right. We can go from [00:37:00] fucking zero to erection, to penetrating in, in a 30 seconds.So it really is. We talking, you know, one minute to 30 seconds, but for us, like for me, it was sleeping with women. Women can take anything from 20 minutes to an hour, really to be ready for sex. Right. So there's a huge mismatch there. Right? You've got one minute and ready. You've got like 20 minutes, half an hour, I'm ready.And it's like, how do we marry this up? Right. So. The thing I teach men is to slow down, slow down, be present, be really focused on the sensations of touch with the person you're with. Even if you're with someone and they're trying to speed things up, slow things down a little bit. There's no rush. We're all conditioned to going really quickly.It's like the rest of our lives. We just run around like mad people all the time. Why? Because we're conditioned to do that. We don't stop and think, wait a minute. Can I do all this shit slowly? Yeah, I could. And I was, I might enjoy it more, you know? So, so that's the kind of in, in play [00:38:00] insects way of, you know, uh, slowing things down as well as I'd add in breathing, deep breathing is a good one, breathing very deeply, you know?Cause it moves. It also moves the sexual energy, the S the sensations around the body. You feel more, not just in your cock, not just in your, in your groin. You start to feel the sensations in your feet and your toes and your hands up the back of your spine and so forth. But I also teach men that before they're even having sex, they can start to do.At home on their own, right? In terms of, you know, like mindful masturbation practice, like a self pleasure practice that includes meditation, maybe a few minutes of meditation, then it includes some, some Breathworks and deep breathing, you know, to relax the body. And then when you do get to put your hands on your cock, right, don't just put your hands there.You have a whole body, you can touch, you can start to learn about the different parts of your body that you enjoy being touched on. You know, for many men, my belief is 90% of men have no idea that they can enjoy any other sort of [00:39:00] touch other than on their Cox. They don't realize that maybe they really sensitive in loads and it feels amazing for them to be, to be stroked or even just slightly licked, you know, because you just have to find that, right.But lot body parts, you just have to find that just right. Type of touch. Right. And you have to, you have to spend some time to experiment, you know, because it might not be firm. It might be soft. It might be like, Featherlight, it might even just be some blowing, right. That feels amazing. And you have this whole body to, to kind of find that out about, and there's like, there's all these different parts.And so you'd have to spend time, but if we'd done this at this free cock centered sex, you'll never know you've missed out on this whole life of all these beautiful sensations. So I teach mentor to, you know, be with themselves, be more connected to their own body and what they enjoy, you know, relax, but also to use different strokes when they're alone, you know, not just the standard up and down with one hand, you know, you use two hands, use a, get a flashlight and use that as well.You know, like really experiment, really being [00:40:00] playful. Being the playfulness of yourself to learn, because this allows you to understand your arousal a bit more. And it also means that when you start getting very aroused, when you're alone, you can slow down and you start to understand your arousal rate as it rises so that when you do go into the bedroom with someone else, you can slow down.When you find yourself getting very aroused, because you want it to last longer. And it means then you just riding the waves, man, just riding these waves as they get a bit higher and then you can choose exactly when you want to. When you want to comment when you want actually, De'Vannon: oh, I think what you just invented, I would call, um, masturbation meditation.David: That's exactly how I describe De'Vannon: it. You should call it patent. Trademark gets that, that our circle thing on there, new masturbation meditation, founds, Fabiola.I mean, for the man out there. [00:41:00] All y'all got sensitive. Nicole's ears pretty much for the most part, if I haven't slept with a thousand men and I have at least y'all yeah. The deck for sure. But your ears and your know-hows trust me. Just let, let somebody touch them and see what happened. David: Yeah. So De'Vannon: does this get into the area of sexual performance anxiety or is that kind of like the same thing?David: No, no, there's a lot of, uh, you know, sexual performance. Anxiety is something that is, is huge for men around lasting long enough, right? There's a, this concern is fear about lasting long. I've been big enough having a nice enough body pleasing the partner, you know, all these things play on the mind of, of, of, you know, sex performance, anxiety, even for men in relationship.I know that some of my clients are like their anxieties around that they have a much lower sex drive than their partner. So their anxiety almost [00:42:00] is like, I'm going to come home. You're going to want sex. And if I don't want to, how am I going to deal with, how am I going to manage that? Right. So all these sorts of anxieties I've already.I do a lot of work for men about, you know, what's the anxiety, what is it? How can you work for it? How can you discuss it with your partner? Right. Where does it really come from? Is it a real anxiety, even, you know, is it a real fear and worry when it comes to sex? Like the one around often that comes from men is like, oh, I want to please, my partner, I've heard, she's been with other men, you know, we want to please her.And it's like, okay, how do you think you go about that? How do you think you'd go about pleasing your partner? And this is a beautiful question, right? Because the way men come at sex a lot, right. Especially heterosexual man is I am doing sex to someone I'm doing sex to a woman. I am doing it to her. It's like, um, it's a it's, it's not a co-creation right.It's not a, uh, something you're both doing [00:43:00] together De'Vannon: from, from the woman's perspective. Sorry to get you off. But, um, so when, whenever, whenever. What I'm going to illustrate what you're saying. So like when I've received the deck from men before, it's like, man, look, they would look at me like I'm going to be like a workbench or like some sort of project.Okay. So while he's up there thrusting, everything's like, he's studying my reaction, everything like that and see what he is doing to me and the effect that he's having on me. It's a project to be done. This is what he's talking about, about people of the audience. And that's what I wanted to say. Go ahead and continue that.David: Oh, that's beautiful customer. Yeah. Yeah. It's like, it's a it's it's do you know what it is? It's very much nail on hammer. The hammer. The nail is the passive object in it. I mean, actually it's not that way. Right? Because, so when I do say so how are you going to please this partner you're going to be with [00:44:00] this woman.They're like, oh, then I need to know. I need to know, you know, how to make her calm. Okay, cool. How are you going to know how to do that? But you don't need to watch a video. Okay. What would you going watch? Uh, you know, there's some stuff on YouTube or, you know, porn or whatever, or other porn sites, right.Tutorials. Okay, cool. And then when you've watched that, what are you gonna do? Okay. So when I'm with her, and then I want to start remembering the stuff I learned and then do that stuff to her. Cool. How'd, you know, she liked it. Um, uh, she'll come how'd, you know, when she comes and, and you know, a lot of us, we, all men are not really sure.Right. That I dunno. Cool. And we get to down this line of, you know, sometimes they add in some more techniques to learn and I go, what else could you do? Sometimes they're done founded and I'm like, so could you ask her what she likes? And then there's usually a silence. Which I [00:45:00] can't do that. How am I going to do that?Then? She'll know, I don't know what to do. Why would, you know what to do? This is a completely new human being, and this here is just a coaching conversation. I've had like 20, 30 times. Right. And they're like, I can do that. I can ask them like what they like. Yeah. And then what will they tell me if they know?Yeah. And then you can do those things, right? Yeah. And then you know that they enjoy that because they told you because they told you beforehand. Yeah. And isn't that a much better thing. And it opens up a lot more, but this is so radical. Right. Because there's this idea that we should all know exactly how to have sex really well with any different person that comes along.Right. Which is really, when you think about is ludicrous. And what it also does on the flip side is with this masculine doing too, it also means that a woman becomes, she doesn't have any responsibility. Right. Which isn't good, right. For her own pleasure because it's [00:46:00] like, oh, he does this to me. So if I have a shit time out, fuck is his fault.Cause he shouldn't bet. So it means that all the responsibility sits with the man about, you know, being right, being good. And the woman's left generally unhappy. Right? Let's be honest about it. Right? If you canvas women around the world about their sexual enjoyment with, with the men that we've. So what my thing is rebalancing is like saying to women, and I think there's a lot of female empowerment.There's a lot of beautiful female empowerment happening. And I love to see, you know, I try to even be part of it, right. Where I can is like speak up as a woman and say, this is what I want. This is what I need is what I desire as a man. Hear that and hear that as like a person that you're with a woman you love, who's loving you.Who wants you to feel pleasure and wants you to know what she enjoys to bake. You can enjoy it together. And it becomes a co-creation instead of the project being done to.De'Vannon: A co a co-creation a project working on [00:47:00] together. Sounds a lot better. It really, really does. And, um, but, but you in pun intended, hit the nail on the head when you were talking about when you were talking about men, not men, not feeling like they could just ask the simple question, communicating and stuff like that is the, if the episode or of any sort of connectiveness that anyone that any two or more people are going to have together.And it's really just that simple or. And, you know, you could just ask, you know, there's the, there's no need to make it a pop quiz or an exam. There's just, it's just simple girl. What do you like? And look, women are freaky as hell and not like she's some shy little school girl, just because she don't come out at him.Perverted, you know, society has taught her, you know, she's got to act like a lady and that's a whole other thing, but trust me, she know what to do with a Dick. Women love sucking them. [00:48:00] She can move them and love the male anatomy and, uh, but a lot, a lot, a lot, a lot of us, the girls are waiting on you to initiate a lot of stuff.But once you do that baby, well, then it's all good. You know,David: it's a question. Is it similar in the, in the Creek community? Is it there's there's men who are like, I do the De'Vannon: Dewey. And then what community, how did you refer to it? David: In the queer community? De'Vannon: Okay. Yeah, I thought she said, it's the term that I had been recognized. I was like, okay, this is a new thing from across the pond.Okay. So something in a gay world, if you are the penetrative one, the one who's sticking the Dick into the asshole or whatever hole you are choosing that particular day. Then we call you a top. If you are the one receiving the Dick and we call you a bottom, if you Afrique and you like at all, we call you versatile.And, um, [00:49:00] but yeah, it's very much, the dynamics are not the same. I'm glad you brought that up because that was going to be my next point, how these, these struggles are the same for gay men, straight men by men, men who prefer not to be labeled any kind of way, but at the end of the day, even in the gay world, I mean, I mean, I've had straight men by men, gay men and everything.It's the same across the board in terms of if they get stage fright, if they are feeling insecure and stuff like that, if they feel, you know, the whole, you know, men can get into their fields and it doesn't matter. And so everything that David has said, this applies to gay men, straight men. Then you have a lot of gay men who were super, super, super, super, super machismo that it doesn't matter.You know, he, he w he'll tell you that he's gay, but that doesn't, he doesn't view himself as a feminine or girly or anything at all. You know, it's all about, you know, and then they'll get into fights and everything [00:50:00] like that. Like, it doesn't matter. I'm not saying men are fighting us what they do, but that brings me to toxic masculinity.I want you to talk, talk to us about. What it is, you know, why it's a problem? Where does this toxic masculinity come from? My Naval guy who, who knows he's toxic has toxic masculinity. You know, like he knows it. He'll be like, yeah, I'll have toxic masculinity. Like, and you know, and then the conversation would go from there.And it, and it was because when I was a massage therapist, I was like, yeah, you should come get a massage. And Tommy was like, yeah, no only girls only girls get attached to me. And I was like, okay. You know, and that, you know, people don't want to have sex with you just so they give you a massage. Like it just, I'm sorry, it's not that serious.And he's like, you know, he was like, yeah, I know, I know. But I just have to talk to them as salinity. And you know, this is just how it is, you know, whateverfree from these expectations in this [00:51:00] toxic, I don't know. You talk, I don't know what to say by, David: so I think your friend there is a really good example actually, of where we talk about the self-mastery it's like he's identified, there's a problem right there. And he's identified that he actually, I don't know if it is a problem for him, that's, there's another, but he's not willing to look at the underlying thing.Like why is it that he's toxic and why does he hold these beliefs? And I guess also the question is is why is he not willing to give them up or try something different? Right. But that's a, that's a whole different conversation. So for me, the, the, the thing about toxic masculinity is that, and also the first thing that was spaced the word toxic masculinity and not synonymous of each other.Right. I think we've moved into a world where some people think that all masculinity is toxic and I really deeply disagree. And I could find so much evidence to only one who doesn't agree with that. So what we've, we've really got in this day and age, you've got the, the patriarchy, and I don't need to explain that to anybody.Right. Which you know, is [00:52:00] hurting black people is hurting white men as well is hurting everybody really. Right. But what it's saying is that it gives us these very small boxes that we have to live in. Like it's saying that. To be a masculine man. You can only be a certain way, right? Which is you need to be big.You need to be buff. You need to be straight. Uh, you need to want to have sex with women all the time. You need to probably, you know, earn good money, have a nice house, drive a fast car and all these things, right. And this box over here of what being masculine is, you know, think of, think of James Bond in the seventies.You know, that was for me is like not the pinnacle of masculinity, but he's very, he's very masculine manually. It doesn't show any emotion. That's something you can't do. If you're a masculine man, you can't show emotion. You can't care very much about anything. That's sweet. If you're a masculine man, you don't really care about anything.You know, you have to be quiet. Um, there's even an aggressive nature to being a real kind of masculine man. So all these things, if you put them all together, Right. There [00:53:00] are definitely part of masculinity. The problem that's really lacking when it used someone who is toxic exhibiting these toxic masculine traits is they lack, compassion and love right.For themselves. But it also have a people because if you have these masculine traits and you start to bring in compassion, right. And love the man who is saying, I can't have a massage from, from a guy when he brings love into that, he's like, oh, well, this actually would be really beautiful for me. Right.I'm going to, it's going to be nice and maybe. There's a bit of uncomfortability, but I can have compassion for my own uncomfortability and still do this thing. Right. And I think that's where we're really lacking is this love, this compassion, compassionate for each other. And we just talked through our world.You know, our capitalist world is just like, everything's about results. Everything's about money, you know, and we don't care about nurturing. We don't care about even creativity. You know, even something as simple as artistry is being decimated [00:54:00] really in our countries because Hey, if it doesn't make money, then it's worthless, you know, kind of thing.So, you know, all those things we would traditionally say are more feminine traits. And when I say masculine and feminine, I'm not saying these things are gendered. It's just the, you know, when we look at these things, you know, first of all, you look at some of the Eastern traditions, uh, like tantra for instance, is very much seen.You know, the feminine is the, what they often call Shakti's the energy of life. It is like full blooded flow and force. And the masculine is, is she, various consciousness is direction is, is boundaries is, is a container, right? And those two things together are, have amazing creative force, but on their own, they don't give you anything valuable.And I think this is a problem for a lot of men is they're just inhibiting all this masculine energy and they're not bringing in any of these, these more feminine traits that actually will help them grow as men, right. And grow and help us grow as a community, as a world to be more loving and kind and more [00:55:00] supportive to everybody and not just be so maybe self-centered and focused on results De'Vannon: and right in the thing is.You know, women, well, we're all lightened, our good and evil, masculine, and feminine everything everybody is. So that's a part of balance. And when we don't embrace it, then we get thrown out of balance. But see, even women like, like you were telling me before, expect certain preprogram masculine traits from men too, you know, I was one that way, you know, you know, especially coming from the south, you know, I was thinking men are supposed to act this way, you know?So if a guy did not act a certain way, I remember one time, this was really fucking, you know, tough to do, but like tattoos everywhere when I was like, you know, you know, on the streets. And they were like heavily involved in drugs and everything, you know, who was known, you know, having a big Dick and all of that, you know, you know, that type of guy [00:56:00] wanted like a grape soda or something one day.And I was thinking, you know, You know, you know, grape soda, you know, I was like, okay, that's kind of like girly compared to the sort of man that I'm looking at here standing before me, you know, but it wasn't right for me to put that, put that restriction on him. If he wants to pound some pussy and then go get a grape soda, then he could fucking pounds of pudding to get a very solid, it doesn't have to be or scotch or a bear or nothing like that.He don't have to go get high. And again, you know, he wants some, a Fresca, wherever the fuck makes Greg sodas, I don't drink soda, but you know that, you know what, that was his right. I shouldn't have done that to him. So what do I get that bullshit from in my mind? So that was me having some toxic bullshit going on about what he should be doing and rather than accepting him for what he was.And, um, so talk to us about how women can expect this too, from people and how this hurts women as well. David: Yeah, because we're all conditioned with the same [00:57:00] patriarchy, they're all conditioned with the same, uh, toss, toxic masculinity. So we've seen so much of this toxic mess and anything we've gone. Okay.This is how men should be. So then women are looking for a man, right. And they're like, they meet a man, maybe like me, for instance, who is, who would be like, you know, and I had this a lot when I was, um, in my twenties and even in my early thirties, it's like, women would be like, oh, you're quiet. You're quite girly.Really? Aren't, you're quite capped. I'd be like, yeah, I guess so. Yeah. I wear a color and I dance. I love to dance. I dance at my home on my own and I'll do all sorts of weird and wonderful things. And they'd be like, oh, that's quite girly. And I'd be like, yeah. And you see there, you're hearing in there, they have associated something like dancing in a man of something that's girly or wearing color.Like, you know, the shirt you have on right now. I'm like, that's a fucking awesome shirt. I'll be wearing that shirt if I was out, you know? So it's like, women would be like, oh, [00:58:00] that's a bit, you know? Okay. Are you, I used to get asked a lot. Are you gay? And I'm like, no, no, I'm not gay. And they'd be like, oh, I'm really sorry if I offended you.I'm like, no, no, no, no, that's fine. I understand why you said that to me. It's not offensive to me. That's what you're thinking. It's not about me. And this is the thing is that when we learn these, we conditioned into this toxic masculine way. And then we project it onto everybody and expect them to be this way.And then the worst thing is, is that. If we have this idea that men see difference, the woman has it. Oh, all men, you know, they sleep around, right. That's how they are because they are men, which is a toxic trait to say a woman sleep around. So then they meet a man and they're dating, or they get married to have babies.And they're like, oh, you know, all man, they sleep. My husband, you know, he's sleeping off a women. That's just how men are. And that's where she has taken on this toxicity that she's learned. She has kind of, um, embedded that into her belief system. And then she allows that to happen a life when really being a man and sleeping around they're, they're two different things.They don't have to go together. Or [00:59:00] even we get to worst things around things like physical abuse. You know, this idea that old men are aggressive, that good men are aggressive. So if you meet a man who's not aggressive, you're like, well, ah, he's not a real man. But you see another man over there who's like fucking frame glass or when at the, at the floor, because he's, you know, he spilled a little bit of his drink or something.You're like, oh, well that's a real man. That's where we, we kind of embed this toxic ideas into us. And then it hurts us as well, because this is the way the perverse way of the toxic masculinity is it also helps the men who are toxic because it's it strangles them into who they're allowed to be. You know, I have a friend of mine.Um, he is, I'd say it's pretty masculine guys tool. His bald is pretty bulky guy. And he did a lot of, uh, was it like street dancing? They do, it's a street dancing classes. Right. And he didn't tell anyone. He went to the street dancing classes because he was afraid that men would, would judge him would make fun of him.Right. And that fee could, there [01:00:00] is what toxic masculinity does. It stops. It stops us from expressing ourselves in the way that we'd really like to, because we fear the judgment of others. So we've in the adjustment of us. De'Vannon: Right. And when you're running around, like that expecting things from people that you shouldn't or expect things from yourself that you shouldn't, then you were out of balance and you won't be able to, to give love because you're not loving yourself.Right. And we can't give away what we don't have. David: Yeah. Yeah. De'Vannon: So then, um, I'm going to let you go ahead and have the last word and, uh, tell the listeners out there, your great wisdom and everything. I've so enjoyed our time today. So go ahead on and preach your gospel. David: What's there for me now.I think the thing that comes up for me is around how we deal with our emotions. I think. [01:01:00] This is a big part of the work I do, especially with men is that there's this idea that emotions are useless, and this is also a part of the kind of toxic masculinity, right? So we should, we should always do everything with the brain, but brain is superior to emotions and we should ignore them and we should, you know, get on with other things we're doing.And the truth is, is like our emotions are very valuable because they give us an understanding of, of our past as well, even because those emotions, some conflicts come from dysfunction. Beliefs and dysfunctional ideas we have, but

Aging with Altitude
#17 Aging with Altitude: PEARLS of Colorado

Aging with Altitude

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 22:09


PEARLS is the Program Encouraging Active Rewarding Lives for Seniors and is run by Cynthia Margiotta.  Cynthia has a Bachelors in Social Work and a solid history of supporting older adults in the Pikes Peak region.  From her work teaching direct care staff best practices to her volunteering with the Alzheimer's Association and the Family Caregiver program with the Pikes Peak Area Agency on Aging, Cynthia has the best background to support older adults who are struggling with anxiety and mental health needs.  The PEARLS program is a unique in-home 19 week program focusing on goal setting and much more.  PEARLS of Colorado Aging with Altitude is recorded in the Pikes Peak region with a focus on topics of aging interest across the country.  We talk about both the everyday and novel needs and approaches to age with altitude whether you're in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida or Leadville, Colorado.  The Pikes Peak Area Agency on Aging is the producer.  Learn more at Pikes Peak Area Agency on Aging.   Transcript: You're listening to studio 809. This is what community sounds like.   Melissa Marts: Hi, welcome to all. This is the Pikes Peak Area Agency on Aging's Aging with Altitude podcast hosted at studio 809 podcast. We provide answers, assistance, and advocacy for people over 60 and their caregivers. Thank you for joining us today. I am Melissa Marts, program administrator with the Pikes Peak Area Agency on Aging. Our topic today is about behavioral health, but let's just call it kind of anxiety and frustrations that our older adults, some of our best friends, go through and are suffering with and some ideas about how to help them. And to talk about this today we have Cynthia Margiotta with us. Cynthia is typically our podcast host so you'll recognize her voice from other podcasts, but today she is our special guest. Last year during COVID, Cynthia launched the PEARLS Program of Colorado, a unique behavioral health program here in El Paso County with goals to spread it around Colorado, but she started it here in our region. Cynthia is also a strong advocate for older adults, and she's supported the aging community for years with her All About Dignity courses, her volunteering with the family caregiver support program at the Pikes Peak Area Agency on Aging, and many other programs. Then also today we have a special masters of ceremony, Ms. Jenny Nihill, who is a military fellow, and she is currently doing this with the Pikes Peak Area Agency on Aging, so thank you Jenny for joining us. Thank you for your over 20 years of military service and jumping in today as the emcee with Cynthia. I'm going to turn it over to Jenny.   Jenny Nihill: Alright, thanks Melissa for the introduction. I'm happy to be here learning and working with Melissa and the Area Agency on Aging. Now I'd like to introduce Cynthia and learn more about the PEARLS Program of Colorado, so let's get started. Can you tell us what is the PEARLS Program of Colorado and who is eligible to use the program?   Cynthia Margiotta: PEARLS Program of Colorado, we just call it PEARLS for short, but PEARLS program of Colorado is a program that is specifically set up to help seniors in our community. We work with the folks 60 plus population. It is an evidence-based program that I took many classes for in order to hold that program here.   Melissa Marts: Cynthia, what does PEARLS stand for?   Cynthia Margiotta: PEARLS stands for Program Encouraging Active Rewarding Lives for Seniors. Melissa Marts: Thanks. It's funny how we get so used to just saying PEARLS and then we forget to actually, to call out those really special words that PEARLS means.   Cynthia Margiotta: Yeah, it's a great one. I wish I had thought of it.   Jenny Nihill: So before we came here today I did go looking on the website so I could learn a little bit more about the organization. It did mention that there were coaches. Can you tell us about the coaches, who they are, what kind of training they might have gone through?   Cynthia Margiotta: I am the only coach in El Paso County, so I travel all over El Paso County from top to bottom, to left to right, but the training. Oh my. So the training I took for this particular program is out of Washington State University. About a year and a half ago now wasn't it. Then there were some other programs that I also took on my own to make it even more valuable like actually what to do when a person has a seizure. There's a difference if they have a seizure and they're known seizure victims or unknown. Different classes like that through the past year and I am currently in a class where I am becoming a PEARLS master trainer.   Jenny Nihill: That sounds good. Can you tell us what the stool concept of PEARLS is?   Cynthia Margiotta: The stools concept. You're very smart. Yes, the stools concept is a great part of the PEARLS program. The way we think of it is a three-legged stool and each leg holds up the person. So those three legs are one leg is the socially active. We encourage people to be socially active, whatever that means to them, and another one is to be physically active. Being physically active actually reduces depression and anxiety so that's important as well, and then also to be like planning an activity of interest. And I don't mean planning to go to Mexico in three years, but maybe going to have supper with a friend next week. So those three legs, and then it's held up by the floor, and the floor is actually in our program, the psychologist and the nurse practitioner so they in a sense they supervise me and help me to understand the medications people are on and what might be a better approach with any particular person. There is really a team of us that do that.   Jenny Nihill: Great. So when participants are enrolled in your program, can you tell me what they can expect to get out of the program?   Cynthia Margiotta: A great deal of joy. That is what I hear from people. Yesterday I took on a new client who was suffering with pretty high depression. She's just getting through the denial stage that people have of her husband's dementia where, I don't know. I don't understand fully why, but it's very common for people to say “oh mom you're going crazy, dad's fine,” “Why is she crazy and he's not having problems?” It's very common and so when I went to visit with her, I spent about an hour explaining a little bit about his disease, his kind of dementia to him. I'm also a longtime volunteer with the Alzheimer's Association so having that knowledge has helped being able to explain that particular dementia. Helping her understand the difference between what she felt. She believes that she's guilty for his dementia and explaining the difference between guilt and regret. I think when we were done a few hours later she was so much happier. She's OK, that's not her fault. That she's not going crazy. And I liked seeing that in people. I like helping people. This is what really enthralled me about the program. Moving people toward more joy. Just because you're over 60 doesn't mean you have to sit on the couch all day.   Melissa Marts: And Cynthia, as you bring up that story and talk about that personal experience that you had with this woman. I think we haven't talked about it yet, where does PEARLS happen? When you are meeting with these folks, where are you actually meeting with them?   Jenny Nihill: Yeah, especially during COVID now because we are still doing a lot of social distancing, with the elderly being a vulnerable population.   Cynthia Margiotta: They are. Oh yes. I do offer to meet with them over the phone if they would prefer. My preference is to go to their home and be there for them. I see and experience things that you wouldn't if you meet in the office. I love to always talk about experiences without names. There is one client I have worked with where she was going blind and deaf at the same time, and her husband. Let me explain how it is. She would sit in the chair and had one chair facing her to talk to her. Her husband would sit in a couch behind her. And I would not have known that if I had not gone to that home. What I suggested to her husband is, go to one of the ARC Thrift Shops and buy a chair so that you have a chair where you can sit where she can hear you when you're talking to her. That's important in a relationship, but if they had met me in an office, I would have never known that.   Jenny Nihill: Right, so when you go meet them, how long are you there for? And how long does this program last? Is it a few sessions, is it just continuous as needed?   Cynthia Margiotta: Actually, the visits are rather long because I try to talk to them about what's on their mind, what are their needs. It's not where I set up a goal for them. They tell me what they need help with. Those depend on you know, a little goal of like figuring out how to I don't know, toast. Using the toaster is easy you know. Where figuring out the difference between depression and anxiety's a little bit more time consuming. And so they tend to vary in time and length per session, usually somewhere around an hour and a half, and then the period in months we started out with this weekly. Then we go every other week or so. Then about once a month, and then about a phone call every now and again kind of thing. And so slowly over a period of many, many, many months we see them and talk to them less frequently.   Melissa Marts: And can I jump in again?   Cynthia Margiotta: Yeah. Oh please.   Melissa Marts: I'm just kind of curious how you see PEARLS being different than kind of a psychotherapy appointment and how, how is this a different approach for older adults? And along with that maybe answering the question of how it's paid for too?   Cynthia Margiotta: People here don't know, but my husband is a psychologist and so I, and I had nothing wrong with psychology. What I see is a psychologist is there to hear and listen and reflect back. My job is to discuss with them, and to find what it is that they want to work on and help them, so we start from today. What's going on today. And how can we change those problems into goals and meet those goals? Our funding comes through the Old Age Act, which is part of the Area Agency on Aging, and so we do have a grant through them and we are so appreciative because I love being able to go to people's homes and say I'm not gonna charge you for these services. So I can see people who have like no money, or have nothing to spend. And yes, we do take donations don't get me wrong, but you know. It's nice to be able to see somebody who says “I, I don't have money to pay you.” It means a lot to me.   Melissa Marts: I know, and I'm glad that we have that opportunity to do that because oftentimes with counseling people have to somehow come up with money to pay for a counselor, and this is a resource that people can access for free. But again, Cynthia's point about taking donations, you know the funds are limited. It's not an unlimited budget, and so for people who can pay it forward when they have appointments with Cynthia and be able to you know, make a donation so that the program can go a little bit further maybe for the next person and other folks down the line is, is really appreciated of course.   Cynthia Margiotta: Absolutely. I so appreciate that and send thank you notes to folks in hopes that they will keep us in mind in their future.   Melissa Marts: Great.   Jenny Nihill: You mentioned earlier that PEARLS here in Colorado Springs is under a larger program of PEARLS. What level is that at, and then where did you see the need arise in El Paso County to start the PEARLS program here?   Cynthia Margiotta: Where did I see the need? You got three days to talk? No, there are so many folks that believe that once you're about 60 or so, you should be happy with what I call “glued to the couch.” Where there's no life. There's no interests. That you look out the window and wish, and you can't do things. I'll use myself as an example. I do suffer with depression. And there are times, my friends all know that I'm a “plantaholic,” if you've ever heard of one of those. I am a plantaholic. I love plants. I've got more than a hundred at home, in the house. Some are taller than I am. That's crazy, but I bring that up because there are days I know I need to water my plants. I have a few that say, “water me now or I'm going to die tomorrow.”   Jenny Nihill: Those are the ones at my house.   Cynthia Margiotta: Yes, bring them over. I'll babysit. But in any case, there are times when I can look right at that plant and I can't get off the couch.  I cannot get off the couch to go water them and that's depression. And that's a lot of the folks we work with that can't get off the couch. I see my job as, what gives me more joy than anything is when I see them get up off that couch, when want to go do things. When they talk to me and they say I wanna go to the senior center.  I want to go volunteer at Area Agency. I want to do things. That gives me a lot of joy.   Melissa Marts: And I'll add a little bit to how the need kind of came to be in our region around behavioral health. You know we, a couple of years ago realized that there were lots of conversations happening at the governmental level around behavioral health and suicide, but no one was talking about it from an older adult perspective. Even our county health plan didn't have a chapter to address older adults and behavioral health. It was really focused completely on people who were under the age of 60, and of course especially adolescents, which we know there was a significant need in that area, but yet we also discovered there is a significant need for older adults, and that the suicide rate for older adults is considerably high.  It might not be a blatant overdose or a blatant suicide, but what it is it's an accidental overdose of medications that people, as Cynthia refers to sitting on the couch and depressed, and they decide to take their own life with the medications that they have. The reality was we have many folks in our area that are alone, isolated, sad, depressed, anxious. We have two programs in our area that were able to provide behavioral health at the time when Cynthia started PEARLS, and they had waitlists. And so people couldn't even get help if they wanted it. And many folks were not comfortable calling Aspen Point at the time. Now it's called Diversus, but Aspen Pointe is kind of the emergency call for behavioral health relief and people didn't want to call that. Especially older adults who are just sitting on the couch and feel like “well my life is over anyway and why should I call and ask for help.” At the Area Agency on Aging, we really wanted to see an additional resource around behavioral health and in the two years that we've been working on this we have seen exponential growth in funding, resources, support, conversations around the needs of older adults who would like to get extra support to feel better about their lives. PEARLS is a nice addition to a more clinical model approach. This is a home-based, much more personal and as Cynthia says, just really getting down and talking about goals. What do you want to do and how can we get there? It's a great addition to our community.   Cynthia Margiotta: Pre covid statistically the population of folks over 60 who were depressed, it was somewhere around 20%. And that's people who acknowledged it. Most folks we find who are depressed say this is just the way it has to be so they don't acknowledge it. We find a lot of them instead of saying they're depressed they say, “we're anxious.” The medication that people take for depression is the same medication they take for anxiety. So even then sometimes doctors don't even mention to them “well I think you're depressed. Here's something for your anxiety.” And again, grin and bear it. It's that population, grin and bear it.   Jenny Nihill: PEARLS sounds like a great program with lots of benefits for our senior population. How can they reach out to you to participate in this program?   Cynthia Margiotta: They can reach out to me, or the family can reach out to me by calling very easily. They can call my phone number. My phone number is 719-459-2017. They can look on the internet. Our website is PEARLSprogram.net. And they can call Area Agency on Aging, talk to people there and say, “hey I need to get a hold of the people at PEARLS.” Family, they can tell family and have family call me. I do prefer to call them because folks who are depressed tend to not get off the couch.   Melissa Marts: So, Cynthia, again, thanks for sharing about how people can get in touch with the PEARLS program. That's good information to know. Is there anything that we didn't ask you? Maybe another story you want to share or something else that we forgot to ask.   Cynthia Margiotta: Well, thank you for asking. I want to thank you Melissa. You're the one who introduced me to PEARLS. When you first told me about it, it was like love at first sight. I'd been doing something very similar to this for many, many years where going to people's homes and visiting with them and trying to encourage them. And to have a formal program that really helps me to do what I see as a better job has been wonderful and I hope that we can spread the PEARLS program throughout Colorado and get more of the Area Agencies on Aging to be involved with PEARLS. And I'll do everything I can to help them do that.   Melissa Marts: Well, I know you will and I appreciate you saying thanks to me. You know the funny story is is that when I was looking for more behavioral health resources in the community and I heard about PEARLS and I knew that Cynthia had a bachelor's in social work and I knew the work that you had been doing, and in my mind, I was kind of hoping that maybe she would be interested. When we did talk about it, I was just kind of throwing it out there, hoping. So yes, you did jump in with both feet and I'm glad that you did. So thank you for that because it is a needed resource when people, again, I can't emphasize enough how unique the model is to be kind of more on a personal level even during COVID right now. That can be a challenge, but that more personal touch where you do go into people's homes and you can kind of see what's going on and be in the real space with them is a good addition to the resources that are here already, and one that we really needed. So any other pieces before we turn this back over to Jenny and alright?   Cynthia Margiotta: I'll probably think of something tomorrow morning at 2 a.m.   Melissa Marts: That's right.   Jenny Nihill: Well, I'd like to thank you for joining us today on Aging With Altitude, a Studio 809 podcast. Aging With Altitude is hosted by the Pikes Peak Area Agency on Aging. For more information on all things aging, we can be found online at www.ppacg.org or by phone at 719-471-2096.