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Northern point where the Earth's axis of rotation intersects its surface

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Best podcasts about North Pole

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Latest podcast episodes about North Pole

Curiously Polar
141 Polar Newsreel (WALRUS FROM SPACE!)

Curiously Polar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 66:52


The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discov

The Astro Ben Podcast
Dr Beth Healey: Doctor, Explorer and (possible) future astronaut

The Astro Ben Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 33:41


Dr Beth Healey is an Emergency Medicine doctor who has worked for several years in the NHS and oversea's. As part of medical and logistical support teams she has worked in a number of extreme and remote environments including Svalbard, Siberia, Greenland and the North Pole. As research MD for the European Space Agency she overwintered in Antarctica at spaceflight analogue 'Concordia', otherwise know as 'White Mars'. There, she researched the effects of isolation and extreme environment on the physiology and psychology of the crew. 00:20 introduction to episode 23: Dr Beth Healey. 01:14 Welcoming Bath   01:42 Where has Beth been the past week? Spoiler alert - astronaut application. 03:30 Beths thoughts on civilian space flight 07:40 Beths career to date 11:22 What is extreme environment physiology 13:33 Ben brings up Covid - but in a relevant way.   14:40 Beths experience on Concordia in Antarctica. 16:40 similarities between Concordia and long space missions. 18:12 Effect on mental health during long isolation missions. 23:40 Artemis Generation 25:00 Being part of the journey! 28:15 Ben mentions ‘first man', but means "Ad Astra". 28:40 Private space companies. Collaborating or competing? 29:45 Beths Hobbies 31:51 Wrap Up Social Media Website: https://www.northbanktalent.com/clients/science-psychology/dr-beth-healey/ Twitter/Instagram: @bethahealey Stay connected with us! Use #Astroben across various social media platforms to engage with us! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/astrobenpodcast/ Website (coming soon): www.astroben.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/gambleonit?lang=en Please subscribe and rate - Ad Astra!  

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Hour 4 - Jason Is Broken

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 17:21


We discuss how much of a beast Jason's dog Bogey is becoming, why Jason's broken brain is going to result in him getting abs, and another round of Are You Smarter Than Jason Dick. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Curiously Polar
140 Polar Explorers, pt. 3: The Real Most Interesting Man In The World

Curiously Polar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 80:24


The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discov

The Conversation
Sisters of skydiving

The Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 27:36


What does it feel like to fall through the sky? Two women who have broken barriers and mastered the art of skydiving from India and the United States tell Kim Chakanetsa the answer. The very first time Rachel Thomas flew in an aeroplane, she jumped out of it at 4,500 feet. Fast forward to 2002 and she became the first Indian woman to skydive and set foot on the North Pole. In her 25-year career she has completed 650 skydives in 11 countries, has been a judge at skydiving competitions and has received many awards including the Padma Shri, India's fourth highest civilian award. Danielle Williams is an African American disabled skydiver who is an advocate for greater diversity in outdoor adventure sports. She graduated from Harvard in 2008 and spent a decade in the U.S. Army. She has completed over 600 jumps, and in 2014 co-founded Team Blackstar Skydivers. This team, originally made up of six African Americans who linked up in a "black star" formation skydive, has now grown to a diverse group of over 330 skydivers in six countries. She is also the Founder and Senior Editor of Melanin Base Camp, an outdoor blog promoting diversity. Produced by Emily Naylor and Alice Gioia. IMAGES: (L) Rachel Thomas, courtesy of Rachel Thomas (R) Danielle Williams, credit Ro Asgari

Binge-Watchers Podcast
Horror Movies To Watch: Horror Movie Double Feature. The Thing From Another World 1951. The Thing 1982.

Binge-Watchers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 35:20


Horror Movies To Watch: Horror Movie Double Feature. The Thing From Another World 1951. The Thing 1982Let's Talk A Couple Of Popular Horror Movie Franchises And My Definition Of Their Original Continuity. Mini-discussion of the continuity issues and road map to watch A Nightmare On Elm Street and Halloween movies. Star Trek alum William Shatner is making his way to space, and at 90 years old, he will set the record for the oldest person to do so.On Monday, Jeff Bezos' aerospace company Blue Origin announced the Emmy Award-winning actor will travel on the New Shepard rocket for the NS-18 mission.Here is what Shatner had to say: "I've heard about space for a long time now, I'm taking the opportunity to see it for myself. What a miracle."More than a fad, K dramas, especially the dark and twisted ones like Netflix's Squid Game are here to stay as a phenomenon. If you guys haven't seen this it reminds me a little like that movie Battle Royale, but this is not students, it is lower class citizens set up in a rigged game and competing for money. But the whole world and young people seem fascinated by it.Venom 2, which is actually called Venom: Let There Be Carnage, is crushing the box office with 90 M so far. I am hearing mixed things about the plot and quality of the monster fights but it is Venom. I am sure if you liked Part 1, you will like this one. My major issue is with the CGI of the Symbiotes. They all look and act the same like they just went into After Effects, Motion or PhotoShop and changed the color hue and that's it. Funny too because they have Andy Serkis who is like the best motion capture director too. Anyway, I am about to drop a potential spoiler or maybe just a cheeky rumor but viewers have gone online and said Venom gets blasted into the MCU by some energy burst at the end of the movie and he arrives when the news breaks that Peter Parker is Spider-Man, which happens during the Spider-Man movie Far From Home.Which horror movie original and its remake are we talking about tonight? Tonight's movies are THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD followed by THE THING.THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD 1951 -When scientist Dr. Carrington  reports a UFO near his North Pole research base, the Air Force sends in a team under Capt. Patrick Hendry to investigate. What they find is a wrecked spaceship and a humanoid creature (James Arness) frozen in the ice. They bring their discovery back to the base, but Carrington and Hendry disagree over what to do with it. Meanwhile, the creature is accidentally thawed and begins wreaking havoc.THE THING - In remote Antarctica, a group of American research scientists are disturbed at their base camp by a helicopter shooting at a sled dog. When they take in the dog, it brutally attacks both human beings and canines in the camp and they discover that the beast can assume the shape of its victims. A resourceful helicopter pilot (Kurt Russell) and the camp doctor (Richard Dysart) lead the camp crew in a desperate, gory battle against the vicious creature before it picks them all off, one by one.Nick likes the jump scare in the 1951 original, David liked the scientists trying to reason with the Thing to comical effect, and John liked the ambiguous ending of the 1982 version.Dave also recommends Midnight Mass on Netflix.Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/bingewatcherspodcast)

Binge-Watchers Podcast
Horror Movies To Watch: Horror Movie Double Feature. The Thing From Another World 1951. The Thing 1982.

Binge-Watchers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 35:21


Horror Movies To Watch: Horror Movie Double Feature. The Thing From Another World 1951. The Thing 1982Let's Talk A Couple Of Popular Horror Movie Franchises And My Definition Of Their Original Continuity. Mini-discussion of the continuity issues and road map to watch A Nightmare On Elm Street and Halloween movies. Star Trek alum William Shatner is making his way to space, and at 90 years old, he will set the record for the oldest person to do so.On Monday, Jeff Bezos' aerospace company Blue Origin announced the Emmy Award-winning actor will travel on the New Shepard rocket for the NS-18 mission.Here is what Shatner had to say: "I've heard about space for a long time now, I'm taking the opportunity to see it for myself. What a miracle."More than a fad, K dramas, especially the dark and twisted ones like Netflix's Squid Game are here to stay as a phenomenon. If you guys haven't seen this it reminds me a little like that movie Battle Royale, but this is not students, it is lower class citizens set up in a rigged game and competing for money. But the whole world and young people seem fascinated by it.Venom 2, which is actually called Venom: Let There Be Carnage, is crushing the box office with 90 M so far. I am hearing mixed things about the plot and quality of the monster fights but it is Venom. I am sure if you liked Part 1, you will like this one. My major issue is with the CGI of the Symbiotes. They all look and act the same like they just went into After Effects, Motion or PhotoShop and changed the color hue and that's it. Funny too because they have Andy Serkis who is like the best motion capture director too. Anyway, I am about to drop a potential spoiler or maybe just a cheeky rumor but viewers have gone online and said Venom gets blasted into the MCU by some energy burst at the end of the movie and he arrives when the news breaks that Peter Parker is Spider-Man, which happens during the Spider-Man movie Far From Home.Which horror movie original and its remake are we talking about tonight? Tonight's movies are THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD followed by THE THING.THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD 1951 -When scientist Dr. Carrington  reports a UFO near his North Pole research base, the Air Force sends in a team under Capt. Patrick Hendry to investigate. What they find is a wrecked spaceship and a humanoid creature (James Arness) frozen in the ice. They bring their discovery back to the base, but Carrington and Hendry disagree over what to do with it. Meanwhile, the creature is accidentally thawed and begins wreaking havoc.THE THING - In remote Antarctica, a group of American research scientists are disturbed at their base camp by a helicopter shooting at a sled dog. When they take in the dog, it brutally attacks both human beings and canines in the camp and they discover that the beast can assume the shape of its victims. A resourceful helicopter pilot (Kurt Russell) and the camp doctor (Richard Dysart) lead the camp crew in a desperate, gory battle against the vicious creature before it picks them all off, one by one.Nick likes the jump scare in the 1951 original, David liked the scientists trying to reason with the Thing to comical effect, and John liked the ambiguous ending of the 1982 version.Dave also recommends Midnight Mass on Netflix. 

Sharon Says So
38. On an Arctic Island with Cecilia Blomdahl

Sharon Says So

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 37:29


Have you ever wondered what it's like to live in the North Pole? In this episode, Sharon gets the inside scoop on Arctic living from photographer and TikTok sensation Cecilia Blomdahl. Cecilia lives in the northernmost town in the world on the Arctic island of Svalbard. Though not exactly the North Pole, Cecilia sees her fair share of polar bears and reindeer. As well, she spends two months of the winter in complete darkness and two months of the summer in 24-hours of sunlight. From living in a cabin with no running water to whale watching from her front porch, Cecilia's life is anything but ordinary. Join Sharon and Cecilia as they talk about Cecilia's grand adventures in Svalbard. For more information on this episode including all resources and links discussed go to https://www.sharonmcmahon.com/podcast

Something You Should Know
How to Project Confidence and Competence & Answers to Fascinating Questions

Something You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 46:34


Can you actually get sick from being sad? Can prolonged sadness shorten your lifespan? A lot of people think so. This episode begins by looking at the scientific link between sadness and health. http://www.ox.ac.uk/news/2015-12-08-happiness-and-unhappiness-have-no-direct-effect-mortality It would be great if people noticed how competent you are on their own. But that rarely happens. If you want to be seen as confident and competent you have to project that image out to the world. Listen as I speak with Jack Nasher, a consultant and negotiation trainer is author of the book Convinced: How to Prove Your Competence and Win People Over (https://amzn.to/2BqWojk). Jack explains what it takes to really get people (including your boss) to see just how great you are and how well you do your job. What time is it at the North Pole? Why does a whip crack? Why do people stick out their tongue when they are concentrating on a task? These are just some of the interesting questions I tackle with science writer Ivan Semeniuk. Ivan along with New Scientist magazine, published a book called Why Don't Penguins Feet Freeze? (https://amzn.to/2R6JMHV) ( and yes we answer that one too.) which explores some of these fascinating questions you've always wondered about. Some foods we call “comfort” foods. Why? It turns out your favorite comfort food has more to do with who cooked it for you and where you were when you first ate it than it does with the food itself. Listen as I explain. https://www.journals.elsevier.com/appetite/media-coverage/we-love-comfort-food-because-we-love-the-cook PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS! Listen to Build For Tomorrow with Jason Feifer, our favorite new podcast, right here! https://apple.co/3rPM8La or visit https://www.jasonfeifer.com/build-for-tomorrow Go to https://backcountry.com/sysk to get 15% OFF your first full-priced purchase. Firstleaf – the wine club designed with you in mind! Join today and you'll get 6 bottles of wine for $29.95 and free shipping! Just go to https://tryfirstleaf.com/SOMETHING Discover matches all the cash back you earn on your credit card at the end of your first year automatically and is accepted at 99% of places in the U.S. that take credit cards! Learn more at https://discover.com/yes Omaha Steaks is the best! Get awesome pricing at https://OmahaSteaks.com/BMT T-Mobile for Business the leader in 5G, #1 in customer satisfaction, and a partner who includes benefits like 5G in every plan. Visit https://T-Mobile.com/business For more information on fire safety products, safety tips and educational activities you can do at home with your family visit https://firstalert.com/firepreventionmonth   Download the five star-rated puzzle game Best Fiends FREE today on the Apple App Store or Google Play! https://bestfiends.com https://www.geico.com Bundle your policies and save! It's Geico easy! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Founder's Therapy
Episode 22: Rugby was Life

Founder's Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 52:07


You have it all, until you don't. For Ollie Phillips, playing professional rugby in a rugby crazed nation, was euphoria. He was at the top and had it all. He was in top fitness shape, at the height of his professional career and captaining the England National 7's team. It wasn't until after Ollie retired from rugby that he realized he was fighting a long and arduous battle with depression and was in need of discovering his true identity and self-love. In addition to being a world class professional rugby player in both the UK and France, he has climbed Mt. Everest, Mt. Kilimanjaro, sailed around the world, was the first to play rugby at the North Pole, and so many other adventures. In this episode, Ollie Phillips joins us in the therapy chair from London to tell us how he managed his bout with depression and how he continues to thrive in his current leadership roles.

Curiously Polar
139 From Earth to Space and Back Again

Curiously Polar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 45:30


The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discov

North Pole Podcast
Frenzied Response to New North Pole Podcast

North Pole Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 10:01


The latest episode of the North Pole Podcast has only been online for about 12 hours or so. But the response to it has been robust - even "frenzied" as Elf Hugo in the North Pole Post Office put it. "We are getting busier but this is way early for this kind of mail," said Hugo, postmaster at the North Pole. "I listened to the episode and I did not hear anything shocking or surprising in it. But you never know what is going to get people going." The episode addresses one of the most common questions we receive here at the North Pole: "How does Santa get around the world in one night?" Elves Frank Myrrh and Crash Murphy of North Pole Radio News take on the topic. You can hear the podcast at this link. Elf Crash Murphy says his email has "gone crazy" today. "I normally don't get a ton of email on a Sunday but today is off the chart for any day of the week. I would say close to 40,000 messages have come in." What are they talking about? "Well, I guess I said something about people who don't believe in Santa and what I think should happen to them on Christmas morning or something," Elf Crash said. "I didn't think it was all that unusual of a question, honestly, but when Frank asked me about them I just said what I thought. I guess a few of them got mad or something. But I have to ask this now - if they don't believe in Santa Claus, why would they care what I said?" We do not know it is because of this latest episode of the North Pole Podcast or not, but registrations for Tracker Elves at SantaTrackers.net are exploding today as well.

North Pole Podcast
Around the World in One Night

North Pole Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 10:01


Elves Frank and Crash take on the difficult question of how Santa gets Around the World in One Night. It is one of the most common questions we get here at the North Pole. Truth be told, Santa does not really get around the world in one night - it's more like two days. The world has so many time zones that people just think he does it in one night. We track him from the North Pole every year and the truth is that he is in flight for over 32 to sometimes 48 hours every Christmas. But of course, Santa delivers in every time zone while people are asleep. As he moves from time zone to time zone he stays in the window the whole way - which takes much more than just one night. It just seems like one night because most people only think of their own time zone, not the time zones of others. In fact, in this episode Elf Crash tells of a time when he was in school and an inspired teacher tried to get his class to answer the question using math and science. Crash explains why that is not necessary. This is a good episode, one that not only answers the question but also an episode that shows how tired elves can get sometimes by just answering this question. Enjoy!

This Week in Travel
Hjörtur Smárason - Greenland and the Future

This Week in Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 65:25


Hjörtur Smárason is the CEO of Visit Greenland. He is a contributor to the new book, Aftershocks and Opportunities 2: Navigating the Next Horizon.   Hjörtur Smárason talks about how Greenland tourism was affected by Covid. No tourism for a year and a half. No cruise ships have been allowed in the country, and that eliminated half the tourism. They will be allowed to resume next year. He continues to tell us about the expected infrastructure growth over the coming 3-4 years and destination differences between North Greenland and South Greenland. Next, we talked about the future of tourism post-Covid and sustainability. He sees an increased demand for rural travel and experiencing peacefulness. We got off on an enthusiastic tangent about the intersection of new tech and travel and the quality of the tourist vs. the number of tourists. Greenland is for adventure travelers. Some of the activities are seeing the "Titanic killers" - sizable icebergs, dogsledding, photo tours, hiking, cross country skiing, standing on the snow that touches the North Pole, seeing the Milky Way, Northern Lights. We conclude with a peek into the future of travel and the fascinating chapters of his new thought-provoking book available on Amazon.   Travel tips of the week: Gary – USB-C charger  Jen – "Hey, Disney" with Walt Disney World voice assistant on the Amazon Echo   Hjörtur – Dogsledding in Greenland with the locals, Inuit hunter. Enjoy the Northern Lights above you.  

Indagare Global Conversations
Alison Levine, Leadership expert, polar explorer and mountaineer: Climb Every Mountain

Indagare Global Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 49:12


How do you work through your greatest fears so you can make it to the top of the mountain (and not let your failures define you)?  Melissa Biggs Bradley talks with mountaineer Alison Levine about the incredible places she's been, completing the adventurer's grand slam: climbing the seven summits and skiing to both the North and South Poles; plus, life lessons learned along the way—and why going backward doesn't mean you're not making progress.

The Retrospectors
On This Day: Let's Get Metric

The Retrospectors

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 10:08


Feet, inches, palms, cubits, rods… all were SWEPT ASIDE on 28th September, 1889, when the first General Conference of the Weights and Measures Commission met in Sèvres, France to refine a definition for the NEW universal measurement of distance: the metre.The calculation was painstakingly made by measuring a quarter of the meridian of the Earth - running from the North Pole to the Equator - and then dividing it into 10 million parts. Metal bars measuring exactly one metre were then distributed to attendees of the Conference. In this episode Arion, Rebecca and Olly consider whether this scientific method of calculating distance was *really* any better than barleycorns and man-size hugs; ask why the USA still hasn't got on-board with the metric system; and explain why Napoleon might not have been as short as we think he was… Further Reading:• ‘Galileo, Krypton, and How the Metric Standard Came to Be' (WIRED, 2018): https://www.wired.com/story/book-excerpt-the-perfectionists-history-meter/• ‘How France created the metric system' (BBC Travel, 2018): https://www.bbc.com/travel/article/20180923-how-france-created-the-metric-system• ‘Who Invented the Meter?' (It's Okay To Be Smart, 2017):https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3eHHwcMVcAFor bonus material and to support the show, visit Patreon.com/RetrospectorsWe'll be back tomorrow! Follow us wherever you get your podcasts: podfollow.com/RetrospectorsThe Retrospectors are Olly Mann, Rebecca Messina & Arion McNicoll, with Matt Hill.Theme Music: Pass The Peas. Announcer: Bob Ravelli. Graphic Design: Terry Saunders. Edit Producer: Emma Corsham.Copyright: Rethink Audio / Olly Mann 2021. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Superman Podcast – Laser and Sword Media
EP0347: The Space Shell, Part Seven

Superman Podcast – Laser and Sword Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 16:13


The Nazis discover Jimmy and his alien friend at the North Pole. Original Air Date: February 20, 1945

The John Batchelor Show
1718: Mark Piesing, #UNBOUND, the complete, forty-minute interview, Arctic exploration; August 28, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 41:00


Photo:  MARIA, PASSING THE DIAMONDS Image extracted from page 25 of  A Narrative of the Cruise of the Yacht Maria among the Feroe Islands in the Summer of 1854  N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia,  by Mark Piesing.  PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting, true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527

The John Batchelor Show
1716: Mark Piesing, #UNBOUND, the complete, forty-minute interview, Arctic exploration; August 28, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 41:00


Photo:  Polar bears on the sea ice of the Arctic Ocean, near the North Pole. USS Honolulu pictured.  Photo by Chief Yeoman Alphonso Braggs, US-Navy. N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia,  by Mark Piesing.  PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting, true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527  

Testing Normal
#113 - Transitory Inflation

Testing Normal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021


Inflation is a real threat, a tax on the poor, and is likely here to stay for awhile at higher than normal levels. Also, we have a serial pooper on the loose that needs to be discussed as well as other subjects that tie to the economic decline of our world and nation. We do end the show more light-hearted as per usual.If you like the music check out the artist here: theearthonfireIntro song links: Spotify Apple MusicPlease subscribe to us on YouTube and Rumble to watch videos after they are published.Follow us on Instagram for random funny picsFollow us on Facebook to get notified of LIVE! episode recordings and to join the chat!Links discussed in episode:Facebook Says Its Rules Apply to All. Company Documents Reveal a Secret Elite That's Exempt.NEW - Facebook shields millions of "VIP users" from the company's standard content moderation practices in a program called "XCheck," according to internal documents obtained by the WSJ.JUST IN - NY Federal Reserve now sees inflation at 5.2% in one year, 4% in three years; a series high with "large expected price rises" in food, rent, and medical costs.'He's just a little boy': Mom cries as teens, 13 and 14, arrested for plotting Columbine-style school attackthe cheat is on - CA recallThis is even more humiliating than him getting booed at the WTC memorialMajor Supermarket Chain Warns Inflation Is About to Impact More AmericansAkron man whose photograph caught serial pooper suspect: 'You messed with the wrong guy' (video)Firm raises $15m to bring back woolly mammoth from extinctionOregon taxpayers could see record $1.9 billion ‘kicker' refund next year1 million Afghan children are at risk of starvation, UNICEF director warnsTIL:TIL there's a mineral element (Promethium) so rare that it's estimated there are 500-600 grams of it in the Earth's crust (one of only two elements followed by a stable element)TIL that due to the fact that they spend the majority of their lives on sea ice, polar bears are classified as marine mammals, like dolphins, seals, and whales.TIL that the ice at the North Pole is only about 2-3 meters (6-10 feet) thick, while the Arctic Ocean is more than 4,000 meters (~2.5 miles) deep at the Pole.TIL - From DadTIL The US convened a Coin Task Force to address a shortage in coinage. They determined there isn't a shortage per se, instead too much of the $48.5 billion in US are not in circulation.Shower Thoughts:The scariest thing to see when camping alone at night isn't a bear, it's a humanExpiration dates are spoiler alertsThe reason no season 6 of Black Mirror released is because we are season 6.Ravioli is the original Hot pocketIronically having and raising a child is the one subject that isn't taught to us but would greatly benefit us as a species to learn how to do it properlyRetirement facility on the moon and Mars would be great for elderly mobility issues If every insect on the planet decided to work together to kill all humans, we would probably loseThere is an air marshal, fire marshal, and field marshal, but no water marshal

Midnight Train Podcast
Hollow Earth Shenanigans

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 109:16


Hollow Earth Theory   Well hello there passengers, and welcome to yet another exciting day aboard the MidnightTrain. Today we delve deep into the mysterious, creepy, possibly conspiratorial world that is our own. What do I mean by that? Well we are digging our way to the center of truth! Today, we learn about Hollow Earth… and for the flat earthers out there… you're gonna wanna hang out for a minute before you dip outta here… also fuck you.   (Cinematic trailer voice) In a World where there exists people who think the world is a flat piece of paper with trees growing out of it and a big guy who flips the piece of paper over to switch between day and night. One man wants to change that idea. His name… is Edmund Halley. Yes that Halley. The one known for the comet he discovered. But before we explore more about him and his findings, let's discuss what led us to this revolutionary hypothesis.   So besides idiots who believe the earth is flat, I mean stupid-endous personalities, there are other more interesting characters that believe the earth is completely hollow; or at least a large part of it. This is what we call the Hollow Earth Theory. Now where did this all come from? Well, nobody cares, Moody. That's the show folks!   Ok, ok, ok… fine. Since the early times many cultures, religions, and folklore believed that there was something below our feet. Whether it's the lovely and tropical Christian Hell, the Jungle-esque Greek Underworld, the balmy Nordic Svartálfaheim, or the temperate Jewish Sheol; there is a name for one simple idea. These cultures believed it to be where we either come from or where we go when we die. This may hold some truth, or not. Guess we will know more when the time comes.   The idea of a subterranean realm is also mentioned in Tibetan Buddhist belief. According to one story from Tibetan Buddhist tradition, there is an ancient city called Shamballa which is located inside the Earth. According to the Ancient Greeks, there were caverns under the surface which were entrances leading to the underworld, some of which were the caverns at Tainaron in Lakonia, at Troezen in Argolis, at Ephya in Thesprotia, at Herakleia in Pontos, and in Ermioni. In Thracian and Dacian legends, it is said that there are caverns occupied by an ancient god called Zalmoxis. In Mesopotamian religion there is a story of a man who, after traveling through the darkness of a tunnel in the mountain of "Mashu", entered a subterranean garden. Sounds lovely.  In Celtic mythology there is a legend of a cave called "Cruachan", also known as "Ireland's gate to Hell", a mythical and ancient cave from which according to legend strange creatures would emerge and be seen on the surface of the Earth.​​ They are said to be bald, taller than most with blue eyes and a big, bushy beard… fucking Moody. There are also stories of medieval knights and saints who went on pilgrimages to a cave located in Station Island, County Donegal in Ireland, where they made journeys inside the Earth into a place of purgatory. You guys know purgatory, that place or state of suffering inhabited by the souls of sinners who are shedding their sins before going to heaven. In County Down, Northern Ireland there is a myth which says tunnels lead to the land of the subterranean Tuatha Dé Danann, who are supposedly a group of people who are believed to have introduced Druidism to Ireland, and then they said fuck it and went back underground. In Hindu mythology, the underworld is referred to as Patala. In the Bengali version of the Hindu epic Ramayana, it has been depicted how Rama and Lakshmana were taken by the king of the underworld Ahiravan, brother of the demon king Ravana. Later on they were rescued by Hanuman. Got all that? The Angami Naga tribes of India claim that their ancestors emerged in ancient times from a subterranean land inside the Earth. The Taino from Cuba believe their ancestors emerged in ancient times from two caves in a mountain underground. Natives of the Trobriand Islands believe that their ancestors had come from a subterranean land through a cavern hole called "Obukula". Mexican folklore also tells of a cave in a mountain five miles south of Ojinaga, and that Mexico is possessed by devilish creatures who came from inside the Earth. Maybe THAT'S where the Chupacabra came from! In the middle ages, an ancient German myth held that some mountains located between Eisenach and Gotha hold a portal to the inner Earth. A Russian legend says the Samoyeds, an ancient Siberian tribe, traveled to a cavern city to live inside the Earth. Luckily, they had plenty of space rope to make it back out.  The Italian writer Dante describes a hollow earth in his well-known 14th-century work Inferno, in which the fall of Lucifer from heaven caused an enormous funnel to appear in a previously solid and spherical earth, as well as an enormous mountain opposite it, "Purgatory". There's that place, again. In Native American mythology, they believed that the ancestors of the Mandan people in ancient times emerged from a subterranean land through a cave at the north side of the Missouri River. There is also a tale about a tunnel in the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona near Cedar Creek which is said to lead inside the Earth to a land inhabited by a mysterious tribe. It is also the belief of the tribes of the Iroquois that their ancient ancestors emerged from a subterranean world inside the Earth. The elders of the Hopi people believe that a Sipapu entrance in the Grand Canyon exists which leads to the underworld. Brazilian Indians, who live alongside the Parima River in Brazil, claim that their forefathers emerged in ancient times from an underground land, and that many of their ancestors still remained inside the Earth. Ancestors of the Inca supposedly came from caves which are located east of Cuzco, Peru. So, this is something that has been floating around a shit ton of ancient mythos for a long ass time. Well, ya know… before that silly thing called SCIENCE. Moving on. Now to circle back to our friend Edmund. He was born in 1656, in Haggerston in Middlesex (not to be confused with uppersex or its ill-informed cousin the powerbottomsex). He was an English astronomer, geophysicist, mathematician, meteorologist, and physicist; because what else was there to do in the 1600's but be a know-it-all? He was known to work with Sir Isaac Newton among other notable (but not gonna note them here) proponents to science.  In 1692 he proffered the idea that the earth was indeed hollow and had a shell about 500 miles thick with two inner concentric (having a common center, as circles or spheres… hear that flat earthers??) shells and an inner core. He proposed that the atmospheres separated the shells and that they also had their own magnetic poles and that the shells moved at different speeds. This idea was used to elucidate(shed light upon… yes pun intended) anomalous(ih-nom-uh-luhs) compass readings. He conceptualized that the inner region had its own atmosphere and possibly luminous with plausible inhabitants. MOLE PEOPLE!! He also thought that escaping gases from the inner earth caused what is now known as the Northern Lights.   Now another early ambassador to this idea was Le Clerc Milfort. Jean-Antoine Le Clerc, or known by a simpler name, Louis Milfort. Monsieur Milfort was a higher ranking French military officer who offered his services during the late 1700's. He is most notably known for leading Creek Indian warriors during the American Revolutionary War as allies of the British. I guess having a common enemy here would make sense as to why he chose this group to lead. He emigrated in 1775 to what was then known as the British Colonies of North America. But we all know there is nothing Bri'ish about us.    Now why would a higher ranking French military Officer want to emigrate from his home to a place of turmoil? Great question Moody! I knew you were paying attention. Well, a little about this French saboteur.   He was known by many aliases, but we will just stick with Louis (Louie) for all intents and purposes. Louis was born in Thin-le-Moutier, near Mezieres, France. He served in the French Military from 1764 to 1774. Now this is according to his memoir that was dated in 1802. He left France after he ended up killing a servant of the king's household in a duel. Apparently, the king's servant loved the king. So much so that when Louis read aloud a poem that he had written that included the king, the servant jumped up, tore off his glove and slapped Louis across the face not once, but 4 fucking times! This is obviously something that Louis could not just let happen, so he challenged the servant to a duel. Not just any duel, mind you. He challenged him to a duel of what was then known as a “mort de coupes de papier.” The servant died an excruciating death and Louis fled. Here is the poem that started the feud.  There's a place in France Where the naked ladies dance There's a hole in the wall Where the men can see it all But the men don't care Cause they lost their underwear And the cops never shoot Cause they think it's kind of cute There a place in France Where the alligators dance If you give them a glance They could bite you in the pants There's a place on Mars Where the ladies smoke cigars Every puff she makes Is enough to kill the snakes When the snakes all die They put diamonds in their eye When the diamonds break The dancing makes them ache When the diamonds shine They really look so fine The king and the queen Have a rubber ding-a-ling All the girls in France Have ants in their pants Yes, this is 100% bullshit… but, you'll have that shit stuck in your head for days. Now as much as we tried to find ACTUAL information as to why there was duel and why it was with a servant of the king, we couldn't find much. But after digging up some more information on Louis we found out that he ended up going back to France to be a part of the Sacred Society of Sophisians.    This group is also known as the secret society of Napoleon's Sorcerers… This may have to be a bonus episode so stay tuned for more!   Now back to the “Core” of our episode. The Creek Indians who are originally from the Muscogee [məskóɡəlɡi](Thank wikipedia) area which is southeast united states which roughly translates to the areas around Tennessee, Alabama, western Georgia and Northern Florida. Louis adapted their customs and assimilated into their Tribe.  He even married the sister of the Chief.   Now after Louis and the rest of the people in the American Revolutionary War lost to the U.S. he decided to lead the Creek Tribe on an expedition in 1781 because, well, they had nothing else to do. On this expedition they were searching for caverns where allegedly the Creek Indians ancestors had emerged from. Maybe even the Origin of Bigfoot.   Yes, the Creek Indians had believed that their ancestors lived below the earth and lived in caverns along the Red River junction of the Mississippi River. Now during the expedition they did come across these caverns which they suspected could hold 20,000 of their family in. That's pretty much all they found. They didn't have video cameras back then otherwise, I'm pretty sure they would have found footage of bigfoot though.   Another advocate was Leonhard Euler, yes, you heard right. Buehler… Buehler… No Leonard Euler. A great 18th century mathematician; or not so great if you didn't enjoy math in school unlike moody who was the biggest nerd when it came to math.    Euler founded the study of graph theory and topology. No moody, not on-top-ology. Mind always in the gutter. Euler influenced many other discoveries such as analytic number theory, complex analysis, and the coolest subject ever; Infinitesimal Calculus. Which is Latin for BULLSHIT.   But anyways I digress. This guy knew his stuff BUT he did think with all his “infinite” wisdom that the earth was in fact hollow and had no inner shells but instead had a six hundred mile diameter sun in the center. The most intriguing and plausible theory he had within this whole idea was that you could enter into this interior from the northern and southern poles. Let's hold to that cool hypothesis for right now and move along with our next Interesting goon of the hollow earth community.   With Halley's spheres and Eulers's Holes came another great man with another great theory. Captain John Symmes! Yes you know Captain Symmes. HE was a hero in the war of 1812 after being sent with his Regiment to Canada and providing relief to American forces at the battle of Lundy's Lane. He was well known as a trader and lecturer after he left the army.    In 1818 Symmes announced his theory on Hollow Earth to the World! With his publication of his Circular No. 1.   “I declare the earth is hollow, and habitable within; containing a number of solid concentric spheres, one within the other, and that it is open at the poles 12 or 16 degrees; I pledge my life in support of this truth, and am ready to explore the hollow, if the world will support and aid me in the undertaking.”— John Cleves Symmes Jr., Symmes' Circular No. 1  While there were few people who would consider Symmes as the “Newton of the West”, most of the world was less than impressed. Although his theory wasn't as popular as one would expect, you gotta admire the confidence he had.   Symmes sent this declaration at a rather hefty cost to himself to “each notable foreign government, reigning prince, legislature, city, college, and philosophical societies, throughout the union, and to individual members of our National Legislature, as far as the five hundred copies would go.”15]   Symmes would then be followed by an exorbitant amount of ridicule for his proclamation, as many intellectuals were back then. This ridicule would later influence a rather bold move, Cotton. We'll touch on this later.    What was so special about his theory that got 98% of the world not on the edge of their seats? Well, to start he believed the Earth had five concentric spheres with where we live to be the largest  of the spheres. He also believed that the crust was 1000 miles thick with an arctic opening about 4000 miles wide and an antarctic opening around 6000 miles wide. He argued that because of the centrifugal force of the Earth's rotation that the poles would be flattened which would cause such a gradual gradation that you would travel into the Hollow Earth without even knowing you even did it.   Eventually he refined his theory because of such ridicule and criticism. Now his theory consists of just a single hollow sphere instead of five concentric spheres. So, now that we know all about symmes and his theory, why don't we talk about what he decided to do with his theory?    What do you think, Moody? You think he created a cult so he could be ostracized? Or do you think he gave up and realized he was silly? Hate to be the bearer of bad news here but he decided to take his theory and convince the U.S. congress to fund and organize an expedition to the south pole to enter the inner earth.    Good news and bad news folks. Good news, congress back then actually had some people with heads on their shoulders as opposed to those today and they said fuck that noise and denied funding for his expedition. Hamilton, Ohio even has a monument to him and his ideas. Fuckin' Ohio. Next up on our list of “what the fuck were they thinking?” We have Jeremiah Reynolds. He also delivered lectures on the "Hollow Earth" and argued for an expedition. I guess back in those days people just up and went to the far reaches of the earth just to prove a point. Reynolds said “look what I can do” and went on an expedition to Antarctica himself but missed joining the Great U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838–1842, even though that venture was a result of his craziness, I MEAN “INTEREST”. He gained support from marine and scientific societies and, in 1828, successfully lobbied the House of Representatives to pass a resolution asking then-President John Quincy Adams to deploy a research vessel to the Pacific. The president, for his part, had first mentioned Reynolds in his November 4, 1826, diary entry, writing: “Mr Reynolds is a man who has been lecturing about the Country, in support of Captain John Cleves Symmes's theory that the Earth is a hollow Sphere, open at the Poles— His Lectures are said to have been well attended, and much approved as exhibitions of genius and of Science— But the Theory itself has been so much ridiculed, and is in truth so visionary, that Reynolds has now varied his purpose to the proposition of fitting out a voyage of circumnavigation to the Southern Ocean— He has obtained numerous signatures in Baltimore to a Memorial to Congress for this object, which he says will otherwise be very powerfully supported— It will however have no support in Congress. That day will come, but not yet nor in my time. May it be my fortune, and my praise to accelerate its approach.”  Adams' words proved prophetic. Though his administration opted to fund Reynolds' expedition, the voyage was waylaid by the 1828 presidential election, which found Adams roundly defeated by Andrew Jackson. The newly elected president canceled the expedition, leaving Reynolds to fund his trip through other sources. (The privately supported venture set sail in 1829 but ended in disaster, with the crew mutinying and leaving Reynolds' ass on shore.) Per Boston 1775, the U.S. Exploring Expedition only received the green light under the country's eighth president, Martin Van Buren. As Howard Dorre explains on his Plodding Through the Presidents blog, multiple media outlets (including Smithsonian, in an earlier version of this article) erroneously interpreted Adams' description of Reynolds' ideas as “visionary” as a sign of his support for the hollow earth theory. In fact, notes Bell in a separate Boston 1775 blog post, the term's connotations at the time were largely negative. In the words of 18th-century English writer Samuel Johnson, a visionary was “one whose imagination is disturbed.” The president, adds Dorre, only agreed to support the polar expedition “after Reynolds abandoned the hollow earth idea.”  I had always heard that he was a believer in mole people and hollow earth, turns out his words were just misinterpreted. Hmm… I wonder if there are any other books out there where the overall ideas and verbage could and have been misinterpreted causing insane amounts of disingenuous beliefs? Nah!   Though Symmes himself never wrote a book about his ideas, several authors published works discussing his ideas. McBride wrote Symmes' Theory of Concentric Spheres in 1826. It appears that Reynolds has an article that appeared as a separate booklet in 1827: Remarks of Symmes' Theory Which Appeared in the American Quarterly Review. In 1868, a professor W.F. Lyons published The Hollow Globe which put forth a Symmes-like Hollow Earth hypothesis, but failed to mention Symmes himself. Because fuck that guy, right? Symmes's son Americus then published The Symmes' Theory of Concentric Spheres in 1878 to set the record straight. I think the duel would have been a better idea. Sir John Leslie proposed a hollow Earth in his 1829 Elements of Natural Philosophy (pp. 449–53). In 1864, in Journey to the Center of the Earth, Jules Verne described a hollow Earth containing two rotating binary stars, named Pluto and Proserpine. Ok… fiction. We get it. William Fairfield Warren, in his book Paradise Found–The Cradle of the Human Race at the North Pole, (1885) presented his belief that humanity originated on a continent in the Arctic called Hyperborea. This influenced some early Hollow Earth proponents. According to Marshall Gardner, both the Eskimo and Mongolian peoples had come from the interior of the Earth through an entrance at the North Pole. I wonder if they knew that.    NEQUA or The Problem of the Ages, first serialized in a newspaper printed in Topeka, Kansas in 1900 and considered an early feminist utopian novel, mentions John Cleves Symmes' theory to explain its setting in a hollow Earth. An early 20th-century proponent of hollow Earth, William Reed, wrote Phantom of the Poles in 1906. He supported the idea of a hollow Earth, but without interior shells or inner sun. Ok, no sun. Got it. The spiritualist writer Walburga, Lady Paget in her book Colloquies with an unseen friend (1907) was an early writer to mention the hollow Earth hypothesis. She claimed that cities exist beneath a desert, which is where the people of Atlantis moved. Mmmk. Deserts and Atlantis. Check. She said an entrance to the subterranean kingdom will be discovered in the 21st century. Pretty broad brush she's painting with there. Next up we're gonna talk a little about Admiral Richard E. Byrd. According to Hollow Earth theorists, Byrd met an ancient race underground in the South Pole. According to Byrd's “diary,” the government ordered Byrd to remain silent for what he witnessed during his Arctic assignment:              March 11, 1947 “I have just attended a Staff Meeting at the Pentagon. I have stated fully my discovery and the message from the Master. All is duly recorded. The President has been advised. I am now detained for several hours (six hours, thirty- nine minutes, to be exact.) I am interviewed intently by Top Security Forces and a Medical Team. It was an ordeal!!!! I am placed under strict control via the National Security provisions of this United States of America. I am ORDERED TO REMAIN SILENT IN REGARD TO ALL THAT I HAVE LEARNED, ON THE BEHALF OF HUMANITY!!! Incredible! I am reminded that I am a Military Man and I must obey orders.” After many polar accomplishments, Byrd organized Operation Highjump in 1947. The objective: construct an American training and research facility in the South Pole. Highjump was a significant illustration of the state of the world and the cold war thinking at the time. The nuclear age had just begun, and the real fears were that the Soviet Union would attack the United States over the North Pole. The Navy had done a training exercise there in the summer of 1946 and felt it needed to do more. The northern winter was coming, and Highjump was a quickly planned exercise to move the whole thing to the South Pole. Politically, the orders were that the Navy should do all it could to establish a basis for a [land] claim in Antarctica. That was classified at the time.Now Operation High jump could probably be its own episode, or is at minimum a bonus. But we'll get some of the important details on how it pertains to this episode. Some say the American government sent their troops to the South Pole for any evidence of the rumored German Base 211. Nazis were fascinated with anything regarding the Aryan race. They traveled all over the world including Antarctica to learn more of alleged origins. The Germans did make their mark in the South Pole. However, what they have discovered doesn't compared to what Byrd recorded in his diary. the time. The nuclear age had just begun, and the real fears were that the Soviet Union would attack the United States over the North Pole. The Navy had done a training exerci but was that all it was   “For thousands of years, people all over the world have written legends about Agartha (sometimes called Agarta or Agarthi), the underground city. Agartha (sometimes Agartta, Agharti, Agarath, Agarta or Agarttha) is a legendary kingdom that is said to be located in the Earth's core. Agartha is frequently associated or confused with Shambhala which figures prominently in Vajrayana Buddhism and Tibetan Kalachakra teachings and revived in the West by Madame Blavatsky and the Theosophical Society. Theosophists in particular regard Agarthi as a vast complex of caves underneath Tibet inhabited by demi-gods, called asuras. Helena and Nicholas Roerich, whose teachings closely parallel theosophy, see Shambhala's existence as both spiritual and physical. Did Byrd find it? He claims to have met “The Master,” the city's leader, who told him of his concerns about the surface world: “Our interest rightly begins just after your Race exploded the first atomic bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. It was that alarming time we sent our flying machines, the ‘Flugelrads' to your surface world to investigate what your Race had done…You see, we have never interfered before in your Race's wars and barbarity. But now we must, for you have learned to tamper with a certain power that is not for your Man, mainly that of atomic energy. Our emissaries have already delivered messages to the power of your World, and yet they do not heed.” Apparently, the government knew about Agartha before Byrd. Marshall Gardner wrote A Journey to the Earth's Interior in 1913 and published an expanded edition in 1920. He placed an interior sun in the Earth (ah ha! The Sun's back!) and built a working model of the Hollow Earth which he actually fucking patented (U.S. Patent 1,096,102). Gardner made no mention of Reed, but did criticize Symmes for his ideas. DUEL TIME! Around the same time, Vladimir Obruchev wrote a novel titled Plutonia, in which the Hollow Earth possessed an inner Sun and was inhabited by prehistoric species. The interior was connected with the surface by an opening in the Arctic. The explorer Ferdynand Ossendowski wrote a book in 1922 titled Beasts, Men and Gods. Ossendowski said he was told about a subterranean kingdom that exists inside the Earth. It was known to Buddhists as Agharti. George Papashvily in his Anything Can Happen (1940) claimed the discovery in the Caucasus mountains of a cavern containing human skeletons "with heads as big as bushel baskets" and an ancient tunnel leading to the center of the Earth. One man entered the tunnel and never returned. This dude was a sniper with the Imperial Russian Army during World War I Moody is going to love these next examples.  Novelist Lobsang Rampa in his book The Cave of the Ancients said an underground chamber system exists beneath the Himalayas of Tibet, filled with ancient machinery, records and treasure. Michael Grumley, a cryptozoologist, has linked Bigfoot and other hominid cryptids to ancient tunnel systems underground. According to the ancient astronaut writer Peter Kolosimo a robot was seen entering a tunnel below a monastery in Mongolia. Kolosimo also claimed a light was seen from underground in Azerbaijan. Kolosimo and other ancient astronaut writers such as Robert Charroux linked these activities to DUN DUN DUNNNN….UFOs. A book by a "Dr. Raymond Bernard" which appeared in 1964, The Hollow Earth, exemplifies the idea of UFOs coming from inside the Earth, and adds the idea that the Ring Nebula proves the existence of hollow worlds, as well as speculation on the fate of Atlantis and the origin of flying saucers. An article by Martin Gardner revealed that Walter Siegmeister used the pseudonym "Bernard", but not until the 1989 publishing of Walter Kafton-Minkel's Subterranean Worlds: 100,000 Years of Dragons, Dwarfs, the Dead, Lost Races & UFOs from Inside the Earth did the full story of Bernard/Siegmeister become well-known. Holy fucking book title, Batman!   The science fiction pulp magazine Amazing Stories promoted one such idea from 1945 to 1949 as "The Shaver Mystery". The magazine's editor, Ray Palmer, ran a series of stories by Richard Sharpe Shaver, claiming that a superior pre-historic race had built a honeycomb of caves in the Earth, and that their degenerate descendants, known as "Dero", live there TO THIS DAY, using the fantastic machines abandoned by the ancient races to torment those of us living on the surface. As one characteristic of this torment, Shaver described "voices" that purportedly came from no explainable source. Thousands of readers wrote to affirm that they, too, had heard the fiendish voices from inside the Earth. The writer David Hatcher Childress authored Lost Continents and the Hollow Earth(1998) in which he reprinted the stories of Palmer and defended the Hollow Earth idea based on alleged (cough… “alleged”) tunnel systems beneath South America and Central Asia. Hollow Earth proponents have claimed a number of different locations for the entrances which lead inside the Earth. Other than the North and South poles, entrances in locations which have been cited include: Paris in France, Staffordshire in England, Montreal in Canada, Hangchow in China, and The Amazon Rain Forest.   Ok, have you two gents heard of the Concave Hollow Earth Theory? It doesn't matter, we're still going to talk about this lunacy. Instead of saying that humans live on the outside surface of a hollow planet—sometimes called a "convex" Hollow Earth hypothesis—some whackamuffins have claimed humans live on the inside surface of a hollow spherical world, so that our universe itself lies in that world's interior. This has been called the "concave" Hollow Earth hypothesis or skycentrism. Cyrus Teed, a doctor from upstate New York, proposed such a concave Hollow Earth in 1869, calling his scheme "Cellular Cosmogony". He might as well have called it Goobery Kabooblenuts. See, I can make up words, too. Anyway, Teed founded a group called the Koreshan Unity based on this notion, which he called Koreshanity. Which sounds like insanity and would make far more sense. The main colony survives as a preserved Florida state historic site, at Estero, Florida, but all of Teed's followers have now died. Probably from eating Tide Pods. Teed's followers claimed to have experimentally verified the concavity of the Earth's curvature, through surveys of the Florida coastline making use of "rectilineator" equipment. Which sounds like something you use to clean out your colon.   Several 20th-century German writers, including Peter Bender, Johannes Lang, Karl Neupert, and Fritz Braut, published works advocating the Hollow Earth hypothesis, or Hohlweltlehre. It has even been reported, although apparently without historical documentation, that Adolf Hitler was influenced by concave Hollow Earth ideas and sent an expedition in an unsuccessful attempt to spy on the British fleet by pointing infrared cameras up at the sky. Oh boy. The Egyptian mathematician Mostafa “Admiral Akbar” Abdelkader wrote several scholarly papers working out a detailed mapping of the Concave Earth model In one chapter of his book On the Wild Side (1992), Martin Gardner discusses the Hollow Earth model articulated by Abdelkader. According to Gardner, this hypothesis posits that light rays travel in circular paths, and slow as they approach the center of the spherical star-filled cavern. No energy can reach the center of the cavern, which corresponds to no point a finite distance away from Earth in the widely accepted scientific cosmology. A drill, Gardner says, would lengthen as it traveled away from the cavern and eventually pass through the "point at infinity" corresponding to the center of the Earth in the widely accepted scientific cosmology. Supposedly no experiment can distinguish between the two cosmologies. Christ, my head hurts. Gardner notes that "most mathematicians believe that an inside-out universe, with properly adjusted physical laws, is empirically irrefutable". Gardner rejects the concave Hollow Earth hypothesis on the basis of Occam's razor. Occam's razor is the problem-solving principle that "entities should not be multiplied beyond necessity", sometimes inaccurately paraphrased as "the simplest explanation is usually the best one." Purportedly verifiable hypotheses of a Concave Hollow Earth need to be distinguished from a thought experiment which defines a coordinate transformation such that the interior of the Earth becomes "exterior" and the exterior becomes "interior". (For example, in spherical coordinates, let radius r go to R2/r where R is the Earth's radius; see inversive geometry.) The transformation entails corresponding changes to the forms of physical laws. This is not a hypothesis but an illustration of the fact that any description of the physical world can be equivalently expressed in more than one way.   Contrary evidence   Seismic The picture of the structure of the Earth that has been arrived at through the study of seismic waves[52] is quite different from a fully hollow Earth. The time it takes for seismic waves to travel through and around the Earth directly contradicts a fully hollow sphere. The evidence indicates the Earth is mostly filled with solid rock (mantle and crust), liquid nickel-iron alloy (outer core), and solid nickel-iron (inner core).[53]   Gravity Main articles: Schiehallion experiment and Cavendish experiment Another set of scientific arguments against a Hollow Earth or any hollow planet comes from gravity. Massive objects tend to clump together gravitationally, creating non-hollow spherical objects such as stars and planets. The solid spheroid is the best way in which to minimize the gravitational potential energy of a rotating physical object; having hollowness is unfavorable in the energetic sense. In addition, ordinary matter is not strong enough to support a hollow shape of planetary size against the force of gravity; a planet-sized hollow shell with the known, observed thickness of the Earth's crust would not be able to achieve hydrostatic equilibrium with its own mass and would collapse.   Based upon the size of the Earth and the force of gravity on its surface, the average density of the planet Earth is 5.515 g/cm3, and typical densities of surface rocks are only half that (about 2.75 g/cm3). If any significant portion of the Earth were hollow, the average density would be much lower than that of surface rocks. The only way for Earth to have the force of gravity that it does is for much more dense material to make up a large part of the interior. Nickel-iron alloy under the conditions expected in a non-hollow Earth would have densities ranging from about 10 to 13 g/cm3, which brings the average density of Earth to its observed value.   Direct observation Drilling holes does not provide direct evidence against the hypothesis. The deepest hole drilled to date is the Kola Superdeep Borehole,[54] with a true vertical drill-depth of more than 7.5 miles (12 kilometers). However, the distance to the center of the Earth is nearly 4,000 miles (6,400 kilometers). Oil wells with longer depths are not vertical wells; the total depths quoted are measured depth (MD) or equivalently, along-hole depth (AHD) as these wells are deviated to horizontal. Their true vertical depth (TVD) is typically less than 2.5 miles (4 kilometers).   Ok, then let's discuss what actual scientists, like ALL OF THEM, believe the earth is actually composed of. The inner core This solid metal ball has a radius of 1,220 kilometers (758 miles), or about three-quarters that of the moon. It's located some 6,400 to 5,180 kilometers (4,000 to 3,220 miles) beneath Earth's surface. Extremely dense, it's made mostly of iron and nickel. The inner core spins a bit faster than the rest of the planet. It's also intensely hot: Temperatures sizzle at 5,400° Celsius (9,800° Fahrenheit). That's almost as hot as the surface of the sun. Pressures here are immense: well over 3 million times greater than on Earth's surface. Some research suggests there may also be an inner, inner core. It would likely consist almost entirely of iron.   The outer core   This part of the core is also made from iron and nickel, just in liquid form. It sits some 5,180 to 2,880 kilometers (3,220 to 1,790 miles) below the surface. Heated largely by the radioactive decay of the elements uranium and thorium, this liquid churns in huge, turbulent currents. That motion generates electrical currents. They, in turn, generate Earth's magnetic field. For reasons somehow related to the outer core, Earth's magnetic field reverses about every 200,000 to 300,000 years. Scientists are still working to understand how that happens.   The mantle   At close to 3,000 kilometers (1,865 miles) thick, this is Earth's thickest layer. It starts a mere 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) beneath the surface. Made mostly of iron, magnesium and silicon, it is dense, hot and semi-solid (think caramel candy). Like the layer below it, this one also circulates. It just does so far more slowly. Near its upper edges, somewhere between about 100 and 200 kilometers (62 to 124 miles) underground, the mantle's temperature reaches the melting point of rock. Indeed, it forms a layer of partially melted rock known as the asthenosphere (As-THEEN-oh-sfeer). Geologists believe this weak, hot, slippery part of the mantle is what Earth's tectonic plates ride upon and slide across.   Diamonds are tiny pieces of the mantle we can actually touch. Most form at depths above 200 kilometers (124 miles). But rare “super-deep” diamonds may have formed as far down as 700 kilometers (435 miles) below the surface. These crystals are then brought to the surface in volcanic rock known as kimberlite.   The mantle's outermost zone is relatively cool and rigid. It behaves more like the crust above it. Together, this uppermost part of the mantle layer and the crust are known as the lithosphere. The crust   Earth's crust is like the shell of a hard-boiled egg. It is extremely thin, cold and brittle compared to what lies below it. The crust is made of relatively light elements, especially silica, aluminum and oxygen. It's also highly variable in its thickness. Under the oceans (and Hawaiian Islands), it may be as little as 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) thick. Beneath the continents, the crust may be 30 to 70 kilometers (18.6 to 43.5 miles) thick.   Along with the upper zone of the mantle, the crust is broken into big pieces, like a gigantic jigsaw puzzle. These are known as tectonic plates. These move slowly — at just 3 to 5 centimeters (1.2 to 2 inches) per year. What drives the motion of tectonic plates is still not fully understood. It may be related to heat-driven convection currents in the mantle below. Some scientists think it's caused by the tug from slabs of crust of different densities, something called “slab pull.” In time, these plates will converge, pull apart or slide past each other. Those actions cause most earthquakes and volcanoes. It's a slow ride, but it makes for exciting times right here on Earth's surface.   https://www.imdb.com/list/ls003260126/?sort=user_rating,desc&st_dt=&mode=detail&page=1   BECOME A P.O.O.P.R.!! http://www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   Find The Midnight Train Podcast: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com www.facebook.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.twitter.com/themidnighttrainpc www.instagram.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.discord.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.tiktok.com/themidnighttrainp   And wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.   Subscribe to our official YouTube channel: OUR YOUTUBE   Support our sponsors www.themidnighttraintrainpodcast.com/sponsors   The Charley Project www.charleyproject.org

new york canada science japan russian china moving american mexico america german master elements man hindu smithsonian origin brazil north earth south tibet men race ireland chief congress samuel johnson english dead french italian north america kansas world gods house west theory mind england british france president south america phantom pacific batman hell hiroshima united states nazis buddhist tribe tennessee oil arizona beasts holy adams jungle cinematic ages pluto alabama baltimore north pole sun ohio natives mississippi river scientists iroquois supposedly egyptian caves bigfoot inferno dragons reynolds sphere gardner mexican cuba peru montreal latin atlantis hamilton holes navy northern lights edmund interior red river cotton antarctica memorial chupacabra lucifer beneath northern ireland grand canyon patent moody soviet union adolf hitler fahrenheit amazing stories napoleon thousands himalayas central asia rama ramayana purgatory pentagon r2 extremely dwarfs presidents incredible jesus christ inca mongolia hopi bengali md arctic ancestors remarks officer mcbride siberian heated cuzco john quincy adams thin newton bullshit bri ancients lyons shenanigans nickel mongolian shambhala martin gardner deserts ufos hanuman massive byrd drilling south pole nah druidism jules verne taino politically geologists moutier celsius lundy poles national security topeka missouri river regiment madame blavatsky staffordshire azerbaijan caucasus abdelkader middlesex ray palmer shaver shaver mystery hyperborea hawaiian islands leonhard euler mole people hollow earth theory wild side tide pods creek indians ancient greeks andrew jackson martin van buren occam fuckin nagasaki anything can happen shamballa dero ahd american revolutionary war hollow earth cedar creek nicholas roerich sir isaac newton ravana euler highjump tvd temperatures pressures medical team all of them estero americus muscogee william reed staff meeting eskimos pontos gotha human race dacian tuatha d danann natural philosophy british colonies military man tibetan buddhists county donegal mandan in native american amazon rainforest vajrayana buddhism northern florida eisenach john cleves symmes theosophists operation highjump edmund halley agartha david hatcher childress cruachan theosophical society lakshmana teed symmes colloquies
Curiously Polar
138 Unintended Consequences: The EU Seal Ban and Indigenous Seal Hunters

Curiously Polar

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 65:05


The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discov

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career
RFT 536: Pole-to-Pole Pilot Robert deLaurentis

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 29:19


Robert DeLaurentis, “Zen Pilot,” is a successful author, speaker, pilot, real estate entrepreneur, philanthropist and Navy Gulf War Veteran. His books include the best-selling Zen Pilot: Flight of the Passion and the Journey Within; Flying Thru Life: How to Grow Your Business and Relationships Through Applied Spirituality; and the forthcoming, Citizen of the World: To the Ends of the Earth and Beyond. In 2019, Robert will undertake his second circumnavigation, this time from the North Pole to the South Pole in the “Citizen of the World,” a 1983 Turbine Commander 900 aircraft with the powerful global mission of “One Planet, One People, One Plane: Oneness for Humanity.” This trip is a real-time example of going after the seemingly impossible, not giving up while “Flying Thru Life” and making the dream of connecting our humanity through flight a reality. Founder and president of the inspirational publishing company Flying Thru Life and the charitable organization, DeLaurentis Foundation, Robert's mission is to inspire people and organizations to live their impossibly big dreams through the wonder of aviation and the power of courageous action. A notable pilot listed in Wikipedia, Robert has flown his single engine Piper Malibu Mirage to 53 countries and territories in three years, including Europe, Central America, Southern Africa, Asia, Siberia, Mexico and the Caribbean. Flying solo, Robert has crossed the Polar Ice Cap, the North Atlantic Ocean, Bering Sea and Gulf of Mexico. In 2015, Robert successfully completed an equatorial circumnavigation, single plane, single engine, single pilot, across the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans to 23 countries in his Piper Malibu Mirage named “Spirit of San Diego.” He survived an engine-out at 14,000 feet over the Strait of Malacca and dead sticked 19.6 nautical miles into Kuala Lumpur International with 600 pounds of fuel in the cabin and oil spraying on the 1500 degree exhaust. He lived to tell the story in his best-selling book, Zen Pilot. In recognition of his courage, resourcefulness and contribution to the San Diego community, the San Diego Mayor's Office and City Council awarded Robert the “Spirit of San Diego Day” Proclamation. An AOPA (Aircraft Owners and Pilot Association) Opinion Leader Blogger with 400,000 followers and more than 100 media interviews, Robert is a recognized social media influencer. In addition to his media and speaking appearances and books, he has recorded the video, Overcoming the Fear of Flying, Unleashing Potential, to be released to 26,000 high schools across the US and created the Citizen of the World Pole to Pole Flight Coloring and Activity Book for children of all ages. Robert's real estate business, Innorev Enterprises, Inc., includes over 300 real estate units, acquired over twenty-eight years. Starting with one condo in 1990, his road to success, much like flying, was not a straight path. The lessons he learned and the success he experienced along the way funded his dream of becoming a pilot and owning a plane, and is the basis of his book, Flying Thru Life. Robert has an undergraduate degree in Accounting from USC, and an advanced degree in graduate studies in Spiritual Psychology, a three year program with an emphasis in Consciousness, Health, and Healing from the University of Santa Monica. Robert was in the Navy for 14 years – four years active duty and 10 years reserves, leaving in 2003 as a Lieutenant Commander. Born in Salamanca, New York, Robert grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area until he was 10 years old, followed by three years in Indonesia. His family returned back to the Bay Area, where Robert lived until attending college at USC. After his initial tour with the Navy, he settled in San Diego where he currently resides. However, watch his Google Map to find out where he is flying to today!

The John Batchelor Show
1694: 4/4 N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia, by Mark Piesing @PorterSqBooks. Hardcover – August 31, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 10:00


Photo:  The flying ship.              Photographic reproduction of an 18th century etching showing an airship designed by Brazilian Jesuit Bartolomeu de Gusmão. Ship has a bird's head and feathers, a boat-like body in which a man stands looking through a telescope; a flag with crest is attached to the rear of the ship. Reproduction of an 18th century book illustration. 4/4    N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia,  by Mark Piesing  @PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527

The John Batchelor Show
1694: 3/4 N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia, by Mark Piesing @PorterSqBooks. Hardcover – August 31, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 13:40


Photo:  Coastal airship Norge. 3/4    N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia,  by Mark Piesing  @PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527

The John Batchelor Show
1694: 2/4 N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia, by Mark Piesing @PorterSqBooks. Hardcover – August 31, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 11:20


Photo:  Arctic explorers preparing for the long winter - historic Cape Sabine and Baffin Bay (79 deg. N. lat.) 2/4   N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia,  by Mark Piesing  @PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527

The John Batchelor Show
1694: 1/4 N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia, by Mark Piesing @PorterSqBooks. Hardcover – August 31, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 10:30


Photo: "Inventio fortunata. Arctic exploration. With an account of Nicholas of Lynn. Read before the American Geographical Society ... May 15th, 1880. Reprinted from the Bulletin of the Society". 1/4    N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia,  by Mark Piesing  PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527

Business Daily
The business of seed banks

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 17:28


Increasingly scientists are using genetic material from wild plants to make agricultural crops more resilient to climate change. To find out how, Rebecca Kesby heads to the Millennium Seed Bank for the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, in the south of England. There she meets Dr Chris Cockel, one of their project coordinators. We also hear from Asmund Asdal of the Global Seed Vault, which is located in a mountain on the archipelago of Svalbaard, between mainland Norway and the North Pole. We speak to Dr Shivali Sharma, who is developing climate resistant varieties of pigeon pea, a staple crop in many parts of rural India. And Mohamed Lassad Ben Saleh, farmer in Tunisia, tells us how breeding crops that combine properties of indigenous wild varieties has improved the quality and yield of his crops. Producers: Clare Williamson and Benjie Guy (Picture: a hand holding seeds. Credit: Getty Images.)

Curiously Polar
137 A Comprehensive Polar Library, Part 1

Curiously Polar

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 53:18


The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discov

This Week in America with Ric Bratton
Episode 2259: BECOMING THE ADMIRAL'S WIFE by Cecily Watson Kelln

This Week in America with Ric Bratton

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 24:03


BECOMING THE ADMIRAL'S WIFE: A DUAL MEMOIR OF A CALLED PAIR by Cecily Watson KellnIn this confessional memoir, Cecily Watson Kelln leaves the comforts of her childhood "Cackleberry Farm" to face womanhood fraught with struggles to find love and security. Divorce, rejection, and despair try to knock her down. But her mother's exemplary Christian faith keeps her full of hope.This true story involves travel and adventures, such as the Peace Corps, cold winter in a tent, and a psychedelic baptism. Becoming the Admiral's Wife is a beautiful testimony of the author's search to know God, and how she eventually finds Him in several dramatic encounters with Jesus Christ. By God's mercy and grace, she ultimately meets the loving Christian man who becomes her husband. With inserted excerpts of his fast-track career in the early years of the nuclear Navy, the book illustrates the power of Christ-centered marriage and inspires readers to patiently trust in God's divine plan for their own lives.Cecily Watson Kelln was raised in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, to be a proper debutante. However after college and Peace Corps (Peru), Cecily flung herself into the culture of the 1970s and accrued momentum for enough failed marriages to create a juicy memoir. But while on vacation in Fort Lauderdale, the Hound of Heaven, Jesus Christ Himself, culminated His dogged pursuit of her until she fell prostrate before Him to accept Him as her Lord and Savior.Over the years, Cecily became a student of the Bible. Finally content to be single, Cecily moved to rural Virginia to care for her widowed mother. In an unexpected encounter, Cecily was introduced to her "new best friend," a retired Navy Admiral. They met at a square dance class. They courted and were united a year later in a Christian marriage. Her life story memoir had a new, happy set of chapters with plenty of innovative endeavors as the couple got involved in Christian ministries and moved steadily westward from Virginia.Cecily has three grown children and eight grandchildren. She and her husband, Albert Lee Kelln, also the author of his own memoir, "Living the MIRACLES: A Sailor's Life in the Nuclear Power Age," live on a little farm with animals, water tanks, and solar panels in the Texas Hill Country.www.kellnbooks.comhttps://www.amazon.com/Becoming-Admirals-Wife-Memoir-Called/dp/1737525542/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=Becoming+the+Admiral%27s+Wife%3A+A+Dual+Memoir+of+a+Called+Pair+Proisle+Publishing&qid=1630282972&sr=8-1http://www.bluefunkbroadcasting.com/root/twia/ceckelinfr.mp3  LIVING THE MIRACLES: A SAILOR'S LIFE IN THE NUCLEAR POWER AGE by Albert Lee KellnAl Kelln's twenty-seven miracles will inspire the reader. The son of German speaking immigrants left the aftermath of the Depression in Oklahoma to become a Naval officer and nuclear propulsion engineer.His years at U.S. Naval Academy (class of 1952) prepared him for destroyer and diesel submarine deployments to the Korean War. Surviving several close calls, the author trained in Admiral Rickover's Nuclear Power School.Early exploratory voyages under the ice to the Arctic Ocean on nuclear submarine USS Skate allowed him to be the first person to have flown over, stood at, and gone under the ice at the North Pole.Kelln served in the construction and subsequent operation of four nuclear submarines. Admiral Rickover made him the Chief Engineer of Aircraft Carrier Enterprise CVAN for its operations in the Mediterranean, its circumnavigation of the world, and shipyard overhaul.With humor, the author shares poignant meetings with John Eisenhower, the Queen of Greece, and ruffians at Holy Loch, Scotland.After retirement, Admiral Kelln founded the Naval Submarine League and several Christian endeavors, including a Pregnancy Center. He and his wife, Cecily, live in Llano, Texas and continue their teaching ministries.www.kellnbooks.comhttps://www.amazon.com/Living-MIRACLES-Sailors-Nuclear-Power-ebook/dp/B07X4JSPCR/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Living+the+Miracles+Albert+Lee+Kelln&qid=1630592819&s=books&sr=1-1http://www.bluefunkbroadcasting.com/root/twia/akelinfr.mp3   

Curiously Polar
136 Back With a Vengeance

Curiously Polar

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 46:57


The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discov

Christmas Creeps
Episode 120: Santa Stole Our Dog!

Christmas Creeps

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 74:44


Let's try that whole Dog Days of Summer thing again, huh? Santa Stole Our Dog! absolutely has a dog in it, and this time it might even be important to the plot! Why on earth would Santa steal someone's dog, anyway? Well friends, this is not the first time a little critter has followed Ed Asner home... And in order the tell the full story of Santa Stole Our Dog!, we receive a transmission from our sister podcast, The O/S/T Party, to suss out how the film managed to secure music from Dolly Parton. That ain't even the half of what makes this week's film so bizarre, so grab yourselves a cold one, buckle up, and join us on another wild ride to the North Pole... Questions/Comments? Email us at XmasCreeps@gmail.comTweet us @ChristmasCreepsVisit us on the web at ChristmasCreeps.com! Join us on our Discord channel! Intro: Happy Christmas, You Guys! (Simon Panrucker) / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 Outro: Night Court theme (Jack Elliot)

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: Vault In Ice Protects The World's Agriculture

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 12:09


Deep inside a frozen mountain on an island between Norway and the North Pole lies the largest store of one the most essential resources of mankind: seeds. In that mountain, over four million seeds of nearly one million different varieties of food crop from civilizations all over the world are kept. FOX's Trey Yingst speaks to Hannes Dempwolf, a senior scientist at the Crop Trust, about the importance of the facility and what they do there.

TBSラジオ「NIKKI'S Green English」

今回は <The new island is the closest point of land to the North Pole.(この新しい島は、北極点に最も近い陸地です。)> というニュースから、「North Pole」を学びます。

Death Of 1000 Cuts
S4E38 - Editing With Nate Crowley Pt2

Death Of 1000 Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 39:27


Me and author Nate Crowley host a very special festive-themed episode of Death Of 1000 Cuts. We look at a story set at the North Pole by a listener, and suggest ways to make it better. And quite possibly several ways to make it worse. If you want to grab a copy of Nate Crowley's NOTES FROM SMALL PLANETS you can here: https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Nate-Crowley/Notes-from-Small-Planets/22869592 You can support the show via my Ko-fi page: www.ko-fi.com/timclare And you can get in touch with me here: www.timclarepoet.co.uk

Tough Girl Podcast
Dr. Hajjah Sharifah Mazlina Syed Abdul Kadir - Malaysian Polar Explorer who ski-sailed across Antartica from the South Pole to Hercules inlet in 22 days.

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 43:18


Dr. Hajjah Sharifah Mazlina Syed Abdul Kadir is a lecturer at the Faculty of Sports Science and Recreation, Universiti Teknology MARA (UiTM).    She successfully ski-sailed across the Antarctic, from the South Pole to the Hercules Inlet from Dec 9 to 30, 2004.   The 1,100km-long journey took her 22 days to complete.   She reached the North Pole in 2007 and Greenland in 2011.   In 2019 she was back at this South Pole, this time as the leader of the All Women Expedition to Antarctica (AWETA) team. Which involved completing the “last degree” 60 nautical miles (69 mi/111 km) from 89 degrees to 90 degrees.    Dr. Hajjah Sharifah Mazlina Syed Abdul Kadir created her very own psychological concept called M.E.P.S.    M = Mental (power and strength of mind), E = Emotion (including spiritual aspects as well), P = Physical (ability and endurance of the body), S = Social (ability and intellectual). A concept that focuses on mental strength, getting out of your comfort zone and maximising your own potential. The MEPS Concept has helped over 300,000 people to date.   New episodes of the Tough Girl Podcast go live every Tuesday and Thursday at 7am UK time - Make sure you hit the subscribe button so you don't miss out.    The Tough Girl Podcast is sponsorship and ad free thanks to the monthly financial support of patrons. To find out more about supporting your favourite podcast and becoming a patron please check out www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast.   Show notes Her full time job as a sports psychologist Having a focus on women empowerment Being a confident and active person Loving sports and being involved in multiple activities Doing her first degree in physical education Going to Canada to do a Masters in Psychology  Creating the MEPSS Concept Wanting to create a balanced human being Needing to put the concept into practice Being a mental training coach in the Commonwealth Games in Malaysia Starting work as a lecturer Needing to go somewhere extreme to challenge her limits Coping with the cold Needed to put a plan in place in order to achieve this dream Needing to learn new skills for dealing with the cold Training 5hrs each day - both weights and cardio Needing to build her endurance Pulling tyres at night when it was cooler Doing her research  Going to Norway for training 2004 South Pole Expedition 1,127km in 22 days - from South Pole back to base camp Being a Muslim women in Antarctica Food and nutrition in a cold extreme environment Dealing with the cold The biggest challenge she faced while on expedition Why the North Pole was the most challenging expedition Dealing with frostbite on her face Telling her mum about her goals Needed to ask for a sabbatical from work Starting with Google  Creating a proposal with all the information  Working to inspire young girls and women Creating a time capsule Doing a talent search all over Malaysia Being called the “Ice Queen” Looking for 5 key qualities  Looking for good human beings Getting the team together to do the last degree in Antarctica Planning her online motivation program   Social Media   Website: drsharifahmazlina.com    Instagram: @sharifah_mazlina_aweta  

Plant-Strong
Ep. 36: Fiona Oakes - Going the Distance for Humanity

Plant-Strong

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 106:25


We'd be hard-pressed to find someone as authentic and true to herself as Fiona Oakes. Vegan for almost 50 years, she is one of the original game-changers and shining examples of the power of being a plantstrong athlete. Fiona has made a name for herself as an endurance runner, earning four Guinness World Records. She is also the fastest woman in the world to run a marathon on all seven continents and the North Pole in both cumulative and elapsed time. She has competed internationally in more than 50 marathons and set five marathon course records around the globe, including The Antarctic Ice Marathon. In 2015, Fiona ran six official marathons in six days on six continents all on a vegan diet. Fiona's achievements are made even more astounding due to the fact she was told at age 14 that she would never walk properly, let alone ever run, after undergoing 17 radical knee surgeries which ultimately led to having her entire right kneecap removed. Her only mission? To raise awareness for the plight of animals and veganism across the globe. Her suffering is intense, but you'll quickly understand that her rewards come from saving the lives of the animals she serves at her own Farm Sanctuary - Tower Hill Stables. For most of us, this lifestyle may seem extreme or radical. She avoids simple pleasures in life like TV, long baths, or massages because they're a distraction to her life's work. Truly, as she says, her goal is for all of us to go out there and lead a happy and healthy vegan life, respect all life, and realize that we're all so intricately connected --The planet, the environment, each other. "I just want us to be good to each other." So simple and so beautiful. The world needs more people like Fiona Oakes who are going the distance for humanity. Episode Resources Running for Good - Film Website Tower Hill Stables Website Fiona Oakes Foundation Website Fiona Oakes Instagram PLANTSTRONGFoods.com - Order our new popcorn and dessert-inspired granolas Our Virtual PLANTSTOCK Returns September 8-12th - Register today Join the PLANTSTRONG Community Theme Music for Episode Promo Theme Music

Middle Grade Mavens
Episode 95: The Song Of Lewis Carmichael / Sophie Laguna and Marc McBride Interview

Middle Grade Mavens

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 43:40


Today on Middle Grade Mavens, Pamela reviews, "The Song of Lewis Carmichael," by Sophie Laguna and Illustrated by Marc McBride, plus Sophie and Marc stop by for a chat. Sites Pamela mentions: www.Littlescribe.com StoryKids | Victoria Together Books Julie mentions: "Anemone is not the Enemy," Honour Book for the 2021 CBCA Awards Book of the Year for Early Childhood by Anna McGregor and "Your Birthday Was the Best!" by Maggie Hutchings and Felicita Sala Books Pamela reviews: Hamnet, Winner of the Women's Prize for Fiction 2020 by Maggie O'Farrell The Song of Lewis Carmichael by Sofie Laguna and Marc McBride https://booktopia.kh4ffx.net/jWOjB5 Anemone Is Not The Enemy https://booktopia.kh4ffx.net/jWOZGn Your Birthday Was The Best by Maggie Hutchings and Felicita Sala https://booktopia.kh4ffx.net/LPZYkV Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell https://booktopia.kh4ffx.net/qn2Gdb Available: 31st August 2021 ISBN: 9781760878573 Number Of Pages: 192 For Ages: 8+ years old Matthew stood on the snowy peak and stared out at the world spread before him. Every picture in his books had been limited by the size of the page, contained within frames. Here, there was no frame. Here, the picture didn't end. Beyond those icy plains, the sea, and beyond the sea, a land that floated on the ice, drifting northwards. Matthew put the binoculars to his eyes and saw valleys and cliffs and rivers all made of snow. Everywhere was white. Matthew has dreamed and read and thought about the North Pole for as long as he can remember. And he has done it secretly. It is a place that cannot be tarnished by the world in which he lives - a world in which he struggles to find answers and make friends, while everything seems to come easily to other children. But one day, a crow called Lewis Carmichael lands at Matthew's window - a crow who believes in Matthew in the most simple and ordinary ways. Soon, the unexpected voyage of a lifetime begins, and it will change everything… To learn more about the Mavens, head on over to https://www.middlegradepodcast.com Or to find Julie online drop by https://www.julieannegrassobooks.com And for Pamela online find her at https://www.ueckerman.net Have a question or comment? Email us at mavens@middlegradepodcast.com To learn what books are in the pipeline, follow us on Instagram Middle Grade Mavens (@middle_grade_mavens_podcast) • Instagram photos and videos --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/middlegrademavens/message

Santa By The Minute Podcast
Minute 72 - Patch Natch, Patch Natch!

Santa By The Minute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 36:54


Patch's Puce Pop commercial is being broadcast live worldwide! Everyone is tuning in including Joe, Santa, the elves, Cornelia, and even two surprise cameos!  We break down the lyrics to the “Patch, Natch” commercial jingle (most of which we don't hear in the movie), imagine Cornelia's tragic origin story, try to figure out how time zones work at the North Pole, and get distracted by a bizarre bust in B.Z.'s office!  Join us as we discuss Minute 72 of Santa Claus: The Movie (1985). Our Podcast Website: bit.ly/3jWsLfr

The Bridge with Peter Mansbridge
On Top Of The World

The Bridge with Peter Mansbridge

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 42:48


We may not be at the North Pole but in some ways we are at the top of the world. Grise Fjord Nunavut is Canada's most northerly residential community. It's an exciting place but one with a difficult history. I bump into an old friend who helps me tell it. And on our election update, they say leaders tours and television ads can make a difference in a campaign. How about lawn signs? You may be surprised.

Silver On the Sage
Katrina Moon - Women of Philmont I

Silver On the Sage

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 50:27


Kicking off our first ever mini-series, Women of Philmont, Katrina Moon joins the show!  Katrina was the first female Ranger from the Naval Academy to work at Philmont.  Although she was only there for a short time, Katrina praises Philmont for it's leadership style and ability to challenge participants and staff to grow in unfamiliar and uncomfortable situations.  Today Katrina lives in North Pole, Alaska with her husband (also a Philmont alumni, Academy Ranger) and their four children, embracing adventure and remaining as tourists in their own home! Philmont Experience:June and July of 2008 - Academy RangerNotable Mentions:Collin CrestChristy WiseSupport the show (https://pod.fan/silveronthesagepodcast)

History Vs.
Bonus Episode 3: Family Reunions

History Vs.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 23:33


On their many attempts to reach the North Pole, Robert Peary and Matthew Henson spent a lot of time in northwest Greenland. So much time that they, like many explorers before them, formed intimate relationships with Inughuit women. Their sons from those unions, Kali Peary and Anaukaq Henson, grew up in their Arctic communities never knowing their fathers. But in the 1980s, an ambitious Harvard neuroscientist brought Kali and Anaukaq to the United States to meet their American relatives. It was a joyous, unforgettable experience—but the family reunion also brought up some painful memories and uncomfortable questions.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Is That True?
Rollin' On Red Rivers

Is That True?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 15:28


 Is it true that Antarctic rivers run red? Follow the fact-finding journey with today's guest Karen Romano Young, kid's author, illustrator, and traveling science communicator. Do you have a fact you'd like us to investigate? Write to us at listen@akidspodcastabout.com. And check out other podcasts made for kids just like you by visiting akidsco.com.  You can check out the #AntarcticLog comics by visiting antarcticlog.com and check out the comic Karen made for this episode here.

AccuWeather Daily
Airpocalypse' smoke reaches North Pole for the first time ever

AccuWeather Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 3:22


AccuWeather Daily brings you the top trending weather story of the day - every day.

Progressive Voices
Green News Report 08-12-2021

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 6:00


Senate Democrats pass bipartisan infrastructure bill and budget reconciliation framework, setting the stage for historic climate action; Wildfire smoke reaches North Pole for the first time in recorded history; PLUS: Tropical Depression Fred heads to Florida, as the rest of the globe swelters and burns... All that and more in today's Green News Report!

The Leftscape
Meet ’89 the Brainchild (Episode 106)

The Leftscape

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 92:26


'89 the Brainchild is a rap performer and entertainer from New Jersey. He flew under the radar for years and began finding buzz through performing in the NJ/NYC area just before the pandemic shutdown. Also a stage production manager, '89's recordings include "Father's Day," Not Who I Thought I Was (the last of my rage), and Patterns, which has been described as a mix of hip hop, house, techno, and nu-disco reminiscent of Jungle Brothers, Heavy D, and Big Daddy Kane. He speaks with Wendy about the dreams and experiences that led to his music, hip hop technology, ageism in the music industry, and self-acceptance around fantasy vs. reality of life as a creative artist. Before the featured interview, co-hosts Robin Renée and Wendy Sheridan share 3 Random Facts about outsider musician and artist Wesley Willis, time at the North Pole, and an infamous 1968 fight between Beat Generation icons Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs. In the News: being a realtor and shopping for a home while black in Wyoming, MI, a very serious report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), how delta variant symptoms may differ from the original COVID-19, 1000-year-old remains of a nonbinary leader, and how, once again, Donald Trump will NOT be regaining the US presidency (Louder for the people in the back!). In The Geekscape, Wendy and Robin reveal their useless superpowers. In You Got Questions? We Got Answers!, the question is "How is COVID impacting music festivals and how are musicians adapting?" sent in by Linda Gaffney.  Things to do: Download tracks by 89 the Brainchild on Bandcamp. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram. Read the IPCC's stark warning. Be aware of concerts and festivals that are rescheduled or cancelled due to the pandemic. See the inadvertent origins of the name of the new mini-segment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GitK6i3HQdU   Sound engineering by Wendy Sheridan Show notes by Robin Renée Fake sponsor messages by Ariel Sheridan Web hosting by InMotion Remote recording by SquadCast

What Am I Doing Here? with Mike Reiss
Episode 21: THE NORTH POLE, THE SOUTH POLE, AND THE OTHER ONE

What Am I Doing Here? with Mike Reiss

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 14:03


Mike visits all three poles. Yes. All three.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Muttersprache Podcast - Der USA Auswanderer Podcast
Folge 65: Sabine nimmt uns mit nach ALASKA - Destination Spezial

Muttersprache Podcast - Der USA Auswanderer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 63:09


7 Stunden Autofahrt bis in die nächstgrößere Stadt, umgeben von riesigen Nationalparks und direkt um die Ecke vom Weihnachtsmann - heute sind wir in Fairbanks, Alaska. Hier lebt Sabine seit 2019, entsendet vom Arbeitgeber ihres Mannes, dem amerikanischen Militär. Der Umzug von Virginia in einen Staat, in dem 7 Monate frostiger, tageslichtarmer Winter herrscht, war 2017 schon erstmal ein kleiner Schock für Sabine. Doch die Tier- und Naturliebhaberin kommt in ihrer neuen Heimat voll und ganz auf ihre Kosten. In einer Region, in der es ebenso viele Elche wie Einwohner gibt und wo man mit die schönsten Nordlichter der Welt sehen kann lässt es sich gar nicht so schlecht leben. Sabine nimmt uns mit auf eine Reise in einen oft unterschätzen Bundesstaat, ein Outdoor Paradies für abenteuerlustige Kaffeeliebhaber. Die Herausforderungen hier ganz oben im Norden sind noch mal ganz speziell und ohne Mückenspray im Sommer, die richtige Kleidung im Winter und als Target-Fan wird man hier nicht glücklich.Visuelle Eindrücke teilt Sabine regelmäßig auf ihrem Instagram Account @beaninamerica.Hier noch ein paar Links zu der Folge:Fairbanks:https://www.explorefairbanks.comDenali Nationalpark:https://www.nps.gov/dena/index.htmSanta House in North Pole:https://www.santaclaushouse.com/visit.aspAnchorage:https://www.anchorage.netSeward:https://www.seward.comWhale Cruise Seward:https://majormarine.comAlaska in general:https://www.alaska.org.➡️ Den  Muttersprache Podcast findest du u.a hier und ich freue mich sehrüber eine 5 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Review von Dir:Apple: shorturl.at/asEJ2Spotify:  shorturl.at/erEGXYoutube: shorturl.at/fBHY2Google: shorturl.at/istBMAmazon Music: shorturl.at/efBNWWebsite: https://www.muttersprachepodcast.com/Podcast

ActionPacked
Action Woman at Action Packed Travel

ActionPacked

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 25:27


'For a few seconds, you don't know whether you're upside down or inside out,' says Louise Hall, who jumped out of a plane for the first time last week. She has also been ice-swimming, climbed and skied Mont Blanc, walked to the North Pole, and dived the Blue Hole in Belize.

Ever Forward Radio
EFR 497: The Buff Bunny Story - Small Town Girl to Worldwide Fitness Sensation with Heidi Somers

Ever Forward Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 65:32


Hailing from the small town of North Pole, Alaska, young Heidi Somers never saw herself as the face of a fitness brand with over 1.7 million followers on Instagram and 765,000 subscribers on YouTube. At the age of 20, the self-proclaimed introvert was working four jobs and left for San Antonio the following year to pursue medical school. It was in university when she began sharing her passion for health and fitness on social media, just for fun. Before she knew it, she'd grown a sizable audience and had company after company at her doorstep. Eventually, Heidi made the big decision to quit school and go all-in on her new business, Buffbunny Collection, which designs and creates luxurious fitness apparel made for every body. The brand showcases and celebrates women of all different body shapes, sizes, and backgrounds. Listen in as Heidi shares her story from shy, small-town girl to entrepreneur and influencer. She also describes her unique relationship with Christian Guzman, who happens to run a well-known fitness brand of his own. Finally, Heidi explains how she stays creative and continues to gain inspiration in an increasingly saturated market.   Follow Heidi @buffbunny Follow Chase @chase_chewning   Episode resources: Save 15% on Paleovalley's 100% grass fed beef sticks with code EVERFORWARD at https://paleovalley.com/store/beef-sticks  Get your free variety sample pack of LMNT Recharge electrolyte drink mix at http://drinklmnt.com/everforward  Watch the complete video and learn more at https://chasechewning.com/podcasts/episode/497