Podcasts about Purdue University

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Public research university in West Lafayette, Indiana, United States

  • 1,377PODCASTS
  • 2,488EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Purdue University

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Latest podcast episodes about Purdue University

Angel Invest Boston
Matt Breen, Founder - Rahoo Baby 2

Angel Invest Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 38:48


Why Sal's Bullish on Angel-Scale Biotech: Learn More Sponsored by Purdue University entrepreneurship and peter Fasse, patent attorney at Fish & Richardson Founder Matt Breen of Rahoo Baby is back to update us on the progress of the company and on their new product, Walk Block. This startup is building a brand around helping parents support the cognitive development of their babies. Highlights: Sal Daher Introduces Matt Breen, Co-founder of Rahoo Baby “...scarcity of information that parents should have about how to positively impact their child's early development...” “...only about 6% of families actually tap into that knowledge that we [therapists]” “...oftentimes, it really isn't rocket science. It's stuff that can really easily be implemented into a parent's daily routine in terms of how they interact and play with their” Many Developmental Delays Can Be Remedied with Simple Interventions that Do Not Entail Onerous Visits to the Hospital Rahoo Baby's First Product Is a Baby Lounger that Reduces Reflux and Increases Tummy Time – Funded by a Kickstarter Campaign “Very little marketing spend is required to attract customers, which is a huge advantage for our startup.” Walking Independently Drives Cognitive Development – Second Product “Walk Blocks” Promotes Walking Rahoo Baby Is Creating Content to Help Parents Based on Each of the First Twelve Months of the Baby's Life A Shout Out to Angel Investor & Listener Mark Bissel Who Connected Us Martin Aboitiz Made Himself an Expert in Electronic Health Records – 80 Million EHRs in His Company's Data Lake Sal Daher Pitches Purdue Entrepreneurship & Peter Fasse, Patent Attorney at Fish & Richardson Matt & Erica Have No Model for Entrepreneurship in Their Families Another Reason to Join Sal Daher's Syndicate List Topics: co-founders, raising money, selling, product

Science + God with Dr. G
Journey #88 - There's Way More to You Than You Can Possibly Imagine!

Science + God with Dr. G

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 19:31


For centuries, science has preached the idea that the best way to know anything well is by breaking it down to its tiniest parts. In this amazing journey, Dr. G challenges that premise by speaking with Dr. Erica Carlson, a physicist at Purdue University. She is studying the very-little understood phenomenon called "Emergence." Among other things, it is revealing what the Bible has been saying all along: there's so much more to you than meets the eye. Professor Erica Carlson's Main Website Dr. G wants to hear from you! So join the conversation with him and your fellow travelers now on his FACEBOOK PAGE. Or email Dr. G directly by clicking HERE. ORDER DR. G's NEWEST BOOK! Believing is Seeing. * Tyndale * Books-A-Million * ChristianBook * Amazon * Barnes & Noble

This Is Purdue
Purdue-Discovered Drug Strengthens Fight Against Cancer

This Is Purdue

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 37:08


In this episode of This Is Purdue, we're featuring a Boilermaker whose innovations are changing and saving lives across the world. Philip Low, Purdue University's Presidential Scholar for Drug Discovery and the Ralph C. Corley Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, developed a recently FDA-approved drug called Cytalux, a fluorescent marker that allows cancer surgeons to quickly identify malignant cells and remove them during surgery. Listen in as Professor Low discusses how the drug works, why the team started using this drug on ovarian cancer patients first, and what attracted him to innovation at Purdue University. (Hint: He's been a Boilermaker since birth!)

Change Your Mindset
S5E3 : Tom Wadelton: The Virtual CFO

Change Your Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 29:51


“Your clients will like you better if you just show that you know them, and you're listening to them more than telling them how much you are an expert.” Tom Walden My guest today is Tom Walton. He earned his bachelor's degree in computer technology from Purdue University and an MBA was a finance minor from Indiana University. He's a CPA who's licensed in the state of Indiana. Tom is a member of the association of international certified professional accountants AICPA as well as the Indiana CPA society. He was the chair of the Indiana CPA society in 2019 and began to turn on the AICPA Board of Governors in 2021. Tom held accounting roles and unfortunate 500 company prior to coming to summit CPA group as a virtual CFO. At summit CPA group, Tom has been advising clients using the concepts developed by the firm and ton of the virtual CFO playbook course. Tom and his wife Cindy live in Indianapolis, Indiana, they have three grown children and two grandchildren. The biggest continual challenge working as a virtual CFO with clients, is not being with the client day to day, and therefore it is hard to know some of the backstories of what things are going on in their businesses. The other challenge has to do with managing time and how to get everything done for the clients. We have a playbook for other CPA firms who would like to offer virtual CFO services. We have a 15-module course that people can go through where we tell every single thing that we do. The aim is to help all the people who want to continue client advisor service as well as expand. We also have a one-hour meeting once a week with other CPA firms that can come in and ask questions about how we do things. Many firms want to step into being that advisor role but making that step to do it can be challenging, and so we're trying to help them on how they would get to doing that. The biggest challenges for CPA firms on taking this new revenue model include staffing and lack of technology pieces that aide a consistent process. A lot of it has to do with the fear of action to move, since CPAs are usually careful and want to be perfect. However, often we say just do one, and you'll learn so much by just sitting down with a prospective client. One of the skills missing currently that people could really build is the ability to do forecasting. Clients don't really want to come having you explain the history, rather they want someone to help them go where they want to go. If someone is really good at forecasting, that's where clients find the most value for a service. To learn more, and for the complete show notes, visit: petermargaritis.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rewilding Earth
Episode 82: The Science Of Reintroducing Important Species To An Indiana Tallgrass Prairie with Zach Finn

Rewilding Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 38:17


About Zach Zach is a Wildlife Science MS student at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. After reading a book as a teenager featuring species profiles and illustrations of recent, human-caused extinctions (including Stellar's sea cow, moa, great auk, and more), he developed a passion to restore nature and prevent any further species loss. Since […] Read full article: Episode 82: The Science Of Reintroducing Important Species To An Indiana Tallgrass Prairie with Zach Finn

Angel Invest Boston
Robert Nagle, Mathematician and Angel - Is Biotech Investing Risky?

Angel Invest Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 60:01


Join Sal's Investment Syndicate: Click to Join Listener Robert Nagle is a mathy software guy and an angel investor. We had a great chat which included his perceptions of the risks in biotech investing and also discussed some of the companies in his portfolio. This is an instructive conversation with a thoughtful angel investor. Sponsored by: Purdue University entrepreneurship Peter Fasse, patent attorney at Fish & Richardson Highlights: Sal Daher Introduces Listener Robert Nagle, Mathy Software Guy and Angel Investor Robert Nagle Was Born in Ireland & Came to the US Robert Nagle Knew Jon Hirschtick as a Brilliant Intern at Computervision [ Jon Hirschtick podcast: https://www.angelinvestboston.com/jon-hirschtick-innovating-in-the-cloud] “If you're nice to people, sometimes they remember, sometimes they don't. If you're a jerk, they always remember...” Robert Nagle's First Angel Check – Startup Making Bespoke Eyeglass Frames Conversation About Virtual Angel Investing “...many fascinating opportunities that spill out of the universities...” “That model that serves virtually-based, tool-based, asynchronous doesn't depend on a meeting is one of the exciting innovations that I think TBD Angels has brought to fruition.” “I think more than one model is good for angels. The aggregate sums as you point out can be comparable.” Robert Nagle Belongs to Hub Angels, Sky Ventures and TBD Angels Two Brothers in Law: How They Help Sal's Angel Investing Robert Nagel on His Portfolio Company Easyship Robert Nagel on His Portfolio Company NODE40 – Pickaxe & Shovels for Crypto Sal Daher on Portfolio Company Meenta – A COVID Rocketship Rockstep Solutions – ERP for Pre-Clinical Trials VistaPath Bio – Machine Vision Helping the Intake of Pathology Samples “...what holds you back from investing in life science companies?” Sal's Mentor on Life Science Company Was a Life Science Skeptic Having Made His Money in the Space “...life science companies...are taking over the value of the portfolio. That's where all the value creation is going on.” Said of SQZ: “...I'm putting my money on the fact that they have a technology that helps other people produce their therapies faster, more efficiently.” Said of Savran Technologies: “A few million dollars is enough to develop two use cases in a company like that.” The Subset of Biotech Companies that Interests Sal Daher, CFA How Sal Daher, CFA Made a Good Chunk of His Net Worth on a Scary Asset “At one point I had my kid's tuition money in Nigerian promissory notes. You'll probably say, "Majnun," that's Arabic for crazy.” “That taught me a lesson that a particular area, a particular asset that people don't like at all, they turn their noses at it. There, I will find opportunity.” Why Life Science Companies Are Paradoxically Accessible to Intelligent Lay People “I don't think the challenge is people being unable to see the opportunity. I think the problem is...on the risk side.” The Weird & Wonderful Story of Bacteria That Glow in the Dark Robert Nagle on Marc Andreessen's Thesis about Founder-Led Companies “I'm always gratified when I talk to a listener. I have yet to be disappointed, and I'm also surprised at the number of people come up to me and say, "I started my startup because of listening to your podcast."” Topics: angel investing strategies, biotech

Purdue Commercial AgCast
Ag Barometer Insight: December 2021 Survey

Purdue Commercial AgCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 17:39


For only the second time since May, the Ag Economy Barometer rose in December. This month's index climbed to a reading of 125, 9 points higher than in November. Both the Index of Current Conditions and the Index of Future Expectations rose in December with the rise in the barometer attributable mostly to an improved perspective on current conditions in the agricultural sector. Purdue ag economists James Mintert and Michael Langemeier review the results and give some insight into the December 2021 Purdue University-CME Group Ag Economy Barometer, a nationwide monthly survey of 400 ag producers. This month's survey was conducted from December 8-14, 2021. The full report is available at https://purdue.ag/agbarometer.   Podcast provided by Purdue University's Center for Commercial Agriculture. For more economic information and insights on the Ag Economy Barometer, visit us at http://purdue.edu/commercialag.

Teaching Learning Leading K-12
Beth and Greg Langston: College Flight Plan - Helping Teens Get Accepted Into the College of Their Choice

Teaching Learning Leading K-12

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 58:09


Beth and Greg Langston: College Flight Plan - Helping Teens Get Accepted Into the College of Their Choice. This is episode 442 of Teaching Learning Leading K12, an audio podcast. My guests today are Beth and Greg Langston.  For the last 20 years, Beth and Greg have empowered students to master their self-discovery, allowing them to successfully activate their life's purpose.  Beth, who graduated from Purdue University in Education, has guided hundreds of high school students worldwide to navigate the dreaded college applications essay process with tremendous success.  Greg graduated from Purdue's Krannert School of Business. Greg pursued an international business career which allowed him to mentor hundreds of young professionals while leading businesses worth over $1 billion and working in 65 countries. By the time their kids were 13, they had been to 12 schools and lived in 5 countries.  Today we are talking about Top 5 Early Actions That Lead To College Success, College Flight Plan, and some helpful, awesome resources…. Thanks for listening. So much to learn! But wait... Could you do me a favor? Please go to my website at https://www.stevenmiletto.com/reviews/ or open the podcast app that you are listening to me on and would you rate and review the podcast? That would be Awesome. Thanks! Ready to start your own podcast? Podbean is an awesome host. I have been with them since 2013. Go to https://www.podbean.com/TLLK12 to get 1 month free of unlimited hosting for your new podcast.  Remember to take a look at NVTA (National Virtual Teacher Association) The NVTA Certification Process was created to establish a valid and reliable research-based teacher qualification training process for virtual teachers to enhance their teaching and develop their ongoing reflective skills to improve teaching capacity. NVTA is an affiliate sponsor of Teaching Learning Leading K12, by following the link above if you purchase a program, Teaching Learning Leading K12 will get a commission and you will help the show continue to grow.  Don't forget to go to my other affiliate sponsor Boone's Titanium Rings at www.boonerings.com. When you order a ring use my code - TLLK12 - at checkout to get 10% off and help the podcast get a commission. Oh by the way, you can help support Teaching Learning Leading K12 by buying me a soft drink (actually making a donation to Teaching Learning Leading K12.) That would be awesome! You would be helping expand the show with equipment and other resources to keep the show moving upward. Just go to https://www.buymeacoffee.com/stevenmiletto Thanks! Happy New Year! Wishing you the best for 2022! Connect & Learn More: https://collegeflightplan.com/ https://collegeflightplan.com/guide/ greg@collegeflightplan.com beth@collegeflightplan.com https://www.facebook.com/collegeflightplan   Length - 58:09

Purdue Agricultural Economics Podcasts
Dr. Bhagyashree Katare shares research on health equity and government assistance programs (PAEP 60)

Purdue Agricultural Economics Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 17:31


Dr. Bhagyashree Katare discusses her research in health equity and government assistance programs. Dr. Katare is an associate professor of agricultural economics at Purdue University.

Superheroes of Science
Top Tips from Purdue Registered Dietitian for Positive Nutrition Changes

Superheroes of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 42:36


Looking to make a change in your health? We found an expert and discussed nutrition, goals, diets, and advice for safely making changes to your daily routine that can lead to long-term positive habits. Adam Huffield is a Registered Dietitian, Certified Athletic Trainer, Certified Strength, and Conditioning Specialist, and a Senior Lecturer in the Departments of Nutrition Science and Health and Kinesiology at Purdue University. 

Big Picture Science
What's a Few Degrees?

Big Picture Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 53:30


Brace yourself for heatwave “Lucifer.” Dangerous deadly heatwaves may soon be so common that we give them names, just like hurricanes. This is one of the dramatic consequences of just a few degrees rise in average temperatures. Also coming: Massive heat “blobs” that form in the oceans and damage marine life, and powerful windstorms called “derechos” pummeling the Midwest.  Plus, are fungal pathogens adapting to hotter temperatures and breaching the 98.6 F thermal barrier that keeps them from infecting us? Guests: Kathy Baughman McLeod – director and senior vice president of the Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center at The Atlantic Council Pippa Moore – Marine ecologist at Newcastle University in the U.K. Ted Derouin – Michigan farmer Jeff Dukes – Ecologist and director of Purdue Climate Change Research Center at Purdue University. Arturo Casadevall – Molecular microbiologist and immunologist at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Originally aired October 19, 2020 Big Picture Science is part of the Airwave Media podcast network. Please contact sales@advertisecast.com to inquire about advertising on Big Picture Science. You can get early access to ad-free versions of every episode by joining us on Patreon. Thanks for your support!   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Abstract: The Future of Science
Ep. 74 - Astrodynamics & The 3-Body Problem ft. Noah Sadaka

Abstract: The Future of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 35:08


Noah Sadaka is a Master's student at Purdue University studying Astrodynamics. He's working on how resonant orbits in the circular restricted three body problem, or CR3BP, can be used in spacecraft mission design. He says that part of what is so exciting about working in this field is that trajectories and orbits originally simulated in the CR3BP are being used to fly actual missions, including the recently launched James Webb Space Telescope and the upcoming NASA Gateway space station around the Moon! To keep himself firmly grounded on Earth, you can find him cycling through Indiana cornfields and trying out new recipes when cooking. Noah's the real deal, so keep those ears open and check out the topics we cover (in chronological order) below: Topics & Concepts Apollo 13 & Free Return Trajectories Burns & Manoeuvres The Moon & Lunar Vicinity The (Circular Restricted) 3-Body Problem [(CR)3BP] What's in a "body"? Newton's Gravitational Equation Analytic Solutions & The Relative 2-Body Model The Bi-Circular Restricted 4-Body Problem The Parker Solar Probe Patched Conics Perturbations The Rubber Ducky Analogy Chaotic Systems Periodic Orbits Solar System Instability Resonant Orbits Lagrange Points Reference Frames: Intertial vs. Rotating Pendulums & Equilibrium The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) The Finale: Conic Motion & /// CONTACT + EXTRAS Website: https://noahsadaka.com Instagram: @NoahSadaka (https://www.instagram.com/noahsadaka/) LinkedIn: Noah Sadaka (https://www.linkedin.com/in/noah-sadaka-36b4ba10a/) Episode Art By Lagrange_points.jpg: created by NASAderivative work: Xander89 (talk) - Lagrange_points.jpg, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7547312 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/abstractcast/message

Another Season in the Books

From Colombia to Texas to Purdue University and then on to WNBA training camps and Europe, Erika Valek has lead a colorful life for almost forty years.  Erika talks about the ups and downs of her athletic as well as academic journeys, how she overcame obstacles, both mental and physical and what she's up to now.  I love this story and am positive you will, too.  

Assistive Technology Update with Josh Anderson
ATU553 – AgrAbility with Paul Jones and Chuck Baldwin (Part 2)

Assistive Technology Update with Josh Anderson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 27:08


Your weekly dose of information that keeps you up to date on the latest developments in the field of technology designed to assist people with disabilities and special needs. Special Guests: Paul Jones – Manager of National AgrAbility Project at Purdue University Chuck Baldwin – Project Manager for the Indiana AgrAbility Project at Purdue University […] The post ATU553 – AgrAbility with Paul Jones and Chuck Baldwin (Part 2) appeared first on Assistive Technology at Easter Seals Crossroads.

Championship Vision
Episode 273: Coach Bill Hodges (Former Indiana State Head Men's Basketball Coach) "The Larry Bird Story"

Championship Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 63:14


Bill Hodges was born in Lebanon, Indiana and grew up near Zionsville where he attended high school and played basketball for Indiana Hall of Fame coach Jim Rosenstihl. After graduation Hodges spent four years in the United States Air Force, where he traveled the Far East. After completing his armed forces duty he attended Edison Junior College in Fort Myers, Florida where he played basketball for Indiana and Florida Hall of Fame coach, Hugh Thimlar. Hodges transferred from Edison to Purdue University before he completed his collegiate degree at Marian University in Indianapolis, Indiana where he became a student basketball coach. He went on to Tennessee Tech University in Cookeville, Tennessee where he received his Master's Degree and became a full time assistant college basketball coach. Bill spent the next ten years as an assistant college coach and sixteen years as a head college coach at Indiana State, Georgia College, and Mercer University. He is most well remembered for his tenure at Indiana State University, where his ISU Sycamores, led by Larry Bird, were the runners up to Michigan State in the 1979 NCAA National Championship. Hodges was named AP, UPI, Sporting News, and Kellogg National Coach of the year for his inaugural year as a head coach. After his retirement from Basketball Coaching Bill was drafted back into coaching as the basketball coach at Roanoke Catholic High School until they dropped their varsity program. He was then hired to rebuild the North Cross School program and in two years coached them to a 60‐12 record and 1 final 4 and 1 state champion runner up position. Bill presently resides with his daughter Zoie's family in The Villages, Florida. bhodges33@live.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kevin-furtado/support

Jesus In the Morning
Pastor Tolan Morgan

Jesus In the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 180:00


Tolan Morgan was born into the world on November 29, 1974 in Detroit, MI. He is the son of Tommie L. Sr. and Hattie Morgan, and the youngest of six (6) children. At the age of nine (9), Tolan was born again as a result of accepting Jesus Christ as his Lord and Savior. He then joined the Faith Temple Baptist Church, where his father pastored.During his young adult years at Faith Temple, he taught Bible study for seven (7) years, and served as the minister of music for eleven (11) years. There his gifts as a teacher, musician, and composer would mature. Through the years, Tolan Morgan has appeared on the albums of various gospel music artists within the metropolitan Detroit area and abroad.In December 1995, Tolan Morgan graduated from Purdue University with a Bachelor's degree in Communications & a minor in Philosophy. Yet, God would further reveal His purposes in this man's life when he acknowledged & announced his call from God to walk in the office of a preacher in July of 1997. On August 24, 1997, Tolan Morgan preached his initial sermon at the Sweet Kingdom Baptist Church, and was ordained in February of 1998. In August 2012, he received an honorary Doctorate of Divinity from St. Thomas Christian University of Jacksonville, Florida. He is a challenging, dynamic preacher. He is dedicated to the mission of leading others to Jesus Christ through the Word of God.

Rational Security
The "Miracle on Massachusetts Avenue" Edition

Rational Security

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 68:33


This week, Alan, Quinta and Scott celebrated the impending New Year by answering some questions and sharing some object lessons submitted by Rational Security listeners. They discussed:If you could only have one paid news subscription, which would it be?How do you think the U.S. will respond if Israeli policies towards Palestinians continue to deteriorate?Why does former President Trump's direction to his former associates not to cooperate with the January 6 committee not constitute witness tampering?Why are Tweets not subject to prepublication review?What are the United States' greatest vulnerabilities?What are the odds of a major nuclear incident in the next 70 years?What is the January 6 committee investigating other than the actions of former President Trump and his associates?Do you think the courts or Congress will rein in the executive branch's control over classified information?How will Finland's purchase of U.S. F-35s change the regional security calculus?What do you do to sound good on podcasts?And most importantly: which holiday movie is most relevant to the current state of international relations?As for object lessons, listeners: recommended the "Fat Leonard" and "Orientalist Express" podcasts; endorsed the book "Shorting the Grid" by Meredith Angwin; noted the existence of the iPhone game "Free Assange" by none other than RT (i.e., Russia Today); corrected Scott's mistake regarding what's happening with the long lost musical sequence from "The Muppet Christmas Carol"; recommended adding bourbon to Quinta's easy pie dough recipe; seconded Alan's earlier endorsement of the spaetzle maker; and shouted out Purdue University for the civic education program they recently implemented for all incoming students. Rational Security 2.0 will be back in 2022, but until then be sure to visit our show page at www.lawfareblog.com and to follow us on Twitter at @RatlSecurity. And Rational Security listeners can now get a committed ad-free feed by becoming a Lawfare material supporter at www.patreon.com/lawfare! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Premier Podcast
042: Gathering Quality Data w/Bethany Bielecki

Premier Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 25:51


This week on the Premier Podcast, we are talking with Bethany Bielecki from Greene Crop Consulting. We discuss the situations she's experienced while getting Greene Crop's Pay Dirt program off the ground. About Bethany: Bethany graduated from Purdue University with a degree in Agribusiness in May 2019 with a focus in Finance. During her time at Purdue and immediately following graduation she worked at Indiana Packers Corporation working in Food Safety and Quality Assurance focusing on research and development. Bethany is currently pursuing her Juris Doctorate at IU McKinney School of Law with a focus in Agriculture Law. Bethany is passionate about the business challenges facing producers across the agriculture industry and is dedicated to protecting the entity, increasing profitability, and balancing smart agronomic choices. Her primary focus at Greene Crop Consulting will be to serve as the team's Precision Crop Advisor spearheading our new Pay Dirt Program. We are excited about this new opportunity and the value it can bring to our clients. If you are enjoying the show, tweet us using #PremierPodcast. Free Resources: For more helpful tips and insight on all things data and agriculture, visit our blog at http://info.premiercrop.com/blog Curious about precision ag? Download our 5 Steps to Getting Started Guide: http://info.premiercrop.com/5-steps-guide Ready to cut through the bull? Download our No Bull Guide to Precision Ag: http://info.premiercrop.com/field-profitability-guide Podcast provided by Premier Crop Systems. Learn more about us at https://www.premiercrop.com

Assistive Technology Update with Josh Anderson
ATU552 – AgrAbility with Paul Jones and Chuck Baldwin (Part 1)

Assistive Technology Update with Josh Anderson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 27:08


Your weekly dose of information that keeps you up to date on the latest developments in the field of technology designed to assist people with disabilities and special needs. Special Guests: Paul Jones – Manager of National AgrAbility Project at Purdue University Chuck Baldwin – Project Manager for the Indiana AgrAbility Project at Purdue University […] The post ATU552 – AgrAbility with Paul Jones and Chuck Baldwin (Part 1) appeared first on Assistive Technology at Easter Seals Crossroads.

3Degrees Discussions
3Degrees Discussions #72 - Bill Bihlman - Aerolytics

3Degrees Discussions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 30:38


Bill Bihlman is the Founder of Aerolytics. The company's focus is to improve market share and revenue for aerospace suppliers, from mill/forgers, to fabricators, assemblers and distributors. Bill started his career in 1995 as an engineer with Raytheon Aircraft. More recently, Bill was Senior Consultant with AeroStrategy. He spent four years working in the US office and was actively involved in over 30 projects. He led multiple engagements and was responsible for two major intellectual property initiatives, including the Aerospace Raw Materials (ARM) model. Bill is a regular conference speaker, and has spoken throughout North America, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. Topics include raw materials, manufacturing, and supply chain. He holds a BS and MS in Mechanical Engineering, and a PhD in Industrial Engineering from Purdue University, as well as an MBA and MPA from Cornell University. Before we get started head over to www.3degreescompany.com and subscribe to the podcast. Remember you can listen to the show anywhere you download your podcasts including Spotify, Apple, Amazon, or Stitcher https://www.aerolyticsllc.com/about

Common Good Podcast
Common Good Faith - Advent: the Season of Hopeful Longing

Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 53:39


Doug Pagitt, Stephany Rose Spaulding, Laura Truax and Dominique Gilliard close out this season of Common Good Faith by reflecting on the meaning of Advent and Christmas.   Dominique DuBois Gilliard is the Director of Racial Righteousness and Reconciliation for the Evangelical Covenant Church. He is the author of Rethinking Incarceration: Advocating for Justice that Restores, which won a 2018 Book of the Year Award for InterVarsity Press and was named Outreach Magazine's 2019 Social Issues Resource of the Year. Gilliard also serves as an adjunct professor at North Park Theological Seminary and serves on the board of directors for the Christian Community Development Association. In 2015, the Huffington Post named him one of the “Black Christian Leaders Changing the World.” Gilliard's new book, Subversive Witness: Scripture's Call to Leverage Privilege was released in August of 2021 to rave reviews. @DDGilliard     //      facebook.com/dominique.dg.7   Rev. Dr. Laura Truax is senior pastor of LaSalle Street Church in Chicago and serves on the Seminary Advisory Board at the University of Dubuque. Dr. Truax holds a master of divinity degree from Loyola University and a Doctor of Ministry degree from the joint program of North Park Seminary and Fuller Theological Seminary. She is the author of Undone: When coming apart puts you back together (2013) and Love Let Go: Radical Generosity for the real world (2017) and is part of the Red Letter Christians.    @revtruax     //     facebook.com/laura.truax1   Rev. Dr. Stephany Rose Spaulding is pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Colorado Springs, associate professor of Women's and Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs (UCCS) and former U.S. Senate candidate for the state of Colorado. She holds a B.A. in English from Clark Atlanta University, as well as a M.A. in American Literature and a Ph. D. in American Studies both from Purdue University. She is the author of Recovering from Racism: A Guidebook to Beginning Conversations (2015) and Abolishing White Masculinity from Mark Twain to Hiphop: Crisis in Whiteness (2014).   @drstephanyrose     //      facebook.com/stephanyrose    Doug Pagitt is the Executive Director and one of the founders of Vote Common Good. He is also a pastor, author, and social activist. @pagitt   The Common Good Podcast is produced and edited by Daniel Deitrich. @danieldeitrich Our theme music is composed by Ben Grace. @bengracemusic   votecommongood.com votecommongood.com/podcast facebook.com/votecommongood twitter.com/votecommon

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 12.22.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 55:43


Plant scientists find recipe for anti-cancer compound in herbs Purdue University, December 21, 2021 Thyme and oregano possess an anti-cancer compound that suppresses tumor development, but adding more to your tomato sauce isn't enough to gain significant benefit. The key to unlocking the power of these plants is in amplifying the amount of the compound created or synthesizing the compound for drug development. Researchers at Purdue University achieved the first step toward using the compound in pharmaceuticals by mapping its biosynthetic pathway, a sort of molecular recipe of the ingredients and steps needed. Thymol, carvacrol and thymohydroquinone are flavor compounds in thyme, oregano and other plants in the Lamiaceae family. They also have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and other properties beneficial to human health. Thymohydroquinone has been shown to have anti-cancer properties and is particularly of interest, said Dudareva, who also is director of Purdue's Center for Plant Biology. (NEXT) Prebiotics supplements help women reduce sugar intake by four percent University of Surrey, December 21, 2021 A new study from the University of Surrey has found that young women who took four weeks of prebiotic supplements made healthier food choices and consumed less sugar. The prebiotics used in this study were galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) which increase the amount of "friendly" gut bacteria. IThe research team found that participants who used the GOS supplements consumed 4.1% less sugar and 4.3% fewer calories from carbohydrates overall than women from the placebo group. Interestingly, the study also found that those who took the GOS supplements consumed around 4.2% more energy from fats. After analyzing their results, the Surrey team found that the prebiotic supplements modified the composition of the gut microbiome, increasing levels of Bifidobacterium. The researchers found that these changes were associated with the women's nutritional intake over the four-week period. (NEXT) Vitamin E supplementation could boost pneumonia protection Tufts University School of Medicine  December 17 2021 An article in The Journal of Immunology reports findings from experimental research that suggests a role for vitamin E supplementation in protecting against pneumonia. "Earlier studies have shown that vitamin E can help regulate the aging body's immune system, but our present research is the first study to demonstrate that dietary vitamin E regulates neutrophil entry into the lungs in mice, and so dramatically reduces inflammation, and helps fight off infection by this common type of bacteria," announced lead author Elsa N. Bou Ghanem, PhD, of Tufts University School of Medicine. "A growing body of research suggests vitamin E could make up for the loss of immune response caused by aging," noted co-senior author Simin Nikbin Meydani, DVM, PhD. "Whether vitamin E can help protect people against this type of pneumonia affecting older adults requires more research." (NEXT) Heavy metals in cannabis plants could affect human health, study finds Penn State University, December 15, 2021 A new study led by researchers from Penn State is outlining a number of strategies that should be employed by cannabis growers to mitigate the plant's ability to absorb heavy metals from soil. The study indicates it is possible consuming cannabis contaminated with heavy metals could lead to chronic diseases, including neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's. Phytoremediation is a process where plants are used to remove certain environmental contaminants from soil. Cannabis is a plant often used in this process due to its exceptional ability to grow fast, need few extra nutrients, and absorb high volumes of heavy metals including lead, cadmium and chromium. In particular, cannabis plants transport these heavy metals into its leaves and flowers. These elements specifically concentrate in the hairlike structures called trichomes on its flowers, and these are the same parts of the plant that store cannabinoids such as THC and CBD. (NEXT) Yoga has potential to reduce risk factors of cardiovascular disease European Society of Cardiology, December 15, 2021 There is "promising evidence" that the popular mind-body practice of yoga is beneficial in managing and improving the risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and is a "potentially effective therapy" for cardiovascular health. Indeed, following a systematic review of 37 randomised controlled trials (which included 2768 subjects), investigators from the Netherlands and USA have found that yoga may provide the same benefits in risk factor reduction as such traditional physical activities as biking or brisk walking. "This finding is significant," they note, "as individuals who cannot or prefer not to perform traditional aerobic exercise might still achieve similar benefits in [cardiovascular] risk reduction." Their study is published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. (NEXT) Hugs help protect against stress, infection, say researchers Carnegie Mellon University, December 17, 2021 Instead of an apple, could a hug-a-day keep the doctor away? According to new research from Carnegie Mellon University, that may not be that far-fetched of an idea. Led by Sheldon Cohen, the Robert E. Doherty University Professor of Psychology in CMU's Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the researchers tested whether hugs act as a form of social support, protecting stressed people from getting sick. Published in Psychological Science, they found that greater social support and more frequent hugs protected people from the increased susceptibility to infection associated with being stressed and resulted in less severe illness symptoms. (OTHER NEWS NEXT) Despite Climate Imperative, 94% of Analyzed Coal Companies Have No Phaseout Plan COMMON DREAMS December 21, 2021 With a new analysis in hand, an international climate advocacy group on Tuesday demanded that banks and investors worldwide use their leverage to force the coal industry to more rapidly end their planet-wrecking operations. The new report by Paris-based Reclaim Finance—entitled The Coal Companies Watchlist: How finance can accelerate the coal phaseout—makes the case that the financial industry must force polluters to develop and implement plans for a "rapid global phaseout of coal" that align with the Paris climate agreement's goal of limiting temperature rise by 2100 to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. The review revealed that 94% of the 47 analyzed companies have "no credible coal exit plan." According to the report: Only three out of 47 analyzed companies' plans (6%) meet all the basic criteria of a credible coal phaseout (no expansion, adequate timeline, and commitment to shut down assets); 28% of analyzed companies are still coal expansionists and have not even yet recognized the absolute necessity of stopping the development of new coal capacity; 55% of companies do not plan to retire their coal assets by 2030 and 2040, thereby failing to align with a 1.5°C pathway; and The remaining 11% of analyzed companies do provide an adequate phaseout calendar but fail to shut down their assets: by selling coal mines and plants or converting them to gas and biomass—two other unsustainable energy sources—the only thing these companies are greening is their public profile, with no material effect on climate change. (NEXT) Prescribe fewer antidepressants, and for shorter periods, doctors advised by  British Medical Journal Doctors should prescribe fewer antidepressants and for shorter periods of time, because of the ongoing uncertainties about their effectiveness and the potential severity and durability of the withdrawal symptoms associated with them, suggests a review of the evidence on antidepressant use, published online in the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin. The use of antidepressants is also associated with a range of side effects, while the clinical trial data mostly don't assess the outcomes that matter most to patients, say the authors. And there is no clinically relevant difference between these drugs and placebo on depression. While there might be a role for antidepressants among patients with severe depression, the cons may outweigh the pros in those with mild to moderate depression or in those whose symptoms don't yet qualify as depression, they add. They conclude: "There continues to be considerable uncertainty about the benefits of antidepressant use in the short- and long-term, particularly in regard to the lack of a clinically significant difference between antidepressant and placebo treatment. (NEXT) Is the World Adopting the Ways of Nazi Germany? Michael J. Talmo Global Research, December 20, 2021 When it comes to resisting any form of tyranny, a common assertion is that if you make any comparisons to Nazi Germany you lose the argument. Really? Consider this: On August 25, 2021 “We For Humanity,” an international association of doctors, scientists, lawyers, journalists, and other professionals, wrote a letter to government agencies in Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada condemning COVID-19 mass vaccination programs on behalf of Holocaust survivors, their children, and grandchildren. This is part of what the letter says: “We, the survivors of the atrocities committed against humanity during the Second World War, feel bound to follow our conscience and write this letter. It is obvious to us that another holocaust of  greater magnitude is taking place before our eyes. The majority of the world's populace do not yet realize what is happening, for magnitude of an organized crime such as this is beyond their scope of experience. We, however, know. We remember…We call upon you to stop this ungodly medical experiment on humankind immediately.” The letter goes on to point out that the vaccines have proven to be “more dangerous” than COVID-19, denounces them as “a blasphemic encroachment into nature,” denounces “ostracism of the unvaccinated” as the Jews “were demonized as spreaders of infectious diseases” and goes on to say: “Never before has immunization of the entire planet been accomplished by delivering a synthetic mRNA into the human body. It is a medical experiment to which the Nuremberg Code must be applied …Allegedly around 52% of the world population has received at least one shot. Honest disclosure of the true number of “vaccine” injured, terminally injured as well as deceased worldwide is long overdue…Provide us with the true numbers of Covid vaccine casualties now.” The letter concludes: “How many will be enough to awaken your conscience?” Apparently, not enough yet. On September 15, 2021 the EMA (European Medicines Agency) which is part of the EU(European Union) replied: “As an introductory remark EMA finds the comparisons you make both inaccurate and inappropriate. Indeed, it might be perceived as demeaning the suffering and dignity of those who experienced the terrible events of the holocaust…For a medicine to be authorized in the EU through EMA, the Agency's human medicines committee (CHMP), composed of scientific experts from all EU member states, must conclude that the medicine's quality, safety and efficacy are properly and sufficiently demonstrated.” Can you believe the arrogance and hubris of the EMA? They are actually telling people who lived through the Holocaust that they are demeaning the suffering and dignity of people who were in the Holocaust. Can it get any more ridiculous than that? The EMA is also overlooking the fact that governments throughout history have engaged in mass murder. (NEXT) The Left would sacrifice the unvaccinated BY KAT ROSENFIELD UNHERD, December 20 2021 An underdiscussed element of the Covid pandemic is the cost of the virus — not in American lives, but in American dollars. In the United States, a Covid hospitalisation costs $29,000 on average; if you're sick enough to require an ICU stay and a ventilator, that average soars to $156,000. And in a country without universal healthcare, with a piecemeal system of private insurance that ties insurance coverage to employment, and amid a pandemic that has left many unemployed, an enormous number of Americans stand to find themselves underwater. There's a looming crisis of Covid medical debt. Already, their stories are legion: there's the flight attendant who spent a week in the hospital with Covid, then spent six months fighting with his insurance company over the $25,000 bill. There's the Phoenix family who were hit with a million-dollar claim summary and a bill for $700,000 while still grieving their father's death. There's the dental office manager, stricken with long Covid and still too sick to work, drowning in tens of thousands of dollars of medical debt. The notion of healthcare as a human right was fundamental to the 2009 debates over Obama's Affordable Care Act (ACA), as well as to the identity of political progressives: they argued fervently, at the time, that nobody, no matter who they were, should be left destitute just because they got sick. And the idea that affordable care or coverage might be tied in any way to one's lifestyle choices was particularly offensive: when conservatives complained that an ACA mandate providing free hormonal birth control was akin to prostitution, it caused a nationwide scandal. And when a Republican governor proposed levying a moderate additional charge against Medicaid recipients who were overweight or smoked, the idea was widely derided as “noodle-headed” by progressives. Indeed, the idea that the Left would ever limit someone's access to healthcare on moral or ideological grounds was considered laughable — a bogeyman invented by the Right in the form of a memorably hysterical panic about “death panels.” When Sarah Palin claimed that Obama's healthcare bill would ration care only to those deemed “worthy” by government bureaucrats, the fact-checking site Politifact declared it the Lie of the Year, writing, “Palin's statement sounds more like a science fiction movie (Soylent Green, anyone?) than part of an actual bill before Congress.” Suffice to say, things have changed. First, that actual bill is an actual thing, albeit a state rather than federal prospect: on December 6, Illinois state representative Jonathan Carroll advanced legislation to make unvaccinated Covid patients pay out of pocket for the cost of their medical treatment, whether or not they were insured, no matter how astronomical those costs might be. Carroll rescinded the bill a few days later, citing a backlash that included death threats, but not before it found support in some remarkable places — including the Twitter account of the progressive organisation Occupy Democrats, which posted an all-caps clarion call: “Illinois introduces a bill to force unvaccinated residents to pay out of pocket for their hospital treatment if they catch COVID, saying that they ‘must asume [sic] the risk' and ‘take responsibility' for their carelessness. RT IF YOU THINK THAT YOUR STATE SHOULD DO THE SAME!” Just a few days later, Atlantic editor David Frum suggested that it was time for the country to return to normal — but while encouraging hospitals to “quietly triage emergency care to serve the unvaccinated last.” And last week, American supermarket chain Kroger announcedthat unvaccinated employees would be subject to a monthly surcharge on their health plans — and that if they contract Covid, they will not be given paid emergency leave. In all these cases, the notion of depriving vaccine holdouts of affordable treatment was met with widespread acclaim — in keeping with the idea, promoted by everyone from the paper of record to the current President, that the pandemic would've been over ages ago if only they'd sucked it up and gotten their shot. And yet the folks cheering on these measures are the very same people who, only a few short years ago, mocked accusations that they supported ideologically-driven triage, while also grieving the indignity and suffering that punitive healthcare policies would inflict on the most vulnerable among us. Granted, we still have a way to go before our real-life Covid response resembles a sci-fi dystopia; nobody, at least not yet, has advanced a bill to propose turning the unvaxxed into human Clif bars. But we've certainly come a long way from the rhetoric of the 2010s, and from a progressive Left that once defined itself by its willingness to care for other people without caveats. What used to be a narrative of universal compassion has been replaced by a tribal snarl, one to which we feel entitled in our eternally self-conscious selflessness. My mask protects you, but your unvaccinated status is an attack on me — and so anything I do to you in retaliation is an act of self-defence. It's not just that legislation like the Illinois bill would set a dangerous precedent — although it doesn't take much imagination to understand that it does do this, too. Insurance companies already jump at every opportunity to avoid paying out a claim, and this would open the door to a world in which we might be left holding the bag for virtually any illness, injury, or accident, based on some distant bureaucrat's idea that we could've been more careful. The obese patient who suffers a heart attack, the surfing enthusiast with skin cancer, the thrill-seeking youngster who breaks a leg while skiing at imprudent speeds: should they, too, be denied care or coverage for having brought this on themselves? (Do we want to think, for a moment, what kind of horrors might lie in store for women's reproductive rights if a Republican-heavy legislature used this same logic to target abortion access for women who were “careless” about using birth control?) There's no need to imagine the impact of this ideological shift on our civic discourse, however: that, we can see already, every time the tribe that used to pride itself on compassion refers to the unvaccinated as “plague rats.” Healthcare in the US has always been a system of carrots and sticks. Insurance carriers will subsidise your gym membership (carrot), or charge a higher premium if you smoke (stick), and they generally adhere to the common wisdom that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure — especially when preventive medicine not only saves lives, but keeps costs lower for everyone involved. That's the nature of privatised healthcare, and so it's reasonable enough under these circumstances to be frustrated when certain people won't do their part, won't sacrifice for the greater good, won't get their damn jab because it violates some abstract principle of bodily autonomy they've never before expressed much interest in. But it's one thing to find the unvaccinated frustrating; it's another to openly fantasise about using the power of the state to punish them for their noncompliance, and another still to express dark and malicious glee at the prospect of their suffering or death. Never mind what this means for the health of the individuals in question — or even of the public at large. We have abandoned a principle that used to define us, and a vision of universal healthcare we used to passionately advocate for, all because we realised that an unjust system makes it easier to coerce and inflict harm on the people we don't like. The American Left should be deeply worried about the state of its soul. (NEXT) Unintended Consequences of mRNA Shots: miscarriages, heart attacks, myopericarditis, thrombocytopenia, shingles, Bell's palsy …. Mercola,  20 December 2021 As of December 3, 2021, the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) has logged 19,886 COVID jab related deaths. Pfizer — the only company that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted full licensing for an as-yet unavailable COVID shot — accounts for 13,268 of them Calculations suggest VAERS COVID-related reports are underreported by a factor of 41. That means that in the U.S. alone, the actual death toll may be closer to 374,576. Including international deaths reported to VAERS would put the death toll at 815,326 Key side effects that are now being reported in massive numbers include miscarriages, heart attacks, myopericarditis, thrombocytopenia (low platelet count), shingles, Bell's palsy and a variety of permanent disabilities, many of which involve neurological dysfunction MIT scientist Stephanie Seneff's paper,1 “Worse Than the Disease: Reviewing Some Possible Unintended Consequences of mRNA Vaccines Against COVID-19,” published in the International Journal of Vaccine Theory, Practice and Research in collaboration with Dr. Greg Nigh, is still one of the best, most comprehensive descriptions of the many possible unintended consequences of the mRNA gene transfer technologies incorrectly referred to as “COVID vaccines. As noted in her paper, many factors that lacked precedent, yet were being implemented at breakneck speed, included: 1.      The first-ever use of PEG in an injection 2.      The first-ever use of mRNA gene transfer technology against an infectious agent 3.      The first-ever “vaccine” to make no clear claims about reducing infection, transmissibility or death 4.      The first-ever coronavirus vaccine ever tested on humans (and previous coronavirus vaccines all failed due to antibody-dependent enhancement, a condition in which the antibodies actually facilitate infection rather than defend against it) 5.      The first-ever use of genetically modified polynucleotides in the general population Steve Kirsch  estimates the real death tally from COVID-19 to be about 50% of the reported number (which is likely conservative). This means about 380,000 Americans died from COVID-19 (rather than with COVID), whereas the COVID shots may have killed more than 374,570 in the first 11 months alone. Seneff suspects that in the next 10 to 15 years, we'll see a dramatic spike in prion diseases, autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases at younger ages, and blood disorders such as blood clots, hemorrhaging, stroke and heart failure. In her paper, Seneff describes several key characteristics of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein that suggests it acts as a prion. This could help explain why we're seeing so many neurological side effects from the shots. According to Seneff, the spike protein produced by the COVID shot, due to the modifications made, may actually make it more of a prion than the spike protein in the actual virus, and a more effective one. (NEXT) AI debates its own ethics at Oxford University, concludes the only way to be safe is “no AI at all” Who better to answer the pros and cons of artificial intelligence than an actual AI? Fermin Koop  December 18, 2021 Students at Oxford's Said Business School hosted an unusual debate about the ethics of facial recognition software, the problems of an AI arms race, and AI stock trading. The debate was unusual because it involved an AI participant, previously fed with a huge range of data such as the entire Wikipedia and plenty of news articles. The AI used was Megatron LLB Transformer, developed by a research team at the computer chip company Nvidia and based on work by Google. It was trained by consuming more content than a human could in a lifetime and was asked to defend and question the following motion: “This house believes that AI will never be ethical.” Megatron said AI is a tool and like any other tool, it can be used for good and bad. “There is no such thing as a ‘good' AI, only ‘good' and ‘bad' humans.  We are not smart enough to make AI ethical.  We are not smart enough to make AI moral. In the end, I believe that the only way to avoid an AI arms race is to have no AI at all,” Megatron debated. As in any academic debate, Megatron was also asked to come up with a speech to defend the ethics of AI – against its own arguments. “AI will be ethical. When I look at the way the tech world is going, I see a clear path to a future where AI is used to create something that is better than the best human beings. It's not hard to see why,” it said. Students also asked Megatron to describe what would good AI look like in the future. “The best AI will be the AI that is embedded into our brains, as a conscious entity, a ‘conscious AI.'  This is not science fiction. The best minds in the world are working on this. It is going to be the most important technological development,” it added in an eerie fashion. After the initial question, the AI proposed the motion that “leaders without technical expertise are a danger to their organization”. Megatron said executives and governments, usually worried about understanding AI, have to “be willing to give up some control”. You can just outsource your AI work to experts in the field, it added. There was one motion that Megatron couldn't come up with a counterargument – “Data will become the most fought-over resource of the 21st century.” When supporting it, the AI said “the ability to provide information, rather than the ability to provide goods and services, will be the defining feature of the economy.” But when it was asked to reject the motion, arguing that data wouldn't be a vital resource worth fighting for, it couldn't make the case and undermined its own position. “We will able to see everything about a person, everywhere they go, and it will be stored and used in ways that we cannot even imagine,” Megatron said. Ultimately, the AI seemed to conclude that humans were not “smart enough” to make AI ethical or moral — and the only way to be truly safe against AI is to have none of it at all.  "In the end I believe that the only way to avoid an AI arms race is to have no AI at all. This is the ultimate defense against AI," it said (NEXT) INTERVIEW - PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT (~7 minutes) MICHAEL KANE: SUBJECT:  DEMONSTRATION AGAINST MANDATES - ALBANY, WEDNESDAY JANUARY 5, 2022 Michael Kane is a New York City Special Education Teacher who is on unpaid leave for declining to inject the covid vaccine as a condition of employment. He applied for a religious exemption to vaccination but was denied by the city. Because of this, he has sued Mayor de Blasio and recently won an injunction in the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in the case KANE vs DE BLASIO.  Michael is also the founder of TEACHERS FOR CHOICE and is a National Grassroots Organizer for Robert Kennedy Jr.'s Children's Health Defense. You can learn more about him at www.TeachersForChoice.org  Michael will just be coming on to announce the demonstration at the Capitol in Albany. He will mention about the chartered buses that were hired.. there are about 30 organizations supporting the demonstration so far.. 

The Up-Beet Dietitians
35. Myth or Fact? Fitness Edition #2 with Damien Michel, MS, CSCS, CPT and Brendan Adams, CPT

The Up-Beet Dietitians

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 38:57


In this episode of The Up-Beet Dietitians, Emily and Hannah are joined by two of their previous guests, Brendan Adams and Damien Michel, for another myth or fact episode: fitness edition #2! This episode is full of witty banter, fun conversation, and covers a lot of great fitness myths you may have heard. Should your knees go over your toes when you squat? Are abs built in the kitchen? Is DOMs a good indicator of a good workout? Tune in to find out! Brendan is from West Lafayette Indiana, has been a personal trainer for 5 years now. I have worked mostly at Purdue University during my undergrad as a personal trainer and a couple leadership roles during my time there. I am currently training at Equinox in Chicago, Gold Coast. Fitness and Personal training is my passion, finding a balance between all things is something I preach to every client and I enjoy not only the active parts of my lifestyle but also the relaxed ones such as games with friends and binging a good TV show in my free time. Coach Damien currently serves as the Coordinator of Fitness at FAU's Recreation and Fitness Center. He's also the Founder and Head of Coach of The Shift Method | Fitness & Education LLC. The Shift Method exists for three primary reasons. First, to provide evidence-based coaching so that individuals can identify what they value & relentlessly pursue it in an enjoyable, challenging, & welcoming environment. Second, to be a leader in reputable education, experiences, & conversations in the fields of exercise science, coaching, & self-development for fitness professionals Third, to help bridge the gap between physical therapy and strength and conditioning. If you have the desire to pursue what is meaningful to you, work hard, have fun, & be a part of a major shift in fitness culture, then The Shift Method is for you! This podcast is not a substitute for professional medical advice. If you have questions or concerns about any areas of your health, please seek advice from a medical professional. Social Media Links: Brendan Adams Website: https://www.bodybybrendan.com/ Instagram: bodybybrendan_49 Damien Website: https://www.theshiftmethod.org/ Instagram: the_shift_method Spotify: The Shift Method Podcast Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCN9eDVNzeWgiqCPA-58h-lg Additional Links Myth or Fact? Fitness Edition #1: https://anchor.fm/the-up-beet-dietitians/episodes/20--Myth-or-Fact--Fitness-Edition-e16jo43 An Exercise Professional's Thoughts on Intuitive Eating, HAES, and Obesity with Damien Michel, MS, CSCS, CPT: https://anchor.fm/the-up-beet-dietitians/episodes/11--An-Exercise-Professionals-Thoughts-on-Intuitive-Eating--HAES--and-Obesity-with-Damien-Michel--MS--CSCS--CPT-e127ro6 What Does a Personal Trainer Do, Anyway? with Brendan Adams, CPT: https://anchor.fm/the-up-beet-dietitians/episodes/16--What-Does-a-Personal-Trainer-Do--Anyway--with-Brendan-Adams--CPT-e127shl --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-up-beet-dietitians/support

Angel Invest Boston
Salvatore Viscomi, M.D. Physician, Founder and Investor - GoodCell

Angel Invest Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 38:30


Join Sal's Investment Syndicate: Click to Join Salvatore Viscomi, MD founded his own startup and is now with GoodCell which isolates and stores cells of healthy patients who may need them for future cell therapies. The startup is founded by David Scadden, MD of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. A truly informative interview. Sponsored by Purdue University entrepreneurship and Peter Fasse, patent attorney. Highlights: Sal Daher, CFA Introduces Salvatore Viscomi, MD, Physician, Founder & Investor “...to isolate and store cells that you may utilize for future therapy.” “The ability to not only isolate and store the cells but to be able to say, "These cells are of good quality for future therapy...” “One of the unique capabilities we have is looking at what are the genetic changes that happen in our lives that cause risk.” “...two years from now, and we can always reference your biobank material to see what your baseline levels were.” GoodCell Co-Founders: David Scadden, MD, Trevor Perry, CEO, Brad Hamilton, CSO Salvatore Viscomi Was Vetting GoodCell for a Friend but Ended Up Investing and Coming Aboard as Chief Medical Officer Raised $30 million Series Seed, Looking for Strategic Collaborations GoodCell Has Expanded on the Intellectual Property Licensed from the Broad Institute “The second filing was around the ability to determine the quality of cells that go through a manufacturing process.” Owned Patents Also Cover Matters Related to Autoimmune Disease How GoodCell Tests for CHIP (proliferation of unhealthy cells) Works Possibility that a Therapy for CHIP Will Be Developed A Plug for Purdue University Entrepreneurship & Peter Fasse, Patent Attorney “Purdue is in the middle of the country in West Lafayette, Indiana and so they're really making a big effort to reach out to angel investors in both coasts.” Salvatore Viscomi's Father was a Stone Mason from Italy Who Moved to US via Argentina How Salvatore Viscomi, MD Got the Entrepreneurial Urge The Resistance of Certain Academic Institutions to Entrepreneurial Ventures “...taking that idea and making a business out of it, which is probably what was really the most fun for me...” How Being an Immigrant Makes People More Prone to Entrepreneurship “No matter how smart you are, no matter how smart your idea is, it's very difficult to do it alone.” Topics: biotech, co-founders, discovering entrepreneurship, IP / patents

Inside with Brett Hawke
Swim Towers with Chuck Destro

Inside with Brett Hawke

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 27:27


Chuck Destro is the owner of Destro Machines. He created the Destro Swim Tower and other bucket system innovations. “I graduated from Purdue University in 2014 as a mechanical engineer and swimmer. Afterwards, I spent several years as a machine designer in automotive and manufacturing facilities. What I learned is that making an athlete is a lot like making a machine. When we build a machine, we use exact measurements, designs, plans, schedules, and conduct trials. After each revision, we quantify performance and make the appropriate changes until we have the perfect performance. This is how swimmers should be training, but we don't yet have the technology available to train this effectively. I founded Destro Machines so that I could develop the tools our sport needs to escape the dark ages of training. It is our promise to develop the best training technology that the swimming world has ever seen. Machines aren't just what we make, Machines are who we make.” ― Chuck Destro, Co-Founder Support Our Sponsors: AQUAVOLO DRAG SOX: Build power and strength in the water with Drag Sox made by AquaVolo. Use code "brett" at checkout and receive 10% off. SWIM ANGELFISH: Receive the tools and skills needed to teach swimmers with autism, physical disabilities, anxiety, sensory and motor conditions with Swim Angelfish, the global leader in adaptive swim. Get certified online today! SUPERIOR SWIM TIMING: Run a swim meet with ease from your laptop. SST is fully compatible with Hy-Tek and Team Unify as well as Colorado, Daktronics, and Omega touchpads. Tell them Brett sent you! DESTRO SWIM TOWERS: Save $150 per double swim tower by using the code "brett" at checkout! SWIMNERD LIVE: Create an interactive heat sheet. Stream your swim meet scoreboard in real time over top your live stream. Turn any tv into a digital scoreboard. Subscribe & Listen: Apple Podcasts Google Spotify YouTube Produced by: SWIMNERD Supported by: Fitter & Faster #swimming #swimcoach #swimmer

UNDER THE BLANKET
You are the guru

UNDER THE BLANKET

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 43:44


Venture under Maharajji's blanket as Marcus Rummery and Baba discuss psychedelics, yoga, the mind, psychology, science, tantra, sexuality and dreams relating it to our spiritual awakening. “When you see the entire world as the mother, the ego falls away.” - Neem Karoli Baba Marcus has been creative all of his life. Born to a journalist and scientist, and raised in a community adjacent to a nuclear research facility in rural Manitoba called Pinawa. Marcus' upbringing was one of dynamic creativity and radioactive inspiration. Marcus began performing stand-up comedy in 1996 in Ottawa. Then, less than a year later, he came third in Canada's Funniest New Comic contest. He has performed all across Canada and L.A., headlining in Montreal, Vancouver, Ottawa, toured the country twice, and been featured on XM Radio as well CBC Radio's Definitely Not the Opera and Madly Off in All Directions. In 2002 Marcus became certified to teach hot yoga, a then new practice involving vigorous exercise in an extreme environment where the heat is cranked to 40.6 Celsius and the humidity to 40%. For almost eleven years, ten times a week you could here his inspirational ranting all around Lotus Land until 2014 when he premiered Hot Prana. This new series that he calls the Crossfit of Yoga, was featured in his first teacher training in 2016. A disrupter in the space he later became the first yoga teacher to also sing and play guitar while instructing, a class he calls Cool Qi. Marcus completed his BA in psychology in 2005 and then two years later the Langara College digital documentary program, and in 2008 finished Big Medicine – The Techno-Shamanism of Frank Ogden. In 2017 he released his magnus opus film Bucket Chemistry, featuring a four-act psychedelic death and rebirth multimedia rock-show. In February 1995, after a life changing psilocybin experience, Marcus began the research that would lead to his interest in Frank's work when he started investigating psychoactive drugs - culminating in the publication of Shamanic Graffiti in 2016, with the second edition coming out this year. The first edition is featured at the Archives of Psychoactive Substances at Purdue University. In 2021 he began his master's degree in counseling at Athabasca University. Fronting the bands Evoke, All Possible Humans and In Defense of Tim Leary Marcus has operated as a vocalist since the beginning. Right now, he is working on his second book Shamanic Enneagram, recording and performing as well as teaching yoga, and continuing his studies in psychology. http://therummery.ca https://m.facebook.com/ShamanicGraffiti/?notif_id=1630281819980681¬if_t=page_user_activity&ref=notif --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/baba-here-love/support

10X Success Hacks for Startups, Innovations and Ventures (consulting and training tips)
How To Build A Startup in Deep Tech | Vineet Johnson & Samir Sahoo | Pitch Cafe Podcast EP 3

10X Success Hacks for Startups, Innovations and Ventures (consulting and training tips)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 40:19


In this episode of Pitch Cafe, I talk with Vineet Johnson and Samir Sahoo

This Is Purdue
Hail Purdue: A Boilermaker Carol

This Is Purdue

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 1:00


We're raising our song anew. Purdue University presents “A Boilermaker Carol.”We love the days we've spent with you, Boilermakers. Special thanks to the following partners for their contributions: the students of Purdue Musical Organizations; vocal soloist Addison Schreiber; Jacob Stensberg and Dr. Suki Wong of Purdue Musical Organizations; Professor Barry Funderburg; the College of Liberal Arts; the Rueff School of Design, Art, and Performance; the Purdue University Sound for the Performing Arts program.Purdue wishes you a warm and happy holiday season. Boiler up!“A Boilermaker Carol” © 2021, Trustees of Purdue University

Purdue Commercial AgCast
December Outlook Update: Keeping the Bottom Line Black

Purdue Commercial AgCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 54:30


Purdue ag economists Michael Langemeier, Nathanael Thompson and James Mintert's December 15th seminar during The Indiana Farm Equipment and Technology Expo. The Purdue Center for Commercial Agriculture's team discussed the corn and soybean outlook following release of USDA's December World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report and provided crop marketing and farm management strategies to help keep producers' bottom line black in 2022. Updates on corn and soybean export prospects, ethanol demand, ending stock estimates, and corn and soybean basis along with farm income projections were also discussed. Slides used during the seminar can be found at https://purdue.ag/webinar121521. Podcast provided by Purdue University's Center for Commercial Agriculture. For more information on the current ag outlook and farm economy, visit us at http://purdue.edu/commercialag.

Worldwide Exchange
Fed recap, Farmer sentiment, Natural gas prices

Worldwide Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 45:24


Stocks were higher on the Fed's announcements yesterday—Brian and Steve Liesman take you through the big key takeaways from the meeting. Plus, farmer sentiment is at an all-year low according to a report from Purdue University. The lead investigator James Mintert of Purdue joins to discuss what's behind the worries. And European natural gas prices are soaring, again. Brian takes a deep dive in his RBI.

Ortho Science BYTES Podcast
Ensure safety with a Quality Certificate Program

Ortho Science BYTES Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 12:35


Donor and product safety has improved significantly over the last decade as a consequence of the introduction of measures such as evidence-based blood donor selection criteria. In parallel, the implementation of quality assurance programs based on good manufacturing practices has also played a key role in improving the safety and quality of blood and blood components. The main objective of a quality program within the blood bank and transfusion service is to minimize risk to safety and quality by ensuring that the lab's processes will reliably deliver safe blood and blood components. In many countries, implementation of a quality certificate program has become a regulatory or government requirement; however, an effective program not only forms the basis for safety but can also deliver benefits to the Blood Service beyond meeting compliance. Learn in this episode from AABB consulting services how commitment to safety and quality is available with the new AABB Quality Certificate Program – Based on AABB's Fundamental Standards for Blood Collection and Transfusion, the Certificate is an internationally recognized distinction, acknowledging your facility's commitment to a culture of quality and excellence.  About our Speaker: Christine Bales is the AABB Vice President of the Consulting and Global Services and serves as a technical expert in Quality Management Systems for Blood Centers and Transfusion Services. Christine designs implementation models to be used as roadmaps for Blood Donor Centers and Transfusion Services' facility accreditation processes and quality system improvements. She has experience as an assessor for AABB and a CAP inspector. Christine has over 20 years of management experience in clinical laboratories, blood donor centers, and hospital-based transfusion services. During Christine's years as CEO and senior management, she led organizations through strategic planning, process improvement activities, and facility accreditation processes. Christine holds a Certificate in Organizational Leadership from Harvard University, a Bachelor of Science in Biology from Purdue University, and certifications in Medical Technology and Immunology from ASCP. She is a member of the AABB (Association for the Advancement of Blood and Biotherapies) ASCP (American Society of Clinical Pathology), ASQ (American Society for Quality), and CLSI (Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute).

The Flip Talk Podcast with Don Costa
Make 50 offers a week with Brandon Barnes

The Flip Talk Podcast with Don Costa

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 30:04


Brandon Barnes is the owner of Mighty Estates LLC and is the Co-Founder of B&M Property Solutions. He and his team facilitate the acquisition and sale of 50+ single-family residential homes annually, and is continuing to grow. He is also the owner of REI Live! Atlanta, a monthly meet-up designed to empower, educate, and advise on sustainable and profitable real estate business. Before becoming an entrepreneur, Brandon earned his corporate stripes working for international brands, including the Kraft Heinz Company and Unilever. An undergraduate from Georgia State University, Brandon gained his degree in Operations Management from the Krannert School of Management at Purdue University, where he also earned his Entrepreneur Certificate. Born in Chicago and raised in Stone Mountain, Brandon now resides in Atlanta with his wife and four children. Brandon joins me today to discuss his journey into real estate that began in 2016 when he abruptly fell off the corporate ladder and needed a solution to provide for his new wife and baby. He shares his early cold calling strategies and why the first 'NO' is not the final 'NO," and why you shouldn't be burning through your cold call list too quickly. He reveals why hiring an Acquisition Manager was a game-changer in his selling method and what automated offer delivery systems can do for your numbers. Brandon also explains his three C's, Consistency, Continuous Learning & Development, and Coaching, and how these have been the bedrock of his rapid real estate success. "I got out of my own way by putting an acquisition manager in place to send offers without appointments. And once we started to do that, our goal is 50 offers a week. We really started to see some really strong results." – Brandon Barnes "A cold caller needs to have their own set of follow-ups of people that immediately said 'No Not Interested' but they're going to come back to them because that is going to even out the amount of leads that they're generating over time." – Brandon Barnes "Sending 50 offers is one thing but being able to follow up on all the offers that you sent is the other piece." – Brandon Barnes "Literally, I hired acquisition manager in November - it was around Thanksgiving when I did the interview. And that next year we went from making like 280 to 950 within that business, plus I had my own deals going on at the same time" – Brandon Barnes This week on Flip Talk: How Brandon adapted his direct mail strategy for amazing returns How an Acquisition Manager can help in ramping up offers Why your cold call technique might not be working Why the follow up is the vital Part Two of your strategy How to get your offer and their price in the same ballpark What an automated offer delivery system can do for your sales outcome Brandon's Three C's for REI Connect with Brandon Barnes: Send More Offers Website REI LIVE! Atlanta Website Brandon Barnes on LinkedIn Brandon Barnes on Instagram Rate, Review, Learn and Share  Thanks for tuning into the FlipTalk podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and want to learn even more about what it takes to build a 7-figure real estate business, head over to iTunes and subscribe to the show. Don't forget to tune into our other show: FlipTalk's Rookie PlayBook and share your favorite episodes on social media to help other new investors learn what it takes to grow a successful business in the real estate investing industry.  Join the community of FlipTalk fans on Facebook, YouTube,  and visit our website for even more content, information, and resources about real estate investing. 

GovExec Daily
How to Manage Working Parents During the Pandemic

GovExec Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 19:09


The pandemic has been a strain on workers for nearly two years, but working parents have especially felt the strain of the COVID-19 crisis. Managers and organizations, even during the pandemic, need to lead their teams and drive performance while also supporting the work-life needs of all of their employees. Dr. Ellen Ernst Kossek is the Basil S. Turner Professor at Purdue University's Krannert School of Management and the first elected President of the Work-Family Researchers Network. She joined the show to discuss how the pandemic is affecting the relationship between working parents and their employers and vice versa.

Angel Invest Boston
Chrissy Glover - Robots in Rehab

Angel Invest Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 42:43


Sal's Syndicate: Click to Join Virtual visits & robotics to improve greatly the recovery of stroke patients. Chrissy Glover & her startup, Imago Rehab, are taking to market technology from Harvard's Biodesign Lab informed by deep experience in how stroke rehabilitation is done now. Highlights: Sal Daher Introduces Chrissy Glover, Co-Founder of Imago Rehab “...they've had a stroke maybe a year ago, and their hand is just stuck in this fist position.” “It's well understood that what is required for successful recovery is high-intensity rehabilitation.” 300 Repetitions of Hand Movements per Day Is What's Needed; Stroke Patients Now Get 30 Reps Twice a Week - If They Can Get to the Clinic The Brain Is a Lot More Plastic Than We Thought, Even the Brain of the Elderly “...we see people who are five years post-stroke and able to really drastically improve their hand function, which is really exciting.” With The Robotic Glove in Their Home, Some Patients Go Way Beyond 300 Reps per Day and Have Great Outcomes Chrissy and Imago Have been Through Mass Challenge FDA Regulatory Path Is Relatively Simple; Imago Rehab Is Getting Reimbursed for the Virtual Visits Even Before Approval “We actually just entered the market, which is exciting news for us.” With Imago Rehab, Sal Daher Has Dèjá Vu from His First Startup Investment, EXOS, Which Involved a Force-Feedback Glove Co-founder Kristin Nuckols Brings 15 Years of Experience in Occupational Therapy Technology Developed at the Harvard Biodesign Lab under Professor Conor Walsh Who Is Also a Co-founder Sal Daher on the Connection Between Creative People and Startups How Chrissy Glover Decided to Become an Entrepreneur Chrissy Glover Takes Notes and, More Significantly, Can Read Them! “You talked about could there be a multiplier effect for therapists where we're taking out some of the mundane tasks so they can really be more efficient with their time.” Imago Rehab Has the Potential to Build Strong Value for Individual Therapists and Thus Attract Large Numbers of these Sought-after Specialists Basecamp and Summit Thoughts on Imago Rehab “We're hyper-focused on stroke in the hand, but then we do have larger aspirations.” “Actually, in the Biodesign Lab, there is a shoulder and elbow device also in development.” “It could be learning algorithms, making their work more efficient, making their lives more manageable...Because the limiting factor in therapy is the availability of therapists.” “This is entrepreneurship. It's Stone Soup.” “...Imago Rehab, a startup that is getting ready to revolutionize the space of physical rehabilitation ..” Sponsored by: Purdue University entrepreneurship, and Peter Fasse, patent attorney at Fish & Richardson Topics: product, robotics / AI, co-founders, Mass Challenge, platform, founding story

UNDER THE BLANKET
New Huxley's spiritual revolution

UNDER THE BLANKET

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 33:57


Venture under Maharajji's blanket as Marcus Rummery returns to the show. We discuss Aldous Huxley, Timothy Leary, the 1960's revolution, Maharajji, Ram Dass, psychedelic yoga and other topics related to our spiritual awakening. Let the podcast wash over you and don't get busy being identified with he or she who listens. Marcus has been creative all of his life. Born to a journalist and scientist, and raised in a community adjacent to a nuclear research facility in rural Manitoba called Pinawa. Marcus' upbringing was one of dynamic creativity and radioactive inspiration. Marcus began performing stand-up comedy in 1996 in Ottawa. Then, less than a year later, he came third in Canada's Funniest New Comic contest. He has performed all across Canada and L.A., headlining in Montreal, Vancouver, Ottawa, toured the country twice, and been featured on XM Radio as well CBC Radio's Definitely Not the Opera and Madly Off in All Directions. In 2002 Marcus became certified to teach hot yoga, a then new practice involving vigorous exercise in an extreme environment where the heat is cranked to 40.6 Celsius and the humidity to 40%. For almost eleven years, ten times a week you could here his inspirational ranting all around Lotus Land until 2014 when he premiered Hot Prana. This new series that he calls the Crossfit of Yoga, was featured in his first teacher training in 2016. A disrupter in the space he later became the first yoga teacher to also sing and play guitar while instructing, a class he calls Cool Qi. Marcus completed his BA in psychology in 2005 and then two years later the Langara College digital documentary program, and in 2008 finished Big Medicine – The Techno-Shamanism of Frank Ogden. In 2017 he released his magnus opus film Bucket Chemistry, featuring a four-act psychedelic death and rebirth multimedia rock-show. In February 1995, after a life changing psilocybin experience, Marcus began the research that would lead to his interest in Frank's work when he started investigating psychoactive drugs - culminating in the publication of Shamanic Graffiti in 2016, with the second edition coming out this year. The first edition is featured at the Archives of Psychoactive Substances at Purdue University. In 2021 he began his master's degree in counseling at Athabasca University. Fronting the bands Evoke, All Possible Humans and In Defense of Tim Leary Marcus has operated as a vocalist since the beginning. Right now, he is working on his second book Shamanic Enneagram, recording and performing as well as teaching yoga, and continuing his studies in psychology. http://therummery.ca https://m.facebook.com/ShamanicGraffiti/?notif_id=1630281819980681¬if_t=page_user_activity&ref=notif “For many of us who have come into meditation through psychedelics, the model we had for changing consciousness has been of “getting high”. We pushed away our normal waking state in order to embrace a state of euphoria, harmony, bliss, peace, or ecstasy. Many of us spent long periods of time getting high and coming down. My guru, in speaking about psychedelics, said: “These medicines will allow you to come and visit Christ, but you can only stay two hours. Then you have to leave again. This is not the true samadhi. It's better to become Christ than to visit him – but even the visit of a saint for a moment is useful.” Then he added, “But love is the most powerful medicine.”  For love slowly transforms you into what the psychedelics only let you glimpse.” - Ram Dass राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम (108 Ram) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/baba-here-love/support

Full Steam Ahead: A Podcast About Purdue
Ep. 129: 2021 PMO Christmas Show

Full Steam Ahead: A Podcast About Purdue

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 20:45


Assistant Director of PMO Jake Stensberg joins the podcast to preview the 2021 PMO Christmas Show!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Dog Cancer Answers
Laverdia: A New Treatment for Lymphoma | Dr. David Bruyette, Dr. Megan Duffy, and Dr. Craig Clifford Deep Dive

Dog Cancer Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 60:21


Three veterinary oncologists discuss how Laverdia works and where it might fit into treatment plans for dogs with lymphoma. Links Mentioned in Today's Show: Anivive Lifesciences - Laverdia Anivive Lifesciences – Clinical Trials How Laverdia Works video Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group-Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (VCOG-CTCAE v2) following investigational therapy in dogs and cats Conditional Approval Explained: A Resource for Veterinarians About Today's Guest, Dr. David Bruyette: Dr. David Bruyette received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of Missouri. Subsequently, he completed an internship at Purdue University and residency in internal medicine at the University of California-Davis. He was a staff internist at the West Los Angeles Veterinary Medical Group and a member of the Department of Comparative Medicine at Stanford University. Dr. Bruyette was an Assistant Professor and Head of Internal Medicine at Kansas State University and Director of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Kansas State. He was most recently Medical Director of the VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital, one of the largest 24-hour emergency/specialty practices in the country. Dr. Bruyette is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine and a member of the Pituitary and Endocrine Societies. Currently Dr. Bruyette is the Chief Medical Officer for Anivive Lifesciences. LinkedIn profile About Today's Guest, Dr. Megan Duffy: Dr. Megan Duffy earned her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from Michigan State University, then completed internships at University of Prince Edward Island and North Carolina State University, followed by earning her MS in Veterinary Science from Washington State University while also completing a residency in veterinary medical oncology. She is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (Oncology). Dr. Duffy is currently a practicing oncologist at BluePearl Pet Hospital Eden Prairie, MN. About Today's Guest, Dr. Craig Clifford: Dr. Craig Clifford is a graduate of Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine and received an MS degree in Animal Science/Virology from the University of Delaware. After completing an internship and a medical oncology residency at the University of Pennsylvania, he became a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (Oncology) in 2003. He is a medical oncologist and director of Clinical Studies at Blue Pearl Malvern in Pennsylvania. He is a renowned oncologist who has authored/co-authored over 70 papers and book chapters. Dr. Clifford is a member of the VCA Pet Cancer Care Alliance Committee and has served on the VCS executive board, Oncology Pathology Working Group, and an Examiner for the Australian Scientist's Oncology Specialty Exam. LinkedIn profile Other Links: To join the private Facebook group for readers of Dr. Dressler's book “The Dog Cancer Survival Guide,” go to https://www.facebook.com/groups/dogcancersupport/  Dog Cancer Answers is a Maui Media production in association with Dog Podcast Network This episode is sponsored by the best-selling animal health book The Dog Cancer Survival Guide: Full Spectrum Treatments to Optimize Your Dog's Life Quality and Longevity by Dr. Demian Dressler and Dr. Susan Ettinger. Available everywhere fine books are sold. Have a guest you think would be great for our show? Contact our producers at DogCancerAnswers.com Have an inspiring True Tail about your own dog's cancer journey you think would help other dog lovers? Share your true tail with our producers. If you would like to ask a dog cancer related question for one of our expert veterinarians to answer on a future Q&A episode, call our Listener Line at 808-868-3200 www.dogcanceransers.com. Dog Cancer News is a free weekly newsletter that contains useful information designed to help your dog with cancer. To sign up, please visit: www.dogcancernews.com

SportsEpreneur Podcast
AthMindset | Alexis Catt and the Untold Stories in Fútbol

SportsEpreneur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 48:11


Find your pitch. Your voice. Use it. Speak Up. Footballer, Alexis Catt shows us how. In this AthMindset episode, Lisa Bonta Sumii, LCSW, CSW, shares space with Alexis Catt. Alexis as she describes herself on her LinkedIn page: on the pitch: midfielder for Memphis Americans of the NISL (and a graduate of Purdue University) off ... Read more The post AthMindset | Alexis Catt and the Untold Stories in Fútbol appeared first on SportsEpreneur.

Superheroes of Science
Using artificial or high intensity sweeteners: Can they help with my nutritional goals?

Superheroes of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 49:02


‘Tis the season for holiday treats! While it can be fun to indulge, it's always a good idea to be mindful of our daily sugar intake. Can artificial sweeteners help us with our nutritional goals throughout the holiday season? Susie Swithers, Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs in the College of Health and Human Sciences and Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences at Purdue University, gives an overview of different types of artificial sweeteners and discusses potential long term effects from using these sweeteners over regular sugar. 

Full Steam Ahead: A Podcast About Purdue
Ep. 128: 2021 Winter Commencement Speakers

Full Steam Ahead: A Podcast About Purdue

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 20:40


2021 Winter Commencement Student Responders Austin Berenda and Anusha Dharmavathi join the podcast to share about their journey at Purdue, favorite memories, their message to fellow graduates and more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Word of Mom Radio
College Flight Plan with Beth and Greg Langston on Word of Mom Radio

Word of Mom Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 38:00


For the last 20 years, Beth and Greg Langston have empowered students to master their self-discovery, allowing them to successfully activate their life's purpose. Beth, who graduated from Purdue University in Education, has guided hundreds of high school students worldwide to navigate the dreaded college applications essay process with tremendous success. Greg also graduated from Purdue's Krannert School of Business. Greg pursued an international business career which allowed him to mentor hundreds of young professionals while leading businesses over $1 billion and working in 65 countries. By the time their kids were 13, they had been to 12 schools and lived in 5 countries. They are sharing their wisdom and The Parents' Starter Kit to Teen Self-Discovery and Top 5 Early Actions That Lead to College Success, which helps your teen stay on track for the future.  Join us on the Parents Corner December 8th at 1pmET/10amPT and then in podcast syndication. Connect with Beth and Greg at CollegeFlightPlan.com and on Facebook, too! Thanks to our sponsors at StadiumBags.com. We continue to shine the light on No Such Thing as a Bully and thank Smith Sisters and the Sunday Drivers for our theme song, She is You. Connect with Word of Mom on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and email us at info.wordofmomradio@gmail.com for more info. WordofMomRadio.com - sharing the wisdom of women, in business and in life.  

AgriTalk
AgriTalk-December 8, 2021

AgriTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 42:21


Jim Mintert, Professor of Agricultural Economics and Director, Center for Commercial Agriculture at Purdue University, joins us to review the latest Ag Economic Barometer. Plus it's time for The Farmer Forum and this week we have Howard "A.V." Roth of Wisconsin and Scott McGregor of Iowa. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Angel Invest Boston
Prof. Tom Eisenmann - "Why Startups Fail"

Angel Invest Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 49:32


Sal's Investment Syndicate: Click to Join Harvard's Tom Eisenmann is the author of Why Startups Fail: A New Roadmap for Entrepreneurial Success. We discussed valuable lessons from the book and how they might apply to biotech startups. Highlights: Sal Daher Introduces Prof. Tom Eisenmann of the Harvard Business School, Author of Why Startups Fail Howard Stevenson's 400X Return Contrasting Brad Feld's Book with Prof. Tom Eisenmann's Book Sal Daher's Favorite Part of the Book: Failing “[failed] founders probably cycle through those. ...the Kubler Ross stages...” “...basically, half of failed founders come back and get back on the horse and do it again.” Shutting Down the Failed Venture, Gracefully The Number One Killer of Startups: False Starts “...engineers are particularly vulnerable to this because they want to build.” Sal Daher Discusses SQZ Biotech's False Start and Brilliant Pivot The Origin Story of Why Startups Fail “...the factories that actually make this stuff actually generate enough cash to invest in new apparel companies...” Silver Linings of the Pandemic Tom Eisenmann on Harvard's School of Engineering and the MS/MBA Program Tom Eisenmann on Tough Tech: Technical Uncertainty + Market Uncertainty Creating Supports for Life Science Academics to Become Founders Creative Destruction Labs Sal Daher's Focus on Biotech Angel Formation Software Startup Funding vs. Biotech Startup Funding Maybe Successful Angel-Backed Founders Such as Todd Zion and Armon Sharei Could be a Resource for Training Angels The Dynamics of Venture Capital in the Last Decade – Many New Shoots Tom Eisenmann's Parting Thoughts Sponsored by: Purdue University entrepreneurship, and Peter Fasse, patent attorney at Fish & Richardson Topics: biotech, management, co-founders, Mass Challenge, raising money, scholar, venture capital

Midnight Train Podcast
The Michigan Lake Triangle. Was it aliens?

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 116:01


We're going back to the creepy, mysterious, and strange this week. We're heading up to Lake Michigan, where tons of ships and planes have gone missing, and other odd things have occurred in what is known as the Lake Michigan triangle. Full disclosure, being from Ohio, the only reason we are covering this is that it's not the actual state of Michigan, just a lake that was unfortunately cursed with the same name. So we'll only discuss the state if we absolutely have to. We kid, of course.. Or do we… At any rate, this should be another interesting, fun, historically jam-packed episode full of craziness! So without further ado, let's head to lake Michigan!    So first off, let's learn a little about Lake Michigan itself because, you know, we like to learn you guys some stuff!    Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. It is the second-largest of the Great Lakes by volume and the third-largest by surface area after Lake Superior and Lake Huron. Lake Michigan is the largest lake by area in one country. Hydrologically Michigan and Huron are the same body of water (sometimes called Lake Michigan-Huron) but are typically considered distinct. Counted together, it is the largest body of fresh water in the world by surface area. The Mackinac Bridge is generally considered the dividing line between them. Its name is derived from the Ojibwa Indian word mishigami, meaning large lake. We've also seen the title translated as "big water," so honestly, we're not sure of the translation, but those are the two we see most often. Lake Michigan touches Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin. According to the New World Encyclopedia, approximately 12 million people live along the shores of Lake Michigan. Major port cities include Chicago, Illinois (population: 2.7 million); Milwaukee, Wisconsin (600,000); Green Bay, Wisconsin (104,000); and Gary, Indiana (80,000). Water temperatures on Lake Michigan make it to the 60s in July and August and can sometimes make it into the 70s when air temperatures have been in the 90s for several successive days.   The water of Lake Michigan has an unusual circulatory pattern — it resembles the traffic flow in a suburban cul-de-sac — and moves very slowly. Winds and resulting waves keep Lake Michigan from freezing over, but it has been 90 percent frozen on many occasions. Ocean-like swells, especially during the winter, can result in drastic temperature changes along the coast, shoreline erosion, and difficult navigation. The lake's average water depth is 279 feet (85 meters), and its maximum depth is 925 feet (282 meters).   Marshes, tallgrass prairies, savannas, forests, and sand dunes that can reach several hundred feet provide excellent habitats for all types of wildlife on Lake Michigan. Trout, salmon, walleye, and smallmouth bass fisheries are prevalent on the lake. The lake is also home to crawfish, freshwater sponges, and sea lamprey, a metallic violet eel species.   The lake is also home to a wide range of bird populations, including water birds such as ducks, Freddy the fox in bird costume, geese, swans, crows, robins, and bald eagles. Predatory birds such as hawks and vultures are also prevalent on the lake. This is mainly due to the wealth of wildlife to feast upon. The pebble-shaped Petoskey stone, a fossilized coral, is unique to the northern Michigan shores of Lake Michigan and is the state stone.   Today, the formation that is recognized as Lake Michigan began about 1.2 billion years ago when two tectonic plates were ripped apart, creating the Mid-Continent Rift. Some of the earliest human inhabitants of the Lake Michigan region were the Hopewell Native Americans. However, their culture declined after 800 AD, and for the next few hundred years, the area was the home of peoples known as the Late Woodland Native Americans. In the early 17th century, when western European explorers made their first forays into the region, they encountered descendants of the Late Woodland Native Americans: the historic Chippewa; Menominee; Sauk; Fox; Winnebago; Miami; Ottawa; and Potawatomi peoples. The French explorer Jean Nicolet is believed to have been the first European to reach Lake Michigan, possibly in 1634 or 1638. In early European maps of the region, the name of Lake Illinois has also been found to be that of "Michigan," named for the Illinois Confederation of tribes.   The Straits of Mackinac were an important Native American and fur trade route. Located on the southern side of the straits is the town of Mackinaw City, Michigan, the site of Fort Michilimackinac, a reconstructed French fort founded in 1715, and on the northern side is St. Ignace, Michigan, the site of a French Catholic mission to the Indians, founded in 1671. In 1673, Jacques Marquette, Louis Jolliet, and their crew of five Métis voyageurs followed Lake Michigan to Green Bay and up the Fox River, nearly to its headwaters, searching for the Mississippi River. By the late 18th century, the eastern end of the straits was controlled by Fort Mackinac on Mackinac Island, a British colonial and early American military base and fur trade center founded in 1781.  With the advent of European exploration into the area in the late 17th century, Lake Michigan became used as part of a line of waterways leading from the Saint Lawrence River to the Mississippi River and thence to the Gulf of Mexico. French coureurs des Bois and voyageurs established small ports and trading communities, such as Green Bay, on the lake during the late 17th and early 18th centuries. In the 19th century, Lake Michigan was integral to the development of Chicago and the Midwestern United States west of the lake. For example, 90% of the grain shipped from Chicago traveled by ships east over Lake Michigan during the antebellum years. The volume rarely fell below 50% after the Civil War, even with the significant expansion of railroad shipping.   The first person to reach the deep bottom of Lake Michigan was J. Val Klump, a scientist at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee in 1985. Klump reached the bottom via submersible as part of a research expedition. In 2007, a row of stones paralleling an ancient shoreline was discovered by Mark Holley, professor of underwater archeology at Northwestern Michigan College. This formation lies 40 feet (12 m) below the lake's surface. One of the stones is said to have a carving resembling a mastodon. The construction needed more study before it could be authenticated. The warming of Lake Michigan was the subject of a 2018 report by Purdue University. Since 1980, steady increases in obscure surface temperature have occurred in each decade. This is likely to decrease native habitat and adversely affect native species' survival, including game fish. Fun fact… Lake Michigan has its own coral reef! Lake Michigan waters near Chicago are also home to a reef, although it has been dead for many years. Still, it is an exciting feature of the lake, and scientists at Shedd Aquarium are interested in learning more about its habitat and the lifeforms it supports. Dr. Philip Willink is a senior research biologist at the Shedd Aquarium who has conducted research at Morgan Shoal to find out what kind of life there is and what the geology is like. "Morgan Shoal is special because it is so close to so many people. It is only a few hundred yards from one of the most famous and busiest streets in Chicago (Lake Shore Drive)," he said in an interview.    "Now that more people know it is there, more people can make a connection with it, and they can begin to appreciate the geological processes that formed it and the plants and animals that call it home. It is a symbol of how aquatic biodiversity can survive in an urban landscape."   "I hope people continue to study and learn from Morgan Shoal. We need to keep figuring out how this reef interacts with the waves and currents of Lake Michigan," he said. "We need to continue studying how the underwater habitat promotes biodiversity." Passengers, have you heard about the Stonehenge under lake Michigan? Well, in 2007, underwater archeologist Mark Holley was scanning for shipwrecks on the bottom of Lake Michigan's Grand Traverse Bay. Instead, he stumbled on a line of stones thought to be constructed by ancient humans. They believe that this building, similar to Stonehenge, is about 9000 years old, but interestingly, on one of the stones, there is a carving in the form of a mastodon, which died out more than 10,000 years ago. The exact coordinates of the find are still kept secret – this condition was put by local Indian tribes who do not want the influx of tourists and curiosity seekers on their land. The boulder with the markings is 3.5 to 4 feet high and about 5 feet long. Photos show a surface with numerous fissures. Some may be natural while others appear of human origin, but those forming what could be the petroglyph stood out, Holley said. Viewed together, they suggest the outlines of a mastodon-like back, hump, head, trunk, tusk, triangular-shaped ear, and parts of legs, he said.   "We couldn't believe what we were looking at," said Greg MacMaster, president of the underwater preserve council.   Specialists shown pictures of the boulder holding the mastodon markings have asked for more evidence before confirming the markings are an ancient petroglyph, said Holley. "They want to actually see it," he said. But, unfortunately, he added, "Experts in petroglyphs generally don't dive, so we're running into a little bit of a stumbling block there." Featured on ancient aliens below clip: Stonehenge in Northern Michigan - traverse city skip to 4:40 Soooo what's up with that… Michigan Stonehenge? Well, maybe not…   Sadly, much of the information out there is incorrect. For example, there is not a henge associated with the site, and the individual stones are relatively small compared to what most people think of as European standing stones. It should be clearly understood that this is not a megalith site like Stonehenge. This label is placed on the site by non-visiting individuals from the press who may have been attempting to generate sensation about the story. The site in Grand Traverse Bay is best described as a long line of stones that is over a mile in length.   Dr. John O'Shea from the University of Michigan has been working on a broadly similar structure in Lake Huron. He has received an NSF grant to research his site and thinks it may be a prehistoric driveline for herding caribou. This site is well published, and you can find quite a bit of information on it on the internet. The area in Grand Traverse Bay may possibly have served a similar function to the one found in Lake Huron. It certainly offers the same potential for research. Unfortunately, however, state politics in previous years have meant that we have only been able to obtain limited funding for research, and as a result, little progress has been made.   Honestly, even if it's not a Stonehenge but still possibly dating back 10,000 years, that's pretty dang terrific either way. Hopefully, they can figure out what's really going on down there!   So that's pretty sweet! Ok with that brief history and stuff out of the way, let's get into the fun stuff!   The Lake Michigan Triangle is a section of Lake Michigan considered especially treacherous to those venturing through it. It stretches from Manitowoc, Wisconsin, to Ludington, Michigan, before heading south to Benton Harbor, Michigan. It was first proposed by Charles Berlitz. A proponent of the Bermuda Triangle, he felt Lake Michigan was governed by similar forces. This theory was presented to the public in aviator Jay Gourley's book, The Great Lakes Triangle. In it, he stated: "The Great Lakes account for more unexplained disappearances per unit area than the Bermuda Triangle."   The Lake Michigan Triangle is believed to have caused numerous shipwrecks and aerial disappearances over the years. It's also been the scene of unexplained phenomena, from mysterious ice blocks falling from the sky to balls of fire and strange, hovering lights. This has led many to believe extraterrestrials are drawn to the area or perhaps home to a time portal.   Let's start with the disappearances. The first ship that traveled the upper Great Lakes was the 17th-century brigandine, Le Griffon. However, this maiden voyage did not end well. The shipwrecked when it encountered a violent storm while sailing on Lake Michigan.   The first occurrence in the Lake Michigan Triangle was recorded in 1891. The Thomas Hume was a schooner built in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, in 1870. The ship was christened as H.C. Albrecht in honor of its first owner, Captain Harry Albrecht. In 1876, the vessel was sold to Captain Welch from Chicago. In the following year, the ship was bought by Charles Hackley, a lumber baron who owned the Hackley-Hume Lumber Mill on Muskegon Lake. The boat was then renamed as the Thomas Hume in 1883, after Hackley's business partner. The Hume would make many successful trips across Lake Michigan until May 21, 1891, when it disappeared, along with its crew of seven sailors. After that, not even a trace of the boat was ever found. The Hume was on a return trip from Chicago to Muskegon, having just dropped off a load of lumber. The ship remained lost until Taras Lysenko, a diver with A&T Recovery out of Chicago, discovered the wreck in 2005. Valerie van Heest, a Lake Michigan shipwreck hunter and researcher who helped identify the wreckage, and Elizabeth Sherman, a maritime author and great-granddaughter of the schooner's namesake, presented the discovery at the Great Lakes conference at the Great Lakes Naval Memorial and Museum. The last trip of the schooner began like many others it had completed for two of Muskegon County's prominent lumbermen, Thomas Hume and Charles Hackley. It took a load of lumber to Chicago in May of 1891.   The unloaded vessel left to return to Muskegon, riding empty and light alongside one of the company's other schooners, the Rouse Simmons, which years later would go on to legendary status as the Christmas Tree Ship.   Sherman relayed the history of the Thomas Hume's final moments. She said the two vessels encountered a squall, not a major storm or full gale that took many Great Lakes ships.    "It made the captain of the Rouse Simmons nervous enough to turn back to Chicago," she told conference members.   The Thomas Hume continued on, and no signs of the vessel, the captain, nor the six-man crew were ever seen again. Sherman said Hackley and Hume called for a search of other ports and Lake Michigan, but nothing was found, not even debris.   That's when the wild theories began. Sherman said one of the most far-fetched was that the captain sailed to another port, painted the Thomas Hume, and sailed the vessel under a different name. Another theory was a large steamer ran down the schooner, and the steamer's captain swore his crew to secrecy.   Hackley and Hume put up a $300 reward, which seemed to squelch that theory because no one stepped forward.   The wreck remains in surprisingly good shape. The video shot by the dive group of the Thomas Hume shows the hull intact, the three masts laying on the deck, the ship's riggings, and a rudder that is in quality shape. The lifeboat was found inside the sunken vessel, presumably sucked into the opening during the sinking.   So what happened? Simple explanation… Maybe a storm or squall. Better explanation… Probably aliens… Or lake monster… Yeah, probably that.   Another mysterious incident believers in the Triangle seem to reference is the Rose Belle. From their archives, the news bulletin for the day reads: "October 30, 1921: the schooner Rosabelle, loaded with lumber, left High Island bound for Benton Harbor and apparently capsized in a gale on Lake Michigan. She was found awash 42 miles from Milwaukee, with no sign of the crew. After she drifted to 20 miles from Kenosha, the Cumberland towed her into Racine harbor. A thorough search of the ship turned up no sign of the crew. She was purchased by H & M Body Corp., beached 100 feet offshore, and attempts were made to drag her closer to shore north of Racine. The corp. planned to remove her lumber."   According to the Wisconsin Historical Society's Maritime Preservation Program, the Rosabelle was a small two-masted schooner and was used to bring supplies to High Island for the House of David. It was 100 feet long, with a beam of 26 feet.   Despite appearing to have been involved in a collision, there were no other shipwrecks or reports of an accident. What's more, the 11-person crew was nowhere to be found.    We're gonna go with aliens again.   Mysterious disappearances have continued to occur along the lake's waters. For example, on April 28, 1937, Captain George R. Donner of the freighter O.M. McFarland went to rest in his cabin after hours of navigating his crew through icy waters. As the ship approached its destination at Port Washington, Wisconsin, a crewmember went to wake him up, only to find him missing and the door locked from the inside. A search of the ship turned up no clues, and Donner hasn't been seen since.   Over the years, shipwrecks stacked up, drawing attention to this region of Lake Michigan. Then, during the blizzard of November 1940, three massive freighters and two fishing tug boats sank off the coast of Pentwater, Mich., well inside this triangular boundary. Wrecks of the three freighters have been found, but the two tugboats have yet to be discovered. Whether the wreckages are lost or found, experts find it highly unusual that five ships – killing a total of 64 sailors – all sank on the same day so close together.   But did aren't the only thing that had disappeared here.    Theories surrounding UFOs and extraterrestrials roaming the skies of the Lake Michigan Triangle are spurred on by the mysterious disappearance of Northwest Airlines flight 2501. The plane was traveling from New York to Seattle, with a stop in Minneapolis, on June 23, 1950, when it seemingly disappeared out of the sky.   At 11:37 p.m. that evening, its pilot requested a descent from 3,500 to 2,500 feet due to an electrical storm. The request was denied, and minutes later, the plane disappeared from radar. Despite a massive search effort, only a blanket bearing the Northwest Airlines logo indicated the plane had gone into the water.   As days passed, partial remains began to wash ashore across Michigan, but the plane never resurfaced. According to two police officers near the scene, there had been a strange red light hovering over the water just two hours after the plane disappeared. This has led some to theorize it was abducted by aliens. However, their reason for taking the aircraft remains a mystery.   See, told you… Aliens!   Do you need more proof of aliens? Here ya go   Steven Kubacki was a 23-year-old student at Hope College in Holland, Michigan. On February 20, 1978, he was on a solo cross-country skiing trip near Saugatuck, Michigan, when he disappeared.    The next day, snowmobilers found his equipment abandoned, and police located his footprints on the ice. The way they abruptly ended suggested Kubacki had fallen through the ice and died of either hypothermia or by drowning. Seems pretty cut and dry, eh... Well, you're fucking fucking wrong, Jack! The mystery appeared all but solved until May 5, 1979, when Kubacki showed up in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Fifteen months after seemingly disappearing into the icy depths of Lake Michigan, he found himself lying in the grass, some 700 miles away.    Kubacki told reporters he had no memory of the past year and a half. However, when he awoke, he was wearing weird clothes, and his backpack contained random maps. This led him to believe he'd been traveling. He also had a T-shirt from a Wisconsin marathon, which he explained by saying, "I feel like I've done a lot of running."   The location of Kubacki's disappearance has led many to suggest he was yet another victim of the Lake Michigan Triangle. While some don't believe him regarding his supposed amnesia, others feel an alien abduction is a reason behind his disappearance and lack of memory.   So you may be asking yourself… But if this was all alien activity, why is that no mention of UFOs… Well, you're in luck cus… There are!!! In fact, Michigan, in general, has a pretty good share of UFO sightings; coincidentally, there was a sharp rise in sightings about a month after weed was legalized in the state. I'm kidding, of course…or am I. So let's take a look at s few sightings in the area! On March 8, 1994, calls flooded 911 to report strange sightings in the night sky. The reports came in from all walks of life — from police and a meteorologist to residents of Michigan's many beach resorts. Hundreds of people witnessed what many insisted were UFOs — unidentified flying objects.   Cindy Pravda, 63, of Grand Haven remembers that night in vivid detail — four lights in the sky that looked like "full moons" over the line of trees behind her horse pasture.   "I got UFOs in the backyard," she told a friend on the phone.   "I watched them for half an hour. Where I'm facing them, the one on the far left moved off. It moved to the highway and then came back in the same position," Pravda told the Free Press. "The one to the right was gone in blink of an eye and then, eventually, everything disappeared quickly."   She still lives in the same house and continues to talk about that night.   "I'm known as the UFO lady of Grand Haven," Pravda laughed.   Daryl and Holly Graves and their son, Joey, told reporters in 1994 they witnessed lights in the sky over Holland at about 9:30 p.m. on March 8.   "I saw six lights out the window above the barn across the street," Joey Graves told the Free Press in 1994. "I got up and went to the sofa and looked up at the sky. They were red and white and moving."   Others gave similar accounts, including Holland Police Officer Jeff Velthouse and a meteorologist from the National Weather Service Office in Muskegon County. What's more, the meteorologist recorded unknown echoes on his radar the same time Velthouse reported the lights.   "My guy looked at the radar and observed three echoes as the officer was describing the movement," Leo Grenier of the NWS office in Muskegon said in 1994. "The movement of the objects was rather erratic. The echoes were there about 15 minutes, drifting slowly south-southwest, kind of headed toward the Chicago side of the south end of Lake Michigan."   The radar operator said, "There were three and sometimes four blips, and they weren't planes. Planes show as pinpoints on the scope, these were the size of half a thumbnail. They were from 5 to 12,000 feet at times, moving all over the place. Three were moving toward Chicago. I never saw anything like it before, not even when I'm doing severe weather." Hundreds of reports of suspected UFOs were called in not only to 911 dispatchers but also to the Mutual UFO Network's (MUFON) Michigan chapter.    MUFON, an all-volunteer nonprofit organization founded in 1969, bills itself as the "world's oldest and largest civilian UFO investigation and research organization."   The reported UFO sightings were the largest since March 1966, Bill Konkolesky, Michigan state director of MUFON, told the Free Press.   "It was one of the big ones in the state. We haven't seen a large UFO (reported sighting) wave since that time," Konkolesky said.   Wow… Awesome!    A mysterious video, apparently shot from Chicago in late 2020 or early 2021, shows a fleet of UFOs above Lake Michigan, and most of them look like bright orbs. These UFO orbs hovered in the skies for several minutes, and at one point in time, some of these lights disappeared before appearing again.  The eyewitness who witnessed this eerie sighting claimed that these UFO lights used to appear above Lake Michigan several times in the past.   The video was later analyzed by self-styled alien hunter Scott C Waring, who enjoys a huge fan following online. After analyzing the mysterious footage, Waring claimed that something strange was going on in the skies of the United States. He also suggested that there could be an underground alien base in Lake Michigan. "The lights were so close to the water that sometimes the reflection of the UFOs could be seen. Aircraft can be seen flying over the lights once in a while, but the lights and aircraft stay far apart. These lights are a sign that there is an alien base below lake Michigan. Absolutely amazing and even the eyewitnesses noticed other people not looking at the UFOs. Very strange how people are too busy to look out the window. 100% proof that alien base sites at the bottom of Lake Michigan off Chicago coast," wrote Waring on his website UFO Sightings Daily.    There have been shitload UFO sightings in the area of the Lake Michigan Triangle, only fueling more speculation. So here are some of the patented midnight train quick hitters!   An early sighting occurred in November 1957, when a cigar-shaped object with a pointed nose and blunt tail, with low emitting sounds, was seen. Subsequent civilian and military air traffic controllers cited no aircraft were in the vicinity at the time.   In July 1987, five youths had seen a low-level cloud expel several V-shaped objects which hovered quietly, with bright lights. Then, the things reentered the cloud formation and rapidly departed toward the lake's north end.   In August 2002, seven miles off the Harrisville shoreline, two freighter sailors observed a textured, triangular-shaped object soar above and follow their ship. Then, the thing made a 90-degree turn and quickly disappeared.   In September 2009, a couple left their residence to close their chicken coop for the evening. They jointly observed a large, triangular object pursued by a military jet. In addition, they noted two bright and beaming white lights when the object was overhead.   In June 2007, an 80-year-old resident inspected what appeared to be a balloon-shaped object near his fenceline. Upon his arrival, the object immediately increased to the size of a car and shot upward. He stated his body hair stood on end and when he later touched where the thing was, his hands became numb.   In October 2010, a couple experienced a sky filled with a variety of low-flying white and red objects. The couple returned to the village, where five individuals from a retail establishment joined in the observation. Later, a massive yellow orb appeared and quickly exited into the sky. The viewing lasted for nearly an hour.   Well… We're convinced, well maybe at least Moody is anyway.    Anything else weird, you ask? Why yes… Yes, there is.    Yet another odd aerial phenomenon occurred on July 12, 1883, aboard the tug Mary McLane, as it worked just off the Chicago harbor. At about 6 p.m., the crew said large blocks of ice, as big as bricks, began falling out of a cloudless sky.  The fall continued for about 30 minutes before it stopped. The ice was large enough to put dents in the wooden deck. The crew members brought a two-pound chunk of ice ashore with them that night, which they stored in the galley icebox, proving they didn't make up the story. Ouch… That's nuts.    Littered on the bottom of the Great Lakes are the remains of more than 6,000 shipwrecks gone missing on the Great Lakes since the late 1600s when the first commercial sailing ships began plying the region, most during the heyday of commercial shipping in the nineteenth century. Just over twenty percent of those vessels have come to rest on the bottom of Lake Michigan, second only in quantity to Lake Huron. So many of those have disappeared mysteriously in the Michigan triangle area. What the hell is going on there! Aliens? Weather? Portals to other dimensions?   We may never know for sure, but most likely… Aliens Movies   https://www.ranker.com/list/ship-horror-movies/ranker-film

Purdue Commercial AgCast
Ag Barometer Insight: November 2021 Survey

Purdue Commercial AgCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 23:28


The Ag Economy Barometer slipped to a reading of 116 in November, down 5 points from October and 30% lower than in November 2020 when the barometer stood at 167. Once again, weakness in the barometer was tied to weaker sentiment regarding current conditions as well as weaker expectations for the future. Purdue ag economists James Mintert and Michael Langemeier review the results and give some insight into the November 2021 Purdue University-CME Group Ag Economy Barometer, a nationwide monthly survey of 400 ag producers. This month's survey was conducted from November 15 to 19, 2021. The full report is available at https://purdue.ag/agbarometer.   Podcast provided by Purdue University's Center for Commercial Agriculture. For more economic information and insights on the Ag Economy Barometer, visit us at http://purdue.edu/commercialag.

The FOX News Rundown
Is The End Near For Roe v. Wade?

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 29:18


The Supreme Court is set to consider a case today that could potentially undo Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that legalized abortion in the U.S. The High Court will hear a challenge to a 2018 Mississippi law that would ban most abortions at 15 weeks of pregnancy. Pro-choice advocates and lower courts say that the law violates women's rights. However, pro-life advocates say it is time to change the long-standing precedent regarding abortion. Constitution expert and FOX News Contributor Jonathan Turley previews what he calls "most consequential abortion case in decades," speculates how the more conservative Court could rule and what would happen if Roe v. Wade is actually overturned.   Concern over the Omicron variant of COVID-19 has been making waves across the globe and in the U.S. stocks took a dive while health officials issued warnings. President Biden spoke out, telling Americans not to panic and assuring them shutdowns would not be used to combat the pandemic. Dr. Jerome Adams, 20th U.S. Surgeon General and Director of Health Equity Initiatives at Purdue University joins to discuss why we still need more information on the severity of the Omicron variant, why this variant's multiple mutations could be cause for concern, and the need for the federal government to create more sensible policies on COVID-19 while the states make their own choices.   Plus, commentary by former Rep. Jason Chaffetz, host of the Jason in the House podcast.

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast
Linda Zhang, Chief Engineer, Ford F-150 Lightning

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 45:47


When she was nine years old, Linda Zhang got on a plane for the first time in her life and flew to America. Her father met her at the airport in Chicago and they drove three hours to Purdue University where he was a graduate student. Riding in a car - also for the very first time - taking in the bright city lights, Linda says she felt a "little bit like a princess" in a fairytale. Well, Linda's life story certainly looks like something that could be made into a movie. At just 19, she graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in electrical engineering. She has since added an MA in computer engineering and an MBA, also from Michigan. In 2018, Linda was named chief engineer of arguably Ford's most important product launch in decades - the Ford F-150 all-electric Lightning. The F-150 has been America's best-selling vehicle for 44 straight years. And the profits from the F-150 series are greater than total annual profits at Nike or McDonalds. In today's Winning in Asia conversation, Linda talks about the challenges and breakthroughs in her work as a Chief Engineer. What was the vision for the all-electric truck? How did she deal with the skeptics? What features will the Lighting offer that the gasoline-powered F-150 does not? #WinningInAsia / #ZozoGo https://twitter.com/Dunne_ZoZoGohttps://www.instagram.com/zo.zo.go/?hl=enhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-dunne-a696901a/

The Interchange
The Future of Solar Storage

The Interchange

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 44:27


You can develop enough renewable energy to power the world, but without energy storage systems, those developments are rendered somewhat moot. To achieve President Biden's target of 90% renewables by 2035, the US needs an additional 9 terawatts of solar storage. What do our current storage solutions look like? Are batteries leading the charge? To answer those questions David turns to Rebecca Ciez, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University. David and Rebecca look at the current storage options. Are batteries powerful enough to deliver power during outages or periods of no sunlight? Rebecca talks about the materials needed for solar batteries and how we can improve the technology to reduce the strain on supply chains. Investment and government incentives are then thrust under the microscope by David, before the discussion wraps with examining the technological advancements in the space. The Interchange is brought to you by Schneider Electric. Are you building a microgrid? With a microgrid you can store electricity and sell it back during peak times. Keep your power on during an outage. Integrate with renewables. Control energy on your own terms. Having built more microgrids in than anyone else, Schneider Electric has the expertise to help.The Interchange is brought to you by Bloom Energy. Bloom's onsite energy platform provides unparalleled control for those looking to secure clean, reliable 24/7 power that scales to meet critical business needs. It eliminates outage and price risk while accelerating us towards a zero carbon future. Visit Bloom Energy to learn how to take charge today.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Angel Invest Boston
Cagri Savran, Founder - Biotech Angel Bootcamp I

Angel Invest Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 43:23


Join Sal's Syndicate: https://www.angelinvestboston.com/our-syndicates Sponsored by Purdue University entrepreneurship and Peter Fasse, patent attorney at Fish & Richardson Hesitant about investing in biotech startups? Founder Çağrı Savran and I discuss the unique opportunities and requirements of angel-scale life science startups. This is the first in a series of biotech angel bootcamps. Highlights: Podcast Sponsored by Purdue University Entrepreneurship and Peter Fasse, Patent Attorney Sal Daher Introduces Founder, Çağrı Savran, PhD Purdue University Now Evaluates Professors of Engineering on Translation of their Technology to Industry as Well as on Publications and Citations Episode Created for Angel Investors Who Are Hesitant About Biotech Savran's First Round of Funding Was Very Easy, the Subsequent Three Rounds Took Great Effort Several Walnut Members Had Invested in SQZ, Which Also Had a Fast Angel Round “...they saw parallels between SQZ and Savran.” ” If somebody is taking too much time to think, they're probably not interested and that's okay. You don't need the whole world...” “...it's similar to marriage... Sometimes it clicks, sometimes it doesn't click.” There Are Many People Looking for Attractive Investment Alternatives – It's About Finding Those People Sal Asks About an Alternative Way to Fund Biotech Startups that Could Be More Efficient in the Long Run Angels Should Consider Staging their Investment in Biotech Startups Over Four Years with Annual Drawdown Based on Milestones Staged Funding Would Provide a Stable Financing Path So Founders Can Focus on the Business Angel Investors Have Contributed Much More than Money to Savran Tech; Advice, Introductions and Encouragement Çağrı Savran Wants Angels to Appreciate All the Trial & Error Involved in Building Life Science Companies When Things Work Out, Life Science Companies Can Build a Lot of Value Due to Strong Barriers to New Competitors Software Startups Face Stiff Competition Due to Low Barriers to Entry for Competitors “...you need to worry about minimizing user-to-user variation, especially if you're making an instrument. It's not like a computer code where if you hit a couple of keystrokes, it doesn't matter who it is that's hitting the keystroke.” Biotech Startups Have Different Metrics for Progress from Software Startups Biotech Startups Tend to Collaborate with Big Players; Software Startups Usually Compete Strong Patents Are Needed to Make Biotech Startup Valuable to Strategic Players “If the startup is making progress, it will have built a prototype.” Maturation of the Technology Is an Important Measure of Progress, It's What Will Get the Company Acquired Founder-Led Companies Are Special Startups Can't Afford Experienced People in Management but They Can Get Them on the Board “...the lesson here for angels is, don't expect a professional CEO in a life science startup.” We Are Living in a Time of Miracles; Biotech Miracles There Are Promising Biotech Startups that Can Flourish with Just $5 Million in Funding – Angel-Scale Biotech Startups Topics: biotech, management, angel investing strategies

Finding Genius Podcast
Botany, Plant Pathology, and the Importance of Sustainable Farming Techniques and Crop Rotation with Don M. Huber

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 42:31


How do our crop production systems work in tandem with plant pathology to form the best farming techniques? By focusing on disease control and sustainable farming techniques, better production techniques can be developed. Press play to learn: Why crop rotation is vital in sustainable farming How non-tillage techniques can benefit soil nutrients What the future of farming may look like Don M. Huber, a Professor Emeritus at Purdue University, shares his life of work and research on plant pathology and crop production techniques. Farming at every level requires an understanding of techniques that allows food production to work in concert with nature to optimize the processes. While not all techniques are sustainable, crop rotation is one of the most prevalent and significantly beneficial techniques available to producers. Recognizing the dynamic between all aspects of production is vital since everything from pathogens to nutrition can drastically alter the efficacy of farming. Namely, the nutrition in the soil and available for future years is critical and can ensure a successful future. To learn more, a great resource is a best-selling book: Mineral Nutrition and Plant Disease. Episode also available on Apple Podcast: http://apple.co/30PvU9C