Podcasts about Special Olympics

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Best podcasts about Special Olympics

Show all podcasts related to special olympics

Latest podcast episodes about Special Olympics

Up To Speed: A Verizon podcast
Up To Speed Morning: May 12, 2022

Up To Speed: A Verizon podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 3:25


Heart of gold. How V Teamer and Special Olympics head coach Tyrone Hicks is going for gold in the USA Games.

Conversations@KAFM
Special Olympics - We're Back!

Conversations@KAFM

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 10:47


Host: Coach Guest: Michael Ruspin Date: 5/10/22

Too Peas In A Podcast
International Pea Week Episode 4. Heartkids with Hannah

Too Peas In A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 41:16


On day 4 of International Pea Week, Kate and Mandy talk to Hannah from Heartkids! Hannah is an amazing 'Superpea' – a twin mum with one twin who has complex medical needs due to a heart condition. Hannah's daughter was diagnosed with a hole in the heart and underwent open-heart surgery at Melbourne's Royal Children's Hospital at only seven days of age. Hannah talks about the whirlwind impact on her whole family of her newborn's diagnosis and initial 5-week hospitalisation, and then the shock of finding out that the surgery had been unsuccessful, which meant they had to do it all again – leading to a long three-month recovery period for her daughter including time in intensive care. Hannah was able to stay at Ronald McDonald House and shares stories about the challenges of caring for her sick baby in hospital while also caring for her twin. Hannah found great support through Heartkids. From helping Hannah deal with rectum situations in hospital initially to providing an ongoing community of care, they've been with the family from the beginning and have played an important role in their journey. Hannah's daughter is now five years old, attending school and still receiving regular specialist treatment for her heart and also her lungs. Hannah talks about the real challenges of twin parenting when one of the twins has additional needs – the very reason why Kate and Mandy started Too Peas! Check out HeartKids via their website if you'd like to find out more information about their services or make a donation. Plus:· Donate to Special Olympics and support our athletes!· Book tickets to our forthcoming live shows via our website· Buy our book The Invisible Life Of Us · Get a signed copy and deck yourself out in some excellent Too Peas merch here!· Listen to our Spotify playlist – Too Peas: Songs Our Guest Peas Love· Melbourne forecast for Thursday May 5– Shower or two, possible small hail, 15 degrees· Join our Facebook Hangout· Find us on YouTubeThank you for supporting Too Peas In A Podcast! Don't forget to rate and review Contact us here:Website: www.toopeasinapodcast.com.auEmail: toopeaspodcast@gmail.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mission-Driven
Chris Mann '00

Mission-Driven

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 80:58


Welcome to Season 3!  New episodes will be released througout the spring and summer of 2022. The first episode of season 3 features a conversation with Chris Mann '00.  Chris has built his career around making a difference in the lives of others.  He's joined in conversation with JP Cunningham '23.  They discuss Chris' time at Holy Cross and how he has carried the HC mission to serve others throughout his life and career. Interview originally recorded in November 2021. -- Chris: And so, I think you're seeing companies really say, "This is about our values and being clear on what our values are." Because our most important stakeholders, our people are saying that that's what matters to them and that's what they care about. And so, I think we just think about business differently. Maura: Welcome to Mission-Driven, where we speak with alumni who are leveraging their Holy Cross education to make a meaningful difference in the world around them. I'm your host Maura Sweeney from the class of 2007, Director of Alumni Career Development at Holy Cross. I'm delighted to welcome you to today's show. This episode features Chris Mann from the class of 2000. Maura: Chris's career has spanned roles that have one thing in common, making a positive impact on people and communities. He graduated from Holy Cross with a psychology major and art history minor. With this foundation, he joined the Dana-Farber and Jimmy Fund team, and his career flourished. Skilled at fundraising, event planning, marketing, and communications, Chris flexed his talents and roles at New Balance, Cone Communications, Reebok, and City Year. Maura: At the time this podcast was recorded, Chris worked as the Senior Vice President of Development for City Year. At the time this podcast is aired, Chris will have assumed a new role at Bain Capital as the first Vice President of Community Affairs, leading their philanthropy, employee volunteerism, events, and sponsorship. Chris is joined in conversation by JP Cunningham from the class of 2023. Maura: Their conversation is far-reaching but starts with the transformative years that Chris spent at Holy Cross, his time on the track and field team, and serving as senior class president, as well as his experiences during immersion programs and running summer orientation helped shape who he is today. Better yet, he can count the ways that the Holy Cross Alumni Network has supported him through each step in his career. A proud alumnus, Chris exemplifies the impact that one person can make by committing their talents to mission-driven work. JP: Hello, everyone. Thank you all for listening. I'm JP Cunningham. I'm a junior here at Holy Cross. And I'm joined by Chris Mann. Chris, how are you doing today? Chris: Hey, JP. I'm good. Good to be here with you today. JP: Thank you. So, yeah, I guess with that, we'll get right into it. I wanted to start with a little bit before your time at Holy Cross. So, my first question is, during your college search, what were some of the factors that drew you to the college? And was it your top choice? Yeah, if you can touch on that. Chris: Yeah, absolutely. So, like most high school students, I was looking at a lot of different schools. I didn't quite know what I wanted. I was the first and oldest child in my family, so I hadn't any brothers or sisters go through the college application process before. And at the time, this was in the mid-'90s, there wasn't as much information. It was kind of the glossy books you got in the mail and things like that, and word of mouth. But I knew a couple of things. Chris: I knew living in Andover, Massachusetts and growing up there, I wanted to be close enough to home that I could get back and forth. So, that kind of kept me looking at New England colleges for the most part. And as I started exploring, I knew about Holy Cross's reputation from an academic standpoint, but also had a couple of people at my high school, Andover High School, that I remember really respecting and looking up to in some ways that had gone to Holy Cross a couple of years before me. Chris: So, Chris Sintros, who was a class of '98, and Christine Anderson, class of '99. And I think it just piqued my interest to say, "Hey, those are people that I think I want to be like, and they chose this school." I actually got really fortunate to end up at Holy Cross. It was one of, I think, five schools I applied to, and I was waitlisted. So, I actually didn't know that I was going to get in until right to the end, and was really relieved and excited when I got in off the waitlist. Chris: And it ended up being a great scenario because I came on campus as the only person from my high school going to Holy Cross in that class. And I was matched up with three roommates in a quad in my freshman year. And it really helped me build some relationships and a network right away in a new place, new environment. JP: Awesome. That's really cool. Yeah, I can kind of relate to that, too, because both my dad and my sister went here, and then a lot of just friends and older classmates at my high school went to Holy Cross. And they're all just role models. And I felt the same way like, wow, this seems like a good place to be and that's what drew me there, too. So, it's great. Chris: Yeah. And I would say too, in visiting the school and seeing it, I mean, I certainly fell in love with the classic New England brick college, IV and setting, and it's a beautiful campus, as you know. And so, that, I was really excited about. And I started to get more and more of a field just as I came to visit a couple of different times. Chris: And as you started to read in and hear about the college's mission, and talking about being men and women for and with others, that all started to really resonate for me and felt a little different compared to some of the other schools that I had been visiting, and I loved that. I also really thought that the size was right for me. I was somewhat of a shy kid. I think I was trying to figure out where my place was. Chris: And I liked the idea of being in a school that felt a little smaller and where I wasn't going to get lost in the shuffle. And I think that ended up being a really big thing for me over the course of the four years, too. JP: Yeah, I couldn't agree more. I feel like people might say it's cliche, but I feel like at Holy Cross, the sense of community, just being on campus that first time, at least for me too, visiting that first time, there's something about it that really draws you and makes you feel like, "Hey, this is the place for me." Yes. I guess moving into the next question, after you became a student here, what were some of the things you were involved in during your time on the Hill? And was there one that you were most passionate about? Chris: I got to do a lot of different things, which was to our earlier point, the benefit of going to a smaller school with a lot of opportunities. Off the bat, athletics ended up being a big thing for me, which wasn't something I had planned. I had done sports in high school all three seasons. Really, I was passionate about basketball and track and field, but hadn't expected to be able to do that in college. Chris: And I showed up on campus and I remember, I think it was probably the first week of school, I got a phone call from Larry Napolitano who was the captain of the track team just saying, "Hey, we saw you did track and field in high school. Would you be interested in coming out and joining the team?" And I said, "Yes", and it was one of the great experiences of my time on the Hill being able to be part of that team. Chris: I certainly wasn't a phenomenal athlete or setting any records, but being part of that team environment, getting a chance to get into the daily routine that athletes do I think really benefited me. The structure was really helpful. I think it prepared me for life after college and having a busy schedule of going from weightlifting, to workouts, to classes, to other things. Chris: And just the relationships you build with teammates and coaches and the life lessons of athletics were really valuable and it helps cement a lifelong practice of fitness and health that exists to this day. So, that was foundational. That was a big one. And then, later in my time at Holy Cross, my senior year, I ended up getting encouraged to run for student government. And I ended up being elected president of the senior class of 2000. Chris: And that was a really powerful experience for me, too, so having a broader role in leading fellow students and thinking about our voice on campus. And to be honest, putting myself out there more publicly to run and be elected was not something I was very comfortable with or used to. So, building up that courage and having people believe in me to do that was also really important. And I think it started to show me that maybe I could do some things that I hadn't previously been confident enough to do or thought I could do. Chris: So, that was another big experience. And same thing, balancing those commitments with academics, with athletics really prepared me for life after college and the working world. JP: That's great. Yeah. I feel like balancing all those activities, being a full-time student athlete while being the president of your class can only help you in the long run and having that structure to your schedule and balancing different activities. Because I don't play any sports, but just balancing activities week by week with the schoolwork and all that, it definitely... I feel like it can only help you for after you graduate. JP: So, yeah, going off that, I guess a little more shifting towards the academics. One of the great things about Holy Cross in liberal arts education in general is that you really have the opportunity to major in anything that piques your interest, and then go out and succeed in business or whatever field you choose. So, I know you're a psychology and art history major. Were there any specific skills that you developed from your course of study that have helped you in your professional career? Chris: Yeah, it's interesting. It was another case of I didn't know what I wanted to study. When I came to Holy Cross, I started taking a few different classes in different areas to try and understand what resonated with me and that was what attracted... the liberal arts education attracted me to Holy Cross as well because I didn't know what I wanted to do. Chris: And I found myself really intrigued in the early psychology classes that I took, whether it was Intro to Psychology, or we had some ones later, behavioral psychology and other things, that just fascinated me between the... both the science and the depth of that field, but then also the ways in which humans interact and the way in which our environment influences us just fascinated me. And I really found myself loving that. Chris: And then, on the flip side, I ended up getting a minor in art history, similarly, because I just found myself interested and passionate in the subject matter and human experience behind that. I wouldn't have thought at the time that either of those would translate into a career path or job. I wasn't going to be a psychologist. I certainly wasn't an artist, but I have found over time that I think there are some lessons in the specifics of that. Chris: And in my current job in previous iterations where I'm a fundraiser, and in essence, I sell people on City Year's mission and investing in City Year's mission, some of the experiences and the lessons from psychology come out there, and understanding how you engage and connect with and influence people. So, that is certainly there. Chris: But more broadly, I just think the liberal arts' approach and specifically Holy Cross and the rigor of the academics forced me to really get tight and concise with my thinking, with how to make an argument, with how to take in information, synthesize that and consolidate it and communicate in a really effective, clear way, both verbally, written, visually, et cetera. Those are things I lean on on a daily basis. And I don't think I appreciated it at the time. Chris: But in talking with friends and colleagues and others whose college experiences were very different, either giant lecture halls or other things, the time, the attention, the rigor of the academics was really valuable. And I don't think I realized it until much later. JP: Yeah, I agree. I feel like everyone... and that's also one of the things that drew me to the liberal arts education is the fact that people say, obviously, you study what's interesting to you, but then being able to develop those skills like critical thinking, communication, and just being able to use those skills effectively go a long way in the professional world. So, you touched on some of the activities you were involved in when you are here at Holy Cross. JP: And since you graduated, there have been a number of new programs, activities. For example, the Ciocca Center for Business, Ethics, and Society was established in 2006. Are there any programs or activities happening now that you've become aware of at Holy Cross that stand out to you or you wish were around when you were a student? Chris: I think the Ciocca Center would have been something I would have really enjoyed getting a chance to participate in. I think this idea of business and ethics and where those intersect, and how companies can have an impact on society has been the centerpiece of my career and the different jobs that I've had. So, I think I would have really enjoyed going deeper there in a more formal way, for sure. Chris: I also really appreciate what the college has done in the last few years as we think about diversity at Holy Cross and how is the Holy Cross experience accessible to all. That is, I think, one takeaway from my time. Certainly, we had some level of diversity when I was at Holy Cross, but it was not nearly what it needs to be and what it should be going forward. And I think particularly for fellow classmates that were of color or came from different backgrounds and the majority of students, I think it was a really challenging thing for them and continues to be. Chris: And so, I think the idea of having a college community that does have more representation, does have more diversity across all levels and spectrums of how diversity shows up is valuable because I think, to be honest, it creates a better learning environment, it creates better dialogue, it creates better understanding. And I think that was a challenge, to be honest, during my time at Holy Cross. Many of the students were just like me coming from the same families, communities, et cetera. Chris: And so, that's something that I've been very encouraged to see over the last few years. JP: Yeah, absolutely. I feel like as a student for me and talking to alumni like yourself and just other people I've spoken to, people just say it's awesome to see the way the college is changing for the better, both academically and socially, like you just touched on. Moving a little away from strictly Holy Cross, can you maybe run through your career or professional path starting after you graduated from the college? Chris: Yeah. So, I was really lucky, and this is an area where I talk to current students or students that are considering Holy Cross, and the network of alumni really stepped up and helped me start my career and pursue the opportunities I've had. And I've been really fortunate to come across Holy Cross graduates at every role, every organization that I've been in, which speaks to the power of even the network of a small school overall. Chris: So, I was trying to decide what I wanted to do after graduation. As we mentioned, I had done activities in track and field. I was big into sports, so I was thinking sports marketing and those areas. I also got a chance, while I was on campus, to do a couple of spring break trips via Habitat for Humanity and build some houses down in Tallahassee, Florida for two spring breaks in a row. Chris: That and an internship at the Special Olympics while I was a student started to spark my interest in having a job where I can actually give back and support causes I cared about, and earn beyond a paycheck feel like I was having an impact on a daily basis in my work. So, that was interesting to me. And we had also run and started summer orientations program, the Gateway Summer Orientation Program. Chris: I was fortunate to be part of that first summer orientation program as a leader and then later, one of the co-leads of it. And I found myself really liking and being attracted by events and the planning that would go into preparing for an orientation program or some other event, and then seeing that come together and seeing people have a great time interacting and being part of that event. So, I was looking at sports marketing. I was looking at event management. I was thinking about nonprofits and exploring different things. Chris: And I was talking with John Hayes, who's class of '91. And he was the director of Holy Cross Fund at the time. He was our advisor for our Senior Class Gift. And John said, "Hey, you should really go talk to my friend Cynthia Carton O'Brien now, a class of '93, who was working at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund." And so, he connected me to Cindy via informational interview. I went and learn more about Dana-Farber and the Jimmy Fund, and just loved the idea of it. Chris: It was a cancer hospital, obviously in Boston, doing amazing work for patients and their families, but also had this deep connection in history to the Red Sox. So, as a sports fan, I was excited about that. And I ended up applying for a couple of different jobs there coming out of school. And on the fundraising side, one was potentially to work in plan giving, so helping people think about their giving benefiting those beyond their lifetimes and resourcing the organization for the future. Chris: And then, the other one was going to be a rotational role, which was going to work on different areas of fundraising, the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk, donor advance and stewardship events, and then also cause marketing, which at the time was a fairly new thing that companies were starting to do. And so, I ended up getting that second job on the rotation. And it was just a phenomenal opportunity experience to get to learn different parts of fundraising and to work with some really, really great team. Chris: So, when I think about advice for people coming out of school and what to think about, I think finding a job where you can learn as much as possible and get exposed to as many different things as you can certainly really worked out for me. And it gave me a chance to understand what parts of fundraising and events that I really liked and what worked well for me. And I was also really lucky to work with just some amazing people. Chris: In particular, my first boss and my first teams on the Jimmy Fund Walk, which later included a couple of Holy Cross grads in the years after me that we hired as well, was just a perfect first start into the working world, for sure. JP: Definitely. So, you may have just answered this next question, but I'll still pose it to you. I know you talked about your experience with the Gateway's orientation. So, would you say that was something that from your time at Holy Cross that greatly influenced your post-grad experience and career? Or were there few other things? Chris: Gateways did influence me mostly in that I realized that I really enjoyed working in a team environment and it was with a lot of students from across different grades that I hadn't met or didn't know before. And I think that idea of working in a team that had some diversity in their experiences, et cetera, is definitely something that's resonated longer term and I've realized leads to a great work environment and a great end product in that Gateway's orientation. Chris: I definitely love the event planning piece of it. And so, I think that steered me towards my first job, for sure. As I got older, I realized I didn't love the always on and the stress of the event planning and so I've since moved to other areas. But I think the idea of that camaraderie and coming together to build something bigger than yourselves was really valuable for me. And I also loved being able to share my experiences with others and with other students. Chris: And so, getting a chance to really talk to people and help share my experience was something that I valued. I think it was probably an early stage mentorship. I don't think I realized it at the time, but I think that's what drew me to it was being able to work with students who were coming into a Holy Cross environment, nervous about it, not sure what to do, and really saying, "Hey, this is going to be a great experience for you. And here's all the reasons why or here are some things to look at." Chris: I realized I think later that that idea of being a mentor and having that mentoring relationship is something that I really value and enjoying doing. But again, I don't think I realized it at the time. But I think it was one of those foundational things, for sure, at least in the early jobs. JP: Absolutely. Yeah, that's awesome. I feel like it's cool to think back on the different ways certain events or activities that you took or spend so much time participating in can go such a long way in your life and the decisions you made, and things like that. Chris: I think so. I think other experiences, too, that I had probably more steered in that direction of what I wanted to do for career, I think having the opportunity to do an internship during my junior year with the Special Olympics of Massachusetts and help to do the marketing and recruitment for a Polar Plunge event that they did sparked an interest in, "Oh, you can do marketing, and you can do these types of business things that I want to do that have an impact for our cause." Chris: And Special Olympics was near and dear to my heart because my mom was a special education teacher. And so, I saw firsthand the power that that can have when you have inclusive opportunities for all young people, and give them a chance to participate in athletics and have those same experiences and lessons that I did from it was really valuable. So, I think the idea and the spark of having a job that can have an impact started there. Chris: And then, I had a summer experience in between my junior and senior years at Holy Cross, where I worked in an educational camp for kids called Super Camp and spent a few weeks on a college campus working with students that were struggling academically. And what we learned in the process when you get to meet these kids and work with them is that, in most cases, it wasn't because they didn't have the ability to learn or to do those that work. Chris: It was because there were other things going on in their lives that were either being a distraction or creating additional challenges that made it hard for them to show up in the education environment or in school in the way that they could or they should. And I think that in hindsight really is why I find myself loving the work that we do at City Year right now. And it's come full circle in that way because we see that talent is absolutely equally distributed and it's everywhere, but access and opportunity are not equally distributed. Chris: So, that's part of what we get to do at City Years is to say, "How can we make sure that every student gets the opportunities that they deserve to really tap into their talent and see success in their futures?" And I think that experience at Super Camp really gave me the first understanding of what education can look like when it works for everyone. JP: Yeah, absolutely. So, while we're looking in hindsight and reflecting on your experience post-Holy Cross, I know there's a lot to say about the strength of Holy Cross's Alumni Network. Could you tell a little bit about how that network has influenced your professional career? Chris: Yeah, it's influenced my professional career because I've been lucky to work with Holy Cross grads in every step of the way in every job almost that I can think of. So, at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund, we hired Joe Robertson, who was a track and field classmate of mine, class of '02, Rebecca Manikian in the year before, '01. So, I got to work with both of them on the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk and had a community and a shared experience with the two of them. Chris: Worked with Kristina Coppola Timmins at Cone Communications. And Rebecca and Joe also were ended up being Cone alumni at different points. And then, now, a huge number of Holy Cross grads, past and present, that I have worked through, including my current boss, AnnMaura Connolly, class of '86. So, I think at every step, I've seen Holy Cross alumni show up both in the work environment and help in the broader network. Chris: There's not a question that I would have or a connection I'd be trying to make that I couldn't reach out to somebody at Holy Cross and just say, "Hey, we share this background. Can you help?" And there's been countless times where I've had Holy Cross grads that I either know or don't know be willing to offer advice or make a connection, no questions asked and right away all the time. And I think that's fairly rare, at least in my experience. Chris: And it always surprises me how we'll be having a conversation and somebody will say, "Oh, they went to Holy Cross." It's amazing I think how people show up, particularly in the space that I'm in where you're working in the nonprofit field or in other jobs that are trying to have an impact on society. I think that's where the Jesuit teachings I think resonate for folks. And they really internalized that learning and those values, and I think it shows up in their career choices, and it certainly did for me. JP: Definitely. Yeah. Even for me as a student, I feel like something everyone can agree on is the strength of the Holy Cross alumni network. And something I always think about, even before I became a student here, just like walking around, wearing either a Holy Cross hat or that purple shirt, I was surprised and people would be surprised based on how many times you would get stopped, like, "Oh, you went to Holy Cross. I was a grad from this class." And I think that's something really special about that network. Chris: Happens all the time. And you see it in families, too. I mean, you're seeing it in your own with your sister being a grad. And I'm hopeful that my kids will end up being graduates as well. But I think you see that legacy in a lot of ways among families, among communities, where that becomes more than just an individual experience. It's a shared family experience, which is a pretty special thing. JP: Yeah, definitely. And even the fact that, like you mentioned, even just being a student, the fact that any alumni you either reach out to or you meet, they're just so willing to sit down and talk for as long as you need and give you advice or whatever the purpose is for that phone call or that meeting. They really just sit down and are willing to help in any way possible. So, I think that's something that's awesome about the college. JP: So, moving along, I think one of the great things about this podcast is that it highlights and showcases the different ways that Holy Cross mission of men and women for others can play into so many different careers and stories of different alumni. So, I guess just to start, what mission or values fuel your professional work today? Chris: Yeah. It's interesting, I think I've been fortunate to work at this intersection of companies and causes coming together to drive better business and greater good. And it's happened throughout my career and gone full circle starting on the nonprofit side at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund and moving over to the corporate side at New Balance Athletic Shoe and later Reebok, and then now in my current role at City Year. Chris: Seeing how companies can work with nonprofits and advising some of them on how to do that, when I was at Cone Communications and advising clients on those pieces, it's just always fascinated me that you can have a social impact. And it doesn't have to just be about charity, it doesn't have to be just about volunteerism or working in a nonprofit that there's all kinds of ways in which everybody can do that individually and collectively. Chris: Companies have a tremendous opportunity and tremendous power to be able to do that. And so, for me, I realized early on through those internships, experiences that I knew I was motivated by doing something kind of more than earning a paycheck, that I wanted to see that impact. Personally, I want to have a job that at the end of the day, I could feel like we were doing something bigger. And I think that was always a core value. Chris: I think, for me, that came from my parents. I think my example was seeing my mom be a special education teacher and work with students to give them that opportunity and to address some of that inequity and make sure that education was tailored to their needs and their situation, paired with my dad who was an executive in an enterprise rent a car for his whole career, high powered, highly growing business, and getting to see that side of it. Chris: And I think those two sensibilities really steered what I was looking for and seeing it as an example. I wanted to dig into business problems. I love the how do you think deeply about that? How do you try and solve those? How do you get somebody to buy your product or support your company or do something? So, the marketing and advertising and those pieces of it were fascinating to me intellectually, but I wanted to see an impact at the same time. Chris: And so, I think I was searching for that through each role of saying, "How do we combine those two things? And how does that show up?" In my time at the Jimmy Fund, it was really good for two things. I think my first job there was working a lot with families that were participating in the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk. And what I realized really quickly was, it was such a huge crash course in empathy and in building relationships and in listening. Chris: Because in most cases, I was just helping people that were participating in the event get registered, get their team organized and set up, get the T-shirts for the event, help them with their fundraising, things like that. But in most cases, I was talking with people that were either in the midst of the worst experience of their life because they were having somebody in their family facing cancer, or they were remembering the worst experience of their life and having lost somebody to cancer. Chris: And so, I think what I found is, you'd have a lot of conversations where people would get frustrated or they'd be angry or emotional, all rightfully so because they were dealing with really hard things. And I think I learned to be able to pick up on that and to connect with them and to try and find ways to encourage and support. And I think it was just a hugely valuable early experience in saying, "How do you connect with people and how do you build relationships?" Chris: "And how do you not take for granted both your own health and good fortune, but also how you'd be there when somebody else is struggling and understand what they're dealing with? And can you lift that load in some small way?" And I certainly was not doing anything significant in that regard and in that role, but I could make their day a little bit easier or solve a problem for them, et cetera. I started to really get excited about the ability to do that. And I found that was really motivating for me. Chris: So, the idea of having a purpose and being able to help somebody in a process during that day was, I think, started to become foundational. I think it also gave me a lot of perspective. You could be having a rough day in your job or something else going on. You could walk down the hall to the Jimmy Fund clinic and see the kids there that are coming in for treatment. It puts it in perspective pretty quick on your challenges and what's tough in your life when you're seeing that with a kid. Chris: So, for me, I think it helped build an immense sense of both opportunity to have an impact but then also an immense sense of gratitude for how fortunate I was. And I think those were two foundational pieces of that experience. And then, later, the second big lesson that I learned and this sparked the longer term career path was, I started to work more with the companies that were participating in the Jimmy Fund Walk, either that were sponsoring the event in different ways or they were getting their employees actively walking and fundraising. Chris: And that gave me a different side of it. It gave me exposure to stuff that I hadn't thought of, which was why would businesses do these types of things? Why would businesses want to have some sort of impact socially, which at the time was still relatively, I wouldn't say uncommon, but it wasn't as clear and upfront as it is today. Philanthropy was something that companies did on the side. It was nice to do because they wanted to be good citizens. But it wasn't a business strategy. Chris: It wasn't something that people were asking them about on a daily basis. It wasn't something that they thought about as part of their broader work as an organization and in their community. And so, that just fascinated me was like, why would companies want to do this outside of a classic kind of capitalist structure where they just have to add value for shareholders in the old Adam Smith lessons and things like that? Chris: And what I realized was, there was so much potential and so many resources that companies could bring to bear to help solve social issues. They had incredible skill and knowledge and power behind what they were doing in a lot of cases, really sophisticated ways to do things as businesses. Two, they had amazing people that they can deploy to have an impact in different ways, whether that was volunteering their time or giving access to their customers, things like that. Chris: And then, three, they can really tell a powerful story. Many companies can reach huge numbers of people and customers in a way that nonprofits can't and don't have the dollars or the access to be able to do. So, they could raise awareness and shine a light on different issues and get people to engage and support in a way that no nonprofit could ever hope to do. And I just became fascinated by that, on what a company could potentially do to have an impact in their community. Chris: And so, I think that job gave me two foundational experiences that I think have started to show up in each of the subsequent jobs that I started to have and really got me on that path. So, I think that's where the kind of being men and women for others started to show up for me was it was like a light went on, like, "Oh, this is how I can do that. This is where I can kind of have that be part of my daily life." JP: Yeah, that's amazing. I think what stuck out to me there was the perspective that you gained and you're sharing with us today is going back to at work or at school, you could be having a really bad day and that's that. I mean, obviously, no one enjoys having a bad day and it happens. But being able to just realize that oftentimes it could be way worse, and there's people, there are children and other people struggling, and they may be having a way worse day than you, I think that's a really important perspective for people to develop and take with them day by day. Chris: Yeah, I think so. Now, we have to acknowledge that that's easy for me to do as a white male, heterosexual, affluent, man of privilege in every possible dimension you can probably think of. I've had every advantage I could possibly have. And so, I think it's easy to say, "Have gratitude and appreciate those things when your life is what my life has been." And that doesn't mean we haven't had challenges and I haven't face things that have been tough, but I think it does give you a bit of a perspective. Chris: And I think gratitude and appreciation for those advantages and those experiences I've had is something that's driven a lot of the work for me and the why. But I would say within that, it's not uncommon, people come to try to have a social impact in many ways because of either guilt or a feeling of charity, like, "This is something I should pay it back. I should give back," and I certainly did. I think that was my perspective. I've been given a lot of opportunity. Chris: I owe it to others to give back in that way. I think when you start to do the work and you start to get proximate and really work on different issues, whatever it is, whether it's education or hunger or any way in which racism shows up in all of our systems, you start to realize that you move on the scale from charity to social justice, and really saying, "This isn't about me giving back or appreciating the opportunities I've had. This is about changing a system that is not just." Chris: "And it's my responsibility to play a deeper role there and to do what I can with the resources I have to drive some change there." So, I think you move from charity to social justice as you start to get proximate and more exposed to issues. And I think Holy Cross planted the ideas behind it and the early experiences, whether it was Habitat or other areas where I could start to see and get exposed to that. Chris: But I think later in my career and particularly at City Year, I started to see that more clearly and I think that's why my career has moved more in that direction. JP: Definitely. Yeah. So, I think you also, with those remarks you made, answered the next question I had, but I wanted to just emphasize. Is there something specific that drives you to work hard each and every day? And my takeaway from all you've just said is, I feel like the common theme of impact and purpose. That's what I picked up on, just whether it's you impacting someone or something, or the company you're working for, or just being able to realize the impact that someone else is having or that greater company is having on a specific cause. JP: That was my takeaway. And I think that's awesome just from a professional standpoint, being able to live by those themes of purpose and impact. That's really great. Chris: I think that's right. I think purpose and impact is the right way to frame it. I do think about that, hopefully, every day. Am I having a purpose and am I having an impact? In the day to day, I think you don't probably get up and get out of bed and think about that immediately. But I do think, as I thought about how I want to work and what jobs I want to take and what organizations I want to be at, I think in those times of reflection, certainly grounding back into purpose and impact has absolutely been the question I asked myself. Chris: Where can I feel connected and closest to a purpose? And where can I have the greatest impact in either my experience or in an organization that's working on a really hard problem? So, certainly, when I thought about coming to City Year and in my most recent role, that's absolutely what I was thinking about is, I had missed being close to the impact in a way that I had at Dana-Farber. Chris: And even at New Balance where I was on the corporate side but working closely with a lot of our nonprofit partners, I got to see that impact on a daily basis. When I moved into Cone Communications and advising nonprofit clients and business clients on their programs and their impact, I loved it. It was mentally fascinating and rigorous and an amazing training ground on all kinds of things around strategy and marketing and communications. Chris: Really tremendous skills and experience. But I found myself too far away from the people that we were serving, and I missed that. I wanted to get closer and back to that. And I think that's what drew me back to the nonprofit side at City Year was a chance to really work among people that were having that level of idealism and impact on a daily basis. Chris: And I also felt like it was a chance to take experiences and skills that I gained from other jobs and put them to really good use in helping, so you think about how we work with companies. Yeah. And I think the working hard piece to our earlier conversation, I think the rigor of Holy Cross academically and then all the other things that I got to be involved in really built that work habit in to where you show up and you do the work every day. Chris: And I think good things happen if you consistently spend the time and put in the effort. And again, I would say I had great examples, whether it's my parents or whether it's coaches and others, that really ingrain that work ethic and constantly trying to move forward for something bigger, whether it was a team that you were part of or whether it was the organization and the issue you were trying to support. JP: Definitely. Yeah. So, I guess to shift gears a little bit here, I wanted to talk about the Boston Marathon. Correct me if I'm wrong here, but you ran the Boston Marathon not once, not twice, but three times. Is that- Chris: Four actually. JP: Four, okay. So, the Boston Marathon, four times. At least in my opinion, being able to run the marathon one time is one heck of an achievement. So, could you tell me a little bit about what drove you to do that again and again and again and again? Chris: Yeah, yeah. It was working at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute really was the big thing in our first event. And that I got to work on the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk. I got exposed to the course because there was a fundraising walk along the route of the Boston Marathon. And we'd have thousands of people walk and fundraise for Dana-Farber along the route. So, I got to know the marathon course, its history. Chris: I got a really good opportunity to work with people like Dave McGillivray, the director of the Boston Marathon, and get to know him and his amazing team and learn from them. And just started to fall in love with that event. I would volunteer at the marathon and see it. And as a former track and field athlete, I wasn't a distance runner by any means, but I started to get it into my head that it would be a really challenging athletic experience. And so, that was interesting. Chris: To be honest, it was my wife that steered me in that direction. She ran the marathon first a couple of times for Dana-Farber and fundraise for them. And so, I got to see her experience doing that. And I'm kind of a competitive guy, so I decided that I wanted to do it myself. And I couldn't just let her have all the fun. So, I did, I signed up and ran for Dana-Farber. I actually got a chance to run that first marathon with my wife who, God bless her, waited for me and dragged me along those last few miles because I was struggling, and she was kind and carried me along. Chris: And then, I had a chance to do it a couple more times, which was great, including when I didn't finish, which was a huge disappointment and a physical struggle. But I got to come back in another year and completed, and it's some of my greatest memories and experiences of participating in that event and being part of fundraising for Dana-Farber, for City Year as part of that. The marathon is a really special event for Boston. Chris: And I think what you learn in that event is that people are always surprised and super like you were complimentary about being able to run that marathon. I fully believe that most people can run a marathon, and I've seen it firsthand on the course. I think what it gets to is our earlier conversation about how do you go pursue your goals and do those things. And anybody that's run a marathon can tell you that the race day is the reward. Chris: It's the thing at the end, it's the countless hours, the 16 weeks before where you're going and you're running three, four, five, six, depending on what your training schedule is, days a week. And putting in countless miles in good weather, bad weather, darkness, snow, rain, cold, your ability to get up and do that each day and keep consistently growing the mileage and keeping the training, that's what leads to the marathon and the success at the end. Chris: So, it's really about, can you do that work on a daily basis? And can you progress over time by sticking with it through the ups and the downs? And then, I was really lucky to train with great groups of people each time. And I think that's another lesson of it is, it's pretty hard thing to go train by yourself and go run a marathon by yourself. Most people that do it have done their training with a group of friends and other people that are running that helped motivate them, support them, and inspire them. Chris: And then, day off, all the people that are out there are cheering you on, supporting you, helping you get to that day. It's truly a team effort. So, I just got to get the rewards of doing it four times. JP: Yeah, that's an awesome achievement. And I have a ton of respect for you and anyone who does that. In fact, one of my buddies here at Holy Cross, Colman Benson, he's a sophomore, and he ran this past marathon. And just seeing him go through that training earlier in the fall, I'd be like, "Oh, what are you doing tomorrow?" He's like, "Oh, I'm running 12 miles in the morning, then I'm going to class." And I just think that's very impressive and definitely an awesome achievement. Chris: Yeah, it's not too late, JP. You can start training, too. JP: Yeah. So, I read in a previous interview that one of your most memorable achievements is your support of Susan G. Komen for the Cure while you're with New Balance. Can you speak a little to that? Chris: Yeah. So, after my first couple jobs at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund, I mentioned I found myself just becoming so fascinated by what companies could do. And I realized that I really wanted to experience it from a company's perspective. I wanted to get over to that side of the work. Around that time, I also decided that I wanted to go deeper into business. I was working with companies. Chris: I was asking them to support us, but I didn't really understand business in a deep way. And so, I ended up going back to graduate school at night to get my MBA while I was working at Dana-Farber. And I ended up making the switch over to New Balance and taking a job there really that was the opposite or the flip side of what I had been doing at the Jimmy Fund. Chris: So, instead of asking companies to support us and asking them to sponsor and have their employees participate in our events, and have an impact in that way, I was helping to guide New Balance's investment in different nonprofits in the community and thinking about how we showed up with our dollars, with our products, with our people to support those efforts. And so, the job was to manage what New Balance called their cause marketing work at the time. Chris: I sat in the marketing department at New Balance. I was measured in the same ways that other marketers were on driving awareness of New Balance's brand, consideration of our product and trying on footwear and apparel and things like that, and then ultimately sales of that product, which was great. And I loved it because I got a chance to really get into the marketing and science of that, which was fascinating, and do it at a brand and in a field of athletic footwear and apparel that I was personally passionate about as a runner and as an athlete. Chris: So, best of both worlds there. And it was just a great opportunity to take what I knew from the nonprofit side and bring that sensibility into the corporate environment into how we showed up and work with our nonprofit partners, whether it was Susan G. Komen for the Cure or Girls on the Run, which was our other major partner. And I just loved it. And I think that really crystallized, this is the career path for me. Chris: I can work with cool products and in areas that I really liked, but I can have an impact in that way. And it just opened my eyes to what was possible for companies. New Balance was such a special place because it was a privately held, family-owned company, had a tremendous number of people that I worked there for years. It really felt like a community of people in ways that the Jimmy Fund and Holy Cross actually felt very similar to me, and that's what I loved about being there at the time. Chris: And we got to do some really cool things, whether it was working on all the different Komen events. I had a chance to meet Joe Biden, President Biden, when he was vice president at the time at an event for Komen and New Balance, which was amazing. We got to do great things, marketing our products, and attending different events, and meeting celebrities. I went on The Ellen Show to give away million dollars for breast cancer research and got to have the big chat out there and hand that to Ellen. Chris: So, amazing, unique experiences that I wouldn't have other ever anticipated getting a chance to do as a result of that job. It's a really special company. And later, I got a chance to really go deep and work with Girls on the Run after my time at New Balance. After I left New Balance, I had a chance to join the board of Girls on the Run and serve on their board and chair their board for a few years. Chris: And to get to work with that amazing nonprofit that focuses on women's leadership development and girls empowerment through a running curriculum and really social-emotional skill building curriculum was just an amazing experience to, again, work for another world-class nonprofit and get a chance to see it grow. So, another really fortunate opportunity for me. JP: Yeah, that's incredible. That seems like such an overall special, I guess, group of things that you got, meeting the president and going on The Ellen Show. That's awesome. So, I guess, it seems like it's hard to top those experiences. But has anything changed in terms of your most memorable milestone since then in your career? Chris: I think you start to look at what are the skills and experiences and most importantly, the relationships you build over your career. And each of those are really cool memories and experiences. But I think what matters is the relationships that you start to have and build over time. So, when I think about those different jobs, it's more about the people that I got a chance to work with and get to learn from. Chris: And I think City Year as my current job and organization now for the last eight years, that's what I start to think about and focus on is how have I gotten the chance to work with and learn from really great people, and continued. I think, even in this kind of midway through my career and later in my career, I feel like I'm still learning and growing on a daily basis, and getting better both at what I do tangibly functionally in my work. Chris: But also as a manager, as a boss, as a co-worker, as a parent, I think you start to pick up those lessons. And I think for City Year in particular, it's by far the most powerful place that I've ever seen as far as helping people really build connection to one another and to help us really explore who we are and how do we show up as our full selves at work on a daily basis. And how do we do that for other people, whether it's our co-workers or whether it's the students we work with in the schools we serve in. Chris: I think that's the amazing lesson and opportunity of City Year. So, I would say I hope I haven't hit the highlights of the careers. I got a lot of work left to do. And I think we've got a lot more to accomplish and learn. So, I'm excited about that. JP: Definitely. The best is yet to come. All right. So, now, to shift over, I know earlier, you talked about the idea of cause marketing and how that plays into your career. And I know that's been around for quite some time now and is becoming increasingly popular and being leveraged by businesses and nonprofits. So, for those who are listening who might not know a lot about it, could you speak a little about cause marketing and what that means to your career, past, present and future? Chris: Yes. It's interesting, you've seen a real change over the decades in how companies think about their responsibility and impact to society. And early on, it was very much about volunteerism and employees coming out doing different things. Or it might be about the company writing a check and the CEO handing it over to an organization. There wasn't really a business strategy. It was, "Hey, we recognize we're part of this community. We want to support our community and we find ways to do that." Chris: And then, what you started to see late into the '90s, early 2000s is companies started to read realize this could actually have a deeper business impact. People want to support companies that are doing good things in their communities. And we can tell that story via our marketing, our public relations efforts, via sponsorships and other things, kind of classic marketing and sales approaches. And so, they started to integrate cause into that. Chris: And so, you start to see opportunities like buy this product, we'll donate XYZ. And then, you started to see buy one, give one like TOMS and other new models of cause marketing come in. But in the early days, it was still very much kind of a business strategy using cause to drive it. So, it was, "We know people care about this cause. And if we talk about being associated with it, it would get them to buy our product or get them to take this action." Chris: And what we've seen over the last decade plus is that's really evolving and going deeper. I think what we started to see, particularly when I was working at Cone Communications and advising clients, we started to say, "What's unique about your company and the work that you do, the industry that you're in, the expertise that you have? And how could you connect your philanthropy to an issue that is aligned with your business?" Chris: "So, if you're in the pharmaceutical industry or other areas, how do you align with health and determinants of health? If you're working in other areas, like cable and telephone and others, how do you think about connectivity and digital connectivity being something that you can provide and connect to?" And so, how do you align the strategy and the impact you can have with your business so that those two things are working in harmony in reinforcing one another? Chris: And so, I think there was an understanding that it can actually drive business. And it's not just a nice thing to do that's over on the side, it's an important strategy to drive business. And so, during my time at New Balance and Cone and later at Reebok, I think we were more in that era of saying, "How do we integrate it into the business? And how do we really see it as a unique business driving strategy?" Chris: Now, I think you're in an even different environment, both with young people like yourselves coming into work and into the environment and being aware of social issues in a way that is deeper and more common than I think it was maybe of my generation and earlier, really wanting to have a purpose at work, and looking at your companies and saying, "How are you helping me do that?" And I only want to be here if I'm having a chance to put my passion and my values front and center in a way that was different than I think previous generations thought about work. Chris: And then, two, I think we're realizing, particularly over the last two years with the pandemic, with the murder of George Floyd, certainly the cracks in our system and how it is not equitable, how racism really shows up across all kinds of dimensions to prevent others from having opportunity that they should, and saying, "That's not okay." And people are saying, "We expect to both individually have an opportunity to affect that." Chris: "And we expect companies to be vocal and to step up and to show what their values are. And if you're not, then that's not going to be a company that I'm going to invest my time in personally as an employee. Or I'm not going to invest my dollars in as a customer." And I think you're seeing a whole new era of companies leading and being vocal in a lot of ways around social issues and taking a stand. Chris: And if they're not, people kind of questioning what's going on and why not. So, I think it's been really impressive and powerful to see. There's a lot that still needs to be done, right? There's a tremendous amount of inequity even within companies. And we see examples every day of bad behavior or other things that companies need to do better and need to do differently. Chris: But I will say, in working with many different Fortune 100 companies on a daily basis, the understanding of issues, the way they talk about social issues, the way they talk about their own diversity, equity, and inclusion and belonging efforts within the company is a huge sea change compared to what I saw even five, 10 years ago, which gives me a lot of hope for where we're going. I think we're realizing that capitalism is an amazing system of value creation. It's done tremendous things to grow and build our company. Chris: And the kind of American dream did a tremendous number of things, certainly for my family and many others, but that that's no longer the case for everyone and it probably never was, to be honest. And so, how do we own that and how do we address that? And I think companies are wrestling with that in a more authentic way. And I hope they continue to do that. It's part of what I think my life's work is, is to try and help companies do that. JP: Yeah, definitely. I feel like that, in my opinion, that idea of cause marketing is something that's... I feel like that's got to be something that's just going to become, I guess, take over in terms of marketing. And just seeing it present today, I guess I've been seeing it firsthand with the new Worcester Red Sox at Polar Park in terms of sports marketing. Their whole thing is... I think the program is like In Debt to a Vet. JP: So, they're marketing that product of going to the game and all. And then, every strike out at home, they donate X amount of money to veterans. And then, they also have just other organizations like fighting food insecurity and things like that. So, I feel like I've just been learning more and more about that. And I feel like that's got to be something like revolutionary in terms of marketing and business today. Chris: Yeah. And do you find yourself deciding who to buy from and who to work with as a result of that? Do you see it show up in the decisions you make? JP: Yeah. Definitely, I feel like these days, I see, even buying clothing and things like that, some... off the top of my head, I can't think of any. And shoes too, especially I've been seeing. They advertise the materials they make their shoes out of and stuff like that. And X percent of the money they take in goes to this cause or that cause. So, yeah, I've definitely been seeing it become more and more present today. Chris: I think it's true. I think as a marketer, and I don't even like the term cause marketing anymore because it feels so transactional, and we're well beyond that. I mean, it is a strategy that is useful and valuable, and company should still do. But I think what you've seen is now that you interact with a company and their products and a brand all the time, whether it's in social media or online or in other places, it used to be such a tightly controlled thing. Chris: You kind of created a marketing message, you put it out there in a campaign. You spent weeks developing it and controlling the advertising message and putting it out there. That's just not how we market and how customers engage anymore. It's year round, minute to minute brand building and engagement. It's a very different thing. And so, what you've seen is companies have to evolve to respond to that and say, "Okay, we need to be talking about not just cause marketing, but it's about what are our values." Chris: "And how do those show up in every action that we do, because it's not just the messaging that we put out from a marketing or an advertising standpoint. It's how somebody experienced us in the store, or an interaction they had with an employee, or something our CEO said, or some way they experienced our product." And it's 24-7-365. And so, I think you're seeing companies really say, "This is about our values, and being clear on what our values are." Chris: Because our most important stakeholders, our people are saying that that's what matters to them and that's what they care about. And so, I think we just think about business differently. JP: Absolutely, yeah. And actually, even aside from just that marketing aspect, the whole idea of impact investing and companies just needing to evolve now based on ESG and sustainability and things like that, it's just becoming more and more just the norm. And I feel like more and more businesses have no choice but to evolve and match what other businesses are doing because that's such a pressing topic in today's time as well. Chris: A hundred percent. And you have to, to compete, to succeed. And all the data tells you that companies that invest and do deep things and are high performing when it comes to the environmental, social, and governance measures outperform other companies and succeed. So, it's not just a nice thing to do, an important thing to do for the planet, a good thing to do. It's an imperative. If you want to continue to build a business and have it thrive, you have to lean in those areas. JP: Definitely. So, could you speak about the back and forth relationship you've seen between business and nonprofits throughout the span of your professional career? Chris: Absolutely. That's a great question. I think to our earlier conversation, early on, I think it was more transactional. It was kind of checkbook philanthropy. And we developed some relationships, and hopefully we get some money. And what we've seen, certainly in my time at City Year and why I was excited to come to City Year and work on it, is that changed. And companies were increasingly looking at a much deeper and holistic way to support issues. Chris: And so, they wanted certainly the branding and the visibility, and being able to talk about themselves as being good citizens, and for nonprofits to help validate and help them have opportunities to do that. They wanted to have employees actively volunteering and spending time, whether that was doing different kind of done-in-a-day volunteer projects or weeks of service, days of service, things like that. Chris: Or deeper ongoing skills-based volunteerism where I can share my expertise in marketing or somebody can share their expertise in web design or other things with the nonprofit and help that nonprofit build its capabilities or its skills. And really being able to set ambitious goals, which is what we're seeing a lot of companies do now, and to say, "This is what we care about from a social impact standpoint. Here's how we're going to try and have some impact. And here's some ways we're going to hold ourselves accountable and measure against it." Chris: And so, now, nonprofits are more partners in that process. And certainly, there's a dynamic of where the dollars come. And we certainly are trying to raise money from companies and have contractual pieces of what we do. But in many ways, we're sitting at the table with our corporate partners, and they view us as experts in the space that help them, at least for City Year, understand education, understand urban education, understand racial issues and how those show up in the education space, and are looking for our help and our guidance on how they can have a deeper impact. Chris: And we often think collaboratively and advise and coach them on some of the things they're thinking about. And in many cases, they can offer tremendous support to help us do different things. We've been fortunate to work with Deloitte Consulting as an example at City Year for decades now, and have benefited from having pro bono case teams and others really come and think about how do we grow City Year as an organization. Chris: So, I would say it's much less of a transactional thing and much more of a collaborative partnership, which has been amazing to see. And I think that's the part that I've been fortunate to have worked on the nonprofit side, the corporate side, the agency side, and seeing that from all angles that I think it hopefully helps me be a better partner to our colleagues. But I think there's such a willingness to say, "These are huge social issues that cannot be solved by any individual nonprofit, any individual organization." Chris: And we have to come together and figure out how we work collectively on them to change them. So, I think the level of expertise sharing, information sharing, and collaboration is greater than it's ever been. So, I'm excited about that. JP: Cool, yeah. Thank yo

Get Busy Livin’
10. Listening for the Bigger Story with Anne O'Neil

Get Busy Livin’

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 4:21


I've shared a bit about my high school and college basketball career in previous episodes, and in today's episode, I want to highlight one of the most pivotal games of my career. Flashback to a snowy game night on the outskirts of Cedar Rapids, Iowa一just a typical Tuesday in the middle of winter for my Kennedy High School team. Two of our biggest fans, Ryan and Greg, were in the crowd. They had differing mental capabilities and were known throughout the town for going to all of the city's sporting events. The warmups and 20minute countdown to tip-off were going as planned, when all of the sudden, the legendary University of Tennessee Head Coach Pat Summitt, and her assistant coach Mickie DeMoss, walked in. Summit accrued 1,098 career wins, the most in college basketball history at the time of her retirement, and took home eight NCAA Division I basketball championship titles, so you can imagine what an honor it was to have her recruiting and watching my game. You would think that's what made the game so special, but it was actually the car ride home that sticks in my memory. My parents and I gave Ryan and Greg a ride home, and they shared passionately about their upcoming Special Olympics game. This conversation sparked a shift in my relationship with them, and I started to view them as true friends and fellow athletes instead of superfans. Listen to today's episode to hear more about how I first learned about the Special Olympics and discovered what it meant to be a part of something bigger than myself. Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, TuneIn, Simplecast, or on your favorite podcast platform. Topics Covered:A peek into my junior year basketball season The larger role that Ryan and Greg played in my life outside of basketball The inclusive team spirit of the Special Olympics Why I love connecting with other people and hearing what lights them up Special Offers: If there's a topic or charity you want me to highlight on the podcast, DM it to me on Instagram @getbusylivin_podFollow Us:Get Busy Livin' Podcast WebsiteGet Busy Livin' Podcast Instagram Get Busy Livin' Podcast TwitterAnne's Website Anne's LinkedInAnne's InstagramAnne's Twitter

MBC Grand Broadcasting, Inc.
Jeff Miller Special Olympics 5 - 3 2022

MBC Grand Broadcasting, Inc.

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 8:40


Fruita Monument assistant football coach Jeff Miller on Special Olympics on The Jim Davis Show.

Play Unified Podcast
S3: E9 Rachel Barcelona is Breaking Barriers

Play Unified Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 70:55


Welcome to the #PlayUnified Podcast where we meet at the intersection of sports, disability, philanthropy, entertainment and community building. Listen as we discuss why sports is such an important part of life, community and social change. Guests will include Special Olympics athletes, local sports figures, government officials, small business owners and figures within the Special Olympics movement. This week, Mike, Charles and Erin speak with Rachel Barcelon, an Autisn self-advocate who is brekaing barriers in the pageant world as the first contestant with Autism in Miss Florida's history. We'll also discuss the Bruins and Celtics playoff prospects, the red sox early season strugles, and the NFL Draft. Don't miss the Lightning Round with Lumene 'Lightning' Montissol.

The Afterword: A Conversation About the Future of Words
The Afterword on accessibility in Sports Part 2

The Afterword: A Conversation About the Future of Words

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 19:40


 Skeeter Powell, founder of David's Table and Carly Mellor, the Greenville, SC area Director of Special Olympics share that awareness is a key factor in creating access to sports for anyone who wants to get in the game! We must treat individuals as individuals so that there can be a balanced approach between need versus agency in sport participation for everyone. Becoming a sports fan, cheering attempts, being willing and valuing inclusion are just a few ways we can ensure that all athletes are represented!

World XP Podcast
Episode 59 - Chip Tarkenton (Former ABC Sports Sideline Reporter)

World XP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 61:01


If you're enjoying the content, please like, subscribe, and comment!   Check out our new clips channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9KPTBSzEkPmwCmo9FL_ulg  Chip Tarkenton started in the communications business at age fifteen, when he worked at family-owned radio stations in Georgia. He went on to be a sportswriter, then a weekend sports anchor at WDEF TV, Chattanooga, Tennessee. From there he moved to sports director at WBMG, Birmingham, Alabama, and WLOS, Asheville, North Carolina. Tarkenton is a Member of the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame. He serves on the Board of Directors for the Special Olympics in Virginia and the Advisory Committee for the Virginia High School League.  He is also involved in the James River Athletic Boosters and contributes as an advisor to many non-profit groups. Tarkenton holds a BA in Speech Communication from the University of Georgia.  ______________________  Follow us!   @worldxppodcast Instagram - https://bit.ly/3eoBwyr @worldxppodcast Twitter - https://bit.ly/2Oa7Bzm  Spotify - http://spoti.fi/3sZAUTG Apple Podcasts - http://apple.co/30uGTny Google Podcasts - http://bit.ly/3v8CF2U Anchor - http://bit.ly/3qGeaH7 YouTube - http://bit.ly/3rxDvUL  #collegefootball #collegefootballplayoffs #ncaa #abcsports #georgiabulldogs #ncaacollegefootball #ncaanationalchampionship #uga #sidelinesportsreporter #sportsanchor #chiptarkenton #podcastshow #longformpodcast #longformpodcast #podcasts #podcaster #newpodcast #podcastshow #podcasting #newshow #worldxppodcast --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/worldxppodcast/support

Klartext
Klartext - nyheter på ett enklare sätt

Klartext

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 5:02


Nu har det varit semifinal för musiktävlingen Funkisfestivalen i Stockholm. Klartext har pratat med Tomas Fogelholm som är en av de artister som tog sig vidare till den stora riksfinalen. Apoteket har berättat för Facebook om vad kunderna har köpt i deras webbutik, trots att det är förbjudet att berätta vad kunderna handlar på apotek. I sommar är det Special Olympics games i Malmö. Inför det har barn med funktionsvariationer nu fått prova på olika sporter i Malmö och vår reporter har pratat med några av barnen.

KVOM NewsWatch Podcast
KVOM NewsWatch, Thursday, April 28, 2022

KVOM NewsWatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 21:25


Faulkner County officials uncover major theft ring; Mallet named Outstanding Young Lawyer; ACTION clients take multiple medals at Special Olympics; Museum of Autos car show planned; baseball and softball district tournaments underway.

SENIA Happy Hour
Get Involved with Special Olympics

SENIA Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 25:04


Overview: Today, host Lori Boll speaks with the Chief Global Education Officer for the Special Olympics, responsible for global education and youth leadership.Jacqueline Jodl, PhD. Lori and Jackie discuss the history of the Special Olympics, the evidence that backs up these programs that lessens bullying and bias, and how we, in our international schools, can get more involved. With a program like Unified Sports, we can create inclusive opportunities. Connect Website Twitter Instagram LinkedIn Resources Mentioned in Today's Podcast: Social Inclusion of Students With Intellectual Disabilities: Global Evidence From Special Olympics Unified Schools Bio Jacqueline Jodl, PhD, is the Chief Global Education Officer for the Special Olympics, responsible for global education and youth leadership. Previously, Dr. Jodl was an Associate Professor at the University of Virginia's School of Education and Executive Director at the Aspen Institute leading the National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development. Dr. Jodl's life is dedicated to helping organizations like Special Olympics that help children and young people who advocate for a more inclusive world where differences are celebrated, not feared. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/seniapodcast/message

Home & Classroom
Young Athletes

Home & Classroom

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 34:59


In this episode, Rachel and Hannah are joined by Ryan Miller, Sr. Director of Program Young Athletes and Elementary of Special Olympics New York. Tune in to hear all about this amazing sport and play program for children with and without intellectual disabilities (ID), ages 2 to 7.Learn more at specialolympics-ny.org---On Home & Classroom, we talk with experts & special guests about children's development, health, nutrition, play, growth, child care, parenting, and more. Email homeandclassroom@brightsideup.org to be a guest or send an interview suggestion today!

The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers
LP783 Technology and Training: Is It Real Enough to Be Effective?

The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 24:20


Technology and Training: Is It Real Enough to Be Effective? Training technology, simulators, and virtual reality have all come along way and have become a big part of the training for many carriers and new students getting their license. In this episode we explore if the technology is effective enough for proper training and what training facilitators think are realistic models. In this episode we talk with the team at Kim Richardson Training Specialists (KRTS - www.krway.com ), IMVR (Virtual Reality Training - www.imvr.ca ) and Commercial Heavy Equipment Training - www.chet.ca ) to learn if one type of technology is better than the other. This episode is sponsored by Rosedale Transport offering career opportunities for truck drivers with their large network. You can learn more at www.rosedalegroup.com   This episode is sponsored by RIMS Transport who is looking for owner operators and drivers to work cross border operations out of Hamilton Ontario. You can learn more about the opportunities at www.rimstransport.com Join us for the Truck Convoy for Special Olympics happening in September helping special needs athletes have fulfilling lives. You can learn more about the Truck Convoy for Special Olympics at www.truckconvoy.ca About the Show LISTEN TO THE PODCAST- The show is available at www.theleadpedalpodcast.com  , ITunes, Stitcher, Spotify, Tunein, iHeartradio, SoundCloud, and other popular podcast platforms. Thanks for listening JOIN THE LEAD PEDAL PODCAST FAN CLUB www.TheLeadPedalPodcastFanClub.com LISTEN TO LEAD PEDAL RADIO at www.LeadPedalRadio.com The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers talks all things trucking for people in the transportation industry helping them improve their business and careers. Interviews with industry professionals and truck drivers, trucking information, and other features on the industry are meant to be helpful for truck drivers and those in transportation. The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers has main episodes released every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with bonus material on other days. You can learn more about the host and show on our website and make sure to SUBSCRIBE to the show on your favourite podcast platform. www.theleadpedalpodcast.com What does The Lead Pedal Podcast mean? The Lead (pronounced - Led) stands for acceleration or fast-track of your career or business. It is a play on words and we certainly are not here promoting speeding in the industry. We are hoping this information will help you become a professional driver faster than if you didn't know about many of these topics. Are you enjoying the show? If so we would appreciate you leaving us a rating and review on iTunes or on your favourite podcast platform. www.theleadpedalpodcast.com Join The Lead Pedal Podcast Fan Club where are loyal fans get first chance at specials, discounts on merchandise and much more.The club is free to join and you can learn more at www.theleadpedalpodcastfanclub.com  

Passage to Profit Show
Maximize Your Refund with Shauna Wekherlien, The Tax Goddess, 04-24-2022

Passage to Profit Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 52:48


This episode of the Passage to Profit Show features Shauna Wekherlien The Tax Goddess, Valeria Aloe from Conscious Abundance and Mark Cronin & John Lee Cronin from John's Crazy Socks. Shauna Wekherlien, CPA is ranked in the top 1% of only 600 Certified Tax Coach and Strategists in the U.S. She is the founder of Tax Goddess Business Services, PC is a full-service tax and accounting firm with a focus on tax strategy and planning to help lower and minimize taxes for business owners and investors. Shauna works with an international team of over 60 tax strategy experts. On average she lowers her clients taxes by $32,600/year, removes stress and hassle, and promotes business growth with additional cash flow. She has 20+ Years in tax field working specifically for Business Owners, Self-employed, and Investors to actively create custom strategies to maximize deductions and reduce their tax burdens to the legal minimum. Read more at: https://taxgoddess.com/Valeria Aloe, our Executive Spotlight guest, is the founder of Conscious Abundance, a bilingual (Spanish and English) research-based, behavioral change platform for women and minority employees and is the author of “Uncolonized Latinas”. Valeria partners with organizations and corporations to identify the particular needs of their women and minority employees and clients, and support them with programs that seek to develop leadership skills, enhance emotional intelligence, and boost resilience and productivity. She also provides 1-on-1 coaching and conducts the course “Your Extraordinary Life Begins Today”, specifically designed for Hispanics in the United States. Read more at: https://uncolonizedlatinas.com/Mark Cronin & John Lee Cronin, our Entrepreneur Presenters, are the founders of John’s Crazy Socks, a sock company that offers an array of designs of socks in a multitude of patterns for men, women and children. Sock collections such as pop culture, food and drink to animals and more. John’s Crazy Socks is a father-son venture inspired by co-founder John Lee Cronin, a young man with Down syndrome. John’s affinity for crazy socks paired with his love of making people smile made our mission clear: we want to spread happiness. Together they found a way to create a social enterprise, John’s Crazy Socks, and build it into a multi-million dollar business. The company donates 5 percent of our earnings to the Special Olympics as they’ve played a vital role in John’s development. Read more at: https://johnscrazysocks.com/ Visit https://passagetoprofitshow.com/ for the latest updates and episodes.

The Afterword: A Conversation About the Future of Words
The Afterword on accessibility in Sports

The Afterword: A Conversation About the Future of Words

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 29:48


In the United States alone, 1 in 4 people have some type of physical disability. Creating space and providing access for everyone who wishes to play a game or participate in a sport is vital to our global well being. Skeeter Powell, founder of David's Table explains that true inclusion tells all athletes that they “get to play” Carly Mellor, the area Director of Special Olympics shares that everyone deserves to be included in games. When everyone plays, we all benefit!

Love Based Leadership with Dan Pontefract
Sasha Seymore - Co-Founder and COO of Learn to Win

Love Based Leadership with Dan Pontefract

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 27:34


Sasha Seymore is the co-founder and COO of Learn to Win, a software platform that unlocks "Last Mile Learning" for organizations. What is Last Mile Learning? It's the critical operational knowledge unique to every team. Last Mile training drives 80% of job performance, but it's unique to every org and can't be bought off-the-shelf. It lives in your experts' heads. It's taught informally - if at all. Learn to Win's platform makes it fast and simple for anyone to build a lesson. Their mobile-first platform delivers learning in bite-size chunks that become easy to consume in the flow of work. The company has clients such as the Pittsburgh Penguins, the U.S. Air Force, Novartis, the Special Olympics and the Carolina Panthers. As a recovering Chief Learning Officer, Dan Pontefract was fascinated to quiz Sasha on a number of different questions to get to the bottom of how organizations and employees need to 'learn to win.'

The Art of Bombing
Episode 227: Lee Bruns (HBO Max, Motorcycle Monthly)

The Art of Bombing

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 57:46


Episode 227: Making A Good Impression! In this episode, Dan and Josh (Josh is gone) are joined by Watertown, SD-based comedian Lee Bruns  (HBO Max, Motorcycle Monthly) who talks about bombing while trying to make a good impression on a booker. Lee talks about the obstacles of living in a small town and having to create his own stage time while curating comedy in a small market. He also shares his dream gig and it's not what you'd think - it's the. Art. of. Bombing! Plus more! Please rate and review. Lee BrunsLee Bruns is a 54-year-old father of three who never really got the hang of being an adult. Formally trained auctioneer,  writer for Many motorcycle magazines, Special Olympics coach, and nerd level motorcycle guy.  Website Instagram Twitter Art of Bombing:  Dead & Mellow: https://deadandmellow.com/  "Nobody Had a Podcast Called The Art of Bombing" Theme by John Hult  Bumpers provided by Joe Nicola Music  Website: https://www.artofbombingpod.com/    Merch: https://teespring.com/stores/blitzed-entertainment Leave us a voice message: https://podinbox.com/artofbombingpod Buy us a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/dbubcomedy  Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/artofbombingpod  FB: https://www.facebook.com/artobpodcast/  Twitter: @artofbombingpod  Instagram: @artofbombingpod  Twitch: @artofbombingpod YouTube: Art of Bombing Podcast  Dan Bublitz Jr: http://www.danbublitz.com/  Josh Shirley: http://www.joshshirleycomedy.com ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Work, Actually
PRO GOLFER - Carly Booth

Work, Actually

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 38:05


Ever wondered what it would be like to be a professional golfer? Today's episode is with Carly Booth - Carly became the youngest ladies' club champion in Britain at the age of 11 at Dunblane New. At 12, she played with Sandy Lyle in the British Masters Pro-Am and at 14 she appeared in her first professional event, the Ladies Scottish Open, and finished 13th. She was rated the No1 junior in Europe after winning the European Junior Masters in 2007, the same year she lifted the Scottish Under-18 and Under-21 titles. In 2008, she became the youngest player to represent Great Britain & Ireland in the 76 year history of the Curtis Cup, facing the Americans in the 35th staging of that match at St Andrews. She also played at the Junior Ryder Cup in 2006 and 2008 and won the Daily Telegraph Finals in 2007 and 2008.At the end of 2009 aged 17, she became the youngest ever Scot to qualify for the LET. As a youngster, Carly was able to practice on the course made exclusively for her and her brother, professional golfer Wallace Booth, by her father Wally at the family farm near Comrie. Sporting achievement runs in the family, Wally was a British wrestling champion and Carly's second brother Paul was a medal winner at the 2010 Special Olympics. Carly is a fierce opponent, who loves the winners circle and recently returned to it by securing victory in the 2019 Tipsport Czech Ladies Open, her first tour victory for 7 years.www.carlyboothgolf.com 

The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers
LP780 Making Money as a Driver Through a Carrier Royalty Program

The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 19:22


Making Money as a Driver Through a Carrier Royalty Program Carriers are getting very creative as they look for drivers and Variant Trucking is moving ahead of the pack. Their unique Ambassador Program not only helps their fleet get more drivers, but also helps there driver make money through royalties even if they are not driving. Learn about this unique program on the podcast. Bruce chats with recruiters and drivers on the program about how it works. You can learn more about Variant Trucking at www.drivevariant.com Traffix Transportation is looking for owner operators to join their team operating in specific lanes between Toronto and Chicago or Missouri and Atlanta. If you are looking for steady miles hauling dry and refrigerated freight then contact Chuck Snow at Traffix at 416-271-3946 or visit them online at www.Traffix.com This episode is sponsored by C.A.T. Transport offering flexible work options, pet friendly programs, and is one of the Best Managed Carriers in Canada. Learn more at www.cat.ca  or call 1-800-363-5313 Join us for the Truck Convoy for Special Olympics happening in September helping special needs athletes have fulfilling lives. You can learn more about the Truck Convoy for Special Olympics at www.truckconvoy.ca About the Show LISTEN TO THE PODCAST- The show is available at www.theleadpedalpodcast.com  , ITunes, Stitcher, Spotify, Tunein, iHeartradio, SoundCloud, and other popular podcast platforms. Thanks for listening JOIN THE LEAD PEDAL PODCAST FAN CLUB www.TheLeadPedalPodcastFanClub.com LISTEN TO LEAD PEDAL RADIO at www.LeadPedalRadio.com The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers talks all things trucking for people in the transportation industry helping them improve their business and careers. Interviews with industry professionals and truck drivers, trucking information, and other features on the industry are meant to be helpful for truck drivers and those in transportation. The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers has main episodes released every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with bonus material on other days. You can learn more about the host and show on our website and make sure to SUBSCRIBE to the show on your favourite podcast platform. www.theleadpedalpodcast.com What does The Lead Pedal Podcast mean? The Lead (pronounced - Led) stands for acceleration or fast-track of your career or business. It is a play on words and we certainly are not here promoting speeding in the industry. We are hoping this information will help you become a professional driver faster than if you didn't know about many of these topics. Are you enjoying the show? If so we would appreciate you leaving us a rating and review on iTunes or on your favourite podcast platform. www.theleadpedalpodcast.com Join The Lead Pedal Podcast Fan Club where are loyal fans get first chance at specials, discounts on merchandise and much more.The club is free to join and you can learn more at www.theleadpedalpodcastfanclub.com    

The Mel K Show
Mel K & Chris Lance On Shattered Dreams Of Special Olympians & The Madness Of The Mandates 4-19-22

The Mel K Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 21:57


Mel Welcomes Chris Lance to discuss his Special Olympian son Rio and how the mass madness of the covid mandates are endangering the welfare and destroying opportunity and hope for our cherished special needs children. Please help fight these devastating mandates and protect our most venerable   Christopher Lance Cell # 949 444  Email: usagamesinfo@specialolympics.org Website: 2022specialolympicsusagames.org  wwwspecialolympics.org Phone Number: 1-800-700-8585 Special Olympics Headquarters Address: 1133 19th Street NW Washington DC 20036 Social Media: specialolympicsUSAgames handles for Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook  Rio Lance is a selected delegate to represent Southern California in the National USA Special Olympics games in Orlando Florida in June. It is horrifying how he's being treated and discriminated against.  It's plain and simple child abuse. The Special Olympics preaches  "inclusion" but is doing the opposite by "excluding" mandate driven special needs children from the opportunity and experience of a lifetime. They denied religious exemption asking for impossible vaccine data on top of the fact that Rio is a child that has already suffered permanent damage from a previous vaccination. Thank you amazing patriots. Please stand strong and keep up the fight to reclaim humanity & our inalienable rights. www.themelkshow.com  It's going to be a great year and definitely a year to get and be involved in taking back our world. We love what we do and are working hard to keep on top of everything to help this transition along peacefully and with love. Please help us amplify our message: Like, Comment & Share! If you value our work and have extra resources, please consider helping to support the show.  The Show's Partners Page: https://themelkshow.com/partners/   Consider Making A Donation: https://themelkshow.com/donate/ Another way to get involved and find ways to become active in the community is to come meet Mel and many amazing truth warriors at our upcoming live in person speaking events. Together we are unstoppable. We look forward to seeing you. GodWins! https://themelkshow.com/events/ Myrtle Beach, SC - May 13-14 (Reawaken America Tour) Virginia Beach, VA - July 8 - 9 (Reawaken America Tour) See our website events page and follow the link to the events. Remember to mention Mel K for great discounts on all these fun and informative events. See you there! RE:AWAKENING The Movie is Here! https://reawakeningseries.com Use code MELK Website (Main Coms Hub) www.TheMelKShow.com Video Platform - Subscription https://www.themelkshow.tv Rumble (Video) - The Mel K Show https://rumble.com/c/TheMelKShow Bitchute (Video) - Melk.News/Bitchute https://www.bitchute.com/channel/Iw2kiviwZpwx/ Podbean (Podcast) https://themelkshow.podbean.com/ TRUTH Social https://truthsocial.com/@themelkshow Gab (Social Media) https://gab.com/MelKShow GETTR (Social Media) https://www.gettr.com/user/themelkshow Telegram (Social App) The Mel K Show Group - https://t.me/themelkshowgroup The Mel K Show Channel - https://t.me/themelkshowchannel The Mel K Show Mailing Address 1040 First Avenue #367 New York, NY 10022 If you are interested to explore investing in precious metals please contact below and mention MelK for special offers: Beverly Hills Precious Metals Exchange Buy Gold & Silver https://themelkshow.com/gold/ Speak with Gold Expert Andrew Sorchini…Tell Him Mel K Sent You! Support Patriots With MyPillow Go to www.MyPillow.com Use offer code “MelK” to support both MyPillow and The Mel K Show Mel K Superfoods www.MelKSuperfoods.com HempWorx The #1 selling CBD brand. https://bit.ly/MDC-HempWorx https://themelkshow.com/my-daily-choice/ Dr. Zelenko Immunity Protocal - Z-Stack Life https://zstacklife.com/MelK Take care of your health with Dr. Mark Sherwood and his team at Functional Medical Institute www.Sherwood.tv/melk – download the free e-book to develop physical and emotional resiliency EMP Shield EMP Shield is designed to protect an entire home from lightning, solar flare (coronal mass ejection), power surges, and an electromagnetic pulse. Use promo code MelK  https://www.empshield.com/?coupon=melk Mantra Essential Oils Highest quality essential oils and essential oil blends. https://bit.ly/MDC-Mantra-Essential-Oils My Daily Sprays Portable easy to use sprays made with only the best clinically proven ingredients that support healthy daily activity, including superfruits and natural antioxidants. https://bit.ly/MDC-My-Daily-Sprays Great Offers on Satellite Phones www.melkphone.com

EC Radio
Eric Decarlis is on this podcast to talk about Special Olympics, Barden Mudfest, and more

EC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 54:36


Eric Decarlis is on this podcast to talk about Special Olympics, Barden Mudfest, programs at the Fitness Mills, and more This Podcast is sponsored by - United Auto Sales-  https://unitedusedcars.com/ EJA Moving Service- www.ejamoving.comJoey's at 307- www.315eats.comBallsy- www.ballwash.com *Use Promo Code MEMEBERSONLY for 15% discount *Utica Coffee Roasters- www.wakethehellup.comSaranac Brewery- www.saranac.comAttorney Dave Longeretta- 315-735-6162___________________________________________________________________________________________________________Support this podcast through Virtual Tip Jar- Venmo: @xytoda Cash App: https://cash.app/AnthonyZeeDonaldson____________________________________________________________________________________________________________Get Social with The D-The D on Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/DisruptionnetworkThe D on Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/disruptionnetwork/The D on Twitter - https://twitter.com/the_D_networkThe D on YouTube- https://www.youtube.com/disruptionnetworkThe D on Twitch- https://www.twitch.tv/disruptionnetwork

Play Unified Podcast
S3: E8 Big Sports Weekend in Boston

Play Unified Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 44:58


Welcome to the #PlayUnified Podcast where we meet at the intersection of sports, disability, philanthropy, entertainment and community building. Listen as we discuss why sports is such an important part of life, community and social change. Guests will include Special Olympics athletes, local sports figures, government officials, small business owners and figures within the Special Olympics movement. This week, Mike, Charles and Erin discuss the exciting weekend ahead with it being the weekend of the Boston Marathon. With the Red Sox home opener, the Bruins at home on Saturday, the Celtics playoff games starting Sunday and B.A.A events all weekend, it is a great weekend to be in Boston!

GEORGIA GOSSIP INC. PRESENTS THE DON NICOLEONE SHOW, THE WOMAN OF THE HOUR
"IS THE SPECIAL OLYMPICS MISTREATING THEIR ATHLETES" THE DON NICOLEONE SHOW

GEORGIA GOSSIP INC. PRESENTS THE DON NICOLEONE SHOW, THE WOMAN OF THE HOUR

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 242:00


DON NICOLEONE SHOW IS THE MOST DYNAMIC SHOW ORBITING THE PLANET EARTH!! THE DON NICOLEONE SHOW BROADCAST LIVE WEEKDAYS 12-4PM EST ON WGAG RADIO! CALL IN AND SPEAK TO DON NICOLEONE LIVE 1.515.605.9828 OR 1.425.569.5274 DON NICOLEONE IS IN THE ORDER OF THE SYBILLINE ORACLES SINCE 1982, THE ANCIENT AND MYSTIC ORDER OF SINCE 1996, THE ANCIENT EGIPTIAN ORDER SINCE 2001, AS WELL AS ASTARA MYSTIC ORDER SINCE 1976, THE GRAND DRAGON OF THE ORDER OF THE DRAGON SINCE 2002, AND SINCE 2002 THE SUPREME AL MUFTA "DIVA" OF THE AL MAHDI SHRINERS THE ONLY WOMAN CHOSEN BY THE GRAND AL MUFTI "DIVAN" IMPERIAL GRAND POTENTATE NOBLE: REV. DR. MALACHI Z. YORK-EL "AS SAYYID ISSA AL HAADI AL MAHDI" OF THE INTERNATIONAL SUPREME COUNCIL OF SHRINERS, INC. HEAD OF THE COUNCIL OF 9

SebyPodcast™️
The 2022 USA SPECIAL OLYMPICS & PLAYOFFS BASKETBALL

SebyPodcast™️

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 70:46


• Meghan McClean joins us this week to discuss the her duties at the games and what to expect and also shares on how we all can support and volunteer for the games. • Then The fellas discuss about the play-in tournament and also the playoffs as well • All this and much much more in this weeks episode • Here is the link to Volunteer as well for everyone: https://volunteer.2022usagames.org --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sebypodcast/support

Too Peas In A Podcast
Humans of Too Peas

Too Peas In A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 59:26


Kate and Mandy talk to children's author and illustrator, plus funny cartoon Instagrammer Loryn Brantz from New York! Fangirl Kate first came across Loryn when she featured on the wonderful Humans Of New York social media page, and she joins Kate and Mandy for a short chat late in the evening, New York time. Loryn shares the story of her little girl Dalia who was born with two rare genetic disorders – Sotos Syndrome and Trisomy 14 Mosaic. Go straight to Loryn's Instagram page for 100% adorable Dalia content, including this cute dance-off inspired by her grandfather's Tourette tics! Loryn talks about Dalia's conception through IVF, her birth and her subsequent diagnosis, and all the joy she's brought to their lives. Loryn has written a book as a love poem to Dalia – It Had To Be You, and also creates funny cartoons about parenting that she shares on Instagram with her over 500,000 followers, including Kate's favourite series on ‘Weird Things Toddlers Love.' Go follow her now! Plus:· Mandy adored Oscar-winning move Coda· Melburnians, go get the delish sweet potato gyoza at Komuni· Shout out to the amazing Jordon from Acast, who organised a great photoshoot for Kate and Mandy.· Donate money to Special Olympics and support our athletes!· Book tickets to our forthcoming live shows via our website· Buy our book The Invisible Life Of Us · Get a signed copy and deck yourself out in some excellent Too Peas merch here!· Listen to our Spotify playlist – Too Peas: Songs Our Guest Peas Love· Melbourne forecast for Thursday April 14– Mostly sunny, 25 degrees· Join our Facebook Hangout· Find us on YouTubeThank you for supporting Too Peas In A Podcast! Don't forget to rate and review Contact us here:Website: www.toopeasinapodcast.com.auEmail: toopeaspodcast@gmail.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Twisted and Uncorked
Episode 60 - Five Men, No Answers - UNSOLVED

Twisted and Uncorked

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 61:04


*** Please note there is a correction at the end of the episode! ***This week Sierra takes on a Patron pick... shout out to Clinton for suggesting this wild case! We guarantee you haven't heard the case like this with information from family interviews and some hot takes on theories. The Yuba County Five were in high spirits leading up to a Special Olympics basketball game when they went missing; later evidence was found of them on a completely different road away from their home. What happened to them may never completely be known, but it is a pretty baffling case. What do you think happened to the five?Remember to rate, review, and subscribe, it is the best way to spread the word!You can support us on Patreon and see all of our bonus content at patreon.com/twistedanduncorkedSources for todays episode can be found on our website, twistedanduncorked.comYou can watch on YouTube - https://youtu.be/xnKdfQcgn60Follow us on all of the socials: Instagram, Facebook and Tiktok = @twistedandcorked and Twitter = @twisted_pod

CityCast
CityCast Ep. 41: Therapeutic Recreation and Miracle Park

CityCast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 27:48


Garnet McKeown, Recreation Division Supervisor for PRT at the City of Rock Hill, joins CityCast to talk about their therapeutic recreation programs, why they're important, along with a discussion about the local Special Olympics.

Get Busy Livin’
9. Spreading Happiness with John's Crazy Socks

Get Busy Livin’

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 35:06


John and Mark X. Cronin are the father-son team behind John's Crazy Socks, a social enterprise with a mission to spread happiness. John is a 26-year-old entrepreneur, advocate, public speaker, philanthropist, and athlete who happens to have Down syndrome. He and Mark strongly believe that people with different abilities should have the same opportunities to work, thrive, and create community. In fact, more than half of the team at John's Crazy Socks have differing abilities, and John and Mark often host tours and workgroups for students with different abilities to open their eyes to what's possible after graduating high school. When John isn't at the warehouse making design decisions, writing handwritten notes for each order, or wrangling socks, he and Mark are speaking at conferences and making strides with their Down syndrome advocacy work. They've spoken at Microsoft, Ernst and Young, and universities all over the world. They've also testified twice before the US Congress, spoken at the United Nations, and John was recently invited on to the floor of the New York State Assembly where the New York State Legislature passed a resolution on World Down Syndrome Day. John's Crazy Socks Giving Back program is at the center of their mission and they have raised nearly $500,000 for their charity partners. From day one, John and Mark have pledged 5% to the Special Olympics, a charity near and dear to them as John has been part of the organization for 21 years. John has now donated over $100,000 to the Special Olympics, which more than any Special Olympic athlete has ever done. Listen to today's episode to hear how John and Mark are spreading happiness one pair of crazy socks at a time. Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, TuneIn, Simplecast, or on your favorite podcast platform. Topics Covered:The reason and inspiration to start John's Crazy Socks How they created a mission-driven enterprise through giving back with each sale  Why hiring people with differing abilities is not altruism一it's good businessHow John has been a Special Olympics athlete for over 20 years and how it shaped his entrepreneurial and leadership skillsHow they scaled from 42 orders on launch day to now shipping over 375,000 packages to 88 different countriesWhat they have planned next for the brandAbout our guest: WebsiteTedx TalkInstagramFacebookTik TokThe Spreading Happiness Podcast   Special Offers: If there's a topic or charity you want me to highlight on the podcast, DM it to me on Instagram @getbusylivin_pod Follow Us:Get Busy Livin' Podcast WebsiteGet Busy Livin' Podcast Instagram Get Busy Livin' Podcast TwitterAnne's Website Anne's LinkedInAnne's InstagramAnne's Twitter

#swagandrepeat
407 Day (Special guest - Michelle Moore)

#swagandrepeat

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 69:26


On this week's episode, Michelle Moore of Experience Kissimmee joins us for a discussion on Sloths, Gators, Air boating, High Tech Corridors, Candy and everything Osceola. 407 Day makes its way through Central Florida with GMID and a Solar Bears game Hear how 20 million was raised for the Special Olympics by eating sandwiches. We discuss how Orlando is leading the way in the recovery of meetings and events with the stats to prove it Trees for All, Dave and Busters Makes a big move and 6 new "high concept" bars to make their debut in Downtown Orlando Plus we highlight all the upcoming events for April, brought to you by the Museum of Illusions.

Uncle (the podcast)
The Uncle Olympic Experience, Utp#259

Uncle (the podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 55:15


Uncle tells more of his story of the 1972 Special Olympics, where he met a Kennedy. During the show Robin and Chuck find an old video from the event featuring a torch bearer, who may actually be Uncle.  Topics include: Kennedy family, Special Olympics, Eunice Kennedy Mary Shriver, torch hand off, opening ceremony, 1972 LA Special Olympics, photos, video of Uncle carrying torch, Sesh Gin and Tonic seltzer, dollar store drink, medals, Gray Gardens, RFK Jr, photo albums, collection of medals

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio
Dr. David Martin: Biden Felonies Imminent, Special Olympics Bans Purebloods, Watch the Water

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 56:24


Monday on the Stew Peters Show, Dr. David Martin shares how the Biden junta may be facing imminent indictment for felony crimes against humanity. Stew also shares a breathtaking preview of an in-depth interview with Dr. Bryan Ardis about the satanic undertones of the plandemic. Go to StewPeters@protonmail.com to reach out and share your story of vaccine injury or death of your loved one, relative, friend, or neighbor. Dr. Jane Ruby details the mass murder being plotted through the poisoning of our public water supply, and the clear impact it is having on the health of Americans unknowingly consuming arsenic and other poisons. Canadian patriot Christopher Sky joins Stew to details the new extremes that Trudeau Castro is endeavoring including freezing the bank accounts of truckers and using globalist mercenaries to erase the identities of dissents. Go to RealChrisSky.com to find more on Chris' story, and visit Friendevu on Chris's page to become a member of his new social media site: https://realchrissky.com/. And, Christopher Lance details how the Special Olympics are complicit in a nefarious plot to force the bioweapon shot onto vulnerable vaccine injured, including his athlete son Rio. Call the Headquarters of the Special Olympics to let them know how this story makes you feel: Special Olympics 1133 19th Street NW Washington, DC 20036-3604 USA  +1 202-628-3630  +1 800-700-8585 https://www.specialolympics.org/about/contact Email: usagamesinfo@specialolympics.org Website: www.2022specialolympicsusagames.org Social Media: specialolympicsusagames Don't miss a moment of Monday's edition of the Stew Peters Show, live on StewPeters.com Get Dr. Zelenko's Anti-Shedding Treatment, NOW AVAILABLE FOR KIDS: http://zStackProtocol.com Go Ad-Free, Get Exclusive Content, Become a Premium user: https://redvoicemedia.com/premium Follow Stew on Gab: https://gab.com/RealStewPeters See all of Stew's content at https://StewPeters.TV Watch full episodes here: https://redvoicemedia.net/stew-full-shows Check out Stew's store: http://StewPeters.shop Support our efforts to keep truth alive: https://www.redvoicemedia.com/support-red-voice-media/

On Brand with Nick Westergaard
Apolo Ohno on Pivoting and Purpose

On Brand with Nick Westergaard

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 31:23


Reinvention is at the core of Apolo Anton Ohno. He acquired and honed this skill over a decade of Olympic speed skating competition, during which he became the most decorated US Winter Olympian of all time. Apolo harnesses these experiences to educate and inspire organizations on how to foster a sustained leadership mindset needed to overcome obstacles. We discussed this along with his new book, Hard Pivot, this week on the On Brand podcast. About Apolo Ohno Apolo Anton Ohno claimed his first major speed skating title at the US Championships at the age of 14—after just six months of training. Over the next decade and a half, he went from kid prodigy to the most decorated US Winter Olympian in history—a title he still holds—earning eight Olympic medals in short-track speed skating across the 2002, 2006, and 2010 Winter Games. Following the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Games, Apolo took his understanding of sports psychology and his personal experience with success and setbacks to develop a resilient and mission-driven approach to life. He wrote a book on this subject, Zero Regrets, which was released in 2011 and went on to become a New York Times best-seller. Apolo remains involved in the Olympic movement. He was an NBC sports analyst for the Sochi 2014 and PyeongChang 2018 Winter Games and is a global ambassador for the Special Olympics and the Winter Olympics. He is currently on the bid committees for the Winter Games in Salt Lake City, Utah, and the 2028 Summer Games in Los Angeles, California. He has also continued to push himself in the world of sport, winning season 4 of ABC's hit reality show Dancing with the Stars and finishing the 2014 Ironman World Championship Triathlon in Kona, Hawaii, finishing in less than ten hours. Apolo has spent much of the past decade traveling the world and translating his successes and life lessons to business. The bulk of this time in Asia was spent immersed in the exploration of various business sectors ranging from rare earth mining and development to infrastructure and software. He also completed the eight-week Executive Education Curriculum at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, alongside executive-track businesspeople from some of the world's top companies. Through his speaking engagements with hundreds of organizations—from Fortune 100 companies to nonprofits—Apolo has helped business leaders think about what it takes to develop a high-performance mindset and remains relevant in a world in which uncertainty is the norm. He has contemplated how individuals—be they executives or those on the front line—find motivation and consistently do their best work. He is passionate about helping others not only achieve but exceed what they believe to be possible in both life and in business. Apolo's most recent work has centered on the concept of reinvention—an undertaking in which he has demonstrated mastery. His life has been defined not just by performing at the highest possible level in various arenas, but also by his regular pursuit of new goals and tackling new challenges, all while maintaining his iconic positive attitude and unmatched energy. Apolo continues to bring these attributes to every new endeavor and every business engagement. What brand has made Apolo smile recently? Apolo pointed to the publisher of Hard Pivot, Sounds True, for their focus on uplifting the world. Learn more by following Apolo on Twitter and Instagram and checking out his website at ApoloOhno.com. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Uncle (the podcast)
Back From the Break, Utp#258

Uncle (the podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 56:32


Uncle met a Kennedy, or perhaps an Onassis, back in the seventies. He is also a Jordan Peterson look alike.  Topics include: back from time off, big surprises upcoming, Top Gun Maverick, war, Ochelli Radio Network, squirrels eat fruit from trees, morning routine, LAX live feed, Zelensky TV show, Russian language, Oscar's slap, odd local businesses, Jimmy James' new car, manual transmission, Instagram handles on car windows, Jordan Peterson look alike, professor, cancel culture, Kennedy assassination, Special Olympics

Play Unified Podcast
S3:E7 Special Guest from the NFL!

Play Unified Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 78:09


Welcome to the #PlayUnified Podcast where we meet at the intersection of sports, disability, philanthropy, entertainment and community building. Listen as we discuss why sports is such an important part of life, community and social change. Guests will include Special Olympics athletes, local sports figures, government officials, small business owners and figures within the Special Olympics movement. This week, Mike, Charles and Erin swap voices, talk Special Olympics Winter Games, March Madness, and bring on very special guest, Zach Smith! Zach is a former classmate of Mike's at Worcester State who now works for the NFL tracking statistics. 

Fightin Words Radio Network
Fightnwords presents Sports Tonight with Don Henderson

Fightin Words Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 117:00


Join Frank Bobby Bella Kayden Brady Quinn Roger from Atlanta Mike Our Soccer expert Doug the Golf Pro Florida Football Today and Bay News 9 Sportscaster Mr Roy Cummings and world renound Sportscaster Hall of Fame and Philadelphia Television and Radio Pioneers Hall of Fame Mr Don Henderson as they review all the sports action of the week month year and yesteryear. Tonights special guest is Mr Mark Ededenson National Director of the Special Olympics. Mark will announce the change of location of the program this year and he Law enforcement torch run dates.

Too Peas In A Podcast
We've got this: writer and musician Eliza Hull talks about parenting with a disability

Too Peas In A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 41:00


Kate, minus Mandy who is unwell with COVID, speaks to musician, writer and disability advocate Eliza Hull. Eliza is the author of the outstanding We've Got This: Stories By Disabled Parents, the first major anthology by parents who identify as Deaf, disabled or chronically ill. Eliza started the process of writing the book nearly eight years ago while pregnant with her first child. With her own diagnosis of Charcot Maire Tooth disease, Eliza was seeking a book that would help her navigate parenting with a physical disability, yet there were none to be found. So Eliza set about writing one, with the intention to include a cross-section of diverse experiences of parenting with disabilities in order to provide support and raise awareness. Kate and Eliza talk through many of the powerful stories in the book and explore the complexities, joys and challenges that the contributors share. Reflecting on her own life and her parenting experience, Eliza feels that her disability is not a negative and not a deficit, but something that makes her life and her children's lives better, kinder and richer. Not just a writer but a talented touring musician as well, Eliza talks about how she turns to music to express some of the harder aspects of her life with a disability. Check out her ethereal dreamy-pop tunes on Spotify and also find out more about Eliza's work as an advocate and speaker via her website. Plus:· Rush out and buy We've Got This: Stories By Disabled Parents right now!· Book tickets to our forthcoming live shows in Canberra and Sydney via our website.· Kate shouts out the awesome podcast Welcome to Patchwork - A Melbourne comedy podcast that stares too hard at everyday life, and says to go follow their Instagram!· Donate money to Special Olympics and support our athletes!· Buy our book The Invisible Life Of Us · Listen to our Spotify playlist – Too Peas: Songs Our Guest Peas Love· Melbourne forecast for Thursday March 31– Shower or two clearing, 21 degrees· Join our Facebook Hangout· Find us on YouTube Contact us:Website: www.toopeasinapodcast.com.auEmail: toopeaspodcast@gmail.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND
The Day We Went To The Other Side

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 115:25


Elvis Duran and The Morning Show are LIVE with a BUSY PACKED SHOW! Tyler Henry from ' Life After Death' on Netflix joins the show. We present a BIG CHECK with 'Jersey Mike's' for their Day of Giving for Special Olympics! What did Skeery do yesterday when he was invited out to lunch? We wrap up March with honoring 'Women in Music' with today's game! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Jeff & Jenn Podcasts
HOT LIST: Tri-State Changes and Natty Light Vodka?

Jeff & Jenn Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 3:34


A popular bar closes it's doors, TriCounty Mall, and a new OTR apartment tower. Plus, how to grab lunch and support Special Olympics!

Special Chronicles Show Podcast
On The Job with Chris McElroy, DEN | Unified at Work Series S3: Pt4 (Ep.473)

Special Chronicles Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 44:02


Join us On The Job with Chris McElroy, Special Olympics Service Ambassador (SOSA) from United Airlines Denver, joins us on the Special Chronicles Podcast for an engaging conversation about his work as a Special Olympics Colorado Athlete Leader, Competing at World Games 2015 in Los Angeles, Journey Coming to United, and we hear about his first few months of inclusive employment as a Service Ambassador. ShowNotes for this episode at: https://specialchronicles.com/Podcast473 Watch the livestream video episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/PluSza6fOT0 Watch Live Every Monday 6PM CT: http://specialchronicles.com/watch/live Support SpecialChronicles by becoming a supporter today at http://SpecialChronicles.com/give ….. Get involved with Special Olympics Colorado: https://www.specialolympicsco.org/ Connect with your local Special Olympics program: https://www.specialolympics.org/programs?locale=en The Unified at Work Series is sponsored by Bridge, United's Business Resource Group connecting people of all abilities. Book your travel today on http://United.com or on the award-winning United app. Listen and Subscribe to the Unified at Work Series for more inclusive employment conversations: http://specialchronicles.com/unifiedatwork Tune in to this Playlist to hear a collection of conversations with United Airlines' Special Olympics Service Ambassadors (SOSAs) from Chicago (ORD), Denver (DEN) & Houston (IAH): https://specialchronicles.com/MeetSOSAs ..... Stay In Touch With Us! Send us audio or email to: feedback@specialchronicles.com Rate & Review this podcast on ApplePodcasts: http://specialchronicles.com/feedback Join The Conversation: #SpecialChronicles Connect with @SpecialChronicles: Instagram: http://instagram.com/specialchronicles Facebook: http://facebook.com/specialchronicles Twitter: http://twitter.com/specialcpodcast YouTube: http://youtube.com/specialchronicles Sign up for our SpecialChronicles Newsletter: http://specialchronicles.com/Newsletter Connect with Daniel: Instagram: @podmandan http://instagram.com/podmandan Facebook: @podmandan http://facebook.com/podmandan Twitter: @podmandan http://twitter.com/podmandan LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/danielsmrokowski Sign up for Daniel's Mailing List: http://specialchronicles.com/Journal ..... Listen Anywhere! Subscribe to the Special Chronicles Show on wherever you listen to podcasts: http://specialchronicles.com/Show More on Special Chronicles Network: http://specialchronicles.com/Shows …… Thank you to our partners! ComEd EnergyForce Ambassador Program: http://SpecialChronicles.com/ComEd Bridge, United's Business Resource Group Connecting People of All Abilities: Book your travel today at http://united.com or on the United App. StreamYard: Create easy and professional livestreams and get $10 in credit when you sign up with our referral link at https://specialchronicles.com/streamyard ….. Credits! Podcast Theme Music: “It Starts With A Voice" written By Amy Wright and performed by Ben Wright, co-founders of Bitty and Beau's Coffee. Used with permission. Executive Produced by: Daniel Smrokowski/ Special Chronicles Network, visit http://specialchronicles.com/podmandan to read more about Daniel. The post On The Job with Chris McElroy, DEN | Unified at Work Series S3: Pt4 (Ep.473) first appeared on Special Chronicles.

Second Opinion
Those with intellectual disabilities

Second Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2022 4:19


Special Olympics is working to protect those inside Ukraine and those fleeing to neighboring countries.

Too Peas In A Podcast
Story time with Julie Anne Grasso

Too Peas In A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 72:43


Kate and Mandy chat with Julie Anne Grasso - children's author, mum, Middle-Grade Mavens podcaster, former paediatric nurse, current library book wrangler, Instagram reels tragic and of course Pea! Julie takes us on a whirlwind journey through the story of her fascinating life – from her ‘p-nurse' career, the births of her children, the autism diagnosis for her son ‘Boy Wizard' and using songs and stories to help him eat, and her next career as a librarian and writer! She also talks about her book review podcast Middle Grade Mavens, which is all about children's literature for primary school-aged kids – check it out. Julie also shares her story of being ‘pea-brarian' who is a strong advocate for everyone accessing the amazing offerings that all library users can use for free, from books and films, homework help, free computer and printing access, community rooms and even just a safe place to feel a part of a community. Julie also strongly encourages destigmatising a lack of interest or inability to read and expanding the options - think Instagram captions, car manuals, graphic novels, food labels, audiobooks, comic books – it's all reading. Mandy also talks about confronting her own ableism, ‘reading snobbery' and expectations about her peashoots' reading capability and interest. It's okay if reading doesn't come naturally and it's okay if you just can't. As a children's author, Julie also talks about “writing diversity into stories” and always includes characters with different abilities in her books, and also makes sure inclusive books are available in her library. They also discuss the power of special schools and again confronting ableism, expectations and accepting and embracing what is. Plus:· Check out Julie's Middle Grade Mavens podcast· Find her books on her website - www.julieannegrassobooks.com· Donate money to Special Olympics and support our athletes!· Book tickets to our forthcoming live shows via our website· Buy our book The Invisible Life Of Us · Listen to our Spotify playlist – Too Peas: Songs Our Guest Peas Love· Melbourne forecast for Thursday March 23– Partly cloudy, 20 degrees· Join our Facebook Hangout· Find us on YouTubeThank you for supporting Too Peas In A Podcast! Don't forget to rate and review Contact us here:Website: www.toopeasinapodcast.com.auEmail: toopeaspodcast@gmail.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Spreading Happiness Podcast
World Down Syndrome Day, Walking Around in Your Underwear and The Batman

The Spreading Happiness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 30:12


You say Syracuse, I say snow! John and Mark journey to Syracuse New York to emcee the Winter Games of the Special Olympics. John pulled double duty as he competed as a Special Olympic athlete and even took home some gold! The boys put on their green socks and talk about their Irish lineage in anticipation of St. Patrick's Day but that's not the only thing they're celebrating in March. 3/21 is Wold Down Syndrome Day and John is celebrating with...you guessed it...CRAZY SOCKS! Take a listen to hear the update on John's love life, some really bad jokes and some really good news.  Hosted by John & Mark Cronin, co-founders of John's Crazy Socks. Visit John's Crazy Socks here: https://johnscrazysocks.com Follow @johnscrazysocks on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and TikTok. The Spreading Happiness Podcast is produced by Launchpad 516 Studios. For show ideas, guest inquiries, general feedback, sponsorships and media inquiries, drop an email: thespreadinghapinesspodcast@lp516.com Subscribe to The Spreading Happiness Podcast on Apple Podcasts and get notified of new episodes, every Tuesday! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-spreading-happiness-podcast/id1611218712 

Special Chronicles Show Podcast
On The Job with Cody Field, DEN | Unified at Work Series S3: Pt3 (Ep.472)

Special Chronicles Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 44:49


Join us On The Job with Cody Field, Special Olympics Service Ambassador (SOSA) from United Airlines Denver, joins us on the Special Chronicles Podcast for an engaging conversation about his work as a Special Olympics Colorado Athlete Leader, Silver Medal and Competing at the X Games, Journey Coming to United, and we hear about his first few months of inclusive employment as a Service Ambassador. ShowNotes for this episode at: https://specialchronicles.com/Podcast472 Watch the livestream video episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/6aVH3BBGC4U Watch Live Every Monday 6PM CT: http://specialchronicles.com/watch/live Support SpecialChronicles by becoming a supporter today at http://SpecialChronicles.com/give ….. Get involved with Special Olympics Colorado: https://www.specialolympicsco.org/ Connect with your local Special Olympics program: https://www.specialolympics.org/programs?locale=en The Unified at Work Series is sponsored by Bridge, United's Business Resource Group connecting people of all abilities. Book your travel today on http://United.com or on the award-winning United app. Listen and Subscribe to the Unified at Work Series for more inclusive employment conversations: http://specialchronicles.com/unifiedatwork Tune in to this Playlist to hear a collection of conversations with United Airlines' Special Olympics Service Ambassadors (SOSAs) from Chicago (ORD), Denver (DEN) & Houston (IAH): https://specialchronicles.com/MeetSOSAs ..... Stay In Touch With Us! Send us audio or email to: feedback@specialchronicles.com Rate & Review this podcast on ApplePodcasts: http://specialchronicles.com/feedback Join The Conversation: #SpecialChronicles Connect with @SpecialChronicles: Instagram: http://instagram.com/specialchronicles Facebook: http://facebook.com/specialchronicles Twitter: http://twitter.com/specialcpodcast YouTube: http://youtube.com/specialchronicles Sign up for our SpecialChronicles Newsletter: http://specialchronicles.com/Newsletter Connect with Daniel: Instagram: @podmandan http://instagram.com/podmandan Facebook: @podmandan http://facebook.com/podmandan Twitter: @podmandan http://twitter.com/podmandan LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/danielsmrokowski Sign up for Daniel's Mailing List: http://specialchronicles.com/Journal ..... Listen Anywhere! Subscribe to the Special Chronicles Show on wherever you listen to podcasts: http://specialchronicles.com/Show More on Special Chronicles Network: http://specialchronicles.com/Shows …… Thank you to our partners! ComEd EnergyForce Ambassador Program: http://SpecialChronicles.com/ComEd Bridge, United's Business Resource Group Connecting People of All Abilities: Book your travel today at http://united.com or on the United App. StreamYard: Create easy and professional livestreams and get $10 in credit when you sign up with our referral link at https://specialchronicles.com/streamyard ….. Credits! Podcast Theme Music: “It Starts With A Voice" written By Amy Wright and performed by Ben Wright, co-founders of Bitty and Beau's Coffee. Used with permission. Executive Produced by: Daniel Smrokowski/ Special Chronicles Network, visit http://specialchronicles.com/podmandan to read more about Daniel. The post On The Job with Cody Field, DEN | Unified at Work Series S3: Pt3 (Ep.472) first appeared on Special Chronicles.

Knockin' Doorz Down
John & Mark Cronin | Down Syndrome Awareness, Addiction & Mental Health Issues & John's Crazy Socks

Knockin' Doorz Down

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 56:37


Jason and Mikey sat down with John Cronin of John's Crazy Sock and his father Mark Cronin on the Knockin' Doorz Down podcast. They discussed Down Syndrome awareness, World Down Syndrome Day which is March 21st each year. During the conversation, Mark Cronin shares that mental health and addiction issues have affected their family. Mark's wife has struggled with mental health issues that led her to make some decisions that affected her law practice and family. As well one of John's brothers, Mark's sons struggled with addiction issues that were become rampant in the area where they lived. With financial hardship in the Cronin household along with members of the family struggling with these mental health and addiction issues. John was getting the age of wanting to find a career path was struggling to do so due to the lack of acceptance of those with special abilities of which John has Down Syndrome. As John and Mark had many ideas of what John could do to make a living and have his own independence they decided to build on John's passion for crazy socks. They built a website and gained local traction, including Jonh personally delivering orders to customers. One thing John always does is includes a personal thank you note and candy in each delivery. John's Crazy Socks was born. John's Crazy Socks is a father-son venture inspired by co-founder John Lee Cronin, a young man with Down syndrome. John's affinity for crazy socks paired with his love of making people smile made our mission clear: we want to spread happiness. They have a social mission and a retail mission, and they are indivisible. They want to show what is possible when you give someone a chance. Every day, they demonstrate what people with intellectual disabilities can do. And they believe in giving back: they donate 5 percent of our earnings to the Special Olympics as they've played a vital role in John's development. They continue to expand our charity partners by offering and creating socks with specific “awareness” themes, such as our Autism Awareness Socks and Down Syndrome Awareness Socks. They match their social mission with a commitment to being a great sock store. They have socks you can love with the widest array of fun, unique, and beautifully designed socks that let you express your passion and personality. And they deliver those socks with fast, personal service. They also provide same-day shipping and every package includes a hand-written thank you note from John and some candy. They love what we do. They hope you love your socks and that your experience with John's Crazy Socks brings you happiness. This is John Lee Cronin and Mark X. Cronin in their own words, on Knockin' Doorz Down. For more on John's Crazy Sock https://johnscrazysocks.com/ To subscribe to the Knockin' Doorz Down podcast wherever you listen for more celebrities, everyday folks, and experts on conversations to end the stigma around addiction and mental health issue conversations https://linktr.ee/knockindoorzdown © 2021 by KDD Media Company. All rights reserved.

The Ten News
Celebrate World Down Syndrome Day

The Ten News

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2022 14:53


DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast
#176 Glee's Lauren Potter on Down Syndrome Awareness

DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022


We are ecstatic to introduce this week's guest, Lauren Potter! You might know Lauren as Becky Jackson from the TV show Glee. She was in all six seasons playing a character who, like her, has Down Syndrome! After graduating high school and attending college in California, Lauren began acting, starring in her first film at the age of 16. In 2012 she was nominated for a SAG award in the Ensemble in a Comedy Series category for her work in Glee, and she also received the SAG/AFTRA Harold Russell Award at the 2012 Media Access AwardsOn top of being a fabulous and successful actress, Lauren is also a fierce advocate. President Obama appointed her to the President's Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities. She has advocated with AbilityPath, Best Buddies International, the National Down Syndrome Society, The American Association of People with Disabilities, and Special Olympics. We are honored to have Lauren on the show, and the timing couldn't be more perfect with World Down Syndrome Awareness Day coming up on March 21st! This day was chosen because people with Down Syndrome have three copies of chromosome 21, so the 21st day of the 3rd month.On This Episode We Discuss:What it is like growing up with Down SyndromeLauren's experience auditioning for the role of Becky on GleeWhat Lauren wants people to know about how the R word can affect peopleLauren's advocacy work with Best Buddies and the President's Committee for people with Intellectual Disabilities“A Guest Room” a short film where Lauren was the lead actress and executive producerInspirational advice for people with Down SyndromeAdvice for parents who may have just found out their baby has Down SyndromeBe sure to follow Lauren on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram to stay up to date on her advocacy work and latest acting roles!Stay tuned for the next new episode of DNA Today on March 25, 2022 where we'll be discussing whole genome sequencing with world-renowned geneticist Dr. Madhuri Hegde, Senior Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer of Global Lab Services at PerkinElmer Genomics. New episodes are released on Fridays. In the meantime, you can binge over 175 other episodes on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, streaming on the website, or any other podcast player by searching, “DNA Today”. Episodes since 2021 are also recorded with video which you can watch on our YouTube channel. DNA Today is hosted and produced by Kira Dineen. Our social media lead is Corinne Merlino. Our video lead is Amanda Andreoli. See what else we are up to on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and our website, DNApodcast.com. Questions/inquiries can be sent to info@DNApodcast.com. Every pregnancy has a chance to have a genetic abnormality or complication. Mitera empowers you to make the most informed reproductive decisions through their at-home genetic tests, without needing your doctor's order. These tests include non-invasive prenatal screening (Mitera's Peaches&Me) and carrier screening (Mitera's 23pears). Request your own kit at miteragenetics.com and use code “DNATODAY” for 10% off. Mitera. Predict. Prevent. Prepare. (SPONSORED)Vizgen is dedicated to pioneering the next generation of genomics, providing tools that demonstrate the possibilities of in situ single cell spatial genomics. These tools are enabling researchers to gain insight into the biological systems that govern human health and disease. Stay tuned for our full episode with Vizgen where we explore single-cell spatial genomics. Get a sneak peak by visiting their website at vizgen.com. Vizgen, leaders in spatially resolved, single-cell transcriptomics. (SPONSORED)PerkinElmer Genomics is a global leader in genetic testing focusing on rare diseases, inherited disorders, newborn screening, and hereditary cancer. Testing services support the full continuum of care from preconception and prenatal to neonatal, pediatric, and adult. Testing options include sequencing for targeted genes, multiple genes, the whole exome or genome, and copy number variations. Using a simple saliva or blood sample, PerkinElmer Genomics answers complex genetic questions that can proactively inform patient care and end the diagnostic odyssey for families. Learn more at PerkinElmerGenomics.com. (SPONSORED)Did you know there is a genetic counselor that specializes in offering care to those in the adoptee community? Brianne Kirkpatrick co-wrote “The DNA Guide for Adoptees” to provide a resource for those in the adoptee community who are utilizing DNA testing to find biological relatives or to seek out medical information. She also started Watershed DNA to offer personalized genetic counseling to directly support people in the aftermath of a surprise DNA discovery. You can hear Brianne share her insight from her book in Episode 103 of DNA Today! Learn more atWatershedDNA.com where you can also book your consult today with Brianne. (SPONSORED)

The Spreading Happiness Podcast
Master of Ceremonies, Mexico New York and Peeing in the Snow

The Spreading Happiness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 34:38


John is super energized today because he's about to leave for Syracuse, New York where he'll not only be competing in the Winter Games of the Special Olympics, but John and Mark are the emcees of the event! Plus, Mark tells a story about John and his mom peeing in the snow that is sure to land him in the doghouse. John premieres the smooth and sultry voice of Big Sexy and Dr. Cupid as he continues to fill listeners in on his love life. Add in some corny jokes and some good news and you have another episode that is sure to spread happiness! Hosted by John & Mark Cronin, co-founders of John's Crazy Socks. Visit John's Crazy Socks here: https://johnscrazysocks.com Follow @johnscrazysocks on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and TikTok. The Spreading Happiness Podcast is produced by Launchpad 516 Studios. For show ideas, guest inquiries, general feedback, sponsorships and media inquiries, drop an email: thespreadinghapinesspodcast@lp516.com Subscribe to The Spreading Happiness Podcast on Apple Podcasts and get notified of new episodes, every Tuesday! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-spreading-happiness-podcast/id1611218712 

They Walk Among America - US True Crime

On this episode of They Walk Among America… After attending a basketball game the night before they were due to compete at a Special Olympics playoff tournament, 5 men went missing in mysterious circumstances…*** LISTENER DISCRETION IS ADVISED *** ‘They Walk Among America' is a Law & Crime podcast network production.This episode was researched and written by Emily G. Thompson and Eileen Macfarlane. Editing by Brad Maybe.Script editing, additional writing, illustrations and production direction by Rosanna Fitton.Narration, narration editing, and production direction by Benjamin Fitton.MUSIC: Call To Battle by Louis Lion Vanished by Wicked CinemaKindness by Outside The SkyEverything For A Reason by Kevin GrahamDarker Days by Alternate EndingsForbidden Wing by Cody MartinProwler by HillThrough The Looking Glass by Joshua SpachtHigh Above by Wild WonderFor more information visit https://lawandcrime.com/podcasts/ or https://theywalkamonguspodcast.com/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Linda's Corner: Faith, Family, and Living Joyfully
Linda's Corner - John's Crazy Socks with John and Mark Cronin

Linda's Corner: Faith, Family, and Living Joyfully

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 34:10


Welcome to Linda's Corner, a top-rated, positive, encouraging, self-improvement podcast.  My name is Linda Bjork and today we're going to be talking about spreading happiness by showing what's possible.  I'm delighted to welcome special guests John and Mark Cronin.  John and Mark are the father-son team that founded John's Crazy Socks. John is an entrepreneur who just happens to have Down syndrome. You may know John and Mark for being named EY Entrepreneurs of the Year or for testifying before Congress or for speaking at the UN.  Perhaps you may know them because John became “Sock Buddies” with former President George H.W. Bush. Or you may know them for having grown a bootstrap start up company into a multi-million dollar social enterprise.  If you want to learn more about them you can visit their website at  https://johnscrazysocks.com/Some of the highlights John and Mark share:The background story of John's Crazy Socks and how they made it grow into the world's largest sock storeTheir two part mission 1) spread happiness, and 2) show what people with differing abilities can doThey explain how hiring people with differing abilities is not "altruism" it's good business, (over half the employees at John's Crazy Socks have a differing ability)  Their 'giving back' program starts with a 5% pledge of profits to benefit Special Olympics and how they've raised over $450,000 for their charity partnersHow they advocate for people with differing abilities by testifying before congress, the UN, and giving TEDx talks.  How they earned fabulous customer satisfaction with over 29,000 positive reviewsAnd morePlease share, subscribe, leave a rating and review, visit the Linda's Corner website at lindascornerpodcast.com and/or follow on youtube, facebook, instagram, and pinterest @lindascornerpodcast.