Podcasts about alamo

Major battle of the Texas Revolution

  • 1,500PODCASTS
  • 3,281EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Sep 29, 2022LATEST
alamo

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about alamo

Show all podcasts related to alamo

Latest podcast episodes about alamo

First Baptist Church Alamo
FBC Alamo Wednesday Evening Service

First Baptist Church Alamo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 34:07


Regular Wednesday Evening Worship Service for First Baptist Church Alamo. Alamo, TN. Chris Rigby, Pastor

Wilson County News
Wilson County jobless numbers fall in August

Wilson County News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 1:13


Workforce Solutions Alamo released data for the Alamo region that includes Atascosa, Bandera, Bexar, Comal, Frio, Gillespie, Guadalupe, Karnes, Kendall, Kerr, McMullen, Medina, and Wilson counties. To serve the needs of local communities, Workforce Solutions Alamo depends on accurate employment and unemployment data. Workforce Solutions Alamo reports that the August unemployment rate for Wilson County was 3.2 percent, down from 3.5 percent in July. The county's August rate is lower than the 3.8 percent unemployment rate for the 13-county Workforce Development Area, and lower than the 4.2 percent unemployment rate for the state of Texas. Currently, there are 823 people...Article Link

9.56 ABV PODCAST
EP. 97

9.56 ABV PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 68:49


Join us this week as we try new beers and talk about Jackson Guitars, Pantera, monkey pox, big birds, hot dog no mo, bad munchies, Fred Trev going down, 100th Episode coming up, Disney & Pixar, the metaverse, Jony overcoming some things and other dope jales. Song of the week: Careless Whisper by Seether Big shoutout to our sponsor Liberty Bail Bonds. 24 Hour Service. Call them at 956-381-5836. Located at 12403 Bail Bond Drive Edinburg, Tx. "If you don't want to do time, Don't commit the crime but if you commit the crime call them anytime." Shout out to our sponsor Pirriwiris Miche Mix. Go try out all the different flavors of mixes and don't forget the olives! Follow on all social medias and place an order. https://www.facebook.com/pirriwiris.michemix.7 https://instagram.com/pirriwiris_mmix?utm_medium=copy_link Big shoutout to our sponsor The Landmark on Tower. Visit The Landmark on Tower to enjoy a new and unique way of drinking. Located in Alamo, Tx. Tell them the 956 ABV guys sent you there. https://www.facebook.com/LandmarkonTower/ https://instagram.com/thelandmarkontower?utm_medium=copy_link Big shoutout to Nature's Joint for sponsoring the podcast with some of the best Delta-8 flower in the RGV. Hit them up here: https://www.facebook.com/Natures-Joint-Cafe-101859025397031/ https://instagram.com/naturesjoint06?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= If you would like to buy us a beer our CashApp is: $956ABV Thank you for listening. Cheers.

First Baptist Church Alamo
FBC Alamo Sunday Morning Worship Service

First Baptist Church Alamo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 72:19


Regular Sunday Morning Worship Services for First Baptist Church Alamo, Chris Rigby Pastor, Alamo, TN.

Fear or Faith? Podcast
Episode 433 - God Continues to Bridge the Chasm (Sermon)

Fear or Faith? Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 18:48


Sermon by Rev. E.B. Holschuh - God Continues to Bridge the Chasm (based on Luke 16:19-31). Recorded 9/25/22 during 9am worship service at Zion Lutheran Church (LCMS) in Alamo, Texas.  Music by theLacesmusicdude from Pixabay.

Podcast – Alamo City Church
Alamo City Church Message

Podcast – Alamo City Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022


Daniel 1:1-4 Jeremiah 32:26-29 2 Corinthians 1:3-5

TLC Todd-versations
TLC Todd-versations Presents Nelia Alamo of Calavo & Lisa McNeece of Grimmway Farms

TLC Todd-versations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 71:23


Why unicorns?  They symbolize uniqueness and, as such, a rare if ever existent find. Todd summed up his chat with Lisa McNeece of Grimmway Farms and Nelia Alamo of Calavo Growers this way, "You two are amazing people in this industry. You're like unicorns. You're one in a million." Todd-versations is honored to have them on the broadcast. Here's to many more years of fun and frivolity while making things happen.

First Baptist Church Alamo
FBC Alamo Wednesday Evening Service

First Baptist Church Alamo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 32:11


Regular Wednesday Evening Worship Service for First Baptist Church Alamo. Alamo, TN. Chris Rigby, Pastor

KME Coaching, Business & Marketing
Episode #51: Rodney Alamo Brown, Guest, Community Advocate with Kim Evans, Host

KME Coaching, Business & Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 53:31


Episode #51: Welcome Rodney Alamo Brown, Guest, Community Advocate with Kim Evans, Host.In this podcast, Rodney shares the process of Leadership and Community Engagement. When I is replaced with WE even illness becomes Wellness".The 7-Pillars of Community consists of Individuals, Economic, Political, Education, Culture, Environment and Social along with Health & Wellness.About Rodney Brown:Rodney Brown is a Community Advocate, Leader and Founder of Sunday Softball Sunday in Richmond, CA.Follow Rodney Alamo BrownEmail: alamohawaii@yahoo.comFB@ https://www.facebook.com/rodney.a.brown1/Enjoy Soulful Softball SundaySign up for Rodney Alamo Brown Coaching Sessionsimply by emailing him.________________________________Never miss a Podcast Show with Kim. Subscribe to KME Coaching Channel. Now featured on over 13 Podcast channels around the world including http://www.kimevans.com/podcastYouTube @ Kim M. Evans.___________________________About Business Coach & Host, Kim Evans, MAOwner of 2GORJIS Wellness Spa of 26 years.https://www.kimmevans.com/aboutBook a free Discovery Strategy Coaching Call with Kim: https://calendly.com/kmecoaching/discovery?month=2022-05Every woman needs their own Business, Sparkle & Beauty Glam. Live a Fit, Fabulous & Free life for Lady Bos Entrepreneurs with Kim Gems.Follow Kim Gems Videos:www.kimgems.comYouTube Channel: Kim M. Evanshttps://youtube.com/channel/UC7Ka_m-0TjqLaVDACHwXJaAPodcast Show: www.kimmevans.com/podcast@Itunes Listeners: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/kme-coaching-business-marketing/id1550658605@Spotify Listenershttps://open.spotify.com/show/6wYksa5RFJNqRuEc9tZBGE?si=4d808caa6d3d4580Follow on Instagram: http://Instagram.com/KMECoachinghttp://Instagram.com/Nutritionover40 http://Instagram.com/2GorjiswellnessAbout Website:www.KimMevans.com Book a 2GORJIS Wellness Spa Appt:www.2Gorjisbeauty.comStay Connected:Text 2GORJISbiz to >>21000Shop 2GORJIS Spa Boutique:www.kimMevans.com/shopThank you for watching our Podcast Show Inspired, Conversations with Kim.Kim Evans, MA, LE, CMT

9.56 ABV PODCAST
EP. 96 with Special Guest Chef Jesse Castellon

9.56 ABV PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 119:14


Join us as Jony sits with Chef Jesse Castellon. They try some whiskey and talk about IFV, Los Bukis, music influences, punk music, Whiskey, being a Chef, competitions, strange activity, Ronin, cooking at home, making music, some gambling and other dope jales. Song of the week: Don't stop the struggle by Filthy Fuckers Big shoutout to our sponsor Liberty Bail Bonds. 24 Hour Service. Call them at 956-381-5836. Located at 12403 Bail Bond Drive Edinburg, Tx. "If you don't want to do time, Don't commit the crime but if you commit the crime call them anytime." Shout out to our sponsor Pirriwiris Miche Mix. Go try out all the different flavors of mixes and don't forget the olives! Follow on all social medias and place an order. https://www.facebook.com/pirriwiris.michemix.7 https://instagram.com/pirriwiris_mmix?utm_medium=copy_link Big shoutout to our sponsor The Landmark on Tower. Visit The Landmark on Tower to enjoy a new and unique way of drinking. Located in Alamo, Tx. Tell them the 956 ABV guys sent you there. https://www.facebook.com/LandmarkonTower/ https://instagram.com/thelandmarkontower?utm_medium=copy_link Big shoutout to Nature's Joint for sponsoring the podcast with some of the best Delta-8 flower in the RGV. Hit them up here: https://www.facebook.com/Natures-Joint-Cafe-101859025397031/ https://instagram.com/naturesjoint06?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= If you would like to donate and support us our CashApp is: $956ABV Thank you for listening. Cheers.

Instant Trivia
Episode 585 - The Third - Star Trek 101 - It's Australia, Mate - Travel Texas - Perhaps Some "Tea"

Instant Trivia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 7:32


Welcome to the Instant Trivia podcast episode 585, where we ask the best trivia on the Internet. Round 1. Category: The Third 1: He was the last king of the House of York. Richard III. 2: Charles Conrad, Jr. was the third man to walk here. The Moon. 3: Our third president, for 4 years he had a Burr in his side. Thomas Jefferson. 4: The third reindeer named in "A Visit From St. Nicholas", he follows Dancer and precedes Vixen. Prancer. 5: Based on an Erich Maria Remarque novel, it was the third film to win a Best Picture Oscar. All Quiet On The Western Front. Round 2. Category: Star Trek 101 1: These hand weapons used by an Enterprise crew can be set from stun to disrupt. phasers. 2: (Hi, I'm Roxann Dawson.) As chief engineer, B'Elanna Torres is in charge of this drive that mixes matter and antimatter. warp drive. 3: Majel Barrett, the computer voice you hear in the TV shows and films, is the widow of this creator of "Star Trek". Gene Roddenberry. 4: (Hi I'm Robert Duncan McNeill.) Tom Paris' father is an admiral in this arm of the Federation. Starfleet. 5: (Hello, I'm Armin Shimerman.) A knowledgeable Ferengi knows there are 285 rules of this, the 1st one being "Once you have their money never give it back". acquisition. Round 3. Category: It's Australia, Mate 1: This Australian state reports it has lost the 1859 decree Victoria signed authorizing its name. Queensland. 2: The "Ground" for this sport in Melbourne, Australia has a capacity of about 100,000 spectators. cricket. 3: Australia's botanists first bred these green-skinned apples in the late 19th century. Granny Smith apples. 4: Australia's smallest state, this island used to be called Van Diemen's Land. Tasmania. 5: It's "evolved" to become the largest city of Australia's Northern Territory. Darwin. Round 4. Category: Travel Texas 1: Used in casting the Marine Corps Memorial, the original sculpture of this event can be seen in Harlingen. Raising of the flag on Iwo Jima. 2: When in San Antonio, remember to visit this famous fortress. The Alamo. 3: At this landmark you can see Davy Crockett's buckskin vest and a hunting knife like the one wielded by Jim Bowie. the Alamo. 4: In Parker, Texas you can tour the Southfork Ranch made famous by this TV series. Dallas. 5: Say howdy to 52-foot Big Tex at the state fair of Texas, a stone's throw from this college football stadium. the Cotton Bowl. Round 5. Category: Perhaps Some "Tea" 1: What Helen Keller called Anne Sullivan. Teacher. 2: Hold hair at ends, comb toward scalp; cracking gum optional. tease. 3: Daniel Tobin headed this union from 1907 to 1952, bringing its membership from 40,000 to more than a million. the Teamsters. 4: It has about 40,000 people and it's right near Hackensack. Teaneck. 5: This great trombonist was part of Louis Armstrong's band from 1947 to 1951. Jack Teagarden. Thanks for listening! Come back tomorrow for more exciting trivia! Special thanks to https://blog.feedspot.com/trivia_podcasts/

First Baptist Church Alamo
FBC Alamo Sunday Morning Worship Service

First Baptist Church Alamo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 60:25


Regular Sunday Morning Worship Services for First Baptist Church Alamo, Chris Rigby Pastor, Alamo, TN.

Fear or Faith? Podcast
Episode 430 - Dishonest in little, dishonest in much… (Sermon)

Fear or Faith? Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 20:44


Sermon by Rev. E.B. Holschuh - Dishonest in little, dishonest in much… (based on Luke 16:1-15). Recorded 9/18/22 during 9am worship service at Zion Lutheran Church (LCMS) in Alamo, Texas.  Music by theLacesmusicdude from Pixabay.

Podcast – Alamo City Church
Alamo City Church Message

Podcast – Alamo City Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022


Mark 4:35-41 Ephesians 1:17-23 Romans 12:1-2 Titus 3:5-6 Acts 13:1-4,6-12 Acts 16:14-18

The Celluloid Mirror
Mini Season 2 Finale Episode

The Celluloid Mirror

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 39:14


Sean and Nicole wrap up season 2 with a little mini finale debrief episode. We discuss audience reaction to our episode about Back to the Future and Masking Threshold with special guest Johannes Grenzfurthner. You can see Masking Threshold when it plays at select Alamo Drafthouse theaters starting September 30th, or digitally on October 7th. Johannes Grenszfurthner's new horror comedy Razennest will premiere this month at Fantastic Fest! You can even watch it at home! We also discuss why Sean doesn't like Pretty in Pink, Nicole's thwarted dreams of ghostwriting Babysitters Club spinoffs, and our own new animated horror short Reveal. Links Masking Threshold Trailer Masking Threshold via Alamo on Demand Ridley Scott on whitewashing Exodus California Diaries Ann M Martin is Queer Alanah Rafferty Alanah's episode of TCM Sarah Schoofs Karen Fleisch Eli Oberman The Shondes Get more Celluloid Mirror on Patreon 4MC on twitter, instagram, website Sean twitter/ IG, Nicole twitter/ IG All music by Kevin MacLeod License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thecelluloidmirror/message

First Baptist Church Alamo
FBC Alamo Wednesday Evening Service

First Baptist Church Alamo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 35:40


Regular Wednesday Evening Worship Service for First Baptist Church Alamo. Alamo, TN. Chris Rigby, Pastor

Two Chicks Talkin Flicks Podcast: A Film Review Podcast
Remember Me, with a twist of lime

Two Chicks Talkin Flicks Podcast: A Film Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 86:36


Remember the Alamo, don't you forget about me and I will remember you, all things easy to remember. The twist at the end of this movie Remember Me does just that. If you haven't seen it, then this should be your spoiler alert! Come join us on this journey as we live to remember this tragic time in our lives. Never Forget. We are trying out a new format so let us know how you like it. Like subscribe and leave us a review. 5 stars makes us feel fabulous!You can find more witty commentary on all our favorite movies at Two Chicks Talkin FlicksEmail twochickstalkinflicks@gmail.comTwitter @2chicksNFlicks Instagram @twochickstalkinflickshttps://linktr.ee/Twochickstalkinflickshttps://www.buzzsprout.com/1326058

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 57 – Unstoppable Stroke Survivor with Melanie Taddeo

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 70:09


Meet Melanie Taddeo. Her parents always encouraged her to be the best that she could be. That attitude shined through when, at the age of 21, she experienced a stroke that left her paralyzed on her left side and totally blind. Her drive helped her to regain the ability to walk. Also, she regained some of her eyesight.   Melanie will tell you that she is a teacher and loves to impart knowledge. In this episode, you will get to hear how she crashed through barriers when school principals and others would not give her a job after discovering she was blind. As many of us have experienced, Melanie found that no matter her capabilities and experience, the only thing prospective employers considered was that she was blind.   Melanie's story proves how incredibly unstoppable she was and is. I hope you will find this episode as inspirational and thought-provoking as did I.   About the Guest: Melanie Taddeo is a passionate advocate for inclusion who at the age of 21 suffered a massive stroke that left her completely paralyzed on her left side and legally blind. After years of therapy, she was able to regain her independence and go on to become the first legally blind teacher to graduate in Ontario.   She is a certified special education teacher with over 20 years of experience in program development, fundraising, community outreach, volunteer management, and public speaking. Melanie founded Connect 4 Life and Voices 4 Ability; V4A Radio based on her personal experience of the lack of programs that promote independence for people with disabilities. She has made it her goal to help empower others to achieve their dreams despite the challenges they face.   Melanie has assisted hundreds of people through Connect 4 Life's programs such as the first broadcast training program for individuals with disabilities: “An Accessible voice in Broadcasting”, life skills training program, and public speaking. Melanie's passion is evident in everything she does to ensure that each client sees their abilities and not only their disabilities.    Melanie published her first book in 2019. “My Unforeseen Journey Losing Sight Gaining vision.   Melanie has been a Toastmaster for eight years achieving her, Distinguished Toastmaster (DTM), and was the recipient of the Member Making a Difference award (MMAD) in 2020, and now using her speaking to inspire others across the globe as a champion of inclusion,    Melanie empowers entrepreneurs, professionals, and community leaders to embrace challenges and how to overcome unforeseen change with dignity, and ease.   Most recently Melanie has created a company called gaining vision, to help promote inclusion across the world, ensuring that every person feels heard, seen, and valued just as they are.      Her story is proof that despite adversity success is possible with hard work and perseverance.         To learn more please visit www.connect4life.ca    WEBSITE: www.melanietaddeo.ca   http://gainingvision2020.com  FACEBOOK PAGE   https://www.facebook.com/gainingvision/  TWITTER   @gainingvision  INSTAGRAM   @gaining_vision  YOUTUBE   Gaining vision with Melanie Taddeo Nxumalo    About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21  Well, hi, once again, and welcome to unstoppable mindset. I am excited to introduce you all to Melanie Taddeo . And Melanie's gonna tell her story. I don't want to give it all away. But Melanie has everything that we could ever expect to have in an unstoppable mindset podcast. She has a great story. She has unexpected life challenges that she has chosen to deal with. And she did deal with them. And she has all sorts of other things that I'm sure we're going to talk about. She's an advocate, dealing with persons with disabilities and all sorts of other stuff. And rather than saying all sorts of other stuff, and then living it to your imagination, Melanie, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Melanie Taddeo  02:04 Thank you so much for having me, Michael.   Michael Hingson  02:07 So here it is a late afternoon for me and an early evening for you. You're in Toronto or LLC and Ontario, right? Correct. Yes. And we're out here in California. So we traverse the three major time zones of our two countries. And so you Have you had dinner? Not yet. I will. I will start cooking after this is over? Well, let's get started. So why don't you tell us a little bit about you kind of your, your early years and all that stuff. And we'll go from there.   Melanie Taddeo  02:42 Wonderful. So I'm the eldest of four girls, my dad is Italian descent, and my mom is Canadian, and a little bit of Irish and English in her background. But I was raised in an amazing loving home, where everything was encouraged, reach for the stars, hard work ethic possibilities and be a great role model for my three younger sisters. And that sounds like a really comfortable life. But it can be challenging at times, of course, because you know, you want to be the perfect daughter, whatever perfect was, but in your is a child that's the impression was given work hard. Of course, you had choices be a doctor or lawyer. I didn't either. But that's okay. But everything they taught me was about equality. And everybody's equal everybody, although there may be differences in our friends, all of us are the same inside and really to focus on that and not seeing differences. And I appreciate that now. Now, this was the mindset they taught me yet in their generations. Decision. How   Michael Hingson  03:46 old were you when this was was being taught to you?   Melanie Taddeo  03:49 Oh, from age five, up so   Michael Hingson  03:53 in school and so on, you are already thinking of people more as equal than probably a lot of kids did.   Melanie Taddeo  04:01 Yes, definitely. And, you know, it's, I'm so thankful for that. Because, obviously, we live in a very multicultural area of Mississauga. And we, it was really great, because, you know, although there are different types, sizes, you know, different genders, all these different things, and of course, you know, different backgrounds. We just were all friends. And that was a great mentality. And I'm really happy my family instilled that in me at that age.   Michael Hingson  04:28 Did other children have any kind of an issue with that? They tend to view people the same way. How did all that work?   Melanie Taddeo  04:37 You know, it was interesting, I think, looking back reflecting back, perhaps there was some definite biases there. But as children, you just think, Oh, they're mean. And that was about it. And I don't want to be their friend because they're mean, but it was never about oh, you're this or that. But it was just that unconscious bias or the way that they were they were raised. But we all play together. We all had great opportunities to learn about one another. And I appreciated that. Even individuals with disabilities, you know, there was a special class back then you might exam not going to age myself. But back then there was different separate classes. But they were just kids, there was nothing different, which I really appreciate that. My family always said, you know, no matter what family you know, sticks together, we always work towards a common goal. Set your goals high. Again, remember that lawyer and Doctor kind of mentality. I reached for the stars, everything I did in my life was to be a teacher, because that was my dream. I wanted to be a teacher, I was that girl that settled her stuffed animals to the front of the room to teach them, you know, the ABCs. I loved it. So everything my volunteer work growing up, as I started to get older, 13 and up was all right around kids. And I wanted to teach that was my dream.   Michael Hingson  05:57 So when you were when you were growing up? Did you have many friends who had any kind of disability? Do you remember? It was they were in different schools?   Melanie Taddeo  06:10 It mostly Yes. But for me, it was just, you know, it wasn't even on my radar, to be honest, at that point. Actually, that's not true. There was a young man down the street that lived there, and he had Down syndrome. But he just used to ride his bike around and he was just the boy like, we called him by his name, Jay. And that was that. But again, everybody was the same. So it didn't dawn on me. But again, reflecting back, I now recognize that, but it was never said to me, oh, this person has Down syndrome. It was just he was Jay. And it was a good thing, because I feel it taught me so much about seeing past the disability. So that was thrilling years, great. Life was really great.   Michael Hingson  06:57 So you went through? Well, I guess would be high school and all that. And you still wanted to teach   Melanie Taddeo  07:04 everything. Actually in high school I used to I got into art. And I found my passion. I had a mentor in high school teach me about art. And I was able to do all these beautiful paintings and drawings. And my creative side came out and I was on cloud nine. i My mentor at the time said I can retire if somebody one of my students goes to university for art, like that's me. And again, I did everything working in art galleries, that sort of thing, just to get experience. And I put together an amazing portfolio and was accepted to go to university for Arch. Again. It's a big joke on me in the future. But this point I was living the dream, teaching art and summer camp. And just loving my spare spare time was painting and drying and really absorbing all the arts.   Michael Hingson  07:53 So you went off to university what university I went to York   Melanie Taddeo  07:57 University, which is in Toronto. At first I committed and then I lived in residence. And it was a great opportunity. It was very well known for their art program, top notch professors and had great facility and I was just experimenting with all the different techniques and styles and just really trying to get my feet footing because I encounter a world would be an art teacher that was my dream. Best of both worlds.   Michael Hingson  08:25 So I get the impression that something happened along the way to change all that.   Melanie Taddeo  08:31 Yes, yes, it did. My fourth year university, I started to develop migraines. And everybody kept saying lots of stress from University. I'm thinking I'm studying art, what kind of stress do you have during kid paid by campus, really. And they kept giving me medication to numb the pain. But till one morning, I couldn't lift my head off the pillow. Finally I said there's something wrong and I went and they did MRIs they did CAT scans. They said no, nothing showing. And so one day, they saw something behind my eyes. And they said well, there's something there. And they diagnosed me with pseudotumor servi. And really just means there's a fake tumor. Yeah. But it was a misdiagnosis. It was a sign of a stroke. So they sent me for the eye operation to relieve the pressure from the optic nerve. And they kept me in the hospital and I was lethargic that was throwing up and they said all this anesthetic, it's this it's that it's the other they sent me home. And I was at my parents house recovering. And they had to go the family doctor and I'd still been really really sick and not well. And I couldn't see out of my eyes when I woke up. So they had the bandage. And they say Oh, it's okay. It's part of the surgery, it's going to come back. And so I had to call the family doctor for a checkup for them to test the eyes. And again, remember remembering that they said oh, you're going to be able to see Don't worry me He's fine. It's just they're swollen, they're going to come down. And I remember having to get showered. And I was like, come on, Melanie get given the shower, and I said, okay, okay, okay, just a minute I sit on, see the toilet and just rest. Basically, my mom had to shower me, and I'm a very modest woman, I would never let that happen. But I was just really out of it. Got to the top of the staircase, and I was like, Okay, go ahead and go down. I'm like, Oh, the house was spinning. And I said, I think I'm gonna go down on my bomb. So I said, at the top of stairs, and I started to go down. And mom's like, move your left side. Melanie said, I am. What do you think I'm stupid. And I would never talked to my mother. But I had had a stroke at the top of the staircase. So this struggle of be completely paralyzed on the left side and legally blind. So I was in a coma for two weeks. And I tell you, everybody, you can hear everything going on when you're in a coma. So please talk to us. I heard everything I heard. I had the last rites. I heard the doctors told my parents, I wasn't going to live to plan my funeral. I heard them basically say, if I survived, I would be a vegetable. Of course, I also heard everybody's deepest, dark, darkest confessions. So again, be careful what you share. My little sister came to me said, I'm so sorry, I stole your case of peach gum, because I kept it in my bedroom, you know, extra case, throw it in your bag every day. And when I woke up, I had remembered everything. And so of course, I would question them. But during the coma, my dad put a Walkman. And again, I'm dating myself, but with music on my ears. And I remember the songs from that time. And again, all of the DJs everything was right there in my mind, because I could hear everything. And I knew it was going, I just wasn't awake.   Michael Hingson  11:48 So you actually were unconscious. So it wasn't just that you were paralyzed and could move. You're actually unconscious. But as you said, you could hear everything. Yeah,   Melanie Taddeo  12:00 that you couldn't communicate. And, again, my brain wasn't there. Apparently, supposedly, I was. You know, they kept saying she's not gonna wake up, she said, and that's a scary thing for a family to go through. But imagine hearing all this and wanting to say, Hello, I'm alive. I'm still here. So it was a very exciting time to reflect on but at that time it was. And so when I woke up, I couldn't see anything. And of course, I was intubated. So I couldn't communicate either. And they kept saying, use this for that and use because I could hear, so use a thumbs up for Yes, down for no. And they wanted me to use this bliss board of letters to point out and I couldn't see them and explain to my can't see anything, and my eyes were no longer bandaged. And this was it. So when I was finally out of the coma, or type still, during the coma, they did life saving procedure, where they inserted a catheter into the groin and inserted 1 million units of blood into my brain. And I was the second out of five in North America to survive. And that changed a lot because it relieved the blood clots, but it also added extra pressure to behind the eyes. So the optic nerves were permanently damaged, destroyed during this whole procedure. So yeah, welcome blind, Nigel to move. It was a very scary time, a very angry time.   Michael Hingson  13:25 So you were intubated, that must have been pretty uncomfortable, especially once you woke up?   Melanie Taddeo  13:30 Definitely I you know, especially because you have to learn to swallow again, not only the stroke, but having this to die for so long. It was it was just a very new process for me having to digest everything that had happened, as well as recover physically.   Michael Hingson  13:46 How long were you intubated once you woke up?   Melanie Taddeo  13:50 So I was in a coma for two weeks. And I'd say that was going to be another two weeks.   Michael Hingson  13:55 Wow. Yeah. My wife went through a situation in 2014, where she had doubled ammonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome, and was put in an induced coma. So she was intubated. But after two weeks, they said they they needed to remove the two but they did a tracheostomy so that she could, she could continue to breathe, but they kept you intubated for a month.   Melanie Taddeo  14:21 Mm hmm. Yes. And again, I am sure again, depending on the timing, how that was because again, I had long term, like they've cracked on my teeth, all that fun stuff. So it was you know, so lots of other things. And then of course, the raspy throat for quite a while. Yeah. But yeah,   Michael Hingson  14:38 yeah, it was. So you were totally blind.   Melanie Taddeo  14:43 Totally nothing at that point. And it was, you know, it was it was it was scary, because I couldn't see I could just hear people come in the room. I couldn't tell who's there. Of course, I got very used to people's voices. And that was a good thing because that's how I tend to, you know, really depend on my sense of hearing. But I also want to have us on one hand, so having to learn to do everything, feed myself, things like that just laying in a hospital bed alone. But being told that I was never going to see again that I was never going to get out of the bed, all those negative thoughts, and I'm a very positive person, I always had been with that positive upbringing. And I kept saying, no, no, I'm going to I'm going to do this. And they, they said, Oh, Melania, you know, stroke really affects you. You're the mindset of how you perceive things. And it's true, I understand that. So I always say I had stroke brain, it's not a medical term. It's a melody term, that I thought I could do everything I kept telling them. This was happening in July, I'm going to university back to university in September, I'm going back to move out on my own pictures to paint you exactly. In my mind that I just wanted to get back to normal, whatever normal was.   Michael Hingson  15:57 So what happened? Well,   Melanie Taddeo  15:59 I am a fighter. I'm a survivor, my parents will tell you I'm stubborn, but I'd like to say determine it sounds much nicer. And after a good kick in the butt from a chaplain of the hospital. I decided that I wanted to thrive instead of just survive, I stopped feeling sorry for myself. And, you know, there's a lot of time to think in the hospital. And you know, I had amazing family support, whatever they were petrified. Because of course, going through the I had regressed because I was scared to a little childcare my parents, mommy and daddy again. And I've just was it was just part of the stroke and part of the fear. But after the chaplain really brought it back home, he's like, if you want to go back to school, you can you know, you just need to really get your act together and work hard. And I went to a rehab hospital where I learned to walk walk again, I don't have use of my left arm still. But that's because I'm right handed and I kind of forgot it was there for a while. But I started walking again after you know, driving my wheelchair and to the wall several time, they said they had to repeat the entire hospital, the rehab center after I left because I kept couldn't see where I was going. So I kept ramming into walls and things like that. But I just kept a positive attitude got my independence back as far as I could physically walking first, of course, you know, with a quad cane, a single pain, and then without a cane. But then I had to come to terms with the fact that I was blind. I went through the denial. They had cniv with just cane National Institute for the Blind, come and see me with a guide dog and a talking watch. Like what are you here for? I don't need you. Well, Melanie, you're black. No not. And after going through that denial, I went to see an IV and learned how to navigate use my white cane, get around and cook independently and get my independence back. And then, of course being stubborn, as you know, as my family would say or determined. I went to teachers college I applied and because my grades were great. My volunteer experience was right up that I knew they had to give me that interview. And the interview went like this much. How are you going to do this with your disability? And how are you going to do that with your disability? Of course, in my mind, I don't have a disability, right. I'm like, fine. I said, I thought this interview was about my abilities and not my disability. Oh, well, they let me in. And my first day of teachers college, my professors are gone by Christmas. I said, Watch me. I had no idea what I was doing. I never went to school without eyesight. And I had to learn to put books on tape about having notetakers asking for accommodations. I knew nothing about this. But I quickly learned and Teachers College was only a year. It was intense. And even with my practicum I had to advocate for myself. So I learned a lot really, really quickly. Because I was determined to achieve this dream. I wasn't gonna let anything hold me back at this point, because that was my lifelong dream. I had to learn how to do things differently, though, because of course, I couldn't do it the same way. Well, you could do them. Absolutely. 100% I got very creative. I was teaching a grade seven, eight split art. And I had these goggles created for the students to see what I saw. So they could understand just a little bit of what I was seeing. And it was the best teachable moment I've ever had. Those students could empathize. They got a really great ideas of what they couldn't do what they couldn't do ask a lot of questions, which opens the dialogue for kids because they you know, they're there. They want to ask questions are curious, but they also are afraid of offending. And I was able to get them to try using doing art without their eyesight. Yes, I haven't blindfold themselves put some music on Okay, painters, and it was a really great experience at the beginning. And as well working with little kids and teaching them about abilities versus the disability, because of course at that time when I was teaching and Teachers College, there was the differences and there was really hard differences with people with this abilities into schools. So they're being made fun of and stuff like that. So I wanted to close that down fast. So it was a great experience. But the one thing I did face that was challenging for me is my professors thought that I should only teach special education. And I fought that tooth and nails. I ended up going into special education because I love it. But I was angry at them for putting me in that box.   Michael Hingson  20:25 So, you, when you were teaching art in Teachers College, what kind of art? Was it painting or sculpting   Melanie Taddeo  20:36 or helping and drying, believe it or not, and it was really getting them to teach the basics. And I had to teach myself, okay, how am I going to teach this concept now that I can't see, because after I, when I was in the rehab hospital, they had me trying to paint and draw. And first of all, the drawings was totally totally disproportion. So I thought, you know, what, it's all about interpretation and perception. So why not call it abstract. But I was still able still having the skill sets to talk it through. So I would help them with a verbal practice, okay, so we're going to, you know, take the charcoal and do this and walk them through it. And I said, Why don't you try and show me how you would draw this from your perspective. And then I would do a demonstration. And they'd be like, Oh, mister, doesn't look like that bowl of fruit? No, it doesn't, you're right, what does it look like, but this is my interpretation. So it was a really great eye opening experience for them. But I also really started to sway towards clay, and sculpture, and really get those tactile feelings. So for me, that's what shifted for me in my art, but I still had to teach the the elements of art. So being creative thinking outside the box, and getting the students to really listen, and be creative as well.   Michael Hingson  21:58 So when you were teaching, drawing, and charcoals, and so on, were you doing that, in part, because you still were going through some sort of a denial or?   Melanie Taddeo  22:10 Oh, okay. And wasn't it?   Michael Hingson  22:14 Right? Because that's, that's what you teach in the in art, right?   Melanie Taddeo  22:17 And that's the norm, right? Because I was normal, though, it took me a long time to really understand when I got to that acceptance stage, I was like, you know, I don't want to join it anymore. And that was okay, for me at that time, since then I've gone back to it, but in a very different way. So, but at that moment, it was working through the process of acceptance.   Michael Hingson  22:41 So you were you were totally blind, that that did change at some point. It did.   Melanie Taddeo  22:46 So I it's amazing. The brain is a amazing muscle, I'll call it. And so because my eyes actually are fine, this optic nerve that is destroyed, in my optic nerve wasn't passing the messages to the brain and what I was seeing, so technically, my brain taught itself how to see. Not well, but it's still going see some shapes. And I see some details. I can read large print, things like that. So I do have some usable sight. However, I also learned very quickly not to depend on that site, because you never know. So,   Michael Hingson  23:21 so how long after? Well, you were in Teacher's College? How long after that? Did you regain some use of eyesight?   Melanie Taddeo  23:29 It was actually a number of years after Teachers College that actually, yeah, okay.   Michael Hingson  23:34 Did you learn braille? I did. So you use Braille. Still?   Melanie Taddeo  23:39 I do not. i It's funny because I had when I was doing my additional qualifications. To teach individuals with a blind or partially sighted they, they you have to learn how to read Braille. So I mastered grade one like that grade to the contractions a little tricky for me, I'll be honest, but it was more visual, I was doing it because my fingertips are not so good with sensation. And, you know, of course, I can still teach it, but I don't use it myself and then still depend on that large print or a Sharpie marker. But I'm also learning but other technologies now to count on that instead of the print.   Michael Hingson  24:21 You think your fingertips and their ability to sense or read dots were affected at all by the stroke?   Melanie Taddeo  24:28 i Yes, absolutely. Even though it's my right side, I definitely feel it was that I noticed even though the stroke affected my left side, other sensations on my right side were diminished. So I think that was definitely part of it.   Michael Hingson  24:40 So that may have been an issue that if you didn't have a loss of sensation that may have helped with Braille.   Melanie Taddeo  24:47 Oh 100% And I think I would have definitely continued with it if it had been able to read it with my fingers because it is such an easy way to communicate and help with interviews like this. If you have no So whenever it would be great.   Michael Hingson  25:03 Yeah. Well, and it's important to be able to do that. And you're absolutely right. The The reality is Braille is the main reading and writing mode that blind people and a lot of low vision people use as well, because in general, it's more efficient than looking at letters unless you have enough eyesight to read to be able to do that comfortably. Yes. And so the problem is that a lot of people, on the other hand, never get to learn braille as children, because they're forced to try to use their eyes. I've heard just countless people say, if I'd only really had the opportunity, and really did learn braille as a child, I'd be a much better reader today.   Melanie Taddeo  25:47 I've heard that a lot as well. And then also, a lot of parents don't want their children to depend on Braille, which is mind boggling.   Michael Hingson  25:55 They don't want their children to be blind, and they won't deal with that. That's true, too. Which is, which is part of the problem. But Braille is still the, the means by which we read and write. But you, you certainly have dealt with it well, and you've dealt with it in some some very practical ways, since you really don't have the sensation to do Braille really well. And that's perfectly understandable. So you went off and you went to be a teacher, you went to Teachers College, and then what did you do?   Melanie Taddeo  26:25 I graduated as a first legally blind teacher to graduate in Ontario, which is a really big deal. Except nobody would hire me. And, you know, I've really struggled with that I didn't comprehend why. Because again, to me, there was no difference. It was just doing something differently. And creatively. I had a lot of great references, of course, because I was doing practice teaching at my old high school as teaching art. And of course, I have references. But once I put my application out to the boards, I get calls from the principal's and they'd be like, Oh, you're exactly looking for, you know, grade seven, eight split for RT, are you willing, and I Ghen, this is something I learned, but not you do not disclose your disability over the phone before getting to the interview, and I asked, Are you aware that I'm visually impaired? And they said, Oh, no. And of course, I said, What was that a problem? Well, not with me, of course, but will be with parents. And again, it wasn't a huge understanding advocacy at that point. But to me who better to tshirt, children with a disability than somebody that little one, just 24/7? So I said, Okay, thanks so much. So I didn't get hired. And I started to feel like what a waste, oh, my gosh, I'm never gonna get a job. You know, the whole pour was me pity parade thing. Stopped. And I thought, you know, what, I'm a great teacher, I was still volunteer teaching, and I was loving it. And I was coming up with really unique ways to teach and get around this, you know, safety thing. So I had all the answers down pat, and how to do things safely for everybody, and where I would be successful, and what different things I could do to bring to the table to add that little bit extra. And I started to talk to people, a lot of people with various disabilities. And they kept saying, you know, we want to learn how to be independent. Melanie, how did you do this? And I said, Well, it's easy. You just have to, you know, really put your mind to it set some goals. And so I thought, wouldn't it be amazing to have a charity, or a program known as a first it was a program to help individuals with different disabilities access, education and training, just as they are, despite their disabilities. And so I had run a learning center for adults with disabilities, just teach them life skills, help them learn to advocate for stuff, all the stuff that I had done to get my independence back. And that went on for three years. And that was great. But I learned a hard lesson. Like I'll use my own money for that. Not a good idea. So it didn't last long. And I then I have met a lawyer, and they're like, why did you start a charity to do the same type of programming, and that way you can seek funding and donations. Okay, so I did that. And in the meantime, I was trying to think outside the box other than life skills, what other skills should I be teaching when the programs you're talking to different people? And advocacy was a big piece. And then also, I needed something to share information because I can't read brochures, and I was like, No, you have to have a great brochure on it, but I can't read it. So I created voices for ability radio, which is the first 24/7 Internet radio station for about and by people with disabilities as a platform for us to have a voice and that was in Canada so I wouldn't be clear in Canada because there's many all over the globe but and so voices for ability radio was our A platform for people to share their stories, as well as those resources that I and my family found so hard to find after becoming someone with a disability, because nobody shared information. So this was an exciting journey that started 2014. And we still are up and running. And it's exciting. We now since doing voices learned that many people with disabilities love media. So what created a radio broadcast training program? And how to podcast so I teach that every day, it's a great thing. So I'm teaching just in a very different way.   Michael Hingson  30:34 Well, and there's nothing wrong with that. No, not at all. I've always liked to teach. And when I was getting my master's degree in physics, I also got a secondary teaching credential. And in a sense, the actual certifications in both cases, I have not used, I didn't really end up with major jobs in physics, although I did, and still do work with companies in terms of scientific technologies, bleeding edge technologies, and so on. And teaching, by definition, because that is something that all of us have to do, as you're pointing out. The reality is we're the best teachers for teaching about disabilities or persons with disabilities. Absolutely. And, and so it's important to do that. The other side of that is that we also, if we do it, well learn to sell we all become great salespeople, because we have to do that in order to break through the misconceptions and perceptions that people have about us. Absolutely. So we we have to do that and make that work. So your the radio and the internet program is still up and running.   Melanie Taddeo  31:56 It is yes, we act now virtual because of course with pandemic, a lot of our clients are high risk. So we had them sound during the pandemic and we were able to reach more people throughout Ontario. So for us that makes sense. So with a 20 week program, we teach radio broadcasting just the basics introductory, they created their own podcast and a demo reel and a resume and then we connect them we partner with a lot of broadcasters they come in and they share their expertise and teach them and connect them with internships after they graduate and help them get their start that's the starting point.   Michael Hingson  32:31 You teach them how to edit and and process what do you use for that Reaper? Okay. There is there and all the appropriate plugins and and scripts that go with it. Yes, Reaper is a wonderful thing.   Melanie Taddeo  32:48 Yes, it is incredible. And you know, it's funny because it took us from trial and error. We tried to das it. We tried all those other ones. It's just like, I can't do this. They're not gonna be able to do it. So yes.   Michael Hingson  33:01 Well, I go back, talk about not wanting to give away your age, but hey, I'm not shy. I'm Nora, my modest. I worked in radio at a campus radio station in the late 60s and early 70s. Actually up through May or June of 1976. And I can tell you that there is nothing like when you need to edit a reel of tape, cutting, splicing, putting splicing tape in and doing it in such a way that you really can bridge the sound very effectively. It is nothing like Reaper today.   Melanie Taddeo  33:35 Yes, it's amazing how far it's come the technology and it again, I can't even imagine how you did that. That's incredible.   Michael Hingson  33:44 Yeah, my wasn't the best splicer in the world. But I but I can use Reaper really well. So I'm very happy with with all the different things that one can do with Reaper, it is a great program. Yes. And it is accessible. And the reality is that it is possible to do editing and so on. And Reaper is something that not only blind but sighted people use, but they have the people who are involved with it have been very diligent about doing everything possible to add in scripts and do other things so that all the features of Reaper are available and accessible.   Melanie Taddeo  34:16 Yes, and it's so great because when we teach our students with who are blind, we do the shortcuts, but we don't do it just for them. We do it for everybody. It's faster guys. And they're like, Yeah, I did as well. This is great. I love that. And it's interesting because it's amazing because everyone's on the same level. And we do do some extra work for those individuals with screen readers, you know, because we've got to make sure that Jaws key commands aren't the same and all those fun things so but it's great.   Michael Hingson  34:46 There are some great Reaper listservs and most of the time is spent talking about doing things to create an edit music and I don't use it for that. I'm so I'm only doing simple stuff by hand. relative terms and that is for podcast. But it is amazing the things that I see people doing and, and all the things that we're learning and all the different things that are available. It's just pretty incredible.   Melanie Taddeo  35:10 It is it is. But I really appreciate the fact that they continue to update the accessibility with Asara and as somebody else. And there's even a group, I don't know if they're in Canada, or they're on national, where they're located. But Reapers without papers. And they're a group of young people that have all this expertise of a river. It's amazing. And they're a great resource.   Michael Hingson  35:32 And that's where all the music stuff comes from. Most Well, I think the main proponents of it are in England or, or in the British Isles somewhere. But it is all over. And there is a huge subscription list. For the for the Reapers with the help papers. It's pretty cute.   Melanie Taddeo  35:52 Yeah, no, I think it's awesome. It's a great resource for our guys as well. So it's, it's wonderful. It's a great experience, and I get to do what I love and watch individuals grow. And that's a dream come true.   Michael Hingson  36:05 So you're, you're teaching them, but do you still have a radio program or any kind of thing that you're publishing?   Melanie Taddeo  36:12 I have my own podcast, take another look podcast, with my co host, kereta Felix, and we talk about uncomfortable and difficult conversations. So that's what I'm doing, you know, because you have to lead by example, of course. And if you don't have a podcast, you're teaching podcasts like, how does that work? But I also, I did have a show on voices for ability for a long time, but just don't have the time to do everything. So I said, just take my content from the podcast and put on station so we're gonna get to that.   Michael Hingson  36:41 Well, there you go. See? And and the podcast is working. Well, how long have you been doing it?   Melanie Taddeo  36:45 Since January?   Michael Hingson  36:47 Oh, you're just you're?   Melanie Taddeo  36:49 Yes, we're newbies. It's interesting, because we wanted to start something new and different. And working together is a lot of fun. And of course, we have we just recorded our 25th episode. So it's exciting.   Michael Hingson  37:03 You're doing once a week.   Melanie Taddeo  37:05 We Yeah, they come on every Saturday, we meet together, we record two episodes, and then just launch them every Saturday. Yes, yeah.   Michael Hingson  37:13 Well, we just are ready to put up show 37 of unstoppable mindset, it goes up on Wednesday. And same thing, we're doing one a week, and we started in September. And we're we're pleased with the results. We've gotten a lot of people who listen, and I hope that the people who are listening to this will definitely reach out as you get the opportunity to and let us know what you think of this. But we're having a lot of fun doing the podcasts. And hopefully we'll be able to teach other people the value of doing their own. It's all about telling stories, isn't   Melanie Taddeo  37:45 it? It is really isn't it, but a platform to be able to share your story to inspire others to educate others, there's so many opportunities, and really just have a conversation with the world about things that others don't know about. It's a great opportunity. And I've learned a lot from your podcasts, Michael, hearing all the different guests and different perspectives, I think it's a great opportunity for everybody.   38:07 So is Connect for life still in operation?   Melanie Taddeo  38:10 It is it is that's where I teach. So I teach students connect for life, the charity that I started. And it's great because not only are we doing the broadcasting class and the life skills class, where we have started up intro to public speaking course. And again, for individuals with, with, you know, some difficulties with being able to see, confidence sometimes could be but any disability can generalize. But so we have an introduction to public speaking course where we just teach the basics and get them comfortable and get them confident to be able to share their story because that's what advocacy is all about and being able to ask for things in an effective way when they need it. And then we also have our Connect for wellness program, which helps individuals cope with their mental health what's happening with being isolated, lonely, having a disability, and again talking about that so that they can get through anything they're struggling with.   Michael Hingson  39:04 So, in teaching public speaking, what's the most basic thing that you try to get people who are interested in becoming like public speakers? What's the most basic thing you work to get them to understand or what what kind of things do you have to overcome?   Melanie Taddeo  39:20 So first thing first is having a universal message that your audience can relate to your stories can be personal, but you always have to have that universal message. And please don't talk like this because it's really boring. vocal variety is everything. And for me, it's just about communicating and sharing stories, having that engaging connection with your audience. Because if you lose your audience right off the bat, they're not going to listen. So it's that universal message, tie it through so that what you're saying makes sense to people. And so that would be the main thing but then of course, you know, of course, in our state Your words don't mumble as well as to to clearly outline your speech or Keynote, whatever it is, so that you know where you're going with this and that people can follow easily. Those will be the main things.   Michael Hingson  40:10 read or speak from the heart and don't read a speech.   Melanie Taddeo  40:14 Exactly. And don't read, don't read, please don't read. Because that's terrible. It sounds awful, but connect with your audience have a conversation. And that's exactly speak from your heart. A lot of people speak best when it's off the cuff.   Michael Hingson  40:28 When I first started, when I first started speaking, after September 11, a couple people said you should write your speeches. Okay, I wrote a speech. And I read, it sounded horrible. And I read it to the audience. And it sounded horrible. They were very kind. But I listened to it because I like to record speeches, and then go back and listen to them again. And find that I probably learn more from listening to speeches, as well as going back and listening to these podcasts, which we do as we're running them through Reaper, to take out any little funny noises and throw clearings and all that. But I find that I learned a lot by doing that. And what I discovered was don't read a speech. Yes. And it's important. And the other reason, which most speakers get locked into a mindset don't do is the value of not reading your speech. If you are at a venue where you're speaking and you get there early, you never know what you might learn that you want to put into the speech to add value to it. You   Melanie Taddeo  41:38 got it 100%. And I think it's so important, because I think, you know, what I learned is, if you read a speech, you sound like you're reading a speech, you're not connected with the audience, and nobody knows what you've written. So here's the thing, if you know what you're talking about, just talk, have that conversation and connect with somebody. And like you said, you can add live and add things that just happen. So can be more relatable to your audience, because they were there for that. Sorry, perhaps they can relate to the topic because they're right there in the moment. But for people that are so focused on what they've written, they won't even go off script, and they lose.   Michael Hingson  42:20 And how boring is that? Or what?   Melanie Taddeo  42:22 Yes. And they only say there's three types of speeches, the one you wrote, when you delivered and the one you wish you'd delivered, right? Yeah. Wouldn't it be great just to deliver and be happy?   Michael Hingson  42:34 Yeah, I work really hard to get to the deliver the one I wish to deliver. And so that's why I love to listen to speeches, and so on, and why it's so important to do. But I don't know whether I've ever mentioned that on unstoppable mindset. I was asked once by a speaker's bureau to go deliver a speech to an organization called the National Property Managers Association. And I said to the speaker's bureau person, well, what is that organization, already having my own preconceived notion of what it was, but they said, what I thought, oh, it's an organization while the people who are in charge of taking people's properties and renting them out and so on. So, you know, do you have stories that you can tell him all that and I said, Sure, because, in fact, at the time that we were doing that we had rented, well, we had given a property manager a home, we were moving from one place to another, we're moving Southern California after Karen's illness. And so we had a property manager take over that. And then there were stories about that, not all positive. But I flew in to deliver the speech and got there very late the night before I was supposed to deliver a breakfast speech. So I got to the event on 1230. And I went to bed, got up in the morning, went down after taking my guide dog Africa outside because she has to go do her stuff. So we went in to do the speech, and it was breakfast. So I sat down and I was listening to some people near me speak. And something sounded off. So I said to one of the people, tell me more about the National Property Managers Association. Exactly what do you guys do and so on. The National Property Managers Association is an organization that is in charge of and responsible for anything physical owned by the United States government. Totally different? Yes. And I'm about 10 minutes away from speaking, whole speech has to be revised. And I'm not saying that to brag, but rather to express the importance of really learning to be flexible. Now as it turns out, I had negotiated government contracts and schedules and so on and had lots of great stories. In fact, it was a much more fun speech to give and did deliver a speech that everyone appreciated. He got to also talk about things regarding disabilities and other things like that. But the bottom line is that if you are locked into something so much that you don't pay attention to what's going on around you, you're going to get in trouble. Or you don't care, in which case, they're not going to want to have you come back.   Melanie Taddeo  45:23 Exactly. You would have got up until richer, original speech and they would have been sad about exactly. And probably wouldn't have said much, but probably wouldn't have invited you back. Yeah, no, exactly.   Michael Hingson  45:39 Right. Exactly. Right. They would, they would not have but, but it was fun. It was a great event, and enjoyed it and spoke to other divisions of it. So it was a it was a fun time. But I very much enjoy the fact that I believe it's important for me to learn more when I go to a speaking event than the people I'm speaking to, because that will help me in future speeches. And it's all about speaking from the heart. And it's all about learning to speak. And I can't even say extemporaneously because I know what I want to say. It's not like it's totally random. But I want to be able to be flexible. And that's what any good speakers should be able to do.   Melanie Taddeo  46:20 You know, it's when I ever talked to my students, oh, how do you memorize all your speeches, I said, Well, I personally, I write out my thoughts on the computer. And then I listened to it over and over again, I never ever go by what I write, but it's just the concepts I want to cover. And I may make point form notes, as I'm practicing, but it's just a matter of listening to it. And then I just put them away, and I just start talking. And that's the best speech when you start talking. Because I already know what I want to say, because I've written it down. And that's part of how I learned. It's just like, putting it down on something. And it could and then I'll just walk around the house talking to myself, my husband's like a UK. Oh, yeah, I'm just talking to yourself. And it works out just fine. And sometimes again, you get up and, you know, wait a minute, no, I'm gonna say this instead. And it just happens. And in the moment, so it is a great way. But it's important I find to teach the art of public speaking to anyone with a disability because they've got to be confident in what they're saying, because they want to win what what we what I like to do is to ensure that people feel heard and valued. And being able to articulate what you need and how you feel things like that is very, very important skill that not everybody does. Because that Oh, well. I'm just somebody with just blowing the whistle here. Yes, they do. They need to hear your voice. So for me, that's why we do that course.   Michael Hingson  47:50 Yeah. And by doing that, you're helping them to gain confidence. And the reality is people always say, well, aren't you afraid to get up in front of an audience and speak because why couldn't do that, I'd be afraid. And so I love to tell the story that after September 11, the first time I was invited to speak anywhere, was to a church service in central New Jersey, where they wanted to honor the people who were lost. So it was like two weeks after September 11. So that would have been? Well, it was the 26th. That was Wednesday, two weeks in a day later. And I said, Sure, I'd be glad to come they said, Well, you don't have a lot of time, only about six minutes or so. But we'd like you to come and tell your story. And I said, Sure, I'd be happy to do that. Then I asked the big question, how many people will be there, not 6000. So I learned pretty quickly, you don't be afraid of how large or what kind of what audience you have. You can you can deal with them. And it doesn't matter about the audience. If you connect, which is what you said earlier, it's all about connecting with the audience.   Melanie Taddeo  49:01 And again, knowing that they're there in an emotional state like you had just gone through and knowing that you can connect on that level, you can connect by celebrating the first responders or whoever you were the fire you're celebrating, and just really truly you're all there for a similar reason. And any conference any speaking engagement usually the people are there for the same reason, usually, but usually, you never know there's always that person that it may hit that may not know what you're talking about, or may really get something more out of it than you even expected.   Michael Hingson  49:37 And one of the things I love to do after speaking is take time to talk to people to to meet with them and so on course it's a blessing to have a book. That was the number one New York Times bestseller and, and also have a guide dog because what we do afterward usually is is there is a book table set up and I'll tie now Alamo black lap current eighth guy dog and tie him to the table. Alamo knows how to draw in people when it's all about petting him, of course. But but people come in, and then we get to chat. So whatever tool you have to use, but the bottom line is that people mostly really do want to interact. And you know, I've spoken at events, if you talk about politics and so on, that are completely opposite in view from the political views that I have to that I happen to have. But who cares is for me, it's not about politics, it's about about speaking and delivering messages. And one of the things that I generally do tell people is, like, I am perfectly capable, and probably will pick on Washington DC during this speech, but just let the record show. I'm an equal opportunity abuser. I go from the standpoint of Mark Twain who said Congress's Grandal benevolent asylum for the helpless, so they're all in the same boat. Yeah. So I said, you know, we could we could pick on all of them. And it's a whole lot of fun,   Melanie Taddeo  51:06 though, and again, adding humor, and it just breaks the ice. It says people at ease, and they know that you're just here to share a story. And then you're not going to get those people. Well, I'm on the side, I'm on that side. Right. Yeah. That that commonality. I love it.   Michael Hingson  51:20 And you know, a lot of people say, don't tell a joke at the beginning of a speech. Well, if, if you're telling a joke, just to tell a joke, then I agree. But if it has a purpose, and I have found some of those that are that are really very helpful to drive points home. So it's a lot of fun.   Melanie Taddeo  51:39 Yes, absolutely. And that's exactly it, it's the right time, the appropriate time, you get used to where that is. And yeah, it's just every speech is unique and different. Every audience is unique and different. So really, knowing your audience ahead of time, the best your ability is good thing,   Michael Hingson  51:55 even delivering the same speech at a lot of different kinds of venues. Each speech is different, and it should be different.   Melanie Taddeo  52:04 Yeah, you have to tailor it, even though you say,   Michael Hingson  52:07 even though it's basically the same speech, but every one is different. And that's what makes it fun, and also makes it great to listen to, because when I go back and listen to some of those speeches in here, how audience react or don't, then that helps me improve it for the next time. So thanks, that's pretty   Melanie Taddeo  52:26 good feedback, or the the response or having those conversations after always gives you that feedback. And you can just evolve from there.   Michael Hingson  52:36 Well, with speeches that I give today, I've learned what I should be able to expect from an audience if I'm connecting with them. And if I'm getting those reactions, then I know that I'm connecting. And if I don't, then I'm, I'm well, on the fly literally need to figure out what to do to make sure that I connect, and I've learned enough to be able to do that. But it is important to do that. And that's what a good speaker should do. Yeah. So you on the other hand, in addition to speaking have written a book, I have, tell us about that if you would,   Melanie Taddeo  53:15 please. So my unforeseen journey losing sight gaining vision is my book and it was published in 2019. I had been told for years, I should write a book, who would want to read my book. And I was listening to an audio book over the Christmas holiday in 2018. I received it and I was mesmerized. It was also such an inspiring book. And it's like, that's why you need to read a book. I'm like, asking the question, Who would want to read my book, he's like, you don't get it Do you don't understand how inspiring you are. So he planted a seed, and I didn't want the book just to be about me. I wanted something tangible for the audience. So the book is about unforeseen change in our life and how we cope with it, and some tangible resources for them to use for their own life. So everybody goes from preceding change, a breakup, a relationship, a death in the family, a loss of a job, let's say, the pandemic, and all of these things. But so the first part of each chapter is my story on a word. So it might be differences, beliefs, success, whatever the word of the chapter is the title of the chapter. And then underneath, I give some things that helped me cope with it. And that way the reader has a choice to add, try to apply it to their situation, or maybe it doesn't work for them. But I wanted something so people's could walk away, go wow, okay, now I can try this out my life, because these are the things that helps me. And it was such an amazing, cathartic process to write the book for myself, but also had my book launch the beginning of December 2019. And I plan this amazing book tour for 2020 and   Michael Hingson  55:00 You know what happened? You got to do it virtually. He   Melanie Taddeo  55:03 was this is it. I didn't actually do much of it to be honest, I understand. Yeah, I, you know, I still will do it. I, you know, I've got all these books. And but what was really great, we got to record the book and audio version, my friend ready for an audio book. And I've been talking a lot about it with different things. But it was a great help. In the pandemic, I had a lot of people say to me, your book, Can I order 10 copies for my friends because they need this right now. And who would have thought I didn't know anything about the pandemic, which was definitely a solution to coping with unforeseen change.   Michael Hingson  55:40 We've just started writing a new book I and a colleague, are writing a book that we are I originally wanted to call blinded by fear because people, when unexpected life changes come about, literally become blinded by fear and they can't make decisions. And it's all about learning to create a mindset where you can deal with unforeseen circumstances and, and be able to move forward. For the moment that we changed the title Carrie, my my colleague decided better title. So right now we're calling it a guide dogs Guide to Being brave, because I've had a guide dogs and so my whole life has been intermix with dogs. So we're going to have a lot of dog stories and other things in it. But the the issue is that people really do need to learn that they can deal with fear and sounds and deal with unexpected life changes. And that sounds like your book, very much talks about that, which is great. It really   Melanie Taddeo  56:37 does. And it's interesting, because I think we automatically assume okay, it's it's terrible life, oh my gosh, how could this? I can't get over it. But we all have that choice. And that's what I had to learn the hard way, that chapel, they came to me and said, Melanie, do you want to just survive? Or do you want to thrive and both. But we don't always have that Chaplain come to us. Sometimes we have worked struggling on our own and not knowing where to turn. And I had to learn a lot of hard lessons. And they weren't easy. So why not share? I wish I had had a book like this. Before this all happens.   Michael Hingson  57:15 When you published the book, was it self published or did a publisher partner publishing?   Melanie Taddeo  57:21 And it's interesting because I did a lot of research about publishing. And I knew nothing about writing a book. And I Okay, I could do the self publishing to a lot of work, and what if it sucked? So I wouldn't know. So I went partner publishing, and I had an angel publisher, and she was amazing. I created a new language. It's called Melanie's, so I use Dragon naturally speaking to me. And it doesn't take what you say. Not always, no, not all the time. So there was a lot of parts, she'd be like, What did you mean here? And then I'd have to go back. Okay, this is what I meant. And so we were caught through it. But she was such a great help in creating the structure of the book and then helping with editing. And she's like, Melanie, look, I wrote it, within eight months, it was just because it was all in my heart in my head. And it was just, I needed to put it on onto the computer, and just get it there. And she's like, this is easy. It's not a problem, just the deciphering of the Davinci Code you've written for me. And, but it came up beautifully and exactly how I wanted it. And it was, it was a great experience. You know, of course, partner push publishing costs money. So that's something I learned now that I kind of know what I'm doing, I would definitely hire an editor, and maybe Self Publish.   Michael Hingson  58:43 Yeah, the thing about self publishing is that you just have to be prepared to do all the marketing, but that's okay.   Melanie Taddeo  58:49 And I did a lot of that with partners publishing as well. So half and half, so it was good.   Michael Hingson  58:55 Don't think for a minute though, that even if you create a contract, and you actually work with a regular full time legitimate publisher, don't think you won't be doing the marketing still, because more and more, they're expecting the authors to do a lot of the marketing, they do provide support, and there's some value to it, but they do require you to demonstrate that you not only can mark it, but that you have a cadre of people to to help and that you have an audience that you can market to, which is cool.   Melanie Taddeo  59:25 And the thing is, who better to market your book than yourself. Because you know the story, you lived it, you've written it. So to me, that makes a lot of sense. And again, I think it's like you mentioned, if you do speaking engagement, you have your book, you can talk about that you can connect with people, and again, it's just making that circuit and I still have to do a lot of that because I haven't had the opportunity yet, as the pandemic starts to, hopefully cool down. We're hopeful I'm optimistic. Again, travelers become, again, something that we're able to do and I hope to go and take it across. Well, definitely to Africa to where my husband is from. So   Michael Hingson  1:00:06 we'll see how it works worse. Yeah. Now where is he from?   Melanie Taddeo  1:00:10 He's from Swaziland, which is a little bit north of South Africa. Closer South Africa.   Michael Hingson  1:00:15 Yeah. So it'd be great to go internationally. Yeah. You join Toastmasters along the way.   Melanie Taddeo  1:00:20 I did. Really when I started the charity. Yeah. So when I started the charity, I knew I had to talk a lot about it. And I'd have to talk to bigger audiences and be able to get my message across. And every single Toastmasters, I'm like, I don't need toast, I don't need to drink, I just need to talk. Like, that's what it's a

9.56 ABV PODCAST
EP. 95 with Special Guest Mark Rodriguez (Skater Mark)

9.56 ABV PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 96:15


Join us this week as we sit with Mark Rodriguez a.k.a Skater Mark, try new beers, and talk about the queen, breakfast beers, Mark's first craft beer, green medicine, dumb drivers, visiting breweries, football is back, traveling, Mark's strange encounter, missing people, lightning, parental advisory cd's, nipples, skateboarding, google maps, boob milk and other dope jales. Song of the week: Easy Rider by Action Bronson Big shoutout to our sponsor Liberty Bail Bonds. 24 Hour Service. Call them at 956-381-5836. Located at 12403 Bail Bond Drive Edinburg, Tx. "If you don't want to do time, Don't commit the crime but if you commit the crime call them anytime." Shout out to our sponsor Pirriwiris Miche Mix. Go try out all the different flavors of mixes and don't forget the olives! Follow on all social medias and place an order. https://www.facebook.com/pirriwiris.michemix.7 https://instagram.com/pirriwiris_mmix?utm_medium=copy_link Big shoutout to our sponsor The Landmark on Tower. Visit The Landmark on Tower to enjoy a new and unique way of drinking. Located in Alamo, Tx. Tell them the 956 ABV guys sent you there. https://www.facebook.com/LandmarkonTower/ https://instagram.com/thelandmarkontower?utm_medium=copy_link Big shoutout to Nature's Joint for sponsoring the podcast with some of the best Delta-8 flower in the RGV. Hit them up here: https://www.facebook.com/Natures-Joint-Cafe-101859025397031/ https://instagram.com/naturesjoint06?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= If you would like to donate and support us our CashApp is: $956ABV Thank you for listening. Cheers.

Podcast – Alamo City Church
Alamo City Church Message

Podcast – Alamo City Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022


Luke 11:13 John 14:16-18 John 15:26 John 16:7-15 Philippians 4:13 Romans 8:13 Galatians 5:16-23

First Baptist Church Alamo
FBC Alamo Sunday Morning Worship Service

First Baptist Church Alamo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 69:17


Regular Sunday Morning Worship Services for First Baptist Church Alamo, Chris Rigby Pastor, Alamo, TN.

Historical Bookworm
A Book-chat about  Worthy of Legend with Roseanna M. White & a Review of Moondrop Miracle by Jennifer Lamont Leo

Historical Bookworm

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 33:09


Roseanna M. White joins us for a chat about her latest release Worthy of Legend and Liz Tolsma hosts A Pinch of the Past: All About the Alamo. If you love historical fiction, period dramas, or grew up admiring the Mary Kay lady with her pretty pink cosmetics, then you simply must try Moondrop Miracle by Jennifer Lamont Leo!

The Best Of Our Knowledge
#1668: Production of microchips in U.S. could be changing

The Best Of Our Knowledge

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 29:58


Jesús del Alamo, a professor in electrical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, began studying semiconductors in the 1970s. The field's obviously developed significantly during his career and now touches on almost every facet of life in the 21st century. So, the United State's manufacturing 10% of the world's microchips seems like a curious position for the country to be in. del Almo explains how we got here, why the CHIPS and Science Act could be a turning point, as well as what's next for the industry. Additional reading del Alamo recently contributed research and writing to “Reasserting U.S. Leadership in Microelectronics,” which details challenges to the microelectronics industry in the States and what steps the country might take to correct course. According to the BBC, the CHIPS act will invest $280 billion in “high tech manufacturing and scientific research amid fears the country is losing its technological edge to China.” The plan includes $52 billion “to boost [U.S.] domestic semiconductor manufacturing,” The Verge reports. Micron, a technology company, said that it'll be investing $40 billion in manufacturing while making use of the new subsidies. The Atlantic said the CHIPS Act will also impact climate science. End notes Our theme music, this and every week, is a track called “Musical Chairs” by Los Angeles producer Omid. Keep up with his latest work on Soundcloud. Follow the show on Twitter and let us know what you think about our interviews by sending an email to knolwedge@wamc.org.

The Best Of Our Knowledge
#1668: Production of microchips in U.S. could be changing

The Best Of Our Knowledge

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 29:58


Jesús del Alamo, a professor in electrical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, began studying semiconductors in the 1970s. The field's obviously developed significantly during his career and now touches on almost every facet of life in the 21st century. So, the United State's manufacturing 10% of the world's microchips seems like a curious position for the country to be in. del Almo explains how we got here, why the CHIPS and Science Act could be a turning point, as well as what's next for the industry. Additional reading del Alamo recently contributed research and writing to “Reasserting U.S. Leadership in Microelectronics,” which details challenges to the microelectronics industry in the States and what steps the country might take to correct course. According to the BBC, the CHIPS act will invest $280 billion in “high tech manufacturing and scientific research amid fears the country is losing its technological edge to China.” The plan includes $52 billion “to boost [U.S.] domestic semiconductor manufacturing,” The Verge reports. Micron, a technology company, said that it'll be investing $40 billion in manufacturing while making use of the new subsidies. The Atlantic said the CHIPS Act will also impact climate science. End notes Our theme music, this and every week, is a track called “Musical Chairs” by Los Angeles producer Omid. Keep up with his latest work on Soundcloud. Follow the show on Twitter and let us know what you think about our interviews by sending an email to knolwedge@wamc.org.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 56 – Unstoppable Moving Beyond 120 with Brittany Grubbs-Hodges

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 60:14


Beyond 120 is a program housed at the University of Florida. Our guest on this episode, Brittany Grubbs-Hodges is a part of this program designed to help college students look beyond the minimum of 120 units of college credits required to graduate. Brittany helps students look at their possible career choices and helps them learn more than they ever thought they could discover about what really goes into whatever they are looking to do with their lives.   Brittany is clearly a teacher at heart. As you will learn, even an immune disability does not stop her.   You will learn how Brittany is advancing her own life goals as she moves toward securing a PHD and how she wishes to continue to help students expand their horizons. Brittany is by any definition unstoppable. I am sure you will enjoy what she has to say and that you will be inspired by her.   About the Guest: Brittany Grubbs-Hodges works at the University of Florida as part of the Beyond120 program. She assists undergraduate students by connecting them to internships and other experiential learning activities. Brittany also works as an adjunct professor in the UF College of Journalism and is graduating with her PhD in December of this year. In her spare time, Brittany enjoys spending time with family and friends, and she is looking forward to adopting her new puppy in the next few weeks!       About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Hi, and welcome back once again to unstoppable mindset. Glad to have you with us wherever you may be. And however you're listening to us. Brittany Grubbs Hodges as our guest this week. We have lots of fun things to talk about. We've been spending the last few minutes kind of reacquainting ourselves after chatting and also talking about all the things we could talk about. She is getting a PhD in higher education. She has a master's degree in journalism. But she wouldn't even let me talk about fake news. I don't know What's all that about. But anyway. But we we can talk about everything. And as people on this podcast know, I'm an equal opportunity political abuser, so it doesn't matter. And so there's real news too. And I haven't seen much of that lately, because it's all fake news, as everybody tells us right away. Brittany, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  02:12 Thank you so much, Michael, thank you for having me today.   Michael Hingson  02:15 And now that we've picked on fake news, we can get to more real stuff. You just got back, you said from DC. How was it up there?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  02:21 It was great. Yeah, I just got back I took about 20 students. I'm a professor at UF. And I think about 20 undergraduate students to DC mainly to just expose them to the world of work. You know, they like to say the real world but the students are in the world or, but I just want them to get an idea of the world of work. Specifically, I work for a department it's called Beyond 120. At the University of Florida, it's our experiential learning program. So we encouraged them to get outside of the classroom through things like internships through mentorship through excursions or study abroad. So this was one of our career excursions, we took them to various places around DC, USA Today, the Capitol building all kinds of places, and hopefully, you know, some of those opportunities will really come to fruition. I know a couple of my students have interviews already. So I'm excited to see what comes from that. And   Michael Hingson  03:15 how did they come up with the name beyond 120?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  03:18 So that's a great question. So 120 is the number of academic credits needed to graduate with a baccalaureate degree. So it's kind of a metaphorical and that we're not asking you to take more credits. We're just asking you to go beyond what's required by really exploring outside of the classroom.   Michael Hingson  03:35 Yeah, that is so much fun and important. I remember being in college years ago, getting a master's degree in physics, and there was no real discussion of either extracurricular activities, although there were a number of things available and so on. But there weren't programs like a beyond 120, I did end up getting very involved on campus at the campus radio station, and I got involved in being in a consumer group of blind people, the National Federation of the Blind, in my senior year, and then continued with it ever since. But it makes a lot of sense to get people to really explore additional sorts of things. And if you will, as you said, look at a little bit of the real world, doesn't it?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  04:17 Yeah, absolutely. And especially in the world of COVID, everything has really changed. You know, you have hybrid workforce, you know, offices now, and that people only come in on Tuesdays or you know, every other day, some some folks we were working with, they have teams so Team A will come in one day, and then Team B will come in the next day. So it's really certainly changed since we last took our excursion. So we've, we've taken four excursions this semester, but prior to that, we our last excursion was February of 2020. So it's been a full two years and a lot of students have had their experiences canceled. A lot of their internships went virtual, a lot of study abroad experiences were canceled. So we're really trying to kind of make up for that and try and get some Students access and exposure to some of the jobs and some of the just the industries out there.   Michael Hingson  05:05 Not trying to be political or anything, but what was it like COVID wise up in DC was masking encouraged or, you know, what are the kinds of things did you see?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  05:15 Yeah, so it really depends on the individual place. So we went to Georgetown University to get our students who are interested in graduate school wanted to get them some exposure to what law school was like in graduate school, and they have a mandate, not only for the vaccine, but also for the booster, and of course masks as well. And then some folks, which, of course, private companies, it's up to them, it's up their discretion. But I did have to have the students bring their COVID cards, because for some of the entities, they were not allowed in without it. So it certainly was not a University of Florida regulation. But it was up to the individual and to T that was hosting us. And they all had very different regulations, depending on, you know, how many people were visiting with social distancing versus masking versus vaccinations, all that fun stuff?   Michael Hingson  06:05 Did you go to Congress or the White House or any of those at all?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  06:09 So we went to the Capitol building, which was a blast, we went to our local Congresswoman, and she took us around, I believe were with her for about two hours. She took us around and showed us a few of the different offices in different areas of the Capitol building, we weren't able to go in because Congress was in session. We weren't able to go in and actually see in the main room there. But we did see some of the areas on the outskirts of those rooms, who was your congressperson? Cat Kammok   Michael Hingson  06:42 haven't met her. I spent a fair amount of time in DC over the years dealing with Congress, I went with the National Federation of blind a number of times, to invade Congress and talk all about the issues regarding blind people, and so on. And I've been there some other times as well. So I've met a number of people that don't think I've met her.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  07:02 So she is our local representative. But we also met with Congressman, Congresswoman Wasserman Schultz, she's also a US alumni. So we made sure to meet with a variety of folks throughout the trip on both sides of the aisle.   Michael Hingson  07:18 And I and I have met her and she has sponsored legislation. So she's a cool lady as well.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  07:24 Yes, it's always great to meet us alums that can share their stories with students and really mentor some of the students   Michael Hingson  07:30 makes perfect sense and go into Washington is an experience that I would encourage anyone to do. But of course, there's so much history there. It makes perfect sense to do.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  07:42 Yes, absolutely. And I wanted the students to get some in history, as well as we gave them some free time, one of the days to go and explore all the museums nearby some of the Smithsonian's that are now open. So they were able to see most of those and really get some time exploring to see their history.   Michael Hingson  07:58 Have you been there before?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  08:00 I have, we did a excursion there in 2019. That was actually our pilot excursion. So beyond 120 was not created until 2018. So myself and one of my co workers are one of the first hired in, in the department. And we kind of met and said, Okay, what is it that we want to do what's going to help students out and so we did an excursion to DC with eight students in 2019, just to see if this would work if it's a good concept at all. And it did, it worked well. So we were able to go to DC and 2019. And then in London in February of 2020. And funny story there. We were at the economist, the Thursday, before the play shut down, they shut down on a Friday. So we were there the day before they shut down. So we've just barely got out of the UK. And thankfully, no one tested positive it was we just made it by the skin of our teeth.   Michael Hingson  08:57 I escaped from New York in March of 2020. On the day they shut down the city, I knew that it was coming because they were talking about it. And I had had a flight later in the day. I decided I better get out of here. And so I was able to and I put it that way escape, before it was all shut down. And I understand why and it made perfect sense to do but it's just so unfortunate that all this is going on and we got to deal with it though it is part of life now.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  09:28 Absolutely.   Michael Hingson  09:29 Well tell me a little bit about you, where you you came from and how you got into the University of Florida and ended up in the programs that you did.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  09:39 Yes, absolutely. So when it comes to my story, I had a very non traditional journey. And so I'd love to go over with you later on in this podcast. Some of the folks that really influenced me, but I had a non traditional journey I actually had an immune deficiency. Whenever I you know, well it is a genetic thing. but I'll say it really made a huge impact on my career and my college trajectory. Because I eventually going into adulthood, I had to have plasma infusions twice a week. So I spent my first two years local, and my second two years, about two hours away at the University of Central Florida. But every weekend, I had to come back and get a plasma infusion twice a week. And it definitely altered my career trajectory. And it altered the opportunities that were available. But I will say while I was there, my first semester at UCF, which was the first semester of my junior year, I said, you know, I've kind of missed out on the first two years, but I need to make up for that, how can I do that. And there was an office of experiential learning to UCF. And I was able to find an internship really saw the power of internships ended up working, it was at a hospital system called Orlando health. And I worked there for about two and a half years, before switching over to the education side. And I initially switched to a K through 12. So I taught grades six through 12 at a private school, but found that that wasn't really my my niche, I love teaching. But that particular age group wasn't really my niche. So I switched to higher education, worked in admissions for about five years, working with students in that college transition. But then when the opportunity came to join beyond 120, I remembered my days as an intern and thought this is going to be perfect for me, I'm so excited to be able to kind of pay it forward to have future students connected with internships and job opportunities, because my internship was so influential for me. So that's kind of how I got into higher education.   Michael Hingson  11:48 I was teaching lower grades different or how did you find them different than teaching upper grades and getting into juniors and seniors in high school and I asked that, in part because my wife was a teacher for many years and loved teaching younger grades more than older grades, because she felt she had a little bit more of an opportunity to help shape the way behave. They behave later, because by the time they were in high school, they were a lot more fixed in less interested in and exploring a lot of things that maybe they should have.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  12:20 Mm hmm. Well, I guess for me, I mean, I was raised on a on a ranch, and I had a very strict upbringing. And so whenever I went to, to teach, a lot of my students did not have that strict upbringing. And I would hear them say things like, he's touching me, he's looking at me weird. He's breathing on me. He's, and it was just, it drove me absolutely crazy. Sounds terrible. But, um, but no, I just, I was definitely wanting to be able to see, I'm not even quite sure the best way to say it, but be able to see the difference that I was making. And that, you know, with a student that I was able to admit, at least with admissions with a student, I was able to admit into college, I can see that transition. And a lot of times those students would come back to me and say, Hey, this is what I've done while I'm here and moving towards beyond 120. I can see, for example, one of the students that I've been working with, for several semesters, we were able to get her an interview at NASA last week, and she said, Oh, my gosh, all of my efforts that I've done, have paid off, she's taken my classes she did the excursion, she's doing the internship. And now the full time job and so to to know that I've had a part in that is incredibly rewarding. And I'm just humbled and honored by the fact that I can be a part of students journeys, and really, truly have an impact and where they go in life. And I'm so thankful and grateful for that.   Michael Hingson  13:47 So it sounds like what I'm hearing you say is that you're helping to teach people that and students that life is an adventure, which is something that conceptually is probably a little bit easier for them to think about and assimilate in later grades, because how do you tell a kindergartener that life's an adventure?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  14:08 Well, and even sometimes students who let's just say a student has a degree in philosophy, the student will come to me and say, What do I What can I do with a degree in philosophy? And my answer is anything you want to do with a degree in philosophy? Let's see. What do you love doing? What are you passionate about? What do you enjoy, you know, and just trying to figure out and really dig deeper into what that student may or may not realize they even want to do and kind of expose them to all these different opportunities out there to see what resonates. So yeah, I love thing. Life is an adventure. Let's explore that together and see, you know, what's going to be the best fit for you. And even if they   Michael Hingson  14:47 start on a career, or they decide to go down one road, you never know when you might have to change and being flexible, being a little bit more broader and thinking really can help people We deal with things that come along and may change their pathways over time.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  15:04 Absolutely. And that's one of the biggest lessons that we teach students is that career paths are not linear. You know, they might be for some students who have a degree in accounting, they might want to be an accountant. And you know, that's that's a linear thing. But for a lot of our students, their journeys aren't linear. And I know my journey in particular was not linear. But But yeah, we're super excited to be able to impact those students. And you know, even my non traditional students love that love that love that we have a program called the University of Florida online program, which is fully 100% online degrees. And a lot of my non traditional students are still enrolled in my classes and take the excursions and do the internships. So, you know, that's oftentimes even more rewarding. I know I had a student about a year ago, who had an immune deficiency, just like I did, and she, because of her condition, she was homebound and she could not leave to participate in some of our activities. And so I said, You know what, let's, let's see what you can participate in. And we were able to organize a few virtual internships for her. So it's certainly very rewarding and love seeing the impact on students.   Michael Hingson  16:12 So in your case, what happened in terms of the immune situation, you were taking transfusions, I gather that has been able to be stopped?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  16:23 Yes. Oh, we're so thankful. So thankful, um, I took plasma infusions for about five years. And thankfully, my body reacted to the infusions and was able to develop immunity on its own. So very thankful to my immunologist for all of his hard work. And it certainly took a while for us to figure out, you know, the dosage and whatnot, there were times that I had six needles in me at one time trying to infuse all of this plasma, because it was done subcutaneously instead of intravenously. So there was there were several obstacles. And I certainly got discouraged at some points. And that's why I want to help to make those impacts on students because I see them often getting discouraged, not necessarily because of a physical condition like mine, but because, you know, they might have financial obstacles, they might have had students who, because of COVID, became homeless, you know, so trying to say, okay, what can we do to make your situation better?   Michael Hingson  17:21 So in your case, though, as you, as you pointed out, you got discouraged, and so on. How did you move past that? How did you pump yourself up, if you will, to keep going?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  17:31 Well, I think my family had a big part in that. My mother, she was with me through every single infusion. And I think she could see how challenging it was at 20 years old to have to come home every single weekend for two years straight, to have to do infusions. And so she truly encouraged me, but also the the power of prayer, me personally, I'm a very strong believer in Christ. And that was, that was my thing. And I know, not everyone has a particular face or a person to lean on. But for me, that was instrumental in my journey,   Michael Hingson  18:05 but there is merit to leaning on something, whoever you are, as, as long as it's a positive thing, and you can use it to help yourself move forward, right. And   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  18:15 I want to be that that person that helps motivate my students in whatever capacity I want to be that that person that is their biggest cheerleader, you know, to try and get students wherever it is that they're looking to go.   Michael Hingson  18:27 So you were able to get beyond that. Do you need to do anything still to kind of monitor your immune system to make sure it doesn't repeat? Or are we beyond that now?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  18:36 Well, I actually had an appointment with my immunologist a couple of weeks ago, my husband and I are hoping to start a family soon. And I said, well, will this impact my child and my immunologist said probably not. But you know what, let's just monitor it. We'll take it day by day, and kind of go from there. So as of now I'm doing good. Very thankful. But yeah, doing doing okay, so far.   Michael Hingson  18:59 Well, jumping forward a little bit. Also, I understand that you're about to get a new addition, you're adopting a puppy. I am I'm very excited to tell us about the puppy.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  19:10 So so this is a mix between a Rhodesian Ridgeback and a lab. We basically got this dog from our my parents set groomers and so we're excited about getting this dog but I mentioned that I grew up on a on a ranch and we had cows and horses and turkeys and you know, all of the the animals and so this will be my first time since my parents sold our farm. About seven years ago. This will be my first time getting a dog and other dogs so I'm very excited about it.   Michael Hingson  19:42 Wow, Rhodesian Ridgeback and lab so it will probably be a fairly good sized puppy dog by the time it's full grown.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  19:50 Oh, yes, absolutely. But if you can take care of a horse, you can take care of anything.   Michael Hingson  19:53 Well, yeah, I wasn't so concerned about that. It'll be a big dog. And are we going to allow it on the bed? probably a good idea.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  20:04 Probably not it, but we'll see, well, we'll cross that bridge. And when we come to it will probably be another four to six weeks before the puppies weaned. But But yeah, I've done that discussion. My husband and I,   Michael Hingson  20:15 my wife always wants to let our dogs on the bed. Right now the only dog we have is Alamo who is my guide dog, a black lab, and I will not let him get on the bed because I know if that happens once it's all over. Yeah. Once it happens one time, he's going to stay on the bed. And it's kind of one of those things that you you do have to monitor. On the other hand, she had a dog that was a breeder for Guide Dogs for the Blind that became her service dog. She's in a wheelchair, she's used to chair her whole life. And this dog who is very intelligent, picked up providing services for her like fetching things, which she had originally not been trained to do. But Karen always would encourage her to be on the bed. And as I love to tell people, Fantasia always took her half out of the middle of the bed. So I can think that it would be tough with a dog that will most likely be even larger than a lab.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  21:13 Yes, yes. But fingers crossed, she'll have a good personality and we're excited.   Michael Hingson  21:20 Yeah, that's the thing. Well, you'll have some control over that, unless it's just a very strange dog. Dogs oftentimes do take on some of the personality of of their people, as long as the people are working really hard to make the home a good one and establish a good relationship. So my money is on you to be able to deal with that.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  21:41 Thank you. I'm, I'm going to try my hardest. You'll have   Michael Hingson  21:44 to keep us posted. We'll do. So you, you were able to deal with the immune deficiency and you're able to then graduate. So did you go to UCS for for the rest of your undergraduate career or what?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  22:00 Yeah, so I went to a community college called SSC je in Jacksonville, Florida for my first two years, went to UCF for my last two years, and I continued on doing plasma infusions until I was probably about a year post graduation. And I had them I mean, because they have to be refrigerated. Most plasmas have to be refrigerated, they delivered it to my work, I had a refrigerator there, and they just kind of made some accommodations for me. But yeah, I went all the way through graduation, with those plasma infusions and continued on into the workforce. And ironically enough, I worked at a hospital for my internship and part of my first job, so it didn't weird anyone out whenever I was getting plasma delivered to me.   Michael Hingson  22:51 How did that work when you were getting infusions, at work, and so on? Did Did someone actually do the infusions? Or was it something you could do?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  23:00 Yeah, actually, every single infusion that I ever had passed, the first three weeks were all me. And it because it's done subcutaneously, you end up getting, I don't know the best way to say it, I guess it's like little fat pockets. Where your stomach is, or your legs are, wherever it is that you're getting your infusions, because you're putting essentially liquid right underneath the skin. And so it would kind of be bloated, I guess, wherever that earring is. And so I would just have to wear loose fitting clothing. And I had, because the infusions took anywhere from one to two hours to do and so whenever I graduated, and there were times when I had to have an extra infusion, so I do that at work. And I would just kind of take my little carrying case with me and people would see tubes kind of going inside my clothes. And I would just say, Oh, I'm having a plasma infusion. No one really felt comfortable asking, like more details. I did have a friend of mine who I worked with who who knew what was going on. And so if there was any emergency, she was able to call someone but thankfully that never happened. Everything was okay. And you know, I was I was comfortable. Eventually just kind of living a couple hours away from home and not going back on weekends after I graduated from college and just kind of doing that myself. But I do have a funny story. We kind of got tired of having the infusions done in the stomach, it began to hurt really, really bad once you do it over and over. And so one of the sites that you can do a plasma infusion is in the back of your arm and like the fatty part of your arm. And so my dad had to do those because I couldn't reach you could reach Yeah, you couldn't reach correctly. So so my dad had do those. And I mentioned I grew up on a on a ranch and my dad is used to giving our cows like you know the vaccinations, right so or their annual shots or whatever it is. And of course the cowhide is extremely thick and so he would jam that Have needle into the cows. And so then it wouldn't came time for me. You pretty much do the same motion. And I remember screaming so hard. You don't need to do it that hard, because he would jam that thing in cowhide. I was like tad. No. And so I never let him do that again. I learned my lesson.   Michael Hingson  25:19 My fourth guide dog Lynnae was a yellow lab and contracted glomerular nephritis, which is a kidney disease, it actually was a morphing of limes disease. But what happened is that the kidney would let out the good stuff, in addition to the waist, so it wasn't really doing the filter that it was supposed to do. But one of the things that we needed to do with her was to give her subcutaneous fluids every other day, and had to put a liter of lactated ringers, saline solution in her just to really keep her very hydrated. So very familiar with the process. And we did that usually on her back right up near her shoulder. So there was always this big bump. She didn't mind, mostly for her it was at least she got attention. And it worked out really well.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  26:12 Well, I'm glad that it helps at least for a little while. Yeah, did for   Michael Hingson  26:15 a while. And eventually she? Well, she lived three more years after the diagnosis. She guided for three years and then live for three more years with us. So we we had her company for quite a while, which was really good. Yeah. So you went off and you graduated, and then you started doing the things that you're doing now. So what exactly do you do you do now? And how are your studies going and all that?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  26:38 Well, I, I've been told that you are not supposed to do your PhD topic on your work, but I completely disregarded that role. So doing my dissertation on what I'm doing at work, because it is a little challenging to kind of juggle everything. So I'm just kind of had to pray that it all worked out. And thankfully it has but what I'm doing now I created a course it's called Industry Insights. And this is a variable 123 credit class. And I basically connect with various UF alumni in different industries. And we co teach a class together. And at the end of that class, the students while some of the students those that want to an internship or a full time position, they will let our alumni co instructor know and potentially interview for a full time position or internship, as of I believe, screen 21 Spring 2021, which is when we piloted the class, there was a student who got a full time position in Dubai. enlistees fall of 2021, there are two new different students who received positions, spring of 2022, there were three students. So so far, it's been pretty consistent, say the top two to four students each semester are getting internships or jobs. But honestly, in some cases, this has done the opposite. And that students think, oh, I want to work in marketing, or I want to go to law school or whatever the case may be. And after they take this class, they say, Oh, my goodness, I don't want anything to do with law school, or I don't want anything to do with this. Which in my case, I think it's just as valuable for people to kind of cross things off the list. And to say, this is what I want to do, because I can say, in my own experience, my internship helped me solidify what I wanted to do. But I also had a second internship. And I won't say where, because it was not a great experience. But I had a second internship that was very closely related to my major, I thought I wanted to work in news broadcasting. And so I did an internship at a station. And it was the worst experience, it was absolutely terrible. And it helped me solidify that this is not what I want to do. And so I tell students, you know, you don't want to get to law school, spend 200 grand getting into debt and getting your law degree to justify it out. You really don't want to be a lawyer or practice any type of law. So in my experience, I think it's just as valuable for students to just be exposed to the industry, and be able to cross something off the list as to be exposed to it and realize that this is what they want to do. So whether it's yes or no, I think it's pretty valuable.   Michael Hingson  29:18 The station you worked at was that TV or radio? It was television, television. So yeah, I'll bet it was awfully political. And there are a lot of challenges. And in doing that,   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  29:29 well hey, this is it wasn't something that I was willing to do at the time that there's there you have to work your way up in, in news and in broadcasting, you start off, you know, as an editor reporter or whatnot, and you have the graveyard shift. And there's just other politics that kind of go into it. And it was just some things that I just wasn't willing to do. And I you know, I really love the corporate side of it, being able to market our hospital services. It's a it's a place that I was working at, and I was like, this is really it. This is what I want to do. And to be honest, I would have been Been there for, oh my goodness, I don't even know how many years if it weren't for the fact that Medicaid reimbursement hit, and my entire department was eliminated. And so it kind of forced me into education. But I found out that I really love teaching. And it ended up being just as great of a fit. And   Michael Hingson  30:17 I was just about to ask what got you from all of that into education. On the other hand, your marketing background, certainly would have a positive effect on you, and education and teaching and so on, because you learned how to communicate with people.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  30:34 I did, I did. And I'll say, when you're initially growing a department, it's crucial to have some of those marketing materials, things like your flyers, your website that and I've had some web design skills, so I was able to design our website. So there were a lot of those skills that I learned throughout my time and communications, that really helps me build beyond 120, along with my other co workers.   Michael Hingson  30:59 So in dealing originally in marketing, and then going on into education, and even some dealing in news and so on, off the off the wall sub question, did anything ever come up in terms of making sure that the information that you produced or the things that you were doing, or now, even with 120, or classes at University of Florida, anything ever come up with making sure that that sort of stuff is accessible for people with disabilities?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  31:26 So, yeah, yes, and no. So I was, at least for my first five years, I worked in the office of admissions, like I mentioned, undergraduate admissions, so I was actually the disability coordinator for the Office of Admissions. And I had anywhere between probably three to 500 students every year, who would apply for disability consideration. And so I worked really closely with the Disability Resource Center at UF, I worked really closely with them to make sure that our students received the disability accommodation that they requested. And so that I mean, you know, of course, we talked about my own disability. And so that really gave me a sense of empathy. And I wanted to make sure that the students were getting what they needed. So So then moving into beyond 120, that was already at the forethought of forethought of what I was doing and saying I want to make this accessible for everyone. So COVID, kind of, in a way forced us to be accessible. However, we already kind of weren't accessible in some senses. So it really, if anything, it just made us be even more conscious about that. And so, for example, we have a class I teach a class called strategic self marketing, I developed the class myself based on some of my own experiences, and some of the things that that students are facing right now things like, you know, the Great Recession and Generation Z needs, and you just some of the things that students are facing. And so I said, How are we going to make this accessible to everyone? Because like I mentioned, I had a student who, you know, had an immune deficiency could not leave. And you know, there are students who are non traditional, perhaps they're a single parent trying to take classes, perhaps they're, they're working a full time job trying to take care of, of their own parents, right. So how do we make this accessible, so we had what's called hybrid classes, so students have the option of either coming in person to learn because I know students tend to who have like ADHD have a tendency to do better based on research in person classes. So we had in person section and at the same time, we would live stream that class. So for those who were at home and couldn't leave, or you know, we're experiencing some type of hardship and whatever case that might be, both sections at the same time could learn and we could all interact with one another and learn from one another. So we didn't necessarily have hybrid classes before zoom, we had a synchronous online classes for our UF Online folks. And then we had traditional sections for our residential folks. But through COVID, it kind of gave us the technology needed to have these hybrid classes. And that's something that I still continue to this day, and I have plans to continue until I leave the University of Florida. So So yes, and no, we did meet with some students who needed accommodations, any specific accommodations? And so we met with them individually and said, what are some things that we can do to make this more accessible for you? So as a department, we kind of worked with all populations myself, as the internship coordinator, I worked with all populations and you know, so so it's, it's been an interesting journey, trying to create a more accessible options. Is there more that we could do? Absolutely. And my goal is to eventually have someone that we can hire or to work with more non traditional populations. And that's kind of been in the works. But But yeah, ultimately just trying to make sure that we're listening to you to everyone and trying to be as accessible as possible.   Michael Hingson  35:10 Access gets to be quite a challenge. Whether it's a hybrid class and virtual class or totally online, for example, professors may create a lot of graphs and images, or professors may write on a board or do something that is visual, not verbalizing it. And the result is that anyone who's in the class who happens to be blind or low vision, won't get that information. And that's one of the access areas, I think, especially in colleges, but not just colleges, where there is a lot of challenge, and sometimes the requirement for a lot of advocacy because the information isn't made available. And it isn't something that technology in and of itself is gonna fix. It's an attitudinal choice that one has to make.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  36:00 Right? I agree with that 100%. And I will say it does get easier with technology. So So for example, I will make sure that closed captioning is on all of the videos that I record. So if anybody, you know needs closed captioning services, we have those available now at no charge. And then we have also transcripts that come along with our zoom recordings. So if a student needs a transcript, to be able to use with one of the services that Disability Resource Center offers, to be able to read those transcripts out to the students, we have those as well. So there certainly have been improvements, but it's up to the individual faculty on whether or not to utilize them. So I agree, it's certainly an attitude thing, as well, trying to make sure everybody's on board. I mean, I can't speak to anybody else. But I'm hoping that my classes are accessible as possible.   Michael Hingson  36:52 Well, here's another, here's another example. So you create a video, or let's say you, you create some sort of video where there's music, or there are a lot of images that are put on the video, what kind of audio description do you create, in order to make sure that a person who can see the images in the video part of it is able to access it and and that's the kind of thing that I'm talking about that we're a lot less a well, I'm able to run word, but we're a lot less likely to include those things, even though they may be just as important to be able to do or you create a document or you scan a document and create a PDF of it. The problem is that's a graphic. And so it is totally unavailable to a person who uses a screen reader to verbalize or to to be able to interpret the document, unless the optical character recognition process is doable. And again, it is a result of becomes inaccessible. And those are the kinds of things that we haven't done a lot with yet. And it's not something that you can easily automate. It is a process that somebody has to put time into one of my favorite things that I that I love to complain about, I love to complain about it, but that I complain about is television advertising, how many ads today just have music, or just have sound but no verbalizations So that unless you can see it, you have no clue what's going on. And the reality is, what you what you do by not having words is leave out not only people who are blind or who can't see it, but you're missing the opportunity to market to all those people who get up during commercials and go do something else, like get a snack or a beer or whatever. Because all they hear is music, and they don't hear anything that helps the commercial continue to keep their focus on the product.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  38:52 Right. Great. No, that makes total sense. I mean, I try and think you know, based on the materials that I teach, whether it be closed captioning service for those who are who are hearing impaired, or whatever the case may be, you kind of try and think of those things. But you're right. There's some things that I've never even thought about that I hope I would be empathetic to if a student needed those. Those that assistance, but yeah, it's it is certainly there's a lot of barriers there.   Michael Hingson  39:21 Well, here's the other part of it. It isn't just the student who may come in and need it. You archive classes.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  39:28 The student, yes, the students do you have access to previous classes? Right, but you have to be enrolled in the class in order to the material. Yeah,   Michael Hingson  39:37 but if that's the case, then without having that information accessible in the archive classes, they're just as unavailable as anything because they weren't made accessible from the outset. So it is a it's a process. I know it's not inexpensive. But if we truly are dealing with accessibility, that is kind of one of the things that we need to explore and maybe the day We'll come when there are better ways to automate a lot of that it's not here yet. I don't know whether you checked out excessive be the company that I work for and help. But it is begun the process of, in part, at least creating an automated process to make websites accessible by analyzing the content of the websites with an artificial, intelligent widget. And it can do a lot to make websites more accessible. But it won't be able to do everything. It's it's amazing what it can do. Because you can oftentimes using the widget, analyze an image and get a description of it. Like on my website, if you go to Michael henson.com, there is a picture of me hugging my guide dog Roselle, the dog who was with me in the World Trade Center, when the image was first encountered by excessive B, before we did anything with it. It analyzed the image and embedded a description that said, Man and black suit hugging yellow Labrador retriever, which is incredible in of itself. But the reality is it doesn't do what we really wanted it to do was to say, which is to say, Michael Hinkson, hugging Roselle. So we embedded code and excessive B, we'll leave it alone. But already we're seeing the the machine process, do a lot to analyze images. And over time, it will get better. But we can't automate videos and put in video or audio descriptions yet and things like that. And maybe the time will come to do it. But in the short term, it means that that people have to make the effort to do that. Right and should make the effort to do that. Absolutely. It's a process. And you know, we're not there. And a lot of people don't think about you mentioned that COVID was something that helped bring a lot of this to the forefront. And it did but not always in a positive way. Like the Kaiser Health Foundation did a survey in 2020 of COVID-19 websites for registering to get when it started vaccines, but before then to get tests and get tested. And out of the 94 websites that the Foundation research 10 had made some effort to include accessibility and the reality is most hadn't, which is unfortunate. It is a process and I only bring it all up. It's it's interesting to discuss it. But hopefully it will help people think about more accessibility kinds of things in the future as we go forward.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  42:30 Absolutely, absolutely. I was hoping. I mean, there's little things that I've learned over the years things like you know, when it comes to folks who need certain services, I don't remember exactly which which disability this was. But there was one particular condition where folks, it was hard for them to read color, it was easier if it was 100%, black and white versus on a grayscale. So So, so yeah, I made sure okay, this is in black instead of in a gray or blue or whatever. Because at University of Florida, our colors or colors are orange and blue. And so a lot of the stuff that I was making was in orange and blue. However, somebody was like, you know, it's actually really hard for me to be able to see this I'm visually impaired and having you know, I again, I don't remember what condition it was. But it was easier for her to to read in black and white. And I was like, Sure, absolutely. Let's do this. So hopefully, I mean, it's the more that we learn and more we're exposed to different things, the more accessible hopefully that we can make the material.   Michael Hingson  43:31 And when we're talking about vision impairments, the reality is what you just described is a lot easier to do today than it used to be because so much is stored electronically, you can quickly go in and change the colors and reprint or whatever. And even the student might be able to do that. But the fact is that you can do it. And that really helps a great deal. Yeah,   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  43:51 I'm absolutely I'm hoping that as as time goes on, of course, I'll be exposed to different things and be able to make those accommodations for my students, but hoping that, you know, everyone around the country will be able to recognize some of the things that we can do as a population to be able to make things more accessible.   Michael Hingson  44:09 Yeah, we need to become a lot more inclusive than we tend to be today. And we're working on it. Diversity doesn't tend to include disabilities, but you can't very well leave us out of inclusion. Otherwise you're not inclusive rights. It's it's a it's a challenge. But you know, we're working on it collectively as a society and I am sure that we will eventually get there. But it is an effort and it's always about awareness to get people to think about it. Well, so you have had a lot of experiences and they're doing a lot of fun things. So what are you going to do in your future? What are your future goals?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  44:48 So, my goal is to keep on building beyond 120 and hopefully to scale. We have had in like I said beyond 120 was just launched in 2018, we had two years where we were just completely cut off in certain areas. But at least in excursions, we've had about 250 students participate in excursions, but our college serves 11,000 students. So I want to be able to scale that up. We want to give more scholarships to students in various populations. I know one of my students, I won't say her name, but she is absolutely precious. She's a single mom, her child is about two or three, I believe now, she started off in her freshman year in one of my classes, we were able to get her a scholarship to participate in an internship and that scholarship went to babysitting costs, you know, because a lot of times those non traditional populations have different challenges than our traditional 1822 population. So I would love to provide more scholarships to students of any population. And we would love to, to really help students get to where they need to go. So I mean, we're actually our excursion is entirely donor funded. And so we're just reaching out to various UF alumni and saying, Hey, come give back. And whatever capacity you can, whether that's money, whether it's time, investing in a student simply through giving them a mentorship consultation, so I would love to be able to reach a larger population within our college and make an impact. And I ultimately, I can only impact this the folks that are here at the University of Florida, however, I would love to share what we've done with other universities, and and really encourage other universities to, to support students in those non traditional ways through experiential learning. I presented at a Duke University online pedagogy conference last Wednesday, and was able to share that with a few people. So any impact that we can make on any other schools, I would certainly love to be able to see that happen.   Michael Hingson  46:57 That is exciting. It'd be great if you could do something with all 11,000 students at University of Florida what?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  47:05 Well, 11,000 students times $2,000 per scholarship is a lot of money. We have a long way to go.   Michael Hingson  47:13 Yeah, well, that's okay. It's, it's something that's still doable. I've seen colleges receive a whole lot larger donations, but it is a process. So once you get your PhD, what will you do? Are you to continue to work at University of Florida? Well, you have the opportunity to do that, or what Yes,   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  47:31 I mean, my, well, I'll say this, my husband is in the Air Force. He is a surgical resident right now at UF and which is why I'm able to stay here, and it will be here for the next six years. And then kind of depending on where he goes, I will be following him and the University of Florida is expect expressed interest in keeping me here in more of a remote position if the if the situation calls for it. So potentially just kind of traveling to help facilitate some of these opportunities. But I would really love to scale the program up and be able to share with other universities, the impact of this program. And of course, to continue impacting students would be my ultimate goal in the future,   Michael Hingson  48:16 interesting idea to figure out a way to expand it to other universities, and whether you do it through the University of Florida, or there's a way to start a company to do beyond 120. Worldwide right beyond beyond when 20 Inc.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  48:32 Yes, exactly. I will say, though, that I will do I have marketing and communication skills, I do not have as much business skill. So I would need somebody to help me with that. I   Michael Hingson  48:42 bet you could find someone at UF to help with that.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  48:46 Yes. Well, I'm excited. I'm excited. Well, we'll see what happens. But But no, it's a great start. We're excited to see now that COVID We've gotten a bit of a handle on it, I certainly have a long way to go with that. But certainly happy to see now that things have kind of calmed down a little bit what opportunities are going to be open for us in the future. I'll say I'm presenting at the National Association of Colleges and Employers next month to share our model with other schools. So hopefully that will go well and we'll be able to to impact other universities there.   Michael Hingson  49:21 That's exciting too. You'll be able to do that. And of course, that's the kind of teaching but you're going to continue to teach.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  49:27 Oh, absolutely. That's the bread and butter of our program. We have the coolest classes of course I have to brag on Brent Industry Insights because that's my class that I created but we have other really cool courses we have a course called The Art of adulting you know, kind of teach students what does it mean to be an adult you know, and just have that interesting? open discussion. We have a Global Pathways course we have a professional pathways just expose students to various industries and particularly the skills correlation to say you know, If you're going to be a lawyer, great, but what are the skills that go into being a lawyer? What do you need things like problem solving, critical thinking, communications, teamwork, all of those skills that go into any profession. And we laugh, we provide students in the internship course what's called the SDS assessment. And it will basically ask you a bunch of questions and then tell you based on your skills, some of the top career choices that align with those particular skills, and it cracks the students up a lot of time, I know it cracked me up, because one of my top job matches was a tattoo artist, and I'm going what on earth? I cannot draw for anything in the world. But but we just kind of had to dig deeper and say, you know, what are the skills that I have, that perhaps a tattoo artists would have, or a marketing manager would have or whatever. So, you know, really teaching the students the value of having some of those transferable skills that you can have in any any job.   Michael Hingson  51:03 You mentioned earlier about people who had an influence on your life, I gather, you have some people that that really have made a great impact on you would love to hear about that?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  51:13 Yeah, yeah, absolutely. So well, Isaac, I don't know if if she'll ever hear this, but she was the internship coordinator who, you know, I walked into her office, and I had a rainbow colored resume, it literally had every color in the rainbow on it. And she looked at me and said, Brittany, what on earth is this, you do not need a rainbow colored resume. And so we kind of work together over the course of this semester. And she was the one that that got me the job at Orlando health that got me that internship that launched the rest of my career. And so I want to be the hula Isaac for for all of my students, so she was definitely an influence. My immunologist was a huge influence. He's the one that worked with me in the midst of having an immune deficiency. And I'll say, I didn't mention this earlier, but I've had four very significant surgeries, three of which were open heart surgeries. So you know, he's, he's been there in the midst of all of that, and just my family to you know, as, as my husband, and I talk about starting our own family saying, you know, what type of influence do I want to be on my kids, just as I am on my students, so that that's kind of my goal is to really make a positive impact on others through their various capacities.   Michael Hingson  52:35 Well, and you're certainly working toward it by any standard. And that's, that's as good as it gets, you know, you're making every effort that you can. So in 10 years, you're going to be doing the same thing.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  52:48 Hopefully, I'll have more of a leadership role. And we'll be able to have grown, I mean, hey, let's say we get 1,000,010 million 100 million dollar donation for the program, hopefully, we'll be able to hire lots of me, and not literally, but lots of people in my role, and be able to scale up and influence 1000s of more students. And ultimately, I would love to travel and be able to share with other colleges, some of the things that we've learned and see how we can help impact those students as well. I mean, you see, me even even going along the employer side, you see a lot of employers saying, Oh, we're going to pay our interns $8 an hour, or we're going to pay our interns nine or $10 an hour. And the reality is Amazon and, you know, Starbucks, and a lot of other employees, they're saying, hey, we'll pay you $15 an hour. And so students don't feel as much of a need to do internships anymore, because they can go work at a part time position for a lot more money. And so we're encouraging employers listen, you want to make sure that you are offering our students a competitive rates, because we want to make sure the students are getting access to internships and for especially for our students who have significant financial barriers, this is something that we strongly encourage employers listen, you need to meet that growing rate, because we want students to have access to whatever it is that you're teaching them, because they're so so so valuable. And I know, the federal folks up in DC are just starting to pay interns. So encouraging employers, encouraging students and really making those those connections. So yeah, so eventually kind of be doing the same thing. I hope it's at a broader scale, though.   Michael Hingson  54:33 Well, hope you can hopefully you can work with companies to get them to fund the internships and pay appropriate wages and so on. And, you know, maybe it would be to their interest because some of those people then will join those companies and move forward but as far as having lots of you doing it, you know, we're not cloning people and that's a good thing. So it's you, but it is really exciting what you're doing I mean, if people want to learn more about it or reach out to you, how can they do that?   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  55:05 So I find that the easiest way and I tell this to my students as well, the easiest way is just to Google UFL beyond 120. And, and that'll bring you to our websites. And it's actually held through the Academic Advising Center. So when students go to get their advising services, a lot of times they'll Fordham to us. If they're saying, Hey, I'm not quite sure what classes to take based on my career interest, or hey, I want to participate in internship, I don't know where to go. So we're held within the Academic Advising Center. So if you see academic advising, you're in the right place. So hear us beyond 120. And then I can certainly send my my email to you as well. It's Brittnay Grubbs@ufl.edu. And so happy to chat with anybody who's interested and you know, replicating the program for their own college or, or maybe donating some time to helping the students we certainly appreciate that.   Michael Hingson  56:01 So do the email one more time and spell it if you would? Absolutely. It's   56:05 B r i t t a y G r u b b s@ufl.edu, UFL for University of Florida. edu for education.   Michael Hingson  56:15 There you go. So people who are interested, maybe you'll hear from some other schools and colleges and universities, or companies that might be willing to contribute to the program. We're certainly willing to advocate so anything we can do to help them hopefully this will raise awareness and that some people will reach out to you and I would love to hear what you what you encounter as you're going forward.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  56:38 I would love that. I would love that it went regardless of what anyone has to know today, whether it's money time or anything else that people are interested in. We are certainly appreciative of anything that people have to offer.   56:50 Well, Brittany, thanks very much for being here. With unstoppable mindset this hour has gone by in a hurry hasn't absolutely having me which is why this is always fun. As always, any of you listening, I'd love to hear what you think. Please reach out to us you can reach me Michaelhi  m i c h a e l h i  at accessibe  A C C E S S I B E.com. I'd love to hear your thoughts. You can also go to our podcast page, which is www dot Michael hingson.com m i  c h a e l  h i n g s o n.com/podcast. Wherever you go, wherever you're listening to this podcast, please give us a five star rating. We really appreciate that a lot. I do want to hear your comments. If you know of other people and Britney you as well. If you know of other people who ought to be guests on unstoppable mindset, please let us know we're always open to hearing about more people. And I appreciate those of you who even over the last week have emailed us about that or reached out. Anytime people want to talk to us about guests or just thoughts about the podcast. We want to hear them and we will respond. So again, Brittany, thanks very much for being here.   Brittany Grubbs Hodges  58:06 Thank you, Michael. Really appreciate it.   Michael Hingson  58:08 And we look forward to all of you joining us next time on unstoppable mindset.  You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

First Baptist Church Alamo
FBC Alamo Wednesday Evening Service

First Baptist Church Alamo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 34:29


Regular Wednesday Evening Worship Service for First Baptist Church Alamo. Alamo, TN. Chris Rigby, Pastor

Texas Business Minds
San Antonio: Women in Leadership - Kate Rogers Takes Charge at The Alamo

Texas Business Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 20:43


The battles that took place almost 200 years ago still resonate for native Texans, and The Alamo symbolizes our strength, independence and a sacred place that changed the course of history. In this episode, SABJ Editor-in-Chief Ed Arnold welcomes Kate Brown, Executive Director of the Alamo Trust. Our 2022 Woman of the Year award winner shares why she accepted the challenge of leading the landmark's restoration and transformation.

9.56 ABV PODCAST
EP. 94 Andy's Birthday Pod

9.56 ABV PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 85:12


Join us as we wish Andy a happy birthday, drink new beers and talk about Andy's bday, strawberry blonde, beig inbetween jobs, lame jokes, who made time?, the chinese calander, shoplifting, top beer styles, where did hot cheetos with cheese originate, Jony's first time, restroom condoms, being more active outside of work, Anthony's marbles, R.I.P Don-Wes flea market, pettiness, scuba sam and other dope jales. Song of the week: Life is good By SIR Shoutout to our sponsor KMstudiocreativo! Go check out and follow KMstudiocreativo on Instagram and Facebook. Get all your party custom stationary and paper goods! Great for kids parties! Big shoutout to our sponsor Liberty Bail Bonds. 24 Hour Service. Call them at 956-381-5836. Located at 12403 Bail Bond Drive Edinburg, Tx. "If you don't want to do time, Don't commit the crime but if you commit the crime call them anytime." Shout out to our sponsor Pirriwiris Miche Mix. Go try out all the different flavors of mixes and don't forget the olives! Follow on all social medias and place an order. https://www.facebook.com/pirriwiris.michemix.7 https://instagram.com/pirriwiris_mmix?utm_medium=copy_link Big shoutout to our sponsor The Landmark on Tower. Visit The Landmark on Tower to enjoy a new and unique way of drinking. Located in Alamo, Tx. Tell them the 956 ABV guys sent you there. https://www.facebook.com/LandmarkonTower/ https://instagram.com/thelandmarkontower?utm_medium=copy_link Big shoutout to Nature's Joint for sponsoring the podcast with some of the best Delta-8 flower in the RGV. Hit them up here: https://www.facebook.com/Natures-Joint-Cafe-101859025397031/ https://instagram.com/naturesjoint06?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= If you would like to donate and support us our CashApp is: $956ABV Thank you for listening. Cheers.

First Baptist Church Alamo
FBC Alamo Sunday Morning Worship Service

First Baptist Church Alamo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 59:07


Regular Sunday Morning Worship Services for First Baptist Church Alamo, Chris Rigby Pastor, Alamo, TN.

Podcast – Alamo City Church
Alamo City Church Message

Podcast – Alamo City Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022


1 Thessalonians 5:20-21 Ephesians 5:25 Matthew 16:13-18

The Because Fiction Podcast
Episode 169: Four 5-Star Reads from This Year's Interviews

The Because Fiction Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 33:30


When I started this podcast, it was a way for me to just get to chat about books, especially 5-star books) with anyone who would listen. I pictured occasional interviews with authors or reader chats (still don't have any of those... sigh), but I wanted a place to just gush about all the bookness. Well, interviews have taken over quite a bit, but I keep pushing back a bit because I still want to talk about the books I loved and why I loved them. I've had some great 5-star reads this year--more than any other year, I think. And so I decided to start a "series" of episodes where I revisit some of the books from author interviews and give my double coppers on them.  The first four--total 5-star books, but I doubt they always will be. Maybe so, though. Christian fiction gets better every year. EEEP!  Just the way it should be. Note: links may be affiliate links that provide me with a small commission at no extra expense to you. A Look Back at Four 5-Star Reads from This Year's Interviews I just want to point out that these are not the ONLY reads from this year's interviews. There have been more before and after these, but I realized too late that I chose the first four that I'd read that followed my "Favorites of 2022 so far" episode. The interview JUST before that is another one I need to do. So take these out of order just because they're great books and you need to know more about them! First up: Janyre Tromp  (Episode 129) Shadows in the Mind's Eye Post WWII, a soldier returns home to find the corrupt town that he left is even more corrupt than before. Add to that PTSD the twists and turns, the making me doubt... it's a wonderful debut novel (one of TWO on this list, btw!) One thing I didn't mention in the interview was the brilliant DEEP POV of the characters. It was definitely an un-putdownable book. I cheated on "how I usually read books" and um... yeah. Read a few more a time or two. If you'd like to read my review, you can find it HERE on Goodreads. After that, I did a "How I choose five-star books" bit so you'd understand how I pick a 5-star read." Next: Danielle Grandinetti (Episode 131) As Silent as the Night While Episode 131 focused on A Strike to the Heart, which I haven't read yet, Danielle Grandinetti also discussed her Christmas novella As Silent as the Night. Mob-controlled Chicago in the 1930s is a dangerous place for many reasons, and for Lucia--terrifying ones. This is Christmas fiction "with a bite." Suspense, crime, romance... it's got it all and in a novella that doesn't feel rushed (although I did not want it to end.  Nope. Nope. My Goodreads review. Then came Liz Tolsma (Episode 142) A Promise Engraved I've loved all (I think) the Doors to the Past split-time novels that I've read, and this was definitely my favorite. The Alamo isn't always my favorite story, but Liz Tolsma really did a phenomenal job writing both time periods. Her contemporary story focuses on border patrol and the terrible position the workers are put in as well as how hard it is for all persons involved. But the historical part... it completely overtook things.  One thing I thought was great was that both stories were complete in themselves but all the richer by adding the element that tied them together. You can read my Goodreads review HERE. Sara Brunsvold (Episode 145) The Extraordinary Deaths of Mrs. Kip So far, I think this is my #1 book of the year--the second 5-star DEBUT novel so far. I'm so impressed by the depth and richness of this story. Mrs. Kip was an amazing woman, and her life inspires readers in amazing ways. I'm not a crier. Rarely cry, actually. But I actually teared up a few times in this book, which I think is pretty impressive. In the words of Kathleen Kelly's mother (from You've Got Mail), "Read it with a box of Kleenex." To read my Goodreads review HERE. I suggested that for more information about Mrs. Kip and the other books I've mentioned, you visit  Avid Readers of Christian Fiction on Facebook. My Goodreads review list! Stay tuned for Tuesday's interview with Amanda Wen! Like to listen on the go? You can find Because Fiction Podcast at: Apple  Castbox  Google Play Libsyn  RSS Spotify Stitcher Amazon and more!

Books on Pod
#279 - David James talks standup, Alamo, murdering Bills fans in Buffalo

Books on Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 20:09


Philly-based standup David James chats with Trey Elling, a head of his shows at Cap City Comedy Club from Sept. 2nd - 4th. Topics include: Getting fired from a paper company (0:25) Working as a parole officer (2:35) His standup journey (4:33) Tik Tok standup "comedians" (5:57) Remembering the Alamo while murdering Bills fans in Buffalo (7:36) David's terrible NYE in San Antonio (13:29) What he hates about Philly (17:13)

A Place of Possibility
025: How to Improve Your Investment Returns and Lower Your Tax Bill with Tax-Loss Harvesting

A Place of Possibility

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 22:31


Where stocks and other liquid assets are concerned, nearly all of us are familiar with the time-tested axiom, “Buy Low, Sell High.” But, as much as we try to adhere to that principle whenever possible, there are times when it does make sense to sell at a loss, specifically, when tax time rolls around, as doing so can provide some decided benefits. This is a strategy known as tax-loss harvesting, and despite its potential advantages, several factors must be taken into consideration before deciding whether to put it to use. And, please rest assured that no tractors or other farming equipment is involved. In this new episode of A Place of Possibility™, we'll cover the nuances of tax-loss harvesting, including the factors determining whether or not it makes sense in a given situation. We'll be talking about: What tax-loss harvesting entails Why tax-loss harvesting can be a powerful financial strategy at tax time When tax-loss harvesting makes sense . . . and just as important. . . when it DOESN'T An additional gifting strategy to fund college education that surprisingly quite often makes more sense than traditional college financing And more! Our objective with this episode is to enhance your understanding of this potentially powerful strategy that can substantially reduce your tax liability under the right circumstances. Because knowledge is power, right? We look forward to sharing some of our insights on tax-loss harvesting with you and hope you'll pass this episode on to your family and friends.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 53 – Unstoppable Love of Learning with Kim Cohen

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 66:19


Our guest today, Kim Cohen, refers to herself as a Nerdy Lit Professor. Mom.  Neurodiversity, DEI, & UDL advocate. Like many people, it took time for Kim to discover that she was a person who possessed ADHD. While you get to hear Kim's story of the discovery of this characteristic, what is more, important is how she decided to handle her life.   In every way, Kim is what she calls a perpetual learner not only about things around her but also about herself and her abilities.  Dr. Cohen not only traversed the corridors of education, but now she gives back as a teacher helping others to discover the value of unstoppable learning.   About the Guest: Nerdy Lit Professor. Mom.  Neurodiversity, DEI, & UDL advocate.  Dogs over cats, always. Gryffindor rules!  Chocolate above all else.  Recovering perfectionist and unapologetic introvert. As a child, Kim Cohen lost entire days reading books and dodging her mom's pleas to play outside.  Her voracious love of learning and books meant she had seven different majors in college and didn't stop there.  She earned a Ph.D. in Literature, focusing on the intersections of culture, class, gender, and food.   She believes in the power that stories of all kinds have to heal, connect, and inspire.    Dr. Cohen currently teaches elementary education and special education teacher candidates and graduate students at Western Governors University, but her start in the field of education was as a paraprofessional and a writing tutor.  She works across the college and university to support faculty development, especially around areas of DEI, reduce institutional inefficiency, and champion inclusive curriculum and differentiated instruction.  She has published work academically and creatively.   Dr. Cohen also serves on multiple school district committees in her community, including the Home Learning Committee and Health & Wellness Committee, bringing her deep commitment to ensuring education meets the needs of 21st-century diverse learners.    After a long stint in the midwest, she returned to live in her home state of New York, setting down roots in the Hudson Valley with her husband, her teenage son, her rescued dog, and a small flock of chickens.  She spends her spare time crocheting, cooking, trying not to kill the plants in her garden, and falling down random learning rabbit holes. Her theme for herself this year is “accommodate” (building accommodations for herself in the ways that she does for others).  Her bedside table always has at least one Brené Brown book on it.         About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Well, hi there. Welcome to another episode of unstoppable mindset. Yep, we're back. Once again. We appreciate you being here. Thanks very much. Hope you enjoy what we have to talk about today. We are meeting with Kim Cohen and gee What can I say about Kim? Well, let me tell you what she says the first thing in her bio says she's a nerdy lit professor. I don't think it gets any better than that. She's a mom. She also says dogs over cats. I suspect that you'd get some disagreement on that Kim but especially from the cats. But Kim, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Kim Cohen  01:59 Thank you so much, Michael, I'm really appreciate you inviting me on.   Michael Hingson  02:03 All right, what is this about a nerdy lit professor?   Kim Cohen  02:06 Well, I mean, I think I always loved stories. I mean, I grew up with my nose in a book, every single day, I think of my life. And just found you know, that there was always, you know, a place to discover. And, you know, when I went to college, ultimately, you know, my degree I focused, you know, in English, and then I just kept going by masters and my PhD and every time I have a chance to connect someone with a good book, I always tell   Michael Hingson  02:45 nothing like reading good. Nothing like reading good books.   Kim Cohen  02:49 Right? Yeah, nothing like reading good books. And I'd love to play a book matchmaker like that is my that is one of my joys of my job.   Michael Hingson  02:57 I remember growing up and probably didn't play outside with other kids nearly as much as maybe I would have liked to. But I also just got very much involved in reading both fiction and nonfiction. Although I do like to read a lot of fiction. I think that fiction writers get to demonstrate a lot of imagination that sometimes we don't see a nonfiction in the same way. But reading is so much fun.   Kim Cohen  03:26 Yeah, agreed. I mean, I feel like there are stories that, that just change our lives. And there's just there's such magic in that, in that process, whether that story resonates with us because we feel seen, or because we get to see into something that maybe we didn't understand. I know, as an adult, I read a book. I was in my early 40s. And it was the first time I had really seen a character that was like me that had a similar background in terms of, you know, coming from an interfaith family and where they're the one side of the family was Sephardic Jew, and the other was, you know, not and it was, it was this odd. Like I was bawling. I was crying because I had never, as a kid seen a story like that, and it had the power to heal even, even then, even in my early 40s, which I which I think is is part of the magic of have a great story.   Michael Hingson  04:42 So you say that you had a diagnosis and there was a journey to get there. Can you tell me about that?   Kim Cohen  04:50 Yeah, absolutely. So I think you know, like a lot of women. Sometimes some of the diagnoses don't happen because we don't always follow the textbook, as as well as other ways that sometimes things get defined. I also was a definitely a child of the 80s. So a lot of things were just like, she has a nervous tummy. But once the sort of pandemic hit, I think a lot of the the carefully structured plans, I had my systems that kept me organized all fell apart. And I didn't really understand what was going on. But sort of at the same time, I was learning a lot about my child's diagnoses. And a lot of things felt super familiar. Like, I was like, wow, I've really resonate with this meme from this ADHD group, or I'm really feeling some of these, these strategies or struggles that I'm reading about. And it really was this, like, almost parallel path of me learning about my kiddo, and then starting to have this dawning resolute realization about my own journey. And where, you know, I, I definitely have that neurodiverse neuro divergence brain where things get super sparkly, but you know, there were things where I just thought I just didn't have my act together, and realize later, no, it's, it's not that, like, I don't need to kind of see that as a source of shame. My brain just works a little differently. And I need to, I need to learn how to exist with it, not in a constant struggle, trying to make it work in a way that it doesn't, it doesn't want to work, it's just not how it was. And that's not how it's wired. And I found myself, you know, saying things to my kiddo that I wanted him to embody, like, don't beat yourself up over this, like, this isn't, you know, this is just, we just need this fix, or just need to think about it in this way. And started to really think about how I could you know, also kind of take my own advice, and not beat myself up for losing my keys again, or my glasses again. And that it's definitely been a journey, you know, and and same with, you know, better understanding my anxiety and how that impacts me and what I need to do to kind of just, you know, generally stay healthy and not let it overtake.   Michael Hingson  07:32 So your ADHD?   Kim Cohen  07:35 I, yes, I have ADHD, I have anxiety. I definitely struggled with depression, I noticed. My anxiety is at its worst, when my ADHD is not under control. There's there's definitely an intermingling there. What?   Michael Hingson  07:53 What does it mean, I guess, or what are the manifestations of ADHD that you recognize? And I guess that's what your your son also has? Sort of the same? The same kind of experiences?   Kim Cohen  08:05 Yeah, I mean, I think, you know, I mean, I think there's, it manifests, I think, slightly different. And everyone, as you know, any diagnosis, um, you know, for me, I always describe myself as having a super sparkly brain. So I have a lot of ideas. I'm always somebody who, like, if you ask for, like, hey, what's the way to figure this thing out? I have, like, at best, like, 13 different plans to get there. But but it can also mean that like, when I'm excited about something, I'm hyper focused, and I will work on that project much too, and let a lot of other things fall away. And if I'm not interested in it, I will put it off, you know, so I have a hate hate relationship with laundry, because there's no part of me that likes it. No part of me that finds it interesting. And I would rather be doing anything.   Michael Hingson  09:09 You're probably pretty normal in that regard. But yes,   Kim Cohen  09:11 yes. But like, you know, it's, it's, it's, uh, it definitely has an has an impact, you know, losing things for me is, you know, my glasses, my keys, for getting my keys in weird places, I think is definitely a part of it. But also, I think one of the things that I didn't realize was a, like, a part of the whole way in which attention works and focus works is, you know, when you call and you have to listen to the message, and I'll say like, press one for this, press two for this. And while I'm waiting, my brain starts to do other things and starts to think on other ways of, you know, I don't know maybe it's what's for dinner. or maybe it's like what I'm going to do later, maybe it's what, you know, a call I have later on in the day, and, and then all of a sudden I hear press Star to repeat this message, and I've missed everything. And it's a pretty much, it's a guarantee that that's going to happen every single time. So just learning to, you know, be gentle with myself that those are the kinds of things that I'm regularly gonna kind of have to just repeat and not to beat myself up over it.   Michael Hingson  10:30 So you have learned, or working out learning not to beat yourself up and to recognize kind of what's going on.   Kim Cohen  10:41 Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I think that has been the biggest journey for me, is really giving myself some grace, you know, really thinking about okay, would I give my kiddo grace in this situation? What I give someone else grace, who, you know, is telling me this story, then what, what can I do for myself? And so one of the things that I'm really strong at as an educator, as a parent, is differentiation, which is essentially like, hey, let's take this thing we're trying to teach someone, but make it work for them. Like, what what, how can we switch things up in the way we talk about it, or the way that we do it, or a tool or a process, so that it's equally accessible by all, and I'm great, I'm making accommodations for my students, for friends for my kiddo. And this year, I'm like, Okay, let's, let's try to extend that accommodation to yourself. So that I'm not constantly setting myself up for feeling like, um, you know, I'm not doing what I should be doing. And instead, just building those accommodations into my life, so that I don't, I just, I'm not beating myself up, or I'm not like doubting myself or, you know, creating some friction, that's just completely unnecessary. When I could just put in a tool or a process or another notification for myself, or whatever it is, so that I can stay on track.   Michael Hingson  12:21 I have maintained for many years, that we are always our own worst critics. And we tend not to, we tend not to allow ourselves, as you would call it, the grace of making mistakes. And learning from the mistakes, we beat ourselves up. But then we don't tend to take the next step. And look at, well, what, what was really the problem? What did I do wrong? What could I do better? Or even if I did it exactly right? And not dwell forever? On my gosh, how could it have been better, but at least look at? How might I have improved it? Okay, I see what else I could even do to make it better and then move on. And the moving on part is what's really always a problem.   Kim Cohen  13:11 Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I think one of the, I suppose, unintentional gifts of something like ADHD is like you fail a lot. You're dropping the ball. And so you have so many learning opportunities to figure out what's working. And I know that something I bring with me in my teaching, it's something I bring with me in my parenting. And I'm really trying to give that to myself to like, okay, hey, you have this plan, and it didn't work. What can we do next time? What? What's a different way to set this up? What's the time when it did go? Well, why did it work then? And not? You know, today, but that that powerful piece of self reflection is so critical?   Michael Hingson  14:03 Yeah. And that's probably the hardest thing to do. Because your brain is going in so many different directions. But for everyone, it's the most important thing we can do.   Kim Cohen  14:12 Right? Yes, absolutely. I mean, I think that there's a there's a power in that, in that self reflection, especially if we can move past the self reflection that's berating like, there you go, again, doing XYZ forgetting your best friend's birthday. And instead, really thinking about well, yep, that happened. And I let this person down. What can I do next time? Can I put it in my calendar right now for next year? What can I do to you know, maybe not make that or maybe it's not that big of a deal? You know, maybe my best friend knows I'm always going to forget her birthday. And she does. Yeah,   Michael Hingson  14:55 which still would be great if you if you didn't, and I hear exact Do what you're saying. I know that it is sometimes easy for me to forget, it's out of sight out of mind, right. And my favorite example of out of sight out of mind, which is a little different, but we buy lots of boxes of Thin Mints every year from the Girl Scouts, which is, of course, as good as it gets. But we put them in the freezer. And I have had boxes of Thin Mints in the freezer for over a year, people would say that sacrilegious, but hey, no, there's more for next time. But But the issue is they're, they're out of sight. Mm hmm. And so for me out of sight of courses, and just out of visual sites, and since I'm not going to see them anyway, but they're not where I can touch them necessarily. And unless I go hunt for them in the freezer, remember them, they're, they're really not there. But other things, as you said, like events and so on. For me, the Amazon Echo device has become a wonderful thing, because I've made it a habit, and I've had to work at it. But I've made it a habit, that when I schedule something, or if something occurs, and I want to be reminded of it in six months, I'll create a reminder right now, just to make sure that I don't have to well, and that's the the operative part, I then I don't have to worry about it. Because I know I'll get reminded,   Kim Cohen  16:20 right, and I think there's there's I mean, I I've use the echo device a lot for those reminders in our family. Because it's, it's, it's so helpful. And then also as a parent, like then it's not me making the reminder, it's this external voice. And so that I can remove a little bit of power struggle sometimes. But anytime I can build that accommodation in is a is a real win, because the weight of being afraid that I'm going to forget something. And being afraid that yet again, I'm going to forget something can can be sometimes more debilitating than the actual forgetting of it. And so really trying to when I can, you know, build those accommodations in and not and not judge myself, you know, for needing you know, multiple reminders or, you know, it needs to have something on the calendar plus I need to write it down. Plus, you know, the Echo has to remind me, and so all of those things might need to be, you know, in place for me to just keep keep on track.   Michael Hingson  17:34 Yep. And it works. How old is your son?   Kim Cohen  17:37 He is 14 and a half. Yes. So he's a ninth grader right now in high school, which is, you know, it's a whole journey. Parenting a teen there are no, there are no manuals, unfortunately. For that stage.   Michael Hingson  17:54 Yeah, no one has written the book.   Kim Cohen  17:57 No, not at all.   Michael Hingson  17:59 But it's a great age. I remember High School and, and had a lot of fun. I had some great teachers, I even keep in touch with one of them regularly and even even today, and definitely enjoy it. So it's really a lot of fun.   Kim Cohen  18:17 Yeah, I mean, I think that it's being a teenager now is really complex in ways that I certainly don't remember. It was complex. I know as a, as a kid, I was really shy, painfully shy, painfully introverted. And I didn't kind of come into my own, you know, for some time, I took a long time to blow. And so I you know, I think sometimes that's, that's challenging. And for my kiddo, he's autistic is ADHD couple of learning disabilities. And so there's definitely challenges, you know, it's hard enough to pick up on social cues. And then sometimes when you you know, have these other factors, it can be even more challenging in those in those spaces, and then you know, thinking about you know, all the things that you're learning all the different subjects and keep this test in mind or that test in mind on top of it all, it's just it can be a lot.   Michael Hingson  19:21 Well, yes, but on the other hand, nothing a dog won't help right.   Kim Cohen  19:26 Rest. Yes, absolutely. Absolutely. Pet Therapy and we have a couple of chickens as well and they are there. They are there to assist as well.   Michael Hingson  19:38 Do they interact much?   Kim Cohen  19:40 My son is the primary caregiver of the chickens so we keep the dog separate for the chickens. Um, but for for my kiddo, the chickens have been great. You know, we got our chickens when he was about five or six And, you know, thinking it would be, you know, not only something he's really great with animals, but but it was also really nice to support him in developing some of those executive functioning skills in a real real world way like the so remember to take them out, he has to make time for that in the morning, he has to remember to collect the eggs. And then it's also a little business for him on the sides, we collect the eggs, he sells the eggs to Yeah, to our neighbors and things like that. And so that's definitely been, you know, a really nice confidence booster, I think for him and in a way for him to kind of build some of those build some of those skills.   Michael Hingson  20:44 Nothing like learning responsibility the hard way. Just doing it.   Kim Cohen  20:49 Right. Yes, yes.   Michael Hingson  20:52 What kind of dog   Kim Cohen  20:54 is she is a rescue dog. So we got her, our previous dog had passed away in the kind of early on in the pandemic. And so we had got a rescue dog. She's a mix, probably some sort of mixed Shepherd on the smaller side. But she came with a lot of trauma, as many rescue dogs too. But you know, she is she's really coming into her own now, which is really great to see. And she's so much more confident and has so much less anxiety but I think she she landed in the perfect family because we're we all have our all of our things here. And so we're super accommodating of you know, whatever it is that she that she needs and her little you know, her quirks and things like that.   Michael Hingson  21:45 Now, my dog, my guide, dog Alamo would love to meet your chickens. I am sure he would, he would go up and make friends. The chickens may not like it, but he would love to go make friends.   Kim Cohen  21:56 Yeah, our previous dog Sadie, her and the chickens got along just great. You know, she was a pretty low key dog, especially as she got older. Our current dog Luna still has a very fierce prey drive. And so she's you know, we're we're working on at least you know, her thinking that they're, you know, friends not food. In   Michael Hingson  22:24 alimos case, you just don't want to get the eggs near his tail, they'd go flying. Yes. For sure. Yeah, he's, he has never met a stranger no matter what it is. And, and that's, that's the kind of dog I would always like to have. I think that that the dog does take on somewhat the and should take on somewhat the personality of the person who is its primary caregiver. And it's always good to set rules. And so that works out pretty well. Well, in your case, you went on to college, though, and I guess that all went well. So you're still here?   Kim Cohen  23:04 I am. Yes, yes. I mean, I, in many ways. I feel like I'm like the perpetual student. I love learning new things. I'm, I think that's like part of that ADHD brain. I always am, you know, never far away from like, obsessing on some new learning that I can do, whether it's like, I need to learn everything about this new crochet technique, or, like everything I need to know about planting fruit trees, or everything I need to know about, you know, some home maintenance thing. So I mean, I am kind of like that perpetual student, I always tell my students, so I have I teach at a university and all my students are teacher candidates that you're, you know, my rule for myself is I know, I'm done with teaching when I don't love learning anymore. Because I can't, I can't teach others to love learning if I stop my love of learning.   Michael Hingson  24:11 So you, you definitely have gone through a process. And so you, you did you go straight into advanced degrees and get a master's in a PhD?   Kim Cohen  24:24 I did. Yeah. So I, my undergraduate I had a lot of majors before I settled in seven majors. Before I settled in creative writing, and my creative writing and Fine Arts degree was made with a promise to my parents. I'd go for a graduate degree. And so I I knew kind of right away that I would go into a program I didn't actually get accepted initially when I applied for PhD programs. And so I had to kind of quickly read like retarded path and went into a master's program. Got that and then was able to go on to a PhD program.   Michael Hingson  25:12 And how did you get involved in starting to teach?   Kim Cohen  25:17 Well, I mean, I think, you know, after I had my master's that was, you know, I always knew that I wanted to teach. I started off, you know, always either being a tutor or one of my first kind of jobs that paid well, in college was as a paraprofessional, so I knew I wanted to be, you know, a teacher. And one of the things that I really enjoyed in college was just some of those deeper conversations that that we can have. And part of my degree programs were, you know, like, they're like, Okay, well, you're here, you're, you know, we're paying for part of your tuition or part of your package. So you teach as well. And so I just, I kind of haven't looked back, I did take a little bit of a break, after graduating, because I just couldn't frankly, find full time work. There was so many hiring freezes. And I served as an instructional designer, which was great, because that's a huge passion of mine. So really designing learning paths for students, and working with, you know, different departments and programs for those things. But then, you know, when WSU really started hiring, I just kind of fell in love with their mission and who their students were, and haven't looked back since.   Michael Hingson  26:50 Well, tell me a little bit about W GU, what it is, and anything you can about the program? Well, W GU is Western Governors University.   Kim Cohen  27:00 Yeah, Western Governors University. So I, when I started looking for, you know, full time work full time teaching work. And I saw that they were remote, which really appealed to me at that time, like, my commute was an hour, both ways over a mountain and a bridge. And I really was not happy with that commute. So I'm not commuting. It was a huge appeal to me. And then as I started to really learn more about it, who their students were, most of them are, you know, adult learners. returning to school, they might have had some college credit, most of them are working, they have families. And I just, I was hooked instantly. I remember as a kid, that was in like fifth grade, where my mom went back to school when she went back to college. And I remember that kind of family meeting we had. And, you know, she had told my brother and I that her goal was to graduate college before I graduated college. And I couldn't, you know, as a little fifth grader couldn't conceive of someone having a goal, like that far into the future. And she did end up graduating one semester before I graduated high school. But I thought, gosh, you know, if mom would have had a school like this, where she could have gone at her own pace, you know, in her own home where she wasn't bound by, oh, I can only do this, you know, two nights out of the week, because I've got my kids and I've got, you know, work and I've got this and I've got that, how life changing that would have been. And that really was such a draw. For me, I had, I had always done a lot of work with adult learners, but really being able to dedicate my entire career focus to them, meant meant a lot. And so, right now, at Western Governors, I'm in the teacher's college. So all my students are, you know, going on to get either, you know, they're trying to be their elementary teachers or special ed teachers. And, and I just, I love it, I have such a big teacher heart, and I just could always talk to students about, you know, learning and how do you how do you foster that love of learning? How do you help kids to write and read and that's, that's been one of my, you know, really, really proud things that I've had is really being able to kind of, I don't know, just like help help form the next generation of teachers.   Michael Hingson  29:49 So the, the question that the question kind of that comes to mind is, there are a lot of students at WVU.   Kim Cohen  30:00 And it's all online. Right? Yes. 100% Online, and it   Michael Hingson  30:04 goes from? Well, it's a four year college and does graduate work also? Yes. So it means that the students have to be disciplined enough to undertake the studies. And yes, they do it at their own pace. But it still is a discipline that, that they have to learn to make sure that they do the classes and do the homework and all the other things, as opposed to being in a in an environment where you're a little bit more forced to do it. Because you're in a physical location, don't you think?   Kim Cohen  30:42 Right. Yes, no, absolutely. And I think, you know, I think one of the challenges in any remote program is, you know, how do you build community, so folks stay engaged and connected and motivated? How do you build in supports, so that if a student is struggling, they have pathways to you know, get assistance, and, you know, all of those things, and especially, you know, in the midst of a pandemic, those factors are even, you know, more exacerbated when we think about, you know, a lot of my students, for example, are their paraprofessionals, their aides, classroom assistants, they're their bus drivers, they're in the school system. And right now, you know, even still, you know, there's a lot of shortages, teacher shortages, sub shortages, Bus Driver shortages. And so you know, they're stretched to the max. And so really helping them to find those support structures, and to get the assistance that they need. Is is a challenge. I think one of the things that I really love about Whu Oh, is that it does have a very student centered approach. And we're constantly asking ourselves, what can we do better? What does it look like to leverage this technology, this system to better support our students, and whether that's, you know, we, we have this new initiative for study halls, so students can come into a, it's effectively like kinda like a quiet Zoom Room, like a study hall where they can just get work done, they can share out each other's goals, celebrate each other. But it's, it's this space that allows adult learners to throw it on their calendar and say, Yes, Mom is studying right now, from seven to nine, and close the door. And it it feels now like secrets, anytime that they can commit to where before, it's like the dishes might be calling, or this kiddo needs a snack? Or what about this, or all these other competing demands that they might have in their life. And I think that's the part that I've always really loved about Wu is that it's, it's just constantly looking for ways to meet our students where they're at, and build the structures so that they can so they can shine.   Michael Hingson  33:15 So do you think that the whole experience of doing such a tremendous amount of online education and online work, perhaps helped you and helps your students, in some ways deal with what's been going on during the pandemic, when now suddenly, everyone was thrust so much into doing things online?   Kim Cohen  33:39 Yeah, I mean, interestingly, like, I had a lot of conversations with students about that, you know, were there they would say, like, you know, we wouldn't just talk about what the course was about, you know, that I was helping them with through whatever content or concepts, but directly to about, you know, managing Google Classroom, or how do you share this out? Or how would you handle, you know, this issue? Or how can I make this more accessible to more of my students? And I think one of the things that I really tried to do is draw a straight line, an explicit line for students, do you see this thing I'm doing right now, this is how I'm modeling to you this process. So when you're in the classroom, you can do something similar? And so you know, I mean, I think good teaching, especially of teacher candidates, we're not just teaching content, we're always modeling what is it to, to do good teaching, what are the best practices in the field and trying to mark those moments for them? Is is critical.   Michael Hingson  34:50 Yeah, it's, it's really interesting to listen, for me, at least to all the people who complain about zoom fatigue. and having to spend so much time on Zoom, they can't be in the office. When, in reality, yes, I understand that. And I understand the value of personal contact, close physical contact, if you will, but still doing what we can do with all the technological advances that we have today offers us so many opportunities to go in different directions that can enhance our lives. And we sort of missed some of that, I think,   Kim Cohen  35:34 yes, you know, I mean, I think that's the thing that I, you know, come come back to a lot is that, it, it gives so many of our students the opportunity to come back to school, when their lives, or frankly, their location, they might be to rural, there might not be a school nearby them. And, and so it really gives them the opportunity to come back to school, and allow that, and I know even from, you know, our own family experience, my son loves remote loved it, preferred it, he felt like he could actually learned because he wasn't getting as distracted by whether it's, you know, some of the social things, peer conflicts, or like the 1000, little noises and distractions that happen in a classroom. And I think it really gave him a little bit of a break, to learn how he learns, and reset and think about, oh, this is the strategy that I wasn't picking up on before. And now, you know, he's been able to, you know, he's like, made high honor roll almost, you know, for the entire time during, you know, on Zoom. And so I think it it gave him gave him a window into what he could do, and gave him some time to learn in a very focused way without some of those other, you know, distractions, whatever, you know, those like typical kids stuff, peer conflicts, bus drama, things like that.   Michael Hingson  37:12 Is he is he back to learning in the classroom? Is he back to physical school?   Kim Cohen  37:16 Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Our district is back, you know, in person. And so, you know, I mean, of course, then that means, you know, all those, all those typical kid dramas are, are definitely there, but he's been able to carry with him, you know, that learning, that learning about learning that he did, and, and he's been very successful. But I I'm so I'm ungrateful, you know, I know, not every kid did well, during the pandemic. And I know, in my district, we we were very attentive to, you know, making sure that, you know, some of the kids who maybe had some technical technology barriers, who maybe needed hotspots, and things like that we already have a pretty much a one to one for technology for our kids already. But, you know, really making sure that everyone's needs were met. I know, not every kid did well, in the pandemic, it happened to be, you know, my kid did, but I'm also very privileged and that I work from home. So if he was struggling, I was right there. I mean, I was working, you know, but I was still home. And it's not like he was, you know, 100% on his own.   Michael Hingson  38:31 Again, we're kind of learning to write the book on how to work more in an online virtual world. And I think it's a little bit unfortunate that probably too many people are just emphasizing the downsides of it, and not looking at some of the advantages that it can bring to help him in not only learning but just doing work in general,   Kim Cohen  38:56 right? Yes, absolutely. I mean, I think even even for myself working in a, in a remote way, like I, I don't, I'm not a confident driver, you know, I, I just I have a lot of traveling xiety. And so, you know, being able to just work from home is then one less kind of weight on me, because I can just, I can just go to work and I can focus on working, I don't have to worry about all of the things that go into traveling to a workplace. And so, you know, I think there's there's a lot to be said for it. But I think there's also a lot to be said for knowing what you need. If you're the kind of person who really gets a lot of energy from working in close proximity to others, like it's not going to be your jam, you probably shouldn't look for that in a job. Or make sure that you've got other plans outside of that to get that you know that input and fill your bucket in that way. For me, it's like the opposite. So I need to make sure I've got, you know, more quiet time to fill my bucket. And certainly, you know, being remote allows allows for some some of that,   Michael Hingson  40:17 well, there's some value in simply taking more quiet time. And I think that most all of us never take enough quiet time, even if it's maybe going to bed 10 minutes earlier and lying and meditating and just thinking about the day and then again, getting back to introspection about what worked, what didn't work, and so on. It isn't that hard to do. But it's a habit that seems to be very difficult to make really happen in most of our lives. But, you know, here's a question. If you could give every student a posted note to put on their desk, what would it say?   Kim Cohen  41:00 Yeah, so I am a big fan of the post it notes. First small little   Michael Hingson  41:05 work for me, but that's okay.   Kim Cohen  41:07 Well, yeah, I'm, I'm, I'm a big fan of as a as a as a as a way to remind myself of small things that I that I never want to lose sight of.   Michael Hingson  41:17 I wish I had been the inventor of the posted note. But yes, that's a different story.   Kim Cohen  41:22 Right? I mean, I think I would, I would have, you know, one thing that I would definitely put on there is, you know, never underestimate the magic of stories. I think sometimes we can get into the habit of maybe relying on books that we enjoyed as kids, but really seeing the power of story and, and looking for stories that can reflect the diversity in our classrooms, and giving students a window into other ways of being. So definitely never understand. Never underestimate the magic of stories will be one. Another thing that I always tell them, which would fit nicely on a post it is differentiation is the work of teaching. So sometimes folks can get into thinking that it's like extra, like, well, I have to do this extra thing for this learner who has this, you know, disability or this need? And, you know, I think we need to remember always that. It's always it's, they'll work there isn't anything other than that. And, and I would say, you know, the last piece that I always come back to is, you know, kind of like the secret sauce to being a good teachers, you just keep learning, keep reflecting. Always like never stop that. I always tell my students when they, you know, they'll sometimes apologize to me and say, Oh, I'm you know, I know, I'm overthinking. I'm overcomplicating it, and I just remind them like, well, you know, you got sorted into the right house here in Teachers College. We all kind of overthink and overcomplicate, but it actually serves you well in the field. And so you need to always be examining what went well, what didn't? Why did I fall on my face? Why did this not go as planned? How can I improve it for next time? And so you know, just remembering like, that is the secret sauce to   Michael Hingson  43:23 getting into the but at the end of those questions. Why was this successful? Why did it work this time?   Kim Cohen  43:29 Yeah, exactly. Yep, exactly what went well, why were more people engaged? How did this student who normally checks out check in what was it about this lesson or this, this assignment or this reading that we did all of those things, and helping them the students to make those connections and remind them like, oh, will remember last time? You? You did whatever it is. And you found that the problems were much more straightforward. So let's try that. So that we're modeling for the students how to build those. Those that recognition of how they learn of how they can, you know, regulate how they can own their own learning process.   Michael Hingson  44:23 Yeah, it isn't always where did we go wrong? Just like in the producers, where did we go, right?   Kim Cohen  44:28 Mm hmm. Yes, yes. But yes, but we are going to fall on our face, like Oh, sure, sure.   Michael Hingson  44:35 But it's also but it is also good to recognize the positives, and also use that recognition to say, can I even do better? Or did I do it right, and and that's as good as it gets. And that's okay, too.   Kim Cohen  44:51 Yeah. And I think the other thing too, is like not it's it's, it's recognizing the positives and recognizing also that like, sometimes your positives are going to be different. Like your milestones are going to be different than somebody else's milestones. And, you know, I think one of the greatest gifts that I have as as you know, being my kiddos parent is just like, his milestones were way different. Like, I remember texting friends, like, oh my gosh, like, he lied to me, this is such a huge thing for him. He's never lied to me before. Because for a kid who is honest to a fault, you know, and, and, realistically, socially, we all need the ability to do some little white lies, so we don't hurt people's feelings. It was a, it was a milestone, and I think we can, I think we can celebrate that sometimes our milestones might look different, and that's okay. And it's, it's, there's no, that, you know, what, what is a celebration for me as a teacher might be very different than for someone else with same as a parent or, you know, as an employee or something like that.   Michael Hingson  46:04 But on the other hand, if you had a big lie, what did you do about that?   Kim Cohen  46:10 We have a rule in my house that if my kiddo says to me, I have something to tell you. And don't get mad, that, that that is, that is the rule, I don't get mad. And so it gives me a little bit of time to center myself, and then we work on kind of figuring out, like, what happened, why what field that that piece? Like? Was, was he trying to solve it on his own? What can we learn from that process? But, you know, that being said, you know, I mean, sometimes there's consequences. Some, some lies, you know, me it's not, it's, it's not, um, you know, especially now at 14, we're not dealing with like, little things anymore. No problem. So.   Michael Hingson  47:01 But I like what you said. And I assume as some one of the things that you would say about, or to incoming teachers, or to anyone, never stop learning. I think that's extremely important. I learned early on. No, I've heard it several times. But I learned early on in a sales course that I took that as a person in sales, you you should always be learning. And the day you decide, you know, it all, that's the day you go to failure,   Kim Cohen  47:32 right? Yes, yes. Because they think it there's, there's always more to learn. And I think the the moment, we're stuck in that where we feel like we're done, then, you know, we're making assumptions. We're not, we're not fully treating maybe the other people in that we're interacting with as full people anymore. We think we've got it all figured out. And especially as teachers like you, you never, you never have everybody figured out.   Michael Hingson  48:07 And that's okay.   Kim Cohen  48:09 Yes. Yeah. And we shouldn't I like, I think that would probably be too much. Too much responsibility. For any one person to have all those parts and pieces and hold all of it, I think it would be probably pretty parallel, you know, pretty pretty, like I would be stuck. I wouldn't know what to do with all that information.   Michael Hingson  48:29 Yeah. That's brain overload. Yes, for sure. Well, well, as a teacher and as a as an online teacher that I would think gets to know their students well, and allows their students to get to know them very well. What's one thing that your students are surprised to learn about you?   Kim Cohen  48:48 I mean, definitely, it always takes them off guard when I tell them that I had seven majors in college. Because, you know, they see me, you know, as a, you know, as a, someone who has a PhD like, boy, I must have had my life always together. And that's, that's helpful for them to know. Because, because I think it just normalizes, you know, for a lot of my students, like, this isn't their first time in college, they might have, you know, tried going to college a few times, and, you know, now they're, they're really trying to make another go of it. So I think that's always something that is, is interesting to them. I think the other thing that that always surprises them as to learn how long it took me to get my PhD, I had, you know, had some health things going on. I had a baby, my baby had a lot of very intense needs. And I was working I was you know, I had multiple like adjunct gigs, working part time. And so, that degree took took some time and I think again, you know, that it really normalizes that, that part of it. And I think You know, the other thing, too, that I share with them is like, Hey, you're always going to have people who doubt you. And, you know, I did have faculty in college who felt like, you don't have what it takes to go and get your graduate degree, like, straight up, you're not smart enough. And I am one of those people that's just super stubborn. And so I was like, well, I'll show you. And so that you have a challenge, right? Well, I'll prove you wrong. And so I think, you know, giving them some stories, you know, that, that help them to, you know, normalize their path. And, and one thing I always try to tell them is, like, you know, you have to own your path, like you own your story. And don't see it as a source of, you know, shame or something, you need to make an excuse for. So what So you had a non traditional path, okay, but it brings a strength, you know, to that classroom, so you were in it first great, like, now you're going to be a, you know, a social studies teacher, fantastic, like lean into that is a strength, it's not a weakness. But I think we can we can get trapped in into those narratives that we tell that that, you know, they're, I don't know, we call them in our house, doubt bunnies, like, they just they can sometimes get really loud, and cause us to doubt ourselves, and they're not always telling us the truth.   Michael Hingson  51:34 My freshman geography teacher in high school, I remember once told us that we'll probably take aptitude tests in our lives, and people will always try to tell us what they think we should do and what we can and can't do, which is kind of what what you're saying, some people said about you. And he said that he took an aptitude test once that said, he should be a plumber. And he said, for a while, I believed it. And then I realized I could teach and I became a geography teacher. And he was a good teacher, by the way.   Kim Cohen  52:09 Yeah, and I mean, I think, you know, I think we, we have a lot open to us. And I think, you know, really, figuring out what, what we want to do what, what drives us, what makes us excited? I always, I'm always surprised and some of like, the, like, well, what jobs do you think are good for someone, you know, with, with, you know, ADHD, or in some other groups, you know, you know, if you're autistic, what jobs are good, and it's like, ultimately always comes down to, well, what interests you what motivates you, if you're interested in teaching, you will make it work, if you're interested in law, you will make that work. Because, you know, your, your focus will be on it, your attention will be on it. And, and there's, you know, rarely a path, I think that can't be done. You know, it's about finding ways that make it work for you.   Michael Hingson  53:11 That's exactly it, you may need to find an even create new tools, or find innovative ways to use old tools. Exactly. But blindness, for example, does not define me as much as people want it to and ADHD isn't what defines you. Although, too many people try to put everyone in little boxes. Well, that just doesn't work.   Kim Cohen  53:38 Right, right. Yes. And I mean, I think that's, that's something, you know, I try to impart to on my students that there's, they really need to think about all the students that are going to be in their classroom, so that they don't do that. Right. Like, you don't want to pass that on like, well, you can't do this, because instead, like, well, what's the path that they can do it? Because that's, that's our job, right? So everyone should be able to do? Everyone should be able to learn. So how are you going to get them there? You know, that's, that's the heart of teaching. That's the That's the call to service. How are you going to? How are you going to make that that happen for all of your students?   Michael Hingson  54:23 Well, speaking of learning, you said you had seven majors, did you graduate with all of them?   Kim Cohen  54:29 No, I graduated with a creative writing degree. My minor was in fine arts and I was a couple of credits shy also like an anthropology minor. And I may be one other one. But yeah, formally, it was creative writing with a minor in fine arts. works. It does. I mean, I'm a very creative person. Like if creativity exists. I'm like, kind of a I now I don't you know, I'm not an artist. I I don't regularly do art I crochet all the time, like, so it comes out in other ways. You know, often it's really beautiful slide decks for my online course, or things like that, but it works for me, you know, I mean, I really do enjoy it enjoy fiddling with it, it gives me my little creative design space. Without, you know, having, you know, without feeling like, I don't have a space for it, because I'm always unhappy, I'm always a little itchy. If I if I can't be creative in the things that I'm doing.   Michael Hingson  55:42 So you we talked a little bit about you having something that surprised your students? Has any student ever been sort of outstanding in your mind that has affected you or changed you?   Kim Cohen  55:56 Yeah, I mean, I feel like that's the gift of teaching. Like, we always have students who give back to us, you know, it's always it's, it's always our students always impact us. But I did have a student who really changed how I presented myself with students. And, you know, I think it was it was that W GU, and so, you know, it's online, we don't really can't see our students. So it does just make things a little bit different. But I had a student in, in, in conversations with her, we were talking about a children's book that she wanted to bring into her class and, and over the course of that conversation, something in me said, like, it's okay, share a little bit more. And I, in the conversation, we both realized that she had lived in the same city that my father grew up in, in Morocco. And I was like, man, wow, this is a one of those small world kind of situations. And as we were, you know, talking further about it, you know, she, this was like, kind of during, you know, anti Muslim ban. And so, you know, things were very difficult for Muslims across the United States. And, you know, my student, you know, was was definitely going through it at that time. But she paused for a moment, and, and she's like, you're like me? And I was like, okay, you know, and I felt very, like, Okay, I'm glad that she, you know, she, she sees herself here. But she's like, No, you're like me, and you're teaching at the greatest teacher's college in the United States. She's like, Now, I know, anything is possible. And I thought, wow, you know, I didn't have to share that story. Like, I didn't have to tell her about anything about my family. I didn't, I didn't have to. But in that moment, I realized, you know, here I am, I'm always telling students like the power of story, the magic and story. And I was talking about storybooks. And I hadn't considered the power of our own story, and what it means to represent, especially as a faculty member, and how that might impact, you know, my students and, and really, after that, I, I really tried to share a little bit more of my story, whether that's, you know, sometimes in some of my online classes, I'll talk about how, you know, some of the challenges that my son has had in learning about, say, inferencing, which can be difficult for some Autistics, and so, but I'll share that out as a as a parent, and the amount of, you know, emails or calls I get from students, who then tell me, Oh, my kiddos, autistic or my kiddo has, you know, a similar diagnoses and they feel seen, and I think that's the power you know, of it. And, and I'm grateful for that student for that lesson, because I don't know that I think I felt like it maybe it was too personal. Or, or, and I just would keep it a little bit too close. You know, but but but she, she helped me feel like that power, and how I can share that with my students. And then they feel seen and then they feel empowered, and it creates a much more inclusive space.   Michael Hingson  59:45 So have you ever considered publishing your own book telling your story?   Kim Cohen  59:51 I haven't. I have written a couple of children's books. None of them, you know, got to a place where they were picked up by an agent's or anything like that. But I think it's a great experience. And I do love telling, you know, stories. But it's it's a whole different. I don't know, it's a whole different drama.   Michael Hingson  1:00:15 It is it is. But now today in in our world, the other thing that we have is the ability to self publish. And, and that opens a lot of opportunities for people to more easily tell their stories.   Kim Cohen  1:00:31 Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely.   Michael Hingson  1:00:35 So it's it's something to think about. What are the platforms? I'm just curious, being technological? What are the platforms that W GU uses to teach? Like zoom or? Yeah, so   Kim Cohen  1:00:50 we primarily with our students, we use WebEx, which is very similar to zoom. And then, so that's typically if we're having like an online class of some kind, that's going to be over. Over WebEx, the majority of my interactions tend to be one on one interactions with students. So that's just over, you know, over a call, or phone call. And then, internally, for us, the majority of our like, our meetings are one on ones with colleagues and things like that are over Microsoft Teams, which I really like because it's, it's really reduced the amount of email, we can just kind of quick connect with each other. Yet another email, which anything that reduces email is a good thing in my mind,   Michael Hingson  1:01:44 right? Yeah, some of those tools are not as from a blind person's perspective, access as accessible as others, WebEx has had some, some challenges and Microsoft teams took a while. It's ironic, Microsoft talks about accessibility a lot. But it took them a while to really make teams pretty accessible. And none of them are, from my perspective, at least as accessible and as usable assume, from a standpoint of just being able to really interact with the technology and others. But have you ever taught any blind students,   Kim Cohen  1:02:20 I'm trying to think I'm sure that I have, because I know I've had to push, you know, make sure certain things you know, had appropriate captions and transcripts and things like that, that could then be modified by the students. In a WG we don't get a lot of information always about our students, because the accommodations, so much are built into the system. In terms of my time in the classroom, I think I probably had one or two low vision students. But it wasn't, that wasn't the typical, you know, student that came through my classroom. But I have impairments. And so it's always been super interesting to me to kind of learn, you know, about all of the different ways to interact with the technology. And even my son has some visual processing things and watching those two kids together, you know, show each other like the different features have their, you know, their Chromebooks or their iPads to make it work for them. has, you know, has been a great gift because I'm like, Oh, I hadn't even considered that feature. I didn't even know that feature existed. And so I do get really jazzed kind of learning about all of those different things, because I never know when, you know, when I might need to use it, or recommended or, you know, something like that.   Michael Hingson  1:04:02 Yeah. You know, it's always an adventure. And we, we always be it goes back to we always learn more as we go along.   Kim Cohen  1:04:15 Yes, absolutely. Absolutely. Well, this   Michael Hingson  1:04:18 has been absolutely fun. I hope you have found it enjoyable and helpful. We've been going for quite a while so I don't want to overstay our welcome with our listeners. I'd love to keep going but probably should stop. But how can people maybe reach out to you or learn more about you and what you do and maybe learn about WVU a little   Kim Cohen  1:04:40 bit? Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I think you can always find me on LinkedIn. So that would be a great way to connect. And then   Michael Hingson  1:04:50 in turn, how do they how do they find you?   Kim Cohen  1:04:52 Oh, gosh, I don't think I have my what I think they can look me up under Kim Cohen and then they'll find The Chem CO and that's affiliated with Wu. And that'll be me. And then I think, you know, in terms of learning about the vgtu, I would always recommend, you know, our website, which has got such great stories and information. I know I talked a lot about teachers college, but we have a fantastic it program and a business program and a nursing program. And all of them are, are fantastic. I talked my cousin into going back for school. And so it's definitely a place where, you know, if you're interested in remote opportunities, I would always check out, you know, our employment page. And if you're interested in   Michael Hingson  1:05:42 school, I'm assuming it's W G. u.edu.   Kim Cohen  1:05:46 It sure is, yes.   Michael Hingson  1:05:47 See what a guest. Well, Kim, thanks very much for being here. And I think inspiring us and giving us a lot to think about, and I hope people have enjoyed it. You've definitely shown, and I don't mean, it is a cliche, but the you're unstoppable. I think the biggest issue is that you always are learning and that that's always a good thing.   Kim Cohen  1:06:14 Right? Absolutely. I mean, I think we, we, when we're when we're not learning, then we're, we're stopped. And that's not the place to be.   Michael Hingson  1:06:25 Well, again, thank you for being here with us. And we appreciate you and your stories. Tell your son to keep moving forward. And that's as good as it gets.   Kim Cohen  1:06:36 Yeah. Thank you so much, Michael. Well,   Michael Hingson  1:06:39 thank you and everyone who has been listening. Thanks for being here today. I hope that you've enjoyed it and that you have been inspired a little bit. I'd love to hear your comments, please feel free to reach out to me my email address is Michaelhi M i c h e l H i at accessibe A C C E S S I B E.com. Or go to our podcast page, www dot Michael Hingson m i c h A E l h i n g s o n.com/podcast. And when you're there, and now that you've listened to this particular episode, I hope that you'll give us a five star rating. We appreciate it very much. We value you You are the people who make us a success and and we love to hear what you think about all of our shows. And I know that Kim will love to hear what you think about all that she has had to say today. So, again, Kim, thanks for being here. And we look forward to the next time that we get to chat on this topic, the mindset.   Michael Hingson  1:07:43 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

9.56 ABV PODCAST
EP. 93 with Special Guest Saul Segura (The Beer Plug)

9.56 ABV PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 111:02


Join us as we sit with Saul Segura a.k.a The Beer Plug, try new beers and talk about being an independent sales rep, one eyed willie, wines, Edinburg North, his first beer, Edward 40 Hands, Bubby's BBQ, the distributor life, coffee, artwork on cans, tequila blanco, mexican moonshine, White Lion and other dope jales. Song of the week: Tiny Fighter by White Lion Shoutout to our sponsor KMstudiocreativo! Go check out and follow KMstudiocreativo on Instagram and Facebook. Get all your party custom stationary and paper goods! Great for kids parties! Big shoutout to our sponsor Liberty Bail Bonds. 24 Hour Service. Call them at 956-381-5836. Located at 12403 Bail Bond Drive Edinburg, Tx. "If you don't want to do time, Don't commit the crime but if you commit the crime call them anytime." Shout out to our sponsor Pirriwiris Miche Mix. Go try out all the different flavors of mixes and don't forget the olives! Follow on all social medias and place an order. https://www.facebook.com/pirriwiris.michemix.7 https://instagram.com/pirriwiris_mmix?utm_medium=copy_link Big shoutout to our sponsor The Landmark on Tower. Visit The Landmark on Tower to enjoy a new and unique way of drinking. Located in Alamo, Tx. Tell them the 956 ABV guys sent you there. https://www.facebook.com/LandmarkonTower/ https://instagram.com/thelandmarkontower?utm_medium=copy_link Big shoutout to Nature's Joint for sponsoring the podcast with some of the best Delta-8 flower in the RGV. Hit them up here: https://www.facebook.com/Natures-Joint-Cafe-101859025397031/ https://instagram.com/naturesjoint06?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= If you would like to donate and support us our CashApp is: $956ABV Thank you for listening. Cheers.

The Mic 106.5
DJ Alamo Interview | Building Genuine Relationships Ep. 58

The Mic 106.5

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 47:10


DJ JSO is back in the studio with another special guest, chapter head of Coalition Djs Philadelphia and current Million Dollaz Worth of Game Entertainment Dj, "The International" DJ Alamo. DJ Jso verbally contends with DJ Alamo on exactly what it takes to build genuine relationships and create a strong core fanbase...Start your own podcast today by using the link. https://open.acast.com/invite/r/themicSupport the show Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

American Loser Podcast
Jim Bowie was Hard to Kill

American Loser Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 98:52


Jim Bowie has to be considered one of the hardest men in American History to kill....it takes an illness and the greatest last stand in history to get the job done at the Alamo but, in true "Loser" fashion...his life leading up to the infamous Alamo is fascinating and seems to get glossed over...he's part legend, part icon...all intriguing and his story will get you wanting to learn to knife fight...he's Jim Bowie...American Loser!

Podcast – Alamo City Church
Alamo City Church Message

Podcast – Alamo City Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022


Doom Generation
Pee-Wee's Big Adventure (1985): "Tell 'em Large Marge sent ya!"

Doom Generation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 70:09


It was 70 years ago, on a night just like tonight...why, tonight's the anniversary! It's Paul Reubens 70th birthday and we are celebrating by bringing you Pee-Wee's Big Adventure. The best bike in the whole world has been stolen and we're hitchhiking to the Alamo to search the basement with a crazy cast of characters, this time on Doom Generation. Follow us on Instagram @doomgenerationpod and on Twitter @doomgenpod Join our Patreon at patreon.com/doomgeneration Featured promo from The Cultworthy Podcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/doomgeneration/message

Dance of Joy: A Perfect Strangers Rewatch Podcast
Tooth or Consequences - Perfect Strangers S5 E4

Dance of Joy: A Perfect Strangers Rewatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 73:56


We talk about World Series earthquakes, the non-existent basement of the Alamo, and pooping Novocaine! All that and more as we watch season 5, episode 4 of our favorite ‘80s hit sitcom, Perfect Strangers. Rate and review us in Apple Podcasts!  Support the show! Be a part of the show! Shop for merch! Leave us a voice message! Email: danceofjoypod@gmail.com Instagram: @danceofjoypod Twitter: @danceofjoypod Facebook: facebook.com/danceofjoypod Facebook Group Visit our website Follow Balkiduds on Instagram Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | RSS Originally recorded Aug. 21, 2022.

Beyond the Big Screen
Remember the Alamo!

Beyond the Big Screen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 43:25


Today I am joined again by fellow Parthenon Podcast Network member, Scott Rank to talk about the movie The Alamo from 2004. The Alamo is an icon of American History. Scott and I will see if Hollywood respected or smashed the history of the Alamo.Learn More About our Guest:Scott Rank, host of the History Unplugged Podcasthttps://www.historyonthenet.com/podcast-2You can learn more about Beyond the Big Screen and subscribe at all these great places:www.atozhistorypage.comwww.beyondthebigscreen.comClick here to support Beyond the Big Screen!https://www.subscribestar.com/beyondthebigscreenhttps://www.patreon.com/beyondthebigscreenClick to Subscribe:https://www.spreaker.com/show/4926576/episodes/feedemail: steve@atozhistorypage.comwww.beyondthebigscreen.comhttps://www.patreon.com/historyofthepapacyParthenon Podcast Network Home:parthenonpodcast.comOn Social Media: https://www.facebook.com/groups/atozhistorypagehttps://www.facebook.com/HistoryOfThePapacyPodcasthttps://twitter.com/atozhistoryMusic Provided by:"Crossing the Chasm" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Image Credits:Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2681465Begin Transcript:You can now support beyond the big screen on Patreon. By joining on Patreon, you help keep Beyond the Big Screen sustainable and get many great benefits. Go to patreon.com/beyondthebigscreen to learn more.A special thanks goes out to Alex at the Executive Producer level!Another way to support Beyond the big screen is to leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. These reviews really help me know what you think of the show and help other people learn about Beyond the Big screen. You can learn more about Beyond the Big Screen, how to contact me, the Parthenon Podcast and support the show by going to our website atozhistorypage.com. I thank you for joining me again, Beyond the big Screen.

KSAT News Now
Reaction to Pete Arredondo firing, Alamo Heights hazing, Taylor Swift class at UT

KSAT News Now

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 21:29


Uvalde CISD voted unanimously Wednesday to fire District police chief Pete Arredondo. An unspecified number of Alamo Heights varsity football players have been suspended for two games in connection with an alleged hazing incident that landed one victim in a hospital emergency room, sources told KSAT 12 Sports Director Greg Simmons. UT Austin is offering an english class structured around Taylor Swift songwriting. Would you enroll? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

9.56 ABV PODCAST
Live at The Elsa Skatepark Grand Opening 8/19/2022 (Bonus Episode)

9.56 ABV PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 71:40


Join as we podcast live at the Elsa skatepark grand opening. We have convos with Mark Rogriquez, Sergio Trevino, Fred Barrera (YIHA Podcast), Alex Morales (Baha Fish Tacos), Danny Vega, Nick Bolts, Chowdish (Location Skateshop), Kinky K (Photography). Shoutout to our sponsor KMstudiocreativo! Go check out and follow KMstudiocreativo on Instagram and Facebook. Get all your party custom stationary and paper goods! Great for kids parties! Big shoutout to our sponsor Liberty Bail Bonds. 24 Hour Service. Call them at 956-381-5836. Located at 12403 Bail Bond Drive Edinburg, Tx. "If you don't want to do time, Don't commit the