Podcasts about Arm

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  • 8,016EPISODES
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  • Jun 22, 2022LATEST

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    Best podcasts about Arm

    Show all podcasts related to arm

    Latest podcast episodes about Arm

    Windows Weekly (MP3)
    WW 782: A Hazy Shade of Winders - Windows Defender, Microsoft Viva, GitHub Copilot

    Windows Weekly (MP3)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 111:25


    Windows Defender, Microsoft Viva, GitHub Copilot Windows New Windows 11 Insider Build Brings OneDrive Information Microsoft Gets Ready to Roll Out Search Highlights on Windows 11 Xiaomi Launches its First Windows on ARM 2-in-1 PC Microsoft 365 & Cloud Microsoft launches Defender for Individuals for Microsoft 365 Personal and Family subscribers Microsoft's Viva Sales: A new companion app that works with many CRM systems (not only Microsoft's) Microsoft to curtail some of its facial recognition capabilities in the name of 'Responsible AI' From Nvidia to IKEA: Here's who's joining the Metaverse Standards Forum Dev GitHub Copilot, Microsoft's AI pair-programming service, is generally available The Directions on Microsoft Briefing | Directions on Microsoft Xbox Xbox Cloud Gaming to Get Mouse and Keyboard Support on PC Microsoft Warns About Supply Shortages for Xbox Controllers Far Cry 5 is Coming Soon to Xbox Game Pass Microsoft's Xbox App on PC Adds a Performance Indicator Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 22H2 App pick of the week: Reading apps Enterprise pick 1 of the week: Microsoft's Secured Core comes to IoT devices Enterprise pick 2 of the week: Don't be fooled: Patch Tuesday isn't going away Beer pick of the week: Torch & Crown Rainbows Everywhere Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: hackerrank.com/WW newrelic.com/windows go.acronis.com/ww

    Windows Weekly (Video HI)
    WW 782: A Hazy Shade of Winders - Windows Defender, Microsoft Viva, GitHub Copilot

    Windows Weekly (Video HI)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 111:57


    Windows Defender, Microsoft Viva, GitHub Copilot Windows New Windows 11 Insider Build Brings OneDrive Information Microsoft Gets Ready to Roll Out Search Highlights on Windows 11 Xiaomi Launches its First Windows on ARM 2-in-1 PC Microsoft 365 & Cloud Microsoft launches Defender for Individuals for Microsoft 365 Personal and Family subscribers Microsoft's Viva Sales: A new companion app that works with many CRM systems (not only Microsoft's) Microsoft to curtail some of its facial recognition capabilities in the name of 'Responsible AI' From Nvidia to IKEA: Here's who's joining the Metaverse Standards Forum Dev GitHub Copilot, Microsoft's AI pair-programming service, is generally available The Directions on Microsoft Briefing | Directions on Microsoft Xbox Xbox Cloud Gaming to Get Mouse and Keyboard Support on PC Microsoft Warns About Supply Shortages for Xbox Controllers Far Cry 5 is Coming Soon to Xbox Game Pass Microsoft's Xbox App on PC Adds a Performance Indicator Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 22H2 App pick of the week: Reading apps Enterprise pick 1 of the week: Microsoft's Secured Core comes to IoT devices Enterprise pick 2 of the week: Don't be fooled: Patch Tuesday isn't going away Beer pick of the week: Torch & Crown Rainbows Everywhere Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: hackerrank.com/WW newrelic.com/windows go.acronis.com/ww

    All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
    Windows Weekly 782: A Hazy Shade of Winders

    All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 111:25


    Windows Defender, Microsoft Viva, GitHub Copilot Windows New Windows 11 Insider Build Brings OneDrive Information Microsoft Gets Ready to Roll Out Search Highlights on Windows 11 Xiaomi Launches its First Windows on ARM 2-in-1 PC Microsoft 365 & Cloud Microsoft launches Defender for Individuals for Microsoft 365 Personal and Family subscribers Microsoft's Viva Sales: A new companion app that works with many CRM systems (not only Microsoft's) Microsoft to curtail some of its facial recognition capabilities in the name of 'Responsible AI' From Nvidia to IKEA: Here's who's joining the Metaverse Standards Forum Dev GitHub Copilot, Microsoft's AI pair-programming service, is generally available The Directions on Microsoft Briefing | Directions on Microsoft Xbox Xbox Cloud Gaming to Get Mouse and Keyboard Support on PC Microsoft Warns About Supply Shortages for Xbox Controllers Far Cry 5 is Coming Soon to Xbox Game Pass Microsoft's Xbox App on PC Adds a Performance Indicator Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 22H2 App pick of the week: Reading apps Enterprise pick 1 of the week: Microsoft's Secured Core comes to IoT devices Enterprise pick 2 of the week: Don't be fooled: Patch Tuesday isn't going away Beer pick of the week: Torch & Crown Rainbows Everywhere Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: hackerrank.com/WW newrelic.com/windows go.acronis.com/ww

    All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
    Windows Weekly 782: A Hazy Shade of Winders

    All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 111:57


    Windows Defender, Microsoft Viva, GitHub Copilot Windows New Windows 11 Insider Build Brings OneDrive Information Microsoft Gets Ready to Roll Out Search Highlights on Windows 11 Xiaomi Launches its First Windows on ARM 2-in-1 PC Microsoft 365 & Cloud Microsoft launches Defender for Individuals for Microsoft 365 Personal and Family subscribers Microsoft's Viva Sales: A new companion app that works with many CRM systems (not only Microsoft's) Microsoft to curtail some of its facial recognition capabilities in the name of 'Responsible AI' From Nvidia to IKEA: Here's who's joining the Metaverse Standards Forum Dev GitHub Copilot, Microsoft's AI pair-programming service, is generally available The Directions on Microsoft Briefing | Directions on Microsoft Xbox Xbox Cloud Gaming to Get Mouse and Keyboard Support on PC Microsoft Warns About Supply Shortages for Xbox Controllers Far Cry 5 is Coming Soon to Xbox Game Pass Microsoft's Xbox App on PC Adds a Performance Indicator Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 22H2 App pick of the week: Reading apps Enterprise pick 1 of the week: Microsoft's Secured Core comes to IoT devices Enterprise pick 2 of the week: Don't be fooled: Patch Tuesday isn't going away Beer pick of the week: Torch & Crown Rainbows Everywhere Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: hackerrank.com/WW newrelic.com/windows go.acronis.com/ww

    Radio Leo (Audio)
    Windows Weekly 782: A Hazy Shade of Winders

    Radio Leo (Audio)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 111:25


    Windows Defender, Microsoft Viva, GitHub Copilot Windows New Windows 11 Insider Build Brings OneDrive Information Microsoft Gets Ready to Roll Out Search Highlights on Windows 11 Xiaomi Launches its First Windows on ARM 2-in-1 PC Microsoft 365 & Cloud Microsoft launches Defender for Individuals for Microsoft 365 Personal and Family subscribers Microsoft's Viva Sales: A new companion app that works with many CRM systems (not only Microsoft's) Microsoft to curtail some of its facial recognition capabilities in the name of 'Responsible AI' From Nvidia to IKEA: Here's who's joining the Metaverse Standards Forum Dev GitHub Copilot, Microsoft's AI pair-programming service, is generally available The Directions on Microsoft Briefing | Directions on Microsoft Xbox Xbox Cloud Gaming to Get Mouse and Keyboard Support on PC Microsoft Warns About Supply Shortages for Xbox Controllers Far Cry 5 is Coming Soon to Xbox Game Pass Microsoft's Xbox App on PC Adds a Performance Indicator Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 22H2 App pick of the week: Reading apps Enterprise pick 1 of the week: Microsoft's Secured Core comes to IoT devices Enterprise pick 2 of the week: Don't be fooled: Patch Tuesday isn't going away Beer pick of the week: Torch & Crown Rainbows Everywhere Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: hackerrank.com/WW newrelic.com/windows go.acronis.com/ww

    Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
    Real Estate News Brief: Supersized Rate Hike, Mortgage Sticker Shock, Home Equity Bonanza

    Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 6:09


    In this Real Estate News Brief for the week ending June 18th, 2022... the Fed's supersized rate hike, mortgage rate sticker shock, and the home equity bonanza.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Economic NewsWe begin with economic news from this past week, and the Fed's biggest rate hike in three decades. The central bank hiked the federal funds rate by three-quarters of a percent which puts it between 1.5% and 1.75%. If inflation doesn't show signs of slowing by next month, Fed Chief Jerome Powell said they might hike it by another three-quarters of a percent. He doesn't expect that to be a common practice, but he said the Fed is determined to get inflation back down to 2%. (1)The rate hike came after two more hot inflation reports. The Consumer Price Index shows that inflation hit an annual rate of 8.6% in May, while wholesale prices came in at 10.8%. Economists are now looking ahead to the CPI report for June as they anticipate the size of the next rate hike and whether higher rates will tip the economy into a recession. As reported by MarketWatch, the Fed has backed off the idea of a “soft landing” and is running the risk of a recession to get inflation under control. (2)The Fed is currently expecting the economy to slow to 1.7% over the next year-and-a-half with inflation running at 5.2% by the end of this year and 2.6% by the end of next year. It anticipates a slight rise in unemployment, but expects the job market to remain strong.Right now, jobless claims are low while job openings are high. There have been some reports of layoffs, which is contributing to recession anxiety. Last week, real estate companies Redfin and Compass announced layoffs, in response to a slower housing market. Redfin is cutting 8% of its staff, and Compass is cutting 10% because fewer people are buying homes. Many can't afford the high price of the home combined with a more expensive mortgage. (3)The housing slowdown is also impacting residential construction. The Commerce Department says that housing starts dropped 14.4% in May to an annual rate of 1.55 million. That's the biggest decline since April of last year. Multi-family starts dropped the most - by 26.8%. Single-family starts were down 9.2%. Permits also fell but only by 7%. (4)Mortgage RatesMortgage rates bolted higher last week, for the largest one-week increase since 1987. Freddie Mac says the average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage rose 55 basis points to 5.78%. The 15-year was up 43 points to 4.81%. On a positive note, higher mortgage rates will help control the crazy home price growth we've seen lately. (5)In other news making headlines…Mortgage Rate Sticker ShockThe rapid rise in mortgage rates is giving some homebuyers sticker shock. Even though mortgage rates are nowhere as high as they were decades ago, they are at their highest level since about 2008. And that's cutting into homebuyer budgets. (6)The National Association of Realtors says that higher interest rates have chopped about 25% off the homebuyer's budget since the beginning of the year. As an example, NAR says that the typical buyer could afford a $360,000 home with a $1,400 monthly mortgage payment in January. Now, with higher interest rates, that buyer will have to shop for a $270,000 home if they want to maintain a $1,400 a month payment because a larger portion of the mortgage will go toward interest.Homebuyers Are Embracing ARMsOne way that homebuyers are dealing with the cost of the loan, is by choosing an adjustable rate mortgage or what's known as an ARM. The Mortgage Bankers Association says that the number of ARMs doubled in May, to help keep initial payments lower. They were as much as a full point lower on the MAXEX exchange. (7)According to the loan-trading platform, MAXEX is a network of 320 banks and nonbank originators, as well as 20 “high-profile investors.” It says these lenders have been seeing explosive growth in ARMs and it expects the trend to continue.Big Equity Gains for HomeownersWhile price appreciation makes it tough to buy a home, most homeowners are feeling a whole lot richer. According to a CoreLogic report, 62% of all U.S. properties rose in value with an average gain of about $64,000. (8)The states with the highest amount of appreciation were California and Hawaii with an average of about $140,000. Other red-hot states were Washington, Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and Nevada. The states with the lowest amount of average appreciation were Iowa at $17,000 and North Dakota at $19,000. That's it for today. Check the show notes for links. And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!I'd also like to recommend a new book called “The Wise Investor” by RealWealth co-founder Rich Fettke. He wrote the book as an entertaining way to share what he's learned about creating wealth both financially and personally. The protagonist is a man who realizes his life is nothing like he had planned and sets off to change that. The reader is swept along for the ride. It's a quick read, and is currently available as a Kindle book on Amazon. The hard cover and audio versions are coming out in August but you can pre-order them now. You can also read more about the book here. (at realwealth.com/grow)Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/fed-lifts-rates-by-most-in-three-decades-anticipates-policy-rate-rising-to-3-8-by-end-of-2023-11655316254?mod=mw_latestnews2 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/as-fed-aggressively-raises-rates-here-are-4-takeaways-from-jerome-powells-press-conference-11655340311?mod=economy-politics3 -https://www.cnn.com/2022/06/17/investing/premarket-stocks-trading/index.html4 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-s-housing-starts-plunge-in-may-11655383118?mod=u.s.-economic-calendar5 -https://www.freddiemac.com/pmms6 -https://magazine.realtor/daily-news/2022/06/17/surging-mortgage-rates-spook-house-hunters7 -https://www.housingwire.com/articles/maxex-report-shows-arms-doubled-in-may/?utm_campaign=Newsletter%20-%20HousingWire%20Daily&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=216674568&_hsenc=p2ANqtz--7Is5ehx6QK5u6f15i-lFl9EfIiIrNoDk029qwgACHkfo3hZfA7lCOZovmqBlflCXrRa7iSat3Dq_i5TwJHWqKqwqWlQ&utm_content=216674568&utm_source=hs_email8 -https://magazine.realtor/daily-news/2022/06/10/homeowners-see-12-month-equity-gain-of-64k

    The Darren James Podcast
    EP 198 Double Arm and Shoulder Transplant Surgery.

    The Darren James Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 11:01


    In this week's episode I talk a man who is named Felix Gretarsson who suffered multiple injuries back in 1998 (including a broken back and neck in three places) and who has now underwent successful surgery for double Arm and Shoulder. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/darren-manfield/support

    100 Sekunden Leben | Inforadio
    Armdrücken mit Putin

    100 Sekunden Leben | Inforadio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 1:47


    Robert Habeck sieht sich in "einer Art Armdrücken" mit Wladimir Putin. Das hat der Bundeswirtschaftsminister am Sonntag im "heute journal" gesagt. Durch Kraftanstrengung müsse Deutschland den stärkeren Arm bekommen – und sich unabhängig machen vom russischen Gas. Unser Kolumnist Thomas Hollmann hat umgehend das Training aufgenommen.

    Beyond the Rut Podcast
    Overcome Burnout and Get Your Family Back - Paul Hastings

    Beyond the Rut Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 41:36


    Paul Hastings lost mobility in his arm from the stress of burnout at 29 years old. He shares the decision to overcome burnout and how to get your family back as a priority.Overcome Burnout Before It Costs You an Arm or LegIf you're like many Americans, you're juggling a lot. You've got work, family, and social obligations, and it can be tough to keep everything going. But sometimes, despite your best efforts, things can get overwhelming. You might start feeling irritable and resentful, and you may find yourself snapping at your loved ones. You might even start to feel like you're failing at everything.If this sounds familiar, you might be experiencing burnout. Burnout is a state of physical, emotional, and mental exhaustion that can be caused by excessive and prolonged stress. It's important to recognize the signs of burnout so you can take steps to address them before it gets worse.Paul Hastings was a hard-working family man running a business that supported his family. The work was rewarding, purpose-driven, and he felt that there was significance in his work. That began to change at 29 years old when he felt numbness in his arm that eventually led to paralysis of that arm. In This EpisodeMeeting at Spark Christian Podcasters ConferenceLife as a campaign marketing manager and the burnout that came with itContemplating work-life balance for healthThe first stories of Compelled gathering remarkable stories from peopleYour stories can impact and teach othersBiggest challenge about podcasting while working full-timeGoing full-time in podcasting with a production teamInterviewing Hannah Overton, wrongfully sentenced to life in prison Paralysis at 29 years old from overworkPutting God and family back as a priorityOur wives as sounding boards and partners in our livesPaul HastingsPaul Hastings is a podcaster and entrepreneur. He has consulted extensively in the film, marketing, and political arenas. He is the host of "Compelled", a podcast telling unique stories about God working through people's lives.He has also produced several award-winning short films and industrial pieces.His work has been featured by Dr. James Dobson's Family Talk, World Magazine, The Gospel Coalition, American Family Association, TheBlaze, CBN News, WND, and more.Paul, his wife, and their three children live near Austin, Texas and attend Redemption Hill Church.See the full show notes at BeyondTheRut.com/310.Beyond the Rut is a proud member of the Lima Charlie Network empowering others to reach new heights in leadership, self-development, and communication. You can learn more at LimaCharlieNetwork.com. Support the show's maintenance and growth by buying me a cup of coffee at BeyondTheRut.com/Coffee. It doesn't matter if it's one cup, three cups, or five. All of it is welcome and appreciated. Go live life Beyond the Rut! Take care!Support the show

    The Withering Effect - Minecraft Podcast
    Episode 147: Secrets and Legends with Carl and DiiKoj

    The Withering Effect - Minecraft Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 57:24


    In this episode, DuDs and Jimbo are joined by CarlRyds and DiiKoj to discuss the release of Minecraft 1.19, The Wild Update, which now supports ARM 64-bit CPUs including Apple's M1 chips. Optifine for 1.19 is currently at 50% as of 6/12 and Mojang have announced a brand new game, Minecraft Legends. Plus, We have a listener comment from Dive Clops and Kitzen about the potential for more new biomes in the Nether. Also, in the main topic, Carl and DiiKoj give us their thoughts on Minecraft 1.19 now its been fully released, and on the 19th of June it's our third birthday and we have a range of changes and improvements coming including an AMA/Q&A you can get involved in, check out the Discord for information. Minecraft 1.19 - The Wild Update: https://minecraft.net/en-us/updates/the-wild-update Minecraft Legends: https://minecraft.net/en-us/about-legends Grian - Things I Would Change in Minecraft: https://youtu.be/rA9p5bNF8NU Statista - Media usage in an internet minute as of August 2021: https://statista.com/statistics/195140/new-user-generated-content-uploaded-by-users-per-minute/ Thank you to our Milk level Patrons: Aerington, aubni, Crock, FragileRock, KC Plays Games and viperoustuna. Discord: https://discord.gg/gqnKyeZ Patreon: https://patreon.com/thewitheringeffect Website: http://thewitheringeffect.com/ E-Mail: podcast@thewitheringeffect.com Voice Message: https://anchor.fm/thewitheringeffect/message Twitter: https://twitter.com/WitheringEffect YouTube: https://youtube.com/thewitheringeffect Instagram: https://instagram.com/witheringeffect Show Hosts DuDs YouTube: https://youtube.com/DuDs_vs DuDs Twitter: https://twitter.com/DuDs_vs DuDs Twitch: https://twitch.tv/DuDs_vs Jimbo YouTube: https://youtube.com/JimboSlice23Gaming Jimbo Twitter: https://twitter.com/JimboSlice23_ Jimbo Twitch: https://twitch.tv/JimboSlice23_ Digital Producer CarlRyds YouTube: https://youtube.com/CarlRydsGaming CarlRyds Twitter: https://twitter.com/CarlRyds CarlRyds Twitch: https://twitch.tv/CarlRydsGaming Music Master DiiKoj YouTube: https://youtube.com/DiiKoj DiiKoj Twitter: https://twitter.com/DiiKoj

    O knihách s knihovnicí
    Do tuzemského cestování a psaní se Ladislav Zibura pustil za lockdownu

    O knihách s knihovnicí

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 6:07


    Prázdniny v Evropě, Už nikdy pěšky po Arménii a Gruzii nebo 40 dní pěšky do Jeruzaléma. To jsou namátkou některé knižní tituly z pera cestovatele Ladislava Zibury.Všechny díly podcastu O knihách s knihovnicí můžete pohodlně poslouchat v mobilní aplikaci mujRozhlas pro Android a iOS nebo na webu mujRozhlas.cz.

    Let Your Freak Flag Fly

    Intro/Outro: The Amplified Elephants Shore from Deep Creatures  Let Your Freak Flag Fly - Radiothon Compilation #2Tina Douglas - The electrical energy of 100,510,000,000J Will Guthrie - Wakanui No Man's Land - Lagomorpha Descending Warren Burt - A Bureaucrat Tells the Truth   Shoeb Ahmad - twopointtwelve  Michelle Nguyen - Song for Mogget  Sisters Akousmatica - Planets  Stellar Metal Arc: Stelarc & BOLT EnsembleLegendary performance artist Stelarc supported by the sonic art of The BOLT Ensemble: Robotic performance art meets art music.16-18 & 23-25 June, Thu-Sat, 8pmat JOLTED: 342 High St NorthcoteTickets and more info here.  Beware! by Stelarc and CortexBeware of the Arm of Fleshfrom the album Great Performances from the JOLT Festival Basel on Label: Tree in a Field (Swiss). Released 2011. Feather Girl - un released. (BOLT ensemble). 

    Buddhismus im Alltag - Der tägliche Podcast - Kurzvorträge und meditative Betrachtungen - Chan - Zen

    Haben Sie schon die ersten Teile meiner Serie "Geschenke an mein Ich" gelesen click. Hier lesen Sie weiter: 14. Freundschaften Wer sich wirklich beschenken will, der hegt und pflegt seine Freundschaften, der kümmert sich um seine Freunde, ihre Belange, ihr Leben. Aber auch zu Ihrem eigenen Ich sollten Sie eine Freundschaft aufbauen, sich mit Wohlwollen im Spiegel ansehen, bewußt auf Ihre Stimme achten, sich selbst "in den Arm" nehmen, alles mögliche tun, um jedenfalls alle möglichen Aversionen gegen sich selbst abzubauen, wenn möglich Freundschaft und gar Selbstliebe aufzubauen. Nur wer mit sich selbst im Reinen ist kann auf den Weg zur Erleuchtung aufbrechen, dem Buddha nacheifern, nachfolgen. Behandeln Sie sich selbst wenigstens so gut, wie Sie es mit Ihrem besten Freund machen, machen Sie sich das Geschenk. 15. Glücklichsein Das wohl wichtigste Geschenk, dass Sie sich selbst machen können, das ist das Glücklichsein, denn Sie sind auf einem guten Weg, auf dem weglosen Weg, hin zum torlosen Tor, wo ein landloses Land auf alle diejenigen wartet, die rechtzeitig erwacht sind, die sich nicht haben blenden lassen, die dem Leiden entsagt haben, weil sie die Entscheidung dazu getroffen haben. Glück ist eine spirituelle Emotion, die man nicht kaufen, nicht verschenken, nicht erben, nicht verdienen kann. Wer gelernt hat wirklich loszulassen, der ist dem Erwachen schon ganz nahe, der wird das allumfassende Glück erleben. Denn Glück steht uns Menschen zu, es ist ein Vorrecht derjenigen, die nicht mehr wünschen oder wollen, die sich mit dem Schicksal arrangiert haben, denn sie können ja sowieso nichts daran ändern. Nehmen Sie aus den alltäglichen Dingen des Lebens Ihre glücklichsten Momente, erfreuen Sie sich an den Blumen am Wegesrand, an den kleinen Umarmungen, an der Wärme der Luft, an der Kühle der Brise, am Geschmack des Essens, an belanglosen Dingen, die Sie oftmals einfach als selbstverständlich erachten. 16. Ein reiner Geist Ihr Geist sollte sein wie ein wunderschöner Garten, rein und erfreulich, immer gepflegt, voller Blumen, Bäumen und Sträuchern, in der Mitte ein kleiner Tempel mit einer zauberhaften Statue des Lehrers aller Lehrer, achtsame Menschen begegnen sich in der Tempelanlage, die imaginär in Ihrem Gedankenpalast aufgebaut wurde. Die Gedanken sind hier die Samen, die die Anlage planen, pflegen und hegen, schlechte Gedanken lassen die Anlage verlottern, gute verbessern das Ensemble, je nach der Geisteshaltung entsteht ein Kunstwerk oder ein Kellerloch. Kümmern Sie sich um die Reinheit Ihres Geistes, um den Garten, um die Gebäude, bauen Sie sich einen Tempel in Ihrem Gedankenpalast, schenken Sie sich Frieden. Der Weg ist das Ziel! Die von rechter Nahrung leben, an kein Eigentum sich binden, in der unfaßbaren Leere ihre hehre Heimat finden, deren Weg ist schwer wie Vogelpfad in Lüften zu ergründen - Buddha - "Der Erleuchtete" - Ehrenname des Siddharta Gautama - 560 bis 480 vor dem Jahr Null

    Blind Guy Talks Tech
    Matt Ater from Vispero talks AD, New JAWS features and Musicals

    Blind Guy Talks Tech

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 46:45


    There's so much hilarity and nonsense on today's episode you would think that it was the Weekend Edition! Today Blind Guys Steven Scott, Robin Christopherson and Shaun Preece are joined by Matt Ater from Vispero to challenge the guys on their views of musicals, audio description and more! There's also a much more serious and welcome chat about a new feature coming to JAWS in the coming days that will help settle down the number of notifications and verbosity in Edge and Windows alike. There's also hard questions asked about when JAWS will be available for ARM computers, with some surprising answers. Get involved as always and share your thoughts by emailing hello@blindguytalkstech.com or call 0204 571 3354 and leave us a voicemail.

    Armário da Bola
    A BASE VEM FORTE | Flamengo de 1992

    Armário da Bola

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 57:52


    ESTMOS NO ARRRRR com o nosso segundo episódio da série A BASE VEM FORTE! Como estamos autorizados neste ano a usufruir das delícias e malícias do mais puro CLUBISMO (checar primeiro episódio de 2022 para entender), resolvemos falar sobre FLAMENGO! Copinha 1990, Brasileirão 1992, Junior, Marcelinho Carioca, Djalminha, Junior Baiano e muito mais! ====== Faça parte da nossa comissão técnica: picpay.me/armariodabola Siga o Armário da Bola em todas as redes sociais: Twitter Instagram Youtube TikTok Twitch

    Host Lucie Výborné
    V budoucnu bude válka strojů. Nadvládu získají státy s technologickou výhodou, míní generál Opata

    Host Lucie Výborné

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 30:39


    Aleš Opata je náčelník Generálního štábu, studoval u námořní pěchoty ve Spojených státech a na Vojenské akademii v Británii. Jako bojovník byl na 7 misích na Balkáně a v Afghánistánu. Velel 43. výsadkovému praporu a 4. brigádě rychlého nasazení. Své působení v čele Generálního štábu Armády ČR 30. 6. končí. Pracuje na knize, ve které se dělí o své vzpomínky a zkušenosti.Všechny díly podcastu Host Lucie Výborné můžete pohodlně poslouchat v mobilní aplikaci mujRozhlas pro Android a iOS nebo na webu mujRozhlas.cz.

    Radiožurnál
    Host Lucie Výborné: V budoucnu bude válka strojů. Nadvládu získají státy s technologickou výhodou, míní generál Opata

    Radiožurnál

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 30:39


    Aleš Opata je náčelník Generálního štábu, studoval u námořní pěchoty ve Spojených státech a na Vojenské akademii v Británii. Jako bojovník byl na 7 misích na Balkáně a v Afghánistánu. Velel 43. výsadkovému praporu a 4. brigádě rychlého nasazení. Své působení v čele Generálního štábu Armády ČR 30. 6. končí. Pracuje na knize, ve které se dělí o své vzpomínky a zkušenosti.

    Unshaken Saints
    2 Samuel 1-1 Kings 11: David & Solomon

    Unshaken Saints

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 444:14


    An in-depth study of 2 Samuel and the first half of 1 Kings, which recounts the reigns of King David and King Solomon. This lesson focuses on loving your enemies, proclaiming peace, steadying the ark, David and Bathsheba, Amnon and Tamar, the rebellion of Absalom, a prodigal's return, wisdom, largeness of heart, judging without becoming judgmental, building with cedar and gold, temple dedications, worldliness and materialism, and more. 0:00 Introduction 4:30 3 Kings of United Israel 8:50 Mourning for Jonathan & Saul 26:23 David Anointed King of Judah 32:58 Proclaiming Peace 41:17 The Rise of David 53:28 King Over All Israel 1:05:17 Steadying the Ark 1:26:47 Desire to Build the Temple 1:50:18 Extending the Kingdom & Establishing Peace 2:08:45 David & Bathsheba 2:51:05 David's Sin Is Revealed 3:09:24 Amnon & Tamar 3:30:30 Absalom Flees & Returns: Reconciliation 3:47:24 Absalom's Rebellion 4:06:50 The Death of Absalom 4:15:41 Recovering from Rebellion 4:38:56 A Psalm of David 4:46:23 The Arm of Flesh 5:04:55 David's Last Days 5:08:02 Solomon as Successor 5:30:34 The Wisdom of Solomon 5:43:57 Discerning a Mother & Dividing a Child 5:55:56 Largeness of Heart 6:02:44 Building the Temple 6:23:40 Cedar and Gold 6:32:14 The Dedication of the Temple 6:58:02 Wisdom or Wealth? 7:02:21 Worldliness and Materialism 7:19:23 Conclusion

    Tecnocast
    246 – Todo mundo quer um pedacinho da Arm

    Tecnocast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 48:11


    Uma empresa de chips que não fabrica chips. Essa é a Arm, que fornece a arquitetura de processadores como M1 e Snapdragon. Sua posição de liderança no setor é inegável. Na verdade, pode-se dizer que muitas empresas dependem da tecnologia da Arm. Daí o temor de que ela seja vendida, ou controlada por um único player. A solução para isso seria um consórcio, ideia defendida pelas gigantes Qualcomm e Intel para manter a Arm neutra. Será que funcionaria? É o que debatemos no episódio de hoje. Quer saber mais sobre essa empresa que não é tão conhecida, mas se tornou uma das mais importantes no mercado de tecnologia? Então dá o play e vem com a gente! ## Participantes Thiago Mobilon Paulo Higa Emerson Alecrim ## Créditos Produtor: Josué de Oliveira Edição e Sonorização: Raquel Igne Arte da capa: Vitor Pádua

    Weltzeit - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
    Musikverbote in Ägypten - Keine Songs über Drogen und Flirten!

    Weltzeit - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 23:32


    Mahraganat ist neben Rap die populärste Musik unter jüngeren Menschen in Ägypten. Trotzdem verbot die Musikergewerkschaft Live-Auftritte von Künstlerinnen und Künstlern dieses Genres. Ein Konflikt zwischen den Generationen und zwischen Arm und Reich.Von Hend Husseinwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, WeltzeitDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

    First Ring Daily
    First Ring Daily 1258: Goodby(i)e

    First Ring Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 12:48


    On this episode of First Ring Daily, the story is ending for IE, a long journey with ARM, and some widget observations. 

    Coder Radio
    470: Make it so, Dev One!

    Coder Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 54:40


    You can't judge a book by its cover, and this week we surprised each other when we dug into the HP Dev One. Plus some insights on remote virtual dev desktops and the gotcha's from WWDC we missed.

    RTL - De Journal (Small)
    De Journal vum 15. Juni 2022, 15/06/2022 00:00

    RTL - De Journal (Small)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022


    Theemen haut: Gesetzesprojet Cannabis, Sonndesfro, Lëtzebuerger Arméi, Kris Pëtrolspräisser, Futtball, Zigarette-Fabrick Landewyck a Millionären zu Lëtzebuerg.

    Screaming in the Cloud
    Not Just a Dinosaur with Guillermo Ruiz

    Screaming in the Cloud

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 34:19


    Full Description / Show Notes Guillermo talks about how he came to work at OCI and what it was like helping to pioneer Oracle's cloud product (1:40) Corey and Guillermo discuss the challenges and realities of multi-cloud (6:00) Corey asks about OCI's dedicated region approach (8:27) Guillermo discusses the problem of awareness (12:40) Corey and Guillermo talk cloud providers and cloud migration (14:40) Guillermo shares about how OCI's cost and customer service is unique among cloud providers (16:56) Corey and Guillermo talk about IoT services and 5G (23:58) About Guillermo RuizGuillermo Ruiz gets into trouble more often than he would like. During his career Guillermo has seen many horror stories while building data centers worldwide. In 2007 he dreamed with space-based internet and direct routing between satellites, but he could only reach “the Cloud”. And there he is, helping customer build their business in someone else servers since 2011.Beware of his sense of humor...If you ever see him in a tech event, run, he will get you in problems.Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/IaaSgeek, https://twitter.com/OracleStartup LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gruizesteban/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I've been meaning to get a number of folks on this show for a while and today is absolutely one of those episodes. I'm joined by Guillermo Ruiz who is the Director of OCI Developer Evangelism, slash the Director of Oracle for Startups. Guillermo, thank you for joining me, and is Oracle for Startups an oxymoron because it kind of feels like it in some weird way, in the fullness of time.Guillermo: [laugh]. Thanks, Corey. It's a pleasure being in your show.Corey: Well, thank you. I enjoy having you here. I've been trying to get you on for a while. I'm glad I finally wore you down.Guillermo: [laugh]. Thanks. As I said, well, startup, I think, is the future of the industry, so it's a fundamental piece of our building blocks for the next generation of services.Corey: I have to say that I know that you folks at Oracle Cloud have been a recurring sponsor of the show. Thank you for that, incidentally. This is not a promoted guest episode. I invited you on because I wanted to talk to you about these things, which means that I can say more or less whatever I damn well want. And my experience with Oracle Cloud has been one of constantly being surprised since I started using it a few years ago, long before I was even taking sponsorships for this show. It was, “Oh, Oracle has a cloud. This ought to be rich.”And I started kicking the tires on it and I came away consistently and repeatedly impressed by the technical qualities the platform has. The always-free tier has a model of cloud economics that great. I have a sizable VM running there and have for years and it's never charged me a dime. Your data egress fees aren't, you know, a 10th of what a lot of the other cloud providers are charging, also known as, you know, you're charging in the bounds of reality; good for that. And the platform continues to—although it is different from other cloud providers, in some respects, it continues to impress.Honestly, I keep saying one of the worst problems that has is the word Oracle at the front of it because Oracle has a 40-some-odd-year history of big enterprise systems, being stodgy, being difficult to work with, all the things you don't generally tend to think of in terms of cloud. It really is a head turn. How did that happen? And how did you get dragged into the mess?Guillermo: Well, this came, like, back in five, six years ago, when they started building this whole thing, they picked people that were used to build cloud services from different hyperscalers. They dropped them into a single box in Seattle. And it's like, “Guys, knowing what you know, how you would build the next generation cloud platform?” And the guys came up with OCI, which was a second generation. And when I got hired by Oracle, they showed me the first one, that classic.It was totally bullshit. It was like, “Guys, there's no key differentiator with what's there in the market.” I didn't even know Oracle had a cloud, and I've been in this space since late-2010. And I had to sign, like, a bunch of NDAs a lot of papers, and they show me what they were cooking in the oven, and oh my gosh, when I saw that SDN out of the box directly in the physical network, CPUs assign, it was [BLEEP] [unintelligible 00:03:45]. It was, like, bare metal. I saw that the future was there. And I think that they built the right solution, so I joined the company to help them leverage the cloud platform.Corey: The thing that continually surprises me is that, “Oh, we have a cloud.” It has a real, “Hello fellow kids,” energy. Yes, yeah, so does IBM; we've seen how that played out. But the more I use it, the more impressed I am. Early on in the serverless function days, you folks more or less acquired Iron.io, and you were streets ahead as far as a lot of the event-driven serverless function style of thing tended to go.And one of the challenges that I see in the story that's being told about Oracle Cloud is, the big enterprise customer wins. These are the typical global Fortune 2000s, who have been around for, you know—which is weird for those of us in San Francisco, but apparently, these companies have been around longer than 18 months and they've built for platforms that are not the latest model MacBook Pro running the current version of Chrome. What is that? What is that legacy piece of garbage? What does it do? It's like, “Oh, it does about $4 billion a quarter so maybe show some respect.”It's the idea of companies that are doing real-world things, and they absolutely have cloud power. Problems and needs that are being met by a variety of different companies. It's easy to look at that narrative and overlook the fact that you could come up with some ridiculous Twitter for Pets-style business idea and build it on top of Oracle Cloud and I would not, at this point, call that a poor decision. I'm not even sure how it got there, and I wish that story was being told a little bit better. Given that you are a developer evangelist focusing specifically on startups and run that org, how do you see it?Guillermo: Well, the thing here is, you mentioned, you know, about Oracle, many startup doesn't even know we have a cloud provider. So, many of the question comes is like, how we can help on your business. It's more on the experience, you know, what are the challenges, the gaps, and we go in and identify and try to use our cloud. And even though if I'm not able to fill that gap, that's why we have this partnership with Microsoft. It's the first time to cloud providers connect both clouds directly without no third party in between, router to router.It's like, let's leverage the best of these clouds together. I'm a truly believer of multi-cloud. Non-single cloud is perfect. We are evolving, we're getting better, we are adding services. I don't want to get to 500 services like other guys do. It's like, just have a set of things that really works and works really, really well.Corey: Until you have 40 distinct managed database services and 80 ways to run containers, are you're really a full cloud provider? I mean, there's always that question that, at some point, the database Java, the future is going to have to be disambiguating between all the different managed database services on a per workload basis, and that job sounds terrible. I can't let the multi-cloud advocacy pass unchallenged here because I'm often misunderstood on this, and if I don't say something, I will get emails, and nobody wants that. I think that the idea of building a workload with the idea that it can flow seamlessly between cloud providers is a ridiculous fantasy that basically no one achieves. The number of workloads that can do that are very small.That said, the idea of independent workloads living on different cloud providers as is the best fit for placement for those is not just a good idea, it is the—whether it's a good idea or not as irrelevant because that's the reality in which we all live now. That is the world we have to deal with.Guillermo: If you want distributed system, obviously you need to have multiple cloud providers in your strategy. How you federate things—if you go down to the Kubernetes side, how you federate multi-clusters and stuff, that's a challenge out there where people have. But you mentioned that having multiple apps and things, we have customers that they've been running Google Cloud, for example, and we build [unintelligible 00:07:40] that cloud service out there. And the thing is that when they run the network throughput and the performance test, they were like, “Damn, this is even better than what I have in my data center.” It's like, “Guys, because we are room by room.” It's here is Google, here it's Oracle; we land in the same data center, we can provide better connectivity that what you even have.So, that kind of perception is not well seen in some customers because they realize that they're two separate clouds, but the reality is that most of us have our infrastructure in the same providers.Corey: It's kind of interesting, just to look at the way that the industry is misunderstanding a lot of these things. When you folks came out with your cloud at customer initiatives—the one that jumps out to my mind is the dedicated region approach—a lot of people started making fun of that because, “What is this nonsense? You're saying that you can deploy a region of your cloud on site at the customer with all of the cloud services? That's ridiculous. You folks don't understand cloud.”My rejoinder to that is people saying that don't understand customers. You take a look at for example… AWS has their Outpost which is a rack or racks with a subset of services in them. And that, from their perspective, as best I can tell, solves the real problem that customers have, which is running virtual machines on-premises that do not somehow charge an hourly cost back to AWS—I digress—but it does bring a lot of those services closer to customers. You bring all of your services closer to customers and the fact that is a feasible thing is intensely appealing to a wide variety of customer types. Rather than waiting for you to build a region in a certain geographic area that conforms with some regulatory data requirement, “Well, cool, we can ship some racks. Does that work for you?” It really is a game-changer in a whole bunch of respects and I don't think that the industry is paying close enough attention to just how valuable that is.Guillermo: Indeed. I've been at least hearing since 2010 that next year is the boom; now everybody will move into the cloud. It has been 12 years and still 75% of customers doesn't have their critical workloads in the cloud. They have developer environments, some little production stuff, but the core business is still relying in the data center. If I come and say, “Hey, what if I build this behind your firewall?”And it's not just that you have the whole thing. I'm removing all your operational expenses. Now, you don't need to think about hardware refresh, upgrade staff, just focus on your business. I think when we came up with a dedicated region, it was awesome. It was one of the best thing I've seen their Outpost is a great solution, to be honest, but if you lose the one connectivity, the control plane is still in the cloud.In our site, you have the control plane inside your data center so you can still operate and manage your services, even if there is an outage on your one site. One of the common questions we find on that area is, like, “Damn, this is great, but we would like to have a smaller size of this dedicated region.” Well, stay tuned because maybe we come with smaller versions of our dedicated regions so you guys can go and deploy whatever you need there.Corey: It turns out that, in the fullness of time, I like this computer but I want it to be smaller is generally a need that gets met super well. One thing that I've looked into recently has been the evolution of companies, in the fullness of time—which this is what completely renders me a terrible analyst in any traditional sense; I think more than one or two quarters ahead, and I look at these things—the average tenure of a company in the S&P 500 index is 21 years or so. Which means that if we take a look at what's going on 20 years or so from now in the 2040s, roughly half—give or take—of the constituency of the S&P 500 may very well not have been founded yet. So, when someone goes out and founds a company tomorrow as an idea that they're kicking around, let's be clear, with a couple of very distinct exceptions, they're going to build it on Cloud. There's a lot of reasons to do that until you hit certain inflection points.So, this idea that, oh, we're going to rent a rack, and we're going to go build some nonsense, and yadda, yadda, yadda. It's just, it's a fantasy. So, the question that I see for a lot of companies is the longtail legacy where if I take that startup and found it tomorrow and drive it all the way toward being a multinational, at what point did they become a customer for whatever these companies are selling? A lot of the big E enterprise vendors don't have a story for that, which tells me long-term, they have problems. Looking increasingly at what Oracle Cloud is doing, I have to level with you, I viewed Oracle as being very much in that slow-eroding dinosaur perspective until I started using the platform in some depth. I am increasingly of the mind that there's a bright future. I'm just not sure that has sunk into the industry's level of awareness these days.Guillermo: Yeah, I can agree with you in that sense. Mainly, I think we need to work on that awareness side. Because for example, if I go back to the other products we have in the company, you know, like the database, what the database team has done—and I'm not a database guy—and it's like, “Guys, even being an infrastructure guy, customers doesn't care about infrastructure. They just want to run their service, that it doesn't fail, you don't have a disruption; let me evolve my business.” But even though they came with this converged database, I was really impressed that you can do everything in a single-engine rather than having multiple database implemented. Now, you can use the MongoDB APIs.It's like, this is the key of success. When you remove the learning curve and the frictions for people to use your services. I'm a [unintelligible 00:13:23] guy and I always say, “Guys, click, click, click. In three clicks, I should have my service up and running.” I think that the world is moving so fast and we have so much information today, that's just 24 hours a day that I have to grab the right information. I don't have time to go and start learning something from scratch and taking a course of six months because results needs to be done in the next few weeks.Corey: One thing that I think that really reinforces this is—so as I mentioned before, I have a free tier account with you folks, have for years, whenever I log into the thing, I'm presented with the default dashboard view, which recommends a bunch of quickstarts. And none of the quickstarts that you folks are recommending to me involve step one, migrate your legacy data center or mainframe into the cloud. It's all stuff like using analytics to predict things with AI services, it's about observability, it's about governance of deploy a landing zone as you build these things out. Here's how to do a low-code app using Apex—which is awesome, let's be clear here—and even then launching resources is all about things that you would tend to expect of launch database, create a stack, spin up some VMs, et cetera. And that's about as far as it goes toward a legacy way of thinking.It is very clear that there is a story here, but it seems that all the cloud providers these days are chasing the migration story. But I have to say that with a few notable exceptions, the way that those companies move to cloud, it always starts off by looking like an extension of their data center. Which is fine. In that phase, they are improving their data center environment at the expense of being particularly cloudy, but I don't think that is necessarily an adoption model that puts any of these platforms—Oracle Cloud included—in their best light.Guillermo: Yeah, well, people was laughing to us, when we released Layer 2 in the network in the cloud. They were like, “Guys, you're taking the legacy to the cloud. It's like, you're lifting the shit and putting the shit up there.” Is like, “Guys, there are customers that cannot refactor and do anything there. They need to still run Layer 2 there. Why not giving people options?”That's my question is, like, there's no right answers to the cloud. You just need to ensure that you have the right options for people that they can choose and build their strategy around that.Corey: This has been a global problem where so many of these services get built and launched from all of the vendors that it becomes very unclear as a customer, is this thing for me or not? And honestly, sometimes one of the best ways to figure that out is to all right, what does it cost because that, it turns out, is going to tell me an awful lot. When it comes to the price tag of millions of dollars a year, this is probably not for my tiny startup. Whereas when it comes to a, oh, it's in the always free tier or it winds up costing pennies per hour, okay, this is absolutely something I want to wind up exploring and seeing what happens. And it becomes a really polished experience across the board.I also will say this is your generation two cloud—Gen 2, not to be confused with Gentoo, the Linux distribution for people with way more time on their hands than they have sense—and what I find interesting about it is, unlike a lot of the—please don't take this the wrong way—late-comers to cloud compared to the last 15 years of experience of Amazon being out in front of everyone, you didn't just look at what other providers have done and implement the exact same models, the exact same approaches to things. You've clearly gone in your own direction and that's leading to some really interesting places.Guillermo: Yeah, I think that doing what others are doing, you just follow the chain, no? That will never position you as a top number one out there. Being number one so many years in the cloud space as other cloud providers, sometimes you lose the perception of how to treat and speak to customers you know? It's like, “I'm the number one. Who cares if this guy is coming with me or not?” I think that there's more on the empathy side on how we treat customers and how we try to work and solve.For example, in the startup team, we find a lot of people that hasn't have infrastructure teams. We put for free our architects that will give you your GitHub or your GitLab account and we'll build the Terraform modules and give that for you. It's like now you can reuse it, spin up, modify whatever you want. Trying to make life easier for people so they can adopt and leverage their business in the cloud side, you know?[midroll 00:14:45]Corey: There's so much that we folks get right. Honestly, one of the best things that recommends this is the always free tier does exactly what it says on the tin. Yeah, sure. I don't get to use every edge case service that you've built across the board, but I've also had this thing since 2019, and never had to pay a penny for any of it, whereas recently—as we're recording this, it was a week or two ago—that I saw someone wondering what happened to their AWS account because over the past week, suddenly they went from not using SageMaker to being charged $270,000 on SageMaker. And it's… yeah, that's not the kind of thing that is going to endear the platform to frickin' anyone.And I can't believe I'm saying this, but the thing says Oracle on the front of it and I'm recommending it because it doesn't wind up surprising you with a bill later. It feels like I've woken up in bizarro world. But it's great.Guillermo: Yep. I think that's one of the clever things we've done on that side. We've built a very robust platform, really cool services. But it's key on how people can start learning and testing the flavors of your cloud. But not only what you have in the fleet here, you have also the Ampere instances.We're moving into a more sustainable world, and I think that having, like, the ARM architectures in the cloud and providing that on the free space of people can just go and develop on top, I think that was one of the great things we've done in the last year-and-a-half, something like that. Definitely a full fan of a free tier.Corey: You also, working over in the Developer Evangelist slash advocacy side of the world—devrelopers, as I tend to call it much to the irritation of basically everyone who works in developer relations—one of the things that I think is a challenge for you is that when I wind up trying to do something ridiculous—I don't know maybe it's a URL shortener; maybe it is build a small app that does something that's fairly generic—with a lot of the other platforms. There's a universe of blog posts out there, “Here's how I did it on this platform,” and then it's more or less you go to GitHub—or gif-UB, and I have mispronounced that too—and click the button and I wind up getting a deploy, whereas in things that are rapidly emerging with the Oracle Cloud space, it feels like, on some level, I wind up getting to be a bit of a trailblazer and figure some of these things out myself. That is diminishing. I'm starting to see more and more content around this stuff. I have to assume that is at least partially due to your organization's work.Guillermo: Oh, yeah, but things have changed. For example, we used to have our GitHub repository just as a software release, and we push to have that as a content management, you know, it's like, I always say that give—let people steal the code. You just put the example that will come with other ideas, other extensions, plug-in connectors, but you need to have something where you can start. So, we created this DevRel Quickstart that now is managed by the new DevRel organization where we try to put those examples. So, you just can go and put it.I've been working with the community on building, like, a content aggregator of how people is using our technology. We used to have ocigeek.com, that was a website with more than 1000 blog and, like, 500 visits a day looking after what other people were doing, but unfortunately, we had to, because of… the amount of X reasons we have to pull it off.But we want to come with something like that. I think that information should be available. I don't want people to think when it comes to my cloud is like, “Oh, how you use this product?” It's like no, guys how I can build with Angular, React the content management system? You will do it in my cloud because that example I'm doing, but I want you to learn the basics and the context of running Python and doing other things there rather than go into oh, no, this is something specific to me. No, no, that will never work.Corey: That was the big problem I found with doing a lot of the serverless stuff in years past where my first Lambda application took me two weeks to build because I'm terrible at programming. And now it takes me ten minutes to build because I'm terrible at programming and don't know what tests are. But the problem I ran into for that first one was, what is the integration format? What is the event structure? How do I wind up accessing that?What is the thing that I'm integrating with expecting because, “Mmm, that's not it; try again,” is a terrible error message. And so, much of it felt like it was the undifferentiated gluing things together. The only way to make that stuff work is good documentation and numerous examples that come at the problem from a bunch of different ways. And increasingly, Oracle's documentation is great.Guillermo: Yeah, well, in my view, for example, you have the Three-Tier Oracle. We should have a catalog of 100 things that you can do in the free tier, even though when I propose some of the articles, I was even talking about VMware, and people was like, “[unintelligible 00:22:34], you cannot deploy VMware.” It's like, “Yeah, but I can connect my [crosstalk 00:22:39]—”Corey: Well, not with that attitude.Guillermo: Yeah. And I was like, “Yeah, but I can connect to the cloud and just use it as a backup place where I can put my image and my stuff. Now, you're connecting to things: VMware with free tier.” Stuff like that. There are multiple things that you can do.And just having three blocks is things that you can do in the free tier, then having developer architectures. Show me how you can deploy an architecture directly from the command line, how I can run my DevOps service without going to the console, just purely using SDKs and stuff like that. And give me the option of how people is working and expanding that content and things there. If you put those three blocks together, I think you're done on how people can adopt and leverage your cloud. It's like, I want to learn; I don't want to know the basics of I don't know, it's—I'm not a database guy, so I don't understand those things and I don't want to go into details.I just they just need a database to store my profiles and my stuff so I can pick that and do computer vision. How I can pick and say, “Hey, I'm speaking with Corey Quinn and I have a drone flying here, he recommends your face and give me your background from all the different profiles.” That's the kind of solutions I want to build. But I don't want to be an expert on those areas.Corey: Because with all the pictures of me with my mouth open, you wouldn't be able to under—it would make no sense of me until I make that pose. There's method to—Guillermo: [laugh].Corey: —my insane madness over here.Guillermo: [laugh] [unintelligible 00:23:58].Corey: Yeah. But yeah, there's a lot of value as you move up the stack on these things. There's also something to be said, as well, for a direction that you folks have been moving in recently, that I—let me be fair here—I think it's clown shoes because I tend to think in terms of software because I have more or less the hardware destruction bunny level of aura when it comes to being near expensive things. And I look around the world and I don't have a whole lot of problems that I can legally solve with an army of robots.But there are customers who very much do. And that's why we see sort of the twin linking of things like IoT services and 5G, which when I first started seeing cloud providers talking about this, I thought was Looney Tunes. And you folks are getting into it too, so, “Oh, great. The hype wound up affecting you too.” And the thing that changed my mind was not anything cloud providers have to say—because let's be clear, everyone has an agenda they're trying to push for—but who doesn't have an agenda is the customers talking about these things and the neat things that they're able to achieve with it, at which point I stopped making fun, I shut up and listen in the hopes that I might learn something. How have you seen that whole 5G slash IoT slash internet of Nonsense space evolving?Guillermo: That's the future. That's what we're going to see in the next five years. I run some innovation sessions with a lot of customers and one of the main components I speak about is this area. With 5G, the number of IoT devices will exponentially grow. That means that you're going to have more data points, more data volume out there.How can you provide the real value, how you can classify, index, and provide the right information in just 24 hours, that's what people is looking. Things needs to be instant. If you say to the kids today, they cannot watch a football match, 90 minutes. If you don't get the answer in ten, they move to the next thing. That's how this society is moving [unintelligible 00:25:50].Having all these solutions from a data perspective, and I think that Oracle has a great advantage in that space because we've been doing that for 43 years, right? It's like, how we do the abstraction? How I can pick all that information and provide added value? We build the robot as a service. I can configure it from my browser, any robot anywhere in the world.And I can do it in Python, Java. I can [unintelligible 00:26:14] applications. Two weeks ago, we were testing on connecting IoT devices and flashing the firmware. And it was working. And this is something that we didn't do it alone. We did it with a startup.The guys came and had a sandbox already there, is like, “let's enable this on [unintelligible 00:26:28]. Let's start working together.” Now, I can go to my customers and provide them a solution that is like, hey, let's connect Boston Dynamics, or [unintelligible 00:26:37] Robotics. Let's start doing those things and take the benefits of using Oracle's AI and ML services. Pick that, let's do computer vision, natural language processing.Now, you're connecting what I say, an end-to-end solution that provides real value for customers. Connected cars, we turn our car into a wallet. I can go and pay on the petrol station without leaving my car. If I'm taking the kids to takeaway, I can just pay these kind of things is like, “Whoa, this is really cool.” But what if I [laugh] get that information for your insurance company.Next year, Corey, you will pay double because you're a crazy driver. And we know how you drive in the car because we have all that information in place. That's how the things will roll out in the next five to ten years. And [unintelligible 00:27:24] healthcare. We build something for emergencies that if you have a car crash, they have the guys that go and attend can have your blood type and some information about your car, where to cut the chassis and stuff when you get prisoner inside.And I got people saying, “Oh gee, GDPR because we are in Europe.” It's like, “Guys, if I'm going to die, I don't care if they have my information.” That's the point where people really need to balance the whole thing, right? Obviously, we protect the information and the whole thing, but in those situations is like hey, there's so many things we can do. There are countless opportunities out there.Corey: The way that I square that circle personally has always been it's about informed consent, when if people are given a choice, then an awful lot of those objections that people have seemed to melt away. Provided, of course, that is an actual choice and it's not one of those, “Well, you can either choose to”—quote-unquote—“Choose to do this, or you can pay $9,000 a month extra.” Which is, that's not really a choice. But as long as there's a reasonable way to get informed consent, I think that people don't particularly mind, I think it's when they wind up feeling that they have been spied upon without their knowledge, that's when everything tends to blow up. It turns out, if you tell people in advance what you're going to do with their information, they're a lot less upset. And I don't mean burying it deep and the terms and conditions.Guillermo: And that's a good example. We run a demo with one of our customers showing them how dangerous the public information you have out there. You usually sign and click and give rights to everybody. We found in Stack Overflow, there was a user that you just have the username there, nothing else. And we build a platform with six terabytes of information grabbing from Stack Overflow, LinkedIn, Twitter, and many other social media channels, and we show how we identify that this guy was living in Bangalore in India and was working for a specific company out there.So, people was like, “Damn, just having that name, you end up knowing that?” It's like there's so much information out there of value. And we've seen other companies doing that illegally in other places, you know, Cambridge Analytics and things like that. But that's the risk of giving your information for free out there.Corey: It's always a matter of trade-offs. There is no one-size-fits-all solution and honestly, if there were it feels like we wouldn't have cloud providers; we would just have the turnkey solution that gives the same thing that everyone needs and calls it good. I dream of such a day, but it turns out that customers are different, people are different, and there's no escaping that.Guillermo: [laugh]. Well, you mentioned dreamer; I dream direct routing between satellites, and look where I am; I'm just in the cloud, one step lower. [laugh].Corey: You know, bit by bit, we're going to get there one way or another, for an altitude perspective. I really want to thank you for taking so much time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more, where's the right place to find you?Guillermo: Well, I have the @IaaSgeek Twitter account, and you can find me on LinkedIn gruizesteban there. Just people wants to talk about anything there, I'm open to any kind of conversation. Just feel free to reach out. And it was a pleasure finally meeting you, in person. Not—well in person; through a camera, at least being in the show with you.Corey: Other than on the other side of a Twitter feed. No, I hear you.Guillermo: [laugh].Corey: We will, of course, put links to all of that in the [show notes 00:30:43]. Thank you so much for your time. I really do appreciate it.Guillermo: Thanks very much. So, you soon.Corey: Guillermo Ruiz, Director of OCI Developer Evangelism. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an insulting comment, to which I will respond with a surprise $270,000 bill.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

    The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News
    EP292 - Quarterly Recap (Live)

    The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 50:44


    EP292- Quarterly Recap Sorry for the delay since our last show. We took a beginning of summer hiatus, and Jason upgraded to a new knee! This episode was recorded in front of a live audience at the NYC Google HQ, for Zenith Basecamp. Key Topics discussed: Amazon's rate of growth declined in Q1, what lies ahead for them. Impact of App Tracking Transparency (ATT) on advertising platforms Shopify vs. Facebook Retail Media Networks Q1 2022 US Department of commerce data and trends Audience questions (including buy now pay later) If you'd like to follow along, the audience could see this deck during the discussion: JAS_ZenithDownload Episode 292 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Wednesday June 8, 2022. http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing. Transcript Jason: [0:23] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show I'm Jason retailgeek Goldberg. This episode is number 292 being recorded on Wednesday June 8, the beautiful New York City Google headquarters for Zenith base camp and is a special treat we're recording the show in front of a live audience. Scot: [0:45] That was a super important. Jason: [0:49] That Applause is super important because I have no credibility with our audience so they wouldn't believe me if you didn't applaud thank you very much as I mentioned I'm Jason retailgeek Goldberg as always I'm here with my co-host Scot Wingo. Scot: [1:01] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason Scott show listeners. Jason: [1:05] I think I've met most of you but for those of you who I haven't mentioned a met yet thrilled to do so today I as was mentioned earlier I'm the chief Commerce strategy officer for publicist your, almost certainly going to hear from Scott that he thinks might title is super funny and, I'm a fourth-generation retailer back in the Dark Ages I helped launch e-commerce at some funny retailers like, Blockbuster and Best Buy and Target and today I get to work across all the Publicis groupe with all the clients that care about Commerce and I'm super interested to know which clients, don't care about Commerce at this point and so that's me but like I said many of you have met. My annoyingly successful co-host Scott you may not have met so Scott can you tell us a little bit about yourself as they flip the slides. Scot: [1:56] Sure and congrats on that a win at Blockbuster on the digital that was that was good you crush that one yeah. Jason: [2:03] It's super fun every presentation ever done a publicist starts with a big Blockbuster logo and a saying like don't let this happen to you. Scot: [2:11] Isn't there one still open in Alaska if you're gone to visit them. Jason: [2:13] Bend Oregon. Scot: [2:14] Okay then yeah I knew you know that have you talked to them about their digital strategy. Jason: [2:20] It's on the to-do list. Scot: [2:22] I'm a Serial entrepreneur from the Research Triangle Park area and so I started a company I have an engineering background started a company the developer tools. And then this thing called the internet came along and I have a lot of weird Hobbies one of my hobbies we'll talk about a lot of those today is I'm a Star Wars fan so I started I had this I sold my first company, said this dangerous combination of e-commerce has born and I had a lot of liquidity so I started buying really big Star Wars stuff, it stays at my office I have an agreement with my wife that it does not come into the house sadly I probably won't be married if it did so there you go, so that was there at the early days of e-commerce that company I parlayed into a company called challenge visor so started that in 2001 that's a B2B soccer as a service platform for selling on marketplaces are there any channel guys are customers in the house about 3,000 customers and then so Channel visors biggest partners are eBay and Amazon so I've been I'm also he's retailgeek I'm Amazon geek if we have to Brand ourselves maybe a little bitty big geek so I'm in the marketplace side and that's how I met Jason we were on a board together at shot dot-org, remember the first meeting I was there with Jason the CEO of NRF walks in and he's like does anyone have a question Jason raises his hand and says why do we have the worst website on the internet and I was like. [3:38] I need to get to know this guy so he called him out on the terribleness of the in R Us website which was kind of fun and then took Channel advisor public so that was one of my things is an option where I always wanted to do was do an IPO so I got to do that in 2013 that was a lot of fun got to ring the bell I'm a also a CNBC donkeys got to meet and Jim Cramer my wife calls him the guy that yells every night on TV and makes all the loud noises, that was fun and then my current startup let's go to the next slide next two slides yeah it's called spiffy and next slide. [4:12] So spiffy was actually good and go through this animation Jason was supposed to take this on and, so spiffy was actually kind of inspired by the podcast so on our podcast would talk a lot about consumer behavior and for me I'm also an Elon Musk geek and Elon talks about core principles his core principles are physics he's always talking about well if you want to send a ship from here to Mars you're going to have to you can't use let's see welds you have to like mix the atoms together and because of physics we can do we don't do that on Jason Scott show we talk about consumer behaviors so we spent a lot of time talking about the bifurcation in the convenience oriented consumer saw that was swirling around in my head I had my first Uber experience and the this the series of things that lit up for me was alright services are going to go digital we've seen products go digital in the form of e-commerce if you look at GDP consumer services are twice the size of consumer products and then the then as I looked out there there was a lot of companies in this space but none of them were going after the convenience oriented consumer. [5:15] Another hobby of I guess it was a shared one is we like to coin phrases, one of the ones that I coined was Zero friction addiction so when consumers have these low-friction experiences not only are they great. But they amplify the friction of previously previous experiences you didn't think we're friction e Starbucks mobile app for example how many of you use the Starbucks mobile, once you do that and then like the mobile app systems down it's like the worst day of your life because you have to wait in line behind three people and you're like oh my God I'm going to claw my eyes out. And before the mobile app existed you're like three people whoaa short line this is going to be a faster bruxism. So all that was swimming around in my head and I was like I wonder where I could participate in this idea and I was gravitated to car care because I previously invested in a car wash and then I researched and Car Care has a minus 85 net promoter score especially with women, how many of mean if you don't have cars in New York but how many of you have had a bad car experience especially. You're my people so another thing that fascinates me is the Auto industry is going to go through this digital change that we've seen e-commerce go through but it's also the car is changing so I've had a Tesla since 2012 since I've been living that kind of vehicle 2.0 lifestyle so next line so started spiffy in 2014 and today we're in 27 locations about a 50 million run rate doubling, we have 250 Vans across the United States and about 500 technicians so that's a little bit of background on me. Jason: [6:44] That's amazing Scott and so you know Scott mentioned we started this podcast that the joke is he and I met at a board meeting it shop dot org and he and. After the meetings we'd go to a bar and we would just talk shop about what was going on in Scotts Valley. You know we should record this there's like eight other people that would be interested in this conversation and the joke is that like the next day I showed up with like five thousand dollars worth of audio equipment I think. Scot: [7:10] This 90 is forget your mom. Jason: [7:12] That's true yeah. Scot: [7:12] 99.9 listeners. Jason: [7:13] Including my mom who gives me notes on every show hi Mom. So so that's kind of how the show started and you know that one of the topics that's most frequent in fact we often say it wouldn't be a Jason and Scot show without talking about Amazon. And so you know Amazon have their quarterly earnings last month and in the u.s. they're gmv growth rate they sold 6.7% more stuff than they did in q1 of last. Um so that is a alarmingly slow rate of growth by traditional Amazon standards and we click to the next slide. The. This month you've seen all these news articles about Amazon actually having too much warehouse space too much what they call fulfillment center space and how they're literally trying to sublease space to other people that they may have over-invested, as e-commerce starts to slow down and if you cook to the this next slide. [8:15] Actually graft my pandemic Hobbies I learned Tableau by the way if anyone super exciting other people are not a big bread. I'm a geek what can I say so I graphed e-commerce has growth rate versus Amazon's growth rate and historically in the u.s. e-commerce has kind of grown about 10% a year before the pandemic Amazon despite being. 35 to 40% of all e-commerce grows quite a bit faster as you can see the gold line above the blue line but when the pandemic. Um they their paths kind of linked and and you know for these last several months Amazon has grown at about the race. E-commerce and so there's a bunch of analysts that are freaking out. Is the gravy train over the good times done is Amazon selling off and so that's the first topic we want to talk about is what the heck is going on with Amazon Scott. Scot: [9:11] Yeah and it's been interesting another one of my hobbies is Amazon Fulfillment centers this one's riveting and so this started I think it's like 2005 I was driving to work and I saw some construction and you know you're later they put a big amazon logo on it that's like holy cow there's like a million square foot building, this is the Raleigh-Durham area so it's like I wonder how many of these there are so I went on to Amazon's website and they said something like we have around 10 fulfillment centers nice like that, that seems low and then what I discovered at that point time was no one was tracking. From the Wall Street analysts through Amazon fulfillment center roll out so so started working on that and quickly discovered that they had about sixty fulfillment centers built and they were building like another 16 so I started publishing data on this, and fun fact they always use airport codes so this was like RDU 3 soyuz rd1 and these numbers and this kind of thing so I get to know about the Amazon fulfillment center really interesting you know really deeply so I think then one of our most popular popular episodes I think we got till like 12:00 listeners on this one so a 30 percent increase this was February 18th we did episode 287 which is a deep dive into Amazon's fulfillment. [10:19] And to me it's just endlessly fascinating I haven't been to a fulfillment center but I have been able to sneak into some of the delivery stations and that's kind of a fun thing so what ties into this is what I think happened is Amazon was in front of their capacity needs before the pandemic and then the pandemic flip that upside down so I think what's happened is over that time where they're in line with e-commerce they were just out of capacity they literally couldn't ship the couldn't build enough fulfillment centers fast enough and whatnot so during the pandemic they have built an incredible amount of infrastructure so I'd have some data here the other thing you need to know is in 2018 another this was probably the most popular one Jason I coined the phrase ship again is even heard this one. And this is where we. Jason: [11:03] We got on like The Today Show. Scot: [11:05] Be on the Today Show they're like what is this ship again and should we be concerned that was us that was us we cause that and we take all the credit, and what happened is Jason has many of his Tableau slides he had this he has a slide that shows the FedEx capacity USPS and ups and then Amazon's growth and you can see that Amazon alone then you layer in e-commerce was going to we would run out of capacity for shipping well Amazon also saw those so in 2018 they started a program called, the DSP now this is confusing because they have two DS p– programs there's one in your world of ads I don't know what that one is, delivery service professionals is the one I focus on and what Amazon did is he basically took a page out of the FedEx Playbook and they went and they built a network of 1099 contractors to do last mile deliveries so whenever an Amazon Prime van comes to your house that is an Amazon DSP. [11:59] They've built that entire network since 2018 which is pretty crazy okay so the problem with that Network though is they started it out of fulfillment centers and very quickly it was obvious the Fulfillment centers were when you have these million square-foot buildings and you're just putting things through a door or a loading dock you can't reload Vans quickly so what they've done is they've come up with a new format called a delivery station, this is a smaller about a 200 thousand square foot thing and what it is it's largely attached to a fulfillment center and it's pretty wild at eight am the Fulfillment center doors open and these rafts of containers come down and there's these Vans all lined up, staged in line, where they go furthest packages away get loaded in the first Vans and then they're off and then it's like a military operation it's like D-Day it's like crazy to watch this happen hundreds of employees loading these vans that get deployed through the day. [12:49] So just to give you some numbers that started at zero and now they have built 487 delivery stations for small products 108 delivery stations for large so they built about 600 delivery stations in the last 3 years which is pretty crazy that represents so there's so nothing Amazon does each delivery station has four or five dsps and they play them off each other so they're small businesses and then they give them all these scorecards and if you score well you get more routes and trucks so there's like this gamification, and I've met some of these guys and they're just like constantly going at each other and and Amazon is very clever because they're like stuck in this game gamification they don't really realize it that Amazon just playing them off each other the thing that fascinates me is they're all run by this you know data in the cloud so everyone in this operation there's no real managers or anything they're just like all looking at their their their devices and it's telling them what to do every day that's kind of as a computer science guy that kind of fascinating we do have a i overlords that that just kind of run things so there's two 2500 dsps and 100,000 Vans and so they've invested a ton in that and then that's just the delivery stations so they've also added you know 88 sortable fulfillment centers. [14:08] Basically they've invested so much in infrastructure during the pandemic that I think we're going to see these numbers they're they actually have admitted they have too much capacity but I think it's going to give them the ability to re-accelerate versus e-commerce because they now have the capacity in this new world. [14:22] It was a long answer to that one but but you know I think what's key to me is if you buy into this theory that getting product to the consumer fast and efficiently is going to be key, they've gotten the cost to deliver a package and that last mile down to a dollar fifty with this. [14:37] You know so many of you that are shipping products and you're looking at FedEx at eight nine ten twelve dollars in different zones that's kind of the economics they've baked into that now for a long time thought one of the Amazons unusual playbooks is they'll build something really really crazy expensive and you're like this is insane and then they'll open it up which for most people in the old score world you're like, that doesn't make any sense because you used to build these proprietary networks like Walmart's Data Center and computer infrastructure, that was proprietary and gave them an edge Amazon's philosophy is let's open it up that makes the product better and we get third parties to help pay for the. So this is obvious now that the AWS and Amazon third-party Network I believe that there will be a day when I could ship I'm enrolling your in Charlotte I'll be able to ship you a package I'll just put on my front porch the Amazon DSP will pick it up and I'll ship you a package for three bucks right so it'll be half the cost of FedEx or UPS but don't make a hundred percent are 50% gross margin on it, so that's going to be really interesting and they'll be able to offer that they are actually offering a lot of that kind of capability to other Merchants so so that'll be interesting you'll have to face this decision of if you're your Cody or someone like that do you want to switch from FedEx to Amazon shipping your products and so there's a lot of real interesting things going on in the Amazon World those are some of the big ones. Jason: [15:51] Yeah yeah to kind of put that in consumer terms. Before the pandemic Amazon had invested something like 50 billion dollars in their fulfillment centers and so on. It wasn't that long ago I would talk to clients and they're like hey Jason we've got the secret plan to compete with Amazon where we're gonna buy a warehouse in Kentucky because that can ship to the whole us and we're going to compete with Amazon and I'm like. You realize Amazon has 109 million square foot fulfillment centers and 50 billion dollars worth of infrastructure and that was before the pandemic from. Mid 2018 to today they've invested another 50 billion dollars and literally double the size of their capacity so the likelihood of anyone in the u.s. competing with him in terms of. Capacity is next to know and as Scott mentioned in 2018 we had this bad holiday where we didn't deliver everything on time Amazon became you know aware that they weren't going to grow where they want to grow using third-party parcels and I think there's this famous quote from Fred Smith it FedEx like. Amazon's an amazing company but they're our partner they're not a competitor they never understand the competitiveness of the, the parcel business and back then Amazon delivered eight percent of their own packages that was 2018 today Amazon delivers over 60% of their own packages right and so in a very short period of time. [17:16] They they've created this phenomenal capability so the magic question is is this a blip like, is the are they going to start growing faster than e-commerce as soon as we get out of all this crazy economic Madness or like is this going to be the new normal for Amazon that they're you know so big that they can't grow as fast anymore. Scot: [17:35] My prediction is yes they will I think they'll get the capacity they'll turn on these other things another area that I think they'll get into and we've covered this on the show is where we call these things like to go Puffs the road you have a fancy name for. Jason: [17:47] Instant delivery or ultra-fast delivery. Scot: [17:49] Yeah Amazon part of this infrastructure they built out is in that similar vein so some same-day infrastructure where, you know these delivery stations are getting smaller and smaller and closer and closer to the consumer so that they can do same delivery in fact at the delivery station I was at they do 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. load out and then everyone comes back at to and they do another load out of a smaller portion of vans, for same-day delivery orders that have come in so so so I think I think what they're going to do is they're going to Crank It Up, Prime will eventually go to same day and then that's going to create a whole new stimulation of demand and then they will grow faster than e-commerce. Jason: [18:24] I feel like that's another funny one is talk to like there's a bunch of new startups that are like trying to do e-commerce fulfillment and they're like we're going to do two day delivery just as well as Amazon. Scot: [18:34] Yeah this is this is a good segue into Shopify so one of the things that there's defied explanation for me is the rise of Shopify shopify's a great platform great CEO but they got this valuation of like 50 times forward earnings forward Revenue which just never made sense to me and then they started poking the bear so they started to give Amazon and Jeff Bezos so hard time like when his pictures they were like making fun of him and I was like this you and I have seen this. Jason: [19:01] They're arming the rebels. Scot: [19:02] We've seen this play out we're like who was it the CEO of Macy's said Amazon will never get into apparel and if they do it'll be a bloodbath everyone that makes one of those statements they end up a you know ruining their career and then be very being very wrong so. Jason: [19:17] Terry Lundgren. Scot: [19:18] Terry Lundgren yeah thanks he was also in the in that in our f word me the so so so it's really interesting is Shopify has been poking at Amazon and then Shopify announced that they were going to. Arm the rebels with two day shipping and they're going to build a fulfillment center we're like. Okay this doesn't ever end well then in this then like literally 30 days later they announced and they were going to spend a billion dollars and build a fulfillment center are two billion which you know Amazon spend 100 billion so that's kind of a ridiculous and then they were going to get everywhere two day shipping and Beebe in parallel with prime which doesn't make any sense then they punted on that and they acquire deliver. And then at the same time and this is a good segue into our next topic they basically said, and this goes back to March of this year last year we saw that after Apple's WWDC that year last year, they announced IDF a and I-80 T which is next slide. Jason: [20:18] Yeah jump to slides actually one more. Scot: [20:20] So you and I were like this is going to change everything and destroy all these middle players so so basically you guys probably know what this is I'll let Jason describe it better these new privacy things basically you get rid of not only third-party cookies for web-based things but if you have an app based ecosystem you get rid of tracking it all together and we were like freaking out about it no one else was I, and I felt like Shopify was going to be worse because if you think about Shopify the bulk of their traffic comes from social then they sit in the middle and then they have the merchant well these things in the middle aren't going to really exist in a world where you can't track anything and sure enough this is really caught up not only to them but the social media guys. So we're entering this world where Shopify poked the bear Amazon has a bunch of stuff going on that hasn't even come out to counteract Shopify and when that stuff comes out, then I'll know if you've seen it but Shopify is down like 98% or something like that because they've lost you lost a lot of credibility with this fulfillment thing and then the overall economic has been a really interesting impact and then I think everyone realizes that they're really exposed to these IDF a changes. Jason: [21:25] Yeah and so I think most people in this room are probably painfully familiar with idea Fay but essentially. It's become harder to track a consumer across multiple website so all these advertising platforms that aggregate an audience and send them to third-party content sites used to be able to buy a super-efficient audience on that third party site and then they used to be able to measure how effective it was when they sent people to that site and what they ultimately bought and so because of the tracking deficiencies too bad things happen we can't buy as good an audience as we used to buy so the by is less efficient so the CPM is higher and we can't measure how effective it was right and so there's a lot of impacts certainly for all of you folks that are involved in advertising there's there's a very direct impact on those changes but the secondary impacts can I talked a lot about is before these changes it felt like Shopify and Facebook for example where cozying up, like Shopify has a digital wallet called shop pay which is very exciting successful and they actually made it possible to buy items not from Shopify sellers on Facebook. With Sharpay and you're like oh man it's very synergistic Facebook gets the audience and then they send them to Shopify seller to close the deal and it seemed like they had this partnership and we saw IDF a coming and were like oh man this is going to break up because in the New World. [22:47] The Facebook's of the world need to own that conversion they need to own the sale so they can see the conversion data so they can report on the efficacy they need instead of third party data they need first-party data and so now all these advertising platforms most notably Facebook and Google are doubling down on becoming Commerce platforms which you've talked for a long time about Google is secretly Marketplace. Scot: [23:13] Yeah and then I think ultimately Facebook has to buy Shopify or build show, so that'll be interesting now the price is down before when it was like 40 times for door like they'll never do that but I think now but they do seem, it's hard to know what's going to happen to Facebook because they're so focused on the metaverse that I don't know if Shopify fits into that somewhere inside of there you know someone watches Revenue versus like Ford things and and if you care about revenue and Facebook you would buy you would buy, Shopify the other thing that's really interesting another one of my weird habits is I love to listen to public quarterly calls. Probably the worst quarterly call I've ever heard and I have a lot of empathy for this because I've done many of these is this the Snapchat the last the q1 Snapchat call they basically it was like they just rolled in there, half drunk and had no idea what's going on in the business and like the analysts are asking them questions like do you think this is the bottom of i d f a and the last quarterly call they had said that was the bottom. They're like well you know last time we said it was the bottom we think this is a bottom Jason do you know if it's a bottom it was just like that kind of a thing so if you're an investor and you're sitting there like these guys have no idea how bad this is where the bottom is or how to remediate. And you know that that leg down I think that really big one there that was right after that quarterly call everyone there while she was like these guys have no clue what's going on. So it's really interesting. [24:33] Wall Street is very much awake that these changes that apple and then subsequently Google have made and the Android have really just clobbered these ad networks that kind of our sit between AD networks and kind of relying on on third-party data the converse of that so every time there's a there's a zero-sum game here every time there's a loser there's a winner the big winner here is retail networks and I heard that we're going to have talk about their ad Network I'm the Amazon guy so Amazon's ad network doesn't get a lot of play here but just as of last year it was 30 billion dollars in revenue and they're growing that 25%. And I know they have a massive amount of investment going on there they have a new marketing Cloud they're doing a ton of stuff in there because they realize hey thanks Apple and Google the you have created gold dust out of first-party data guess who has the most first-party data on buyer intent and conversion it's Amazon. But then if you're other retailer be at a Walmart or Target and even smaller retailers are getting into this and kind of more of a, I called a Battlestar Galactica kind of way but more of like a shared data kind of a way that's going to be real interesting. [25:41] You are yeah yeah I think you and I are the only ones to get them the, so that's that's really fascinating to watch this one change in mobile platform just cause these billion-dollar ripples down there and you kind of wonder who it Apple did they think about this where they like, you know that Mark Zuckerberg he's too big for his britches let's let's clobber him in the rest of these guys but you know they don't love app Amazon either so they have to be kind of frustrated that it has helped enable one type of competitor but that just clobbered the other ones. Jason: [26:12] Yeah it's I mean it's super fascinating I. The retail the emergence of retail media networks I think you know is a direct cause of this essentially that you know you now have all this first-party data it Walmart and Target and to your point like. Craziest retail media Network to me is Gap in the reason I say that like most retail media Networks primarily sell ads to endemic Advertiser so you know Cody wants to sell through Sephora so for launches retail media Network they have some leverage to get Cody to invest in, in add-on Sephora but Gap doesn't have any endemic advertisers like Gap only sells their own stuff right so they're now you know trying to go find. Advertisers that are synergistic with The Gap lifestyle and sell ad so I don't think that could have ever happened in a world in which you could really cost effectively by that audience from Facebook but today because it's harder for the Facebook's of the world I think this is a. A permanent shift we're seeing and another reason that it's really an imperative for Facebook to become a Commerce platform of Their Own. Scot: [27:20] Yeah this is probably a good time to pause and see if there's any questions yeah so Amazon or IDF a any questions on those two topics any other comments how many of you have felt some kind of an impact from the IDF a thing that's called you to change strategy. Wow I guess we're wrong yeah. Jason: [27:38] We usually are so there's that I feel like a lot of the success of the show is Scott and I rarely agree and I feel like people like to hear us debate right and so the last topic we put together is. Again one that's probably only near and dear to my heart but the, US Department of Commerce publish all this data about the health of the US retail right and I'm this dork that like wakes up at 8 a.m. I'm kidding I'm up at 8 a.m. right now I wasn't supposed to say that out loud, on the on the day the data is released to like load the stuff into Tableau and so may was a super exciting month because that's the first time we get the. Q1 quarterly data for all the retail categories and e-commerce and so I kind of put together a quick. Quick summary and week I just want to hear if you're surprised or not so first thing if sorry if you go back just one side for just a sec. From from January through April in the u.s. we sold 2.2 trillion dollars of stuff that's almost 10% more stuff than we sold in 2020. [28:42] 36% more stuff than we sold in 2019 so everybody talks about how hard the last two years have been and how challenging and difficult and that's all true. What doesn't get hit is it's been the greatest two years in the history of retail like we've grown, way faster than we ever have before and so if you flip to this next slide this is this visualization that's got an icon of created this is sales by month so that Gray Line is retail sales in 2019 and then the Gold Line is 20/20 so you can see oh my gosh we all panicked in April when the pandemic first happened we have this dip but 2020 we actually sold more stuff than we did in 2019 even with the the pandemic. What we sold changed dramatically we'll talk about that, and then we get to 20 21 and look how much higher 2021 was like 20 everyone was like oh my gosh was 2020 a weird year and growth is going to go down and instead, growth went way up and so at the end of 20 21 I was advising all my peers that worked at clients to retire right because your comps are going to be impossible from, from 20:21 so that was a great time to go out on top. And I was really worried that 2022 was going to come in below that and of course we're talking about all these economic headwinds and things that we may talk about but so far in 2022. [29:59] Even ahead of 2021 so you hear all this news about how like. Oh man the rate of growth has slowed we grew so much in 2021 and now we're only growing a little bit and doom and gloom and all these things. But when you see this picture you go wait a minute. With the best year in the history of retail last year and we're doing even better this year it's actually quite a Rosy story but if you flip to the next slide of course there are certain categories that did. Especially well right and so if you are a gas station and you got utterly creamed. During the pandemic and one was driving anywhere it was easy as to grow fast if you are restaurant that no one went to it was easiest to grow fast apparel that. Scot: [30:41] Miscellaneous that's my favorite yeah I wish I sold more miscellaneous. Jason: [30:46] It's the hardest category to buy. Um and so you can see there's categories that kind of outperform the industry average and there's categories that underperformed the industry average food and beverages grocery right so even though grocery had a really good time in the pandemic it's actually underperforming, the overall category because there were some of those other categories that were so much and whenever I talk about this people are like yeah Jason but all the growth you're talking about isn't, consumer changes or more spending its inflation right and so I actually tried this, experiment of taking the inflation out and I looked at the last three years of growth in 2018 dollars and as you can see, information used to not matter very much in the data so through 2020 and then we started opening up this Gap where inflation legitimately has an impact on our sales right now but even if you just look at the Gold Line which is taking all the inflation Outlook. Um the growth is still very meaningful in phenomenal so it's a like Well you certainly inflation is part of the reason that we're seeing a lift in sales it's a mistake to assume. [31:51] People are just buying less stuff and they're just having to pay more for that stuff in that there really isn't a consumer change the really is a consumer change here in so we want double click on a couple categories in the first category I grab because it's super near and dear to Scott's heart is Automotive right so they sold half a trillion bucks last year they're up 50% from the bed you have 20/20 and if you go to the next slide you'll see the. You know they're their shape that obviously the you know the pandemic gave him a temporary dip but again like most categories they we did slightly better in 2020 2021 was a phenomenal year and then it seems like 20:22 is having a little bit of trouble comping against that what's going on in the apparel or the automotive industry. Scot: [32:34] Was a guy that buys like 30 Vans a month you can't buy vehicles yeah so there are no vehicles out there it's pretty crazy I had to buy my daughter a vehicle and we had to wait like six months and then had to pay like over sticker. Against all grains of my being but had to do it yeah the things we do for our kids. Jason: [32:52] Combo of like there's increased demand and there's these supply-chain constraints and there's no chips right. Scot: [32:58] Yeah yeah so it went from chips now they seem to have the chips but then all the zero covid policy in China is made all the other inputs go to hell in a handbasket so-so so there was some Supply that got out because they had all these vehicles waiting for chips the chips have gotten there but now they can't make a lot of the other components of the vehicle as my understanding and we order we ordered 100 Vans and we got three delivered this year from from new which is just crazy. The other problem I'm up against his there's this other company buying a lot of ants called Amazon and they're buying I'm buying I'm buying what it feels like a lot to us 100 and they're buying like you know, twenty thousand so so they seemed to get a higher spot. Jason: [33:36] They're higher in the queue than you yeah so if you take nothing else out of this this segment if you have to sell a car right now do not use Blue Book value your car is way more valuable than Blue Book value. Scot: [33:47] And before you sell your car get a new car so it's kind of like yeah because you may be hoofing it if you don't you may be getting to know the Uber app really well. Jason: [33:55] Yeah and whichever card you get get it clean by get spiffy. So let's a lot of people in here in the cpg space so grocery super important this is a category that I follow really closely almost 300 billion in sales in the first quarter and again it's up its up. By the way a new coin we turned is your over 32 years ago right like that's the new the new black in earnings calls is everyone's talking about their silver says 2019 which was the. Quote unquote normal year so groceries up twenty Twenty-One percent from from that normally year and we've kind of had this 8% growth rate which is better than grocery historically grew if you go the next slide you see our shape again, grocery is a unique one right like. Yet average sales in 2019 and then 20:28 was great for grocery right because nobody went to restaurants like so all the calories that used to buy from restaurant you're buying from grocery so that Gold Line is way up and then, in 2021 they had trouble comping against it in the first half of the Year where all that growth happen but they still 2021 ended up. [35:00] About 10% from 20/20 and 2022 is continuing to be up so far, from from 20 21 and so the way I like to think about this if you jump to the next slide is Sheriff stomach so this gray line is how much. Calories you buy from grocery stores in the Gold Line is how many calories you buy from restaurants and historically over the last 10 years it's been almost a 50/50 split so then the pandemic happened and we got seventy percent of our calories from grocery stores thirty percent of our calories from restaurants and everyone's like wait how did we get any calories from restaurants they're all closed doordash, right it was all off Prem consumption and then we've been waiting to see what would happen could grocery permanently hang onto that lead would restaurants come back and you can see over the last year it kind of close the gap but then look what's happened these like this year restaurants are way above Grocery and so the magic question here is, was their pent-up demand and we're all rushing out to restaurants because we haven't been there and that's kind of a, a one-time Spike and it's going to normalize back to 50/50 or is the new normal that we're all so sick of being in the kitchen for the last two years. That groceries going to have a real decline because if you're you know a leading Grocer in the US this this is a really scary slide at the moment you have a guess. Scot: [36:21] Yeah I'll throw a Freakonomics curveball in here I think a one input into this is the work from home trend, so when you're working from home it's a lot easier to go to the grocery store prep the veggies between zooms or while you're on his Zoom or something like that or like chopping below below the line and just prepare a meal right but when you're in the office and you work late and now you're kind of gone back to that office lifestyle then I think that's going to be a big driver I think. I think we're going to go back to working in the office I think when everything's up into the right you're like okay everyone can work from home but if things get tougher and we go into recession one of the levers Executives can pull as well we need everyone back in the office so I think we're going to get back to that, it won't be the same so it's not going to be whatever we were at before it'll be ten to twenty percent lower but I think that's going to be the Big Driver of this one is that work from from home Trend and I bet it's spiking now, um because of that so I'm seeing and we have data at spiffy for this so one of the things we do at spiffy is we go to office Parks as an amenity if I look at Dallas the Raleigh-Durham area and Atlanta, we're almost back to 80 or 90 percent to pre-pandemic levels at office parks. Now you look at Blue States like California New York Etc you're like a zero so so ultimately I don't know if that separation remains or not but ultimately we're seeing people get back to the office park at least in this Southeast kind of region which is which is I think that's going to drive this more than what you show her. Jason: [37:47] And so then the the last category we're going to talk about is obviously most near and dear to our heart is e-commerce. So in March we sold almost a hundred billion dollars worth of stuff inside baseball thing this is data from the US Department of Commerce it comes out every every month there's better data that comes out every quarter this quarter we had a crazy thing happen, the US Department of Commerce restated the data that they had published in the past and they actually added 100 billion dollars of extra e-commerce sales last year they said we've been Under reporting how big e-commerce was so you may have earlier in the year seen these articles in the Wall Street Journal and elsewhere talking about how the e-commerce craze is over and retailers caught up and it's a much more complicated story than that again e-commerce is up 55% from 20/20 so that's going to be tough to comp against the if we flip to the next slide. Scot: [38:45] Well I disagree with their methodology so we had them on the show and it was. Jason: [38:49] US Department of Commerce. Scot: [38:50] Here's the geekish I had to like break-in Jason was like you were just like. Jason: [38:53] It would be like if anyone mask was on the show. Scot: [38:55] Yes yeah you're just like slobbering all over yourself it was embarrassing and they God we're. Jason: [38:59] Tending that's unusual. Scot: [39:00] They got were Audio Only and the, but then as we got into it you know they count like curbside pickup is e-commerce and to me as an e-commerce guy I have to kind of throw the flag on that one because you know going during the pandemic you know, order online have it shipped to me and now I just go to the Best Buy and set outside they bring it to the store and now I've converted that to an e-commerce sale that doesn't really pencil for me so I think these numbers are overinflated because all the curbside pickup flipped over to e-commerce. Jason: [39:29] There's a common debate and you and I violently disagree on that one. Scot: [39:33] Digital influencer blah blah blah. Jason: [39:35] Yeah yeah exactly but yeah I mean if you so if you what's happening is e-commerce orders are being fulfilled from the store but you think about all these orders at Target that you place online and get delivered to your home from a shipped person or even from a u.s. post office targets fulfilling 96 percent of all their e-commerce orders from stores so curbside pickup is just another. E-commerce order that's fulfilled from a store and so again like to me. Scot: [40:03] But I had to get my car ready to go to Best Buy and I kind of blue shirts only difference is the blue shirt walked 50 feet to me versus me walking 50 feet in the store. Jason: [40:12] But so yeah we'll agree to disagree. Scot: [40:13] That's e-commerce more people can disagree. Jason: [40:13] Smart people can disagree and us so you see the shape again you know again 2020 accelerated e-commerce 2021 still did better although slower and so far in 2022 we're doing better again. Scot: [40:28] Boy what's the one that you hate so much what's the chart you hate the Goldman Sachs one. Jason: [40:33] Well yeah I mean there's a couple different. Scot: [40:38] Mackenzie or McKenzie yeah that's it. Jason: [40:40] Yeah so we'll talk. Yeah so jump to the next slide so Mackenzie is the early in the pandemic came out with this thing and said hey e-commerce has been perfect permanently accelerated by 10 years. Which is utterly wrong right like e-commerce. White kind of went three years ahead and now some categories are still three years ahead like grocery but a lot of categories are much closer to where we'd forecast which I'll show you in just one sec before I get to that though I just wanted to kind of show you pre-pandemic the Gold Line is have as retail grew this The Gray Line is how fast e-commerce grew again Scott and I would disagree about how to count e-commerce but still. [41:18] Retail tended to grow three to four percent a year a great year would be 5% e-commerce grew ten to fifteen percent a year, and and in the pandemic obviously e-commerce wildly accelerated and Retail kind of stayed flat people thought it went down but it kind of stayed flat so then we had this thing that's never happened in my lifetime, which is in like May of 2021, because retail had been so soft for so long retail actually grew faster than e-commerce and we're now having this topsy-turvy thing where the rate of growth for e-commerce and Retail are very similar and so you know I said hey. Well what would have happened if we didn't have the pandemic so this next slide is kind of showing the growth rate for e-commerce. And showing where we would have forecasted e-commerce to go and again in the Wall Street Journal they showed the blue line under the Gold Line. They have this old US Department of Commerce data and if you go to the next slide I zoom. Scot: [42:15] They don't wake up at 8:00 and put it into the table like it. Jason: [42:18] They don't know Tableau like I know tableau, and shout out to all my friends at Salesforce for the own table so you can see it's very noisy right now but it does seem like the pandemic permanently accelerated e-commerce. You know 122 years of acceleration not, not ten years and so then I think the very last slide I put together on the shape of e-commerce is in this is a scary one of me I'm curious what you think about this while e-commerce is continuing to grow well. Is Gary is this is traffic to the top 10 eCommerce sites in the US and this is a different story the gold on the grey line was before the pandemic the blue, the Gold Line was after the pandemic but you can see traffic went down in 2021 even though sales went up and traffic is down even further in 2022 and so what this means is fewer. Are going to e-commerce that the big eCommerce sites less often but they're buying more stuff when they go so. This will be our last question is we're way over time is, that like an inflation thing is that a change in consumer Behavior what do you have any hypothesis what's going on here. Scot: [43:30] So I think people were pegged at home for a while they bought everything they possibly could and they've bought forward so they feel like they got new laptops they've got their fancy exercise bikes. They've got all that stuff their peloton's and now they're just spin out on stuff and now they're wanting to do experiences and services so that's where the dollars are going if you know I think the Gainer of this traffic is probably, Airline sites hotel sites another we have visibility in this a spiffy because our largest customer set is rental car companies, we had a record day yesterday so people are traveling like. Pre-pandemic levels and which is really interesting so the dollars they do want to spend the discretionary dollars are going to experiences and not Services I'd call this a year to go I was a year early, I'm sadly many of our predictions. Jason: [44:16] We have a forecast every year and I get to cream Scott in the for. Scot: [44:19] Well I don't know what. Jason: [44:21] History doesn't show that but you guys don't know. Scot: [44:23] So I think that's what's going on so I you know but I feel like a really really interesting indicator is going to be Amazon Prime day so that's going to be in July of this year and we call it Prime day but every other retailer is glommed onto it and sees a bump from it so it's kind of this fabricated holiday not unlike singles day. That yeah that you know, that is going to be really interesting data point so that could you know the the bullish cases that's going to stimulate people to be like oh yeah I do need a couple other you know cables or a battery or whatever it is so we'll see that we'll be a nursing data point that I think will set us up for holiday and we'll get a pretty good indication of how this is going to go, will the consumer be like okay I'm all travelled out and I want to buy more things or will they continue down this Services dollars been passed. Jason: [45:11] I do think it's really complicated economy right now part of this is inflation and inflation I think is hitting e-commerce harder than than the sort of CPI numbers because the price of a lot of the goods that tend to sell on e-commerce are tend to be. Scot: [45:25] Their supply chain a lot of stuff you just can't get. Jason: [45:27] So there's there's constraints but also consumer Behavior has changed their categories that we would never sell on e-commerce before the pandemic that we are now so one of them that we talked about is Automotive that's a big ticket item right so you need less visits to sell a big Tesla then you then you did to sell a TV and another one is Grocery and when I say that people are Jason are you hi Grocery and I am hi I just had my knee replaced and I'm on some Good Meds the I wore it out going on store visits, the the grocery isn't that expensive but grocery sales and e-commerce are a week's worth of groceries it's 60 to 120 items so that. It is actually a lot higher per visit so some of these new categories becoming more important combined with inflation combined with the supply chain constraints I think off, aspire to do that and that's kind of our, our last take away because it's happen again if you go to the next slide we have used way more than our allotted time but there was no one that could put us off the stage and so. Appreciate it and Scott any closing words. Scot: [46:34] Did anyone have any questions. [46:49] How do you think is going to impact and trends that we're seeing right now. Jason: [46:53] So to repeat the question really quick big Trend in buy now pay later Apple just announced that they were going to have their own flavor buy now pay later built in the Apple pay this week at their event. Scot: [47:06] I've seen some interesting consumer behavior and I'm a little little incredulous on it because it's always sponsored when you dig into it it's like sponsored by a firm and so but what it what it shows is Millennials and gen Z they don't like to have as much open credit they kind of view that negatively and I see this I have kids that are in their 20s and they are freaked out by credit cards but they like to attach that credit to a thing and then pay it off and be done with it, so I think there's an argument to be made that there will be a generational the way we interact with credit will change and then people will after certain over a hundred dollars they'll interact with it in that way so I think that's a really fascinating thing and I want to see more data on that before 100% believe it but I was super incredulous that talk to my kids are like yeah that's how I think I was like well I guess there may be something here. Jason: [47:53] Yeah and as usual that's a really thoughtful and wrong answer. Scot: [47:58] For you yes. Jason: [48:00] No so it. Buy now pay later is huge right now it's the fastest growing form of check out and / Scott's point I would argue they've done an amazing job of branding right like oh it's credits evil credits bad this is not credit right and I talked to our traditional, um Financial customers and I talked to a family-run bank that's a fourth-generation bank and the CEO is like Jason, my family's been in the money renting business which I think that's an awesome way of calling the credit money money renting business for 100 years and that buy now pay later dog doesn't hunt, like it's just a bad version of credit that's been rebranded and. At the moment it's working like it's more expensive to sell something with with a firm or with a buy now pay later service than it is with a credit card but retailers are all doing it because they're selling more stuff because of it right so that's the argument at a firm. Best Buy you should pay more to use buy now pay later. Scot: [48:59] Conversion rates go up. Jason: [49:00] Because conversion rates go up. The scary thing that's starting to come up is guess what's happening right now 42% of all those buy now pay later purchases are now in arrears right so so kids haven't kept up with those purchases it's a. Scot: [49:15] What would a firm would say is that on the front end they can tighten the credit now so yeah that's what they all say. Jason: [49:20] The jury is out and I would say like this Amazon announcement is kind of an interesting nothing Burger because guess how you pay for the the Amazon the Apple buy now pay later service with a credit. Right so you're so it it's kind of like. If the buy now pay later services are rebranded credit and they kind of hide the fact that as credit that Apple buy now pay later is installment payments on a credit card. So so the. Is still out but there is a fear that that this whole bubble of buy now pay later is about to burst and whether it does or not I would say there's too many of them there's going to be a, consolidation retailers are having a lot of pain about. All the consumer requests they're getting to support all of them and we call it NASCAR in the checkout when like you have to you know have 57 logos on the checkout for all these different different ways to pay so I think it's kind of going away. Any other questions before they kick us off the stage. Awesome well thank you guys so much and until next time happy Commerceing! Scot: [50:20] Thanks everybody.

    The Chrome Cast
    Apple's new hardware, Lenovo Duet 3 impressions, and a Pixel Watch app

    The Chrome Cast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 84:27


    This week on The Chrome Cast, we begin the show by talking about Apple's latest announcements from WWDC 2022. With a new ARM-based M2 chip, a new Macbook Air, a confusing Macbook Pro with the M2 chip, and an interesting new multitasking tool in Stage Manager, there was a fair bit to discuss on the Apple front this week. While we generally stick to Chromebooks around here, there's no denying that many of the things Apple chooses to do set the precedents in tech as we move forward, so it's worth getting into their new announcements when they happen. Additionally this week, we touch on the new Pixel Watch app that was discovered and the fact that this will not only serve as a connection point to Google's new wearable, but should also pave the way for Android Smart Unlock as well. Finally, we get into some of our thoughts on the recently-launched Lenovo Chromebook Duet 3 as we now have a production-level model in the office for review. LINKS Lenovo Chromebook Duet 3 pre-review sneak peek: remote working from a tablet Lenovo Chromebook Duet 3 unboxing and impressions [VIDEO] Pixel Watch will have a dedicated app and feature Android Smart Unlock Google needs to steal this new macOS webcam feature for ChromeOS right away Join our Patreon community and get extras, early access to videos, private Discord server access, an ad-free experience on site, and more. CLICK HERE to be a part of our community. This episode is brought to you by Fresh Roasted Coffee. To check it out, go to https://chromeunboxed.com/coffee/ and use the discount code CHROMEUNBOXED for 15% off your initial purchase! This episode is also brought to you by NordVPN. CLICK HERE to try it out and get 2 years for $3.29 per month. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/chromeunboxed/support

    airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien
    GraalVM, Apple Silicon (M1) and Clouds

    airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 83:09


    An airhacks.fm conversation with Shaun Smith (@shaunmsmith) about: Shaun Smith in episode "#167 GraalVM and Java 17, Truffle, Espresso and Native Image", GraalVM has a 3 months release cycle, from Graal 21.3 release to GraalVM 22.1, GraalVM 22.1 supports Apple's Silicon M1 , M1 and container support, ARM and container, Oracle Database on docker, Intel vs. ARM native compilation on Intel, project kenai.com memories, jreleaser, AWS Graviton, Oracle A1 ARM instances and Ampere, CPU is cheap, RAM is expensive, the economics of FaaS, kubernetes vs. Lamba, failing fast with quick builds and -Ob optimization, JRockit, JMC and Sun JVM merge, continuous monitoring with JFR, 22.0 - improving the output and developer experience, GraalVM web assembly support, python vs. Ruby vs. Java, django vs. Ruby on Rails, JavaGD and R, GraalVM supports LLVM and so C and C++ languages, Java on Truffle, or project espresso, GraalVM Visual Studio Code tooling, Micronaut and reflection-free CDI, Quarkus, Micronaut and build-time deployment, NetBeans language server is used in Visual Studio Code, JetBrains and GitPod partnership, need for speed and Visual Studio Code, awk and icon, why I'm using Java and not, blog post: "Why are you not using [the language of the year] instead of Java?" Shaun Smith on twitter: @shaunmsmith