Podcasts about The Blues Brothers

American blues and soul band

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Best podcasts about The Blues Brothers

Latest podcast episodes about The Blues Brothers

Second Citizens
Tracy Thorpe

Second Citizens

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 52:16


Tracy Thorpe delights us with sooooo many great stories from her years at the Second City, including our second eyewitness account of the TourCo van that almost went over the Mountain! In fact, she had so many great stories that we didn't even GET to talking about the most epic bizco gig in history, we may need a part 2! *Tracy also corrected our host (off air) on the authorship of the brilliant song "Helium". Apologies to John Hildreth, the writer of the greatest song ever about a noble gas. Speaking of... it would be noble of you to Subscribe Rate and Review! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/secondcitizenspod/Twitter: https://twitter.com/SecondCitizens_

The Latch Key Kids
My Favorite Year (Special Edition) Planes Trains Automobiles

The Latch Key Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 86:22


They say things happen in threes and in 1987 three of the best Hollywood had to offer joined together to tell a story that even now, 35 years after its release leaves a lasting impact.  John Hughes, Steve Martin, and John Candy were quite literally at the top of their games when they brought to life the Thanksgiving classic Planes, Trains, and AutomobilesThe film would mark a turning point for all three men, who's roots were connected by the likes of Second City, Saturday Night Live, and National Lampoon.  As their careers continued to skyrocket into the 90's, each of them would forge a unique and unforgettable path that helped define a generation.However, despite the countless roles and movies that would identify them.  The Jerk, Stripes, Vacation, Mr. Mom, Roxanne, Summer Rental, The Three Amigos, Splash, Home Alone, The Breakfast Club, Uncle Buck, Parenthood, Ferris Bueller, The Blues Brothers, Father of the Bride – it is the story of Del Griffith and Neal Page's Thanksgiving journey that stands alone. A bona fide cinematic classic that captures and re-captures the heart each and every year around the Thanksgiving table.  The Latch Key Kids are going to tell you why….Because it's time to sit back and relax Mom & Dad won't be back for at least an hour and Welcome To The Latch Key Kids Present This Season Three Special Edition Of My Favorite Year 1987 – Planes, Trains, And Automobiles.

The Confused Breakfast
The Blues Brothers (1980)

The Confused Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 109:30


MR. MAN! It's 106 miles to Chicago, we got a full tank of gas, half a pack of cigarettes, it's dark... and we're wearing sunglasses. Hit it. We're getting the band back together. The Blues Brother are on a mission from God. And we're on a mission to discuss it. So get some dry white toast, four fried chickens, and a coke. crank up that cop motor to hit some Illinois ASWPP's. You guys better get going, they want us to pay for the beer. •0:00:00 - Introductions•0:03:30 - Memories of first viewing•0:07:45 - Pertinent movie details •0:15:45 - Critical and fan reviews•0:24:00 - Scene by scene breakdown •1:39:30 - Modern day ratings——————————————————————**Get Free Shipping, returns and exchanges from Felix Gray Glasses.  http://felixgrayglasses.com/confused——————————————————————**Cedar Ridge Distillery-  Go check out our sponsor and order some whiskey.  http://cedarridgewhiskey.com——————————————————————**Visit us at Http://confusedbreakfast.com or leave a voicemail about your thoughts of the show!  319.804.9596——————————————————————**Support us at http://patreon.com/confusedbreakfast like these fine people-Robin Fawcett, Dane, Joel, Nick Merulla, Mark Prior, Keerlana, Elisha, Camden Griffith, Francisco Rivera, Cameron Jay, Bud Larsen, Katie Beeks, Mr. and Mrs. Roommate, Cale James, Jason Davis, Shaun Dixon, Emilio Perez, Skyler Brunssen, Jordan Hooten, Brynna Misener, Willie Cox III, Jenel Lewis, Joe Thomas, Chris DeAro, Marshall G, Mitch Cavanaugh, Josh Miller, Condumb, Jason Botsford, Chris Prior, Paul DeAro, Jason Hahn, Travis Scanlan, Gary McCarthy, Corey Vaughn, Ranger Rick and Suebaloo, Damien Zemek, Zachary Hearon, Dallas B, Revis, David Waggoner, Jeni Wilson, Tim Nash, Mike Zachar, Duane Van, Robert Vens, Joey Piemonte, David Waters, Allen Cross, negaduck, ZerophoniK, Amy N, Ryan O, David Gould, John Devlin, Zachary Jones, Seth Murray, Tina Hansen,  Leeloo Dallas Multipass, Lance Davis, Jesse Anderson, MikeBeingMike, Dale Prystupa, Lana Kropf, Derek Foreal,  Mike Wheeler, Andrew Sawtell, Mike Oxhard,  Gerret Layoff, Aaron Baker, Ryan Grabski, Michael Nash, Adam Bathon, Ryan Weaver, Quinton Moore, Joseph Morris, Zach Evans, Willard Brown, Justin Wooley, Todd Fatjo, Jared Bushman,  Melinda Miller, Luke Bittues, SHADOWxViking, Rachel Heintz, Bailey Rome, Merkie, Tyler Darke, John Miller, Caleb Kampsen, Dean Roan, Austin Hartman, Jason Ruby Rod Rodgers,  Chris M, Cody Kirker, Chris Kleman, Louie Loniewski, Alexandra Hemingway, Starling,  Jessica Hlavinka, Tanner Gray,  Quincy Mullen, David Amodei, Matthew Rosendahl, Jon Martinez, Jackson M, Jamie Young, Spaceballs the Username, Erin, Richard Harding, Brandon Anderson, Captain Chunk, Bryant Wayland, Jacob Stahl, Carson Krueger, Aaron Hamblin, Alex Navarro, Richard Burciaga, Steven Andrew Gibson, Peter Fitz, Jay Bender, Stephen Gaydos, Steve Bland, Andy M, Chris Nelson, Sean Galbreath, Matt Cruz, Terry Pyatt, Kyle Donnelly, Kyle Eberle, Tyler Kenepp, Jose Leusch, Robert Ross, Steve Primm, Jacob Collins, Max W, Lee Rash, Michael May, Trent Crutcher, Austin Pellazari, Father Peña, Domin Brown, Travis Ferris, Mr. and Mrs. Beers, Ronnie, Midnight Rider, Todd Zeutenhorst, Mindy Zellis, Emma Page, Meghan, Damien Zemek, Mitchell Lundy, Aaron George, Cody Gerdes, Zachary Schild, Michelle Musick and Matt Wendt. You are the best.  You will always be number 1 in our hearts.   Thank you. 

Second Citizens
Maribeth Monroe

Second Citizens

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 79:21


After numerous attempts to schedule this episode we finally tracked down Maribeth Monroe! Joe Gets his most embarrassing moment at Second City (amongst many) out of the way up top before a rollicking romp through Maribeth's Second City years. From her precocious start in Detroit to the......mixed reaction she and some others got upon arriving in Chicago including stories of mystery and intrigue and stalkers! *to any concerned listeners everything works out in the end and no improvisers were harmed in the recording of the episode or in the stories they tell. Happy belated Thanksgiving (no matter when you read this) and we would be thankful if you would Subscribe Rate and Review Please!Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/secondcitizenspod/Twitter: https://twitter.com/SecondCitizens_

In the Corner Back By the Woodpile
In the Corner Back By the Woodpile #279: Reformations VI with Dr. Carlos Eire

In the Corner Back By the Woodpile

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 46:32


We're back with another installment of our talk with Reformation scholar Carlos Eire. This time we discuss the joys of historical research and discovery, the devil getting credit for miracles and The Blues Brothers and Oh Brother Where are Thou as films of faith. To hear on Stitcher, click here! To hear on iTunes, click here! To hear on Spotify, click here!

Mass-Debaters
One on One: 104 80s Movie Tournament with Harvey Laguerre

Mass-Debaters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 77:21


We are sitting down with Harvey, and he is doing his very own 104 80s Movies tournament. Check out this episode to see what he think is the best movie from the 80s movie. If you want to do your own tournament, please contact us, and we will set it up. Here are all the movies in the tournament: TOP GUN (1986)Harlem Nights (1989)DIRTY DANCING (1987)CADDYSHACK (1980)THE LOST BOYS (1987)BACK TO THE FUTURE (1985)Coming to America (1988)E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL (1982)Wall Street 1987GHOSTBUSTERS (1984)REVENGE OF THE NERDS (1984)STAR WARS: EPISODE V -- THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK (1980)SPACEBALLS (1987)SIXTEEN CANDLES (1984)THE LAND BEFORE TIME (1988)THE SHINING (1980)ST. ELMO'S FIRE (1985)RAGING BULL (1980)LABYRINTH (1986)RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK (1981)DEAD POETS SOCIETY (1989)DO THE RIGHT THING (1989)COMMANDO (1985)THE PRINCESS BRIDE (1987)FIELD OF DREAMS (1989)THE THING (1982)THE NAKED GUN (1988)DIE HARD (1988)THE KARATE KID (1984)THE TERMINATOR (1984)police academy (1984)BLADE RUNNER (1982)less than zero (1987)RAISING ARIZONA (1987)TOOTSIE (1982)EVIL DEAD 2 (1987)THE RETURN OF THE LIVING DEAD (1985)AIRPLANE! (1980)WHEN HARRY MET SALLY... (1989)PREDATOR (1987)TIME BANDITS (1981)STAND BY ME (1986)LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS (1986)SAY ANYTHING... (1989)THE LITTLE MERMAID (1989)THE GOONIES (1985)PURPLE RAIN (1984)PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES (1987)WARGAMES (1983)SHORT CIRCUIT (1986)DRAGONSLAYER (1981)THE NEVERENDING STORY (1984)STEEL MAGNOLIAS (1989)BEVERLY HILLS COP (1984)FRIDAY THE 13TH (1980)THE BREAKFAST CLUB (1985)A FISH CALLED WANDA (1988)FERRIS BUELLER'S DAY OFF (1986)FOOTLOOSE (1984)HEATHERS (1989)Breakin' (1984)A CHRISTMAS STORY (1983)INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM (1984)RISKY BUSINESS (1983)Rain Man (1988)A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (1984)REAL GENIUS (1985)ROBOCOP (1987)BIG (1988)BEETLEJUICE (1988)BILL & TED'S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE (1989)THIS IS SPINAL TAP (1984)THE COLOR PURPLE (1985)THE BLUES BROTHERS (1980)WEIRD SCIENCE (1985)GREMLINS (1984)TRON (1982)DESPERATELY SEEKING SUSAN (1985)TO LIVE AND DIE IN L.A. (1985)STAR WARS: EPISODE VI -- RETURN OF THE JEDI (1983)MYSTIC PIZZA (1988)FULL METAL JACKET (1987)PRETTY IN PINK (1986)BATMAN (1989)the last dragon (1985)TRADING PLACES (1983)FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH (1982)NATIONAL LAMPOON'S Christmas VACATION (1989)ESCAPE FROM NEW YORK (1981)PLATOON (1986)THE UNTOUCHABLES (1987)MAD MAX 2 (1981)REPO MAN (1984)AFTER HOURS (1985)BROADCAST NEWS (1987)WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT (1988)THEY LIVE (1988)VALLEY GIRL (1983)SID & NANCY (1986)INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE (1989)LETHAL WEAPON (1987)SCARFACE (1983)POLTERGEIST (1982)BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA (1986) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/support

Ace On The House
OTH: Deep, Deep Cuts with Adam Carolla

Ace On The House

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 59:48


It's a jam packed show this week, as the guys go through some musical legends from the Blue Velvet to the Red Rocker. Then, they turn to your questions on repainting a kitchen vent, building a tree fort, and what's the future of the real estate market? Thanks for supporting our sponsors: Geico.com Ro.Co/Ace BlindsGalore.com, Let them know we sent you!

Ah ouais ?
LES ? DE L'INFO - Michael Jackson : pourquoi a-t-il failli interdire le clip de "Thriller" ?

Ah ouais ?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 2:52


"Thriller", l'album mythique de Michael Jackson ressort ce vendredi 18 novembre pour ses 40 ans. "Billie Jean", "Beat it" et évidemment "Thriller", avec son clip inoubliable que le roi de la pop a failli interdire ! Il avait pourtant fait des pieds et des mains pour sortir ce clip de 13 minutes. Presque 1 million d'euros de budget dont 150.000 de sa poche vu que sa maison de disques lui avait donné seulement 100.000 pour le faire. Comme l'album était déjà un triomphe, ils ont dit pas la peine de claquer des sous pour rien ! C'est donc grâce au making of d'une heure vendu à la télé américaine que le clip s'est financé. Avec un casting de fou. Réalisation : John Landis qui avait fait les Blues Brothers. Masques et monstres, Rick Baker, 7 fois Oscar du meilleur maquillage. Tous les jours à 6h50 sur RTL, Florian Gazan révèle une histoire insolite et surprenante, liée à l'actualité.

Second Citizens
Jamison Webb

Second Citizens

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 67:21


Jamison Webb (no relation to Webb Telescope) joins us to talk about the Webb telescope. We also discuss the many Florida Gator contributions to the improv community which makes Joe mention the 96 Fiesta bowl. We also talk about the post 50th anniversary years and the wealth of talent in that era. We also hope each of you listeners are able to book a national commercial that runs for years....  Subscribe Rate and Review!Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/secondcitizenspod/Twitter: https://twitter.com/SecondCitizens_

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: Sometimes the little guy just doesn't cut it.Let Me Run This By You: Time's a wastin' - giddyup, beggars and choosers.Interview: We talk to star of Parks and Recreation, Easter Sunday, and Barry - Rodney To about Chicago, Marquette University, Lane Tech,  getting discovered while pursuing a Chemistry degree, The Blues Brothers, Dürrenmatt's The Physicists, playing children well into adulthood, interning at Milwaukee Rep, Lifeline Theatre, Steppenwolf, doing live industrials for Arthur Anderson, Asian American actors and their representation in the media, IAMA Theatre Company, Kate Burton, and faking a Singaporean accent.FULL TRANSCRIPT (UNEDITED):1 (8s):I'm Jen Bosworth RAMIREZ2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand2 (15s):It. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all.1 (21s):We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?2 (30s):How's your, how's your eighties decor going for your1 (35s):New house? Okay, well we closed yesterday. Well,2 (39s):Congratulations.1 (40s):Thank you. House buying is so weird. Like we close, we funded yesterday, but we can't record till today because my lender like totally dropped the ball. So like, here's the thing. Sometimes when you wanna support like a small, I mean small, I don't know, like a small bank, like I really liked the guy who is the mortgage guy and he has his own bank and all these things. I don't even, how know how this shit works. It's like, but anyway, they were so like, it was a real debacle. It was a real, real Shannon situation about how they, anyway, my money was in the bank in escrow on Friday.1 (1m 20s):Their money that they're lending us, which we're paying in fucking fuck load of interest on is they couldn't get it together. And I was like, Oh no.2 (1m 29s):They're like, We have to look through the couch cushions,1 (1m 31s):Right? That's what it felt like, Gina. It felt like these motherfuckers were like, Oh shit, we didn't actually think this was gonna happen or something. And so I talked to escrow, my friend Fran and escrow, you know, I make friends with the, with the older ladies and, and she was like, I don't wanna talk bad about your lender, but like, whoa. And I was like, Fran, Fran, I had to really lay down the law yesterday and I needed my office mate, Eileen to be witness to when I did because I didn't really wanna get too crazy, but I also needed to get a little crazy. And I was like, Listen, what you're asking for, and it was true, does not exist. They needed one. It was, it was like being in the, in the show severance mixed with the show succession, mixed with, it was like all the shows where you're just like, No, no, what you're asking for doesn't exist and you wanna document to look a certain way.1 (2m 25s):And Chase Bank doesn't do a document that way. And she's like, Well she said, I don't CH bank at Chase, so I don't know. And I said, Listen, I don't care where you bank ma'am, I don't care. But this is Chase Bank. It happens to be a very popular bank. So I'm assuming other people have checking accounts that you deal with at Chase. What I'm telling, she wanted me to get up and go to Chase Bank in person and get a printout of a certain statement period with an http on the bottom. She didn't know what she was talking about. She didn't know what she was talking about. And she was like, 18, 18. And I said, Oh ma'am, if you could get this loan funded in the next, cuz we have to do it by 11, that would be really, really dope.1 (3m 6s):I'm gonna hang up now before I say something very bad. And then I hung up.2 (3m 10s):Right, Right. Yeah. Oh my God, I know. It's the worst kind of help. And regarding like wanting to support smaller businesses, I what, that is such a horrible sadness. There's, there's no sadness. Like the sadness of really investing in the little guy and having it. That was my experience. My big experience with that was going, having a midwife, you know, with my first child. And I really, I was in that whole thing of that, that time was like, oh, birth is too medicalized. And you know, even though my husband was a doctor, like fuck the fuck the medical establishment we're just, but but didn't wanna, like, I didn't wanna go, as my daughter would say, I didn't wanna be one of those people who, what did she say?2 (3m 52s):You know, one of those people who carry rocks to make them feel better.1 (3m 57s):That's amazing. Super.2 (4m 0s):So I didn't wanna go so far as to be one of those rock carrying people to have the birth at my house, but at the same time I really wanted to have this midwife and then there was a problem and she wasn't equipped to deal with it. And it was,1 (4m 11s):I was there,2 (4m 13s):Fyi. Yes, you were1 (4m 15s):The first one, right? For your first one.2 (4m 16s):The first one.1 (4m 18s):Here's the thing you're talking about this, I don't even remember her ass. What I, she, I don't remember nothing about her. If you had told me you didn't have one, I'd be like, Yeah, you didn't have one. I remember the problem and I remember them having to get the big, the big doctor and I remember a lot of blood and I remember thinking, Oh thank God there's this doctor they got from down the hall to come or wherever the hell they were and take care of this problem because this gene is gonna bleed out right here. And none of us know what to do.2 (4m 50s):Yes. I will never forget the look on your face. You and Erin looking at each other trying to do that thing where you're like, It's fine, it's fine. But you're such a bad liar that, that I could, I just took one look at you. I'm like, Oh my God, I'm gonna fucking bleed out right here. And Aaron's going, No, no, no, it's cool, it's cool, it's cool. And then of course he was born on July 25th and all residents start their residency on July 1st. So you know, you really don't wanna have a baby or have surgery in July cuz you're getting at a teaching hospital cuz you're getting a lot of residents. And this woman comes in as I'm bleeding and everything is going crazy and I haven't even had a chance to hold my baby yet. And she comes up to me and she says, Oh cuz the, the midwife ran out of lidocaine. There was no lidocaine.2 (5m 30s):That's right. They were trying to sew me up without lidocaine. And so this nurse comes in, she puts her hand on my shoulder, she says, Hi, I'm Dr. Woo and I'm, and I said, Dr. W do you have any lidocaine? I need some lidocaine stat right up in there. Gimme some lidocaine baby. And she had to call her boss. You know who I could tell when he came in, of course he was a man and I could tell when he came in, he looks at my midwife and is like, Oh, this is what you did here. I see we have to come in and clean up. But sometimes that's the case. Sometimes it's really just true that, you know, it's that the, that the bigger kind of like more corporate option is better cuz it just works better.1 (6m 8s):Well, and they've done this before, like there is, they've done the job before in a way, and they've seen the problems. They know how to troubleshoot in a way because they just have the fucking experience. Now you could say that getting that experience is like super fucked up and patriarchal and, and all the isms, it's, and you'd be right, but when you are bleeding to death or when you know you are in a big financial negotiation that could go south at any moment and lead to not having a ho like a all feeling lost. You want someone who knows how to fucking troubleshoot, dude. Like, come on. And I, you know, and it is sad, it's heartbreaking when you like, fuck man.1 (6m 50s):I really wanted this, like Dr. Altman always said, and I have an update on Dr. Altman, my favorite psychiatrist mentor of mine. But he always said like, well when I was going through med titration, when they put this dingling at Highland Park Hospital, who tried her best but put me on lithium thinking I was bipolar and then I was and all the meds, right? All the meds. And he's like, well they could've worked2 (7m 15s):It could've worked it1 (7m 17s):All's. And I was like, you are right. So like, it could've worked, it could've gone differently, but it just didn't. So it's like, yeah, it's better to look at it like that because, or else it's just infuriating that it didn't work in the first place, Right? Like, you're like, well fucker, Well they tried.2 (7m 35s):Yeah. I use that all the time that it could have worked. Things that I got through you from Dr. Altman, you know, my husband is having like some major, you know, growth moments. Like come like those moments where all the puzzle pieces become clear and you go, Okay, my childhood isn't what I thought it was and this person has got this and this person has got that. Yes. You know? And, and whenever he's doing the thing that we all do, which is like lamenting the life, the family he wish he had had, I always say like, well, as Dr. Almond says, it could have worked. Yes, these parents could have been just fine for you if you were a different person, but you're you.2 (8m 16s):And so, and they're them and it wasn't a good match. And like that happens sometimes.1 (8m 21s):And I think it's really good with kids maybe too. Cause it's like, listen, like, like I say to my niece, like it could, this could have been whatever it is the thing or my nephew too that worked and like that you loved volleyball or that you loved this. Like you are just looking, and I think it's all about titration, right? Like it's all about figuring out where we fit in, where we belong, where we don't. And it's a fucking process, which is what he was saying and like, and that you don't, we don't get it right the first time. Even in medicine, even in it's maybe especially in medicine, maybe in especially in relationships, like, so it, it also opens the door for like, possibility, right? That like, it's an experiment and like, we don't know, even doctors don't know, Hey, run this by you, Miles did of course.1 (9m 14s):And done. What about you? What about you?2 (9m 17s):I'm gonna do it after this, after we're done recording today, I'm gonna go over and I always like to take one of my kids so they, you know, see that this is the process and you have to do it and it's everybody's responsibilities to do it. That doesn't mean that I didn't get all angry at my own party this week. You know, my mom has a great expression. I think it's her expression. She says it. In any case, all politics is local, right? Like where it really, where the really meets the road is what's happening in your backyard. And like, I have a lot of problems with my town,1 (9m 52s):So Right.2 (9m 53s):They don't wanna have, you know, they voted down this measure to put a a, like a sober living place, wanted to take up residence here. Couldn't think of a greater idea. Nobody wanted it. You know, it's a lot of nis not in my backyarders over here. And it really drives me crazy. And in the, in the paper this week, there was a big scandal because there's this particular like committee in our town, Okay. That was in charge of, there was gonna be this, what is it, like a prize maybe or an honor or not a scholarship Okay. But something where they were gonna have to name it.2 (10m 33s):Okay. And they were, you know, really looking around for names. They were trying to think up what names would be appropriate. And somebody put forward the name of this person who is already kind of a named figure in our town. Like, we had this beautiful fountain, it's named after him. He was, he was a somewhat of a big guy, you know, he was an architect, whatever. Sure. So this name gets put forward in this woman who's on this committee says, I don't think this is a great time to name something after an old white man. Now, to me couldn't be a more reasonable thing in the world to say everybody's calling for her resignation. And these, you know, the thing that I hate the most about, not just conservatives, but it seems like it's especially conservatives.2 (11m 20s):I hate this saying. And I remember, I think I've said this before on the podcast, I remember hearing some black activists saying a lot of white, you know, a lot of racism perpetrated by white people is like founded on pretending. Pretending like you don't see color pretending like, you know, saying things like, Oh, well why would you have had that experience, you know, walking down our street at night? Like, or why would you have had that difficulty getting that job? I don't understand. And pretending like they don't know that this person just got1 (11m 51s):That job because of2 (11m 52s):The color biscuit and that kind kind of a thing. So of course the way that people are coming down on this woman is to say, Well, I don't know about you, but I was taught that we have to look beyond race and we have to recognize the person before the color of their skin. And if you can't be, you know, representing the needs of white men, then I just don't really think that you, there's a place on this council. And of course, you know, somebody who I know and have in the past really respected was quoted in this article as saying, Oh, somebody who considers himself like a staunch liberal. Yeah. I mean, I just really can't think of any people of note from our town who weren't white men.2 (12m 34s):Sure. And this motherfucker let himself be quoted in our newspaper as saying this. Now maybe he feels fine about it. Maybe he doesn't think there's anything wrong with it. But I I I think it's completely, completely disgusting. Of course. So then I went and I just did this research of like all the people who have lived in our town historically, they're not just white men. We, there's other people to choose from. Needless1 (12m 58s):To say. Yeah. Well also, like, it's so interesting. I mean, it's just that that quote just is so problematic on so many levels. It like goes so deep. But like the other thing is like, maybe they miss, the only thing I can think of is that dude, did they miss the second half of your quote? Which was, and that's a problem. Like, like if, if you can't, if you can't finish that quote with, you know, I can't really think of like anyone of note in our being or anyone being recognized in our town in this way that wasn't a white dude and that's really crazy. We should really reevaluate how we're doing things here.1 (13m 39s):Period. You're so2 (13m 41s):To offer, you're so, you're so sweet to offer him this benefit of the doubt. Of course I don't offer that to him because this is a person who, you know, there's been a few people in my life who I've had the opportunity to, you know, know what they say privately and then know what they say publicly. Right? And I, and I know this, you know, I know this person personally. And no, it doesn't surprise me at all that, that that would've been the entirety of the quote. It would've been taken out of context. Now it might have been, and I don't know, and I'm not, I'm not gonna call him up to ask him, but you know, at a minimum you go on the local Facebook page and say, I was misquoting.1 (14m 20s):No, no, yeah. Chances are that this, this person just said this. And actually the true crime is not realizing if, if, if that's the case, that they, that that statement is problematic. So that's really fucked up. And also, like, think of all the native people that were on that land, on our land. Like, you're gonna tell me that just because you haven't done, they haven't done the research. They don't think that a native person from the northeast did something of greatness. Shut up, man. Excellent. Before it was rich.2 (14m 56s):Excellent point, Excellent point. Maybe when I write to my letter to the editor, maybe I'll quote you on that because Yeah, yeah. It's like, it's so, it's just, and I'm, by the way, I'm, I have been, I'm sure I'm still am guilty of the same thing too, of just being the laziness of like, well, I don't know, we'd love to, you know, hire a person of color, but none have applied. I mean, I have definitely said things like that and I just understand differently now I understand. No, no, no, they're not gonna be at the top of the pile of resumes that you're gonna get because historically these people haven't felt like there's a place for them at your table. So what you have to do is go above and beyond and say, we are specifically recruiting people of color for this position. I understand.1 (15m 35s):And how about even like, do some research online and find out who those people are and try to like, hire them away from wherever they are to and make them a great offer. You know what I mean? Like all those things. Well,2 (15m 48s):This experience did cause me to go on my little Wikipedia and look up, you know, people who have lived here and I was really like, surprised to learn how many people have known. Now it's true to say that, you know, when, when you're just looking up a list of famous people, it is gonna mostly be white men because that's who mostly, you know, sort of, she made, made history, made the news, whatever. But yeah, one of the very first things that come up, comes up when you look it up my town on Wikipedia, is that the fact that this was the Ramapo tribe that lived here. You know, this is who we took the land away from. I was also surprised to that.1 (16m 29s):I've never,2 (16m 30s):Yeah, Yeah. It was also interesting to learn, supposedly according to this, how many people of live here currently, including people like Harvey Firestein, who I have, I've never seen around town, but God I would really love to. And like some other, you know, sort of famous people. But anyway, That's1 (16m 50s):So cool.2 (16m 51s):Yeah. So, so I will be voting after this and I really, I don't have a great feeling about the election, but I'm, you know, I'm just like, what can you do? You can just sort of go forward and, you know, stick to your values. Yeah. I mean,1 (17m 7s):The thing is, stick to your values, move forward. And like my aunt, happy birthday, Tia, it's her birthday today, and she is like super depressed that, you know, she, she said, what she says is like, fascism is really, today is the day that we really something about fascism, it's like really dire and like really, Okay. So my, it's so interesting that I think boomers feel really bad because they had it so good, even though it wasn't really good, there was an illusion of goodness. Right? So I, I am depressed. But here's the thing, and I was, I was gonna bring this up to you.1 (17m 47s):It's like I, I had an experience last night where I went to this theater and saw the small theater, which I really wanna do my solo show in which is this famous theater called The Hayworth, which is, they show silent movies and all, but there's now it's like an improv sort of venue and, and it's really cute and throwbacky. But anyway, I went there and I just was thinking like, as I was watching these performers, like, oh, it is not even that, Like, it's literally that I spent 45 years thinking that I was worse than everybody else, right? And so now that I don't really think that, I actually don't have that much time left to accomplish what I would like to accomplish. So I, I spent all this time feeling like I couldn't do what she's doing.1 (18m 29s):I can't do what he's doing, can't do what theirs doing. They're, they are doing because I'm not good enough. Like literally. And now I'm like, Oh my God, I'm good enough. I have things to say. I really wanna leave a legacy. And literally the clock is ticking. Now, I'm not saying I'm running around like a nut, but what I'm saying is like, I, I, I do feel that I literally don't have the time left to participate in half-assed measures of art or whatever we're gonna do. We gotta make it purposeful because I w i, I spent all this time getting ready 45 years to not hate myself. And now the clock is ticking, I donate myself and there are things to do.1 (19m 13s):That's literally how I feel. So then when I see art or something where I'm like, Why are you using your platform this way? What are you talking about? What are you saying? Oh no, I can't, I even now I know why people leave movies early, plays early if it is, and some, for me anyway, like some people probably just assholes and like the, the person on stage doesn't look cute and they're out or whatever, but, or they're having panic attacks like I used to and I have to leave. But like, mostly I understand where it's like this is wasting my, my time, time I could be using to sort of plant seeds that may do something to be of service.1 (19m 53s):So I'm gonna jet and good luck to you. But yeah, it's the first, I just really feel like time is of the essence. And I always thought that was such a stupid thing that old people said, which was, you know, time is our most precious commodity. And I was always like, that is the dumbest thing I've ever heard. And now I'm like, oh shit. Yeah, it's really true Dude.2 (20m 15s):Yeah. Yeah. I actually had an experience some that I relate to with that, which is that, you know, I, I volunteered to be part of this festival of one act and you know, the thing we were supposed to do is read all of the submissions and then pick our top three. And then they were gonna do this rank order thing where they're attempting to put each director with one of their top three choices. Well, I read, it was like 10 plays I read them and I, I didn't have three, three ch choices. There was only one play that I felt frankly was worth my time.2 (20m 56s):And I felt really uncomfortable about having that feeling. And I was doing all of the like, who do you think you are? And you know, it's, you haven't directed something in three years and beggars can't be choosers in the whole thing. And I just thought, you know, I know what I'm gonna do if I don't stand up for whatever it is I think I can do here is I'm gonna resent the thing that I get, you know, pitted with and then I'm gonna do something self-destructive or I'm gonna kind of like blow up the relationship and I don't wanna do that. So I spend a lot of time thinking about how I was gonna write this email back saying basically like, I don't have three choices. I only have one choice. And I understand if you don't want to give that to me that this, I might not be a good fit for you.2 (21m 37s):You know? But I really, I really kind of sweated over it because when you don't, you know, when you're a very, if I was an extremely established theater director, you know, I wouldn't have thought twice about it. But I'm not, I'm trying to be established here and I, you know, so my, my, my go-to has always been well having opinions and choices and stuff like that is for people who, you know, have more than you do or have more to offer than you do. And it doesn't always work out that when you kind of say, This is me and take me or leave me. It doesn't always work out. But in this case it doesn't. They gave me my first choice. And so I'm, I'm happy about that, but there's a lot.2 (22m 18s):Thank you. Thank you. Yeah, there's a lot that just goes into the, it's all just work I have to do on myself. Like, I have this, a way of thinking about things is like, I have to do this work with this other person or I have to convince them why it has nothing to do with that. It's just that I have to do this.1 (22m 34s):Well that's what I'm realizing, like Gina, Absolutely. And good for you for like, coming at it from a place of like, okay, like this might not work, but I have to do it to see and put it out there and it may not work and they may say, go fuck yourself. But the alternative one is resentment, but also is like, hmm, not doing anybody else any favors either. If you aren't saying like, I actually don't have three choices here, I'm not gonna do justice. And I also, it brings me to my other thing, which I thought was so full of shit, which is so true. It's like most things are just not, it's about not being a right fit. It's not about you're bad and I'm good, I'm good and you're bad.1 (23m 15s):It's like, this is not a good match. And I, I think it just takes what it takes to learn that it is a not, it's about a matching situation. So like you knew that like those other two wouldn't be good matches and you wouldn't do a service to them or yourself. And it's not, And also like this thing about beggars can't be choosers. I fucking think it's so dumb because like most of us are beggars all the time and, and we, we settle for garbage. And it doesn't, like, I feel like we can, like beggars should be more choosy. And I also feel like, I'm not saying not be humble, but like, fuck you if you take away our choices, like we have to have choices.1 (23m 57s):That's the thing. It's like beggars have choices, whatever you call a beggar, we still have choices. Like how we're gonna interact and how and how we're gonna send emails and shit. I'm just like,2 (24m 9s):Yeah. Plus that whole phrase is so like, in a way rooted in this kind of like terrible supremacy structure that we're trying to fight against, which is like, we wanna tell, of course we wanna tell beggars that they can't be choosers cuz we just, we don't wanna think about them as people who have the same agency in life as we do.1 (24m 25s):Sure. And now I've started saying to people when I have this conversation about like, about unhoused, people like having tent encampments and I get it, like, you're going to school, you're walking your kid to Montessori and there's a fucking tent encampment in your front yard. You did not pay for that. You did not sign up for that. You are, I get it. And also my question is, what are we gonna do when the tents outnumber the people in homes? Because then it's a real fucking problem. So like, how are we gonna do that? You think it's uncomfortable? I think it's uncomfortable to walk by a tent encampment as I'm on my way to a coffee date with someone or whatever.1 (25m 8s):That's uncomfortable. But what are we gonna do when, like in India, the, the quote slums or whatever people, you know, whatever people choose to call it, outnumber the goddamn people in the towers. Then we, then it's gonna be a different problem.2 (25m 35s):Today on the podcast, we were talking to Rodney Toe. Rodney is an actor, you know him from Parks and Recreation, Barry good girls Rosewood. He was in a film this summer called Easter Sunday. Anyway, he's a delight. He's also a professor of theater at USC and he's charming and wonderful and we know you are going to love listening to him as much as we loved talking to him. So please enjoy our conversation with Rodney Toe.3 (26m 8s):Can you hear me? Can you hear me okay?2 (26m 11s):Yes, you sound great. You sound1 (26m 13s):Happy. No echo. You have beautiful art behind you. We can't ask for a2 (26m 17s):Better Easter Sunday. We were just talking about Easter Sunday, so we're gonna have to ask you Oh sure about it, Beth. But first I have to say congratulations, Rodney tell you survive theater school.3 (26m 28s):Oh, thank you. Yes, I did. I sure did. Was2 (26m 31s):It usc? Did you go to3 (26m 32s):Usc? No, I, I'm a professor. I'm currently a professor at usc. So1 (26m 36s):We just assumed you went there, but where did you go3 (26m 38s):To No, no, no, no, no. I, that, that came about like in a roundabout way, but no, I, I totally, I went, went to Marquette University. Oh, in Milwaukee?1 (26m 46s):In Milwaukee. Oh my gosh. Yeah. So3 (26m 48s):Everybody's reaction, everybody's reactions like, well1 (26m 53s):I actually love Mil, I'm from Chicago and Evanston you do and then you are,3 (26m 58s):Yeah, born and raised north side. My family's still there. What1 (27m 1s):The hell? How did I not know this? Yeah, I'm from Evanston, but lived in Rogers Park and went to, we went to DePaul.3 (27m 7s):Well I hear the park. Yes, yes. Born and raised. My family's still there. I am a Chicago, I'm an undying Chicago and through and through. Yeah.1 (27m 15s):Wait a minute. So, so, okay, okay, okay. So you grew up on the north, you grew up in, on the north side.3 (27m 20s):Yeah, I grew up in, I, I grew up and I went to Lane Tech. Oh1 (27m 24s):My gosh, that's where my niece goes right this very minute. She goes, Yeah,3 (27m 28s):It's1 (27m 28s):Quite the school. I dunno how it was when you went, but it went through a hard time and now it's like one of these3 (27m 34s):Go, I mean when I went it was, it was still considered a magnet school. And I I, you know, I think like in like it went maybe through a period of like, sort of like shifting, but then it's like now it's an incredible school. I'm September 17th is apparently Rodney to day at Lane 10. No, Yeah, it just happened. I mean it's, it's silly. It's Easter significance. No, cause of Easter Sunday they did like a bunch of, you know, I do a lot of advocacy for the Asian American for Asian-American representation. So sort like all together1 (28m 4s):That movie had broke so many, broke so many barriers and was, I mean it was a phenomenal, and also I just feel like it's so obviously so needed. Duh. When people say like, more representation is needed, I'm like, okay, no shit Sherlock. But it's true. It bears repeat again. Cause it still is true that we need more representation. But I am fascinated. Ok, so you went to Lane Tech and were you like, I'm gonna be a famous actor, comedian? No, what,3 (28m 34s):What anything about it? Didn't I, you know, it's called Lane Tech for a reason, right? It's a technical school. Correct. So like we didn't, you know, it didn't, I mean there were arts, but I, it never really, you know, it was one of those things that were like, you know, I guess like when you were a kid, it's all like, hey, you wanna learn how to like macrame. But there were theater arts in my, in my high school, but it wasn't like,1 (28m 54s):In fact, my mother did macrame. And let me tell you something, it has come back in style. And the shit she made, we could be selling for $199 at Urban Outfitters right now. I'm just,3 (29m 4s):Oh yeah, it's trendy now. Yeah. It's like, yeah, it's in style.1 (29m 7s):Anyway, side note, side note. Okay, so you were like, I'm not doing, there was no performing at Lane Tech. There was no like out there, there,3 (29m 13s):There was, and there was, but it wasn't, again, you know, in terms of representation, there was nothing that like, I mean there was nothing that that showed me any kind of like longevity in, in, you know, it didn't even really occur to me that this was a business that people sort of like, you know, pursued for themselves. So it wasn't until I went to Marquette that I discovered theater. And so it was one of those things that like, I was like, oh, there's something here. So it wasn't like, it wasn't fostered since I was a kid.1 (29m 43s):This,2 (29m 44s):And this is my favorite type of origin story because it means, you know, like there are people who grow up in LA or their, their parents are in the industry. And then, so it's always a question like, am I gonna go into this industry? But, but people like you and like me and like Boz, who, there's no artist in our family, you know,3 (30m 4s):You2 (30m 4s):Just have to come to it on your own. So I would love to hear this story about finding it at Marquette.3 (30m 10s):So like the, this, I, I've told this story several times, but the short version of it is, so I went to college for chemistry. And so again, because I came from, you know, that that was just sort of the path that, that particularly, you know, an Asian American follows. It's a very sort of stem, regimented sort of culture. And when I went to Marquette, my first, my sort of my first like quarter there, it was overwhelming, you know, I mean, college was, was a big transition for me. I was away from home and I, I was overwhelmed with all of the STEM courses that I was taking, the GE courses. And I, I went to my advisor and at the time, you know, this is pre-internet, like he, we sat down, I sat down with him and he pulled out the catalog.3 (30m 52s):Oh yeah, the catalog, right? I1 (30m 54s):Remember the catalog. Oh yeah.3 (30m 56s):And so he was like, let's take a class that has nothing to do with your major. Oh,1 (30m 60s):I love this. I love this advisor. I love this advisor. Do you know, can he you say his name3 (31m 7s):At the, was it Daniel? Dr. Daniel t Hayworth. I mean, it's been a while I went to college with Dahmer was arrested. So that's been a1 (31m 15s):While. Okay. Yeah's, same with us. Same with me. Yeah.3 (31m 18s):Yeah. So like, I think it was Daniel Daniel Hayworth. Yeah. Cuz he was a, he was a chemistry professor as well. So he opened up, he opened up the, the thing in the, the catalog and it said acting for non-majors. And I remember thinking, that sounds easy, let's do that. And then I went to the class, I got in and he, he, he was able to squeeze me in because already it was already in the earl middle of the semester. And so I, the, the, the, the teacher for that class was a Jesuit priest. His name is Father Gerald Walling. And you know, God rest his soul. And he, his claim to fame was he had like two or three lines on Blues Brothers, the movie.1 (31m 59s):Amazing. I mean like great to fame to have Yes. Get shot in Chicago. Yeah. And if you're a Jesuit priest that's not an actor by trade, like that is like huge. Like most people would like die to have two to three lines on Blues Brothers that are working anyway. So, Okay, so you're, so he, so how was that class?3 (32m 19s):So I took the class and he, after like the first week he asked me, Hey is, and it was at 8:00 AM like typical, like one of those like classes that I was like, Oh my gosh, I'm gonna go in here miserable. Yeah. But he said to me early on, he said, Do you have any interest in doing this professionally? And I said, no. And he's like, and he, he said, and he said, I was like, You're hilarious. You know,1 (32m 43s):You're a hilarious Jesuit.3 (32m 45s):Yeah. I'm like, Good luck with God. He, he then he was directing, he was directing the university production of, and he asked me to audition for it. And I was, I don't even know what an audition was. That's amazing. So like, it was one of those things that I didn't really know how to do it. I didn't know much about it. And so he's like, Can you come in and audition for it? And I did and I got it and it was, it was Monts the physicist,1 (33m 12s):What the fuck is that?3 (33m 14s):Oh man, I love that play. It's Amont, it's the same, you know, it's the same. He's, you know, Exactly. It's really, it's one of those like sort of rarely done plays and it's about fictitious Albert Einstein, the real, lemme see if I, it's been so long since I recall this play. The real, So Isaac Newton and what was the other Mobius? A fictitious, So the real, I'm sorry, The real Albert Einstein, The real, the real Albert Einstein, the real Isaac Isaac New and a fake, a fictitious play scientist named Mobius.3 (33m 55s):And they were, they were all in, in a mental institution. And I1 (33m 60s):Think that I have this play and my shelves and I just have never read it before. Okay, so3 (34m 4s):Who did you play? It's extraordinary. Extraordinary. And so I played, I played a child like I did up until my mid thirties. I played a child who had like one line, and I remember it took, it took place in Germany, I believe. And I remember he's like, Do you have a German accent? I was like, No. You're1 (34m 20s):Like, I I literally am doing chemistry 90.3 (34m 23s):Yeah. I was all like, you're hilarious. Yeah. Only children do accents, You know what I mean? Like, it was totally, I was like, whatever's happening, I don't even know what's happening. And, and then I made up a European accent. I mean, I, I, I pulled it on my ass. I was like, sure, don't even remember it. But I was like, one of,1 (34m 39s):I love when people, like, recently Gina showed me a video of her in college with an accent. Let me tell you something, anytime anyone does an accent, I'm like, go for it. I think that it's so3 (34m 51s):Great. Yeah. I've got stories about, about, I mean, I'm Asian, right? So like, I mean it's been one of those things that all my life I've had to sort of navigate people being like, Hey, try this on for Verizon. I was like, Oh gosh. And you know, anyway, I can go on forever. But I did that, I had a line and then somebody saw me in the production with one line and said, Hey, this is at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater, somebody from the Milwaukee Repertory Theater. It's huge1 (35m 18s):Theater. Fyi. Right,3 (35m 20s):Right. Again, it's, it's to this day. And so they asked if I would intern, if I would be considered interning while I was in school. And I said, I didn't even know what that was. So I met with them. And when I walked into that theater, it was one of those, it's one of the biggest, most extraordinary music theaters in the wor in the country. Right. Won the regional, Tony and I, again, I had no frame of reverence for it. So walking in, it was like this magical place. And so I started, I started interning right, right off the bat. And it was one of those like life changing experiences. I, I mean, to this day, the best acting I think I've ever seen, you know, face to face has been on that stage. It's, you know, many of those actors are still, I'm still in touch with to this day.3 (36m 3s):Some of them have passed away. However, it was the best training, right? I mean, I got thrown into the deep end. It was like working with some of the greats who never, no one ever knew. Right. So it really, it was really a wonderful experience. And that's when I sort of, you know, that's when I was like, Oh, I actually can do this for a living. So it was,1 (36m 21s):Oh yeah, Milwaukee rep. I've seen some amazing stuff there. And also what would've been great is, yeah, we like, I mean there's so many things that would've been great at DePaul at the theater school, but one of them would've been, Hey, there's all these regional theaters, like if you wanna make some dough, it was either like, you are gonna be doing storefront and Die of Hunger, or you're gonna be a star. Hilarious was no like, what about Milwaukee Rep? What about the Guthrie? Like all the things3 (36m 50s):Gut, Yeah. Never1 (36m 51s):Told at least. Or I didn't listen or I was like in a blackout drunk state. But like, I just feel like hilarious. I just feel like that is so amazing that you got to do that. So then, Wait, did you change3 (37m 2s):Your It wasn't, I did. I eventually did. Yes. So I have both. And so now it was one of those, like, it was, it was harrowing, but eventually, I mean, I did nothing with my chemistry degree. Nothing. Like literally nothing. That's,2 (37m 16s):Most people do nothing with their theater degree. So, so it all evens out. Wait, I have a question. Now. This is a question that would be difficult for me to answer. So I wouldn't fault to you if it's difficult for you. What do you think it was in you that this person saw and said, have you ever considered doing this professionally? I mean, just trying to be really objective about the, the asce the essence of you that you bring to the table. Always. How, what did that person identify, do you think, if you3 (37m 44s):Had to guess? You know, I'd like to say it was talent. I'd love to be that person and be like, you know, they recognized in me in one line that ordinary artist was going to emerge into the universe and play children into his thirties. I, I wish I could. It was that, I mean, honestly, I looked different than everybody else on that's a white school and Milwaukee rep, you know, God, forgive me for saying this, but it was a sensibly all white institution.1 (38m 12s):Super white. Super white. Yeah.3 (38m 14s):So in comes this little Asian guy who like they thought might have had potential and also is Asian. And I checked off a lot of boxes for them. And you know what I could easily say, like I, I could easily sort of, when, if you asked me like 20 years ago, I was like, Oh, I was talented, but now I'm like, no, I made my way in because of, because I, I checked boxes for people and, and1 (38m 37s):Talented,3 (38m 38s):You couldn't,1 (38m 39s):You3 (38m 39s):Couldn't have done it if you didn't have talent to thank you. And I can, I can, you know, whatever, I can own that now. But the, but the reality is like, I made it in and that's how I got in. And I'm okay with that. And I'm not saying that it's not taking anything away from talent, but the reality is it's like you gotta get in on the inside to work your way out. And if I didn't have that exposure early on, I certainly wouldn't have had the regional career that I did for a little while. You know? So like that credit, like you, like you said Jen, it's like, it's a, it's a huge credit. So like I would not have made it in any other way. Right. And I certainly,1 (39m 12s):Yeah, I just am like noticing also like my reaction to, Yeah, it's interesting too as other humans in this industry or any industry, it's like, it's like we have had to, especially those of us that are, you know, I'm 47 and like those of us who have made it in or sort of in for, in my, I'm just speaking for myself. Like I, I sort of, right, It could have been fucked up reasons or weird reasons that we got in the door or even filling someone's need or fantasy. But then it's like what we do with it once we're in the room, that really, really matters. And I think that yeah, regardless of how you ended up in Milwaukee rep, like I think it's smart and like I really like the idea of saying okay, like that's probably why I was there.1 (39m 58s):I checked, I've checked boxes, but Okay. But that's why a lot of people are a lot of places. And so like, let's, let's, let's, you could stop there and be like, that is some fucked up shit. Fuck them. Or you could say, Wait a second, I'm gonna still have a fucking career and be a dope actor. Okay, so you're there, you're, you're still, you graduate from Marquette with a double major, I'm assuming, right? Chemistry and, and was it theater, straight up theater or what was your degree?3 (40m 23s):It's, well, no, no, it's called, it's, it's, it's the, at the time it's called, they didn't have a theater degree. Right. It was called the, you graduated with a degree in Communications. Communications,1 (40m 32s):Right? Yes. Okay, okay. Yeah. My, my niece likes to say Tia, all the people in communications at UCLA are the dumbest people. I'm like, No, no, no, no, no. That would've been me. And she's like, Well, anyway, so okay, so, so you graduate and what happens? What happens to you?3 (40m 54s):So, you know, I, I went from there. I went to, I got my equity card pretty ear pretty early cuz I went for my, I think it was my final between my, the summer, my junior year and my senior year I went to, because of the Milwaukee rep, I got asked to do summer stock at, at ppa, which is the Pacific Conservatory, the performing Arts, which is kind of like an Urda contract out in the West Co on the west coast. And so I was able to get credits there, which got me my equity card very quickly after, during that time I didn't get it at the institution, but I got like enough, you know, whatever credit that I was able to get my equity card. And again, at the time I was like, eh, what are the equity? I didn't even know know what that was really.3 (41m 34s):I don't know if anybody truly knows it when they're, when they're younger. So I had it and I went, right, I had my card and I went right to Chicago because family's there. So I was in Chicago. I did a couple of shows, I did one at at Lifeline at the time. I did one at North. Yeah. So it was nice to sort of go back and, and, and, and then I, you know, right then I, it's my favorite story, one of my favorite stories. I, I got my, my my SAG card and my after card in Chicago that summer, because at the time the union was separate. That's how old I am. And I got my SAG card doing a Tenax commercial, and I got my after card doing, I'm not sure if they're still there.3 (42m 18s):I think they are actually. It is a company called Break Breakthrough Services and they did it live industrial. Oh yeah.1 (42m 24s):They, I think they still wait live. How does that work? Yeah,3 (42m 29s):Exactly. So it's a lot of like those training, you know, you see it a lot, like the people do it, like corporate training stuff. Right. So they used, at the time it was really new. So like they used a lot of actors and they paid well.1 (42m 42s):Well, I did an Arthur Anderson one that like paid my rent3 (42m 45s):Long time. Yeah, yeah, yeah. So exactly when Arthur Anderson was still a, I think I did one too. So like, they,1 (42m 53s):Rodney,3 (42m 55s):Were you in St. Charles, Illinois?1 (42m 57s):I don't know. I had to take the Amtrak. It could have been,3 (42m 59s):Yeah. In St. Charles. Right? That's where they were centered. Yes. Yeah.1 (43m 2s):Okay, go ahead. Go ahead. So you, okay, so you got your, I know our world. Do you live, Where do you live?3 (43m 8s):I'm in, I'm in LA right now. This is my home. Yeah.1 (43m 11s):Okay. Well I'm coming to your home. Okay, great. I'm in Pasadena right now. Okay. Anyway, go ahead. Oh yeah.3 (43m 17s):Okay. So we, yeah, I went to Chicago, got my cards, and then was there for, you know, a hot minute and then I moved to New York. Okay.1 (43m 25s):Wait, wait, wait. Moved. Did you have, what years were you working in Chicago? Like were we still, were Gina and I in school? What, what, what years were that were you were like, Tampa, a man Chicago.3 (43m 35s):I did God bless that commercial. Yeah, it was so good. I did, let's see here, I grad, I was there in 90, let's see, 97,1 (43m 47s):We were there. Well, Gina was graduating and I, I was, yeah. Anyway, we were there.3 (43m 52s):And then I moved to New York in 98 and then I moved to New in 98. So1 (43m 55s):You were only in Chicago a hot minute? Yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (43m 57s):Okay. Yeah. But then I came back, I came back in 2004 five to do a show at Victory Gardens. Oh. And then I did a show at Victory Gardens, and then I did a workshop at Stepin Wolf. So it was nice. Look at1 (44m 12s):Victory Gardens. Victory Gardens. That was a whole,3 (44m 15s):I'm sorry, what was that?1 (44m 16s):R i p, Victory Gardens.3 (44m 17s):Oh, yeah. I mean, well I was there pre-K. Yeah. And so, but it was, yeah, r i p I mean, r i it was truly one of the most magnificent, magnificent shows that I've been part, but I mean,1 (44m 30s):Okay, so wait, wait, wait. Okay, so why New York? Why weren't you like, I'm gonna bust out and go to LA and be a superstar on,3 (44m 38s):It's all about representation. I mean, I didn't see at the time, and you know, if you think about it, like there were people on television, but, you know, in terms of like the, the, the, it wasn't pervasive. It was like sort of every once in a while I'll turn on my TV and I'll see like Dante Bosco or I'll see like, you know what I mean? But it wasn't like I saw like, you know, I wasn't flooded with the image of an Asian American making it. However, at the time, you know, it was already Asian Americans were starting to sort of like flood the theater world, right? So I started, you know, through James c and, and Lisa Taro in Chicago, and like, people who are like, who are still friends of mine to this day, Asian American actors, they were doing theater. And so I was like, you know what, I'm gonna do theater. And so I, it was just one of those, like, I went to, and I already had these credits.3 (45m 19s):I had my equity card, I had some credits. My natural proclivity was then to go to, to, to first theater in New York. So it wasn't, I didn't even think about LA it wasn't like, oh, let me, let me like think about doing television and film. So I went1 (45m 32s):To York. I just feel like in LA it's so interesting. As an actor, writing is a little different, but as an actor, it, most of us, if we plan to go to LA as actors, we're gonna fail. I just feel like you have to end up here as an actor by accident because you do something else that you love and that people like, and then they're like, I just, it's not the most welcoming. Right. Medium film and tv. So like, it's so hard. So I think by accident is really sort of the only way, or if you're just already famous for something else, but like, anyway, So you're in New York. Did you, did you love it? Wait, can I,2 (46m 9s):Can I hang on Buzz, Can I do a timeout? Because I've been wanting to ask this just a little bit back to, you know, your undergrad experience. Did you wanna be, did you love chemistry or did you just do that because Oh, you did, Okay. So it wasn't, it wasn't like, oh, finally I found something that I, like you liked chemistry.3 (46m 29s):Yeah. To this day, to this day, I still like, it's still very much like, you know, the, the, the values of a stem field is still very much in how I teach, unfortunately. Right? Like, I'm very empirical. I, I, I need to know an, I need to have answers. Like, you know, it tends to, sometimes it tends to be a lot of it, like, you know, you know, sort of heady and I'm like, and now I need, I need, I'm pragmatic that way. I need to understand like why, Right? That2 (46m 53s):Doesn't seem unfortunate to me. That seems actually really fortunate because A, you're not the only artist who likes to think. I mean, you know, what about DaVinci? Like, a lot of people like to think about art in a, in a, I mean it's really, they're, they're, they're really kind of married art and science.3 (47m 8s):Yeah. They really are people. I, I think people would, It's so funny. Like people don't see it as such, but you're absolutely right. I agree. It's so more, Yeah. There's so much more in common.1 (47m 18s):The other thing that I'm glad Gina brought that up is cuz I'm questioning like, okay, so like, I don't know about at Marquette, but like at DePaul we had like, we had, like, we had these systems of, you got warnings if you, you weren't doing great and I bet like you probably didn't have the cut system cause that just is okay, good. But okay.3 (47m 36s):Well we were, we remember we were, we weren't a conservatory, right? So we were very much a, a liberal programming.1 (47m 42s):Yeah, I love it. Oh God, how I longed for that later, right? But anyway, so what would've helped is if someone with an empirical, like someone with more a stem mind sat down with me and said, okay, like, here are the things that aren't working in a practical way for you, and here are the things that you can do to fix it. Instead, it was literally this nebulous thing where my warning said, You're not living up to your star power now that's not actually a note. So that, that, that Rick Murphy gave me, and I don't, to this day, I'm like, that is actually, so I would love if I had someone like you, not that you'd be in that system, but like this to say like, okay, like here's the reasons why.1 (48m 25s):Like there was no why we were doing anything. It was like, you just do this in order to make it. And I said, Okay, I'll do it. But I was like, what the hell? Why are we doing this? That's,3 (48m 35s):That's like going to a doctor and a doctor being like, you're sick. You know what I mean? And you're like, but can, that's why I'm here is for you to help me get to the root of it and figure it out. Right. Being like, you're,1 (48m 46s):I think they didn't know, Here's the thing, I don't think it, it3 (48m 50s):Was because they're in.1 (48m 51s):Yeah. I I don't think it was because they were, I mean, they could have been rude in all the things. I literally, now that I'm 47, looking back on that experience, I'm like, Oh, these teachers didn't fucking know what they were, how to talk. And3 (49m 3s):This is how I came. Yeah, yeah. Which is how I came back to usc. So like that's,1 (49m 7s):Anyway, continue your New York adventure. I just wanted to know.3 (49m 11s):No, no, no. New York is was great. New York is New York was wonderful. I love it. I still love it. I I literally just got back with it. That's why, remember I was texting you, emailing you guys. I I just got back, Yes. The night before. Some amazing things. My husband would move back in a heartbeat if I, if I like texted him right now. And I was like, Hey, like let's move back. The house would be packed and we'd, he'd be ready to go. He loves, we both love it. You know, Am I in love with New York? I, that, that remains to be seen. I mean, you know, as I get older that life is, it's a hard life and I, I love it when there's no responsibilities when you can like, skip around and have tea and you know, walk around Central Park and like see shows.3 (49m 53s):But you know, that's obviously not the real, the reality of the day to day in New York. So I miss it. I love it. I've been back for work many times, but I, I I don't know that the life is there for me anymore. Right. I mean, you know, six fuller walkups. Oh no. Oh no. I just, yeah, I1 (50m 11s):Just like constantly sweating in Manhattan. Like I can't navigate, It's like a lot of rock walking really fast and3 (50m 20s):Yeah. And no one's wearing masks right now. I just, I just came back and I saw six shows when I was there. No one's wearing masks. It's like unnerving. And again, like, you know, you know, not throwing politics in it. I was like, you guys, like, how are you okay with it? I'm just like, how are you not unnerved by the fact that we're cramped in worse than an airplane? And everyone's like coughing around you and we're sitting here for three hours watching Death of a Salesman. I mean, like, how was that1 (50m 43s):Of an2 (50m 45s):Yeah know?3 (50m 46s):I mean,2 (50m 47s):So what about the, so at some point you, you pretty much, I mean, you don't do theater anymore, right? You transition to doing3 (50m 55s):Oh, I know, I do. Very much so, very much. I'm also the associate, Yeah. I'm the associate artistic director of, I am a theater company, so like I'm, I'm very much theater's. I will never let go. It's, it's just one of those things I will never as, as wonderful as television and film has been. It's, it's also like theater's, you know? It's the, it's my own, it's my first child. Yeah.2 (51m 19s):Yeah.1 (51m 20s):We have guests like Tina Parker was like that, right? Wasn't,2 (51m 23s):Yeah. Well a lot of, a lot of people. It's also Tina Wong said the same thing.3 (51m 26s):He and I are different. She's part, we're in the same theater company. So Yeah. Tina's.2 (51m 30s):That's right. That's right. That's right. Okay, now I'm remembering what that connection was. So I have a question too about like, when I love it, like I said, when people have no idea anything related to performing arts, and then they get kind of thrust into it. So was there any moment in sort of discovering all this where you were able to make sense of, or flesh out like the person that you were before you came to this? Like a lot of people have the experience of, of doing a first drama class in high school and saying, Oh my God, these are my people. And never knowing that their people existed. Right. Did you have anything like that where you felt like coming into this performing sphere validated or brought some to fullness?2 (52m 14s):Something about you that previously you hadn't been able to explore?3 (52m 18s):Yeah. I mean, coming out, you know what I mean? Like, it was the first time that people talk, you know? Of course, you know, you know, I was born to, you know, like was God, I said I was born this way. But that being said, like again, in the world in which I grew up in, in Chicago and Lane Tech, it's, and, and the, you know, the technical high school and, and just the, the, the, I grew up in a community of immigrants. It's not like it was laid out on the table for one to talk about all the time. Right. It wasn't, and even though I may have thought that in my head again, it wasn't like, it was like something that was in the universe and in the, in the air that I breathed. So I would say that like when I got to the theater, it was the first time, you know, the theater, you guys we're, we're theater kids, right?3 (53m 2s):We know like every, everything's dramatic. Everything's laid, you know, out to, you know, for everyone. Everyone's dramas laid out for everyone. A the, and you know, part of it was like sexuality and talking about it and being like, and having just like, just being like talking about somebody's like ethnic background. And so it was the first time that I learned how to talk about it. Even to even just like how you even des you know, you know how you even describe somebody, right? And how somebody like, cuz that again, it's not, it wasn't like, it wasn't language that I had for myself. So I developed the language and how to speak about people. So that's my first thing about theater that I was like, oh, thank God.3 (53m 43s):You know? And then, you know, even talking about, you know, like queer, like queer was such a crazy insult back when I was a kid. And then now all of a sudden queer is now this embraced sort of like, badge of honor, Right? And so like, it was just like that and understanding like Asian and Asian American breaking that down, right? And being Filipino very specifically breaking that down, that all came about from me being in theater. And so like, I, I'm, I owe my, my life to it if you, and, and because I've, yeah, I didn't, you know, it's so funny how the title of this is I Survived Theater School for me. It's, Yes, Yes.3 (54m 23s):And I also, it also allowed theater also gave, allowed me to survive. Yes.2 (54m 31s):Theater helped you survive. Yes. That's beautiful. So in this, in the, in this spectrum or the arc, whatever you wanna call it, of representation and adequate representation and you know, in all of our lifetimes, we're probably never gonna achieve what we think is sort of like a perfect representation in media. But like in the long arc of things, how, how do you feel Hollywood and theater are doing now in terms of representation of, of specifically maybe Filipino, but Asian American people. How, how do you think we're doing?3 (55m 3s):I think we, you know, I think that there's, there's certainly a shift. You know, obviously it, we'd like it to be quicker than faster than, than it has been. But that being said, there's certainly a shift. Look, I'm being, I'll be the first person to say there are many more opportunities that are available that weren't there when I started in this, in this business, people are starting to like diversify casts. And you know, I saw Haiti's Town, it was extraordinary, by the way. I saw six shows in New York in the span of six days out of, and this was not conscious of me. This is not something I was doing consciously. Out of the six shows, I saw every single show had 90% people of color.3 (55m 43s):And it wasn't, and I wasn't conscientious of it. I wasn't like, I'm going to go see the shows that like, it just happened that all I saw Hamilton, I saw K-pop, I saw, you know, a death of a Salesman I saw. And they all were people of color and it was beautiful. So there's definitely a shift. That said, I, for me, it's never, this may sound strange, it's not the people in front of the camera or on stage that I have a problem with. Like, that to me is a bandaid. And this is me speaking like an old person, right? I need, it needs to change from the top down. And for me, that's what where the shift needs to happen for me. Like all the people at top, the, the, the people who run the thing that needs to change. And until that changes, then I can expect to starter from1 (56m 25s):The low. It's so interesting cuz like, I, I, I feel like that is, that is, we're at a point where we'd love to like the bandaid thing. Like really people really think that's gonna work. It never holds. Like that's the thing about a bandaid. The longer the shit is on, it'll fall off eventually. And then you still have the fucking wound. So like, I, I, I, and what I'm also seeing, and I don't know if you guys are seeing it, but what I'm seeing is that like, so people got scared and they fucking started to promote execs within the company of color and othered folks and then didn't train them. And now are like, Oh, well we gave you a shot and you failed, so let's get the white kid back in that live, you know, my uncle's kid back in to, to be the assistant.1 (57m 6s):And I'm3 (57m 7s):Like, no people up for success is a huge thing. Yeah. They need to set people up for success. Yes, yes, for sure.2 (57m 12s):Yeah. So it's, it's performative right now. We're still in the performative phase of1 (57m 16s):Our, you3 (57m 17s):Know, I would say it feels, it, it can feel performative. I I'm, I'm definitely have been. I've experienced people who do get it, you know what I mean? It's just, Sunday's a perfect example of somebody who does get it. But that being said, like again, it needs to, we need more of those people who get it with a capital I like, you know, up at the top. Cause again, otherwise it's just performative, like you said. So it's,1 (57m 38s):Does it make you wanna be an exec and be at the top and making choices? Yeah,3 (57m 42s):You know, I've always, people have asked me, you know, people have asked me what is the next thing for me. I'd love to show run. I've, I just, again, this is the, this is the stem part of me, right? Like, of us, like is I'm great at putting out fires, I just have been that person. I'm good with people, I'm, I'm, you know, and I've, I, you know, it's, it's, it's just one of those things that like I, I see is a, is a natural fit. But until that happens, you know, I'm, I'm, I'm also, you know, a professor is very much a version of show learning. So I've been doing that every day.1 (58m 14s):We talk about how, cause you've mentioned it several times about playing children into your thirties. So a lot, we have never had anyone on the show that I'm aware of that has had that sort of thing or talked about that thing. They may have had it. Mostly it's the opposite of like, those of us who like, I'll speak for myself, like in college, were playing old people at age, you know, 16 because I was a plus size Latina lady. And like that's what what went down. So tell me what, what that's what that journey has been like for you. I'm just really curious mostly, cuz you mentioned it a couple times, so it must be something that is part of your psyche. Like what's that about? Like what the, I mean obviously you look quote young, but there's other stuff that goes into that.1 (58m 57s):So how has that been for you and to not be, It sounds like you're coming out of that.3 (59m 1s):Yeah, I mean, look, all my life I've always been, you know, I mean I'm, I'm 5, 5 6 on a good day and I've always just been, I've always just looked young. Like, I mean, I mean, and I don't mean that like, oh I look young. Like I don't mean that in any sort of self-aggrandizing way. I literally just am one of those and you're built, like me, my one of my dear friends Ko, God rest his soul, he was always like, Rodney, you're like a little man look, looks, you're like a man that looks like a boy. And I was like that, that's hilarious. Like, and look, I for growing up little in, in high school and, and it, it was one of those things that I was always like, you know, like I was always chummy with people, but I was never sort of like, like there's a look, let's face it.3 (59m 45s):Like we're, we're a a a body conscious society and when you're, whatever it is, you can't help. There's implicit bias, right? Implicit bias, right. Supremacy at it's most insidious. And so I am not all my life, I was like always trying to, you know, the Napoleon complex of always trying to sort of be like, prove that I was older than I was.1 (1h 0m 6s):How did you do it? How did you do, how were you, what kind of techniques did you use? For3 (1h 0m 10s):Me, it wasn't even my technique. It was about doing everything and anything I possibly could. I mean, I was like president or vice president, I a gajillion different clubs. So it1 (1h 0m 18s):Was doing, it was doing, it was not like appearance. Okay, okay. So you3 (1h 0m 23s):Was actually yeah, I couldn't do anything about this. Yeah.1 (1h 0m 25s):Right. So yeah, but like people try, you know, like people will do all kinds of things to their body to try to, But for you, it sounds like your way to combat that was to be a doer, like a super3 (1h 0m 36s):Duer. And I certainly, I certainly like worked out by the time I got to college I was like working out hardcore to try and masculinize like, or you know, this. And, and eventually I did a gig that sort of shifted that mentality for me. But that being said, I think the thing that really, that the thing that, that for me was the big sort of change in all of this was just honestly just maturity. At some point I was like, you know what? I can't do anything about my age. I can't do anything about my height, nor do I want to. And when that shifted for me, like it just ironically, that's when like the maturity set in, right? That's when people started to recognize me as an adult.3 (1h 1m 17s):It's when I got got rid of all of that, that this, this notion of what it is I need to do in order for people to give me some sort of authority or gimme some sort of like, to l

Second Citizens
Suzy Nakamura

Second Citizens

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 58:14


Today's episode exemplifies the idea of the Second City "family". Although Joe and Suzy had never actually met beyond introductions before our recording, within seconds they immediately began back and forth banter like siblings or old pals. Joe talks about how Second Citizens don't take shit from anyone and Suzy immediately proves it by schooling Joe on the real reason behind some of those behaviors. We also get a first hand telling of the most infamous Tourco story EVER! I'm talking about the tourco Van that almost fell off a mountain!!It's a real fun time!Also fun?(for us): Subscribing Rating and Reviewing!Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/secondcitizenspod/Twitter: https://twitter.com/SecondCitizens_

Jagbags
What SNL Characters Are Your Favorite?

Jagbags

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 77:04


SNL has been on the air for 47 years, and in that time so many characters have come and gone. Which characters are your favorite? Which SNL cast member had the best characters? Which popular characters do you actively despise? In a 96-character bracket, which characters would be your top seeds? Are the Blues Brothers actual SNL characters, or just musical guests and therefore ineligible? Which SNL hosts came up with the best characters? We go through all these burning questions for you. Tune in!

Mass-Debaters
One on One: 104 Comedy Movies with Jeremy Bryant from the Maniacal Music Musings

Mass-Debaters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 57:35


We are sitting down with Jeremy from the Maniacal Music Musings Podcast, and he is doing his very own 104 Comedy movies tournament. Check out this episode to see what he think is the best movie from the Comedy movie. If you want to do your own tournament, please contact us, and we will set it up. Here are all the movies in the tournament: SCARY MOVIE (2000) surf ninjas (1993) spies like us (1985) HOUSE PARTY (1990) CLUE (1985) Dazed and Confused (1993) SPY (2015) AIRPLANE! (1980) BEETLEJUICE (1988) MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL (1975) BRIDGET JONES'S DIARY (2001) Major Payne (1995) THE SCHOOL OF ROCK (2003) LEGALLY BLONDE (2001) Don't Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood (1996) THE BIG LEBOWSKI (1998) Dogma (1999) AMERICAN PIE (1999) Undercover Brother (2002) a low down dirty shame (1994) A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN (1992) THE PRINCESS BRIDE (1987) DIRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS (1988) GROUNDHOG DAY (1993) GOOD MORNING, VIETNAM (1987) THE 40-YEAR-OLD VIRGIN (2005) better off dead (1985) TOP FIVE (2014) WHEN HARRY MET SALLY... (1989) CRAZY RICH ASIANS (2018) HAROLD & KUMAR GO TO WHITE CASTLE (2004) BLAZING SADDLES (1974) NAPOLEON DYNAMITE (2004) NATIONAL LAMPOON'S ANIMAL HOUSE (1978) BROADCAST NEWS (1987) THIS IS SPINAL TAP (1984) TOOTSIE (1982) BILL & TED'S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE (1989) BEST IN SHOW (2000) 21 JUMP STREET (2012) THE ADVENTURES OF PRISCILLA, QUEEN OF THE DESERT (1994) THE JERK (1979) MEAN GIRLS (2004) Wedding Crashers (2005) SPACEBALLS (1987) COMING TO AMERICA (1988) SISTER ACT (1992) THE BLUES BROTHERS (1980) STEP BROTHERS (2008) THE NAKED GUN (1988) i'm gonna git you sucka (1988) SHAUN OF THE DEAD (2004) National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation (1989) Booty Call (1997) GALAXY QUEST (1999) BRIDESMAIDS (2011) HAPPY GILMORE (1996) TRADING PLACES (1983) MEET THE PARENTS (2000) SUPER TROOPERS (2001) GIRLS TRIP (2017) ZOOLANDER (2001) LIFE (1999) white chicks (2004) WAYNE'S WORLD (1992) CLUELESS (1995) FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH (1982) RAISING ARIZONA (1987) TOMMY BOY (1995) Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back (2001) death becomes her (1992) The Waterboy (1998) Harlem Nights (1989) CADDYSHACK (1980) the happytime murders (2018) TEAM AMERICA: WORLD POLICE (2004) IDIOCRACY (2006) ACE VENTURA: PET DETECTIVE (1994) BEVERLY HILLS COP (1984) BARBERSHOP (2002) OFFICE SPACE (1999) The Wood (1999) Little Shop of Horrors (1986) sausage party (2016) BIG (1988) Role Models (2008) FERRIS BUELLER'S DAY OFF (1986) CLERKS (1994) THERE'S SOMETHING ABOUT MARY (1998) PITCH PERFECT (2012) BORAT: CULTURAL LEARNINGS OF AMERICA FOR MAKE BENEFIT GLORIOUS NATION OF KAZAKHSTAN (2006) MRS. DOUBTFIRE (1993) Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) DUMB & DUMBER (1994) FRIDAY (1995) AUSTIN POWERS: INTERNATIONAL MAN OF MYSTERY (1997) SUPERBAD (2007) GHOSTBUSTERS (1984) pineapple express (2008) ANCHORMAN: THE LEGEND OF RON BURGUNDY (2004) THE HANGOVER (2009) A FISH CALLED WANDA (1988) ELF (2003) PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES (1987) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/support

The Language of Creativity Podcast
The Mirror – Steven Leavitt (reverse-interview with Adam Sears) Ep. 28

The Language of Creativity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 103:47


“Creativity is a base element of the human soul.” So says Steven Leavitt, the host of the Language of Creativity podcast. In this very special episode, Steve's very first guest on the podcast flips the tables in this tell-all reverse interview guest-hosted by his long-time collaborator Adam Sears! As a music producer, Steve has helped Sears craft his last 3 projects with Progressive Rock band Lobate Scarp. Their 2016 recording of Beautiful Light has won awards and recognition as “a masterpiece” and in 2022 Steve Co-Executive Produced Lobate Scarp's latest album You Have It All. The ambitious full-length album has received high praise from reviewers and fans alike.  But it wasn't always easy… Steven was born into a family of motion-picture stunt performers but always felt way more at home in front of a microphone, piano or a mixing console. Steve began learning the piano at 8 years old “to express what I was feeling when I couldn't express it in words.” Lyrically blocked, bullied as a kid and extremely sensitive as a boy he was certainly an odd fit in a family that worked in such a rough and tumble industry. But he stuck with it, choosing to pursue audio engineering in college at Musician's Institute in Hollywood after realizing that there was an ideal career path for using his skills and talents: music producer. Steve graduated in 2000, unfortunately right as Napster was crashing the music industry. The dot-com bust made it hard to enter the job market (thanks Enron) so he began to freelance making websites, editing video demo-reels for stunt-people, and started working on films as a background precision driver. He recorded for independent musicians to build experience, joined a band, and edited videos for his dad's stunt-company producing “featurettes” with celebrity talent and assisted with MTV shoots. Steve kept a “web journal” before blogging got big and considered himself a multimedia artist a whole five years before the advent of YouTube. When he started Don't Call Us Tori in 2004, a music showcase he co-founded with with singer-songwriter Shannon Hurley, in Hollywood, Steve's music network really began to grow leading to a fateful introduction to Adam who approached Steve to produce his band's debut album Time and Space in 2008. The album's production coincided with what Steve describes as “an unexpected spiritual awakening” during the lead up to the album's 2012 release “that felt like I was coming home to myself.”  Adam talks with Steve about their very fruitful creative partnership and Steve's relentlessly perfectionistic work ethic in the studio. They discuss starting this podcast and how it has been a major creative outlet for Steve (he probably could have pursued a career in Radio). They talk about what it was like growing up attending “backflips down the aisles churches” and discovering hit singles on KIIS FM while coming of age thinking it's only okay to listen to Christian music but finding Christian grunge, loving Weird Al… about dropping out, burnout, ptsd, and… Just why the heck did Steve choose not to go into the stunt business? Steve shares  about learning the importance of infusing joy into your work, finding your inner creative spark, and how sometimes we can be doing the right thing while going about it the wrong way! Could Future-Steve have somehow been sending messages back in time to himself? ** if show-notes cut off click here Guest: Steven Leavitt Producer Website: stevenleavitt.com Artist Coaching: icreatesound.com Podcast: thelanguageofcreativity.com (please subscribe and review!) Steven Leavitt (filmography: IMDB) Guest-Host: Adam Sears adamsears.com Lobate Scarp: website | BandCamp @lobatescarp Twitter | Instagram @adamsears32 Twitter | Instagram Adam Sears on Ep.1 of The Language of Creativity Podcast “Naming The Podcast” Featured Music The Mirror by Lobate Scarp Safe With You by Skillet The Dime by performed (and re-recorded) by Steven Leavitt, lyrics by Steven Leavitt and Tony Khan a parody of Sign (originally performed by Ace of Base) written by Jenny Cecilia Berggren (STIM), Jonas Petter Berggren (STIM), Malin Sofia Katarina Berggren (STIM), and Ulf Gunnar Ekberg (STIM) published by Megasong Publishing (KODA) and Warner-Tamarlane Publishing Group (BMI) Copyright 1992. Episode References Ender's Game (IMDB) Nat Magnuson (episode 4 and 5) The Artist's Way by Juilia Cameron (theartistswaybook.com) Serendipity & Synchronicity (Dr. Carder Stout for Goop) Synchronicity by The Police (Wikipedia) “Prog” = Progressive Rock (music genre: Wikipedia) Time and Space by Lobate Scarp Interstellar (movie: Rotten Tomatoes) Rich Mouser (discogs.com) Spock's Beard V (Album: Wikipedia) The Mouse House Studio The Highly Sensitive Person (hsperson.com) Debbie Evans (Steve's mom, professional stuntwoman) Precision Driving The Truman Show (Rotten Tomatoes) Bruce Almighty (IMDB)   Toni Koch on The Language of Creativity Ep. 11 “The Times They Are a Changin Matthew 5:15 (BibleGateway.com) Episode 26 with Physical Therapist Elizabeth Makous Amy Grant album Lead Me On (title track: YouTube | Wikipedia) KIIS FM, Los Angeles (Wikipedia) Pentecostalism (BBC Religions) Church scene from The Blues Brothers (feat. James Brown! YouTube) 35 Best 90s Christian Alternative Rock Bands (Ranker.com) Poor Old Lu (BandCamp) Skillet (rateyourmusic.com) Jonie Blinman (Apple Music) Radiohead: Kid A (besteveralbums.com) World Music in Newhall (Yelp.com) Yes! (official website) Roger Waters - Amused to Death (Wikipedia | Last 3 tracks: YouTube) KLOS Jim Ladd (LAist.com) Hammond B3 (Wikipedia) Agnosticism (Wikipedia) Weird Al work ethic in the studio (Behind the Scenes on the making of Strait Outta Lynwood) (Weird Al and Steve share a birthday!) The Sign (song: Wikipedia) – Ace of Base (Music Video: YouTube) Cakewalk for DOS (WinWorld), SMPTE (Old School Tape Sync, How Did It Work? YouTube) Amish Paradise by “Weird” Al Yankovic (Video: YouTube) Episode 165 - Top Ten “Weird” Al Songs w/ Steven Leavitt on All Time Top Ten with Ben Eisen Parody vs. Pastiche (Masterclass) Christianne Kinney (Entertainment Attorney) The Language of Creativity Ep. 14 Callin' in Sick by “Weird” Al Yankovic (YouTube) Beautiful Light by Lobate Scarp (Lyric Video: YouTube) Lobate Scarp Choir Session (Making-of: YouTube) Malcolm Gladwell's “Connectors”: People Who Spread Ideas (ShortForm.com) Adrienne Woods (official website) Friendster (Article: Vice) Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age (GoodReads) The Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon (

Second Citizens
Brendan Jennings

Second Citizens

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 51:17


Brendan Jennings jumps onto the show to talk about the pros and cons of going into a Second City show as a long term understudy, and how he dealt with keeping expectations at bay. We also ruminate on not believing what people tell you and how Brendan eventually got to write his own shows on the ETC! We also believe that Brendan and our host are the only people in Second City History to understudy one another for the same parts in the same show.  We didn't talk about Subscribing, Rating and Reviewing, which is why I'm reminding you to do those things in print!Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/secondcitizenspod/Twitter: https://twitter.com/SecondCitizens_

Cult Fiction
Episode 69 – The Blues Brothers

Cult Fiction

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 44:18


In this episode, Andy and Stephanie discuss Chicago, rock and roll, and cocaine as they review John Landis's THE BLUES BROTHERS. Andy hates on the director and Stephanie shits on the Catholic Church. We're on a mission from God.

The Guys Review
Ghostbusters

The Guys Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 77:37


Ghostbusters Welcome to The Guys Review, where we review media, products and experiences.  **READ APPLE REVIEWS/Fan Mail**Mention Twitter DM group - like pinned tweet @The_GuysReviewRead emails theguysreviewpod@gmail.comTwitter Poll Ghostbusters         (im starting to hate the swedish translation of movies. Now in swedish Ghostbusters is called Ghostleague) Director: Ivan Riteman Writers: Dan Aykroyd. Harold Ramis. Rick Moranis(uncredited) Starring:  Bill MurreyDan AykroydSigourney WeaverHarold RamisRick MoranisErnie Hudson  Released: June 8, 1984 Budget: $30M ($85,700,096.25M in 2022) Gross US & Canada $243,578,797M   ($695,824,211.55M in 2022) Opening weekend US & Canada $13,578,151M in JUN 10, 1984 ($38,788,294.92M in 2022) Gross worldwide $296,578,797M ($847,227,714.92M in 2022)  Ratings:   IMDb 7.8/10 Rotten Tomatoes 63% Metacritic 71% Google Users 86%   Here cometh thine shiny awards Sire. My Lord Tucker the Wanker second Earl of Wessex. Lord of the Furries. Heir of Lord baldy the one eyed snake wrestler. Protector of Freedom units. Step Sibling with funny feelings down stairs. Entertainer of uncles. Jailor of innocent. Spanker of innocent milk maids and stable boys. The toxic wanker. Big Cheif sitting doughnut. Teepee giver to the great Cornholio. Edgar Allan Poe's shaved muse. Academy Awards, USA 1985NomineeOscarBest Effects, Visual EffectsRichard EdlundJohn BrunoMark VargoChuck Gaspar Best Music, Original SongRay Parker Jr. For the song "Ghostbusters".  BAFTA Awards 1985WinnerBAFTA Film AwardBest Original SongRay Parker Jr. For the song "Ghostbusters".NomineeBAFTA Film AwardBest Special Visual EffectsRichard Edlund   Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films, USA 1985WinnerSaturn AwardBest Fantasy Film   Golden Globes, USA 1985NomineeGolden GlobeBest Motion Picture - Comedy or Musical Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - Comedy or MusicalBill Murray Best Original Song - Motion PictureRay Parker Jr. Song: "Ghostbusters"  Golden Screen, Germany 1985WinnerGolden Screen  Grammy Awards 1985NomineeGrammyBest Album of Original Score Written for a Motion Picture or Television SpecialRay Parker Jr.Kevin O'NealBobby AlessiTom BaileyGraham RussellDavid FosterJay GraydonDiane WarrenMick SmileyElmer Bernstein Hugo Awards 1985NomineeHugoBest Dramatic PresentationIvan Reitman (director)Dan Aykroyd (written by)Harold Ramis (written by)  National Film Preservation Board, USA 2015WinnerNational Film RegistryNational Film Preservation Board Online Film & Television Association 2021WinnerOFTA Film Hall of FameSong "Ghostbusters"  Online Film & Television Association 2016WinnerOFTA Film Hall of FameMotion Picture Young Artist Awards 1985WinnerYoung Artist AwardBest Family Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy First Time you saw the movie? Plot: After Columbia University parapsychology professors Peter Venkman, Ray Stantz, and Egon Spengler experience their first encounter with a ghost at the New York Public Library, the university dean dismisses the credibility of their paranormal-focused research and fires them. The trio responds by establishing "Ghostbusters", a paranormal investigation and elimination service operating out of a disused firehouse. They develop high-tech nuclear-powered equipment to capture and contain ghosts, although business is initially slow. After a paranormal encounter in her apartment, cellist Dana Barrett calls the Ghostbusters. She recounts witnessing a demonic dog-like creature in her refrigerator utter a single word: "Zuul". Ray and Egon research Zuul and details of Dana's building while Peter inspects her apartment and unsuccessfully attempts to seduce her. The Ghostbusters are hired to remove a gluttonous ghost, Slimer, from the Sedgewick Hotel. Having failed to properly test their equipment, Egon warns the group that crossing the energy streams of their proton pack weapons could cause a catastrophic explosion. They capture the ghost and deposit it in an ecto-containment unit under the firehouse. Supernatural activity rapidly increases across the city and the Ghostbusters become famous; they hire a fourth member, Winston Zeddemore, to cope with the growing demand. Suspicious of the Ghostbusters, Environmental Protection Agency inspector Walter Peck asks to evaluate their equipment but Peter rebuffs him. Egon warns that the containment unit is nearing capacity and supernatural energy is surging across the city. Peter meets with Dana and informs her Zuul was a demigod worshipped as a servant to "Gozer the Gozerian", a shapeshifting god of destruction. Upon returning home, she is possessed by Zuul; a similar entity possesses her neighbor, Louis Tully. Peter arrives and finds the possessed Dana/Zuul claiming to be "the Gatekeeper". Louis is brought to Egon by police officers and claims he is "Vinz Clortho, the Keymaster". The Ghostbusters agree to keep the pair separated. Peck returns with law enforcement and city workers to have the Ghostbusters arrested and their containment unit deactivated, causing an explosion that releases the captured ghosts. Louis/Vinz escapes in the confusion and makes his way to the apartment building to join Dana/Zuul. In jail, Ray and Egon reveal Ivo Shandor, leader of a Gozer-worshipping cult, designed Dana's building to function as an antenna to attract and concentrate spiritual energy to summon Gozer and bring about the apocalypse. Faced with supernatural chaos across the city, the Ghostbusters convince the mayor to release them. The Ghostbusters travel to the apartment building roof as Dana/Zuul and Louis/Vinz open the gate between dimensions and transform into demonic dogs. Gozer appears as a woman and attacks the Ghostbusters then disappears when they attempt to retaliate. Her disembodied voice demands the Ghostbusters "choose the form of the destructor". Ray inadvertently recalls a beloved corporate mascot from his childhood, and Gozer reappears as a gigantic Stay Puft Marshmallow Man that begins destroying the city. Against his earlier advice, Egon instructs the team to cross their proton energy streams at the dimensional gate. The resulting explosion destroys Gozer's avatar, banishing it back to its dimension, and closes the gateway. The Ghostbusters rescue Dana and Louis from the wreckage and are welcomed on the street as heroes.  TOP 5​Before the Ghostbusters become established in New York City, they release a commercial to advertise their services. The three original members — Peter Venkman (Bill Murrey), Ray Stantz (Dan Aykroyd), and Egon Spengler (Harold Ramis) — appear on television, with the number 555-2368. During the film's theatrical release in 1984, Ivan Reritman ran that very same commercial, which allowed people to call in. Callers would hear a pre-recorded message from Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd, who announced that they were unable to answer as they were busy busting ghosts! The number received 1,000 calls every hour, 24 hours a day, for several weeks! Sadly, the line is no longer operational, so if you're being troubled by strange noises in the middle of the night, or you're experiencing feelings of dread in your basement or attic, we don't know what to tell you!“Ghostbusters” is such an iconic title — so much so, that many fans still haven't noticed that, following the opening scene in the New York Public Library in the original 1984 film, the title that appears on the screen is actually two words and not one, reading “Ghost Busters”! Before the filmmakers settled on the now iconic title, Dan Aykroyd originally considered the title “Ghost Smashers”, while “Ghostbreakers” was also an option. The sign outside the Ghostbusters fire station in New York even had variations of these titles during production. “Ghostbusters” wasn't available because of Filmation's Ghostbusters (1975), an unrelated TV series (there's also a 1986 cartoon). In the end, Columbia Pictures obtained the rights, while The Real Ghostbusters (1986 — 1991) was so named to distinguish it from the Filmation version.Despite becoming one of the most iconic characters in the entire Ghostbusters franchise, Slimer is never actually name-dropped in either of the two movies, Ghostbusters and Ghostbusters II (1989). However, he was referred to as “Onionhead” by the crew of the original film. The “ugly little spud” wasn't actually named “Slimer” until the animated show, The Real Ghostbusters, in which he's part of the team. It's this that inspired his more friendly cameo in Ghostbusters II, in which he offers Louis Tully (Rick Moranis) a ride in a town car. Slimer isn't the only ghost in the original movie who isn't referred to by the name we now know him by Gozer's two minions, Vinz Clortho/the keymaster and Zuul/the gatekeeper are never referred to as "terror dogs", despite the hellhounds now being synonymous with the name.As well as being called “Onionhead” by the crew members of the original 1984 film, Slimer also went by another name — “The Ghost of John Belushi”, something Dan Aykroyd started. Aykroyd has since confirmed that Slimer was heavily inspired by the late John Belushi. For starters, the green spook's hankering for food was based on Belushi's cafeteria scene in National Lampoon's Animal House (1978). The role of Peter Venkman was originally written for the actor, however, he passed away while Aykroyd was working on the script in early 1984. While there are no direct references to the actor in the film, there are plenty throughout IDW's Ghostbusters comic book series, some of which even feature Belushi's character, “Joliet” Jake Blues, from The Blues Brothers (1980), which also stars Dan Aykroyd as Elwood Blues.Once the Ghostbusters cross the streams, the rift between the two dimensions causes the Marshmallow Man to explode, raining down marshmallow on the unsuspecting New Yorkers below. But getting that amount of actual marshmallows to dump on the film's extras was implausible. Instead, Edlund's team collected 500-gallon batches of shaving cream to substitute for the remnants of Mr. Stay-Puft. William Atherton, who played EPA villain Walter Peck, was skeptical about having such a large amount of heavy cream dropped on him, so they tested the idea on a stuntman using only 75 pounds, and it knocked him to the ground. The stuntman was okay, and another smaller batch was collected to dump on Atherton for the final take in the film. **TRIPLE LINDY AWARD** **REVIEW AND RATING**TreyChrisStephen .5Tucker .5 TOP 5Stephen:1 Breakfast club2 T23 Ghostbuster4 Sandlot5 Color out of space  Chris:1. sandlots2. T23. trick r treat4. rocky horror picture show5. hubie halloween Trey:1) Boondocks Saints2) Mail Order Brides3) Tombstone4) Very bad things5) She out of my league Tucker:1. T22: Tombstone3: My Cousin Vinny4: Ghostbusters5: Scream WHAT ARE WE DOING NEXT WEEK? Web: https://theguysreview.simplecast.com/EM: theguysreviewpod@gmail.comIG: @TheGuysReviewPodTW: @The_GuysReview - Twitter DM groupFB: https://facebook.com/TheGuysReviewPod/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYKXJhq9LbQ2VfR4K33kT9Q Please, Subscribe, rate and review us wherever you get your podcasts from!! Thank you,-The Guys

Ian Talks Comedy
D.B. Frick

Ian Talks Comedy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 64:25


Comedy writer D.B. Frick joined me to discuss watching the Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson; George Carlin; comedians of the 1980's; baseball; John Mulaney; banging Bond babes; Herschel Walker; trying stand up; Wantagh; GPS; The Amazing Race; reality TV; Herve Villechaize; Antonio Banderas; Peter Dinklage; blackface; working at UCLA with Conchatta Farrell; Abe Vigoda; being an intern on Late Night with Conan O'Brien; writing a joke that Conan called his favorite of the year; getting the internship; Paul Schaffer; Alan Zweibel; Saturday Night Live's 50th; Lemmings Revival; Tony Hendra; Chevy Chase; sneaking in to the SNL 25th after party; sneaking into the Hayden Planetarium; raising a kid; making money by inventing or inheriting; not being in wills when promised;  Mr. T method of travel; teaching improv at Cambridge; getting scalped tickets to Monty Python; his TV show Welcome Back, America; Jackie "The Jokeman" Martling; writing a sitcom for himself pre-COVID; being taken seriously; having friends outside of show biz; borrowing money; giving to the homeless; having a wallet in 2022; putting everything in the back of your phone; crickets; being at Conan when Norm MacDonald had the greatest appearance in late night history; working for Conan O'Brien; how he thinks he blew his chance at Conan; wishing he was part of the original cast of SNL; The Blues Brothers; Bob Nelson; Christopher Guest directing Lemmings; Darrell Hammond; Don Pardo; SNL's 50th Anniversary; Punkie Johnson; 30 Interviews in 30 Minutes

Second Citizens
Rob Janas

Second Citizens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 41:13


After some technical difficulties in our first crack at an episode our host and Rob Janas sit down for take two to talk about Northwestern University and it's lengthy improv roster, the IO road show and of course the Second City! You may ask why I even mention that this was a second recording and it's because the improv chemistry between Rob and Joe that only comes from performing thousands of free shows together makes it SEEM like it's a first episode. *Except for any parts where we might mention that it's a second attempt. I'm guessing you won't need a second attempt to subscribe, rate and review! Because you are such a smart listener!Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/secondcitizenspod/Twitter: https://twitter.com/SecondCitizens_

ELIMINATION
S4 - Rd1 - John Candy Vs Chris Rock

ELIMINATION

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 64:27


DON'T MENTION THE SLAP!!Its a sweet match up with Candy coming up against Rock but who deserves a place in Round 2???Bob is making his own sitcom called DUSTY, click the link and join the Dusty family.https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/dusty-sitcom-by-robert-rivett/x/26898052#/Thanks for listeningBounce to the RhythmPodcast about independent music artists who are worthy of a bigger audience and deserve...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Adam Carolla Show
Part 2: Ethan Wayne + News (ACS October 19)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 63:07 Very Popular


Actor Ethan Wayne comes to the studio and talks about his experience growing up as the son of John Wayne and how his father would pull him out of school to take him on location. Ethan explains how being around stunt guys at a young age led him to pursue stunt work on ‘The Blues Brothers' and talks about the exhibit he's curated in Texas showcasing the life and work of his father. Gina Grad reports the news of today including: a NY congressional candidate releasing a sex tape to highlight their 'sex positive' platform, James Corden apologizing after being banned from a restaurant, and Selma Blair's final performance. PLUGS: Visit the pop-up store, ‘The Williams Racing Experience', open today through Sunday at 800 Congress in downtown Austin Join the musical event: Williams Racing Presents: ‘DJ Cassidy's Pass The Mic', live on Friday at Austin City Limits And follow Jenson on Twitter, @JensonButton Listen to Ethan Wayne's ‘John Wayne Gritcast' wherever you find podcasts Visit the exhibit, ‘John Wayne: an American Experience', open 7 days a week in Fort Worth, Texas And follow him and his dog Finn on Instagram, @TravelingWithFinn THANKS FOR SUPPORTING TODAY'S SPONSORS: GoodRanchers.com/ Adam, Enter code: ADAM SimpliSafe.com/ADAM Geico.com

Second Citizens
Dwayne Colbert

Second Citizens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 50:13


*NOTE* This episode was recorded a few weeks before The Second City announced that they will be opening a New York theater in 2023 (Hooray!), while at the same time removing all evidence of the Los Angeles theater from their website without alerting any of the Second Citizens still teaching for them out here. (BOOOOOOOOOOOOO!)- on with the show. The Second City Los Angeles has contributed mightily to the comedy output of the company and no one was more vital to the LA theater than Dwayne Colbert. He joins us to talk about discovering improv, the highs and lows of the Second City Network, how he found his way to the Second City Advisory Board (Thanks Amber Ruffin!) and what he plans to bring to that role. We also have a brief discussion on what it means to be a "Second Citizen".  I can't think of a better person to represent the Second City LA, no matter what the future holds. We've been getting some snarky reviews and are loving it. Keep em' coming with those 5 star ratings! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/secondcitizenspod/Twitter: https://twitter.com/SecondCitizens_

The Official EFL Podcast
S5 Ep12: Eustace and his blues brothers, and the inspirational Joe Thompson!

The Official EFL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 46:14


On this week's official EFL podcast, Mark Clemmit is joined by Birmingham City manager John Eustace, to discuss life at St Andrew's and what's possible for the blues this season. Elsewhere, Clem also sits down with the brilliant Joe Thompson, to talk about the incredible way that he's coped with all that's been thrown at him over the last few years, and in addition to his inspirational and motivational attitude to life, he's also a bit of a punditry pro as well!

Second Citizens
Lancy Kinsey

Second Citizens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 55:21


Lance Kinsey (whom we've decided to call Uncle Lance- you'll hear) joins us to talk about how improv and the second city method influenced the writing and directing of his movie "All Stars" (Featuring multiple Second City Alums), and how it continues to inform his process today. Lance's interview was recorded shortly after the passing of his good friend and Second City Legend  Mike Haggerty (Joyce had to find him another job so he would stop doing Second City shows) and this episode is dedicated in memory of Haggs.Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/secondcitizenspod/Twitter: https://twitter.com/SecondCitizens_

Nerdelandslaget
#160: Ragnhild Solberg

Nerdelandslaget

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 132:22


ENDELIG! Første gang vi spurte ukas gjest om å være gjest i Nerdelandslaget var 5. August 2020, og nå, over to år etter står planetene på linje! Det er vi fryktelig glade for, for maken til kompetanse er det sjelden vi har i studio: Ta vel imot doktorgradsstipendiat innenfor dataspill, sertifisert Spillpike og nyeste spiller på Nerdelandslaget: Ragnhild Solberg! ☀️Vi snakket om Prince of Persia, Blues Brothers, Final Fantasy, Theme Hospital, Starcraft, Heroes of The Storm, Overwatch 2, Super Mario-filmen og masse mer

Too Many Captains - A Movie Podcast
Bonus Mini-Episode: WAWTA...Saturday Night Live Movies

Too Many Captains - A Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 13:29


Superstar (1999)Wayne's World (1992)The Blues Brothers (1980)Website: https://amoviepodcast.com/Twitter: @ItsaFilmPodcastInstagram: @toomanycaptainsproductions

Afternoons With Mike PODCAST
S4E188 ERIC FLOYD, a professional entertainer at a major theme park, has a great passion for Jesus.

Afternoons With Mike PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 50:46


Eric Floyd is a hard-working entertainer at Orlando's Universal Studios. He has been a part of the "Blues Brothers" Show since 1998, which is enjoyed several times a day at this very popular theme park. While talented at his trade, he also has a great love for God, His church and the Kingdom of God. He is a podcaster, and loves to talk to others about their faith. His unique background also gave him a love for thoroughbred horses, and that topic is discussed in segment 3. You're in for a treat with this interview.

Lauer Road Radio
Episode 112 - The Mt. Rushmore of Shapes and Kayne West

Lauer Road Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 53:12


This week Dan and Jason have a full studio with Jesse, Preston and Harrison.  They talk about Harrison winning a spaghetti eating competition, going to a Columbus Crew match, the Mt. Rushmore of Shapes, buying a TV, talking with customer service, giving the stick eye, Kayne West, Savannah gets a voice,  old school recess games, Blue's Clues and The Blues Brothers.  Enjoy and Share!   Netflix Suggestion of the Week: Jason:  Punkin Chunkin Dan:  Facing Nolan   Video Podcast Link YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFCEtzOS_7KEGkIwa-TY5iA Audio Podcast Links Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/lauer-road-radio/id1080548373 Podbean: https://lauerroadradio.podbean.com/ Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5LmfrAiGoe2Db6VUR8nF0t?si=RrmDIYrPSY-ioWXwBQjBJA iHeart: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/256-lauer-road-radio-31121154/ Player.FM: https://player.fm/series/lauer-road-radio-2360388 Castbox: https://castbox.fm/channel/Lauer-Road-Radio-id1334980?country=us Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/lauer-road-radio   Social Media Links Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lauerroadradio/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/lauerroadradio Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lauerroadradio/ Contact Us Directly Email: lauerroadradio@gmail.com Support Lauer Road Radio CashApp: $LauerRoadRadio https://cash.app/$LauerRoadRadio  

Second Citizens
Amanda Blake Davis

Second Citizens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 41:51


Amanda Blake Davis worked on multiple oceans and multiple deserts before ABD (as she's known) hit the ETC. She shares her stories from all of these wet/dry climates, as well as the temperate midwest (ha.). Jobs are a theme as the financial sacrifice of working for tourco comes up as well as how sometimes you have to move away from Chicago so that you can move back to Chicago. And though this episode was recorded a while ago, I think I remember us talking about the grinding world of theater league, co-ed, FLAG FOOTBALL! (ABD is a 2X TLCFF champion)And you will be a Champion if you Subscribe, Rate and Review!