Podcasts about orbits

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Orbital gravitationally curved path of an object around a point in outer space; circular or elliptical path of one object around another object

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  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about orbits

Space Business Podcast
#53 Luca Rossettini, D-Orbit: space logistics

Space Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 57:33


My guest this week is Luca Rossettini, founder and CEO of D-Orbit, arguably one of the most prominent European new space companies. D-Orbit is already successfully operating a last-mile delivery service in orbit, a so-called space tug, but there is so much more on their visionary roadmap. Luca and I talk all about it - enjoy! If you have comments or questions about the episode, email us at spacebusinesspodcast@gmail.com or post them on our Twitter (@podcast_space). If you enjoy the show, please leave us a review on your favorite podcast app - we highly appreciate it! The Space Business Podcast is sponsored by NanoAvionics and produced in partnership with the International Space University (ISU). Follow the podcast on Twitter @podcast_space If you got interested in learning more about the business opportunities in space, check out my online course at https://www.udemy.com/course/space-entrepreneurship/ If you speak German, also check out my recently published introductory book on the space economy. Episode notes: 0:00 Intro 1:51 D-Orbit elevator pitch & history 12:57 Fundraising and business focus over time 16:54 "Skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been" 19:24 D-Orbit's core activities and roadmap 25:29 D-Orbit's ION space tug 36:33 Other roadmap elements 47:43 Interplanetary transport 52:37 What else is interesting in space? 54:05 Sci-Fi

The Anjunadeep Edition
The Anjunadeep Edition 377 with William Orbit

The Anjunadeep Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 60:17


Celebrating his Anjunadeep debut, William Orbit takes over this week's Deep Edition.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1825: Nova Scotia to Orbit. Bob Zimmerman BehindtheBlack.com

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 7:35


Photo:  Expulsion of the Acadians in Grand-Pré. More than 80 per cent of the Acadian population was expelled from the region between 1755 and 1764. Nova Scotia to Orbit.  Bob Zimmerman BehindtheBlack.com https://behindtheblack.com/behind-the-black/points-of-information/nanoracks-signs-deal-to-be-first-customer-for-canadian-spaceport/

World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN
William Shatner, fresh from low orbit, shows off his range on new record 'Bill'

World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 31:17


In this session we get into Shatner's new record, he shares stories from his colorful life, including a recent trip to space.

Are We There Yet?
“A smashing good time”: NASA plans to knock an asteroid out of orbit to learn how to save our planet from a future impact

Are We There Yet?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 28:12


NASA's DART mission is set to launch tonight from Vandenberg in California, on a 10-month mission that ends when it smashes into a tiny rock in space. The spacecraft is part of NASA' planetary defense plan -- figuring out ways to save our own Earth should an asteroid threaten to hit us.

Voices of Search // A Search Engine Optimization (SEO) & Content Marketing Podcast
How To Have A Great Meeting About SEO -- Andy Crestodina // Orbit Media

Voices of Search // A Search Engine Optimization (SEO) & Content Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 18:54


Co-founder and Chief Marketing Officer at Orbit Media Studios, Andy Crestodina, explores improving conversations around SEO. When it comes to building out effective SEO strategies, the conversations are not always happening with SEO professionals. Without data, these discussions can miss the mark. Andy shares his insights on having great SEO conversations. Show NotesConnect With: Andy Crestodina: Website // LinkedInThe Voices of Search Podcast: Email // LinkedIn // TwitterBenjamin Shapiro: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Voices of Search // A Search Engine Optimization (SEO) & Content Marketing Podcast
Why Does The SEO Industry Have Such A Bad Reputation -- Andy Crestodina // Orbit Media

Voices of Search // A Search Engine Optimization (SEO) & Content Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 19:12


Andy Crestodina, Co-founder and Chief Marketing Officer at Orbit Media Studios talks about questionable practices within the SEO industry. When it comes to laying the blame for SEO's spammy reputation, several parties are at fault. With the industry slowly trending towards better SEO practices, Andy looks into why the SEO industry has a bad reputation. Show NotesConnect With: Andy Crestodina: Website // LinkedInThe Voices of Search Podcast: Email // LinkedIn // TwitterBenjamin Shapiro: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Hate Read Podcast
The Twisted Ones by T. Kingfisher

Hate Read Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 64:47


Welcome back, Literary Slummers, to another episode of Shelf Aware! This week we are wrapping up Em's unit on psychological horror with T. Kingfisher's The Twisted Ones. We've got creepy deer, an excellent dog, and way too many dolls. An actual scary book, but maybe doesn't entirely fill the prompt. Oh well. Join us next week for another Morph Monday! Recommended Reading: Winter's Orbit by Everina Maxwell Hammers on Bone by Cassandra Khaw The Last Final Girl by Stephen Graham Jones A Small Charred Face by Kazuki Sakuraba Twitter: @shelfawarecast, @amdeebee, @emnoteliza Instagram: @shelfawarecast Email: shelfawarecast @ gmail ...and i twisted myself about like the twisted ones...

Kommentar - Deutschlandfunk
Russlands Satellitenabschuss und die Folgen - Eine rücksichtslose Machtdemonstration im Orbit

Kommentar - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 5:00


Mit einer Rakete hat Russland einen ausgedienten Satellit abgeschossen. Das sei eine rücksichtslose Machtdemonstration, deren Folgen noch lange nachwirken würden, kommentiert Ralf Krauter.Ein Kommentar von Ralf Krauterwww.deutschlandfunk.de, Kommentare und Themen der WocheDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Mile High Endurance Podcast
Jake Kilgore Trial Running

Mile High Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 88:26


Jake Kilgore is the race director of the DC Peaks 50 that has an epic story this year, ending in NYT headlines '87 Rescued From ‘Near-Whiteout' Conditions During Utah Ultramarathon.  Speaking of stories, Jake is also author of the book Trial Running: Learning Perseverance Through Life's Aid Stations. You heard right "TRIAL running".  Jake and his trail running has some very interesting roots, twists and unexpected outcomes. It was his time in Federal Prison where much of his trail running dreams were manifested.   Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD   Thanks very much to Venga CBD for helping make the show possible.   Venga was started by athletes like you who wanted a better way to use CBD to help fight pain, train longer, race harder and recover faster.  Venga has created a SYSTEM of CBD products that cover 100% of your CBD needs. Each product is specifically made to support an area of your endurance life. Ultra Gels and Balm are great for training recovery and fighting inflammation Gummies and Energy Drink are great while racing Sleep Gels help you get the sleep you need for that overnight recovery   All Venga CBD products are 100% THC Free and water soluble!  Just go to https://vengaendurance.com/303podcast to order yours today. First-time order is 30% off with code (303PODCAST).  We've also added 50% off your first month's subscription with code (303SUBSCRIPTION).     In Today's Show Interview with Jake Kilgore Endurance News PTO Press Release Gustav Iden is poised to be crowned as PTO World No. 1 for 2021 IRONAN Arizona Inaugural Challenge Malta will take place May 2022 Wattie Ink is now Spaero Triathlon What's new in the 303 Weekly Spin and Inside Tracker Coaches Corner and TriDot Videos of the Week   Interview Sponsor: UCAN Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance!   You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co   Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co,    Interview with Jake Kilgore Setup quote from IRunFar: https://www.irunfar.com/what-really-happened-at-the-2021-dc-peaks-50-mile-race   As race day approached, a poor weather forecast developed, predicting significant precipitation via rain and/or snow depending on the altitude. The National Weather Service, for example, instructed hunters and outdoor recreationists to be prepared for winter conditions in the Utah mountains. This type of storm is not unusual for the month of October — and even the second half of September — in this geography, the tops of mountains.   On Saturday, October 9, at 5:30 a.m., the race started off as planned in Kaysville, Utah. This town is just north of Salt Lake City in Davis County, the namesake of DC in the race name. Runners were excited for this autumn ultra, to run a rugged course that traversed the mountain range above the northern Salt Lake City suburbs, including Francis Peak and Bountiful Peak. The more prepared runners had seen the weather forecast and knew the event's high passages, and packed their running vests accordingly with jackets and gloves, some even bringing pants as a precaution.   Kelly Sparks, the Davis County Sheriff, spoke about the shock it was to get a call of this magnitude.   “It's pretty rare, in our part of the country, to get a call that so many people are in need of assistance. We usually deal with groups of twos and threes. We got the call at about 9:30 a.m. that there were runners out on this high altitude course that needed assistance. We sent some SAR people on foot, some on snowmobile, and some on four-wheelers. Some went from the front of the course going forward, and others went from the midpoint backtracking. We needed to ensure everyone could get off safely.”   When asked about the characterization in the initial media reports of runners being lost, Sheriff Sparks stated, “I don't think anyone was lost at that time, but the [race directors] realized that it could become a real situation, with the blowing snow and visibility. We needed to get people to a warm environment as fast as possible.”   The DC Peaks 50 blizzard and athlete rescue is just the tip of the iceberg of this story.  You have to understand where this this story starts with Jake Kilgore as a CEO of a major motorize wheelchair company and the journey to ultra trail running.   Let's talk to Jake Kilgore.     There are ton of details about Jake's experience that we did not get to:   Kilgore, Jake. Trial Running: Learning Perseverance Through Life's Aid Stations (p. 41). Kindle Edition. The doctor's office is left with an Orbit prescription pad in order to make the referral process simple. This pad contains checkboxes and fields for the medical professional to order supplies and materials based on a patient's needs. Many reps would make minor changes to this prescription pad and other paperwork—adding a missed checkbox, filling in a date, or writing in “ninety-nine months” when the length of need is overlooked. Everyone knew it. The owners knew it, I knew it, and our internal reviewers knew it. Although this behavior was not permitted, everyone viewed these actions as not a big deal—and certainly not criminal.     Kilgore, Jake. Trial Running: Learning Perseverance Through Life's Aid Stations (p. 36). Kindle Edition. I used every Sunday for a one-on-one phone call with each of my four kids, rotating through them oldest to youngest, one Sunday at a time. This was the best I could do to keep a close, private, trusted relationship with each child. I dedicated all fifteen minutes to that one child. If you only had fifteen private minutes a month, being recorded by the government, what would you ask your child? What would you talk about? Inmates were charged roughly three bucks for their fifteen minutes.   Kilgore, Jake. Trial Running: Learning Perseverance Through Life's Aid Stations (p. 50). Kindle Edition. We heard the whispers, we saw the looks of “That's Jake Kilgore. The one who's going to prison soon. His poor wife and kids. Sad that his greed and unlawful conduct would do that to them.” We heard it all. We saw it all.     Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance. Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Endurance News:   GUSTAV IDEN POISED TO CAPTURE TITLE AS PTO WORLD NO. 1 Professional Triathletes Organisation today announced that Gustav Iden is poised to be crowned as PTO World No. 1 for 2021. In his victory in Florida over the weekend at his first long-distance race, Iden scored 107.23 PTO World Ranking Points, the second highest score for a full-distance race in 2021, just below the stellar performance of 2x World Champion Patrick Lange at Tulsa, where Lange scored 108.88 PTO World Ranking Points. Combined with Iden's 110.18 points scored at the IM 70.3 World Championship® and the 111.34 points he scored at The Collins Cup, this gives Iden a nearly unassailable average of 109.62 PTO World Ranking Points.   With Jan Frodeno, PTO World No. 2, announcing that he is not expected to race again this season, Iden is set to finish the season as PTO World No. 1. This will be the first year since the PTO Rankings began in 2016 that Frodeno has not been PTO World No. 1 and might signal that the Changing of the Guard has well and truly begun.   The PTO World Rankings are based on the average number of PTO World Ranking Points that an athlete has earned for their three best races in 2021. Frodeno's best three races are 112.86 points at The Collins Cup, 107.51 points at Challenge Miami and 88.10 points at Challenge Gran Canaria, giving him an average of 102.82 PTO World Rankings Points. Should Frodeno decide to race again before December 31 and was to score 108.52 or more PTO World Rankings Points, he would reclaim the PTO World No. 1 ranking.   Ironman Arizona Schedule:  Thursday, Nov. 19 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. - IRONMAN Village Opens – Tempe Beach Park Friday, Nov. 20 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. - IRONMAN Village Opens – Tempe Beach Park Media Credential pick up time and location will be coordinated upon approval of credentials. Please contact press@ironman.com for additional information. 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. – Opening Ceremonies – Tempe Beach Park Saturday, Nov. 20 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. - IRONMAN Village Opens – Tempe Beach Park 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. – Bike Check-in – Transition Area 10:00 a.m. – IRONKIDS Arizona Fun Run – Tempe Beach Park 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. – Practice Swim – Tempe Beach Park Sunday, Nov. 21 – Race Day 5:00 a.m. – 6:30 a.m. - Transition area open – Tempe Beach Park 6:45 a.m. – Select Blinds IRONMAN Arizona Age Group Rolling Start – Tempe Beach Park 7:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. - IRONMAN Village Opens – Tempe Beach Park Approx. 3:00 p.m. – First finisher expected at the finish line Approx. 11:30 p.m. – IRONMAN Race Ends (*17 hours after the last athlete enters the water)   Challenge Family Announces Challenge Malta for Early 2022 November 12, 2021   The Mediterranean island of Malta has been announced as the latest destination in Challenge Family's global triathlon series. The inaugural Challenge Malta will take place on Sunday 15 May 2022 with a 113km coast-to-coast course that includes the country's most spectacular scenery. 12 November 2021./ENDURANCE SPORTSWIRE/ – The Mediterranean island of Malta was today announced as the latest destination in Challenge Family's global triathlon series. The inaugural Challenge Malta will take place on Sunday 15 May 2022 with a 113km coast-to-coast course that includes the country's most spectacular scenery.   Malta packs a glorious variety into its small archipelago. Malta's landscape contrasts rocky stretches of coast that end in dizzying limestone cliffs with sheltered bays that hide crystal-clear water and red-gold beaches. Combine that with its exotic mix of Italian, French, British and Arabic influences in both architecture and cuisine along with 3,000 hours of sunshine a year and Malta is an exciting new destination for the long distance triathlon world.   Wattie Ink is now Spaero Triathlon Spaero Triathlon, a California-based triathlon apparel brand formerly known as Wattie Ink, has announced its new brand name. The newly branded Spaero Triathlon is also rolling out a new line of advanced technical triathlon gear and an ambassador team program.   “We already have a stellar reputation for technical, high quality performance apparel,” said CEO Ryan Cady. “We are continuing to build on that foundation by working with some of the most advanced fabrics that deliver improved thermal regulation and superior aerodynamics.   “I can't wait to bring these new products to market with a new look and feel. We're committed to taking triathlon training and racing apparel to the next level that will put athletes at every level at an advantage.”   The new Spaero Triathlon ambassador team is comprised of elite and age-group squads. These ambassadors receive a wide range of benefits including custom apparel, training resources from human performance experts and professional athletes, exclusive event experiences, rewards, and perks from other prestigious brands.   “Spaero Triathlon is an evolution for us,” added Cady. “We've been producing top quality triathlon gear for the last eight years. Current market research tells us that high performance gear for triathletes at all levels is in high demand.   “We've been elevating our product development for a while and this rebrand is a great opportunity to showcase the technical performance of our product line.”   Spaero Triathlon will continue to be manufactured in the company's two wholly owned and operated facilities in San Diego, CA and Mexicali, MEX.     What's New in the 303:   Colorado State Cyclocross Championships - Nov 20th & 21st The 2021 Colorado cyclocross season all comes down to this, the event where we crown the best in the state!  This year the Colorado State Championships heads back north to the oldest venue in the state, a venue that got it's start back in 1999.  Over the years this venue has been home to some iconic cyclocross action, earning the nickname, the "Bowl of Death"   303ENDURANCE GIVEAWAY The Ultimate InsideTracker Prize Package InsideTracker--ultra-personalized nutrition and wellness platform that analyzes data from your blood, DNA, and lifestyle--is proud to partner with 303Endurance.   ONE LUCKY WINNER WILL RECEIVE: 2 InsideTracker Ultimate Test ($1,178 value) 1 InsideTracker DNA Kit ($249 value) 2 InsideTracker InnerAge Test ($198 value)   303 Holiday Gift Guide?   Coaches Corner:   I have been using TriDot as an athlete for several months now.  The more experience I have with it, the more I've come to appreciate how effective the training has been for me as an athlete.  It's made me question how effective my designed training plans are compared to what TriDot provides.    I design training plans and workouts based on my knowledge of my athlete, what I assess they are capable of, my training philosophy and what I think is the best future training based on what the athlete has achieved in the past.   Summing this up.  I'm taking all of an athlete's training data, combined with the filter of my professional training as a coach, my experience as an athlete and a coach, and my philosophies to create the perfect future workouts and training cycles.   My crisis is admitting that my training plans are limited by my experience and filters. TriDot is using millions of records from tens of thousands of athletes to make hundreds of calculations to design the perfect workout and training plan.  It then automatically adjusts based on your training and if you miss a workout.    I am signing up to be a TriDot coach because I believe the platform is that good.  But this has caused me to ask the question, what coaching services that am I providing do athletes value most in a coaching relationship?    Question:  Bill, it's been a while since either of us was actively coached, but question for you:  When you accomplished your goal, what services did you appreciate the most?    Here's a list of typical coaching services.  I'll read the list and you tell me what your top 5 and maybe what would be really low on your list.  That work?   Assessing current fitness and realistic goals Designing a perfect training plan Adjust and redesign training for life events or injuries Test and establish athletes training zones Provide inspiration and encouragement Provide feedback and accountability for training compliance Teach best practices and safety during training Teach swim form, drills, bicycle handling and running form Teach strategies for mental resilience Assess hydration and nutrition needs and develop athlete specific strategies Teach how to setup devices to be congruent with training workouts and compatible with athletes gear   Upcoming Guests Marianne Martin is the first woman to win the Tour de France in 1978.  Marianne Martin (born November 1, 1957 in Fenton, Michigan) is an American road racing cyclist. She won the first Tour de France for women in 1984, covering the 616-mile course in 29 hours, 39 minutes, and 2 seconds. The race was held in July and had 18 stages. The women's tour ran the same time as the men's and finished 2–3 hours before the men each day.[1][2]   The year she won the Tour de France Martin suffered from anemia earlier in that year and had been riding poorly. At the race Martin took the lead after stage 14 where the race encountered the mountains. Martin was a good climber and never gave up the lead after that into Paris. The streets were said to contain more two million spectators watching the race.   Martin, along with runners up Heleen Hage (Dutch) and Deborah Shumway (American), stood on the podium with male champions Laurent Fignon, Bernard Hinault and Greg LeMond. Fignon's prizes were valued at over $225,000 (adjusted to 2016). Martin was awarded a trophy and $1,000.[3]   Martin was inducted into the 2012 Boulder (Colorado) Sports Hall of Fame.[4]     Video Of The Week When Mother Nature Says No | DC Peaks 50 Miler 2021     Aid Station Mentality: Enduring Life Challenge's Through Ultra Running     Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
An anti-satellite missile test Russia conducted on Monday generated a debris field in low-Earth orbit

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 6:03


Guest: Space Systems Engineer and Space Scientist Ani Vermeulen  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Be The Serpent
Episode 99: Detective Boyfriends

Be The Serpent

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 63:58


On this week's episode, we're celebrating the release of Freya's debut book by talking about detectives in love! The tentpoles are Of Dragons, Feasts, and Murders by Aliette de Bodard, A Marvellous Light by Freya Marske, and the fanfic If Life Was A Movie We'd Have A Better Soundtrack Than This by galaxysoup.   What We're Into Lately  Dark Rise by C. S. Pacat The Saint of Steel series by T. Kingfisher that ruthless love by alherath The Warrior of the Third Veil by Victoria Goddard The Sisters Avramapul series by Victoria Goddard Other Stuff We Mentioned Captive Prince by C. S. Pacat Chant Universe by Alexandra Rowland "You Should Really Be Reading Victoria Goddard's Nine Worlds Series" by Alexandra Rowland Guardian Bones Castle Lord Peter Wimsey series by Dorothy L. Sayers A Taste of Gold and Iron by Alexandra Rowland House The Angel of Crows by Katherine Addison Doctor Who The Memory of Souls by Jenn Lyons Captive Prince series by C. S. Pacat Winter's Orbit by Everina Maxwell A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine Vorkosigan Saga by Lois McMaster Bujold Komarr by Lois McMaster Bujold Leverage The X-Files Hannibal Rosemary & Thyme Poirot Hinterland Hot Fuzz Lady Sherlock series by Sherry Thomas Twilight by Stephenie Meyer The Will Darling Adventures by K.J. Charles John le Carré James Bond novels by Ian Fleming Think of England by K.J. Charles An iconic Doctor & Donna scene from Doctor Who Greenwing & Dart series by Victoria Goddard Be the Serpent Episode 33: Turn In Your Badge and Gun! A Private Reason for This by femmequixotic (aka mentioned Harry/Draco case fic) A Dead Djinn In Cairo by P. Djèlí Clark Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch by Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman For Next Time None, it's the Extravaganza! Content Warnings Minor fantasy violence in Of Dragons, Feasts, and Murders and A Marvellous Light.   Transcription The transcript of this episode is available here. Thank you so much to our wonderful team of scribes for their hard work!

StarTalk Radio
Cosmic Queries – Launching the Inspiration4 with Chris Mason & Sian Proctor

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 42:56


What did we learn from the first all civilian mission into orbit? Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice explore SpaceX's recent launch, the Inspiration4, with biophysicist Dr. Chris Mason and geoscientist and pilot Dr. Sian Proctor. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free.Thanks to our Patrons Arlindo Anderson, Miranda Toth, Dino Vidić, Nala Andromeda, Erik Varga, JohnMettler, and Aaron Rikede Ahlman for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: U.S. Space Force photo by Airman 1st Class Thomas Sjoberg, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Curiosity Daily
Circumtriple Planets, Deep Convos with Strangers, Thomassons in Architecture

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 12:45


Learn about a planet orbiting three stars at once; useless architectural relics; and deep conversations with strangers.  We found a planet orbiting three stars at once by Briana Brownell This May Be the First Planet Found Orbiting 3 Stars at Once. (2021). The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/28/science/triple-sun-planet.html  ‌Siegel, E. (2021, September 30). Planet found orbiting three stars all at once. Big Think; Big Think. https://bigthink.com/starts-with-a-bang/planet-orbiting-3-stars/  ‌Scientists may have found the first known planet to orbit three stars. (2021). Science.org. https://www.science.org/content/article/scientists-may-have-found-first-known-planet-orbit-three-stars ‌ Smallwood, J. L., Nealon, R., Chen, C., Martin, R. G., Bi, J., Dong, R., & Pinte, C. (2021). GW Ori: circumtriple rings and planets. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 508(1), 392–407. https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stab2624  Thomassons Are Functionally Useless Architectural Relics by Anna Todd Trufelman, A. (2014, August 26). Thomassons - 99% Invisible. 99% Invisible. https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/thomassons/ Thomassons: Those Peculiar Architectural Relics That Serve No Purpose | 6sqft. (2014, August 28). 6sqft. https://www.6sqft.com/thomassons-those-peculiar-architectural-relics-that-serve-no-purpose/ Everything we assume about deep conversations with strangers is wrong by Cameron Duke Getting beyond small talk: Study finds people enjoy deep conversations with strangers. (2021, September 30). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/929731  Kardas, M., Kumar, A., & Epley, N. (2021). Overly shallow?: Miscalibrated expectations create a barrier to deeper conversation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1037/pspa0000281  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dongfang Hour - the Chinese Aerospace & Technology Podcast
Shenzhou 13 Performs a Historic Spacewalk, iSpace Sets Foot in Wenchang, Tianwen-1 Changes Orbit - ep 59

Dongfang Hour - the Chinese Aerospace & Technology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 16:43


Hello and welcome to another episode of the Dongfang Hour China Space News Roundup! A kind reminder that we cover many more stories every week in our Newsletter (newsletter.dongfanghour.com) and our website (www.dongfanghour.com).This week, we discuss:Shenzhou-13 performs a historic spacewalkCommercial launch startup iSpace sets foot in HainanMars orbiter Tianwen-1 switches to a space sciences orbitThank you for your kind attention! Don't forget to follow us on YouTube, Twitter, or LinkedIn, or your local podcast source.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Travelers in the Night Eps. 127E & 128E: Next Step to Mars & A Weird Orbit

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 5:30


Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - NASA is proposing the next step on the path to Mars to be a mission to 2008 EV5. - 2015 FS332 has an orbit that is inclined by 35 degrees with respect to the ecliptic.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Xcessive Podcast
The Orbit Ep.1 Feat. Rich Zeller, BoltiMC, OnlyJahmez, Unocompac (& more)- XCESSIVE Podcast S.3:Ep.1

Xcessive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 70:06


Please make sure to like, comment, and subscribe! Welcome back to the XCESSIVE Podcast! Today we premier season 3 with a new show we call: The Orbit. Each episode of the orbit is going to feature a bunch of artists, returning and new, doing all sorts of segments such as interviews or whatever else we can think of! We're still going to have our normal interviews and holiday specials this season so don't worry if you're missing that content! It's coming back soon with even more artists than last season, and we're focusing more on Jersey's hottest up-and-coming artists so get ready! In today's episode, we have Rich Zeller, BoltiMC, OnlyJahmez, UnoCompac, KeyzToTheGame, & HeartBreak K! Chapters: 0:00 Intro 1:11 Rich Zeller 15:12 BoltiMC 23:10 OnlyJahmez 35:15 UnoCompac 52:20 KeyzToTheGame 1:04:14 HeartBreak K 1:09:27 Outro Make sure to check everyone out! RichZ: https://www.instagram.com/itsrichz/ BoltiMC: https://www.instagram.com/boltimc/ OnlyJahmez: https://www.instagram.com/onlyjahmez/ UnoCompac: https://www.instagram.com/ethannlucass/ KeyzToTheGame: https://www.instagram.com/keyztothegame/ HeartBreak K: https://www.instagram.com/imheartbreak_k/ Intro & Outro Song: "Satelitte" - OnlyJahmez: https://lnk.to/respectfullytoxic/ Make sure to check out XCESSIVE on other social media pages: Website: https://xcessive.tech Second Channel: http://bit.ly/tooxcessive Discord: https://discord.gg/GU2zbMxrPh Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/xcessivetv/​ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/XCESSIVETV/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/XcessiveTV​ Tik Tok: https://www.tiktok.com/@xcessivetv? Snapchat: https://www.snapchat.com/add/xcessivetv​ Wanna just to listen to the podcast? No problem! Here are the links to all the audio platforms we're a part of! Spotify: http://bit.ly/xcessivepodcastspotify Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/3rsKuxZ SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/xcessivetv Amazon Music: https://amzn.to/3brnBVk Google Podcasts: http://bit.ly/xcessivegooglepodcasts Check out our Sadboys WorldWide Collab! http://bit.ly/SADWRLDXCESSIVE Our personal social media John: https://www.instagram.com/jpullara11/​ Bizz: https://www.instagram.com/matt_bizzz/​ Spencer: https://www.instagram.com/spencerpark_/​ Aidan: https://www.instagram.com/gallagher_b7/​ John B: https://www.instagram.com/johnbernier16/

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1798: Gold rush low-Earth orbit. Bob Zimmerman, BehindtheBlack.com auu

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 12:30


Photo: From ISS in low-Earth orbit. Gold rush low-Earth orbit.  Bob Zimmerman, BehindtheBlack.com auu https://behindtheblack.com/behind-the-black/points-of-information/weather-forces-another-delay-for-endurance-launch-to-iss-2/

The How-to Entrepreneur
Growth Marketing That Launches Brands Into Orbit! The How-to Edition with Ex - Google Hypergrowth Lead / Founder of Galactic Fed Zach Boyette

The How-to Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 52:30


Ex-Google Hypergrowth lead and Galactic Fed Co-Founder. Zach and his team are a fully distributed, multinational digital marketing agency that specializes in Growth Marketing, SEO, and Paid Media.  Zach and the Galactic Fed-eracy have built paid media programs for several top-tier companies including Shell, Descript, and HVMN. Whether it's your brand's vision, mission or growth goals - their 100+ expert roster consists of expertise in every department. I run through a mock consult call with Zach regarding my own business and how they can help me drive results UP! and to the right. Leave Some Feedback: Who should we have on the show next? Please let us know in the comments below Did you enjoy the episode? If so, please leave a short review. Connect with Us: TheHowtoEntrepreneur.com Instagram Twitter LinkedIn Today's Sponsors: JavaPresse Coffee Company - #1 Rated Coffee Grinder on Amazon (Free Grinder in Link) SANESolution - Harvard Medical endorsed body & mind health framework American Dream U -  Transitioning veteran professionals 

The John Batchelor Show
1795: Hotel Mars: Building Boom for Low-Earth Orbit. David Livingston, SpaceShow.com. Eric Berger @ArsTechnica.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 12:55


Hotel Mars: Building Boom for Low-Earth Orbit.  David Livingston, SpaceShow.com. Eric Berger @ArsTechnica. https://arstechnica.com/tag/blue-origin/

The Deep Dive Radio Show and Nick's Nerd News
The earth's orbit is about to get way more crowded!

The Deep Dive Radio Show and Nick's Nerd News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 12:31


This is a discussion we all really need to have!

Constellations, a New Space and Satellite Innovation Podcast
114 - Commercial Infrastructure for Space Communication, Proving the Technology Works and Social Media from Orbit

Constellations, a New Space and Satellite Innovation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 23:45


In this Constellations Podcast, we'll discuss the evolution of internet in space as it moves from utilizing government infrastructure to utilizing modern commercial infrastructure. Increased commercial technology has made space more accessible than ever. More accessibility in space drives the demand for faster, more modern communication onboard spacecraft. During this episode, Brian Barnett, Co-Founder and CEO of Solstar Space Company, will discuss the evolution of space communication and how NASA has accomplished it with their deep space network, tracking and data relay satellites, and fly-over ground stations. Hear Brian explain how Solstar's Schmitt Communicator, now at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, enabled the first commercial tweet from space and how it currently enables secure communication for the military with Critical Data Relay technology.

Growth Everywhere Daily Business Lessons
David Spinks Reveals Key Secrets to Growing Red Hot Communities

Growth Everywhere Daily Business Lessons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 28:21


When social media first surfaced, it was generally dismissed as largely inconsequential for businesses. These days, it's almost impossible to imagine a successful business without a social media presence. With the rise of Web 3 and the ubiquity of social media comes the integral concept of community and the impact and engagement it creates. Here to help us interrogate this rapidly expanding field is David Spinks, VP of Community at Bevy and Cofounder of CMX, two platforms dedicated to helping businesses create and support a thriving community. He is also the author of the new book, The Business of Belonging: How to Make Community your Competitive Advantage. In this conversation, we discuss the key difference between building an audience versus a community and why community drives deeper and more meaningful engagement for business. Learn about some of CMX's useful resources, like the SPACES Model, a fundamental framework for defining your community's business value. We also discuss the most common mistakes businesses make when they first build their communities and how to go about it the right way. Be sure to tune in to learn more about this important topic from an expert in the field! TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:00] Before we jump into today's interview, please rate, review, and subscribe to the Leveling Up Podcast! [00:15] Introducing David Spinks, VP of Community at Bevy and Co-founder of CMX. [01:14] How community is being factored into how businesses are structured.  [02:28] Outlining the differences between audience and community. [04:30] How community encourages participants to create rather than consume. [05:40] Examples of communities where David has seen people create and contribute. [07:35] The importance of a skilled and competent community manager.  [08:42] How to find the right community manager. [09:39] How Bevy, a pioneering community event engine, was started. [11:29] Starting small and setting an intentional example with your initial community members. [15:59] How to ‘push out control' to manage large communities with fewer community managers and why many businesses make the mistake of growing too fast.  [18:04] The SPACES Model as a framework for defining your community's business value. [21:07] The best way to grow your community; why most businesses start in the wrong place. [24:07] David's top book recommendation and its far-reaching applications. [24:39] David's podcast, Masters of Community, and what you can learn from it.  [25:24] Exciting new AI tools to take your community to the next level!   Resources From The Interview:   David Spinks David Spinks on LinkedIn David Spinks on Twitter The Business of Belonging Masters of Community Podcast CMX The SPACES Model: The Framework for Defining Your Community's Business Value Bevy Startup Grind Orbiit.ai Orbit.love Must-read book: Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind   Leave Some Feedback:   What should I talk about next? Who should I interview? Please let me know on Twitter or in the comments below. Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review here Subscribe to Leveling Up on iTunes Get the non-iTunes RSS Feed   Connect with Eric Siu:    Growth Everywhere Single Grain Leveling Up Eric Siu on Twitter Eric Siu on Instagram

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
David Spinks Reveals Key Secrets To Growing Red Hot Communities

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 28:26


When social media first surfaced it was generally dismissed as largely inconsequential for businesses. These days it's almost impossible to imagine a successful business without a social media presence. With the rise of web three and the ubiquity of social media comes the integral concept of community and the impact and engagement it creates. Here to help us interrogate this rapidly expanding field is David Spinks, VP of Community at Bevy and Cofounder of CMX, two platforms dedicated to helping businesses create and support a thriving community. He is also the author of the new book The Business of Belonging: How to Make Community your Competitive Advantage. In our conversation, we discuss the key difference between building an audience versus a community, and why community drives deeper and more meaningful engagement for business. Learn about some of CMX's useful resources, like the SPACES Model, a fundamental framework for defining your community's business value. We also discuss the most common mistakes businesses make when they first build their communities and how to go about it the right way. Be sure to tune in to learn more about this important topic from an expert in the field! TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:00] Before we jump into today's interview, please rate, review, and subscribe to the Leveling Up Podcast! [00:15] Introducing today's guest David Spinks VP of Community at Bevy and Co-founder of CMX. [01:14] How community is being factored into how businesses are structured.  [02:28] Outlining the differences between audience and community. [04:30] How community encourages participants to create rather than consume. [05:40] Examples of communities where David has seen people create and contribute. [07:35] The importance of a skilled and competent community manager.  [08:42] How to find the right community manager. [09:39] How Bevy, a pioneering community event engine, was started. [11:29] Why it's important to start small and set an intentional example with your initial community members. [15:59] How to ‘push out control' to manage large communities with fewer community managers and why many businesses make the mistake of growing too fast.  [18:04] The SPACES Model and how to use it as a framework for defining your community's business value. [21:07] The best way to grow your community and why most businesses start in the wrong place. [24:07] David's top book recommendation and its far-reaching applications. [24:39] David's podcast Masters of Community and what you can learn from it.  [25:24] Exciting new AI tools to take your community to the next level!   Resources From The Interview:   David Spinks David Spinks on LinkedIn David Spinks on Twitter The Business of Belonging: How to Make Community your Competitive Advantage Masters of Community Podcast CMX The SPACES Model: The Framework for Defining Your Community's Business Value Bevy Startup Grind Orbiit.ai Orbit.love Must-read book: Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind Subscribe to our premium podcast (with tons of goodies!): https://www.marketingschool.io/pro   Leave Some Feedback:     What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review.     Connect with Us:      Neilpatel.com Quick Sprout  Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel  Twitter @ericosiu    

Moon Money
Get Ready For Orbit! (Tesla Price Prediction)

Moon Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 12:09


Get Ready For Orbit! (Tesla Price Prediction) RISK WARNING: Trading involves HIGH RISK and YOU CAN LOSE a lot of money. Do not risk any money you cannot afford to lose. Trading is not suitable for all investors. We are not registered investment advisors. We do not provide trading or investment advice. We provide research and education through the issuance of statistical information containing no expression of opinion as to the investment merits of a particular security. Information contained herein should not be considered a solicitation to buy or sell any security or engage in a particular investment strategy. Past performance is not necessarily indicative of future results.

HistoryPod
3rd November 1957: Laika the dog becomes the first animal to enter orbit around the Earth

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021


Laika was never intended to return to Earth as the technology to re-enter the atmosphere had not yet been ...

Romance ME Podcast
Winter‘s Orbit

Romance ME Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 100:34


Today we'll be discussing Winter's Orbit by Everina Maxwell.  One day, out of the blue, free-spirited Prince Kiem learns of his duty to marry to maintain peace. He's okay with this, he knew it would happen one day, but he doesn't want to marry the still mourning widower of his cousin. Jainan, the prospective groom, is reserved, careful, and seemingly repelled by Kiem, all expected behaviors of a grieving spouse. However, when it's revealed that his previous husband died under suspicious circumstances, these actions become questionable. Caught in an expanding web of politics and deceit, Kiem and Jainan must learn to trust each other while they work to discover the truth--and love. Content warning: Depictions of past domestic violence, abuse survivorship.

One Symphony with Devin Patrick Hughes
Tracy Silverman, electric violinist and classical music Rock-Star

One Symphony with Devin Patrick Hughes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 58:15


Tracy Silverman, electric violin virtuoso and pioneer, and conductor Devin Patrick Hughes speak about “The Agony of Modern Music,” the history of how many strings came to be on the violin, Tracy's debut with the Chicago Symphony, his stint as a musical Olympian, how to not achieve perfection, playing like Ray Charles, Jascha Heifetz, and Jimi Hendrix. He also discusses his collaborations with Terry Riley, John Adams and his Electric Violin Concerti, and his album Between the Kiss and the Chaos.   Described as “the greatest living exponent of the electric violin” by the BBC, pioneering violinist and composer Tracy Silverman believes “strings must evolve or they will perish” and his mission is to reconnect strings with our popular culture and to teach string players to groove. His groundbreaking work incorporating rock, jazz, Americana, hip-hop, and other popular genres with the 6-string electric violin has upended the contemporary classical genre, and his strum bowing method has been adopted by performers all around the world.  Terry Riley described Tracy's violin playing as being like an orchestra itself. John Adams said: “When I heard Tracy play I was reminded that in almost all cultures other than the European classical one, the real meaning of the music is in between the notes.  No one makes that instrument sing and soar like Tracy, floating on the cusp between Heifetz and Jimi Hendrix.” Tracy was first violinist in the Turtle Island String Quartet, and was named one of the 100 distinguished alumni by the Juilliard School, and as a composer has 3 Electric Violin concerts among other works, and has performed concertos written for him by John Adams, Terry Riley, Nico Muhly, and Kenji Bunch. The violin virtuoso and humanitarian was recently featured on NPR's Tiny Desk Concerts, Performance Today, CBS Sunday Morning, and A Prairie Home Companion, and is an internationally in-demand clinician and currently teaches at Belmont University in Nashville.  Thank you for joining us on One Symphony and thanks to Tracy Silverman for sharing his performances and works. You heard Between the Kiss and the Chaos, Hundred Percent Forever, the Beatles Here Comes the Sun, Axis and Orbits, Crazy Times, John Adams's the Dharma at Big Sur, all performed by Tracy Silverman.   Additional performances were by the Beatles, Fanny Clamagirand, Sinfonia Finlandia, Nikolaus Harnoncourt, the Berlin Philharmonic, the BBC Symphony, and John Adams. Thanks to the record labels Delos, Naxos, Acewonder, and Nonesuch for making this episode possible!  You can check out Tracy's music and books at  tracysilverman.com and strumbowing.com. You can always find more info at OneSymphony.org including a virtual tip jar if you'd like to lend your support. Please feel free to rate, review, or share the show! Until next time, thank you for being part of the music!

#QualityMatters
Ep 123 - Kris Earl - of GyroData - Drilling precision is tighter than launching to orbit

#QualityMatters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 21:01


Such a fun conversation today with Kris Early of GyroData. The technology used in drilling for oil & gas has advanced so very far. These updates enable drilling teams to save not only time and money, but minimize environmental impacts on a large scale. Find Kris Earl on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/kris-earl-655830128/ https://www.gyrodata.com/ Learn more about #QualityMatters & Texas Quality Assurance :LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter  | Instagram  | YouTubewww.qmcast.com | Texas Quality Assurance

Software Social
A Conversation with Rosie Sherry

Software Social

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 37:17


Follow Rosie! https://twitter.com/rosiesherryCheck out Rosieland: https://rosie.land/Michele Hansen  0:01  This episode of Software Social is brought to you by Reform.As a business owner, you need forms all the time for lead capture, user feedback, SaaS onboarding, job applications, early access signups, and many other types of forms.Here's how Reform is different:- Your brand shines through, not Reform's- It's accessible out-of-the-box... And there are no silly design gimmicks, like frustrating customers by only showing one question at a timeJoin indie businesses like Fathom Analytics and SavvyCal and try out Reform.Software Social listeners get 1 month for free by going to reform.app/social and using the promo code "social" on checkout.Hey, welcome back to software social. I am so excited this week to have with us the woman the myth, the legend, Rosie Sherry. Hello. So excited to have you. So you were I founder of Ministry of Testing, lead community at Indie Hackers, which is probably how many people listening know you, currently leading community for Orbit. Also have your own thing going on Rosieland, which is a community about community. So excited to talk to you.Rosie Sherry  1:30  Thank you, thank you. It's good to be here.Michele Hansen  1:33  So I want I want to start out with something something I noticed when I think about your background is how you've kind of gone between being a founder yourself, and intentionally working for other people also having sort of other things going on. And, you know, on the show in the past, we've kind of talked a little bit about how sometimes there's this perception that there's this sort of like staircase of an entrepreneurs career where you start out working for other people, and then maybe you have an info product, and then maybe you do consulting, and then you do an info product, and then you have a SAS and then I don't know, and it's like this sort of like staircase. And there's this sort of like implied increase in virtue throughout all of that. And then if you're taking backwards steps, that's seen as like, literally like a step backwards. And it's like this ladder rather than being this kind of what I'm more see in people's actual careers, which is kind of moving between different things as their interests lead them and as their life leads them. I feel like I see that in your career. And I'm kind of curious how you think about these shifts you've made between working for yourself and working for other people? And like, like, kind of all of that.Rosie Sherry  2:45  Yeah, it's kind of like steps going up and down, right? Or going up and down or left, I guess, an elevator? Yeah, I mean, I have like, no idea what I'm doing. But I guess like, I kind of go with the flow. When I when I stepped back from Ministry of testing, I had been doing that for 10 years. And I thought, like, as I was stepping back, I thought I'd never work for someone else's, like my plan was to take some time off and just like, take it easy for it. And just, I don't know, see what I wanted to do. And I knew I kind of wanted to, like focus in on community, but I wasn't sure how. And then, like, the opportunity with indie hackers came up. And I was like, Oh, you know, this could be fun. This could be interesting. I think I could learn a lot from how courtland has built community there. It's similar to ministry testing, in some ways, but yet, it's, it's really different. So I kind of just jumped on that, like, you know, earlier, earlier than I had planned. I was I was a contractor there for the whole time. And I was there for two years as a contractor. And basically, we just kept renewing the contract, like every three to six months. So it wasn't like it was the plan, stay there. And apparently surprised that I stayed there for two years, I thought I wouldn't last I thought I wouldn't be able to kind of work for someone else after like doing my own thing for 10 years. That was interesting. There's a lot of benefit, especially, I think, perhaps more these days where everything just seems I just feel like there's so much opportunity out there. And there's a lot of things that I didn't like about running a business. I didn't necessarily want to manage people, I didn't want to do the accounts, I didn't want to worry about money or worry about, you know, the future of, of the business. So yeah, I mean, this, you know, loads of things about running a business that I think people try to glorify, they try to hide, they try to not talk about it. But you know, it can be stressful. And I think my realization after running the Ministry of testing, is actually I don't, I don't want to run a company and employ people. I don't want to be responsible for someone's wages at the point of life that I that I am in at the moment. might might change over time, but right now Yeah, I'd rather like I guess, do something more for me something more, you know, focusing on, like my interest in things that that I need. And yeah, and I guess like contracting, bringing home a paycheck, that's great. But you know, for me, it's been, you know, it was great, I saved up a bunch of money, I didn't actually spend any of the money that I made in the hackers. So that was like a nice, consistent income for me to like, you know, get our family more and more of a safety net. Now, my Uber and I never, ever considered working for a startup people have it. Yeah, it's, it's new. For me, it's different from me. But this negative, there's a lot of pros as well. So I try to kind of be mindful of all of that. And, you know, there's days, I just want to pack it all in and say, I can't be bothered, I should just go back to being independent. But there are other days where I'm just like, no, this is actually really good. I'm enjoying what I'm doing this, you know, there's a great team that I'm working with. And again, you know, I get paid well, I don't have to worry about money, I don't have to invoice people the money every month in my bank account. And I'm like, Oh, this is nice. This is, you know, this nice not just to show up and do the work.Michele Hansen  6:11  You mentioned how it was stressful, being responsible for people's paychecks. And I totally relate to that. I think it's one of the reasons why we haven't really, you know, formally hired here, right? Like, I have a VA, but you strike me as someone who you know, and this comes through so much in your work for indie hackers in your work on community who like deeply cares about other people, and supporting them and encouraging them and helping them reach their goals, and you know, and be that person they want to be. And I wonder if that almost made it harder to be running a company and responsible for people's income when you felt so responsible for those outcomes and really invested in them as people?Rosie Sherry  6:57  Yeah, I mean, it's actually interesting, because I still own in ministry, testing, or co owner, when you're founded, you kind of like, I guess, the foundation of everything that comes later, to a certain extent. So like, the fact that I worked when I wanted, the fact that I had five kids, the fact that I just like took time off when I needed to the fact that I defined, you know, decided my own hours, all of those things, ended up becoming how things were done administrator testing, and it's become more apparent, I guess, as the team, I think about eight or nine people at the moment, at first, you know, I was only one with kids. And, you know, I was very much family friendly person, I would support, you know, everything about me is like, we need to live our own lives as well. We need to have flexibility, you know, work shouldn't stop us having having a family and doing things that we want to do. And at first, it was like, just me it was kids. But then like, as the years have gone, I think last year, there were three new babies born within the company, and as a team with like nine people that's like, oh, wow, how are we gonna manage this as like, as a company, even though it's not my responsibility anymore. There's a CEO running it. But he very much took on the philosophy of like, well, this is how Rosie has always done it. So this is what everybody else gets to do as well. So we let the mothers choose what they want to do. We let them you know, take the time off that they need to take time off, and have a say, and there's no there's no judgment for any of it. And we listen, and we care and we try to make good decisions, even even if it costs us money, right. And like, as a small company, and you have three of your people off on maternity leave is a big kind of hit. But it's not something that feels wrong, it very much feels right and like allowing everybody just to choose the time that they have off and pay in the world. And you know, making sure that they get a fair deal when they're often on maternity leave is to me, you know, I couldn't do it any other way. Because it would feel hypocritical. And for me, it's just like, I can't have once that rule to me and like different set of rules for For everyone else, even if I never took maternity leave properly. I believe like, you know, everybody else should have had that right to do that. I guess.Michele Hansen  9:20  It sounds like a bit like Golden Rule management, like treating others as how you would want to be treated.Rosie Sherry  9:26  Yeah, I don't understand why companies can't do that. can't comprehend it. And it's probably why I haven't. It took me I guess it's probably why it took me a long time to actually end up working for other people. Because without listen to the pandemic, because just like nobody was truly flexible enough in their thinking about how people showed up for work. And I've been working from home all this time on my own rolls, and then the pandemic comes along and I'm just like, still working the same way that I was working before. This ain't nothing changed for me day to day, but for everyone else. Or, you know, like a huge majority of people, life change and companies rethought their processes and what was acceptable and what wasn't acceptable. And the fact that we can all work from home now I think is is great, but at the same time is unlike Well, why couldn't we do this before we could have. But companies, you know, I guess like it wasn't urgent enough to think of our needs until the pandemic came along.Michele Hansen  10:26  And, you know, you mentioned how your life didn't change all that much with the pandemic. Yeah, I want to detour for a second because I understand that so you have five children, and you unschool them and it would just be interesting for a moment just to talk about not only what does that look like but also you know, you mentioned your whole life didn't change much. And I'm kind of curious what does that home life look like between you and your husband with this sort of unschooling elements layering on top of also like your, your work life? Like how does all of that work together?Rosie Sherry  11:02  Yeah, it's tough. I think like unschooling, I think the toughest part about unschooling, I think is, or even homeschooling is about making that kind of adjustment to life, like trying to instead of like, you know, if if kids go to school, you know, you have the six, eight hour block of time to kind of get work done and you can plan things around that with unschooling is like, well, you kind of have to plan for your kids. And then you have to plan your work around your kids, and you have to juggle things. With me, it's with my husband, we like have equal share on like, the kids in the house. And I just think that's the hardest part is like most people, probably, I guess I feel I feel privileged to be able to do that at the moment. But like, I guess, like, the thing I do is like, we're having this chat for me, it's in the morning. And that's like, not my normal schedule. So the like, normally like I'm online from midday till eight, and I'm with my kids from when they wake up until midday. And then at midday, me my husband swapped over. And that's those are the, that's the deal we have right now, to make things work. And so, in the morning, I would normally take my kids to a class that they have or a group that they go to, and it works, I guess, to try and to split that time, it changes all the time as as my work changes, or as my husband's work changes, we find ways to adapt and I guess that's the magic of unschooling, I guess like unschooling is like, we're always, I guess, we're always looking for things that our kids want to do to keep them active. So every day, especially our younger ones, who are between the age of three and 10. You know, getting them out out the house once a day is like basically our goal. And that happens in different ways at the moment, except for school, beach school, art class, sports, or football. And then other days that we hire, or we pay a friend to take them out for the day. She's like a single mom, and appreciates extra bit bit of income. It's tough, it really is tough. And it's like we have to say no to things a lot of the time, but I think at the same time, I think like the pandemic has kind of worked in my favor as well. Now that everyone's online, I feel like what's the right word? I guess previous to the pandemic, I felt like I was only one needing to have the flexibility. But I think like these days, it's it's more more acceptable. I guess, everyone's more accommodating, like having kids in the background is okay. Pre pandemic, that was not okay. You know, stuff like that, you know, despite COVID I appreciate how the world has changed. We feel it feels weird. I don't know. What do you think it feels? It feels weird to? Yeah, to say that. But I think you know, actually, there's been positives from COVID.Michele Hansen  13:57  I think it's forced us to reevaluate things and maybe shifts that were happening very slowly, like you mentioned, you know, more work from home and maybe more flexibility shifts that were happening very, very slowly, or only in very specific corners of the economy were kind of thrust on everyone all at once, which was both traumatic and also sped up things that needed to happen to at the same time at great cost to everyone involved, Beto as you said, like, you know that it's acceptable to have children in the background or even a dog barking, like I remember two years ago, you know, before COVID, and I was having a call and my dog barked in the back because the mailman was there or whatever. Like, I always felt so embarrassed on the call. And, you know, I remember sometimes, you know, the people, you know, whoever I was having a, you know, customers having call with, or one of them being like, Oh yeah, you know, we have a dog friendly office too. And I was just like, Yeah, like, dog friendly office, you know, that whole thing of like being a really small company and not wanting? Yes, I'm actually like working from home like that being kind of like something to be sheepish about, you know, like that you were working from home because it was like, What? Like, can you not afford an office? Are you not legit enough to have an office? Like, do you not like it used to prompt so many questions, most of them not very, like, positively reflecting on the company. But then all of a sudden, you know, so many of us, you know, who were lucky enough to be working from home, everybody was working from home, everybody, you know, had kids in the background dogs in the background cats on their keyboard, like, you know, and we all just had to learn how to be a little bit more understanding with one another.Rosie Sherry  15:41  Well, human right, I think like, we, we've learnt to appreciate and see that we all live in different circumstances, and we should adapt to that, and we should make sure it's okay. You know, almost like, I guess, like, the whole diversity movement, I guess, in the past few years is, you know, crept up. And, you know, to me, this is also like, part of it is like, we're all human, we're all people, we have different circumstances, that the sooner we can make that, okay for everyone to just like, be who they are opt in, opt out things, be able to, you know, not have shame for, for whatever it might be, I think like, the better the quicker, we can just like, move on and like, kind of focus on our work and get and get things done.Michele Hansen  16:38  Using shame, just there kind of reminded me of what we sort of started this conversation with, which is, you know, in your career, you have sort of intentionally and consciously moved between contracting and, and being a founder and working for other people. And when people come to a situation where they realize that maybe consulting isn't working for them, or they're trying to get their own SAS off the ground, and it's not working, and the finances are tight, and they're thinking about, you know, going out and getting a job. Yeah, it seems like people often feel a lot of shame around that. And then that feels like failure to them. And I think what your story shows that, you know, it's not linear. And, and I'm just kind of curious what you would say to someone who is kind of maybe at that point, who is wondering, you know, just, you know, that thing, things aren't, things aren't working, or the finances aren't there. And they've they've got to go back and, you know, get a job, like, what would you say to them?Rosie Sherry  17:56  I definitely felt this, like in the indie in the indie world, like, being immersed in that world. And, you know, people want to make it they want to be full time, indie hackers. And it almost becomes, like, a thing of like, what if you're not a full time indie hacker, then, like, you know, you're not a success really are there's only one way. And, you know, I almost, you know, thought that, you know, I thought even just like working in India, because I thought I wouldn't last I thought, you know, people, you know, I wouldn't make an impact. I wouldn't enjoy working with courtland, or all that kind of stuff. And even even when I joined indie hackers, the opportunity came up as a result of courtland looking for some social media help. And I was just like, at that point, I was just looking for something else to do. And like when I reached out to him, he was like, Yeah, but you're overqualified for this. I was like, Yeah, I know. But I'm, you know, I'm still like, yeah, I could do it. And, you know, I, I personally felt like I could learn from indie hackers. And that role ended up being more like of a community manager community lead role that he that he offered me. But did I feel shame, like doing that a little bit, but at the same time, as I, it doesn't matter, you know, I need to, you know, I really wanted just to have an excuse to do something else. And so yeah, I work for CEO, founder to social media and community manager, which is a step back, right? You know, on paper, it's a step back. But actually what it did for me was was huge, is like, before I joined India, because no one in the indie world really knew who I was. There's a few people here in there. But what it did for me was was massive. So I say I think a lot of the time choices, I guess, perhaps is that it's not all about money. It's not all about job titles. And we can dismiss job titles is not important. That's, you know, I think sometimes they can be but I think I think, if we think about, or like, the way I think about it is like, well, I want to do stuff, I want to learn stuff, and I want to work on things I care about. And does it matter if it's starting your own thing? or working for someone else? I don't think it really does. I think, at least for me, it's like, you know, five, finding, finding the right people to work with is, is key. And yeah, I mean, there's a lot of jobs that I'm sure would be sucky. And I see I definitely see people struggle, working for companies and being like, part indie part, like, working for companies. So yeah, I don't think like anything is necessarily Perfect. Perfect solution. But I guess it's like more about like, finding your fit what's right for you? How do you get to do the work that you do? Enjoy? How are you growing personally? And, like all, but I think I'm growing a lot personally. And also in, in my, I guess, desire to kind of impact the community world, I think I'm doing that. And I get access to stuff that I wouldn't, if I was trying to do all, all of that kind of stuff on my own. So yeah, there's definitely like, the pros and cons. So yeah, but but it's easy to think because when I joined, obey, it was at the back of my mind is that oh, my God, what will people think? I've been indie for, for 15 years. You know, should I actually take this job? Is it is it in conflict with, with who I am? Those are all that was definitely in the back of my mind, I can't, I won't lie about that. Yeah, I was nervous about announcing that. I'm not sure what people would think. But I think, at the end of the day is like, I'm still sticking to, to who I am, I'm still sticking to my values, I'm still pushing for the things that are important to me in all of it. And if I don't get those, and it's going to become a problem. You know, say, I'm still being me, in every, every space that I show up. And, and that's what's important to me, is that, and if I can't get that, then that's where it becomes a problem. For me, I think, Patrick, my boss,Michele Hansen  22:52  I noticed that you just said how you had this conflict around identity. And I feel like that's running undercurrent of a lot of time when people are having this struggle, is identifying as a founder, and all of the things that come with it, identifying as an indie hacker, identifying as someone who, you know, runs their own things and whatnot, and shifting identity into something else into, into, you know, who am I if I am not somebody who runs their own company? What does that say about me? Just who am I as as a person, I think in a world where we wrap up so much of our identity and what we do for work. That's a, that's a massive and can be quite a, you know, debilitating sort of shift and psychological process to go through. And yet what I also heard you say several times throughout the, the conversation is a reason why you took the job with indie hackers, or the contract with indie hackers, is because you wanted to learn and, and I wonder if that transition is a little bit smoother. When you think of, you know, there's you have this identity as an indie hacker, as a founder, you also have an identity as someone who likes to do other things. And one of those, I think, for you that really comes through is somebody who's curious, and who likes to learn and letting another identity almost kind of supplant that, that founder, one that's sort of, you know, taking a backseat.Rosie Sherry  24:40  Yeah, it's interesting. It actually brings me back to like minister testing and like when I stepped back, it was like, Oh my god, like, Who am I? Who am I going to be now I've been this testing person, this person, leading the testing community for so long. I'm almost leaving behind. And much of that, obviously they I still keep in touch with people, but I'm not in that world anymore. Yeah, it was, it was hard, it's hard to shift away from that and to figure out how to how to kind of redefine your life and who you want to be. And how do you get people to, I guess, to see that to know that and, and yeah, it's, it's tough and I guess like, right now with the indie stuff like, you know, I do Rosi land stuff on the side. But even that, I feel like oh, you know, I see a lot of the indie stuff happening, I still keep an eye on indie hackers. But, you know, at the same time I miss in the hacking as well, I don't do nearly as much as I would love. And, you know, I struggle with that. So it's like, how much of these different people can I be? How do I? How do I separate that? Do I need to separate that? And I mean, I was I was employed over it was no full well, knowing that I had all this stuff on the side. And that that had to continue to exist when I joined over it. But yeah, I feel like I definitely feel less a part of the indie world. Because just because I don't have the time to spend in it. And that makes me feel sad. Definitely sad. And I want to do more, but I can't just because because of time. But yeah, I don't even know where I'm going with this. But this constant shift of identity moving on, almost like shedding skin. All right, is that I shed my skin from history testing. I'm shedding my skin a bit from indie hackers, but not quite. And, you know, moving through life, I think, like, I think we almost become different people as we grow up. I mean, I think I'm in my early 40s now, and am I the same person? I was 10 years ago. So yes, but no. And that's okay. Yeah, I don't even know where I'm going. But yeah.Michele Hansen  27:31  It's interesting you say that I love how you dove into the identity shifts of that. And you're like, so even though you're no longer with, you know, indie hackers proper. I still think of you as the mama bear. The indie world is my head but like that's, that's it's you know, Rosie, Sherry mama bear of the indie hackers.Rosie Sherry  27:59  Well, I like that. I'll have to put that on my Twitter. But it's interesting, right? People will always remember you for different things. So there'll be people from the testing community who will always remember me for ministry testing, and things I did, and nothing will probably change as much in a ton of indie hackers out there will remember me as being the mom of their I love it. Yeah, and like, the more I do all of it, orbit, the more people associated me not with being indie, but being more all about community. And that's okay, as well. Right? And what does it mean is that, I don't know. But But I think like, I mean, you know, I guess it goes back to trends, life, the world changing, no one has careers for life anymore. And this is you know, probably I guess a proof of it is like, let's, you know, change as we grow, let's be okay with, like, actually discovering things. As we learn about ourselves, and as we learn about the world around us, and, and adapt and we should Yeah, I think we should all be able to do that and make make it feel okay. And make it you know, not not feel like step backwards, is you know, it's not a step backwards. It's just like, as you as an individual, you you're doing what's what's right for you at any point in your life. And that's, you know, that's okay.Michele Hansen  29:45  I'm reminded of the Walt Whitman, quote, I contain multitudes and, and I feel like what you're saying is, is about that we have many different identities and even the identities of us in other people's minds may be different than what we think of ourselves as or reflects a version of us in the past. And, you know, you're that that identity that you had as a founder, the identity you had, as the community person for indie hackers. As rosy land, as community person at orbit, like, all of those are valid, and they all exist, regardless of you know, what you're currently we're doing. And I feel like, what you're saying is, you don't really have to choose one, you know, you can still you can still have all of those pieces and so many more pieces of yourself. And, and it's okay to shift and change and grow.Rosie Sherry  30:54  No, think like, as as, I guess, like an unschooling approach to things we encourage, everything we do is like child led learning. And, like, I live that, that same philosophy in life is like, you know, I think like, like, as I get older, I just, I just can't spend any time on anything I don't enjoy. And then when I look at my kids, I'm like, why should they have to spend any time on the things that they don't enjoy, we should, like, you know, focus, focus all our energy as much as is possible to do the things that we love, because that's, that's like a really special place to be. And, like, at the moment, like, like, you know, I've been working for 23 years of my life, when I started out, working. Man, it was just like, a different place. And like, where I am, now, I'm like, this is just such a better place to be doing work that, that I love that I appreciate that, that, you know, I believe I can have impact on. And if I look back at myself, like 20 years ago, and see see where I am now, I say, I would have like, I guess, never, never imagined that this kind of life is possible. The life I had then was about working in jobs that I didn't really enjoy that much, or for companies that I wasn't really, that interested in what they were doing. And now it's like, everything's flipped to like, I'm working for a company that I believe in what they're doing, I enjoy the day to day work, we're aligned in the things that we want to do. And that's just like, Whoa, you know, how, you know, how great is that, to be a part of that. And regardless of the outcome, whether, you know, I continue to rise up in the company where they continue to get pay raises, whether whether orbit ends up, you know, growing massively in IPO, and that that doesn't matter. To me, it's like what matters is, you know, being able to do do what I love, right now.Michele Hansen  33:22  Follow the things you love, even if those things take you from entrepreneurship, to working for other people and changing your identity. And, yeah,Rosie Sherry  33:34  I look at Patrick, my, one of the cofounders I see some of the things that he has to do as a founder. And I'm like, I'm so glad I'm not doing that. And like I can see it as the founders because like, not not to the same extent, you know, they've raised money, it's a different game. But you know, that the same principles applies, like, I don't have to do any of that stuff. And I'm very happy about that.Michele Hansen  34:03  It sounds like you're in a good place. Now. I want I want to thank you for for joining us today. You know, we again, in this sort of indie world, we talk a lot about building in public and you know, I talked about writing in public. But something I am really valuing lately is when people are willing to be vulnerable in public. And I feel so much from that of that from you. And not only in on on Twitter, and your support of other people, but also here today. And, and I have a feeling that your story today is it's gonna make somebody at least one person feel feel less alone and feel feel better about their journey. Hopefully you know, less shame about Going from entrepreneurship to employment?Rosie Sherry  35:06  I hope so. I hope so. I try. I think it's, it's hard, I guess. I mean, I don't know what your experiences but like women in tech when in business, whether it's like, I guess it's hard to stand up to certain things and be open about the challenges that we have. And so yeah, I try my best, I think my confidence increases over time. I will say, I don't give a damn anymore, like what people think. I don't know if that comes of age. But like, you know, I definitely wasn't this open about everything before. So, yeah, part of me like does it to, to help other people see, I think it's important, like, who I am a woman, five kids on schooling. I kind of want to show people that. Yeah, yes, I'm a bit obsessive with the things that I want to do. I'm, like, you know, switched on, like, all the time, pretty much. But But I spend lots of time with my kids as well, you know, I managed to make it work. And I guess that my hope is that in time, like more people can be like this, if that's what they choose, you know, if they, if they can see the possibility. You know, it's done me a lot of good. And I guess, like, there must be more people out there that want something like this. And for them to be able to see an example. I guess is, is what's in the back of my mind when I tweet when I write when I do my things? Yeah. Yeah. Well, thank you. Yeah,Michele Hansen  36:59  thank you so much for yesterday. I've really enjoyed this conversation.Rosie Sherry  37:05  Thank you, Michelle. I appreciate catching up.Michele Hansen  37:08  If you enjoyed this episode, please let Rosie and I know on Twitter. You can find us at software social pot. Thanks

Coffee in Space
John Appel - Assassin's Orbit

Coffee in Space

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 33:47


I learned so much from John Appel, both about writing and publishing and his debut novel, Assassin's Orbit. I think you'll have a great time, just like I did. The thing that makes John such a great guest is that he's a former Army scout, so he fits in very well with the Military Fans of Science Fiction group, from which sprang this very podcast. So after you get to know John, give his book a looksee.You can learn more about John's work at his website HERE. You can also catch up with his latest news at his Twitter feed HERE.Like the podcast episode? You can support the show by becoming a patron! Once you click the link, you can learn more about how the show got started, where I keep the episodes, and more. I would appreciate any support you can give. Thank you!Finally, please consider subscribing to the Coffee in Space newsletter so you can stay up to date on all podcast episodes and news about the interviews! * Links in these show notes may be affiliate links. I may make a small percentage from your purchase. I would always want you to buy from a local, independent store, but if you are looking to use Amazon, I would appreciate you considering my links. Thank you!

The Daily Crunch – Spoken Edition
Voyager, Nanoracks and Lockheed's “Starlab” is the latest sign that the low Earth orbit economy is coming

The Daily Crunch – Spoken Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 3:22


The era of private space stations is officially here as Nanoracks, Voyager Space and Lockheed Martin announce plans to launch a commercial station in 2027, but it's just the next logical step for developing the new space economy, the companies say.

Cannabis Talk 101
In Orbit With Rocket Seeds

Cannabis Talk 101

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 42:23


Rocketseeds CEO Landra Live At MJ Biz Con hear about the Products, Service, & So Much More! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Mount Church
Satellites in Orbit

The Mount Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 55:00


Raumzeit
RZ095 JUICE

Raumzeit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 67:44


Das Jupitersystem mit seine großen Zahl an Monden birgt noch viel Unbekanntes und im nächsten Jahr startet die ESA mit JUICE eine Mission, die sich weniger auf den Planeten selbst als vielmehr auf seine Monde konzentrieren wird. Finales Ziel ist der größte der sogenannten Galileiischen Monde Ganymed. Die Sonde wird in einen Orbit um diesen Mond eintreten und dabei das Objekt über einen längeren Zeitpunkt mit vielen Instrumenten aufs genaueste untersuchen.

ENJOYYOURBIKE - Der Radsport & Triathlon Talk
EYB 75 Job gekündigt, Rad gekauft! Marius Karteusch, vom Anfänger zum Orbit-Sieger!

ENJOYYOURBIKE - Der Radsport & Triathlon Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 122:48


Tolle Geschichten über Kanu-Kader, einen schweren Motorradunfall, die Flucht aus dem Arbeitsleben und viele andere inspirierende Geschichten erzählt uns Marius Karteuh heute. Er hat sich in der Corona-Zeit sein erstes sportliches Fahrrad gekauft und wurd

CHAOSScast
Episode 46: Social Science Theories with Erin Staples

CHAOSScast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 36:18


Hello and welcome to CHAOSScast Community podcast, where we share use cases and experiences with measuring open source community health. Elevating conversations about metrics, analytics, and software from the Community Health Analytics Open Source Software, or short CHAOSS Project, to wherever you like to listen. Today, our guest is Erin Staples, who works as a Community Advocate at Orbit. She is with us to talk about social science theories and what we can learn from other communities. Erin tells us the importance of making sure your contributors feel valued, creating a very inclusive, mindful environment online, and she explains how we can learn a lot from how Fandom communities measure health. She goes in depth about behaviors at gatherings such as conferences and she shares advice in creating online spaces. Download this episode now to find out much more, and don't forget to subscribe for free to this podcast on your favorite podcast app and share this podcast with your friends and colleagues. [00:02:00] Erin fills us in a little on her background and about what they do at Orbit with building a healthy community in the online space. [00:03:38] How did Erin get so interested in this topic? [00:05:33] For the social science conversation and Fandom, Erin talks about how she started to explore this huge topic. She tells us about a journal article she loves from Rachel Winter, Anastasia Salter, and Mel Stanfill who wrote about the “Communities of making: Exploring parallels between Fandom and open source.” [00:09:02] Erin explains more about the behaviors and how they happen at gatherings and in the Fandom world. [00:13:30] Georg brings up how open source is changing and has changed over the years with more organizations getting involved in creation of software and paying employees to be in these communities and Erin shares her thoughts about how this may be changing the dynamic. The Founder of Linux, Linus Torvalds, comes up in conversation as well. [00:19:47] Venia tells us about a website called Budget Light Forum and Erin talks about “the medium is the message,” which is a quote from Marshall McLuhan and how this relates to the way we think about online spaces and how we transmit information. [00:24:44] Georg brings up a great point if you want to understand the community you actually have to talk to the community members and ask them how that makes them feel, if they feel welcome and included, etc., and Erin and Venia share their thoughts on this. [00:28:11] As more people are working online, maintainer burnout in open source is discussed, which existed before COVID, with pressure to maintain the quality of code and for being responsive and they're not feeling appreciated. [00:30:41] Erin talks about some action steps to creating online spaces and shares an example of the Dunning-Kruger effect. [00:32:04] Find out where you can follow Erin online. Adds (Picks) of the week: * [00:32:46] Georg's pick is re-reading the Eragon series in English. * [00:33:38] Venia's pick is a book called Systematic Methods for Analyzing Culture: A Practical Guide. * [00:34:22] Erin's pick is a book called A City is Not a Computer: Other Urban Intelligences. Panelists: * Georg Link * Venia Logan Guest: * Erin Staples Sponsor: * SustainOSS (https://sustainoss.org/) Links: * CHAOSS (https://chaoss.community/) * CHAOSS Project Twitter (https://twitter.com/chaossproj?lang=en) * CHAOSScast Podcast (https://podcast.chaoss.community/) * podcast@chaoss.community (mailto:podcast@chaoss.community) * Erin Staples Twitter (https://twitter.com/erinmikail) * Erin Staples Website (https://blog.erinmikailstaples.com/home/) * Erin Staples Linkedin (https://www.linkedin.com/in/erinmikail) * Orbit (https://orbit.love/) * Fandom (https://www.fandom.com/) * Communities of making: Exploring parallels between fandom and open source by Rachel Winter, Anastasia Salter, and Mel Stanfill (https://journals.uic.edu/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/10870/10056) * Fans, at their core, are producers. What does this tell us about the ethics of fan labor?- Fandom Communties 002 (https://blog.erinmikailstaples.com/fans-at-their-core-are-producers-what-does-this-tells-us-about-the-ethics-of-fan-labor/) * Budget Light Forum (https://budgetlightforum.com/) * Become a Tea Duellist By Austin Sirkin (Steampunk R&D) (https://steampunk.wonderhowto.com/how-to/become-tea-duellist-0140892/) * Herbert Marshall McLuhan (Wikipedia) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_McLuhan) * Margaret Mead (Wikipedia) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Mead) * Dunning-Kruger effect (Psychology Today) (https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/dunning-kruger-effect) * Ted 2016: Linux founder not a ‘people person' By Jane Wakefield (BBC News) (https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-35599774) * Linus Torvalds apologizes for his behavior, takes time off (Hacker News) (https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=18000698) * [The Inheritance Cycle Series 4 Book Collection Eragon, Eldestk, Brisngr Box set by Christoper Paolini](https://www.amazon.com/Inheritance-4-Book-Paperback-Eragon-Brisingr/dp/0449813223/ref=sr13?crid=5TIVV6TC74OQ&dchild=1&keywords=eragon+book+series&qid=1634154783&sprefix=eragon%2Caps%2C181&sr=8-3) * [Systematic Methods for Analyzing Culture: A Practical Guide by H.J. François ](https://www.amazon.com/Systematic-Methods-Analyzing-Culture-Practical/dp/0367551519/ref=sr11?dchild=1&keywords=systematic+methods+for+analyzing+culture&qid=1634155245&sr=8-1) * [Dengah II, Jeffrey Snodgrass, Evan R. Polzer, William Cody Nixon](https://www.amazon.com/Systematic-Methods-Analyzing-Culture-Practical/dp/0367551519/ref=sr11?dchild=1&keywords=systematic+methods+for+analyzing+culture&qid=1634155245&sr=8-1) * [A City is Not a Computer: Other Urban Intelligences by Shannon Mattern](https://www.amazon.com/City-Not-Computer-Intelligences-Places/dp/0691208050/ref=sr11?crid=8AC8JRJ020NJ&dchild=1&keywords=a+city+is+not+a+computer&qid=1634155914&sprefix=A+city+is+not+a+computer%2Caps%2C173&sr=8-1) * The Sims: A Retrospective, A Participatory Culture 14 Years On by Ludovica Price (Intensive: Cult Media Review) (https://intensitiescultmedia.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/5-price-the-sims2.pdf) Special Guest: Erin Staples.

The John Batchelor Show
1769: #ClassicHotelMars: A long line of tourists -- Captain James T. Kirk? -- for Earth-orbit hotel rooms. David Livingston Spaceshow.com. Marcia Smith, SpacepolicyOnline.com

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 11:54


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. 1961  A model of an inflatable space station concept with a solar power system collector in 1961. It was 24 feet in diameter with internal fabric bulkhead which could be separately pressurized in an emergency. @Batchelorshow #ClassicHotelMars: A long line of tourists -- Captain James T. Kirk? -- for Earth-orbit hotel rooms. David Livingston Spaceshow.com. Marcia Smith, SpacepolicyOnline.com https://www.newsweek.com/star-trek-george-takei-william-shatner-blue-origin-unfit-1639612 https://spacepolicyonline.com/news/space-tourism-hitting-its-stride/https://spacepolicyonline.com/news/space-tourism-hitting-its-stride/

GeekWire
The shared orbits of Microsoft and Amazon, and the tech industry's future in space

GeekWire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 40:59


This week on the GeekWire Podcast: a new Microsoft leader finally gets to work, Amazon makes a surprising change in its remote work policy, and the promise of space for the tech industry. Our guest commentator is Charlie Kindel, who worked for many years as a Microsoft general manager in areas including its server and mobile businesses, before jumping into the world of startups and then ending up at Amazon, where he led mobile payments and built the Alexa Smart Home organization.  After working as chief product and technology officer at home automation company SnapOne, previously known as Control4, he's now an independent advisor and consultant to companies including space and satellite startups. Stories covered on this week's show: ‘The most profound experience': Blue Origin sends Star Trek's William Shatner to the final frontier Microsoft and Amazon reach truce allowing former AWS executive Charlie Bell to start in new role Amazon will leave remote work decisions to individual team leaders in new policy twist With GeekWire's Todd Bishop and John Cook. Theme music by Daniel L.K. Caldwell. See geekwire.com/podcast for more episodes and links to subscribe.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 3: Prince William blasts space race after Bezos sends William Shatner into orbit

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 30:56


Seattle to begin towing vehicles again, but it's unclear what that means for people who live in cars // Man breaks into White Center home, crawls into child's bed - AUDIO  // Prince William blasts space race after Bezos sends William Shatner into orbit - AUDIO // William Shatner Reacts to Prince William's Disapproval of Space Race (Exclusive) - AUDIO  // Katie Couric's former colleague Ashleigh Banfield rejects claims in new book: 'You went after my dad'  - AUDIO  // “I Can't Be Surprised Like This Again” // We Mastered Zoom From Home. Just Wait for Hybrid-Office Zoom. // LETTERS See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Aww Shift
Frederick Bussey - Breaking Orbit

Aww Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 27:25


In today's episode, our guest is Frederick Bussey. He is a writer, speaker, coach, creative, and serial entrepreneur. He helps leaders and organizations unleash their hidden potential and connect more powerfully with their ideal clients. He helps his clients gain extreme clarity of purpose, execute with greater precision and consistently perform at the highest level. This person is passionate about helping business owners create more leverage, generate more impact, and ultimately realize a more fulfilling level of success. Today, he will share with us how he helped struggling entrepreneurs scale their businesses to live the life they dreamed about. [4:47] Why should we listen to you? I'm interested in people. I want to know what people are up to. What makes them tick, their story, and what their dreams are. And I believe that my role is to help people see what's possible to tap into those dreams. I learned to be patient, be in the moment, and listen. It is sometimes what people need; to feel pain, and many don't feel that way. [06:39] When you work with people, do you find sometimes they get that soft on the inside going on? Absolutely. As entrepreneurs, we talk a lot about imposter syndrome and that kind of thing. We always defer to the lowest level of our training, and our programming, and our mind. A lot of people managers are stuck in that space. It's difficult to believe the best things about yourself when we typically focus on those lowest negative thoughts that drive us crazy.  [08:07] What is your go-to starting point where they should make a move? We always talked about getting out of your way. The reason we're in our own way is that we believe that we are, in some ways, we overestimate the impact we're supposed to have. And we underestimate the fact that we can have in the world. We had to dive in and figure out where that root is and then unhook it from your ship. You can seek and let go. You can move forward and create the momentum to accelerate [10:32 ] How did you figure it out? A couple of years ago, I realized that everything that I've been building towards even working in the music industry. I was helping to kind of tap into my gift. The discovery process allowed me to realize I could do it more powerfully in this way than all the other ways that I've been trying before, unveil for me why I wasn't delighted. I made this choice actually to invest in a coach instead of paying the rent. I don't believe that I have a solution. He sent me a message back that just changed everything from me. He said God doesn't make people without answers. [18:10] How does the book unpack and like roll through the flow of somebody finding that? I talk about how it is that we don't understand what a gift is. A skill is not a gift—it is something that you learn. When you go to school, it's up to the learner to develop a skill; it is a way of doing something. And so if you have to learn it, or if you can acquire it, then it can't be given to you. You can do something that only you can do; the only way you can do it is in you from birth. I talked about in the book how Dr. George land did a study where he was studying creativity and children. He realized using tests that 90% of these children are born on a genius level of creativity. A gift is our ability to create an impact in the world in a unique way. Most of us never discover that because we are taught to abandon what society or the world sees as valuable. [24:26] The big thing about writing this book is that I felt more and more compelled to write it because these are things that people don't hear. And I didn't realize that people didn't listen to it, even though I didn't even know it myself.  [26”52] The thing that this book uncovered, and the writing process of writing, was just that the end is already guaranteed.  Your purpose is in your gift, and it is made to create an impact.  [29:06] Future Analogy I would describe our gift as the type of container associated with the function we're supposed to have in the world. If we think about all those experiences that go into our lives, right, we're shaped to hold a particular type of container experiences. We're also designed to pour those experiences out to share them with other people. And the way that that that comes out with a water hose, a water hose is a container in some ways it transports water from so everything that we have, everything was designed was a certain way. [32:05]  What promise did God make to the world when He created you? I'm going to show you I'm going to be able to tell you, you can discover what that means. I was here to translate the meaning to help people understand what it all means, but not all of it. But we can do whatever I can.   Learn more about Fredrick Bussey on: Website: http://fredrickbussey.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frederick.bussey.7 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fredrick.bussey/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fredrickbussey Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Fredrick-Douglas-Bussey/

Science & Technology - Voice of America
NASA's Latest Mission to Explore Asteroids Near Jupiter's Orbit - October 14, 2021

Science & Technology - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 5:35


Self-Coaching
Toxic friends, toxic relationships: never be disappointed again. Never!

Self-Coaching

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021


In this Self-Coaching episode, Lauren and I discuss relationships—especially toxic relationships that chronically deflate us, frustrate us, and worse, depress us. Why in the world do we waste time on people who are toxic for us? You'll find the answer in Self-Coaching's technique called “Orbits.” Once you understand your relationship “orbits” you'll never be disappointed by someone's shabby behavior again. Never! It's important to keep in mind that not all friendships are equal. It's time to spend more time on friends that you're in synch with and less time with “quasi-friends” who typically wind up draining you. It's better to be discriminate and have one or two close friends rather than many quasi-friends. It's the quasi-friends who often leave you scratching your head asking, “Why do I put up with this nonsense?” But even with quasi-friends, as long as they are placed in their proper "orbit," it's possible to include them in your life without being negatively affected by them. Remember, “In life, we never lose friends, we only learn who the true ones are.”

Carnival of Screams Old Time Radio Podcast

Hate ads? No problem! Access the Ad-Free episodes and Bonus Content Here PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/fringemystery Contact, Support, shop, follow and join our community through this link: https://linktr.ee/mysterytheater Business Inquires: https://anchor.fm/mysterytheater The Last Orbit #52 The CBS Radio Mystery Theater (or CBSRMT) was created by Himan Brown and ran from January 6, 1974, till the final episode December 31, 1982. Himan Brown was known as a legend for his work on Inner Sanctum Mysteries, The Adventures of Nero Wolfe, and many other shows dating back to the 1930s. The creation of CBSRMT was an attempt in the 1970s to revive the great drama of old-time radio. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mysterytheater/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mysterytheater/support

The Bike Shed
311: Marketing Matters

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 37:37


Longtime listener and friend of the show, Gio Lodi, released a book y'all should check out and Chris and Steph ruminate on a listener question about tension around marketing in open-source. Say No To More Process, Say Yes To Trust by German Velasco (https://thoughtbot.com/blog/say-no-to-more-process-say-yes-to-trust) Test-Driven Development in Swift with SwiftUI and Combine by Gio Lodi (https://tddinswift.com/) Transcript: CHRIS: Our golden roads. STEPH: All right. I am also golden. CHRIS: [vocalization] STEPH: Oh, I haven't listened to that episode where I just broke out in song in the middle. Oh, you're about to add the [vocalization] [chuckles]. CHRIS: I don't know why, though. Oh, golden roads, Golden Arches. STEPH: Golden Arches, yeah. CHRIS: Man, I did not know that my brain was doing that, but my brain definitely connected those without telling me about it. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: It's weird. People talk often about the theory that phones are listening, and then you get targeted ads based on what you said. But I'm almost certain it's actually the algorithms have figured out how to do the same intuitive leaps that your brain does. And so you'll smell something and not make the nine steps in between, but your brain will start singing a song from your childhood. And you're like, what is going on? Oh, right, because when I was watching Jurassic Park that one time, we were eating this type of chicken, and therefore when I smell paprika, Jurassic Park theme song. I got it, of course. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: And I think that's actually what's happening with the phones. That's my guess is that you went to a site, and the phones are like, cool, I got it, adjacent to that is this other thing, totally. Because I don't think the phones are listening. Occasionally, I think the phones are listening, but mostly, I don't think the phones are listening. STEPH: I definitely think the phones are listening. CHRIS: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Steph, what's new in your world? STEPH: Hey. So we have a bit of exciting news where we received an email from Gio Lodi, who is a listener of The Bike Shed. And Gio sent an email sharing with us some really exciting news that they have published a book on Test-Driven Development in Swift. And they acknowledge us in the acknowledgments of the book. Specifically, the acknowledgment says, "I also want to thank Chris Toomey and Steph Viccari, who keep sharing ideas on testing week after week on The Bike Shed Podcast." And that's just incredible. I'm so blown away, and I feel officially very famous. CHRIS: This is how you know you're famous when you're in the acknowledgments of a book. But yeah, Gio is a longtime listener and friend of the show. He's written in many times and given us great tips, and pointers, and questions, and things. And I've so appreciated Gio's voice in the community. And it's so wonderful, frankly, to hear that he has gotten value out of the show and us talking about testing. Because I always feel like I'm just regurgitating things that I've heard other people saying about testing and maybe one or two hard-learned truths that I've found. But it's really wonderful. And thank you so much, Gio. And best of luck for anyone out there who is doing Swift development and cares about testing or test-driven development, which I really think everybody should. Go check out that book. STEPH: I must admit my Swift skills are incredibly rusty, really non-existent at this point. It's been so long since I've been in that world. But I went ahead and purchased a copy just because I think it's really cool. And I suspect there are a lot of testing conversations that, regardless of the specific code examples, still translate. At least, that's the goal that you and I have when we're having these testing conversations. Even if they're not specific to a language, we can still talk about testing paradigms and strategies. So I purchased a copy. I'm really looking forward to reading it. And just to change things up a bit, we're going to start off with a listener question today. So this listener question comes from someone very close to the show. It comes from Thom Obarski. Hi, Thom. And Thom wrote in, "So I heard on a recent podcast I was editing some tension around marketing and open source. Specifically, a little perturbed at ReactJS that not only were people still dependent on a handful of big companies for their frameworks, but they also seem to be implying that the cachet of Facebook and having developer mindshare was not allowing smaller but potentially better solutions to shine through. In your opinion, how much does marketing play in the success of an open-source project framework rather than actually being the best tool for the job?" So a really thoughtful question. Thanks, Thom. Chris, I'm going to kick it over to you. What are your thoughts about this question? CHRIS: Yeah, this is a super interesting one. And thank you so much, Thom, although I'm not sure that you're listening at this point. But we'll send you a note that we are replying to your question. And when I saw this one come through, it was interesting. I really love the kernel of the discussion here, but it is, again, very difficult to tease apart the bits. I think that the way the question was framed is like, oh, there's this bad thing that it's this big company that has this big name, and they're getting by on that. But really, there are these other great frameworks that exist, and they should get more of the mindshare. And honestly, I'm not sure. I think marketing is a critically important aspect of the work that we do both in open source and, frankly, everywhere. And I'm going to clarify what I mean by that because I think it can take different shapes. But in terms of open-source, Facebook has poured a ton of energy and effort and, frankly, work into React as a framework. And they're also battle testing it on facebook.com, a giant website that gets tons of traffic, that sees various use cases, that has all permissions in there. They're really putting it through the wringer in that way. And so there is a ton of value just in terms of this large organization working on and using this framework in the same way that GitHub and using Rails is a thing that is deeply valuable to us as a community. So I think having a large organization associated with something can actually be deeply valuable in terms of what it produces as an outcome for us as consumers of that open-source framework. I think the other idea of sort of the meritocracy of the better framework should win out is, I don't know, it's like a Field of Dreams. Like, if you build it, they will come. It turns out I don't believe that that's actually true. And I think selling is a critical part of everything. And so if I think back to DHH's original video from so many years ago of like, I'm going to make a blog in 15 minutes; look at how much I'm not doing. That was a fantastic sales pitch for this new framework. And he was able to gain a ton of attention by virtue of making this really great sales pitch that sold on the merits of it. But that was marketing. He did the work of marketing there. And I actually think about it in terms of a pull request. So I'm in a small organization. We're in a private repo. There's still marketing. There's still sales to be done there. I have to communicate to someone else the changes that I'm making, why it's valuable to the system, why they should support this change, this code coming into the codebase. And so I think that sort of communication is as critical to the whole conversation. And so the same thing happens at the level of open source. I would love for the best framework to always win, but we also need large communities with Stack Overflow answers and community-supported plugins and things like that. And so it's a really difficult thing to treat marketing as just other, this different, separate thing when, in fact, I think they're all intertwined. And marketing is critically important, and having a giant organization behind something can actually have negative aspects. But I think overall; it really is useful in a lot of cases. Those are some initial thoughts. What do you think, Steph? STEPH: Yeah, those are some great initial thoughts. I really agree with what you said. And I also like how you brought in the comparison of pull requests and how sales is still part of our job as developers, maybe not in the more traditional sense but in the way that we are marketing and communicating with the team. And circling back to what you were saying earlier about a bit how this is phrased, I think I typically agree that there's nothing nefarious that's afoot in regards to just because a larger company is sponsoring an open-source project or they are the ones responsible for it, I don't think there's anything necessarily bad about that. And I agree with the other points that you made where it is helpful that these teams have essentially cultivated a framework or a project that is working for their team, that is helping their company, and then they have decided to open source it. And then, they have the time and energy that they can continue to invest in that project. And it is battle-tested because they are using it for their own projects as well. So it seems pretty natural that a lot of us then would gravitate towards these larger, more heavily supported projects and frameworks. Because then that's going to make our job easier and also give us more trust that we can turn to them when we do need help or have issues. Or, like you mentioned, when we need to look up documentation, we know that that's going to be there versus some of the other smaller projects. They may also be wonderful projects. But if they are someone that's doing this in their spare time just on the weekends and yet I'm looking for something that I need to be incredibly reliable, then it probably makes sense for me to go with something that is supported by a team that's getting essentially paid to work on that project, at least that they're backed by a larger company. Versus if I'm going with a smaller project where someone is doing some wonderful work, but realistically, they're also doing it more on the weekends or in their spare time. So boiling it down, it's similar to what you just said where marketing plays a very big part in open source, and the projects and frameworks that we adopt, and the things that we use. And I don't think that's necessarily a bad thing. CHRIS: Yeah. I think, if anything, it's possibly a double-edged sword. Part of the question was around does React get to benefit just by the cachet of Facebook? But Facebook, as a larger organization sometimes that's a positive thing. Sometimes there's ire that is directed at Facebook as an organization. And as a similar example, my experience with Google and Microsoft as large organizations, particularly backing open-source efforts, has almost sort of swapped over time, where originally, Microsoft there was almost nothing of Microsoft's open-source efforts that I was using. And I saw them as this very different shape of a company that I probably wouldn't be that interested in. And then they have deeply invested in things like GitHub, and VS Code, and TypeScript, and tons of projects that suddenly I'm like, oh, actually, a lot of what I use in the world is coming from Microsoft. That's really interesting. And at the same time, Google has kind of gone in the opposite direction for me. And I've seen some of their movements switch from like, oh Google the underdog to now they're such a large company. And so the idea that the cachet, as the question phrase, of a company is just this uniformly positive thing and that it's perhaps an unfair benefit I don't see that as actually true. But actually, as a more pointed example of this, I recently chose Svelte over React, and that was a conscious choice. And I went back and forth on it a few times, if we're being honest, because Svelte is a much smaller community. It does not have the large organizational backing that React or other frameworks do. And there was a certain marketing effort that was necessary to raise it into my visibility and then for me to be convinced that there is enough there, that there is a team that will maintain it, and that there are reasons to choose that and continue with it. And I've been very happy with it as a choice. But I was very conscious in that choice that I'm choosing something that doesn't have that large organizational backing. Because there's a nicety there of like, I trust that Facebook will probably keep investing in React because it is the fundamental technology of the front end of their platform. So yeah, it's not going to go anywhere. But I made the choice of going with Svelte. So it's an example of where the large organization didn't win out in my particular case. So I think marketing is a part of the work, a part of the conversation. It's part of communication. And so I am less negative on it, I think, than the question perhaps was framed, but as always, it depends. STEPH: Yeah, I'm trying to think of a scenario where I would be concerned about the fact that I'm using open source that's backed by a specific large company or corporation. And the main scenario I can think of is what happens when you conflict or if you have values that conflict with a company that is sponsoring that project? So if you are using an open-source project, but then the main community or the company that then works on that project does something that you really disagree with, then what do you do? How do you feel about that situation? Do you continue to use that open-source project? Do you try to use a different open-source project? And I had that conversation frankly with myself recently, thinking through what to do in that situation and how to view it. And I realize this may not be how everybody views it, and it's not appropriate for all situations. But I do typically look at open-source projects as more than who they are backed by, but the community that's actively working on that project and who it benefits. So even if there is one particular group that is doing something that I don't agree with, that doesn't necessarily mean that wholesale I no longer want to be a part of this community. It just means that I still want to be a part, but I still want to share my concerns that I think a part of our community is going in a direction that I don't agree with or I don't think is a good direction. That's, I guess, how I reason with myself; even if an open-source project is backed by someone that I don't agree with, either one, you can walk away. That seems very complicated, depending on your dependencies. Or two, you find ways to then push back on those values if you feel that the community is headed in a direction that you don't agree with. And that all depends on how comfortable you are and how much power you feel like you have in that situation to express your opinion. So it's a complicated space. CHRIS: Yeah, that is a super subtle edge case of all of this. And I think I aligned with what you said of trying to view an open-source project as more generally the community that's behind it as opposed to even if there's a strong, singular organization behind it. But that said, that's definitely a part of it. And again, it's a double-edged sword. It's not just, oh, giant company; this is great. That giant company now has to consider this. And I think in the case of Facebook and React, that is a wonderful hiring channel for them. Now all the people that use React anywhere are like, "Oh man, I could go work at Facebook on React? That's exciting." That's a thing that's a marketing tool from a hiring perspective for them. But it cuts both ways because suddenly, if the mindshare moves in a different direction, or if Facebook as an organization does something complicated, then React as a community can start to shift away. Maybe you don't move the current project off of it, but perhaps you don't start the next one with it. And so, there are trade-offs and considerations in all directions. And again, it depends. STEPH: Yeah. I think overall, the thing that doesn't depend is marketing matters. It is a real part of the ecosystem, and it will influence our decisions. And so, just circling back to Thom's question, I think it does play a vital role in the choices that we make. CHRIS: Way to stick the landing. STEPH: Thanks. Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is leading-edge application performance monitoring that's designed to help Rails developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature bloat. With a developer-centric UI and tracing logic that ties bottlenecks to source code, you can quickly pinpoint and resolve those performance abnormalities like N+1 queries, slow database queries, memory bloat, and much more. Scout's real-time alerting and weekly digest emails let you rest easy knowing Scout's on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers ever see them. Scout has also launched its new error monitoring feature add-on for Python applications. Now you can connect your error reporting and application monitoring data on one platform. See for yourself why developers call Scout their best friend and try our error monitoring and APM free for 14 days; no credit card needed. And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. STEPH: Changing topics just a bit, what's new in your world? CHRIS: Well, we had what I would call a mini perfect storm this week. We broke the build but in a pretty solid way. And it was a little bit difficult to get it back under control. And it has pushed me ever so slightly forward in my desire to have a fully optimized CI and deploy pipeline. Mostly, I mean that in terms of ratcheting. I'm not actually going to do anything beyond a very small set of configurations. But to describe the context, we use pull requests because that's the way that we communicate. We do code reviews, all that fun stuff. And so there was a particular branch that had a good amount of changes, and then something got merged. And this other pull request was approved. And that person then clicked the rebase and merge button, which I have configured the repository, so that merge commits are not allowed because I'm not interested in that malarkey in our history. But merge commits or rebase and merge. I like that that makes sense. In this particular case, we ran into the very small, subtle edge case of if you click the rebase and merge button, GitHub is now producing a new commit that did not exist before, a new version of the code. So they're taking your changes, and they are rebasing them onto the current main branch. And then they're attempting to merge that in. And A, that was allowed. B, the CI configuration did not require that to be in a passing state. And so basically, in doing that rebase and merge, it produced an artifact in the build that made it fail. And then attempting to unwind that was very complicated. So basically, the rebase produced...there were duplicate changes within a given file. So Git didn't see it as a conflict because the change was made in two different parts of the file, but those were conflicting changes. So Git was like, this seems like it's fine. I can merge this, no problem. But it turns out from a functional perspective; it did not work. The build failed. And so now our main branch was failing and then trying to unwind that it just was surprisingly difficult to unwind that. And it really highlighted the importance of keeping the main branch green, keeping the build always passing. And so, I configured a few things in response to this. There is a branch protection rule that you can enable. And let me actually pull up the specific configuration that I set up. So I now have enabled require status checks to pass before merging, which, if we're being honest, I thought that was the default. It turns out it was not the default. So we are now requiring status checks to pass before merging. I'm fully aware of the awkward, painful like, oh no, the build is failing but also, we have a bug. We need to deploy this. We must get something merged in. So hopefully, if and when that situation presents itself, I will turn this off or somehow otherwise work around it. But for now, I would prefer to have this as a yeah; this is definitely a configuration we want. So require status checks to pass before merging and then require branches to be up to date before merging. So the button that does the rebase and merge, I don't want that to actually do a rebase on GitHub. I want the branch to already be up to date. Basically, I only ever want fast-forward merges on our main branch. So all code should be ahead of main, and we are simply updating what main points at. We are not creating new code. That code has run on CI, that version of the code specifically. We are fully rebased and up to date on top of main, and that's how we're going. STEPH: All of that is super interesting. I have a question about the workflow. I want to make sure I'm understanding it correctly. So let's say that I have issued a PR, and then someone else has merged into the main branch. So now my PR is behind me, and I don't have that latest commit. With the new configuration, can I still use the rebase and merge, or will I need to rebase locally and then push up my branch before I can merge into main but at least using the GitHub UI? CHRIS: I believe that you would be forced to rebase locally, force push, and then CI would rebuild, and that's what it is. So I think that's what require branches to be up to date before merging means. So that's my hope. That is the intention here. I do realize that's complicated. So this requirement, which I like, because again, I really want the idea that no, no, no, we, the developers, are in charge of that final state. That final state should always run as part of a build of CI on our pull request/branch before going into main. So no code should be new. There should be no new commits that have never been tested before going into main. That's my strong belief. I want that world. I realize that's...I don't know. Maybe I'm getting pedantic, or I'm a micromanager of the Git history or whatever. I'm fine with any of those insults that people want to lob at me. That's fine. But that's what I feel. That said, this is a nuisance. I'm fully aware of that. And so imagine the situation where we got a couple of different things that have been in flight. People have been working on different...say there are three pull requests that are all coming to completion at the same time. Then you start to go to merge something, and you realize, oh no, somebody else just merged. So you rebase, and then you wait for CI to build. And just as the CI is completing, somebody else merges something, and you're like, ah, come on. And so then you have to one more time rebase, push, wait for the build to be green. So I get that that is not an ideal situation. Right now, our team is three developers. So there are a few enough of us that I feel like this is okay. We can manage this via human intervention and just deal with the occasional weight. But in the back of my mind, of course, I want to find a better solution to this. So what I've been exploring…there's a handful of different utilities that I'm looking at, but they are basically merged queues as an idea. So there are three that I'm looking at, or maybe just two, but there's mergify.io, which is a hosted solution that does this sort of thing. And then Shopify has a merge queue implementation that they're running. So the idea with this is when you as a developer are ready to merge something, you add a label to it. And when you add that label, there's some GitHub Action or otherwise some workflow in the background that sees that this has happened and now adds it to a merge queue. So it knows all of the different things that might want to be merged. And this is especially important as the team grows so that you don't get that contention. You can just say, "Yes, I would like my changes to go out into production." And so, when you label it, it then goes into this merge queue. And the background system is now going to take care of any necessary rebases. It's going to sequence them, so it's not just constantly churning all of the branches. It's waiting because it knows the order that they're ideally going to go out in. If CI fails for any of them because rebasing suddenly, you're in an inconsistent state; if your build fails, then it will kick you out of the merge queue. It will let you know. So it will send you a notification in some manner and say, "Hey, hey, hey, you got to come look at this again. You've been kicked out of the merge queue. You're not going to production." But ideally, it adds that layer of automation to, frankly, this nuisance of having to keep things up to date and always wanting code to be run on CI and on a pull request before it gets into main. Then the ideal version is when it does actually merge your code, it pings you in Slack or something like that to say, "Hey, your changes just went out to production." Because the other thing I'm hoping for is a continuous deployment. STEPH: The idea of a merge queue sounds really interesting. I've never worked with a process like that. And one of the benefits I can see is if I know I'm ready for something to go like if I'm waiting on a green build and I'm like, hey, as soon as this is green, I'd really like for it to get merged. Then currently, I'm checking in on it, so I will restart the build. And then, every so often, I'm going back to say, "Okay, are you green? Are you green? Can I emerge?" But if I have a merge queue, I can say, "Hey, merge queue, when this is green, please go and merge it for me." If I'm understanding the behavior correctly, that sounds really nifty. CHRIS: I think that's a distinct but useful aspect of this is the idea that when you as a developer decide this PR is ready to go, you don't need to wait for either the current build or any subsequent builds. If there are rebases that need to happen, you basically say, "I think this code's good to go. We've gotten the necessary approvals. We've got the buy-in and the teams into this code." So cool, I now market as good. And you can walk away from it, and you will be notified either if it fails to get merged or if it successfully gets merged and deployed. So yes, that dream of like, you don't have to sit there watching the pot boil anymore. STEPH: Yeah, that sounds nice. I do have to ask you a question. And this is related to one of the blog posts that you and I love deeply and reference fairly frequently. And it's the one that's written by German Velasco about Say No to More Process, and Say Yes to Trust. And I'm wondering, based on the pain that you felt from this new commit, going into main and breaking the main build, how do you feel about that balance of we spent time investigating this issue, and it may or may not happen again, and we're also looking into these new processes to avoid this from happening? I'm curious what your thought process is there because it seems like it's a fair amount of work to invest in the new process, but maybe that's justified based on the pain that you felt from having to fix the build previously. CHRIS: Oh, I love the question. I love the subtle pushback here. I love this frame of mind. I really love that blog post. German writes incredible blog posts. And this is one that I just keep coming back to. In this particular case, when this situation occurred, we had a very brief...well, it wasn't even that brief because actually unwinding the situation was surprisingly painful, and we had some changes that we really wanted to get out, but now the build was broken. And so that churn and slowdown of our build pipeline and of our ability to actually get changes out to production was enough pain that we're like, okay, cool. And then the other thing is we actually all were in agreement that this is the way we want things to work anyway, that idea that things should be rebased and tested on CI as part of a pull request. And then we're essentially only doing fast-forward merges on the main branch, or we're fast forward merging main into this new change. That's the workflow that we wanted. So this configuration was really just adding a little bit of software control to the thing that we wanted. So it was an existing process in our minds. This is the thing we were trying to do. It's just kind of hard to keep up with, frankly. But it turns out GitHub can manage it for us and enforce the process that we wanted. So it wasn't a new process per se. It was new automation to help us hold ourselves to the process that we had chosen. And again, it's minimally painful for the team given the size that we're at now, but I am looking out to the future. And to be clear, this is one of the many things that fall on the list of; man, I would love to have some time to do this, but this is obviously not a priority right now. So I'm not allowed to do this. This is explicitly on the not allowed to touch list, but someday. I'm very excited about this because this does fundamentally introduce some additional work in the pipeline, and I don't want that. Like you said, is this process worth it for the very small set of times that it's going to have a bad outcome? But in my mind, the better version, that down the road version where we have a merge queue, is actually a better version overall, even with just a tiny team of three developers that are maybe never even conflicting in our merges, except for this one standout time that happens once every three months or whatever. This is still nicer. I want to just be able to label a pull request and walk away and have it do the thing that we have decided as a team that we want. So that's the dream. STEPH: Oh, I love that phrasing, to label a pull request and be able to walk away. Going back to our marketing, that really sells that merge queue to me. [laughs] Mid-roll Ad And now we're going to take a quick break to tell you about today's sponsor, Orbit. Orbit is mission control for community builders. Orbit offers data analytics, reporting, and insights across all the places your community exists in a single location. Orbit's origins are in the open-source and developer relations communities. And that continues today with an active open-source culture in an accessible and documented API. With thousands of communities currently relying on Orbit, they are rapidly growing their engineering team. The company is entirely remote-first with team members around the world. You can work from home, from an Orbit outpost in San Francisco or Paris, or find yourself a coworking spot in your city. The tech stack of the main orbit app is Ruby on Rails with JavaScript on the front end. If you're looking for your next role with an empathetic product-driven team that prides itself on work-life balance, professional development, and giving back to the larger community, then consider checking out the Orbit careers page for more information. Bonus points if working in a Ruby codebase with a Ruby-oriented team gives you a lot of joy. Find out more at orbit.love/weloveruby. CHRIS: To be clear, and this is to borrow on some of Charity Majors' comments around continuous deployment and whatnot, is a developer should stay very close to the code if they are merging it. Because if we're doing continuous deployment, that's going to go out to production. If anything's going to happen, I want that individual to be aware. So ideally, there's another set of optimizations that I need to make on top of this. So we've got the merge queue, and that'll be great. Really excited about that. But if we're going to lean into this, I want to optimize our CI pipeline and our deployment pipeline as much as possible such that even in the worst case where there's three different builds that are fighting for contention and trying to get out, the longest any developer might go between labeling a pull request and saying, "This is good to go," and it getting out to production, again, even if they're contending with other PRs, is say 10, 15 minutes, something like that. I want Slack to notify them and them to then re-engage and keep an eye on things, see if any errors pop up, anything like that that they might need to respond to. Because they're the one that's got the context on the code at that point, and that context is decaying. The minute you've just merged a pull request and you're walking away from that code, the next day, you're like, what did I work on? I don't remember that at all. That code doesn't exist anymore in my brain. And so,,, staying close to that context is incredibly important. So there's a handful of optimizations that I've looked at in terms of the CircleCI build. I've talked about my not rebuilding when it actually gets fast-forward merged because we've already done that build on the pull request. I'm being somewhat pointed in saying this has to build on a pull request. So if it did just build on a pull request, let's not rebuild it on main because it's identically the same commit. CircleCI, I'm looking at you. Give me a config button for that, please. I would really love that config button. But there are a couple of other things that I've looked at. There's RSpec::Retry from NoRedInk, which will allow for some retry semantics. Because it will be really frustrating if your build breaks and you fall out of the merge queue. So let's try a little bit of retry logic on there, particularly around feature specs, because that's where this might happen. There's Knapsack Pro which is a really interesting thing that I've looked at, which does parallelization of your RSpec test suite. But it does it in a different way than say Circle does. It actually runs a build queue, and each test gets sent over, and they have build agents on their side. And it's an interesting approach. I'm intrigued. I think it could use some nice speed-ups. There's esbuild on the Heroku side so that our assets build so much more quickly. There are lots of things. I want to make it very fast. But again, this is on the not allowed to do it list. [laughs] STEPH: I love how most of the world has a to-do list, and you have this not-allowed to-do list that you're adding items to. And I'm really curious what all is on the not allowed to touch lists or not allowed to-do list. [laughs] CHRIS: I think this might be inherent to being a developer is like when I see a problem, I want to fix it. I want to optimize it. I want to tweak it. I want to make it so that that never happens again. But plenty of things...coming back to German's post of Say No to More Process, some things shouldn't be fixed, or the cost of fixing is so much higher than the cost of just letting it happen again and dealing with it manually at that moment. And so I think my inherent nature as a developer there's a voice in my head that is like, fix everything that's broken. And I'm like, sorry. Sorry, brain, I do not have that kind of time. And so I have to be really choosy about where the time goes. And this extends to the team as well. We need to be intentional around what we're building. Actually, there's a feeling that I've been feeling more acutely than ever, but it's the idea of this trade-off or optimization between speed and getting features out into the world and laying the right fundamentals. We're still very early on in this project, and I want to make sure we're thinking about things intentionally. I've been on so many projects where it's many years after it started and when I ask someone, "Hey, why do your background jobs work that way? That's a little weird." And they're like, "Yeah, that was just a thing that happened, and then it never changed. And then, we copied it and duplicated, and that pattern just got reinforced deeply within the app. And at this point, it would cost too much to change." I've seen that thing play out so many times at so many different organizations that I'm overwhelmed with that knowledge in the back of my head. And I'm like, okay, I got to get it just right. But I can't take the time that is necessary to get it, quote, unquote, "Just right." I do not have that kind of time. I got to ship some features. And this tension is sort of the name of the game. It's the thing I've been doing for my entire career. But now, given the role that I have with a very early-stage startup, I've never felt it more acutely. I've never had to be equally as concerned with both sides of that. Both matter all the more now than they ever have before, and so I'm kind of existing in that space. STEPH: I really like that phrasing of that space because that deeply resonates with me as well. And that not allowed to-do list I have a similar list. For me, it's just called a wishlist. And so it's a wishlist that I will revisit every so often, but honestly, most things on there don't get done. And then I'll clear it out every so often when I feel it's not likely that I'm going to get to it. And then I'll just start fresh. So I also have a similar this is what I would like to do if I had the time. And I agree that there's this inclination to automate as well. As soon as we have to do something that felt painful once, then we feel like, oh, we should automate it. And that's a conversation that I often have with myself is at what point is the cost of automation worthwhile versus should we just do this manually until we get to that point? So I love those nuanced conversations around when is the right time to invest further in this, and what is the impact? And what is the cost of it? And what are the trade-offs? And making that decision isn't always clear. And so I think that's why I really enjoy these conversations because it's not a clear rubric as to like, this is when you invest, and this is when you don't. But I do feel like being a consultant has helped me hone those skills because I am jumping around to different teams, and I'm recognizing they didn't do this thing. Maybe they didn't address this or invest in it, and it's working for them. There are some oddities. Like you said, maybe I'll ask, "Why is this? It seems a little funky. What's the history?" And they'll be like, "Yeah, it was built in a hurry, but it works. And so there hasn't been any churn. We don't have any issues with it, so we have just left it." And that has helped reinforce the idea that just because something could be improved doesn't mean it's worthwhile to improve it. Circling back to your original quest where you are looking to improve the process for merging and ensuring that CI stays green, I do like that you highlighted the fact that we do need to just be able to override settings. So that's something that has happened recently this week for me and my client work where we have had PRs that didn't have a green build because we have some flaky tests that we are actively working on. But we recognize that they're flaky, and we don't want that to block us. I'm still shipping work. So I really appreciate the consideration where we want to optimize so that everyone has an easy merging experience. We know things are green. It's trustworthy. But then we also have the ability to still say, "No, I am confident that I know what I'm doing here, and I want to merge it anyways, but thank you for the warning." CHRIS: And the constant pendulum swing of over-correcting in various directions I've experienced that. And as you said, in the back of my mind, I'm like, oh, I know that this setting I'm going to need a way to turn this setting off. So I want to make sure that, most importantly, I'm not the only one on the team who can turn that off because the day that I am away on vacation and the build is broken, and we have a critical bug that we need to fix, somebody else needs to be able to do that. So that's sort of the story in my head. At the same time, though, I've worked on so many teams where they're like, oh yeah, the build has been broken for seven weeks. We have a ticket in the backlog to fix that. And it's like, no, the build has to not be broken for that long. And so I agree with what you were saying of consulting has so usefully helped me hone where I fall on these various spectrums. But I do worry that I'm just constantly over-correcting in one direction or the other. I'm never actually at an optimum. I am just constantly whatever the most recent thing was, which is really impacting my thinking on this. And I try to not do that, but it's hard. STEPH: Oh yeah. I'm totally biased towards my most recent experiences, and whatever has caused me the most pain or success recently. I'm definitely skewed in that direction. CHRIS: Yeah, I definitely have the recency bias, and I try to have a holistic view of all of the things I've seen. There's actually a particular one that I don't want to pat myself on the back for because it's not a good thing. But currently, our test suite, when it runs, there's just a bunch of noise. There's a bunch of other stuff that gets printed out, like a bunch of it. And I'm reminded of a tweet from Kevin Newton, a friend of the show, and I just pulled it up here. "Oh, the lengths I will go to avoid warnings in my terminal, especially in the middle of my green dots. Don't touch my dots." It's a beautiful beauty. He actually has a handful about the green dots. And I feel this feel. When I run my test suite, I just want a sea of green dots. That's all I want to see. But right now, our test suite is just noise. It's so much noise. And I am very proud of...I feel like this is a growth moment for me where I've been like, you know what? That is not the thing to fix today. We can deal with some noise amongst the green dots for now. Someday, I'm just going to lose it, and I'm going to fix it, and it's going to come back to green dots. [chuckles] STEPH: That sounds like such a wonderful children's book or Dr. Seuss. Oh, the importance of green dots or, oh, the places green dots will take you. CHRIS: Don't touch my dots. [laughter] STEPH: Okay. Maybe a slightly aggressive Dr. Seuss, but I still really like it. CHRIS: A little more, yeah. STEPH: On that note of our love of green dots, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Let's wrap up. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeee!!! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Real Estate Espresso
The Wrong Orbit

Real Estate Espresso

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 4:59


On today's show we're talking about getting trapped in the wrong orbit. Now I realize that when I use the word wrong, it sounds like I'm making something right and something else wrong. What that really means is getting trapped in an orbit that's different from what you might have intended. This type of thing happens all the time in all kinds of industries. It stems from having imprecise goals. That lack of clarity can be a trap. ----------------- Host: Victor Menasce email: podcast@victorjm.com

The Travelers Blueprint
TTB 158: September Travel Bites

The Travelers Blueprint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 33:55


TTB 158: September Travel Bites In this episode we discuss some of the recent travel related news we found interesting or relevant over the month of September. We break down our favorite different news articles, including:  Update on Bob's personal COVID travel experiences https://www.cnn.com/2021/09/18/world/woolly-mammoth-science-newsletter-wt-scn/index.html (Woolly mammoth resurrection project receives $15 million boost) https://thepointsguy.com/news/covid-sniffing-dogs-miami-international-airport/?utm_term=Editorial&utm_campaign=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_content=11759E82-141A-11EC-9AA9-51343A982C1E&fbclid=IwAR3uMfSm4JjPqjXLuDCSIAucRyaOGxoXILYs-H9E9kM2y9vo69EZyfJXSJM (COVID-sniffing dogs now on duty at Miami International Airport) https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/18/science/spacex-inspiration4.html (Inspiration4 Astronauts Beam After Return From 3-Day Journey to Orbit) https://www.engadget.com/rolls-royces-all-electric-aircraft-completes-15-minute-maiden-voyage-143051424.html?src=rss&fbclid=IwAR1iVm6uh8aVcX5Y9WikChJxcYUa8ZFe0uQgQhOwoVbzpDTTwOg0bmgaGXc&guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly9sLmZhY2Vib29rLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAM3W13VfWduUSZ7RYAaHMrPYhBVXok8rR0eOnfscPMmfeJjFq8m4x7Nyv3njcxfQ-6X8ThMT_1poxwJAS0zG0U6ubmX5GL1Cx8E8AUdDIUUSeUz0nlro0GCi7xrAquVSc_7PheIWYUsRoBw0fReFHcKUW-NwGCpbdbfXAt5lPjSN (Rolls-Royce's all-electric aircraft completes 15-minute maiden voyage) https://robbreport.com/motors/aviation/hypersonic-jet-hermeus-quarterhorse-1234631198/ (Forget Supersonic. This Hypersonic Jet Can Fly From NYC to London in Under an Hour.) https://thepointsguy.com/news/unvaccinated-testing-requirements/ (New travel restrictions will require unvaccinated Americans to face additional testing) https://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-tips/why-you-should-book-your-rental-car-asap-for-holiday-travel (Why You Should Book Your Rental Car Before Anything Else This Holiday Season) https://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-news/musicians-perform-on-floating-violins-venice-canals (This 39-foot Violin-shaped Boat Floated Down Venice's Grand Canal With a String Quartet on Board) Up This Month:  Katie Quinn on her book, “Cheese, Wine, and Bread: Discovering the Magic of Fermentation in England, Italy, and France” Eva Westerling on her travel agency which offers once-in-a-lifetime hiking tours in the Moroccan desert Bob and Elliot on their Moroccan experience in Marrakech and the Sahara Desert The Travelers Blueprint is more than just a podcast with consulting services that allow you to Become Your Own Travel Agent! Take a moment to rate us! Screenshot your review, email us the screenshot with your name and address and we will send you a FREE travel sticker! TheTravelersBlueprint@gmail.com FREE Travel Cheat Sheet! Just sign up for all the latest TTB news and guest information at http://www.thetravelersblueprint@gmail.com (www.thetravelersblueprint.com) For Travel Consulting Services w/ Bob: https://thetravelersblueprint.com/travel-consulting (https://thetravelersblueprint.com/travel-consulting) Our Private Community on Facebook is a great way to have your travel questions be heard and speak directly to us. Join here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/260677938112800 (The Travelers Blueprint Community) For less than a cup of coffee you can be a major supporter of our time and efforts in producing this podcast. Please consider becoming a Patron by signing up here: https://www.patreon.com/join/thetravelersblueprint (https://www.patreon.com/join/thetravelersblueprint) Follow Us on Social Media: https://www.instagram.com/the_travelers_blueprint/ (Instagram) - https://www.facebook.com/TheTravelersBlueprint18/ (Facebook) - https://twitter.com/ttblueprint?lang=en (Twitter) - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyB8gPEriEPYP92Q1DHHkbg (YouTube) This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy Chartable Support this podcast

The Bike Shed
310: Schedule Shut Down, Complete

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 39:16


Chris talks feature flags featuring Flipper (Say that 3x fast!), and Steph talks reducing stress by a) having a work shutdown ritual and b) the fact that thoughtbot is experimenting with half-day Fridays. (Fri-yay?) Flipper (https://featureflags.io/2016/04/08/flipper-a-feature-flipper-feature-toggle-library/) Drastically Reduce Stress with a Work Shutdown Ritual (https://www.calnewport.com/blog/2009/06/08/drastically-reduce-stress-with-a-work-shutdown-ritual/) Iceland's Journey to a Short Working Week (https://autonomy.work/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/ICELAND_4DW.pdf) Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle (https://www.burnoutbook.net/) Transcript: STEPH: Hey, do you know that we could have an in-person recording at the end of October? CHRIS: I do. Yes, I'm planning. That is in the back of my head. I guess I hadn't said that to you yet. But I'm glad that we have separately had the same conversation, and we've got to figure that out, although I don't know how to do noise cancellation and whatnot in the room. [laughs] How do we...we'll have to figure it out. Like, put a blanket in between us but so that we can see across it, but it absorbs sound in the middle. It's weird. I don't know how to do stuff. Just thinking out loud here. STEPH: We'll just be in the same place but still different rooms. So it'll feel no different. [laughter] Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. Hey, Chris, what's new in your world? CHRIS: Feature flags. Feature flags are an old favorite, but they have become new again in the application that I'm working on. We had a new feature that we were building out. But we assumed correctly that it would be nice to be able to break it apart into smaller pieces and sort of deliver it incrementally but not necessarily want to expose that to our end users. And so, we opted with that ticket to bring along the feature flag system. So we've introduced Flipper, in particular, which is a wonderful gem; it does the job. We're using the ActiveRecord adapter. All that kind of makes sense, happy about that. And so now we have feature flags. But it was one of those mindset shifts where the minute we got feature flags, I was like, yes, okay, everything behind a feature flag. And we've been leaning into that more and more, and it really is so nice and so freeing, and so absolutely loving it so far. STEPH: I'm intrigued. You said, "Everything behind a feature flag." Like, is it really everything or? Yeah, tell me more. CHRIS: Not everything. But at this point, we're still very early on in this application, so there are fundamental facets of the platform, different areas of what users can do. And so the actual stuff that works and is wired up is pretty minimal, but we want to have a little more surface area built out in the app for demo purposes, for conversations that are happening, et cetera. And so, we built out a bunch of new pages to represent functionality. And so there are sidebar links, and then the actual page itself, and routing, and all of the things that are associated with that, and so all of those have come in. I think there are five new top-level nav sections of the platform that are all introduced behind a feature flag right now. And then there's some new functionality within existing pages that we've put behind feature flags. So it's not truly every line of code, but it's basically the entry point to all new major features we're putting behind a feature flag. STEPH: Okay, cool. I'm curious. How are you finding that in terms of does it feel manageable? Do you feel like anybody can go into the UI and then turn on feature flags for demos and feel confident that they know what they're turning on and off? CHRIS: We haven't gotten to that self-serve place. At this point, the dev team is managing the feature flags. So on production, we have an internal group configured within Flipper. So we can say, "Ship this feature for all internal users so that we can do testing." So there is a handful of us that all have accounts on production. And then on staging, we have a couple of representative users that we've been just turning everything on for so that we know via staging we can act as that user and then see the application with all of the bells and whistles. Down the road, I think we're going to get more intentional with it, particularly the idea of a demo account. That's something that we want to lean into. And for that user, we'll probably be turning on certain subsets of the feature flags. I think we'll get a little more granular in how we think about that. For now, we're not as detailed in it, but I think that is something that we want to expand as we move forward. STEPH: Nice. Yeah, I was curious because feature flags came up in our recent retro with the client team because we've gotten to a point where our feature flags feel complex enough that it's becoming challenging and not just from the complexity of the feature flags but also from the UI perspective. Where it feels challenging for users to understand how to turn a feature on, exactly what that impacts, and making sure that then they're not changing developer-focused feature flags, so those are the feature flags that we're using to ship a change but then not turn it on until we're ready. It is user-facing, but it's something that should be managed more by developers as to when we turn it on or off. So I was curious to hear that's going for you because that's something that we are looking into. And funnily enough, you asked me recently, "Why aren't y'all using Flipper?" And I didn't have a great answer for you. And that question came up again where we looked at each other, and we're like, okay, we know there was a really good reason we didn't use Flipper when we first had this discussion. But none of us can remember, or at least the people in that conversation couldn't remember. So now we're asking ourselves the question of we've made it this far. Is it time to bring in Flipper or another service? Because we're getting to the point that we're starting to build too much of our own feature flag system. CHRIS: So did you uncover an answer, or are you all just agreeing that the question makes sense? STEPH: Agreeing that the question makes sense. [laughs] CHRIS: That's the first step on a long journey to switching from internal tooling to somebody else managing that for you. STEPH: Yeah, because none of us could remember exactly. But it was funny because I was like, am I just forgetting something here when you asked me that? So I felt validated that others were like, "Oh yeah, I remember that conversation. But I too can't recall why we didn't want to use Flipper in the moment or a similar service." CHRIS: I'll definitely be interested to hear if you do end up trying to migrate off to another system or find a different approach there or if you do stick with the current configuration that you have. Because those projects they're the sort of sneaky ones that it's like, oh, we've been actually relying on this for a while. It's a core part of our infrastructure, and how we do the work, and the process, and how we deploy. That's a lot. And so, to switch that out in-flight becomes really difficult. It's one of those things where the longer it goes on, the harder it is to make that change. But at some point, you sometimes make the decision to make it. So I will be very interested to hear if you do make that decision and then, if so, what that changeover process looks like. STEPH: Yeah, totally. I'll be sure to keep you up to date as we make any progress or decisions around feature flags. CHRIS: But yeah, your questions around management and communication of it that is a thing that's in the back of my mind. We're still early enough in our usage of it, and just broadly, how we're working, we haven't really felt that pain yet, but I expect it's coming very soon. And in particular, we have functionality now that is merged and is part of the codebase but isn't fully deployed or fully released rather. That's probably the correct word. We have not fully released this functionality, and we don't have a system right now for tracking that. So I'm thinking right now we're using Trello for product management. I'm thinking we want another column that is not entirely done but is tracking the feature flags that are currently in flight and just use that as a place to gather communication. Do we feel like this is ready? Let's dial this up to 50%, or let's enable it for this beta group or whatever it is to sort of be able to communicate that. And then ideally, also as a way to track these are the ones that are active right now. You know what? We feel like this one's ready. So do the code change so that we no longer use the feature flag, and then we can actually turn it off. Currently, I feel like I can defer that for a little while, but it is something that's in the back of my mind. And then, of course, I nerd sniped myself, and I was like, all right, how do I grep the codebase for all the feature flags that we're using? Okay. There are a couple of different patterns as to how we're using…You know what? I think I actually need an AST-based parser here, and I need to use the Visitor...You know what? Never mind. Stop it. Stop it. [laughs] It was one of those where I was like...I was doing this not during actual work hours. It was just a question in my mind, and then I started to poke at it. I was like, oh, this could be fun. And then I was like, no, no, no, stop it. You need to go read a book or something. Calm down. STEPH: As part of the optimization around our feature flag system that we've created, we've added a few enhancements, which I think is also one of the reasons we're starting to question how far we want to go in this direction. One of them is we want a very easy way to track what's turned on and what's turned off for an environment. So we have a task that will easily check, or it prints out a really nice list of these are all your flags, and this is the state that they're in. And by using the system that we have, we have one file that represents...well, you mentioned migration because we're migrating from the old system to this new one. So it's still a little bit in that space of where we haven't fully moved over. So now, moving over to a third thing like Flipper will be even more interesting because of that. But the current system, we have a file that lists all the feature flags and a really nice description that goes with it, which I know is supported by Flipper and other services as well. But having that one file does make it nice where you can just scan through there and see what's in use. I really think it's the UI and the challenges that the users are facing and understanding what a feature flag does, and which ones they should turn off, and which ones they shouldn't touch that that's the point where we started questioning okay, we need to improve the UI. But to improve the UI, do we really want to fully embrace our current system and make those improvements, or is now that time that we should consider moving to something else? Because Flipper already has a really nice UI. I think there is a free tier and a paid tier with Flipper, and the paid tier has a UI that ships. CHRIS: There's definitely a distinct thing, Flipper Cloud, which is their hosted enterprise-y solution, and that's the paid offering. But Flipper just the core gem there's also Flipper web, I want to say is what it is, or Flipper UI. And I think it's an engine that you mount within your Rails app and that displays a UI so that you can manage things, add groups and teams. So we're definitely using that. I've got my eye on Flipper Cloud, but I have some fundamental questions around I like to keep my data in the system, and so this is an external other thing. And what's the synchronization? I haven't really even looked into it like that. But I love that Flipper exists within our application. One of the niceties that Flipper Cloud does have is an audit history, which I think is interesting just to understand over time who changed what for what reasons? It's got the ability to roll back and maintain versions and whatnot. So there are some things in it that definitely look very interesting to me. But for now, the open-source, free version of Flipper plus Flipper UI has been plenty for us. STEPH: That's cool. I didn't know about the audit feature. CHRIS: Yeah. It definitely feels like one of those niceties to have for a more enterprise offering. So I could see myself talking me into it at some point but not quite yet. On that note though, so feature flags we introduced a week and a half, something like that, ago, and we've been leaning into them more and more. But as part of that, or in the back of my mind, I've wanted to go to continuous deployment. So we had our first official retro this week. The project is growing up. We're becoming a lot of things. We used retro to talk about continuous deployment, all of these things that feel very real. Just to highlight it, retro is super important. And the fact that we haven't had one until now is mainly because up till now, it's been primarily myself and another developer. So we've been having essentially one-on-ones but not a more formal retro that involves others. At this point, we now have myself and two other developers that are working on the project, as well as someone who's stepped into the role of product manager. So we now have communication collaboration. How are we doing the work? How are we shipping features and communicating about bugs and all of that? So now felt like the right time to start having that more formal process. So now, every two weeks, we're going to have a retro, and hopefully, through that, retro will do the magic that retro can do at its best which is help us get better at all the things that we're doing. But yeah, one of the core things in this particular one was talking about moving to continuous deployment. And so I am super excited to get there because I think, much like test-driven development, it's one of those situations where continuous deployment puts a lot of pressure on the development process. Everything that is being merged needs to be ready to go out into production. And honestly, I love that as a constraint because that will change how you build things. It means that you need to be a little more cautious. You can put something behind a feature flag to protect it. You decouple the idea of merging and deploying from releasing. And I like that distinction. I think that's a really meaningful distinction because it makes you think about what's the entry point to this feature within the codebase? And it's, I think, actually really nice to have fewer and more intentional entry points into various bits of functionality such that if you actually want to shut it off in production, you can do that. That's more straightforward. I think it encourages an intentional coupling, maybe not a perfect decoupling but an intentional coupling within the system. So I'm very excited to explore it. I think feature flags are going to be critical for it, and I think also observability, and monitoring, and logging, and all those things. We need to get really good at them so that if anything does go wrong when we just merge and deploy, we want to know if anything goes wrong as quickly as possible. But overall, I'm super excited about all of the other niceties that fall out of it. STEPH: [singing] I wanna know what's turned on, and I want you to show me. Is that the song you're singing to Flipper? [laughs] CHRIS: [laughs] STEPH: Sorry, friends. I just had to go there. CHRIS: That was just in your head. You had that, and you needed to get it out. I appreciate it. [laughter] Again, I got Flipper UI, so that's not the question I'm asking. I think that's the question you have in your heart. STEPH: [laughs] Mid-roll Ad And now we're going to take a quick break to tell you about today's sponsor, Orbit. Orbit is mission control for community builders. Orbit offers data analytics, reporting, and insights across all the places your community exists in a single location. Orbit's origins are in the open-source and developer relations communities. And that continues today with an active open-source culture in an accessible and documented API. With thousands of communities currently relying on Orbit, they are rapidly growing their engineering team. The company is entirely remote-first with team members around the world. You can work from home, from an Orbit outpost in San Francisco or Paris, or find yourself a coworking spot in your city. 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Because I think the thing that does add more pressure for me is figuring out what can I deploy, or do I need to cherry-pick commits? What does that look like? And going through that whole cycle and stress is more stressful to me than figuring out how do we get to continuous deployments and making sure that everything is in a safe space to be deployed? CHRIS: That's the dream. I'm going to see if I can live it. I'll let you know how it goes. But yeah, that's a bit of what's up in my world. What else is going on in your world other than some lovely singing? STEPH: Oh, there's always lots of singing. It's been an interesting week. It's been a mix of some hiring work. Specifically, we are helping our client team build their development team. So we have been helping them implement a hiring process. And then also going through technical interviews and then going through different stages of that interview process. And that's been really nice. I haven't done that specifically for a client team where I helped them build a hiring pipeline from scratch and then also conduct those interviews. And one thing that stood out to me is that rotations are really important to me and specifically that we don't ask for volunteers. So as we were having candidates come through and then they were ready to schedule an interview, then we are reaching out to the rest of the development team and saying, "Hey, we have this person. They're going to be scheduled at this time. Who's available? Who's interested? I'm looking for volunteers." And that puts pressure on people, especially someone that may be more empathetic to feel the need to volunteer. So then you can end up having more people volunteer than others. So we've established a rotation to make sure that doesn't happen, and people are assigned as it becomes their next turn to conduct an interview. So that's been a lot of fun to refine that process and essentially make it easier. So the rest of the development team doesn't have to think about the hiring. But it still has an easy way of just saying, "Hey," and tapping someone to say, "Hey, it's your turn to run an interview." The other thing I've been working out is figuring out how to measure an experiment. So we at thoughtbot are running an experiment where we're looking to address some of the concerns around sustainability and people feeling burned out. And so we have introduced half-day Fridays, more specifically 3.5 Fridays, as our half-day Fridays just to help everybody be certain about what a half-day looks like. And then also, you can choose your half-day. Everybody works different schedules. We're across different time zones, so just to make sure it's really clear for folks and that they understand that they don't need to work more than those hours, and then they should have that additional downtime. And that's been amazing. This is the second Friday of the experiment, and we're doing this for nine Fridays straight. And one of the questions that came up was, well, how do we know we did a good thing? How do we know that we helped people in terms of sustainability or addressing some of the feelings that they're having around burnout? And so I've collaborated with a couple of other thoughtboters to think through of a way to measure it. It turns out helping someone measure their wellness is incredibly complex. And so we went for a fairly simple approach where we're using an anonymous survey with a number of questions. And those questions aren't really meant to stand up to scientific scrutiny but more to figure out how the team is feeling at the time that they fill out the survey and then also to understand how the reduced weekly hours have impacted their schedule. And are people working extra hours to then accommodate the fact that we now have these half Fridays? So do you feel pressured that because you can't work a full day on Friday that you are now working an extra hour or two Monday through Thursday to accommodate that time off? So that survey just went out today. And one of the really interesting parts (I just haven't had to create content for a survey in a while.) was making sure that I'm not introducing leading questions or phrasing things in a very positive or negative light since that is a bias that then people will pick up on. So instead of saying, "I find it easy to focus at work," and then having like a multiple choice of true, always, never, that kind of thing, instead rephrasing the question to be, "Are you able to focus during work hours?" And then you have a scale there. Or instead of asking someone how much energy they have, maybe it's something like, "Do you experience fatigue during the day?" Or instead of asking someone, "Are you stressed at work?" because that can have a more negative connotation. It may lead someone to feel more negatively as they are assessing that question. Then you can say, "How do you feel when you're at work?" And then you can provide those answers of I'm stressed, slightly stressed, neutral, slightly relaxed, and relaxed. So it generated some interesting conversations around the importance of how we phrase questions and how we collect feedback. And I really enjoyed that process, and I'm really looking forward to seeing what folks have to say. And we're going to have three surveys total. So we have one that's early on in the experiment since we're only two Fridays in. We'll have one middle experiment survey go out, and then we'll have one at the end once we're done. And then hopefully, everybody's responses will then help us understand how the experiment went and then make a decision going forward. I'll be honest; I'm really hoping that this becomes a trend and something that we stick with. It is a professional goal of mine to slowly reduce the hours that I work each week or quickly; it doesn't have to be slowly. But I really like the four-day workweek. It's something that I haven't done, but I've been reading about it a fair amount lately. I feel like I've been seeing more studies conducted recently becoming published, and it's just very interesting to me. I had some similar concerns of how am I still going to be productive? My to-do list hasn't changed, but my hours are changing. So how am I still going to get everything done? And does it make sense for me to still get paid the same amount of money if I'm only working four out of the five days? And I had lots of questions around that, and the studies have been very enlightening and very positive in the outcome of a reduced workweek, not just for the individuals but for the companies as well. CHRIS: It's such an interesting space and exploration. The way that you're framing the survey sounds really great. It sounds like you're trying to be really intentional around the questions that you're asking and not being leading and whatnot. That said, it is one of the historically hard problems trying to quantify this and trying to actually boil it down. And there are so many different axes even that you're measuring on. Is it just increased employee happiness? Is it retention that you're talking about? Is it overall revenue? There are so many different things, and it's very tricky. I'm super interested to hear the results when you get those. So you're doing what sounds like more of a qualitative study like, how are you feeling? As opposed to a more quantitative sort of thing, is that right? STEPH: Yes, it's more in the realm of how are you feeling? And are you working extra hours, or are you truly taking the time off? CHRIS: Yeah, I think it's really hard to take something like this and try and get it into the quantitative space, even though like, oh yeah, if we could have a number, if it used to be two and now it's four, fantastic. We've doubled whatever that measure is. I don't know what the unit would be on this arbitrary number I made up. But again, that's the hard thing and probably not feasible at all. And so it makes sense the approach that you're taking. But it's super difficult. So I'm very interested to hear how that goes. More generally, the four-day workweek thing is such a nice idea. We should do that more. I'm trying to think how long I did that. So during the period that I was working freelance, I think there were probably at least five months where I did just a true four-day workweek. Fridays were my own. It was fantastic. Granted, I recorded the podcast with you. But that day was mine to shape as I wanted. And I found it was a really nice decompression period having that for a number of weeks in a row. And just getting to take care of personal stuff that I hadn't been and just having that extra little bit of space and time. And it really was wonderful. Now I'm working full five days a week, and my Fridays aren't even investment days, so I don't know what I'm doing over here. But I agree. I really like that idea, and I think it's a wonderful thing. And it's, I don't know, sort of the promise of this whole capitalism adventure we're supposed to go on, increasing productivity. And wasn't this the promise the whole time, everybody, so I am intrigued to see it being explored more, to see it being discussed. And what you're talking about of it's not just good for the employees, but it's also great for the companies. You're getting people that are more engaged on the days that they're working, which feels very true to me. Like, on a great day, I can do some amazing work. On a terrible day, I can do mediocre to bad work. It is totally possible for me to do something that is actively detrimental. Like, I introduce a bug that is going to impact a bunch of customers. And the remediation of that is going to take many more hours. That is totally a realistic thing. I think we often think of productivity in terms of are you at zero or some amount more than zero? But there is definitely another side of that. And so the cost of being not at your best is extremely high in my mind. And so anything we can do to improve that. STEPH: There's a recent study from a non-profit company called Autonomy that published some research called Going Public: Iceland's Journey to a Shorter Working Week. It's very interesting. And a number of people in my social circle have shared it. And that's one of the reasons that I came across it. And they commented in there that one of the reasons...I hope I'm getting this right, but we'll link to it in case I've gotten it a bit wrong. But one of the reasons that Iceland was interested or open to this idea of moving workers to a shorter workweek is because they were struggling with productivity and where people were working a lot of hours, but it still felt like their productivity was dropping. So then Autonomy ran this study to help figure out are there ways to improve productivity? Will shortening a workweek actually lead to higher productivity? And there was a statement in there that I really liked where it talks about the more hours that we work; we're actually lowering our per hour productivity which rings so true for me. Because I am one of those individuals where I'm very stubborn, and so if I'm stuck on something, I will put so many hours into trying to figure it out. But at some point, I have to just walk away, and if I do, I will solve it that much faster. But if I just try to use hours as my way to chip away at a problem, then that's not going to solve it. And my ability to solve that problem takes exponentially more time than if I had just walked away and then come back to the problem fresh and engaged. And some of the case studies I admired the way that they tackled the problem. They would essentially pay the company. So the company could reduce the hours for certain employees so then they could run the experiment. So if they reduced employees to say 32 hours but the company didn't actually want to stop working at 32 hours and they wanted to keep going, so then they brought in other people to work the remaining eight hours. Then as part of that study, they would pay the company to help them stay at their current level of productivity or current level of hours. This way, they could conduct the study. And I thought that was a really neat idea. I do have lots of questions still around the approach itself because it is how do you reduce your to-do list, essentially? So just because you dropped to a four-day workweek. So essentially, you have to just say less stuff gets done. Or, as these case studies promise, they're saying you're actually going to be more productive. So you will still continue to get a lot of your work done. I'm curious about that. I'd like to track my own productivity and see if I feel similarly. And then also, who is this for? Is this for everybody? Does everybody get to move to a four-day workweek? Is this for certain companies? Is it for certain jobs? Ideally, this is for everybody because there are so many health benefits to this, but I'm just intrigued as to who this is for, who it impacts, how can we make it available for everyone? And is the dream real that I can work four days a week and still feel as productive, if not more productive, and healthier, and happier as I do when working five days a week? Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. 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And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. CHRIS: I remember there was an extended period where working remote was this unique benefit that some organizations had. They had adopted that mode. They were async, and remote, and all of these wonderful things. And it became this really interesting selling point for those companies. Now the pandemic obviously pushed public opinion and everything on that in a pretty significant way such that it's a much more common thing. And so, as a result, I think it's less of a differentiator now. It used to be a way to help with recruiting. I wonder if there are organizations that are willing to take this, try it out, see that they are still close to as productive. But if it means that hiring is twice as easy, that is absolutely...especially if it is able to double your ability to hire, that is incredibly valuable or retention similarly. If you can increase retention or if you can make it easier to hire, the value of that is so, so high. And it's interesting in my mind because there's sort of a gold rush on that. That's only true for as long as a four-day workweek is a unique benefit of working at the organization. If this is actually the direction that everything's going and eventually everyone's going to settle to that, then if you wait too long to get there, then you're going to miss all the benefits. You're going to miss that particular benefit of it. And so I do wonder, would it be advantageous to organizations...I'm thinking about this now. Maybe this is the thing I have to do. But would it be advantageous to be that organization as early on as possible and try to get ahead of the curve and use that to hire more easily, retain more easily? Now that I say it all out loud, I'm sold. All right. I got to do this. STEPH: Yeah, I think that's a great comparison of where people are going to start to look for those types of benefits. And so, if you are one of the early adopters and you have the four-day workweek or a reduced workweek in general, then people will gravitate towards that benefit. And it's something that people can use to really help with hiring and retention. And yeah, I love it. You are CTO. So you have influence within your company that you could push for the four-day workweek if you think that's what you want to do. And I would be really intrigued to hear how that goes and how you feel if you...well, you've done it before where you've worked four days a week. So applying that to your current situation, how does that feel? CHRIS: Now you're actually holding me accountable to the things that I randomly said in passing. But it's interesting. So we're so early stage, and there's so much small work to do. There's all…oh, got to set up a website. We've got to do this. We've got to build that integration. There's just kind of scrambling to be done. And so there's a certain version in my mind that maybe we're in a period of time where additional hours are actually useful. There's a cost to them. Let's be clear about that. And so how long that will remain true, I'm not sure. I could see a point perhaps down the road where we achieve a little bit closer to steady-state maybe, who knows? It depends on how fast growth is and et cetera, a lot of other things. So I'm not sure that I would actually lead with this experiment myself, given where the organization is at right now. But I could see an organization that's at a little bit more of a steady-state, that's growing more incrementally, that is trying to think really hard about things like hiring and retention. If those were bigger questions in my mind, then I think I would be considering this more pointedly. But for now, I'm like, I kind of just got to do a bunch of stuff. And so my brain is telling me a different story, but it is interesting. I want to interrogate that and be like, brain, why is that the story you have there, huh? Huh? STEPH: I really appreciate what you're saying, though, because that makes sense to me. I understand when you are in that earlier stage, there's enough to do that that feels correct. Versus that added benefit of having a reduced workweek does benefit or could benefit larger companies who are looking to hire more heavily, or they're also concerned about retention or just helping their people address feelings of burnout. So I really appreciate that perspective because that also rings true. So along this whole conversation around wellness and how we can help people work more sustainable hours, there's a particular book that I've read that I've been really excited to share and chat with you about. It's called Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle. It's written by two sisters, Emily and Amelia Nagoski. And they really talk through the impact that stress has on us and then ways to work through that. And specifically, they talk about completing the stress cycle. And I found this incredibly useful for me because I have had weeks where I have just worked hard Monday through Friday. I've gotten to the end of my day Friday, and I'm like, great, I'm done. I've made it. I can just relax. And I walk away from work, and I can't relax. And I'm just like, I feel sick. I feel not good. Like, I thought I would walk away from work, and I would just suddenly feel this halo of relaxation, and everything would be wonderful. But instead, I just feel a bit ill, and I've never understood that until I was reading their book about completing the stress cycle. Have you ever had moments like that? CHRIS: It has definitely happened to me at various points, yes. STEPH: That makes me feel better because I haven't really chatted about this with someone. So until I read this book and I was like, oh, maybe this is a thing, and it's not just me, and this is something that people are experiencing. So to speak more about completing the stress cycle, they really highlight that stress and feelings, capital F feelings, can cause physiological symptoms. And so it's not just something that we are mentally processing, but we are physically processing the stress that we feel. And there's a really big difference between stressors and stress. So a stressor could be something like an unmeetable deadline. It could be family. It could be money concerns. It could be your morning commute, anything that increases your stress level. And during that, there's a very physical process that happens to your body anytime there's a perceived threat. And it's really helpful to us because it's frankly what triggers our fight, flight, or freeze response. And our bodies receive a rush of adrenaline and cortisol, which essentially, if we're using that flight response, that's going to help us run. And a number of the processes in our system will essentially go into a state of hibernation because everything in our body is very focused on helping us run or do the thing that we think is going to save our life in that moment. The problem is our body doesn't know the difference between what's more of a mental threat versus what is a truly physical threat. So this is the difference between your stress and your stressors. So in more of a physical threat, if there's a lion that you are running from, that is the stressor, but then the stress is everything that you still feel after you have run from that lion. So you encounter a lion, you run. You make it back to your group of people where you are safe, and you celebrate, and you dance, and you hug. And that is completing the stress cycle because you are essentially processing all of that stress. And you are telling your body in a body-focused language that I am safe now, and everything is fine. So you can move back, and anything that was in a hibernation state, all of that dump of adrenaline and cortisol can be worked out of your system, and everything can go back to a normal state. Most of us aren't encountering lions, but we do encounter jerks in meetings or really stressful commutes. And whenever we have survived that meeting, or we've gotten through our commute to the other side, we don't have that moment of celebration where we really let our body know that hey, we've made it through that moment of stress, and we are away from that stressor, and we can actually process everything. So if you're interested in this, the book's really great. It talks about ways that you can process that stress and how important it is to do so. Otherwise, it will literally build up in your system, and it can make you sick. And it will manifest in ways that will let us know that we haven't dealt with that stress. And one of the top methods that they recommend is exercise and movement. That's a really great way to let your body know that you are no longer in an unsafe state, and your body can start to relax. There's also a lot of other great ways. Art is a really big one. It could be hugging someone. It could be calling someone that you love. There are a number of ways that you can process it. But I hadn't recognized how important it is that once you have removed yourself from a stressor, that doesn't necessarily just mean you're done, and you can relax. You actually have to go through that physical process, and then you can relax. So I started incorporating that more into my day that when I'm done with work, I always find something to do, and it's typically to go for a walk, or it's go for a run. And I have found that now I really haven't felt that ill-feeling where I'm trying to relax, but I just feel sick. Saying that out loud, I feel like I'm a mess on Fridays. [chuckles] CHRIS: I feel like you're human. It was interesting when you asked the question at the beginning. You were like, "Is this a thing that other people experience?" And my answer was certainly, yes; I have experienced this. I think there's something about me that I think is useful where I don't think I'm special at all on any axis whatsoever. And so whenever there's something that's going on, I'm like, I assume that this is just normal human behavior, which is useful because most of the time it is. And this is the sort of thing where if I'm having a negative experience, I will look to the external world to be like, I'm sure other people have experienced this, and let me pull that in. And I've found that really useful for myself to just be like, I'm not special. There's nothing particularly special about me. So let me go look from the entirety of the internet where people have almost certainly talked about this. And I've not read the book that you're describing here, but it does sound like it does a great job of describing this. There is a blog post that I found that has stayed in the back of my mind and informed a little bit of my day-to-day approach to this sort of thing which is a blog post by Cal Newport, who I think at this point we've mentioned him a handful of times on the show. But the title of the post is Drastically Reduce Stress with a Work Shutdown Ritual. And it's this very interesting little post where he talks about at the end of your day; you want to close the book on it. I think this is especially pointed now that many of us are working from home. For me, this is a new thing. And so, I've been very intentional with trying to put walks at the beginning and end of my day. But in this particular blog post, he describes a routine that he does where he tidies things up and makes his list for the next day. And then he has a particular phrase that he says, which is "schedule shut down, complete." And it's a sort of nonsense phrase. It doesn't even quite make sense grammatically, but it's his phrase that he internalized, and somehow this became his almost mantra for the end of the day. And now when he does it, that's like his all right, okay, turned off the brain, and now I can walk away. I know that I've said the phrase, and I only say the phrase when I have properly set things up. And so it's this weird structure that he's built in his mind. But it totally works to quiet those voices that are like, yeah, but what about…Do we think about…Do we complete…And he's got now this magic phrase that he can say. And so I've really loved that. For myself, I haven't gotten quite to that level, but I've definitely built the here's how I wind down at the end of the day. Here's what I do with lists and what I do so that I can ideally walk away comfortably. Again, this is one of those situations where I sound like I know what I'm doing or have my act together. This is aspirational me. Day-to-day me is a hot mess like everybody else. [laughs] And this is just what I...when I do this, I feel better. Most of the time, I don't do this because I forget it, or because I'm busy, or because I'm stressed, [chuckles], and so I don't do the thing that reduces stress, you know, human stuff. But I really enjoyed that post. STEPH: I haven't heard that one. I like a lot of Cal Newport's work, but I haven't read that particular blog post. Yeah, I think the idea of completing the stress cycle has helped me tremendously because by giving it a name like completing the stress cycle has been really helpful for me because working out is important to me. It's something that I enjoy, but it's also one of those things that's easy to get bumped. It is part of my wellness routine. And so, if I'm really busy, then I will bump it from the list. And then it's something that then doesn't get addressed. But recognizing that this is also important to my productivity, not to just this general idea of wellness, has really helped me recenter how important this is and to make sure that I recognize hey, it's been a stressful day. I need to get up and move. That is a very important part of my day. It is not just part of an exercise routine, but this is something that I need to do to close out my day to then make sure I have a great day tomorrow. So bringing it back, it's been a week that's been filled with a lot of discussions around burnout and then ways that we can measure it and then also address it. And I've really enjoyed reading this book. So I'll be sure to drop a link in the show notes. On that note, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Schedule shut down, complete. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeeeeeee!!! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

This Week in Tech (MP3)
TWiT 841: Dancing Bullwinkle - iPhone 13, iPad Mini, Microsoft Surface preview, Inspiration4

This Week in Tech (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 154:20


iPhone 13, iPad Mini, Microsoft Surface preview, Inspiration4 The Moose and the Showgirl. Arctic Adventure! Apple's iPhone 13 sports better battery and improved cameras, starting at $799. Apple unveils redesigned iPad Mini with an 8.3-inch display and 5G connectivity. Apple Watch Series 7 delivers larger screens and more durability. iPhone 13's cinematic mode will let you manipulate focus like a pro. Tim Cook Faces Surprising Employee Unrest at Apple. Supply chains, labor costs, consumer apathy: Why 'Made in America' is a tricky idea to sell. What Amazon's $18 average hourly wage means for other employers. Amazon fights high warehouse turnover with offer of free college tuition. OpenSea confirms executive used insider knowledge when buying NFTs. YouTube takes down the Ig Nobel show because of a 1914 recording. Facebook Knows Instagram Is Toxic for Teen Girls, Company Documents Show. Instagram chief faces backlash after an awkward comparison between cars and social media safety. How Facebook Hobbled Mark Zuckerberg's Bid to Get America Vaccinated. The Week Nicki Minaj's Cousin's Friend's Balls Dominated Twitter. Facebook's first smart glasses are the Ray-Ban Stories Google and Apple, Under Pressure From Russia, Remove Voting App Telegram Messenger Blocks Navalny's Bot During Vote. Inspiration4 Astronauts Beam After Return From 3-Day Journey to Orbit. Tesla will open controversial FSD beta software to owners with a good driving record. Surface Pro 8 leaks with 120Hz display and Thunderbolt support. Galaxy Fold-style Pixel foldable, 'Jumbojack,' spotted in Android 12.1. Woolly mammoths could walk the Earth again by 2027 if CRISPR startup succeeds. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Devindra Hardawar, Jason Hiner, and Harry McCracken Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit wealthfront.com/twit podium.com/twit CrowdStrike.com/twit