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  • 270PODCASTS
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  • Aug 20, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about bursts

Latest podcast episodes about bursts

Deep Fat Fried
Spontaneous Human Combustion: Is it Real?

Deep Fat Fried

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 33:00


Without warning, and without any obvious source of ignition a living human being BURSTS into flames hot enough to reduce their body into ash. Yet, combustible items nearby or even in direct contact with their bodies are largely unaffected by the fire. These are the conditions of a ghastly phenomenon with no definitive explanation. Let's answer your burning questions about spontaneous human combustion on today's episode of Deep Fat Fried.

19 Nocturne Boulevard
19 Nocturne Boulevard's THE THRICE TOLLED BELL (reissue)

19 Nocturne Boulevard

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 40:13


Reissue of one of 19 Nocturne's earliest episodes (from October 2008). Includes notes from Julie about the history and making of 19 Nocturne Boulevard.  (transcript below cast list) THE THRICE TOLLED BELL (TW:  Insensitive archaic references and representations of people who might be in a "sanitarium".) An homage to classic Hammer films. Cast List Dracula - Bryan Hendrickson Van Helsing - Rick Lewis Wallace - Gene Thorkildsen Dr. Pettigrew -      Michael Faigenblum Miranda Locksley -      Rhys Torres-Miller Dr. Trevalian -      Mathias Rebne-Morgan Mrs. Farge - Molly Tollefson Gorvi - Joel Harvey Britt - Julie Hoverson Nurse - Krystal Baker MUSIC All works composed by Harlan Glotzer (© 2008) [BMI] {harglo@gmail.com} Concertina - Harlan Glotzer Violoncello - Rachael Beaver & Tracy Hagen Toy Piano - Dana Wen & Roger Nelson Clavichord - Dana Wen     Toy-Box Trio (http://www.myspace.cpm/toyboxtrio) toyboxtrio@gmail.com Voices recorded with the assistance of Ryan Hirst of Neohoodoo Studio Editing and Sound:   Julie Hoverson Assistant Director:  Reynaud LeBoeuf 19 Nocturne Theme Music:  Kevin MacLeod     (Incompetech.com) Cover Photo:   Vickie Mathews              (courtesy of Stock Xchange.com) "What kind of a place is it? Why it's an Edwardian insane asylum, can't you tell?" __________________________________________________ THE THRICE TOLLED BELL intro   This was one of the first ten episodes of 19 Nocturne Boulevard that I made and put out, back in late 2008.  I can't recall, specifically, what order I made them in. I've mentioned previously that Brokensea audio hosted a new spooky episode every day in October for a big spooky month event, and several of my first batch of episodes debuted during that event. But this episode, in particular, is literally attributable to Bill Hollweg, the master of disaster of Brokensea, he who will ever be missed.  In the couple of months leading up to the October event, he posted a challenge to all comers, to write him a script with the following parameters: It must be in the style of a Hammer Studios Dracula film (the 1960s-70s classics that starred the mesmerizing Christopher Lee); It may only include Dracula and Van Helsing (no other Hammer standard characters or monsters); and It must include a broken bell, a wooden leg, and use the line "It's never done that before!" ...To the best of my memory, anyway. So I sat down and wrote The Thrice Tolled Bell, but then didn't want to give the script up to anyone else!  I don't recall if he had any other entries, but Bill took it all with a roaring laugh and loved what I made. I loved including the stock types of characters - the lunkheaded servant; the straight-laced housekeeper; and the sexy chick played by (in this case) my best Britt Eckland voice.  I even snuck in an obviously semi-nude scene, just because I could, and it fit the genre. This was also my first attempt at commissioning music, since for once I couldn't find *quite* what I wanted among the massive catalog (even back then) of Kevin MacLeod of Incompetech.com, who I can never thank enough for what he makes available for beginning and not for profit storytellers of all kinds.  I don't recall much of the process, but I got one piece of music that I used bits of throughout and it was quite effective. When I was casting this piece, I still had a limited pool to draw from, since I was trying to stay local and work mainly with people I could actually direct in the studio.  One of my actors, Beverly Poole, was still in high school, and the doctors in this piece were some of her classmates.  But I needed the right voice for Mrs. Farge, the irascible housekeeper. I was still seeking when I went to Beverly's school play Twelfth Night (which did a lot of gender cross casting, and Beverly played Malvolio to extreme hilarity), and the voice of Fabian (pretty sure that was the role) struck me and after the play I caught up with Beverly and shouted (well, not shouted, but it was excited and urgent) "Bring me that voice!" and Molly Tollefson was recruited, accent and all. I've never cared much for auditions.  Either doing them or holding them.  It's just me.  I'd always rather grab an actor I've heard, or recruit someone from a show I like than have to evaluate from a bunch of recorded voices.  Plus, I hate being "mean" and having to turn everyone else down. ____________________________________________________ SCRIPT THE THRICE TOLLED BELL (an homage to Hammer Studio horror films)   TW:  disrespectful references to sanitarium patients and a "halfwit" character, in keeping with the time the script is set as well as the general character types of the Hammer Films franchise.  ...also nudity.   Cast (All various British accents except Dracula): Dracula (M), immortal vampire Van Helsing (M), Vampire Hunter Dr. Michael Pettigrew (20s/M), new head of the asylum Miranda Locksley(20s/F), Pettigrew's nurse/fiancée Mrs. Farge (30s/F), housekeeper Gorvi (30s/M), trustee Wallace (40s/M), cheery orderly Dr. Trevalien (40s/M), rival Britt Mecklin (20s/F), hapless blonde Nurse (F any) OLIVIA      What do you mean, what kind of a place is it?  Why, it's an Edwardian asylum, can't you tell?  MUSIC SOUND      HEAVY DOOR CRASHES SHUT SOUND     FOOTSTEPS - ONE SET LIMPS ODDLY WALLACE     Right through here - sir, miss.  Now this is one of the saddest cases we have, sir, truth be told.  Once he was the finest psychiatric mind in Europe - perhaps even the world.  MICHAEL     Always tragic when a good mind snaps.  The same fire that feeds genius also devours and leaves madness in its wake. WALLACE     Yessir. MIRANDA     What sort of madness does he suffer from? WALLACE     Miss?  I dunno that I should-- MICHAEL     Go ahead, Wallace.  Miss Locksley is not merely my fiancée, but a very competent and highly trained psychiatric nurse.  We will be working in tandem to try and bring my late father's asylum into the 20th century. MIRANDA     [sadly] From what I've seen, it will take quite some doing. WALLACE     [stiff] Sir, I dunno 'bout that, but your father was a very good and brilliant man - though the last ten years or so, since your mother died, begging your pardon, sir, he seemed to lose interest in everything. MICHAEL     Did he - not even treat the patients? WALLACE      He left much of that in the hands of Dr. Trevalian.  MICHAEL     Why did he not send for me?  I could have spent my residency here instead of in Budapest.  I could certainly have learned as much from father as I did from Dr. Bulovic! WALLACE     Sir, if you don't mind me speaking above me place, I think your father - well, he didn't want you to see him... like that. MICHAEL     But I might have been able to help him! WALLACE     I don't think naught could have helped him - not at the end, there.  MICHAEL     [British agony] He should have sent for me. MIRANDA     Dearest.  He did what he thought was best.  I'm sure your father thought very highly of you - otherwise, why should he have left this institution under your care? MICHAEL     Of course, you're right.  [condescending] Always the practical one. MIRANDA     One of us needs to be, and you must save your energy for the needs of the patients. MICHAEL     Well, show us this paragon, Wallace. WALLACE     Sir? MICHAEL     The doctor you say was so sadly struck down. WALLACE     Oh, yes sir - sad it is to see great men crumble.  SOUND     KNOCK ON HUGE IRON BOUND DOOR WALLACE     Herr Doktor?  Young Doctor Pettigrew wishes to speak with you. VAN HELSING     [muffled, behind the door] Enter. WALLACE     Ah.  Here we go, then.  SOUND     OPENING LOCKS AND BARS ON DOOR WALLACE     Dr. Pettigrew, Miss Locksley--  [ta-da!] Doctor Van Helsing. MUSIC GORVI     Gorvi done mopping.  Gorvi eat now? MRS. FARGE     Tis not dinner time yet, ye pillock.  Yer s'posed to muck out the barn t'make room for that motorcar the new head brought wi' 'im. GORVI     Mo-to-cah?  What is mo-to-cah? MRS. FARGE     An engine of Satan.  If god had wanted us to speed about in great smoking heaps of metal, he wouldn'a made horses. GORVI     [wail] Gorvi hungry! MRS. FARGE     Off wi' ye!  I've no time for this today - must have everything ready for inspection by the new head.  And here's hoping he doesna choose to sack us all.  Shoo! SOUND     GORVI LEAVES - HEAVY FOOTSTEPS, RICKETY DOOR OPENS, CLOSES AMBIANCE     OUTSIDE BRITT     [off, barely audible, singing]  When that I was and a little tiny boy-- GORVI     [leering chuckle] SOUND     FOOTSTEPS ON GRASS SPEED UP GORVI     Pretty pretty britty.  Pretty... golden... BRITT     With a hey-ho, the wind and the rain-- SOUND     FINGERS SQUEAK ACROSS GLASS, TINY WINDOW SLIDES OPEN - SINGING IS NOW CLEAR, WITH SLOSHING OF WATER, BATHING GORVI     Oh-ho! BRITT     A foolish thing was but a toy, for the rain it raineth every day... GORVI     [smothering his delighted chuckles] SOUND     DRIPPING AS A LEG IS RAISED OUT THE WATER.  BRUSH SCRUBS BRITT     Hey-ho, the wind and the rain, for the rain it raineth every day... GORVI     [Bursts out with a shriek of delight] BRITT     What?  [gasps]  Oh no! SOUND     HEAVY FOOTSTEPS RUNNING ON GRAVEL GORVI     [breathing heavily]  No scream, no scream.  Gorvi not bad.  No scream, pretty Britty. SOUND     SHIFT TO INSIDE BRITT     [screams piercingly] SOUND     [INSIDE] DOOR OPENS, FEET RUSH IN NURSE     What is it miss? BRITT     Someone was looking at me!  A man! NURSE     [condescending, fading out]  Of course.  Don't you worry.  We'll sort it all out... SOUND     SHIFT TO OUTSIDE SOUND     GORVI RUNNING GORVI     [panting with exertion] SOUND     OPENS HUGE OLD DOOR, RUNS IN MUSIC MICHAEL     After Wallace's admonitions, this is hardly what I expected. VAN HELSING     I am quite aware of my condition, my dear doctor Pettigrew.  You're fortunate enough to catch me on a good day.  MICHAEL     Perhaps you would indulge me with your own diagnosis? VAN HELSING     Simple, really.  Bouts of severe depression, which, I am ashamed to admit, I... treat... unsuccessfully... with over-use of alcohol. MICHAEL     Dipsomania? VAN HELSING     I would consider it more a symptom than a core disease, but you understand how difficult it is to be objective. MICHAEL      I appreciate your frankness. MIRANDA     I trust you are comfortable here, doctor - this is hardly a typical cell.  More like a suite in an expensive hotel. VAN HELSING     Dr. Pettigrew - the elder - was very kind, and understood that reading... helps me to ...moderate... my humors. MICHAEL     If only more patients could respond to such simple, constructive therapies.  [chuckles] VAN HELSING     [slight chuckle, indulgent] MIRANDA     The human mind is a fabulous, complex organ.  VAN HELSING     It is amazing. MUSIC AMBIANCE     ECHOEY ROOM - ABANDONED CHURCH GORVI     [muttering] Pretty pretty.  Gorvi likes pretty golden Britt.  [heavy sigh]   Britty no like Gorvi.  Gorvi only look. DRACULA     [creepy echoey voice]  Do you want her? GORVI     Who... is there?  Please? DRACULA     [creepy echoey voice]  Help me, and I shall help you in return. GORVI     Where are you?  Gorvi is alone? DRACULA     [creepy echoey voice]  Return later and bring a shovel.  I shall show myself. GORVI     You - new doctor? DRACULA     [creepy echoey voice]  Do you want this pretty Britt you long for? GORVI     Oh, want!  [licks his lips]  Yes. MUSIC AMBIANCE     DINNER NOISES SOUND     LARGE PLATTER SET DOWN MIRANDA     [cold] Thank you, Mrs. Farge.  SOUND     FOOTSTEPS TAP AWAY MIRANDA     [anxious]  Are you certain you want to do this, Michael?   I realize your father-- TREVALIAN     They expect it, even look forward to it.  Besides, they should be given the chance to meet the two of you.  You needn't worry, it is only the most stable of the inmates. SOUND     FEET RETURN MRS. FARGE     [announcing] Miss Mecklin. TREVALIAN     Miss Locksley, Dr. Pettigrew, may I present Miss Britt Mecklin. BRITT     Pleased to meet you, Doctor.  Miss Locksley. MICHAEL     Charmed. MIRANDA     Lovely. TREVALIAN     Will you have a seat? SOUND     CHAIRS SHIFT AS HE SEATS HER, THEN THEY SIT MIRANDA     It would be somewhat indelicate to discuss cases during dinner.  There will be time tomorrow to familiarize ourselves-- MICHAEL     Of course. BRITT     I have nothing to hide.  I have come to realize that it is only in my subconscious that people watch me.  Understanding it is all in my head does not stop it from frightening me, but makes it more bearable. MICHAEL     [reassuring] We shall work on that. MUSIC AMBIANCE     STORMY NIGHT OUTSIDE ECHOEY STONE ROOM SOUND     SQUEAKY DOOR OPENS, GORVI'S FOOTSTEPS GORVI     Gorvi brings shovel! DRACULA     [creepy echoey voice]  Have you light? GORVI     Gorvi have a candle. DRACULA     Do you see the bell? GORVI     Bell?  DRACULA     The bell.  You must move the bell. GORVI     No bell.  Gorvi see no bell. DRACULA     It is metal.  It is large.  Move it, or I shall unleash the fires of hell upon you! GORVI     Ahhhhh! SOUND     SHOVEL CLATTERS TO FLOOR, FEET RUN, SLAM MUSIC SOUND     WATER INTO METAL TUB.  DISHES BEING WASHED SOUND     DOOR SLAMS OPEN MRS. FARGE     Don't you dare--! [surprised] Oh! Lucas! TREVALIAN     Lena.  I simply couldn't take it any more.  Having to kow-tow to that ... boy doctor and his miserable cold fiancée. MRS. FARGE     Lucas.  You shoulda been put in charge! TREVALIAN     I know.  [snarl] Blood runs thick.  MRS. FARGE     Dr. Pettigrew shouldna've looked over yuir years o'loyalty - Yuir unstinting devotion! TREVALIAN     There's no time for that now.  We must bide and see what they decide to alter -- SOUND     BACK DOOR SLAMS OPEN, GORVI RUNS IN MRS. FARGE     What the divvil is wrong with ye, y'idiot? Running about in the rain like a madman! TREVALIAN     Calm yourself, Lena. MRS. FARGE     Tis easy for ye to be charitable.  Ye dinna haveta squeeze work outta him like blood from a turnip.  Turnip!  That's what y'are! GORVI     Gorvi not turnip.  Gorvi scared. TREVALIAN     What frightened you? MRS. FARGE     [over her shoulder] Perhaps a slight breeze. TREVALIAN     Shh.  Gorvi, tell me everything. MUSIC SOUND     VAN HELSING'S DOOR UNLOCKS, OPENS VAN HELSING     Right on time. WALLACE     'Ave I ever missed?  SOUND     DOOR SHUTS, WOODEN LEG FOOTSTEPS WALLACE     Were it a good idea, d'yer think, to tell them you was an alcoholic?  VAN HELSING     I needed a reason for my presence here that wouldn't require overmuch explanation.  Speaking of spirits, have you--? WALLACE     [chuckling]  'Course.  Would I let yer down? SOUND     SITS.  ODD, HEAVY UNSCREWING NOISE VAN HELSING     Your thoughts on the new administrators? WALLACE     Well, 'e'll never 'ave an 'appy life, not wit' that one.  She's cold, and no mistake. VAN HELSING     Truer words were never said. WALLACE     'Ee seems... well-intentioned... but I don't see 'ow you'll be able to tell 'im much.  Not wi'out proof. SOUND     BOTTLE PULLED OUT OF WOODEN SHELL WALLACE     And there y'are.  Better use for me wooden leg, I'll never know.  [hinting] 'Cept the one... SOUND     BOTTLE OPENS VAN HELSING     Care to stay for a game of chess before you strap it back on? WALLACE     Don't mind if I do. MUSIC AMBIANCE     STORMY NIGHT GORVI     There door.  Gorvi no go in again. TREVALIAN     In the old chapel?  Dr. Pettigrew always insisted it was on the verge of falling in.  [sigh, to Gorvi]  Not safe.  No go in. GORVI     He say Gorvi move bell.  He yell at Gorvi. TREVALIAN     Poor halfwit.  TREVALIAN     Run along back to the kitchen, Gorvi.  No need to wait out here in the wet. GORVI     Doctor be careful! TREVALIAN     Of course.  Go on. SOUND     GORVI RUNS OFF SOUND     SQUEAKY OLD DOOR OPENS TENTATIVELY TREVALIAN     Hmm.  Sounder than I expected. SOUND     DOOR SHUTS, MUFFLES SOUND OF RAIN SOUND     TAP ON WALL TREVALIAN     Here's the shovel-- SOUND     PICKS UP SHOVEL TREVALIAN     And that must be the bell... SOUND     SLOW FOOTSTEPS TREVALIAN     That explains a lot - who's ever seen a huge bell sitting on the floor?  Hardly even recognizable under all those cobwebs.  Must have fallen... DRACULA     [creepy distant whisper, piteous]  Help me. TREVALIAN     Hello? DRACULA     Help.  Please.  The bell.  It came down and trapped me. TREVALIAN     I see.  Hmm.  [thinking]  Wait, the cracks in the flags below it are... covered in dust - that bell fell ages ago! DRACULA     Please.  Help. TREVALIAN     Where could that voice be coming from? DRACULA     [closer whisper, becomes command]  Move the bell.  Anything you want - it will be yours. TREVALIAN     I doubt you could give me what I truly want. DRACULA     Oh, yes.  I can give you such things....  Come, close to the crack in the bell, and tell me what it is you... crave. MUSIC MICHAEL     Darling? MIRANDA     Yes, Michael? MICHAEL     Do you think you can stick it here? MIRANDA     Of course.  You know I'm fully prepared to take on anything you need me to do. MICHAEL     I know, but - well, you won't hate it or anything, living in the country like this? MIRANDA     I shall immerse myself in work.  Just as you will.  Side by side. MICHAEL     Should I--  May I-- sit next to you there on the settee, then? MIRANDA     Michael!  We are to be wed in the spring.  I just want to make certain - living here without a proper chaperone, and all--  MICHAEL     Of course, darling.  I - I think I shall turn in.  Get an early start in the morning. MIRANDA     That sounds very wise. SOUND     TAP ON DOOR MIRANDA     Yes? SOUND     DOOR OPENS, MRS. FARGE ENTERS, PICKS UP TRAY MRS. FARGE     Did ye need anything further tonight? MIRANDA     No, we were--- SOUND     IN THE DISTANCE, A BELL TOLLS SOUND     TRAY CLATTERS TO FLOOR MRS. FARGE     [gasp!] MICHAEL     Why Mrs. Farge, whatever is the matter? MRS. FARGE     [haunted]  That be the bell up t'old kirk.  MICHAEL     Come, now, it's never done that before? MRS. FARGE     [ominous] Nay - I've been here nigh on 15 years, and that bell has nivver rung. SOUND     FOOTSTEPS AWAY MRS. FARGE     [slightly off] But I wouldna go seeking it - not even if m'very life depended on it. MUSIC VAN HELSING     [considering]  Mmm.  Check. SOUND     BELL TOLLS IN THE DISTANCE WALLACE     Wazzat? VAN HELSING     What? WALLACE     [worried] The bell - don't you hear it? VAN HELSING     Nonsense.  Hmm....  Go and check it.  If it is, we might have a problem on our hands. SOUND     BELL TOLLS IN THE DISTANCE WALLACE     I'll get going-- SOUND     QUICKLY STRAPPING LEG BACK ON VAN HELSING     Wait!  Just in case. SOUND     BOTTLE SLOSHES WALLACE     Is it--? VAN HELSING     It should help. WALLACE     Every bit does.  Leave the door open, shall I? MUSIC BRITT     [waking]  Eyes!  Someone at the window?  [muttered] I will not go look.  I will not-- SOUND     TAPPING AT THE WINDOW DRACULA     [creepy voice]  Open the window that I may bask in your radiance. BRITT     [breathing heavily, bosom heaving] It is not real.  I must take my solace in the lord. SOUND     OPENS DRAWER, TAKES OUT BIBLE BRITT     God, please give me strength! SOUND     SOMETHING FLAPS AWAY INTO THE NIGHT, ANNOYED MUSIC MICHAEL     Are you certain you'll be all right?  I could bring in a cot - there's a couch in my dressing room--? MIRANDA     No, Michael, I will be fine.  Kiss me quickly and go to bed. SOUND     QUICK KISS MIRANDA     Sleep well. SOUND     DOOR SHUTS MIRANDA     [sighs]   Men.  [chuckles]  SOUND     RAP AT THE WINDOW, BUT SHE DOESN'T NOTICE DRACULA     [distant, creepy, heavy breathing]  Yessss. SOUND     LETS HER HAIR DOWN, BEGINS TO REMOVE CLOTHES MIRANDA     [humming to herself] SOUND     HEAVY GOWN LAID ON THE BACK OF A CHAIR SOUND     STEPS APPROACH THE WINDOW SOUND     TAPPING SOUNDS ON THE GLASS DRACULA     [creepy whisper]  Open the window. MIRANDA     Hmm?  MIRANDA     How vexing.  Tree branch?  We'll see about that--! SOUND     LATCH TURNS MUSIC MIRANDA      [Off, scream!] MICHAEL     Good god! SOUND     FLINGS OFF BEDCLOTHES, FOOTSTEPS MICHAEL     [calling] Miranda!  Darling!  I'll be right there! SOUND     DOOR FLINGS OPEN, A FEW STEPS.  DOORKNOB RATTLES, POUNDING ON THE DOOR MICHAEL     [frantic]  Miranda!  Open the door! SOUND     KNOCKING MICHAEL     I'm coming in! SOUND     HEAVY THUMP MIRANDA     [calling from behind the door, spooky sounding]  Michael?  Whatever are you doing? MICHAEL     Are - are you - all right? SOUND     DOORKNOB RATTLES MIRANDA     [close now] Of course, darling.  I woke from a... strange dream.  Nothing to fret over. MICHAEL     [off] If... you're... quite certain. MIRANDA     When am I not? MICHAEL     [off] Well.  Sorry.  I-- MIRANDA     Go back to bed, dear.  We'll talk tomorrow. SOUND     [off] MICHAEL'S FOOTSTEPS RECEDE MIRANDA     [long sigh]  Well...? DRACULA     [husky] Very good, my most delectable one... SOUND     SEXY NECK NIBBLING MIRANDA     [ecstatic gasp] MUSIC SOUND     WOODEN LEG STEPS SOUND     BRISK KNOCK ON A DOOR WALLACE     Doctor, sir?  It's morning, it is. MICHAEL     Come on in, Wallace.  I'm up.  SOUND     DOOR OPENS, STEPS APPROACH MICHAEL     Is Miranda-- Miss Locksley up? WALLACE     Feeling poorly, she says.  Wooden even 'ave the drapes open.  Travel don't suit 'er? MICHAEL     Hmm.  I suppose I might breakfast with Dr. Trevalian, then. WALLACE     I ain't sure where 'e can be found, sir.  Went out last night and ain't come back.  MICHAEL     Does he do that often? WALLACE     Can't say, sir. MICHAEL     [sigh]  I hate to breakfast alone. WALLACE       Ahem, sir.  Doctor Van Helsing would be glad of your company. MUSIC MRS. FARGE     Gorvi!  Gorvi! Where is that bloody idiot? SOUND      DOOR OPENS GORVI     [whimper] MRS. FARGE     What the divvil is wrong wit' ye, ye mongrel?  Get out here! GORVI     [whimpering]  Gorvi no like! MRS. FARGE     Gorvi like breakfast? GORVI     Yes.  Please. MRS. FARGE     Gorvi will get up and work, then! GORVI     Aye, Mrs. Farge. MRS. FARGE     Go fetch some water from the well, ye brute - and while you're out, you might look where you last left Lucas-- Dr. Trevalien, that is - and see wha' he's been up to all night. GORVI     No!  No go to old door!  No! MRS. FARGE     I'll get the whip! GORVI     [whimper] SOUND     SCUTTLES OUT THE DOOR MUSIC SOUND     VAN HELSING'S DOOR OPENS VAN HELSING     Come in, dear fellow!  Wallace? WALLACE     [leans in] Yessir? VAN HELSING     [muttered] The chapel? WALLACE     [muttered] Never made it, sir, the inmates was restless last night. VAN HELSING     Today then? WALLACE     Better anyway.  [significant]  Better light. VAN HELSING     I hope so. SOUND     MICHAEL ENTERS MICHAEL     Sorry?  Do you mind if I sit down with you? VAN HELSING     Never meant to exclude you, dear boy.  Simply thought I'd heard something last night that couldn't have been. MICHAEL     The bell? VAN HELSING     You heard it as well? MICHAEL     Of course.  Why? VAN HELSING     Would you do me an enormous favor? MICHAEL     If I can - I have a busy day ahead of me, and Miranda's - a bit under the weather. VAN HELSING     Soon as we finish here, then, go along with Wallace to the old chapel.  Take a look at the bell.  Would you? MICHAEL     Why? VAN HELSING     [considers]  Hmm.  That's a tale for after you've looked.  [changing tone, chatty]  Do you, by any chance, play chess? MUSIC SOUND     KNOCK ON THE DOOR MIRANDA     [dead tired] Go away! MRS. FARGE     Dinna want to start organizing everything? MIRANDA     Oh, blast.  SOUND     STUMBLING FEET, DOOR OPENS MIRANDA     Can you help me?  I feel weak as a kitten. MRS. FARGE     You do look a wee bit pale.  I'll fetch something hearty to drink. MIRANDA     [shudder] I couldn't face anything heavy. MUSIC AMBIANCE     OUTSIDE SOUND     WALLACE AND MICHAEL WALKING OUT TO CHAPEL MICHAEL     Humoring a delusion is not the right answer - in most cases. WALLACE     You 'eard the bell, too, sir. MICHAEL     But why go look at a bloody bell? SOUND     DOOR CREAKS OPEN WALLACE     Come along, then. SOUND     FOOTSTEPS GO IN, SLOW, THEN STOP SOUND     DOOR SHUTS WALLACE     [quiet but fervent] Oh, my gracious lord. MICHAEL     What is it?  Oh!  That must have been-- SOUND     DASHING FORWARD MICHAEL     [urgent] Help me move it! WALLACE     I fear it's too late for Dr. Trevalian. MICHAEL     Help me! BOTH     [grunting and heaving] SOUND     BELL ROLLS, BUMPS, AND THUMPS INTO A WALL MICHAEL     Good god! WALLACE     Sir? MICHAEL     You're right.  He's gone.  That thing must have fallen and crushed him. WALLACE     Shouldn't there be more blood, sir? MICHAEL     Not necessarily.  We'll get him back to the infirmary and take a look. WALLACE     I'll go for a stretcher, then, shall I? MICHAEL     Just a moment!  Is this the bell we heard? WALLACE     Yes, sir. MICHAEL     [echoey - inside the bell] But there's not even a clapper! WALLACE     'asn't been rung in decades, sir. MICHAEL     What are all these markings on the inside? WALLACE     Wouldn't know, sir.  Though I don't doubt Doctor Van Helsing could 'elp you. MICHAEL     [coming out] Really - why would he--? WALLACE     I think 'e was 'ere when the bell fell, sir. MICHAEL     It must have been sitting here - the clear circle on the ground - but this is odd-- MUSIC SOUND     DOOR BURSTS OPEN, MICHAEL STORMS IN MICHAEL     I demand an explanation.  Who, precisely, was trapped under that bell? VAN HELSING     [calm] What? MICHAEL     I saw the marks of fingernails!  Trying to scratch a way out!  Wallace said you were there, along with my father.  I want to know what you did. VAN HELSING     Sit.  [up]  Wallace? WALLACE     Yes, Sir? VAN HELSING     Please check on the residents, particularly any comely females. SOUND     WALLACE GOES OUT, SHUTS DOOR CAREFULLY VAN HELSING     Now, my boy... MICHAEL     You're not "mad" at all, are you?  You've lived here all this time-- VAN HELSING     Shh. Shh.  You need to hear this.  15 years ago, your father called upon my services to help him with a rather difficult problem - a rash of unusual deaths and nightmares among the female inmates.  Having had a great deal of experience with such obsessions and delusions, I was able to spot the problem immediately - a vampire. MICHAEL     [incredulous] A vampire?  One who believes he must steal life from the living?  VAN HELSING     No delusion - a true creature of the night. MICHAEL     Preposterous! VAN HELSING     Humor an old man.  This was not just any vampire, but Dracula - the lord of all vampires, whom I have sworn to destroy.  MICHAEL     But the bell? VAN HELSING     We trapped him.  Blessings etched on the inside - some from when it called the faithful, others we added - kept him penned.  Simply putting a stake through his heart, as would do for most vampires, is not sufficient for Dracula.  Far too simple for those who follow the dark arts to summon him back across the dark divide! MICHAEL     But there must be a way-- VAN HELSING     What do you think I have been researching all these years?  I believe I have the answer, but first we must locate him. MICHAEL     Why should I believe any of this? VAN HELSING     Ask your fiancée. MUSIC MRS. FARGE     Let me fetch the doctor. BRITT     Yes.  You can't be too careful! MIRANDA     [trying to be strong] Nonsense.  I'm just tired.  I'm... not used to the country. BRITT     Someone was looking into my room last night. MRS. FARGE     Nonsense.  You know that's all in your mind. BRITT     No, it was real!  Eyes.  At the window. MIRANDA     Red eyes? BRITT     You saw them too? MIRANDA     [evasive] Don't be silly.  How could it be? SOUND     DOOR BURSTS OPEN, FEET DASH IN, THEN STOP MIRANDA     [gasp] MICHAEL     Oh, goodness.  I'm sorry, but darling, there's something I must ask-- VAN HELSING     [coming on, commanding]  Remove that scarf and show us your neck, if you please. MIRANDA     [gasps and faints noisily] SOUND     BODY DROP MUSIC VAN HELSING     --resting normally.  Despite the slight anemia, she should recover.  We must watch her very closely, though, my young friend. MICHAEL     How could this have happened?  Miranda is the most sensible of women-- VAN HELSING     Does it take a fanciful mind to be attacked by a rabid dog?  No!  In fact, a more fanciful mind is often better prepared to ward off such evil.  Witness Miss Mecklin. BRITT     Me? VAN HELSING     What did he say to you, at your window? BRITT     It was just noises - scratching. VAN HELSING     Come now, there were words - if not in your ears, then in your mind, were there not? BRITT     [sniffling] It's my subconscious.  Not real. VAN HELSING     This time, I'm afraid, is much different.  You must help us. BRITT     He just said "open the window".  VAN HELSING     But it was definitely a "he?" BRITT     It is always men who are watching me. VAN HELSING     Did he say where he might hide by day? BRITT     No.  I am so sorry! VAN HELSING     Never mind.  You did well.  Keep your bible close tonight. BRITT     Oh, yes! MUSIC GORVI     [muttering]  No more for Gorvi.  He will sleep now.  No more work.  Gorvi will-- SOUND     DOOR OPENS, QUICK STRUGGLE DRACULA     [hissing whisper]  Silence! GORVI     [hand over his mouth]  Mmm! DRACULA     Shut the door. SOUND     DOOR SHUTS DRACULA     You did not release me, but I can overlook that, if you will serve me now. GORVI     [muffled] Mm-hm! [yes] DRACULA     Good.  I still know what you want.  The oh-so-lovely miss Britt. GORVI     [muffled] Mm-hm! [eager yes] DRACULA     Then this is what you must do... MUSIC SOUND     DOORS BEING LOCKED, WINDOW SHUTTERS SECURED VAN HELSING     I appreciate your humoring me, Michael. MICHAEL     Of course. VAN HELSING     Bringing everyone here to my rooms. MICHAEL     I assume you think we may be safe here? VAN HELSING     As safe as anywhere else. MIRANDA     How can we all sleep? VAN HELSING     You may lie on the couch, if you need to.  Michael and I will remain awake.  On guard. BRITT     I can help guard as well. VAN HELSING     Did you bring your bible? BRITT     I could not find it! VAN HELSING     Never mind, I think we have whatever we may need.  Wallace? WALLACE     [grim] Absolutely, sir. MICHAEL     What if he doesn't come here? VAN HELSING     He must.  I circled the patient rooms and staff quarters with poppy seeds and salt.  He will never get across that.  MICHAEL     So he will have to come here, or--? VAN HELSING     --or starve. MUSIC     TIME PASSES VAN HELSING     We can slow him with spells, or stake him through his heart, but to truly banish his soul to the purgatory he so richly deserves, only holy water will suffice - and not a mere sprinkling, a veritable dousing. MUSIC     TIME PASSES VAN HELSING     Vampires are irredeemably evil.  The only way to save miss Locksley from this hellish fate is to destroy this monster before she loses the last spark of humanity.  As long as her soul does not depart her body, she can be saved. MUSIC     TIME PASSES SOUND     MOST ARE SLEEPING VAN HELSING     This will be it.  Are you ready? WALLACE     Can't wait to see how it turns out, sir.  VAN HELSING     Good man. SOUND     KNOCK AT THE DOOR VAN HELSING     Ah...  It begins. GORVI     [muffled] Gorvi is alone?  Let Gorvi in! WALLACE     Bloody idiot. VAN HELSING     You may be more correct than you know.  Wait for my signal.  Michael, wake up, get the ladies into the dressing room, back there.  Whatever you do, do not open the door until you are certain it is morning - you may have to restrain miss Locksley, if Dracula has enough of a hold over her.  Can you? MICHAEL      Yes, I think so. VAN HELSING     Move, then.  There's a good lad. VAN HELSING     Take this-- SOUND     RATTLE OF NECKLACE CHAIN VAN HELSING     It offers some protection. SOUND     CROWD GOES OUT, DOOR SHUTS VAN HELSING     Now. WALLACE     Right.  Gorvi?  Is there anyone with you? GORVI     [muffled, but clearly lying] No.  Who would be with Gorvi? VAN HELSING     [laugh] No one alive.  Throw open the gate. WALLACE     A'right.  Just a moment. SOUND     DOOR THUMPS VAN HELSING     [hissed] Stay back. SOUND     DOOR SLAMS OPEN, HITS WALLACE WALLACE     Uhh! SOUND      BODY DROPS AND SLIDES ACROSS FLOOR VAN HELSING     Wallace! WALLACE     uhh...[out cold] SOUND     HEAVY BOOTS STRIDE CONFIDENTLY INTO ROOM VAN HELSING     Dracula! DRACULA     You stand between me and destiny, old man.  Step aside and I shall kill you quickly. VAN HELSING     Never.  Back, foul fiend! DRACULA     [hisses]  You believe you can tame me?  I have seared my flesh on your so-clever prison walls so many times, I have scars. VAN HELSING     And yet, you do not approach. DRACULA     Only a fool uses his hands to dig when he has a shovel... Gorvi! GORVI     [flying leap] Master! SOUND     BODY DROP - CROSS DROPS VAN HELSING     Unh! DRACULA     [evil laugh]  And now, my most precious enemy, prepare to meet your well-deserved fate! SOUND     DOOR SLAMS OPEN MICHAEL     No! SOUND     MICHAEL STORMS IN VAN HELSING     Dammit, boy!  You've ruined it!  Do what you want with me-- DRACULA     Of course, herr doktor!  You have always cared more for others than for yourself.  [commanding, hot] Come to me, my darling! MIRANDA     [breathless] I must go--! MICHAEL     No!  Get back! BRITT     Miss Miranda, you can't! GORVI     Britt! MIRANDA     [snarling]  Let me pass, strumpet! SOUND     SHORT CATFIGHT MIRANDA     Ugh! [hurling Britt] SOUND     BRITT ENDS UP IN DRAC'S ARMS GORVI     [upset] Britt! DRACULA     A gift?  For me?  You are too kind. MIRANDA     My love!  You don't want her! DRACULA     She is merely the aperitif, my dearest darling - [hot] you alone can satisfy me. MIRANDA     [ecstatic sigh] DRACULA     Now, my pale blonde flower.. BRITT     [struggles for a moment, then goes limp with a sigh, breathing hard] SOUND     FANGY NOISE GORVI     No!  Gorvi wants Britt! VAN HELSING     Wallace!  Ready! DRACULA     Imbecile! SOUND     THUMP AS GORVI HITS DRACULA SOUND     HEAVY THROW, BODY HITS WALL, NECK CRUNCH GORVI     [dying noises] DRACULA     Miranda, show your devotion - come and hold this delectable morsel for me. SOUND     RUNNING FEET WALLACE     Yaaaah! VAN HELSING     Kick him! DRACULA     [very slight] Oof.  WALLACE     [struggling] DRACULA     [chuckles nastily] And now what do you do?  I have your leg. WALLACE     [triumphant] Yes! SOUND     CLICK, SMALL EXPLOSION SOUND     MUCH WATER SPLASHES, HISSING BURNING NOISE DRACULA     What?  No!  [shrieking in agony] Ahhh! MICHAEL     Good God! VAN HELSING     Holy water!.  DRACULA     But how?  I would have seen a bottle.  Ahh! VAN HELSING     Wooden leg.  WALLACE     And a small blasting cap. DRACULA     Ahh! [receding] SOUND     LIQUIDY HORRIBLE PUDDLY NOISE WALLACE     Uh, Sir?  Can I get a hand? VAN HELSING     Certainly.  I'll even give you a leg up. MUSIC END  

Jewishish!
August 16 Thu's brilliant traveling companion bursts in with clarity and insight uncharacteristic of this program.

Jewishish!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 18:22


Thu meanwhile claims that golf isn't purely random. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jewishish/message

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
What are repeated bursts of remote learning doing to schools and education?

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 10:43


Ask any parent, teacher or student about home schooling and chances are they'll tell you it's really difficult. With many regions plunging in and out of remote learning, where is that protracted experience leaving our students?

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E33 - Simon on Reforestation

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 60:17


Episode Notes Margaret talks to Simon, a restoration ecologist who works in the Pacific Northwest, about confronting climate crisis with reforestation, and about hope and resilience in the face of environmental devastation. Simon can be found on twitter @plant_warlock. The host, Margaret Killjoy, can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. You can support her and this show on Patreon at patreon.com/margaretkilljoy. Transcript 1:00:24 Margaret Hello, and welcome to Live Like the World is Dying, your podcast for what feels like the End Times. I'm your host, Margaret Killjoy, and I use she or they pronouns. And this episode I'm excited—I put a call out basically being like, who should I talk to about reforestation and how we can confront climate change through reforestation and, you know, how microclimates affect things, etc. And I am very excited to talk to my guest for this week, Simon, about reforestation. But first, Live Like the World is Dying as a proud member of the Channel Zero Network of Anarchist Podcasts. I tried to go into, pretty neat, y'all heard it, but I tried to go into the radio producer voice but I gave up. We're proud member of the Channel Zero Network of Anarchist Podcasts, and here is a jingle from another show on the network. Da duh daaaa! Jingle Speaker 1 (Scully) Where did you get this? Jingle Speaker 2 (Mulder) Your friendly neighborhood anarchist? Jingle Speaker 3 More of an anarchist militant... Jingle Speaker 4 People involved in social struggles, everybody else. Jingle Speaker 5 People have been waiting for some content. Jingle Speaker 6 Radio. Jingle Speaker 7 The show. Jingle Speaker 8 The Final Straw and I'm William. Jingle Speaker 9 And I'm Bursts of Goodness. Jingle Speaker 8 Thefinalstrawradio.noblogs.org. Margaret Okay, if you could introduce yourself with, I guess, your name, your pronouns, and some of what you do for work professionally that has led you to end up on this podcast talking about this issue. Simon Hi Margaret, thanks for having me. My name is Simon Apostle. And I've been a restoration ecologist working primarily in Oregon and Washington for the past decade or so. And a lot of my work has focused on reforestation projects, I guess would be an easy way to describe them to lay people, but really I'm a general practice restoration ecologist. And that means applying science to the field of restoring ecosystems. Margaret Okay, so that brings up the broad and probably easy to answer question of how do we fix the ecosystem? It seems kind of broken right now. Simon Yeah, I mean, it's obviously the biggest question that is, you know, people are never able to answer in my field. I think the first thing you need to know is what's wrong. Which is a question that is answerable through a combination of research and also just feeling out your values, you know, how do—what do we want from our ecosystems globally and locally? And in the early, kind of the early times of ecological restoration as a field, and it's a fairly new field, you know, the idea was, okay, we're going to find historical reference conditions. We're going to figure out, you know, this is what ecosystems used to be—and used to be usually meant, what were they like before white settlers—I'm speaking at a North American context here which, of course, you know, plays into a lot of racist notions about noble savage, you know, how native peoples here really didn't affect the ecosystem that was in a natural state. And as the field has developed, especially in recent years, people have become much more cognizant of what people have been living in and interacting with and manipulating the ecosystems around us for millennia. But then that question becomes much more complicated, you know, our relationship with the natural world is different than it used to be and different than people in cultures historically have related to the ecosystem. So it becomes a very difficult question to answer. So you need to start to fall back on some priorities, you know, or—and those priorities can be something like, well, we value biodiversity, you know. We can look and see that this ecosystem here is degraded, it's full of introduced weeds, there's only three species really dominant. And we know a minimum, whatever things were like in the past, that there was a lot more going on here. So that's a really good starting point. So you have a value of biodiversity. Margaret The the moving away from, like, reference systems is really interesting to me. So the idea is that, like, basically, people are moving away from the idea of, well we're going to make it exactly like it used to be in thism like, quote/unquote, untouched natural state, which of course doesn't really exist because humans have been interacting with nature for a long time. But instead picking what values matter to us and then applying them? Is that— Simon Yeah, I think that's true. And one of those values is historical conditions. And that's kind of the core value of the field. But it's the introduction of these other values that have made things much more complicated and I think much more interesting, but also much more true to how we interact with the natural world. So certainly a value is, we know—we basically know that we've messed up. We know that we've come in and through agriculture, and through building cities and roads, and all of the things that modern society does, we've impacted the natural world in negative ways. We see declines of species, we see loss of biodiversity, we see introduction of invasive species from other areas. And so we know that these things are problems, but what I think my field is starting to wrestle with a little bit more is, okay, well, what is what is really the solution? We can't, we can't, you know, find a time capsule and go backwards. Margaret Right. Simon And even if we did, you know, we don't know how people were managing those systems before we—an when I say we, I'm talking about white people which, again, you know, there's lots of native people that are involved in ecological restoration and that's becoming more of a focus as well. But it's introducing those more complex values. And then, of course, you introduce global warming which is—kind of makes it clear that you can't just go backwards, you know, we don't know what the effects of climate change are going to be in every system or in any system. And so that throws a wrench into the whole idea of, okay, we can just, we can just return. Margaret I like that I like—I mean, I don't like that everything's going horribly. But I like this idea of acknowledging that we can't go backwards and, you know, one of the things that always—when I was a younger environmentalist and I was more involved with green anarchism, one of the things that wasn't always the problem but could sometimes kind of come up as a problem is this idea of, like, pretending like we're all going to go back to the quote/unquote natural way of living and like living off of the land in very specific ways. And it never made any sense to me because it always seemed to me that people,—even people who are like foraging and things like that, I always thought of, you know, I mean, if you live in a city, dumpster diving is foraging, you know, like, not just picking berries, or whatever, and—not to be dismissive of foraging in wild environments—but it always seemed like this romanticization of the past. Of, like, trying to recreate the past rather than taking the ideas—well it's like people, the thing that we're excited about is like people working with what's around them. And what's around us is different than what was around people before industrialization and things like that. So it's just, it's kind of interesting to me to see a parallel with that in something like ecological restoration. And, I mean, it's even in the name "restoration," right? To restore things kind of implies the taking things back to what they used to be, but I don't know. Simon Yeah, you have to respond to the world as it exists in front of you. And you need to maintain a level of idealism, you know, in order to be in this field, I think, you know, because you're faced with the kind of enormity of the world being fairly messed up, you know. There's a lot of tragedy in environmental fields, you know, it's you feel like you're just fingers in the dam and trying to stem the bleeding. And so, in a way, kind of letting go of that vision of, we're just going to completely return and we're going to have these little time capsules of true native ecosystems that are how things were, and then everything else is changing around it—letting go of that maybe can start to allow for some hope and for a broader vision of the future. But there's room for lots of different methods and lots of different results, and that's going to vary a lot locally as well. I'm speaking again kind of in the context of having worked, you know, in the Pacific Northwest. But things may be different somewhere else. So, and the impacts that you're dealing with may be different. So, there's a lot to consider there. But certainly, you know, some of my work is in coastal estuaries in forested wetlands and it's important work, it's important to restore these areas that have been degraded by agriculture. The land has subsided through lack of sediment inputs and diking. We can restore them and we can, we can rebuild these wetland forests and the estuary. But we also have the knowledge that many of these systems that we're, right, quote/unquote restoring, are going to be gone in 100 years. That's just, that's a certainty. And so is there still value in doing that? And maybe the answer is yes. Because maybe, really, it's not restoration, it's just a form of stewardship of the land. You know, we're taking care of it, we're improving the condition for generations of plants and animals. And we can't know what will happen after that. We know that this thing will be gone, but there will be something else after it. And we're maintaining some biodiversity just for the time being. Margaret Well and it seems like if we, if we restore certain areas, even though we know we're going to lose them, you know, we might lose them in like different ways than we would otherwise lose them. I don't know if this is totally naive. But I'm like, well, you know, we know that desertification, and we know that, you know, well at least climate is going to change and overall be much harder. We know that's true. Right? But maybe the way things die off can be different, you know, if we make things a little better ahead of time. Simon Yeah, no, that's absolutely true. And I think that there's functional reasons that would be true, just basic population ecology reasons that that would be true. You know, if you're working somewhere and you know, like, for example, okay, we're trying to, you know, we're working on a dry site and we're trying to restore, let's say, ponderosa pine woodlands in the American Southwest. But we know maybe this is a marginal site for Ponderosa pines, and eventually they're not going to persist in this area. Well, one of the potential mechanisms of climate change is that things move both north and they move uphill, they move up slope, especially in mountainous areas as the temperature warms. And those upslope areas become become relatively warmer, but they maybe are closer to the temperature that was previously in the valleys. It's oversimplification, there's many other factors. But if there aren't trees there, then there's no seed source for that population to move up upslope, right. So, you know, and we deal with a similar thing in these estuarine systems in coastal areas where we know sea level rise is going to flood these places out, it's like, well, at least we have the spruce swamps. We have spruce, and if the spruce exists, the spruce can move into the upper areas. Or if they're there, maybe, you know, you have more trees, they capture more sediment, it slows that process and allows things to adapt. And sometimes the slowing of those start processes can be really beneficial. Margaret Is this the like—when I was in Arizona I went to this place, I think it was called Mount Lemon—and it was like a sky island. It was basically the Pacific Northwest, but in Arizona. I think it even had Douglas firs. I feel like wrong when I say that. But there was some— Simon No. I mean, it probably does. Margaret And that's cool. That's like a—do you know this concept, have you heard of green nihilism or like eco nihilism or climate nihilism or whatever, like nihilism as applies to the climate but in a positive way? Have you heard this? Simon Yeah, totally. And I mean, I think it's kind of self explanatory, right? Like, it's just, it's too much and it's like, well, there's just there's a fatalism about climate change. Margaret Yeah. And this idea—and I think when people use it positively—like green nihilism is like, you know, people sometimes talk about, like, giving up hope in order to be able to, like, you know, stopping—like, giving up stopping climate change and moving towards adapting to climate change. I actually think that that style shouldn't—to me that doesn't feel like nihilism at all, it actually feels very hopeful. Because most of the time, when I think about climate change, I kind of think over everyone forced to live underground and grow foods and hydroponics and, you know, the earth—surface of the earth is unrecognizable. And so when people talk about, like, well, maybe everything will just be a little bit different. I'm like, oh, that sounds so optimistic. And I get really excited about that optimism. But I like, I don't know, the thing that you're talking about now seems like this, like, in between space where it's—you know, it's like, knowing you're going to lose, but seeing what you can gain by trying to win in the process. Simon Yeah, I mean, you have to be realistic about that things are going to change, but we also know that changes are just a part of ecology. It's a part of the natural world. And I—these—it's funny to say that out loud, right, because that's the sort of phrasing that gets used by climate denialist—deniers and such, to say, oh, you know, climate change is natural these things happen. And of course it's not. And the rate of change is extreme and it's bad. But we also can—we can have an active hand in that adaptation, I think is what you're kind of getting at. We can, we know that change is coming. And there's people who are working on trying to slow that rate of change and that's what, you know, we're trying to do if we're talking about reducing emissions and things like that. But when we also talk about—a lot of what we talked about in ecology is resiliency, which, of course, is a really important concept in human communities as well, right? It's how do you build community resiliency in the face of disasters, in the face of climate change, or other threats. And that's a lot of what we talked about in restoration as well now. We kind of, when we talk about moving on from that historical model, one of the things that—one of the buzzwords now is—and I say that not negatively, because I think it's important—is resiliency. And a lot of things can make an ecosystem resilient. One of those things is biodiversity. You know, if we don't know how the world is going to change, the more organisms occupy a space, the more they occupy a piece of ground, the more likely it will be that some kind of balance or equilibrium is going to be found later, or that one of those organisms is going to survive and thrive in some form that may not be the current form, it's not going to be the community composition that it is today, but you probably also won't have a monoculture. It won't disappear completely. You won't get desertification or whatever the specific threat is in the area that you're living and working in. Margaret So it's just like similar to how farmers, you know, one of the reasons that people push back against Monsanto and these other sort of attempts to sort of monoculture our food sources is because if you have only one strain of rice or whatever then whatever blight comes through iw will take out all of your rice. Versus, the more different strains you have, the better your chances of actually getting a good yield. Simon That's exactly right. And that's talking about even just genetic diversity, right. And it's really just, it's threat mitigation. The more—if we have a diversity of species, the same way we think about diversity of genes, you know, and we think about climate change as a disease to an ecosystem, if you think about as a singular living body, the more diversity you have among plant species, the more likely it is that the ecosystem is going to be able to respond. You know, so you don't—if you have a single overstory tree species, which in some cases you have, in some marginal ecosystems that's all that's there and that's all that's available. But if that single overstory species becomes impacted in a way, specific to climate change, to the point where maybe it's wiped out, which is a real possibility in some parts of the arid West where you have native bark beetles, often increasing in damage to forests stands, largely due to climate change, you know, you have warmer winters and so they're able to be active for longer, you have less kills from freezes, so you have whole stands disappearing. And if you have a single tree species in those stands, then it's not a forest anymore It'll be something else. But if you have a multi-layered canopy with with many different tree species, then you know, perhaps one of those other species is going to be resilient, it's going to resist that, threat and it can occupy the space. So it's really just, it's just kind of building in more options for the ecosystem to adapt. Margaret I like this a lot. Like, I don't know, I really am enjoying learning this stuff because it—because it dovetails so well into, like, what I believe about the world and things like that. But like, you know, I mean, one of the main things that I'm interested in is that I believe diversity is a better form of strength than, like, unity. Rather than trying to make everyone agree to something or making everyone the same along almost any axis, instead, getting people to work together despite differences, you know, and, like actual multiculturalism versus like the melting pot, for example. Or, you know, even like in political movements, having diverse opinions, diverse strategies, diverse methods, and then just working together to try not to step on each other's toes and to try to figure out how all of our different strengths can tie together. And so I'm excited to hear that that's, like, the main way that people are thinking about creating resilient ecosystems is, you know, because I think people have this concept of, like, the way to stop climate change is, you know, essentially this eco fascist idea—or I heard someone call it, I think, climate Leviathan or something like that—you know, this idea of, like, a top down, here's what we all must do approach. And yet, I think that replicates, well, the problems that got us here in the first place, but also, you know, that would be like saying, like, oh, well, this is the tree, this particular tree will resist climate change the best. So we're just gonna, like, clear cut everything and plant that tree, you know? Simon Yeah, I think, oh, yeah, I just—I think there's a lot of social lessons probably to be drawn from ecology. And I think it's tempting for people and it's been done a lot. And it interplays, right, we—ecology is the study of relationships between organisms functionally, and if you're talking about restoration ecology, it's just how do you restore those relationships. And if you have a monoculture, there's no relationships to be had, or there's fewer. You know, your web becomes just some kind of simple grid with a few connections instead of this kind of unknowable complexity of interactions. And it's that sort of unknowable complexity that I think is, like, most beautiful in ecology to me, and is maybe why I was drawn to being a practitioner instead of a researcher. Maybe I'm also just not smart enough, that's part of it, maybe I'm not good enough at the math. You know, it's, you know that you have to let go. You get to act and you get to see how the ecosystem responds, and you're never really going to know what all those response mechanisms actually were. I mean, I think that's really nice. But yeah, I mean, it's, an ecosystem is not top down, it's not anything down, it's just the interaction of many organisms. And as a top-down actor, in a sense, you know, choosing our inputs into the ecosystem, I think that's something that does need to be decided as a society in a way, but also that society can be in, you know, there's layers to that, right. It's like, how, what is our ethic? How do we treat natural systems? You know, I think there needs to be like a moral framework. But then a lot of this stuff, it really is only, it only functions on a local scale. I mean, I think it's, in my field, it's so important to just continue to work in one place as much as possible. I mean, it just, I'm still learning plant species, you know, in sites that I've worked on for years and it's, like, I didn't even know this thing existed. And so some level of local control, even if we're operating in the space where government and funding and all of these things are major factors, you need local experts. And some of that is just that, like, we don't orient our society towards local expertise because people have to have jobs and they need to move on from those jobs. And sometimes a career opportunity is going to be in a different part of the country. And, on and on. But without that local knowledge there's just—you miss too many things. And you miss many things regardless. But—and that's why when people, you know, people do lip service to Indigenous knowledge and cultural practices and stuff, and sometimes it's not genuine, but the most genuinely important thing about it is that local knowledge, right, and when you think about, like—in my field, I think about just like the massive tragedy of losing, you know, 1000s of years of knowledge. And then what of it that we have—because these these, you know, cultures and Indigenous people are still with us and they're like—I see, like, yeah, tribal governments and just individual native people trying to insert themselves into these spaces and natural area management and being kind of like, oh, well yeah, you can have this over here. You can do this over in this other space. And it's like, you know, what little we have left that we didn't, you know, wreck of this built up knowledge over 1000s of years, we're kind of just, like, shunting to the side. Margaret Yeah, kind of marginalizing it. Simon And putting it into it's own little box when really that's the model we need to be replicating, you know, and building as a culture, right. We need to build those generations of knowledge. Margaret I like, I get really excited about organizational structures that are bottom-up, right? Like, where the main most important thing is that local expertise, is the fact that the people who live in an area are more likely to have the skills they need to deal with problems in that certain area, but they might need resources. And in some ways, you might want to centralize the acquisition of these resources or whatever, you know, or talk with each other and like network and coordinate with each other, you know, because there's some—there are decisions that need to be sort of made at a larger and wider level. But I think that just, like, we can essentially invert the kind of hierarchies within our society. But I suppose that is tangential to reforestation. And I've been spending the whole time trying to come up with a way to phrase the pun, like, see the forest for the trees, but I'm just going to leave that there, and you all can come up with your own version of that. What, um, to try and be, like, more specific and more practical about it: How does reforestation affect, like a local area? Besides—I guess, like, okay, it's two separate questions. One is the large scale question: How does reforestation impact climate change, besides, again, like protecting biodiversity like you were just saying, and giving, like more tickets in the lottery of survival or something? But also, like, is it true—okay, I'll just go—like, is it true that if we plant a whole bunch of trees then we'll be able to slow down or mitigate the effects of carbon in the atmosphere because of trees capturing carbon? That would be a first question. Simon Yeah. So the simple answer to that first question is yes, of course we know trees capture carbon. And through photosynthetic processes trees and all plants, not just trees, which is an important point that people miss, capture carbon. And that carbon is stored unless it's burned or, you know, otherwise disturbed, sometimes through decomposition processes, you can have methane and carbon released back into the atmosphere. But yes, on a global scale, reforestation, generally, if you're starting at zero state—you know, you take a bare piece of ground and plant trees—reforestation is an effective way to mitigate or counter the effects of climate change. Now, I don't want to go on too much of a tangent, but I will say that one of the scariest sets of words in my field is "global tree planting initiative." Margaret Oh, interesting, okay, because that's where my brain goes. Simon Yeah, that's less a function—well, I think it's a function of going back to talking about needing local solutions—or at least needing local expertise, even if you have a global initiative. And a lot of it is that, frankly, there's organizations out there that are, they're just big grify, you know, that are saying, you buy this product, we're going to plant a tree. You don't know really where that tree is, or they're going to maybe—sometimes that money goes towards replanting timber plantations in Canada or something, you know, and it's like, well, the carbon accounting of something like that is pretty sketchy, because they were probably going to replant it anyways because it's functionally a farm. Right? They're just replanting the trees that they're going to harvest again in 50 years. And in other cases, you have organizations kind of swooping into areas and planting non-native species, you know, in areas that were already vegetated, and maybe that vegetation has similar, you know, carbon storage capacity as that monoculture of trees that you went in and planted. So, you know, I don't want to get too far down that road. But I—the answer is that trees, yes, of course, store carbon. So does other plant life. And the most effective way to use forests to—at least in the Pacific Northwest where I have some knowledge—to combat climate change, it can be tree planting, but it's protecting existing forests from logging and destruction. Because it's really the old trees, at least in this system that I'm familiar with, that have the most carbon storage capacity. But big, old, you know, 100 plus year old trees. Margaret I mean, that's—I guess it's not surprising to me that the organizations are the problem with tree planting initiatives, you know, because I'm so used to not even thinking organizationally at this point that I'm like, oh, no, you just plant trees everywhere, right? But I'm like, oh yeah, but if there was like, either, of course—yeah, of course, these companies where they're like, oh, we want to get the most carbon capture per dollar or whatever. And so yeah, I guess they'll go plant the wrong trees in some area and mess up that ecosystem and mess up the ways of life of all the people who live around there and things. Yeah, I mean, I guess it seems to me that, yeah, defending the trees that we have as well as, I guess, replanting and reforestation but from local, like, in ways that are applicable to the local context as best understood by people who are Indigenous to that context, or at least are experts in that local context, is that...? Simon Yeah, I think that's right. And the other thing I would add to that is carbon accounting is extremely difficult. And in any scientist who studies this—I'm not a scientist who studies carbon accounting, but from everything that I've seen and read, and everyone who I know and I've talked to, there's so much hedging as to be the point, well, we know that this probably has impacts, but maybe those impacts are two centuries down the line. One example is I just saw a presentation about, you know, is looking at what was the carbon storage capacity in coastal wetland systems. Again, this is just, these are places I work. So this really smart researcher whose name I'm forgetting—but that's probably okay—was looking at carbon capture, and then also carbon and methane emissions from these wetland systems. And one of the conclusions was that these wetland systems are long term if left alone, you know, net carbon and methane positive, right, like they will capture more than they take in. But a lot of them are actually emit more methane and carbon through decompositional processes. You know, you think about walking around in a swamp, you stick your boots in, and you get that smell of sulfur and methane. Those decompositional processes, which are super important and do a lot for the ecosystem, emit more methane, which is a much stronger greenhouse gas than carbon than they do capture carbon. And eventually it becomes carbon positive, I guess would be the term, right, that it's capturing more than it's emitting, because methane doesn't last as long as the atmosphere, you're continuing to capture carbon, you know, over time, that could be 400 years in the future, you know. So that doesn't make it not worth doing, but if the idea is we're going to solve climate change by planting trees, you know, or by manipulating ecosystems in order to prioritize carbon capture without considering all these other things, I think it's probably too difficult. It's a nice bonus. But I—my feeling tends to be that there's so much that restoring ecosystems, including forests, reforestation does for societies and for people beyond that—things that you can see and feel and effect—and feel the effects of locally, that we should be valuing those things as well. Margaret Can you give me examples of some of those things? Simon Yeah, well, initially, you know, I know you wanted to talk about micro climates. Margaret That is my next question, so this is great. Simon Yeah. I mean, well, we can jump right into it I guess. There's like, there's been some really interesting research lately on the local climate effects of forests. I was reading a paper earlier about, you know, of course you have you have effects on ground temperature, just through direct shading, right. Just the creation of shade can make a massive difference. In the Northwest, we just experienced what has been described as 1000 year heat event. In Portland, where I live, we had temperatures pushing 120 degrees, which is, like, not fathomable. Margaret Yeah. Simon You know, I still can't fathom that, even though it just happened and I'm seeing the effects. Margaret Yeah. Simon Seeing dying plants. You know, it's apocalyptic feeling. But because we have a good network of temperature sensors and weather stations, you can see that in neighborhoods that had tree cover, you could easily be 10 degrees cooler than neighborhoods without that. And that's going to be largely because of just the direct shading effects. And then there's also cooling effects from respiration and trees, you know, water is one of the best temperature moderators that exists, right. And so just the process of trees respirating and giving off water vapor through that process cools the air. And so— Margaret Oh it's like evaporative cooling that's happening on the Trees? Cool. Simon Essentially yeah. Yeah, it's just, you know, it's thermodynamics. And that respiration slows, you know, when you have a super hot temperatures, a lot of species will undergo, you know, like, sort of heat dormancy, summer dormancy. But it still happens and depends on the planets but, and then of course just the direct shading. I mean, obviously, shade is cooler than being in the direct sunlight. And open concrete and asphalt is the opposite, it reflects a lot of heat. So in an urban context—and there's been actually some really incredible research done by—again, trying to recall his name. A researcher, same person. Yeah, I will, maybe I'll come up with a later. But a researcher at Portland State University who's done thermal mapping of the City of Portland and now has moved on to other cities, basically showing where there's these urban heat islands, right. And these heat islands are—I mean, it's incredibly stark. And of course, there's all these social implications because the heat islands are in poor neighborhoods, and the rich neighborhoods have big old trees. But again, yeah, that the cooling effects just directly from being your trees is well known and it's becoming more and more well documented. Margaret Yeah, I live—I mean, part of the reason I got excited about like reading about microclimate stuff is that, you know, I live on a land project where slightly more than half of it is open field. And then the other half is up in the woods. And I'm the only one who built her house up in the woods. And there's, you know, when it comes to running my solar panels and things, there's a lot of disadvantages here. And the humidity is a little bit worse up there, which is a problem in the mid-Atlantic, although I feel terrible complained about any climate problem that I'm facing in one of the most temperate and so far least affected areas. But it's a 15 degree difference between—you know, and I'm not that far into the woods or something, but my house stays fine in hot Southern summer without AC from, as long as I haven't maintained some airflow and have vents and things. And if I walked out into the field, I'm like—like, I'll walk down in the morning and I'll have a hoodie on, and I'll get to the field and everyone else who lives there will be, like, you know, not wearing a shirt or whatever. It's stark in a way that I never—you know, it's like, I know it on some level, like, oh, if you walk on the middle of the road and it's black and, you know, it's asphalt, it's hot or whatever, right. But I never quite, you know, felt it daily that that difference. And so that's why I got excited about it, just because I was like, oh, this works here. It clearly is applicable on a global scale and I should enforce a global tree planting initiative. Simon Yeah. You can make pretty good money at it. Margaret Yeah. How long does it take to create a microclimate? Is this something that, like, listeners who if they have, like, if they have enough power to influence the, you know, flora of their neighborhood and things like that could be pursuing as a way to at least keep their environment, like, a substantial amount of cooler, or? Simon Oh, yeah, absolutely. I mean it's, of course, gonna depend on the growth rate of trees. And that's going to depend regionally. I mean, I live in a pretty productive climate, a mild climate so far in our history and lifetimes. But there's tree species here that, you know, in their established can grow 5-10 feet a year. So that's very much within our lifetimes. Those shade effects, you know, you start to feel that as soon as it's putting out shade, and the more shade that's put out, the stronger those effects will be. So absolutely. If this is a primary, you know, if you're talking about an urban context of interest in your neighborhood, you do want to consider, right, like, what is the growth rate of the species that I'm planting? You know, maybe that's an important consideration for a reforestation project or picking something near your house. You know, if you look in the West, you know, all the old homesteads, they would plant poplars in a row, either as a windbreaker or as shade or both next to the houses, because poplars and things in Populous, in that group of plants, grow incredibly fast. They're also very brittle. Something to consider if you're planting near your house, you know. Limbs can fall off and such. But yeah, I mean, it's something that you can be involved in and do and, you know, especially on sites that I work on, I have sites where I I planted the trees or planted trees with a group of people and eight years later, they're, they're 25 feet tall. And so you're really seeing a forest develop. Margaret That's cool. Simon But of course, that's going to depend on on where you live. Margaret Okay, here's an oddly specific question. How do you plant a tree? Like when I was a kid and it was like Arbor Day or something, they were like, go home and plant this pine tree. And they gave us like this like pine tree sapling, and I like dug a hole and I put it in the hole and then it died. Simon Yeah. Margaret You know? And so I've convinced myself ever since that I can't—I have like a, you know, an anti-green thumb or whatever. And if anytime I plant anything, it's gonna die because I like tried to plant a pine tree in elementary school. But, what's involved in just the literal act of reforestation or even just tree planting. Simon Yeah, well in reforestation, you know, what you're talking about, mostly is scale, right? And so the most important thing is covering acreage and making sure that we can cover as much ground as possible and in the field of ecological restoration locally, we're, you know, we're actually borrowing a lot of practices from agriculture and from commercial forestry where these things are—there's lots of money behind them and techniques have been established, right. So a tree planting crew in the Pacific Northwest, even in steep terrain, and the less steep it is, the easier. You know, each crew member can plant 1000 to 1200 trees per day, would be about standard. Margaret Oh wow. Simon And, you know, if you're reforesting it at an area, say it's canopy species only and you're—you maybe planting 300 stems per acre on a restoration project. So each crew member might reforest four acres a day, on a on a good day. You know, if we're doing a restoration project, we're also planting understory species and other things as well, then maybe that drops to an acre. You know, scale is the most critical thing. So it's professionals, people who know what they're doing, right. And it's not that anyone can't learn, there's some simple things that all plants want when they're being planted. You know, not—letting the roots hang naturally is maybe one of the most important things that people kind of get wrong when they're planting a tree. It's like oh, my god, this, these roots are too big, I'm just going to kind of stuff in the hole and then they turn upwards and we'd call that J rooting. Right? So the root basically forms a J and the tree can recover from that, but when you think about a young sapling developing, one of its biggest limitations in a lot of climates, not all, is going to be water availability. And the deeper those roots are—so the deeper the hole is, the deeper the roots are, and the more natural they are in their arrangement—the later it's going to be able to access water into the dry season. Every inch of depth might gain at a week as the, as things dry out. Trees get planted too high, you know, roots get exposed. That's another component. Margaret Okay. So you just, like—you're going out there with like a, like a one person gas auger or something and drilling a bunch of holes and then going back through and putting saplings that were grown in a nursery somewhere into it? Simon Yeah, most of what most of what we would use in reforestation projects locally, it's almost all going to be hand planting. Again, you're talking about pretty steep terrain. In some cases we may use augers mounted on the back of a tractor. But anywhere that's flat in Oregon and Washington in the winter is usually pretty wet, when we're planting things. So it can be hard to get equipment around. But usually it's snow, we plant smaller trees, things that people can carry. We use what we would call bare root stock, primarily, that's grown in a commercial nursery. And instead of coming in a container, you know, a plastic pot that creates a lot of trash and also is just heavy and hard to carry around, we—the plants when they're dormant get pulled out of the ground with the roots exposed to the air and then they get put in a, basically a planting bag and sealed up. And then you pull them out when it's time to plant them and the roots are just exposed to the air and you plant them in the ground directly. And when you have that, each tree planter can carry maybe 200 trees at a time in planting bags just on their shoulders because the weight is significantly lighter when you don't have the soil attached. So almost all hand planting. So that 1200 trees a day will be—they're digging every one of those holes and just sliding the tree in. You just dig as small hole as possible. You open it up a little bit and—it's a cool process to watch. Margaret Yeah. What do you what are you digging it with that if it's not like a gas auger or something? Like I guess I'm yeah, building foundations. Simon Yeah, we have planting shovels. They're just a long shovel with a long narrow spade usually. In some cases, there's a tool called a hoedad in steep areas. And actually—I'm going to get the history wrong—I think the tool is named after a group of basically hippies that moved out to Oregon in the 60s to be on tree planting crews and they developed this tool, you know, or they named the group after the tool. But I think it was the other way around. Anyways, one or the other. But the hoedads were a cool group of kids back in the day. And so on steep terrain you might have basically looks like kind of a long pickaxe with a blade at the end. But usually, yeah, it's just like a 16 inch long, narrow shovel. Margaret Okay, and then what if someone's trying to plant trees a little bit more DIY, whether getting them from a nursery? Or even, like, is it feasible for people to try and plant from seed with trees? Like, I really don't know much about gardening. I feel almost bad, this podcast is like not focused on food. But I would like to. Simon Yeah, I mean, absolutely. And again, this is where connecting with people locally and understanding what things need to grow locally is so important, right? We don't use a lot of seating for trees and shrubs just because we have a well-developed network of nurseries that grow these seedlings. And it makes maintenance a little bit easier to be able to know exactly where the seedlings are. So you're not mowing something that's, you know, an inch tall. But trees grow from seed, you know. And definitely, you know, one of the things that I've done is on a project where we've had to remove alders, they were going to see it at the time, and we just ground that up into mulch and the seeds that were developing on the tree were part of that mulch, and then that just got spread around on the site. And then we had like, thick stand of alders just pop up. And they were mulch, basically, from the bodies of the parents. Margaret Oh wow. Simon In some cases you can also use natural processes to get those seeds to establish on their own. Like another example would be the cottonwoods locally, which a lot of my restoration is of kind of cottonwood galleries along rivers. They time their sea drop to happen after the river is just dropped, you know, the spring floods have receded. And you have all these, this exposed mud and exposed ground so the seeds can take advantage of that exposed ground. And so, of course, because we have hydroelectric dams on a lot of the rivers here, you don't have that flooding anymore and you have weedy grasses and things. But if you clear that ground at the right time of year underneath the trees, you can get a response of seedlings dropping all around and among those trees. So the remaining mature trees will kind of sprout a forest if you just, you know when those seeds drop, you know when the natural time is for them to emerge, you can use that to your advantage. Margaret How do—you know it's, like, okay, so you work on restoration and reforestation and things like that. But then, of course, as you pointed out, we're also losing a lot all the time. Right? And it's kind of two questions. And one is—sometimes I worry about, you know, my work as an environmentalist or even as, like, with encouraging preparedness, like how much am I just, like, in some ways, like, allowing the system to continue. Because if I'm mitigating—as an activist, if I'm mitigating the worst effects of a system, then in some ways I'm allowing it to continue, right? And like, you know, charity is particularly famous for this of, like, basically just, like, well, industrialized capitalism wouldn't work without charity because it doesn't—you know, like, people need that or there wouldn't be a workforce anymore. And yet, at the same time, this act of redistributing resources is very good, right? And so in the act of physical resources we'll talk about, you know, mutual aid instead of charity. And I wonder about, like, something like reforestation. Where do we cross the threshold? Is it just a matter of scale of crossing the threshold from, like, being a release valve for the worst parts of industrialization versus, like, gaining ground ecoligically. Simon Yeah, right. I don't know. I don't know how to assess that, like, on a global scale. But what I can know is that—you know, circling back to talking about resiliency—if you're doing something to the best of your knowledge to improve your local natural environment, you are—you're counteracting some of those negative effects. Whether it's enough, I don't know. I mean, there's lots that we need to do aside from climate change, I think, to like, start gaining ground instead of just halting it. And the history of the environmental field, or of conservation of natural resource management, is starting with that, oh, we just need to halt things, right, we need to preserve land. And that's super important and still needs to happen. And restoration was kind of people thinking, well, we need a next step, right? We've preserved a lot of land but, like, a lot of its degraded. But of course, we're still building new subdivisions. You know, we're still converting small farms to industrial agriculture. These processes are still happening. And so the answer is, I don't know. I mean, it's hard to know what action is going to have like the best total positive difference. I think maybe organizing to stop a new subdivision is going to be a more effective use of your time, or just more impactful, than reforesting an area that's already natural, that is just degraded. I really don't know, and part of that's going to depend on what you're valuing. You know, what are you most concerned about? Is it habitat—is a total, you know, is it climate change? Is it total loss of green areas? Is it shade as we're talking about, you know, local climate mitigation? These are all things to consider, I guess. And, yeah, I don't know when we reach the tipping point in the other direction, but I know that, for me, if it's directionally—if it feels directionally good, then maybe I've just chosen not to think about it beyond that, because otherwise it's too hopeless. Margaret No, no, I totally understand that. I mean, it's like a thing that I wrestle with when I'm doing activism, but it doesn't make me stop doing activism. You know, I'm like, okay, like, we're still gonna—we still need to do these things even if it isn't yet at a critical mass at which it, like, is winning or whatever on this larger scale. I guess I've always been a big fan of, like, sort of why not both approach [inaudible] girl asking why not both. Because, like, I've always been of the, like, stop/demolish the institutions of destructive—or, you know, like, stop oppression while also building liberation as like, you know, both things are so necessary and I guess I can accidentally sometimes get caught up in that false dichotomy of, like, building up the things we want versus tearing down the things that are destroying the world. I guess, coming towards the end of this, but I wanted to ask—because you were talking about how the work you do, you know, kind of relies on idealism and hope. And I think that that's something that's in short supply right now. And despite my last name, and despite the fact that I run a podcast about the end of the world, I believe very strongly in hope, at least as a strategic thing. You know, it's like, you can't—you can't win unless you fight to win, and you can't fight to win unless you envision the fact that you could win or at least, you know, have a better time along the way to losing or whatever. And so I guess I want to ask you, like, what gives you hope? What—because most of us don't know that much intimately about the ecological impacts of climate change. It's just scary, right? And I know that what you're talking about, about biodiversity giving us a better shot, that feels really hopeful. But I'm wondering if you have other ideas. Simon I would say, one of the most beautiful things I think about being in the field that I am, building forests, a lot of the time is that you are hopefully creating something that's going to outlast you. There's sort of an awe that I try to maintain. And it's not always easy, but some of these organisms that we interact with that might be a couple years old, and they plant it, it could have a lifespan of, in my region, 500 years. We can talk about a coast Douglas fir. And we can't know what the world is going to be like. And it's not really about making your impact, because no one's going to know, oh, I designed, I built this cathedral. You know, it's not like that. But it's, like, you're humbled by the experience of working with something that's so big and so vast in size and in time. And I think that's a really—I think it's a really beautiful thing. And it's a cliche to say, oh, go plant a tree as like an environmental action. But participating in restoration locally—which there are ways to do, hopefully, and people should try to if they have the ability—it can give you that sense of awe. And then if you're able to go back to that place that you helped, you know, 10 years, in 20 years, it's really humbling and it's really amazing. So it gives me hope that things outlast us, you know, that the world kind of goes on, and that also that we can be a positive part of the natural world. It's not just oh, humans are are bad and we're screwing everything up. It's—we can be intentional and how we interact with nature. And I think introducing that intentionality into how we impact the natural world is just so important, and feels good when you do it. Margaret Yeah, I wonder if one of the single most important things we can do is fight this idea of, like, humanity as a cancer or whatever, right? Like, you know, humanity itself, like humans are not inherently flawed in this way. Like, we're not inherently going to destroy everything. You know, it's—there's certain organizational systems, both economic and also larger structural systems, that do this thing, you know, and we end up participating in it. But there's other ways that we can live, have lived, do live, will live, you know? Simon Yeah. And a lot of times we think about nature as something that we affect incidentally. You know, we do a thing that we want to do for some reason, and then we accidentally have an effect on the natural world. And I would like people to maybe think about it as, we can choose how we affect the natural world, and we can be a positive force, and we can be, you know, get very hippy, but we can be one with it. You know, we're not separate, as you said. And it just, it's I think just a much healthier way to view ourselves and nature. Just go do something positive. You know, be specific in how you want to impact the natural world, in the same way that you would be intentional about how you want to impact your community and your relationships with your family and your friends. Margaret Yeah, I like that. I like that comparison and it feels very—it's almost, it's like not even a metaphor. It's just literal. You know, there's like the human and the nonhuman communities that were part of, you know? Simon Yeah. And it's not just having less impact, it's having good impact. Margaret Yeah. Instead of the—you know, it always struck me as, like, trying to just reduce your impact upon the world was always, like, what's the point of that just so that you can feel better about yourself, you know? Like, actually doing something positive feels way better and way less, in some ways, like, obsessive, right? Because if you're just trying to make sure you have no impact on the natural world, you're essentially just trying to negate yourself. Yeah. Was there—is there a question I should have asked you or something that you really want to bring up that you think I or the listener should hear? I wanted to ask you all this stuff about riparian zones and flooding, but that was entirely selfishly because I live on quote/unquote 100 year floodplain that thanks to climate change is a 4-5 times a year. But I'll ask that another time. Simon Yeah. I mean, I think we covered some interesting ground. I would say, connecting with people locally and building that local knowledge is the main thing that I can leave people with. Because that's—I can't tell you what to do if you live somewhere else, or even if you live near me. You know the problems that you face better than anyone, and people in your community probably do as well. So that's, yeah, I can't think of anything else. Margaret Okay. Well, thank you so much for coming on. And do you have any—you know, I don't know whether you're trying to have strangers ask you questions on Twitter or if you'd like to shout out anything about how people can either follow your work or learn more about what you do, or if there's any other organizations or anything like that that you're excited about that you'd like to shout out to people? Simon Yeah. I would say, if people want to follow me on Twitter, it's plant_warlock. And as much as I talk about, you know, environmental issues and projects that I'm working on that may be interesting to folks. Again, reforestation and dam removals and things like that. I have to admit, I also just talk a lot about how terrible our mayor is and things like that. But I would also say for people local to Portland, if they're interested in tree planting, we have a great organization called Friends of Trees that does tree planting projects in neighborhoods and also a natural areas. And it's a great way to kind of get your foot in the door and see if you enjoy doing this kind of work. And if anyone just has questions or, you know, wants advice on things in the natural world, I may at least be able to point them in the right direction. So feel free to contact me. Margaret Okay, thanks so much. And does that organization in Portland—do you all, like, take donations? Can I try and direct people to give you all money? Simon Yeah, they do. I'm not affiliated. I just know it's an easy way for people to get involved. But they certainly take donations, and they are always looking for volunteers. That's not, I know that's slowed down and been different during COVID times, but I think they're taking volunteers again, and people can certainly donate to them. Margaret Cool. Okay, well, thanks so much. Simon Thank you. Margaret Thank you all so much for listening. If you enjoyed this episode, please tell people about it. This is the kind of the only way that people find out about this podcast is through word of mouth. And I'm incredibly grateful for everyone who, like, you know, shares and retweets and posts to their story on Instagram and blah, blah, blah, like feeds the algorithm and tells their friends about it. And of course, anyone who tells people about it in person. Well if you don't like the episode then don't tell people about it—unless, actually, if you—if you don't like the episode, you should tell people about how much you don't like it because that will still also drive engagement. That's my favorite thing when people do. And you can also support the show by supporting me on Patreon. Eventually, it'll be supporting a whole organization on Patreon, which is basically what you're doing if you support me on Patreon because other people are very involved in this podcast at the moment and we're going to expand out to other podcasts and shows and things like that. Oh, speaking of which, I now have a YouTube show. The channel is called Live Like the World is Dying. You'll be shocked to know that. And you can find it on YouTube. I only have one episode up as of this recording, but who knows how many I have up by the time it's released. In particular, I'd like to thank some of my patreon backers. I'd like to thank Sean and Hugh and Dana, Chelsea, Eleanor, Mike, Starro, Cat J, The Compound, Shane, Christopher, Sam, Natalie, Willow, Kirk, Hoss the dog, and Nora. I really can't thank you all enough. I mean, I don't know, I guess if I did too much no one would listen anymore. If I just said just names over and over again in a weird pleading tone. So I won't do that. But I will say that I hope everyone is handling all this as best as they can and I will talk to y'all soon Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

The Michael Yardney Podcast | Property Investment, Success & Money
Harry Dent says Australia's property bubble will burst, but Pete Wargent bursts his bubble

The Michael Yardney Podcast | Property Investment, Success & Money

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 58:07


Are we heading for the biggest crash since the Great Depression? Is it just around the corner? Well according to Harry Dent, we are and it is. He is telling anyone who is prepared to listen that we are heading for a stock market crash, and the value of your house will drop by up to 40%. Today I to chat with economist Harry Dent about his views, and then Pete Wargent and I give you our thoughts on what's ahead. Now a word of warning before we get into the interview,  especially for the faint hearted. There are some scary predictions made by Harry, so please listen to his whole interview and don't sell up your assets before you have my views and those of Pete Wargent. Subjects I Discussed with Harry Dent Harry is a Harvard MBA graduate, a Fortune 100 consultant, and his demographics-based approach to economic forecasting has helped him correctly predict many major economic events, including Japan's 1989 economic collapse, the 2000 dot-com bust, and the populist wave enabling Brexit and Donald Trump's election. Harry believes that an economic winter is coming that will be worse than the Great Depression. He believes that the governments are using stimulus to keep economies alive, and that this is bound to not end well. Harry's biggest surprise about COVID was how much the governments stepped up and created stimulus. He believes that the biggest sign of problems in the US is that the home sales are going down while housing prices go up. He believes that rates are artificially low because governments are printing money out of nowhere and using it to do things like buy bonds. His line in the sand is 2022, which is when he believes the lowest point will occur. Harry says that hitting the limits wall cause the bubble to explode. He says that China has the biggest bubble, and because they're Australia's biggest export, their bubble bursting will hurt Australia. Harry believes that Australians who think he doesn't understand Australia's markets just don't understand the world. He would advise people to reassess their assets and sell what they don't need. Harry explains that the upside of a burst bubble is that it will get rid of bad companies being artificially propped up and make way for new ones. Harry also discusses how he would explain his views to someone who visited his seminars and did what he suggested years ago but didn't see it work out for them. Bursting the Bubble with Pete Wargent According to Pete Wargent, we're not in a bubble, and there isn't necessarily a big explosion coming Australia is seeing record-low mortgage rates A typical response to low mortgage rates is more people getting into the housing game. More people getting into the housing game is basically what is happening right now. The current housing market is underpinned more by owner-occupiers than investors This makes a bubble less likely. Australia's government has been prudent, and there are not high levels of government debt. What's more, the interest rates are low. Australia's banking system is sound. The majority of the debt is in the hands of people who have the means to service it. Resources: Michael Yardney Get the team at Metropole to help build your personal Strategic Property Plan Click here and have a chat with us Harry Dent's newsletter: www.HarryDent.com Pete Wargent  Next Level Wealth  Pete Wargent's new book Low Rates High Returns Shownotes plus more here: Harry Dent says Australia's property bubble will burst, but Pete Wargent bursts his bubble Some of our favourite quotes from the show: “As an investor, I believe it's important to listen to others views.” – Michael Yardney “In my mind, a bubble is an economic cycle characterized by a rapid escalation in asset values, then it's followed by contraction.” – Michael Yardney “From what I can see, the debt that's out there is in the hands of people who can manage it.” – Michael Yardney PLEASE LEAVE US A REVIEW Reviews are hugely important to me because they help new people discover this podcast. If you enjoyed listening to this episode, please leave a review on iTunes - it's your way of passing the message forward to others and saying thank you to me. Here's how  

This Sacred Life Podcast with Shann Vander Leek | Soulful Living | Feminine Sovereignty | Wisdom Teachings

Hello and welcome back for a new episode of This Sacred Life.™ A soulful, sensual, and sacred podcast for women. This month I'm speaking with Spiritual teacher and author Michele Sammons. Today's focus is a conversation about Michele's new book, The Little Book of Big Knowing: Tiny Bursts of Insight to Wake Up Your Soul. Michele is an inspirational author, spiritual teacher, and highly-attuned guide who works with clients worldwide helping them transform their lives through divine guidance. As an empath and intuitive, Michele's light-hearted, joyful approach embraces her clients right where they are on their spiritual path and gently guides them to personal clarity and understanding. Michele is passionate about working with Spirit to uplift others while spreading love and joy along the way.   Topics covered in this episode: Why Aeracura rose to the top of the deck Inspiration and intention for The Little Book of Big Knowing  How Michele's book can help you transform your life How Michele helps people receive Divine guidance.  Visit Michele at MicheleSammons.com and get a copy of The Little Book of Big Knowing at Amazon and wherever books are sold.  

The Closet Conservative Podcast
What happens when Biden's bubble bursts?

The Closet Conservative Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 11:06


The United States is on the precipice of the most extensive financial collapse our nation has seen. The inflation rate is now the highest it has been since 2008. We all remember that time, or we should. During Obama, The global financial crisis of 2007–2008 was the most severe worldwide economic crisis since The Great Depression. That is, until now.  The COVID-19 global pandemic most assuredly has brought distress across all worldwide markets - that point is understandable. Over the last year and a half, we have seen every country across the globe attempt to battle and overcome this virus and the chaos and distress it brought along with it.  During a time of crisis, Democratic Party lawmakers, pushed by the Biden Administration, would have Americans believe that the answer to their burdens and prayers would be to increase federal spending, and in turn, paying people to do nothing. All the while holding crippling businesses hostage, who now will bear the immediate financial burden of financing more liberal lunatic spending. During the unveiling of Democrats' 3.5-trillion spending bill, a loophole of federal legislation that will allow today's liberals to use their power to bypass Senate oversight, Biden stated that his massive spending would be paid for by increasing corporate tax rates and taxing the wealthy.  Americans today, all of us, are paying more for every product and service. According to the Fed and the most recent CPI inflation report, prices rose across the board in June. By a lot. According to an article in Forbes, overall, prices in June climbed 5.4% year-over-year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), and 0.9% over the past month, the biggest monthly gain since June 2008. Even when you strip out volatile food and energy prices—so-called core CPI inflation—prices rose by 4.5% year-over-year, the most significant such gain since November 1991. If you all remember, that was another American recession due to post-Gulf War, when employment numbers struggled to regain strength.  Along with the short-sighted Federal Reserve, Joe Biden and his fellow Democrats are in cahoots, with all of them speaking from the same mouth. But I'm here to tell you that they better find one that works if they are all sharing a brain, for you cannot continue to state that things will get better by spending more and hiding behind why Americans are not able to return to work. Americans today can find work if they want a job. Due to Democratic Party spending initiatives, both federal and state, there is no incentive to work. From coast to coast, Americans continue to be rewarded for absolutely no effort. For a year and a half, folks have not been mandated to pay their mortgage or rent payments, free rides on power and utilities, un-Godly stay-at-home unemployment, and never-ending free this and free that. Medicaid/Chip enrollment has also increased by 9.3 million or 13.1%.  Across the nation, housing costs have skyrocketed, over nearly 13%, which accounted for 1/5th of the inflation in June. Used car and truck prices leaped 45.2% over the last year, while car and truck rental costs skyrocketed 87.7%, the Labor Department reported. Here are more increases according to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics: Gasoline - 44.5% Moving/Storage - 17.3% Motor Vehicle Insurance - 11.3% Furniture - 8.6% Appliances - 5.8% Food and Grocery - 1.5% Under Biden's watch, it costs more to survive. But have no fear, under the Democrats' plan, only the wealthy making more than $400,000 a year will pay more, right? You remember Joe Biden's promise during his campaign. Let me tell you how this is all going to go down.  While Joe Biden, Pelosi, and Schumer target big businesses with the financial burden of their spending bills, let me tell you, companies also have a plan. That plan is to immediately counter their increased costs bypassing those expenses directly to their consumers, and that, ladies and gentlemen, is called "indirect taxation."  The fact is this: if Biden and the Democrats increase taxation on large companies, you know the ones that employ millions and provide services such as food, fuel, housing, retail, transportation, and utilities, every American, regardless of income, will pay more. As the cost of living increases, businesses will become burdened with increasing their paid employee wages, further increasing the cost of products. All the while, Biden and the Democrats will look to improve poverty assistance programs like Medicaid and CHIP, which will put an even more federal financial strain on our nation. And round and round we go.  Within a year, this will be the new America. The big banks that gave money for overpriced houses will find their customers defaulting on their upside-down loans as housing prices plummet. Those who haven't paid a mortgage payment in 18-months will see those banks immediately calling for payment, which they will not have. Anyone still in an adjustable-rate mortgage will see their rate swell, leading to immediate foreclosure.  You have all been warned - the writing is firmly on the wall. We are all witnessing the collapse of our country. Remember, you heard it here. Music courtesy of Greg Shields Music. http://www.reverbnation.com/GregShields

Ra World Address
Trailer: Bursts of Expression

Ra World Address

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2021 0:27


Welcome to Ra World Address. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/raworldaddress/message

Tech News Now
Underwater pipeline bursts in Gulf of Mexico, causing flames to erupt on ocean surface

Tech News Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 2:00


The fire started in an underwater pipeline connecting to a platform at state oil company, Pemex's Ku Maloob Zaap oil development. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

First Assembly of God, Windber, PA, Sermons
Baal Perazim - The Lord Who Bursts Through

First Assembly of God, Windber, PA, Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2021 32:10


WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio
Local Companies To Help Pay For Damage After Pipe Bursts At Lowell High

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 0:50


RNZ: Morning Report
Water main bursts on major Wellington road

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 2:04


There is a burst water main in Wellington at the intersection of Wellington Rd and Kilbirnie Crescent, and residents are being told to avoid the area if possible. The intersection is a major traffic route. Reporter Emma Hatton was on the scene.

Global Exclusive
Vivi bursts hard! - Maintenance Thursday

Global Exclusive

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 7:28


Quick info about what happened in Maintenance, and about Vivi's numbers. Join our Discord for exclusive after-talk content! https://discord.gg/Y9JkMfN Global Exclusive is a Final Fantasy Brave Exvius weekly podcast, by the people that give you the Gamepedia Wiki Unit Rankings.

Straight Up Breakdown
Pressure Bursts Pipes

Straight Up Breakdown

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 27:35


Greg Smith is joined by Wendy’s Big Show co-host Steve “Sparky” Fifer to give you the breakdown on how unique the Packer versus Aaron Rodgers situation is, the pressure mounting on the Milwaukee Bucks and much more in the latest episode of the Straight Up Breakdown podcast. Please follow, rate and review our podcast! Follow me on twitter @gregsmithhv  Email me at straightupbreakdown@hailvarsity.com  A Hurrdat Media Production. Hurrdat Media is a digital media and commercial video production company based in Omaha, NE. Find more podcasts on the Hurrdat Media Network and learn more about our other services today on HurrdatMedia.com.

Freud Institute
Episode 523: Could 2021 be the year that the Bitcoin bubble bursts?

Freud Institute

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 1:02


This question answered.

RAD Radio
05.14.21 RAD 10 Win Rob's Change & Gas Hoarder Bursts Into Flames

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2021 7:18


Win Rob's Change & Gas Hoarder Bursts Into Flames

The Final Straw Radio
Shane Burley on "Why We Fight"

The Final Straw Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2021 68:44


This week, we present a conversation with Shane Burley, author of the new AK Press book, “Why We Fight: Essays on Fascism, Resistance, and Surviving the Apocalypse”. For the hour, we speak about the contents of the book, anti-fascism, toxic masculinity, pushing racists and fascists out of cultural space, antisemitism (including in the left), conspiricism, right wing publishing and other topics. Bursts references a couple of podcasts at various points: Black Autonomy Podcast: Black Anti-Fascism And Armed Self-Defense 12 Rules For What #36: Antifascist RPGs and Nerd Cultures w/ Postcards from Cable Street You can find Shane's writings at shaneburley.org, support them and get regular articles on patreon.com/shaneburley or find them on twitter at @Shane_Burley1 David Easley Fundraiser Friend of the pod and prison organizer David Easley could use some support and someone's collecting money to help him out. You can find more at gf.me/u/zscmgw . ... . .. Featured tracks: Viva Boma by Cos on Funky Chicken: Belgian Grooves from The 70's Andy is a Corporatist by Newtown Neurotics from Kick Out!

Cricket Nagaram - A Telugu Podcast
Episode 71 : The IPL Bubble Bursts | రెండు రోజుల్లో కథ అడ్డం తిరిగింది

Cricket Nagaram - A Telugu Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 37:07


Everything changed in a matter of hours. We have Sandeep with us to discuss what went wrong with the bubble and the lessons learnt from here. రెండు రోజుల్లో అసలు ప్రపంచం మొత్తం తలక్రిందలు అయినట్టు అయ్యి అందరు కట్ట బుట్ట సర్దుకొని ఇళ్లకు చేరుకోవాల్సిన పరిస్థితి ఎలా వచ్చిందో ఈ ప్రత్యేక ఎపిసోడ్ లో మాట్లాడుకున్నాం You can follow us on twitter , instagram

The Scorecard with Liam Flanagan
Indian Premier League Covid Bubble Bursts

The Scorecard with Liam Flanagan

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021 7:02


Aussies forced into isolation as IPL teammates record positive tests Is Lyon the man to replace Buckely at the Pies? LeBron James wants idiot fired over NBA play in tournament Raiders star homesick See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dragon's Lair Motorcycle Chaos
Biker dies when his motorcycle bursts into flames after police chase

The Dragon's Lair Motorcycle Chaos

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 45:03


A biker was tackled after a bike chase with a cop and caught underneath his bike. What happened next was unthinkable! Black Dragon covers the story.Help us get to 10,000 subscribers on www.instagram.com/BlackDragonBikerTV on Instagram. Thank you!Subscribe to our new discord server https://discord.gg/dshaTSTGet 20% off Gothic biker rings by using my special discount code: blackdragon go to http://gthic.com?aff=147Subscribe to our online news magazine www.bikerliberty.comBuy Black Dragon Merchandise, Mugs, Hats, T-Shirts Books: https://blackdragonsgear.comDonate to our cause with Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/BlackDragonNP Donate to our cause with PayPal https://tinyurl.com/yxudso8z Subscribe to our Prepper Channel “Think Tactical”: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-WnkPNJLZ2a1vfis013OAgSUBSCRIBE TO Black Dragon Biker TV YouTube https://tinyurl.com/y2xv69buKEEP UP ON SOCIAL MEDIA:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/blackdragonbikertvTwitter: https://www.twitter.com/jbunchiiFacebook : https://www.facebook.com/blackdragonbiker

The Trader Mindset
04-25-2021: Cryptocurrency Check In | Bitcoin finally bursts | Buy the dip?

The Trader Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2021 10:32


So bitcoin finally popped. I've always said be careful playing bitcoin at these extended levels and finally we are seeing monthly consolidation. Is this time to buy the dip? I talk about that in this episode. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

In Search of Reality
Episode 57: Subtle Shifts With Tiny Bursts of Insight

In Search of Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2021 48:12


A discussion seeking to answer some of life’s big questions. Intuitive medium and energy worker Michele Sammons joins us. Author of (The Little Book of Big Knowing) is teaching and guiding others on life understanding and self discovery. Michele is helping others to find purpose and gain better insight to the souls journey. We cover the purpose of an experience in regard to the soul. We cover topics like past life, meditation, soul purpose, and many other aspects to understanding enlightenment. A very moving discussion on this episode of In Search of Reality. https://www.michelesammons.com Sponsor: www.shopblackoxygen.com/reality Website: www.insearchofrealitypodcast.comFacebook:https://www.facebook.com/In-search-of-reality-podcast-103619891320439/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/insearchofrealityTwitter: www.twitter.com/@insearchreality Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdpJBb2DAPw0w9_u6vU8z8Q?view_as=subscriber

The Daily Space
X-ray Surges Found Along With Radio Bursts From Crab Nebula

The Daily Space

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 16:55


Data analyzed from the NICER telescope aboard the ISS contains evidence of X-ray boosts accompanying radio burst detections, releasing more energy than expected as “giant radio pulses”. Plus, machine learning, yellowballs, intraterrestrial life, all the volcanoes, and updates on SN15 and Ingenuity.

Sorry, I'm Sad
The Bubble Bursts

Sorry, I'm Sad

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2021 68:05


When Chris started a phase-three clinical trial for a promising ALS drug, the Snows were hopeful. As the months wore on and Chris' disease didn't seem to be progressing at all, they were thrilled. Each month with no change to Chris' health made the notion that this experimental medicine could stop his ALS in its tracks seem like a real possibility.  And then, in April 2020, nine months after Chris joined the trial, that possibility crumbled with one photograph. Looking at that picture, Kelsie realized Chris' smile had changed slightly and that their story and the trajectory of Chris' illness had changed completely. In this episode, Chris and Kelsie talk about how devastating the loss of his smile and all of the losses that came after it have been and how, even amidst the most painful developments since his ALS diagnosis, they still cling to hope.

Not Too Busy To Write
Episode 8 - Writing in short bursts

Not Too Busy To Write

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2021 40:32


When life is busy, we don't always get the long stretches of time we would ideally like to have to write. So how do you train yourself to write in tiny spaces of time? Ali and Penny discuss the techniques they have used over the past few years when time is short. From keeping up the frequency so your mind is never far from the project, to using mini rituals and music to short cut your way to writing mode, this is an episode which questions our default excuse to avoid writing because we only have tiny pockets available to us. Links mentioned https://www.janetmurray.co.uk/build-your-audience-programme/ (Janet Murray Membership) (virtual co-working) https://londonwriterssalon.com/#writershour (London Writers Salon) (writers hour) Books Medical Muses: Hysteria in 19th century Paris by Asti Hustvedt https://uk.bookshop.org/books/holy-anorexia/9780226042053 (Holy Anorexia by Rudolf M Bell) https://uk.bookshop.org/a/6990/9781529035438 (Summerwater by Sarah Moss) You can find all of our book recommendations at https://uk.bookshop.org/lists/not-too-busy-to-write-recommends (Not Too Busy To Write - Bookshop.org )

The Innovative Mindset
Artist, Community Catalyst Teresa Funke on Finding Your Burst of Brilliance

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 50:49


Teresa Funke Wants To Help You To Find Your Inner Artist Teresa Funke believes there's an artist in everyone. She's published seven inspiring books for adults and children based on true stories from World War II, including Dancing in Combat Boots and War on a Sunday Morning. Her newest book, Bursts of Brilliance for a Creative  Life, takes readers in a new direction, encouraging them to ignite their creative spirits in order to bring better ideas into our world. It's based on her popular blog of the same name. Teresa is a community catalyst, speaking widely and running programs that support history education, literacy, writing, the arts, and personal development. Connect with Teresa Social Media Handles for Bursts of Brilliance® FB: burstsofbrilliance Twitter: BOBrilliance Inst: bursts.of.brilliance   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/burstsbrilliance Twitter: https://twitter.com/BOBrilliance Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bursts.of.brilliance/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/Bobrilliance   Social Media Handles for Teresa Funke (Teresa Funke & Company) FB: teresafunkeandcompany Twitter: teresafunke Inst: teresa.r.funke   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/teresafunkeandcompany Twitter: https://twitter.com/teresafunke Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/teresa.r.funke/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/teresafunke/

Have You Heard? with Emma Mae Jenkins
The Lord Bursts Through - Happy Easter

Have You Heard? with Emma Mae Jenkins

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 38:15


Happy week of Easter folks! Join me in the Word today to learn more about how awesome the Lord is. He is the Lord Who burst through the grave and defeated sin and death so that through Him we can have eternal life and be in relationship with Him forever. He is the peace that bursts through anxiety. He is the hope that bursts through despair. He is the light that bursts through the darkness. I pray you are mightily encouraged today.

Inside the Hexagon
"Strikeforce: Carano vs. Cyborg" - August 15, 2009...Gina Carano and Cyborg shatter a glass ceiling, Gegard Mousasi bursts onto the U.S. scene, and more!

Inside the Hexagon

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 81:58


It's Ladies Night on "Inside the Hexagon," as Gina Carano and Cris Cyborg break through and set records when they main event the first major MMA event to be headlined by female fighters! "Carano vs. Cyborg" was a truly historic event, and we've got all the details on this week's episode. We dive into the entertaining main event while also discussing Nick Diaz's side deal with CSAC, Gegard Mousasi's obliteration of Babalu Sobral, Gil Melendez's revenge, and so much more. Make sure to catch this one!  All our links can be found here: https://podfollow.com/inside-the-hexagon/view. Download and subscribe, and connect with us on Instagram and Twitter...@TheHexagonPod. Also, please don't forget to rate and review! We appreciate your support! Sources: Tapology, Sherdog, MMA Weekly, MMA Junkie, Figure Four Weekly Special thanks to Joseph McDade for our theme song: www.josephmcdade.com #Strikeforce #UFC #Bellator #MMA #Podcast

My Steps to Sobriety
131 Lisa Olson - Connecting Through Humor and Daily Bursts of Bravery

My Steps to Sobriety

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2021 68:00


In Lisa's words: I escaped my traumatic childhood through humor. This later became my business. Improvisation is a superbly useful tool I teach others for their businesses, projects and goals.  I'm the 'icebreaker queen',  and I promise to not scare your introverts.

Black Box Down
Cargo Door Bursts Open Mid Flight

Black Box Down

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2021 43:01


A cargo door on a Boeing 747 bursts open as the plane is climbing to cruising altitude. United Airlines Flight 811 suffers a rapid decompression after the cargo door separates from the plane at 22,000 feet. What happened to make this door come off the plane and is the flight able to land safely? Find out on this episode of Black Box Down. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @BlackBoxDownPod. https://twitter.com/blackboxdownpod https://www.instagram.com/blackboxdownpod/ Sponsored by The Jordan Harbinger Show (jordanharbinger.com/subscribe) and Candid (http://candidco.com/blackboxdown and use code blackboxdown) BUY OUR SHIRT - U.S. STORE: https://store.roosterteeth.com/products/black-box-down-t-shirt U.K. STORE: https://store.roosterteeth.co.uk/products/black-box-down-t-shirt Crash Simulator: https://roosterteeth.com/watch/black-box-down-1

The Final Straw Radio
Aric McBay on "Full Spectrum Resistance"

The Final Straw Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2021 80:03


This week we are re-airing a conversation that Bursts had last year with Aric McBay, who is an anarchist, organizer, farmer, and author about his most recent book called Full Spectrum Resistance published by Seven Stories Press in May 2019. This book is divided into 2 volumes, and from the books website [fullspectrumresistance.org]: “Volume 1: Building movements and fighting to win, explores how movements approach political struggle, recruit members, and structure themselves to get things done and be safe. Volume 2: Actions and strategies for change, lays out how movements develop critical capacities (from intelligence to logistics), and how they plan and carry out successful actions and campaigns.” This interview covers a lot of ground, with topics that could be of use to folks newer to movement and ones who have been struggling and building for a while. McBay also talks at length about the somewhat infamous formation Deep Green Resistance, some of its history, and tendencies within that group that led him to break with them. Transcript PDF (Unimposed) Zine (Imposed PDF) Links to Indigenous and Migrant led projects for sovereignty and climate justice, and some for further research: Wet'suwet'en Strong, which includes extensive educational material on allyship, racism, settler colonialism, and decolonization. Interview on TFS with Smogelgem, a Wet'suwet'en Hereditary Chief of the Likhts'amisyu clan, on ongoing struggles against pipelines and moves to create a Wet'suwet'en lead climate change research facility on their lands at Parrot Lake. Indigenous Environmental Network [ienearth.org] Migrant Rights Network [migrantrights.ca/about] Igniting a Revolution, Voices in Defense of the Earth [akpress.org/ignitingarevolutionak.html] eds. Steven Best & Anthony J. Nocella, II Judi Bari, Revolutionary Ecology [judibari.org/revolutionary-ecology.html] Links for more reading from Aric McBay: fullspectrumresistance.org aricmcbay.org Aric McBay on Facebook (search “Aric McBay Author”) Announcements Xinachtli Parole Letters Chicano anarchist communist prisoner, Xinachtli, fka Alvaro Luna Hernandez, has an upcoming parole bid and is hoping to receive letters of support. Xinacthli has been imprisoned since 1997 on a 50 year bid for the weaponless disarming a sheriff's deputy who drew a pistol on him at his home. The last 19 years of his incarceration have been in solitary confinement. Details on writing him letters and where to send them can be found at his new support site, FreeAlvaro.Net, as well as his writings and more about him. He is also one of the main editors of the Certain Days political prisoner calendar, author and a renowned jailhouse lawyer. Parole support letters are requested no later than March 20th, 2021. Mumia has Covid-19 It was announced last week that incarcerated educator, broadcaster, author, revolutionary and jailhouse lawyer Mumia Abu-Jamal has been experiencing congestive heart failure and tested positive for covid-19. There are actions scheduled in Philadelphia before the airing of this broadcast, but you can find more info and ways to plug in at FreeMumia.Com Transcription, Zines, Support... Thanks to the folks who've been supporting this project in various ways. You can pick up merch or make donation that support our transcription work with the info at TFSR.WTF/Support. Our transcripts are out a week or so after broadcast and we're slowly starting to transcribe older episodes. Zines can be found at TFSR.WTF/Zines for easy printing and sharing. You can find our social media and ways to stream us at TFSR.WTF/links and learn how to get us broadcasting on more radio stations at TFSR.WTF/radio! Thanks! . ... . .. Featured Tracks: kidsnextdoor – Carmack Stackin That Brass (Creative Commons) Fennec Beats – I just feel sometimes (Creative Commons) (loop created by William) Angels Sing by Apollo Brown from Trophies U.N.I.Verse at War by The Roots from Instrumentals Album

StarDate Podcast
Magnetic Bursts

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2021 2:14


One of the big astronomical mysteries of the last decade or so has been the origin of fast radio bursts. In recent months, though, astronomers have found that at least some of them may be powered by magnetars — the super-magnetized remnants of exploded stars. A fast radio burst lasts about a thousandth of a second. In that instant, though, it emits more energy than the Sun produces in several days. But most bursts are in other galaxies, so they’re hard to study. Last April, though, a burst was recorded inside our home galaxy, the Milky Way. It came from a known magnetar. A magnetar is the ultra-dense corpse of a star that exploded as a supernova. It’s heavier than the Sun, but only a few miles across. And it has a magnetic field that can be a trillion times as powerful as Earth’s. Starting on April 27th, X-ray telescopes in space saw the magnetar produce a series of outbursts. After a few hours, it produced an especially powerful burst — a fast radio burst. Astronomers aren’t sure just how a magnetar produces such an event. One study says it may begin with a “quake” — a crack in the magnetar’s crust. That shoots out a magnetic bubble that disrupts the surrounding magnetic field. The field reconnects behind the bubble, triggering a short but powerful burst of energy. There could be more than one way to make fast radio bursts. But last April’s event suggests that at least some of them could come from super-magnetic stars. Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Inside Indiana Sports Breakfast with Kent Sterling
Hoosiers Bubble bursts! Colts free agents - who to bring back? Purdue rolls over Wisconsin!

Inside Indiana Sports Breakfast with Kent Sterling

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2021 12:44


Colts have managed their roster so overpaying for any of their own is unnecessary. Hoosiers lost their way off the bubble last night, while might might be a four seed. Pacers at Cleveland tonight. Darius Leonard launches Maniac Foundation! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-kent-sterling-show/support

The Smartest Man in the World

Greg and Jennifer pay tribute to their friend Lawrence Ferlinghetti. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Self-Care for Educators with Dr. Tina H. Boogren
Episode 35: Twinkle Lights and Bursts of Joy

Self-Care for Educators with Dr. Tina H. Boogren

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2021 4:15


"Twinkle lights are the perfect metaphor for joy ..." —Brené Brown. For episode resources, see SelfCareForEducators.com. Music: Happy Clappy Ukulele by Shane Ivers - https://silvermansound.com

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: Hundreds Feared Dead After Glacier Bursts In India

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2021 12:10


Over one hundred are feared dead after a Himalayan glacier burst in northern India that caused massive flash flooding that hit villages, dams and a pair of power plants. Mass protests in Burma over military coup and forty countries display the colors of Belarus in major cities joining them in honoring Belarus Solidarity Day. FOX’s Trey Yingst speaks with Yonat Friling, Senior Fox News Field Producer about various news stories emerging from around the world. 

Cerebral Women Art Talks Podcast

Episode 51 features Guyanese-American artist Theresa Chromati (b. 1992). She has garnered critical and institutional attention for figurative paintings that are shaped by fragmented forms of desire and constant motion. Bursts of complex color, sensual protrusions, and texture deploy abstraction to explore various contemporary realities of black woman. These bodies are at once imaginative, bordering on grotesque, and celebratory as they convey a variety of emotional and spiritual states of being. Chromati was born and raised in Baltimore, attended the Pratt Institute, and is now based in New York City. Recently, her work was on view at The Baltimore Museum of Art, The Pérez Art Museum Miami, and The Moscow Museum of Modern Art. She has been featured in The New York Times, i-D, Interview Magazine, Juxtapoz, Architectural Digest, and Vogue. Photo credit: Elliott Jerome Brown Jr. https://www.theresachromati.black/ https://bmoreart.com/2020/06/stepping-out-to-step-in-theresa-chromati.html https://www.kravetswehbygallery.com/theresa-chromati https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/07/t-magazine/theresa-chromati-artist.html https://www.documentjournal.com/2019/06/theresa-chromatis-technicolor-portraits-of-women-being-as-loud-as-they-want/ https://i-d.vice.com/en_uk/article/bv84zd/theresa-chromati-ive-been-going-back-and-forth-attempting-to-settle-on-a-thought-for-this-time https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/this-museum-found-an-ingenious-way-to-open-an-exhibition-during-lockdown https://www.decontemporary.org/theresa-chromati

RNZ: Checkpoint
Torrent of water in Aro Valley as water main bursts

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2021 1:10


RNZ has captured footage of water gushing from a burst water main and pouring down the street in Aro Valley in central Wellington. The pipe burst sending a torrent of water gushing out of the main on the corner of Durham and Aro Street. Wellington Water says its crews responded to the incident and are working on a fix. RNZ video journalists Dom Thomas and Samuel Rillstone caught up with people in the area at the time..

The Morning Toast
17: Intermittent Bursts of Excitement: Wednesday, January 27th, 2021

The Morning Toast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2021 48:43


Girl With No Job Claudia Oshry spills on her plastic surgeries including chin implant, Botox & lip fillers in new book (The Sun) Colton Underwood Details Every Step of His Split With Cassie Randolph For the First Time (E! Online) Paris Hilton Reveals She's Started IVF Process with Boyfriend Carter Reum, Says It Was 'Tough' but 'Worth It' (PEOPLE) See Kristen Stewart's First Photo as Princess Diana - the Resemblance Is Double-Take Worthy! (PEOPLE) Former 'RHONY' star Barbara Kavovit enters NYC mayoral race (Page Six) Dear Toasters Advice Segment The Morning Toast with Claudia (@girlwithnojob) and Jackie Oshry (@jackieoshry) Merch: https://shopmorningtoast.com/ The Morning Toast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/themorningtoast Girl With No Job by Claudia Oshry: https://www.girlwithnojob.com/book (http://www.girlwithnojob.com)

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Travel bubble bursts, Google trouble, extradition battle over

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2021 11:21


Australia correspondent Chris Niesche joins Kathryn for the latest on how Australia's temporarily pulled the pin on quarantine-free travel for New Zealanders, the escalation of tension between Google and the Australian government over plans to make the tech giant pay for news and a long-running battle to extradite a former teacher accused of sexual assault from Israel finally sees her return to Australia.

Talking Through The Medias
Wandavision Spoiler Talk - Rumors & Specs - Ep. 167

Talking Through The Medias

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2021 88:02


1. WARNING: The following contains spoilers for WandaVision episodes 1 & 2, now streaming on Disney+. After the premier fans of the show have flooded social media with more speculations as to where it all is heading. Another way of saying it, “What The Hell Is Going On”? Bursts of color repeatedly intrude on the town's black-and-white existence, like a toy helicopter falling from the sky or a splash of red blood on a housewife's hand. Beekeepers are crawling from the sewers, mysterious voices on the radio reach out to Wanda, and, oh right, episode 2 ends with Wanda miraculously a few months pregnant as the entire world turns to technicolor. How Is S.W.O.R.D. (stands for Sentient Weapon Observation Response Division) involved In All This? And finally what’s up with "Geraldine," played by Teyonah Parris. She was cast as Monica Rambeau, a name that should sound mighty familiar to anyone who saw Captain Marvel. Last we saw she was the eleven-year-old girl whose mother was Carole Danvers's best friend. So What Is Going On? 2. Variety: Josh Duhamel is in talks to star opposite Jennifer Lopez in the Lionsgate romantic adventure “Shotgun Wedding,” replacing Armie Hammer in the lead role. Hammer dropped out of the project last Wednesday, with a representative for the production explaining, “Given the imminent start date, Armie has requested to step away from the film and we support him in his decision.” Duhamel would star as Tom, opposite Lopez’s Darcy, in the film about a couple who gathers their families together for a destination wedding. Things start to go south, however, after the pair gets cold feet. But it really takes a turn for the worst when the entire wedding party is taken, hostage. Hammer began trending on social media last week after direct Instagram messages were posted sharing graphic sexual fantasies that appeared to be written by Hammer — which has not been verified. “I’m not responding to these bullshit claims but in light of the vicious and spurious online attacks against me, I cannot in good conscience now leave my children for 4 months to shoot a film in the Dominican Republic. Lionsgate is supporting me in this and I’m grateful to them for that,” Hammer said in a statement. 3. Los Angeles Times: Are you familiar with a new phenomenon called Churn? Data suggests it’s becoming harder for media and entertainment companies to retain subscribers as competition increases. The problem is that, because they are so easy to cancel, those services are seeing a lot of people leave after they finish watching the shows that convinced them to sign up in the first place. That phenomenon, known in the industry as “churn,”. According to a survey of 1,100 people in October, 46% of respondents canceled at least one streaming service in the last six months. That’s a dramatic increase from the 20% who said in a similar January survey that they’d canceled service in the previous year. Of the people surveyed who canceled a streaming subscription, 62% did so because they finished the show.

Everyone Talks To Liz Claman – FOX News Radio
Peter Schiff Bursts The Bitcoin Bubble

Everyone Talks To Liz Claman – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2021 39:03


Host of FOX Business Network's The Claman Countdown, Liz Claman is joined by founder and CEO of Euro Pacific Capital, Peter Schiff.  In early January, Bitcoin made headlines as its value peaked at over $40k, causing at-home investors and finance mavens alike to race to get their hands on the cryptocurrency.  But ever since Bitcoin became available in the early 2010s, Peter Schiff has been skeptical of its worth. Today, he joins Liz to discuss how Bitcoin works, why he doesn't like the cryptocurrency as an investment, and how he thinks Bitcoin will ultimately fail.  Follow Liz on Twitter: @LizClaman

The Tone Mob Podcast
A "Journey" w/ Steve Rose

The Tone Mob Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2021 73:44


Calling all creatives!! This episode is for you. Steve is a guitar gear fanatic, really cool dude, and a professional photographer for Journey. Yes. The band. We talk about how the love of guitar and music led him down a crazy career path, and how that can be applied to a variety of different creative fields. Oh, and we talk about 1959 Bursts as well. Why wouldn't we? Check out Steve's Instagram HERE Support the show and get extra episodes over at Patreon.com/tonemob. You can also help out with your gear buying habits by purchasing stuff from Tonemob.com/reverb or Tonemob.com/sweetwater Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Final Straw Radio
Organizing To End Prison Slavery with Bennu Hannibal Ra Sun

The Final Straw Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2021 71:59


Organizing To End Prison Slavery with Bennu Hannibal Ra Sun [starts at 00:02:37] This week, Bursts spoke with Bennu Hannibal Ra Sun, co-founder of the Free Alabama Movement and the National Freedom Movement, which is helping coordinate prisoner-led organizing across the so-called US. Bennu just finished a 5 year period in segregated housing for his organizing efforts. For the hour, they talk about the National Network coordination, the continuation of slavery from chattel slavery in which black and brown bodies were private property to the modern slavery of mass incarceration, pandemic behind bars, the importance of platforming prisoners in their struggles, the January Boycott FAM is conducting against prison industries, reform efforts and more. Transcription PDF (unimposed) Zine (imposed PDF) You can learn more and get in touch with Free Alabama movement by visiting their websites at http://FreeAlabamaMovement.Org and https://FreeAlabamaMovement.wordpress.com/, email them at FreeAlabamaMovement@gmail.com and find them on Twitter and Facebook. You can check out some of their radio shows at AbolitionToday.org You can reach the National Freedom Movement via 1NationalFreedomMovement@gmail.com. National Freedom Movement is now on Twitter as well. Inspirational revolutionaries we wanted to remember at the end of this chat: Bennu describes Richard Mafundi Lake as an “Ancestor, political prisoner and Panther for Life” Bursts mentioned Karen Smith and Rebecca Hensley, who both had memorials written up in the December 2020 SF Bay View Newspaper by comrades. Sean Swain Sean Swain's segment will be at the end from [starts at 01:04:17] Announcements [starts at 00:00:00 til 2:37] Likht'samisyu Village Fundraiser We'd also like to share a fundraiser being hosted by the Likht'samisyu Clan in so-called Canada for the purpose of expanding their sovereign village construction and to help pay for ongoing maintenance. You can find out more at their GoFundMe. TFSR Transcription The Final Straw is beginning to use our Patreon to fund comrades transcribing the episodes. Subscribers to our Patreon for $10 or more a month, will receive an episode a month as a zine in the mail alongside other thank-you's. For every $120 we raise in donations above $10 we will commit to another monthly episode transcribed up til our goal of $480 in those kinda donations. Transcriptions of our episodes allow for easier searching of content, so our chats will show up in search engines more quickly and completely, it'll also aid in translation, help folks for whom comprehension in English or audio is difficult and make it easier for abolitionists to send our chats into prisoners for discussion! You can find out more at our Patreon. . ... . .. Track used in this episode: La La (instrumental) by Slum Village

This Week with David Rovics
Fifth Estate Live with Bursts from the Final Straw Radio Podcast

This Week with David Rovics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2020 62:56


We spend the hour with Bursts, part of the collective in Asheville, NC that puts out the Final Straw Radio Podcast, talking about prison uprisings, mutual aid, and many other subjects.

Language Hacking
#25 Learn a Language in 5-Minute Bursts with Drops

Language Hacking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2020 47:48


Benny chats with Shannon Kennedy and Caitlin Sacasas about how they use language app Drops, which teaches vocab for 40+ languages.

Bits Before Crits
Magical Girls vs. The Male Gayz: 12|Heart Bursts

Bits Before Crits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2020 59:42


In which several are triggered. Join us on Patreon to follow the girls' non-canon adventures in Bits Betwixt Crits! www.patreon.com/bitsbeforecrits

Ron Paul Liberty Report
What To Do When The Bubble Bursts - With Porter Stansberry

Ron Paul Liberty Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2020 29:32


What is happening as the massive bubble is bursting in the US economy? Is there any hope to survive - or even prosper - in the age of Fed bubbles, Covid-19 hysteria, and riots in the street? Financial publisher and author Porter Stansberry joins the Ron Paul Liberty Report with his views on what's wrong and what we can do about it. Website: https://www.2020Warning.com

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism
1712: Micro-Bursts of Self-Care by Julie Morgenstern on How To Make A Consistent Self Care Routine

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2020 8:39


Julie Morgenstern discusses how to attain micro-bursts of self-care. Episode 1712: Micro-Bursts of Self-Care by Julie Morgenstern on How To Make A Consistent Self Care Routine Julie Morgenstern is an organizing & productivity consultant, New York Times best-selling author, and speaker. For over 30 years, Julie has been teaching people all around the world and at all stages of life how to overcome disorganization to achieve their goals. Her mission is to free each individual to make their unique contribution to the world - by helping them design their own systems for managing time and space that feel natural and are easy to maintain. This Inside Out approach to organizing everything gives readers, listeners, and clients the energy and knowledge they need to get (and stay) organized. The original post is located here: https://www.juliemorgenstern.com/tips-tools-blog/2020/1/21/micro-bursts-of-self-care Please Rate & Review the Show! Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com and in The O.L.D. Facebook Group and Join the Ol' Family to get your Free Gifts! Right now NetSuite is offering you valuable insights with a FREE guide - "Seven Key Strategies to Grow your Profits" at NetSuite.com/OLD Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/optimal-living-daily/support