Podcasts about Latin American studies

  • 451PODCASTS
  • 830EPISODES
  • 52mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 31, 2023LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Latin American studies

Show all podcasts related to latin american studies

Latest podcast episodes about Latin American studies

Lead With We
Finding Your Way to Flourish: Dr. Katia Sol, Assistant Director of the Stanford Flourishing Project

Lead With We

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 48:43


The way we think about leadership is changing, both on a personal level and in the context of business growth and development. For a business to succeed, especially in the digital era, the conversations around what it means to lead must evolve with the changing societal landscapes. But when you are seeking reinvention, it's easy to get stymied by the simple question: where do we start? Dr. Katia Sol is a lecturer at Stanford University as well as Assistant Director of the Stanford Flourishing Project, a weekly lecture series designed to enhance one's own leadership toolkit and change-making capacity, as well as one's ability to enhance collective prosperity and flourishing. In this episode, she shares how we can regenerate ourselves to show up most effectively for others and the planet, and how we foster a culture of purpose and service to navigate challenging times and course-correct our future. Lead With We is Produced by Goal 17 Media - https://goal17media.com Dr. Katia Sol: Dr. Katia Sol innovates and illuminates at the nexus of individual leadership and flourishing, cultivating an intimate and regenerative relationship with the natural world, and the healing and transformation of our collective systems. She teaches Leadership and Wellness Education at Stanford University, with courses on topics such as contemplative ecological leadership, living on purpose, and integrating inner and outer engagement. She also serves as the Assistant Director for the Dalai Lama Fellows program, a global contemplative leadership and social innovation program that supports young entrepreneurs around the world. Beyond Stanford, Katia offers private coaching and consulting services, leadership training, and immersion retreats. Katia holds a BA in Latin American Studies and MA in Education (Stanford University), PhD in Leadership and the Dynamics of Global Change (University of Toronto), and a MS in Management (Stanford Graduate School of Business), and has led over 5000 hours of in-depth leadership development programs focused on cultivating wise action to meet today's greatest global challenges. She lives in Richmond, CA with her husband and three boys (ages 4, 14, and 17). Resources: Learn more about Dr. Katia Sol at https://www.katiasol.com/ Connect with Dr. Katia Sol on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/katia-sol-phd-8b22976/ Visit leadwithwe.com to learn more about Simon's new book or search for "Lead With We" on Amazon, Google Books, or Barnes & Noble. 

Manage Smarter
219: Maria Victoria Albina: Stress, Anxiety and Burnout

Manage Smarter

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 26:15


Maria Victoria Albina (she/they) is a Master Certified Somatic Life Coach, UCSF-trained Family Nurse Practitioner and Breathwork Meditation Guide with a passion for helping humans socialized as women realize that they are their own best healers by reconnecting with their bodies and minds, so they can break free from codependency, perfectionism and people-pleasing and reclaim their joy. She is the host of the Feminist Wellness Podcast, holds a Masters degree in Public Health from Boston University School of Public Health and a BA in Latin American Studies from Oberlin College. Victoria has been working in health & wellness for over 20 years and lives on occupied Munsee Lenape territory in New York's Hudson Valley. FREE MEDITATIONS FOR MANAGE SMARTER LISTENERS: victoriaalbina.com/salesfuel In this podcast for managers, Audrey, Lee and Victoria discuss:  -Signs and signals leaders should look for indicating they aren't well -Why people pleasing and likability are a recipe for bad health for leaders -How past traumas play out in bad health today -A calming exercise to use at work to reset your nervous system and re-center yourself  "The number 1 mistake managers make is Ignoring signals from their bodies that are telling them they are overstressed or overworked. They do this to be productive and to continue being seen as high performers..”– Victoria Albina Build Credibility and Effective Leadership with the Manage Smarter Podcast Join hosts Audrey Strong and C. Lee Smith every week as they dive into the aspects and concepts of good business management. From debunking sales myths to learning how to manage with and without measurements, you'll learn something new with every episode and will be able to implement positive change far beyond sales.   Connect with Victoria Albina     ·       Website        Instagram: @victoriaalbinawellness Podcast: Feminist Wellness ·       Facebook ·       LinkedIn Connect with Manage Smarter Hosts ·         Website: ManageSmarter.com  ·         LinkedIn: Audrey Strong                                                                 ·         LinkedIn: C. Lee Smith   Connect with SalesFuel ·         Website: http://salesfuel.com/  ·         Twitter: @SalesFuel  ·         Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/salesfuel/  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Novedades editoriales en historia
La invención de la música latinoamericana. Una historia transnacional (2022)

Novedades editoriales en historia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 54:39


¿Cómo se volvió “latinoamericana” la música? La heterogeneidad lingüística, étnica y geográfica de esta región también es musical. Entonces, ¿cómo puede un mismo término abarcar corrientes sonoras y poéticas de tradiciones tan diversas —nativas y migrantes, afroatlánticas, andinas, urbanas, rurales, comerciales, vanguardistas, religiosas y nacionales? Pablo Palomino reconstruye la historia transnacional de la “música latinoamericana” durante la primera mitad del siglo XX con un enfoque regionalista que concibe las naciones individuales como agentes y a la vez resultado de fuerzas imperiales, económicas e ideológicas. En ese recorrido, ilumina el rol crucial de los actores y las prácticas musicales —la educación musical, los rituales estatales, los mercados, las migraciones, los gremios, la industria del entretenimiento, la musicología, los escritos de los intelectuales y la diplomacia cultural— que postularon la existencia de una corriente particular, distinguible dentro de la polifonía del mundo, llamada música latinoamericana. En La invención de la música latinoamericana. Una historia transnacional (Buenos Aires: Fondo de Cultura Económica, 2022), la exploración de la música latinoamericana conduce hacia la historia más amplia de la conceptua lización de la región. Tal como sostiene Palomino: “La música proporciona así un modelo para comprender ahora los mecanismos nacionales y transnacionales que siguen produciendo el lugar de América Latina en el marco de la cultura global conflictiva y fascinante que habitamos”. Pablo Palomino (Buenos Aires, 1973) es licenciado en Historia por la Universidad de Buenos Aires y doctor por la University of California, Berkeley. Ha impartido clases en ambas instituciones y también en el Center for Latin American Studies and Department of History de la University of Chicago. Actualmente, es profesor de Estudios Latinoamericanos y del Caribe en el Oxford College de la Emory University. Sus investigaciones están centradas en la historia cultural transnacional de Argentina, Brasil y México, así como en la construcción de América Latina como región. Entrevista realizada por José Antonio Galindo estudiante del programa de doctorado en historia de El Colegio de México Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Novedades editoriales en literatura y estudios culturales
Pablo Palomino "La invención de la música latinoamericana. Una historia transnacional" (2022)

Novedades editoriales en literatura y estudios culturales

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 54:39


¿Cómo se volvió “latinoamericana” la música? La heterogeneidad lingüística, étnica y geográfica de esta región también es musical. Entonces, ¿cómo puede un mismo término abarcar corrientes sonoras y poéticas de tradiciones tan diversas —nativas y migrantes, afroatlánticas, andinas, urbanas, rurales, comerciales, vanguardistas, religiosas y nacionales? Pablo Palomino reconstruye la historia transnacional de la “música latinoamericana” durante la primera mitad del siglo XX con un enfoque regionalista que concibe las naciones individuales como agentes y a la vez resultado de fuerzas imperiales, económicas e ideológicas. En ese recorrido, ilumina el rol crucial de los actores y las prácticas musicales —la educación musical, los rituales estatales, los mercados, las migraciones, los gremios, la industria del entretenimiento, la musicología, los escritos de los intelectuales y la diplomacia cultural— que postularon la existencia de una corriente particular, distinguible dentro de la polifonía del mundo, llamada música latinoamericana. En La invención de la música latinoamericana. Una historia transnacional (Buenos Aires: Fondo de Cultura Económica, 2022), la exploración de la música latinoamericana conduce hacia la historia más amplia de la conceptua lización de la región. Tal como sostiene Palomino: “La música proporciona así un modelo para comprender ahora los mecanismos nacionales y transnacionales que siguen produciendo el lugar de América Latina en el marco de la cultura global conflictiva y fascinante que habitamos”. Pablo Palomino (Buenos Aires, 1973) es licenciado en Historia por la Universidad de Buenos Aires y doctor por la University of California, Berkeley. Ha impartido clases en ambas instituciones y también en el Center for Latin American Studies and Department of History de la University of Chicago. Actualmente, es profesor de Estudios Latinoamericanos y del Caribe en el Oxford College de la Emory University. Sus investigaciones están centradas en la historia cultural transnacional de Argentina, Brasil y México, así como en la construcción de América Latina como región. Entrevista realizada por José Antonio Galindo estudiante del programa de doctorado en historia de El Colegio de México Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Novedades editoriales en pensamiento y procesos políticos
Pablo Palomino "La invención de la música latinoamericana. Una historia transnacional" (2022)

Novedades editoriales en pensamiento y procesos políticos

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 54:39


¿Cómo se volvió “latinoamericana” la música? La heterogeneidad lingüística, étnica y geográfica de esta región también es musical. Entonces, ¿cómo puede un mismo término abarcar corrientes sonoras y poéticas de tradiciones tan diversas —nativas y migrantes, afroatlánticas, andinas, urbanas, rurales, comerciales, vanguardistas, religiosas y nacionales? Pablo Palomino reconstruye la historia transnacional de la “música latinoamericana” durante la primera mitad del siglo XX con un enfoque regionalista que concibe las naciones individuales como agentes y a la vez resultado de fuerzas imperiales, económicas e ideológicas. En ese recorrido, ilumina el rol crucial de los actores y las prácticas musicales —la educación musical, los rituales estatales, los mercados, las migraciones, los gremios, la industria del entretenimiento, la musicología, los escritos de los intelectuales y la diplomacia cultural— que postularon la existencia de una corriente particular, distinguible dentro de la polifonía del mundo, llamada música latinoamericana. En La invención de la música latinoamericana. Una historia transnacional (Buenos Aires: Fondo de Cultura Económica, 2022), la exploración de la música latinoamericana conduce hacia la historia más amplia de la conceptua lización de la región. Tal como sostiene Palomino: “La música proporciona así un modelo para comprender ahora los mecanismos nacionales y transnacionales que siguen produciendo el lugar de América Latina en el marco de la cultura global conflictiva y fascinante que habitamos”. Pablo Palomino (Buenos Aires, 1973) es licenciado en Historia por la Universidad de Buenos Aires y doctor por la University of California, Berkeley. Ha impartido clases en ambas instituciones y también en el Center for Latin American Studies and Department of History de la University of Chicago. Actualmente, es profesor de Estudios Latinoamericanos y del Caribe en el Oxford College de la Emory University. Sus investigaciones están centradas en la historia cultural transnacional de Argentina, Brasil y México, así como en la construcción de América Latina como región. Entrevista realizada por José Antonio Galindo estudiante del programa de doctorado en historia de El Colegio de México Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books Network en español
La invención de la música latinoamericana. Una historia transnacional (2022)

New Books Network en español

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 54:39


¿Cómo se volvió “latinoamericana” la música? La heterogeneidad lingüística, étnica y geográfica de esta región también es musical. Entonces, ¿cómo puede un mismo término abarcar corrientes sonoras y poéticas de tradiciones tan diversas —nativas y migrantes, afroatlánticas, andinas, urbanas, rurales, comerciales, vanguardistas, religiosas y nacionales? Pablo Palomino reconstruye la historia transnacional de la “música latinoamericana” durante la primera mitad del siglo XX con un enfoque regionalista que concibe las naciones individuales como agentes y a la vez resultado de fuerzas imperiales, económicas e ideológicas. En ese recorrido, ilumina el rol crucial de los actores y las prácticas musicales —la educación musical, los rituales estatales, los mercados, las migraciones, los gremios, la industria del entretenimiento, la musicología, los escritos de los intelectuales y la diplomacia cultural— que postularon la existencia de una corriente particular, distinguible dentro de la polifonía del mundo, llamada música latinoamericana. En La invención de la música latinoamericana. Una historia transnacional (Buenos Aires: Fondo de Cultura Económica, 2022), la exploración de la música latinoamericana conduce hacia la historia más amplia de la conceptua lización de la región. Tal como sostiene Palomino: “La música proporciona así un modelo para comprender ahora los mecanismos nacionales y transnacionales que siguen produciendo el lugar de América Latina en el marco de la cultura global conflictiva y fascinante que habitamos”. Pablo Palomino (Buenos Aires, 1973) es licenciado en Historia por la Universidad de Buenos Aires y doctor por la University of California, Berkeley. Ha impartido clases en ambas instituciones y también en el Center for Latin American Studies and Department of History de la University of Chicago. Actualmente, es profesor de Estudios Latinoamericanos y del Caribe en el Oxford College de la Emory University. Sus investigaciones están centradas en la historia cultural transnacional de Argentina, Brasil y México, así como en la construcción de América Latina como región. Entrevista realizada por José Antonio Galindo estudiante del programa de doctorado en historia de El Colegio de México Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Inside Story Podcast
Lula is back. What does that mean for Brazil?

The Inside Story Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 19:53


Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva is back in power in Brazil, promising to unite the country and undo his predecessor's policies. But in a deeply divided nation, what can Lula deliver?Join host Hashem Ahelbarra. Guests: Guilherme Casaroes - Professor of Political Science at Fundacao Getulio Vargas University.Nizar Messari - Professor of International Relations at Al Akhawayn Univesrity.Vinicius de Carvalho - Reader in Brazilian and Latin American Studies at King's College London. 

Reimagining Black Relations
#67 Replacing Institutions

Reimagining Black Relations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 34:36


Dr. Santos Ramos, an assistant Professor of Integrative Studies at Grand Valley State University is a mixed Mexican-Irish-American. His research and teaching centers on the Intersections of Latin American Studies, Intercultural Competence, and Digital Technology.He introduced the concept of Sovereignty in his work on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, while emphasizing the research necessary for historical context of policy brutality, prison industrial complex, and current protests."I'm definitely light-skinned, but I've never felt white in my whole life... a lot of it is how people treat you, especially with my name.." - Dr. Santos Ramos

The Lawfare Podcast
The Political Crisis in Peru

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 54:25 Very Popular


On December 7, Peruvian president Pedro Castillo attempted to dissolve Peru's Congress and implement a state of emergency. His dictatorship lasted only a few hours before he was impeached by Congress and arrested—making him the fifth president to leave office in Peru in five years. Since Castillo's arrest, Peru's crisis has spiraled further, with protests in the streets and a violent response by the police and military that has left 25 people dead. To understand what's going on right now in Peru, Lawfare senior editor Quinta Jurecic spoke with Rodrigo Barrenechea, a 2022/23 Santo Domingo Visiting Scholar at the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard University and an assistant professor at the Departamento de Ciencias Sociales of the Universidad Católica del Uruguay. They talked about how and why Peru ended up here, the fragile state of the country's democracy, and why Rodrigo thinks that Castillo's attempted dissolution of Congress was “the most ill-planned coup d'etat in Latin American history.”You can read Rodrigo's article on the crisis in the Peruvian newspaper El Comercio (in Spanish) here.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Faculty Voices
Episode 37: Steven Levitsky on the Political Crisis in Peru

Faculty Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 19:44


What's going on in Peru? Harvard's Government Professor Steven Levitsky, who is also the director of the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies and the co-author of How Democracies Die, tells us of the many challenges the country faces after Peruvian President Pedro Castillo was ousted from office last week after an attempted self-coup. His Vice-President Dina Boluarte became the seventh president in six years and the first female Peruvian president in history.

New Books in Political Science
Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way, "Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 58:29


Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism (Princeton UP, 2022) explores why dictatorships born of social revolution—such as those in China, Cuba, Iran, the Soviet Union, and Vietnam—are extraordinarily durable, even in the face of economic crisis, large-scale policy failure, mass discontent, and intense external pressure. Few other modern autocracies have survived in the face of such extreme challenges. Drawing on comparative historical analysis, Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way argue that radical efforts to transform the social and geopolitical order trigger intense counterrevolutionary conflict, which initially threatens regime survival, but ultimately fosters the unity and state-building that supports authoritarianism. Steven Levitsky is the David Rockefeller Professor of Latin American Studies and Professor of Government at Harvard University. Lucan Way is a professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, where he co-directs the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine. The previous book by both authors is Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Sally Sharif is Simons Foundation Canada Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School for International Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her most recent paper is “Can the Rebel Body Function without its Visible Heads? The Role of Mid-Level Commanders in Peacebuilding.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Sociology
Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way, "Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 58:29


Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism (Princeton UP, 2022) explores why dictatorships born of social revolution—such as those in China, Cuba, Iran, the Soviet Union, and Vietnam—are extraordinarily durable, even in the face of economic crisis, large-scale policy failure, mass discontent, and intense external pressure. Few other modern autocracies have survived in the face of such extreme challenges. Drawing on comparative historical analysis, Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way argue that radical efforts to transform the social and geopolitical order trigger intense counterrevolutionary conflict, which initially threatens regime survival, but ultimately fosters the unity and state-building that supports authoritarianism. Steven Levitsky is the David Rockefeller Professor of Latin American Studies and Professor of Government at Harvard University. Lucan Way is a professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, where he co-directs the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine. The previous book by both authors is Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Sally Sharif is Simons Foundation Canada Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School for International Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her most recent paper is “Can the Rebel Body Function without its Visible Heads? The Role of Mid-Level Commanders in Peacebuilding.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Chinese Studies
Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way, "Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 58:29


Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism (Princeton UP, 2022) explores why dictatorships born of social revolution—such as those in China, Cuba, Iran, the Soviet Union, and Vietnam—are extraordinarily durable, even in the face of economic crisis, large-scale policy failure, mass discontent, and intense external pressure. Few other modern autocracies have survived in the face of such extreme challenges. Drawing on comparative historical analysis, Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way argue that radical efforts to transform the social and geopolitical order trigger intense counterrevolutionary conflict, which initially threatens regime survival, but ultimately fosters the unity and state-building that supports authoritarianism. Steven Levitsky is the David Rockefeller Professor of Latin American Studies and Professor of Government at Harvard University. Lucan Way is a professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, where he co-directs the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine. The previous book by both authors is Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Sally Sharif is Simons Foundation Canada Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School for International Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her most recent paper is “Can the Rebel Body Function without its Visible Heads? The Role of Mid-Level Commanders in Peacebuilding.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast
Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way, "Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism" (Princeton UP, 2022)

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 58:29


Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism (Princeton UP, 2022) explores why dictatorships born of social revolution—such as those in China, Cuba, Iran, the Soviet Union, and Vietnam—are extraordinarily durable, even in the face of economic crisis, large-scale policy failure, mass discontent, and intense external pressure. Few other modern autocracies have survived in the face of such extreme challenges. Drawing on comparative historical analysis, Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way argue that radical efforts to transform the social and geopolitical order trigger intense counterrevolutionary conflict, which initially threatens regime survival, but ultimately fosters the unity and state-building that supports authoritarianism. Steven Levitsky is the David Rockefeller Professor of Latin American Studies and Professor of Government at Harvard University. Lucan Way is a professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, where he co-directs the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine. The previous book by both authors is Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Sally Sharif is Simons Foundation Canada Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School for International Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her most recent paper is “Can the Rebel Body Function without its Visible Heads? The Role of Mid-Level Commanders in Peacebuilding.”

New Books Network
Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way, "Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 58:29


Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism (Princeton UP, 2022) explores why dictatorships born of social revolution—such as those in China, Cuba, Iran, the Soviet Union, and Vietnam—are extraordinarily durable, even in the face of economic crisis, large-scale policy failure, mass discontent, and intense external pressure. Few other modern autocracies have survived in the face of such extreme challenges. Drawing on comparative historical analysis, Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way argue that radical efforts to transform the social and geopolitical order trigger intense counterrevolutionary conflict, which initially threatens regime survival, but ultimately fosters the unity and state-building that supports authoritarianism. Steven Levitsky is the David Rockefeller Professor of Latin American Studies and Professor of Government at Harvard University. Lucan Way is a professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, where he co-directs the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine. The previous book by both authors is Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Sally Sharif is Simons Foundation Canada Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School for International Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her most recent paper is “Can the Rebel Body Function without its Visible Heads? The Role of Mid-Level Commanders in Peacebuilding.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way, "Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 58:29


Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism (Princeton UP, 2022) explores why dictatorships born of social revolution—such as those in China, Cuba, Iran, the Soviet Union, and Vietnam—are extraordinarily durable, even in the face of economic crisis, large-scale policy failure, mass discontent, and intense external pressure. Few other modern autocracies have survived in the face of such extreme challenges. Drawing on comparative historical analysis, Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way argue that radical efforts to transform the social and geopolitical order trigger intense counterrevolutionary conflict, which initially threatens regime survival, but ultimately fosters the unity and state-building that supports authoritarianism. Steven Levitsky is the David Rockefeller Professor of Latin American Studies and Professor of Government at Harvard University. Lucan Way is a professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, where he co-directs the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine. The previous book by both authors is Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Sally Sharif is Simons Foundation Canada Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School for International Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her most recent paper is “Can the Rebel Body Function without its Visible Heads? The Role of Mid-Level Commanders in Peacebuilding.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

New Books in African Studies
Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way, "Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in African Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 58:29


Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism (Princeton UP, 2022) explores why dictatorships born of social revolution—such as those in China, Cuba, Iran, the Soviet Union, and Vietnam—are extraordinarily durable, even in the face of economic crisis, large-scale policy failure, mass discontent, and intense external pressure. Few other modern autocracies have survived in the face of such extreme challenges. Drawing on comparative historical analysis, Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way argue that radical efforts to transform the social and geopolitical order trigger intense counterrevolutionary conflict, which initially threatens regime survival, but ultimately fosters the unity and state-building that supports authoritarianism. Steven Levitsky is the David Rockefeller Professor of Latin American Studies and Professor of Government at Harvard University. Lucan Way is a professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, where he co-directs the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine. The previous book by both authors is Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Sally Sharif is Simons Foundation Canada Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School for International Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her most recent paper is “Can the Rebel Body Function without its Visible Heads? The Role of Mid-Level Commanders in Peacebuilding.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

New Books in Central Asian Studies
Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way, "Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Central Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 58:29


Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism (Princeton UP, 2022) explores why dictatorships born of social revolution—such as those in China, Cuba, Iran, the Soviet Union, and Vietnam—are extraordinarily durable, even in the face of economic crisis, large-scale policy failure, mass discontent, and intense external pressure. Few other modern autocracies have survived in the face of such extreme challenges. Drawing on comparative historical analysis, Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way argue that radical efforts to transform the social and geopolitical order trigger intense counterrevolutionary conflict, which initially threatens regime survival, but ultimately fosters the unity and state-building that supports authoritarianism. Steven Levitsky is the David Rockefeller Professor of Latin American Studies and Professor of Government at Harvard University. Lucan Way is a professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, where he co-directs the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine. The previous book by both authors is Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Sally Sharif is Simons Foundation Canada Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School for International Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her most recent paper is “Can the Rebel Body Function without its Visible Heads? The Role of Mid-Level Commanders in Peacebuilding.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/central-asian-studies

New Books in Eastern European Studies
Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way, "Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Eastern European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 58:29


Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism (Princeton UP, 2022) explores why dictatorships born of social revolution—such as those in China, Cuba, Iran, the Soviet Union, and Vietnam—are extraordinarily durable, even in the face of economic crisis, large-scale policy failure, mass discontent, and intense external pressure. Few other modern autocracies have survived in the face of such extreme challenges. Drawing on comparative historical analysis, Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way argue that radical efforts to transform the social and geopolitical order trigger intense counterrevolutionary conflict, which initially threatens regime survival, but ultimately fosters the unity and state-building that supports authoritarianism. Steven Levitsky is the David Rockefeller Professor of Latin American Studies and Professor of Government at Harvard University. Lucan Way is a professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, where he co-directs the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine. The previous book by both authors is Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Sally Sharif is Simons Foundation Canada Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School for International Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her most recent paper is “Can the Rebel Body Function without its Visible Heads? The Role of Mid-Level Commanders in Peacebuilding.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/eastern-european-studies

New Books in Latin American Studies
Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way, "Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 58:29


Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism (Princeton UP, 2022) explores why dictatorships born of social revolution—such as those in China, Cuba, Iran, the Soviet Union, and Vietnam—are extraordinarily durable, even in the face of economic crisis, large-scale policy failure, mass discontent, and intense external pressure. Few other modern autocracies have survived in the face of such extreme challenges. Drawing on comparative historical analysis, Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way argue that radical efforts to transform the social and geopolitical order trigger intense counterrevolutionary conflict, which initially threatens regime survival, but ultimately fosters the unity and state-building that supports authoritarianism. Steven Levitsky is the David Rockefeller Professor of Latin American Studies and Professor of Government at Harvard University. Lucan Way is a professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, where he co-directs the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine. The previous book by both authors is Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Sally Sharif is Simons Foundation Canada Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School for International Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her most recent paper is “Can the Rebel Body Function without its Visible Heads? The Role of Mid-Level Commanders in Peacebuilding.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books in World Affairs
Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way, "Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 58:29


Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism (Princeton UP, 2022) explores why dictatorships born of social revolution—such as those in China, Cuba, Iran, the Soviet Union, and Vietnam—are extraordinarily durable, even in the face of economic crisis, large-scale policy failure, mass discontent, and intense external pressure. Few other modern autocracies have survived in the face of such extreme challenges. Drawing on comparative historical analysis, Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way argue that radical efforts to transform the social and geopolitical order trigger intense counterrevolutionary conflict, which initially threatens regime survival, but ultimately fosters the unity and state-building that supports authoritarianism. Steven Levitsky is the David Rockefeller Professor of Latin American Studies and Professor of Government at Harvard University. Lucan Way is a professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, where he co-directs the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine. The previous book by both authors is Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Sally Sharif is Simons Foundation Canada Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School for International Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her most recent paper is “Can the Rebel Body Function without its Visible Heads? The Role of Mid-Level Commanders in Peacebuilding.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

NBN Book of the Day
Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way, "Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism" (Princeton UP, 2022)

NBN Book of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 58:29


Revolution and Dictatorship: The Violent Origins of Durable Authoritarianism (Princeton UP, 2022) explores why dictatorships born of social revolution—such as those in China, Cuba, Iran, the Soviet Union, and Vietnam—are extraordinarily durable, even in the face of economic crisis, large-scale policy failure, mass discontent, and intense external pressure. Few other modern autocracies have survived in the face of such extreme challenges. Drawing on comparative historical analysis, Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way argue that radical efforts to transform the social and geopolitical order trigger intense counterrevolutionary conflict, which initially threatens regime survival, but ultimately fosters the unity and state-building that supports authoritarianism. Steven Levitsky is the David Rockefeller Professor of Latin American Studies and Professor of Government at Harvard University. Lucan Way is a professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, where he co-directs the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine. The previous book by both authors is Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Sally Sharif is Simons Foundation Canada Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School for International Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her most recent paper is “Can the Rebel Body Function without its Visible Heads? The Role of Mid-Level Commanders in Peacebuilding.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/book-of-the-day

The Real News Podcast
William Robinson: Global Revolts in the Age of COVID Capitalism

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 74:45


Read the transcript of this episode: Capitalism's response to the COVID-19 pandemic has come at the expense of the lives, health, and freedom of millions of poor and working people around the world. While corporations guzzle profits at every opportunity, governments have been ready to discipline workers to keep profits churning, and cooperation between capitalist states and the transnational capitalist class during COVID has led to the erection of a global police state. What forms of resistance are taking shape around the globe to the emerging post-pandemic police state and a capitalist order dead set on destroying our shared planet and even human civilization as such? In the second installment of our two-part interview with Professor William Robinson, TRNN Editor-in-Chief Maximillian Alvarez continues his discussion with Robinson about his latest trilogy of books on capitalism in the time of the pandemic.William I. Robinson is Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Global Studies, and Latin American Studies at the University of California at Santa Barbara. Among his many books are Global Capitalism and the Crisis of Humanity; Into the Tempest: Essays on the New Global Capitalism; The Global Police State; Global Civil War: Capitalism Post-Pandemic; and Can Global Capitalism Endure?Post-Production: Jules TaylorHelp us continue producing radically independent news and in-depth analysis by following us and becoming a monthly sustainer: Donate: https://therealnews.com/donate-podSign up for our newsletter: https://therealnews.com/newsletter-podLike us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/therealnewsFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/therealnews

UNC Press Presents Podcast
Sarah Abel, "Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome" (UNC Press, 2021)

UNC Press Presents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 65:38


Over the past twenty years, DNA ancestry testing has morphed from a niche market into a booming international industry that encourages members of the public to answer difficult questions about their identity by looking to the genome. At a time of intensified interest in issues of race and racism, the burgeoning influence of corporations like AncestryDNA and 23andMe has sparked debates about the commodification of identity, the antiracist potential of genetic science, and the promises and pitfalls of using DNA as a source of "objective" knowledge about the past.  Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome (University of North Carolina Press, 2021) engages these debates by looking at the ways genomic ancestry testing has been used in Brazil and the United States to address the histories and legacies of slavery, from personal genealogical projects to collective racial politics. Reckoning with the struggles of science versus capitalism, "race-blind" versus "race-positive" public policies, and identity fluidity versus embodied experiences of racism, Permanent Markers seeks to explain why those of us in societies that have broadly embraced the social construction of race continue to search for, and find, evidence that our bodies are marked permanently by the past. Sarah Abel is British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Cambridge's Centre of Latin American Studies.  Reighan Gillam is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at University of Southern California.

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Sarah Abel, "Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 65:38


Over the past twenty years, DNA ancestry testing has morphed from a niche market into a booming international industry that encourages members of the public to answer difficult questions about their identity by looking to the genome. At a time of intensified interest in issues of race and racism, the burgeoning influence of corporations like AncestryDNA and 23andMe has sparked debates about the commodification of identity, the antiracist potential of genetic science, and the promises and pitfalls of using DNA as a source of "objective" knowledge about the past.  Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome (University of North Carolina Press, 2021) engages these debates by looking at the ways genomic ancestry testing has been used in Brazil and the United States to address the histories and legacies of slavery, from personal genealogical projects to collective racial politics. Reckoning with the struggles of science versus capitalism, "race-blind" versus "race-positive" public policies, and identity fluidity versus embodied experiences of racism, Permanent Markers seeks to explain why those of us in societies that have broadly embraced the social construction of race continue to search for, and find, evidence that our bodies are marked permanently by the past. Sarah Abel is British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Cambridge's Centre of Latin American Studies.  Reighan Gillam is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at University of Southern California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

New Books in African American Studies
Sarah Abel, "Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 65:38


Over the past twenty years, DNA ancestry testing has morphed from a niche market into a booming international industry that encourages members of the public to answer difficult questions about their identity by looking to the genome. At a time of intensified interest in issues of race and racism, the burgeoning influence of corporations like AncestryDNA and 23andMe has sparked debates about the commodification of identity, the antiracist potential of genetic science, and the promises and pitfalls of using DNA as a source of "objective" knowledge about the past.  Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome (University of North Carolina Press, 2021) engages these debates by looking at the ways genomic ancestry testing has been used in Brazil and the United States to address the histories and legacies of slavery, from personal genealogical projects to collective racial politics. Reckoning with the struggles of science versus capitalism, "race-blind" versus "race-positive" public policies, and identity fluidity versus embodied experiences of racism, Permanent Markers seeks to explain why those of us in societies that have broadly embraced the social construction of race continue to search for, and find, evidence that our bodies are marked permanently by the past. Sarah Abel is British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Cambridge's Centre of Latin American Studies.  Reighan Gillam is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at University of Southern California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in Technology
Sarah Abel, "Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in Technology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 65:38


Over the past twenty years, DNA ancestry testing has morphed from a niche market into a booming international industry that encourages members of the public to answer difficult questions about their identity by looking to the genome. At a time of intensified interest in issues of race and racism, the burgeoning influence of corporations like AncestryDNA and 23andMe has sparked debates about the commodification of identity, the antiracist potential of genetic science, and the promises and pitfalls of using DNA as a source of "objective" knowledge about the past.  Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome (University of North Carolina Press, 2021) engages these debates by looking at the ways genomic ancestry testing has been used in Brazil and the United States to address the histories and legacies of slavery, from personal genealogical projects to collective racial politics. Reckoning with the struggles of science versus capitalism, "race-blind" versus "race-positive" public policies, and identity fluidity versus embodied experiences of racism, Permanent Markers seeks to explain why those of us in societies that have broadly embraced the social construction of race continue to search for, and find, evidence that our bodies are marked permanently by the past. Sarah Abel is British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Cambridge's Centre of Latin American Studies.  Reighan Gillam is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at University of Southern California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/technology

New Books in Sociology
Sarah Abel, "Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 65:38


Over the past twenty years, DNA ancestry testing has morphed from a niche market into a booming international industry that encourages members of the public to answer difficult questions about their identity by looking to the genome. At a time of intensified interest in issues of race and racism, the burgeoning influence of corporations like AncestryDNA and 23andMe has sparked debates about the commodification of identity, the antiracist potential of genetic science, and the promises and pitfalls of using DNA as a source of "objective" knowledge about the past.  Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome (University of North Carolina Press, 2021) engages these debates by looking at the ways genomic ancestry testing has been used in Brazil and the United States to address the histories and legacies of slavery, from personal genealogical projects to collective racial politics. Reckoning with the struggles of science versus capitalism, "race-blind" versus "race-positive" public policies, and identity fluidity versus embodied experiences of racism, Permanent Markers seeks to explain why those of us in societies that have broadly embraced the social construction of race continue to search for, and find, evidence that our bodies are marked permanently by the past. Sarah Abel is British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Cambridge's Centre of Latin American Studies.  Reighan Gillam is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at University of Southern California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Critical Theory
Sarah Abel, "Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 65:38


Over the past twenty years, DNA ancestry testing has morphed from a niche market into a booming international industry that encourages members of the public to answer difficult questions about their identity by looking to the genome. At a time of intensified interest in issues of race and racism, the burgeoning influence of corporations like AncestryDNA and 23andMe has sparked debates about the commodification of identity, the antiracist potential of genetic science, and the promises and pitfalls of using DNA as a source of "objective" knowledge about the past.  Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome (University of North Carolina Press, 2021) engages these debates by looking at the ways genomic ancestry testing has been used in Brazil and the United States to address the histories and legacies of slavery, from personal genealogical projects to collective racial politics. Reckoning with the struggles of science versus capitalism, "race-blind" versus "race-positive" public policies, and identity fluidity versus embodied experiences of racism, Permanent Markers seeks to explain why those of us in societies that have broadly embraced the social construction of race continue to search for, and find, evidence that our bodies are marked permanently by the past. Sarah Abel is British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Cambridge's Centre of Latin American Studies.  Reighan Gillam is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at University of Southern California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books in Anthropology
Sarah Abel, "Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 65:38


Over the past twenty years, DNA ancestry testing has morphed from a niche market into a booming international industry that encourages members of the public to answer difficult questions about their identity by looking to the genome. At a time of intensified interest in issues of race and racism, the burgeoning influence of corporations like AncestryDNA and 23andMe has sparked debates about the commodification of identity, the antiracist potential of genetic science, and the promises and pitfalls of using DNA as a source of "objective" knowledge about the past.  Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome (University of North Carolina Press, 2021) engages these debates by looking at the ways genomic ancestry testing has been used in Brazil and the United States to address the histories and legacies of slavery, from personal genealogical projects to collective racial politics. Reckoning with the struggles of science versus capitalism, "race-blind" versus "race-positive" public policies, and identity fluidity versus embodied experiences of racism, Permanent Markers seeks to explain why those of us in societies that have broadly embraced the social construction of race continue to search for, and find, evidence that our bodies are marked permanently by the past. Sarah Abel is British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Cambridge's Centre of Latin American Studies.  Reighan Gillam is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at University of Southern California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

New Books in Latin American Studies
Sarah Abel, "Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 65:38


Over the past twenty years, DNA ancestry testing has morphed from a niche market into a booming international industry that encourages members of the public to answer difficult questions about their identity by looking to the genome. At a time of intensified interest in issues of race and racism, the burgeoning influence of corporations like AncestryDNA and 23andMe has sparked debates about the commodification of identity, the antiracist potential of genetic science, and the promises and pitfalls of using DNA as a source of "objective" knowledge about the past.  Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome (University of North Carolina Press, 2021) engages these debates by looking at the ways genomic ancestry testing has been used in Brazil and the United States to address the histories and legacies of slavery, from personal genealogical projects to collective racial politics. Reckoning with the struggles of science versus capitalism, "race-blind" versus "race-positive" public policies, and identity fluidity versus embodied experiences of racism, Permanent Markers seeks to explain why those of us in societies that have broadly embraced the social construction of race continue to search for, and find, evidence that our bodies are marked permanently by the past. Sarah Abel is British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Cambridge's Centre of Latin American Studies.  Reighan Gillam is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at University of Southern California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books in American Studies
Sarah Abel, "Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 65:38


Over the past twenty years, DNA ancestry testing has morphed from a niche market into a booming international industry that encourages members of the public to answer difficult questions about their identity by looking to the genome. At a time of intensified interest in issues of race and racism, the burgeoning influence of corporations like AncestryDNA and 23andMe has sparked debates about the commodification of identity, the antiracist potential of genetic science, and the promises and pitfalls of using DNA as a source of "objective" knowledge about the past.  Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome (University of North Carolina Press, 2021) engages these debates by looking at the ways genomic ancestry testing has been used in Brazil and the United States to address the histories and legacies of slavery, from personal genealogical projects to collective racial politics. Reckoning with the struggles of science versus capitalism, "race-blind" versus "race-positive" public policies, and identity fluidity versus embodied experiences of racism, Permanent Markers seeks to explain why those of us in societies that have broadly embraced the social construction of race continue to search for, and find, evidence that our bodies are marked permanently by the past. Sarah Abel is British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Cambridge's Centre of Latin American Studies.  Reighan Gillam is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at University of Southern California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Sarah Abel, "Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 65:38


Over the past twenty years, DNA ancestry testing has morphed from a niche market into a booming international industry that encourages members of the public to answer difficult questions about their identity by looking to the genome. At a time of intensified interest in issues of race and racism, the burgeoning influence of corporations like AncestryDNA and 23andMe has sparked debates about the commodification of identity, the antiracist potential of genetic science, and the promises and pitfalls of using DNA as a source of "objective" knowledge about the past.  Permanent Markers: Race, Ancestry, and the Body After the Genome (University of North Carolina Press, 2021) engages these debates by looking at the ways genomic ancestry testing has been used in Brazil and the United States to address the histories and legacies of slavery, from personal genealogical projects to collective racial politics. Reckoning with the struggles of science versus capitalism, "race-blind" versus "race-positive" public policies, and identity fluidity versus embodied experiences of racism, Permanent Markers seeks to explain why those of us in societies that have broadly embraced the social construction of race continue to search for, and find, evidence that our bodies are marked permanently by the past. Sarah Abel is British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Cambridge's Centre of Latin American Studies.  Reighan Gillam is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at University of Southern California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)
Fundación Tú Más Yo: Focused Community Support - Creative Conversations

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 43:19


How do we move from purpose to action? Fundación Tú Más Yo focuses on community development through education and collaboration. Toñe Beguerisse and Dalia Rodriguez speak with Morgan Appel about how they implement programs and work directly with communities to create change. Series: "Education Channel" [Public Affairs] [Humanities] [Education] [Show ID: 38414]

Humanities (Audio)
Fundación Tú Más Yo: Focused Community Support - Creative Conversations

Humanities (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 43:19


How do we move from purpose to action? Fundación Tú Más Yo focuses on community development through education and collaboration. Toñe Beguerisse and Dalia Rodriguez speak with Morgan Appel about how they implement programs and work directly with communities to create change. Series: "Education Channel" [Public Affairs] [Humanities] [Education] [Show ID: 38414]

Latin America (Video)
Fundación Tú Más Yo: Focused Community Support - Creative Conversations

Latin America (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 43:19


How do we move from purpose to action? Fundación Tú Más Yo focuses on community development through education and collaboration. Toñe Beguerisse and Dalia Rodriguez speak with Morgan Appel about how they implement programs and work directly with communities to create change. Series: "Education Channel" [Public Affairs] [Humanities] [Education] [Show ID: 38414]

KPFA - UpFront
Aviva Chomsky on Climate Justice, Reparations, and De-Growth

KPFA - UpFront

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 59:58


00:08 Aviva Chomsky, professor of History and Latin American Studies at Salem State, on her new book Is Science Enough: Forty Critical Questions About Climate Justice The post Aviva Chomsky on Climate Justice, Reparations, and De-Growth appeared first on KPFA.

The Real News Podcast
COVID-19 and the global police state with Professor William Robinson

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 76:47


Capitalism was in crisis before the COVID-19 pandemic, and existing conditions of inequality, dispossession, and ecological ruin set the stage for the deadly success of the coronavirus. But how has COVID-19 changed capitalism, and where is the system headed now? The system shock of the pandemic has provoked growing resistance from the working class. At the same time, the wealthiest fraction of society has exploited the crisis of COVID-19 to accelerate their accumulation of wealth and violent dispossession of the world's majority. Professor William I. Robinson argues that humanity is now on a path towards the election of a "global police state," unless it can be stopped by organized resistance from below. TRNN Editor-in-Chief Maximillian Alvarez speaks with Robinson about his new book, Global Civil War: Capitalism Post-Pandemic, in the first of a multi-part interview.William I. Robinson is Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Global Studies, and Latin American Studies at the University of California at Santa Barbara. Among his many books are Global Capitalism and the Crisis of Humanity; Into the Tempest: Essays on the New Global Capitalism; The Global Police State; Global Civil War: Capitalism Post-Pandemic; and Can Global Capitalism Endure?Post-Production: Jules TaylorHelp us continue producing radically independent news and in-depth analysis by following us and becoming a monthly sustainer: Donate: https://therealnews.com/donate-podSign up for our newsletter: https://therealnews.com/newsletter-podLike us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/therealnewsFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/therealnews

Rádio Escafandro
80: Bolsonaro vai pagar?

Rádio Escafandro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 67:37


O presidente Jair Bolsonaro cometeu uma série de crimes e contravenções nos quase quatro anos de mandato presidencial. Crimes que vão de quebra de protocolos sanitários a abuso de poder político e econômico nas eleições, passando por charlatanismo e prevaricação. Mas, nesses quase quatro anos, assim como nas últimas três décadas, Bolsonaro esteve protegido por um dispositivo jurídico chamado foro por prerrogativa de função - popularmente conhecido como foro privilegiado. Por isso, o presidente nunca chegou a responder pelos crimes cometidos. Isso deve mudar a partir do ano que vem, quando Bolsonaro deixará de ter foro privilegiado. Diante disso, este episódio escuta três especialistas em direito para saber como será o futuro jurídico do presidente. *** Ajude a manter a Rádio Escafandro no ar! *** Entrevistados do episódio Rodrigo Haidar Jornalista especializado no Poder Judiciário, é colunista da Rádio Band News FM e criador da editora Amanuense Livros, voltada para questões jurídicas. Trabalhou no site Consultor Jurídico, onde foi editor e chefe de redação, no Ig e na Carta Capital. Rafael Mafei Bacharel, mestre, doutor e livre-docente em direito, é Professor Associado da Faculdade de Direito da Universidade de São Paulo. Foi pesquisador bolsista no Instituto Max Planck para Direito Penal Estrangeiro e Internacional, no Center for Latin American Studies da American University, em Washington-DC, e no Centre for Socio-Legal Studies da Universidade de Oxford. Fábio de Sá e Silva É professor de Estudos Brasileiros na Universidade de Oklahoma, EUA, e pesquisador afiliado do Centro de Profissões Jurídicas da Harvard Law School. Tem formação em direito, ciências sociais e políticas públicas, com graduação (USP, 2002) e mestrado em direito (UnB, 2007), e PhD em Direito, Politica e Sociedade (Law, Policy & Society) pela Northeastern University (EUA). Ficha técnica Trilha sonora tema: Paulo Gama Mixagem: Vitor Coroa Design das capas: Cláudia Furnari Concepção, roteiro, e edição: Tomás Chiaverini

Out Of The Blank
#1265 - Marc Becker

Out Of The Blank

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 74:41


Marc Becker is a professor of Latin American Studies at Truman State University and part of Historians Against the War that was formed at the January 2003 American Historical Association meeting in response to the Bush administration's threats against Iraq. Marc is the author of various works such as "The FBI in Latin America: The Ecuador Files" where through a trove of FBI documents from its Ecuador mission to uncover the history and purpose of the SIS's intervention in Latin America and for the light they shed on leftist organizing efforts in Latin America. Ultimately, the FBI's activities reveal the sustained nature of US imperial ambitions in the Americas. Another book titled "The CIA in Ecuador" which draws on recently released US government surveillance documents on the Ecuadorian left to chart social movement organizing efforts during the 1950s. Emphasizing the competing roles of the domestic ruling class and grassroots social movements, Becker details the struggles and difficulties that activists, organizers, and political parties confronted. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/out-of-the-blank-podcast/support

LibVoices
Episode 29: Jimmy Zavala on Community Archives, Counternarratives, and Student Empowerment

LibVoices

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 39:47


Jimmy Zavala is the Teaching & Learning Librarian for UCLA Library Special Collections. Prior to joining UCLA, Jimmy was the Project Coordinator Librarian for Transforming Knowledge, Transforming Libraries, a three-year IMLS-funded research project analyzing the intersection of Ethnic Studies and Community Archives at UC Irvine. He received his MLIS from UCLA and also holds a BA in Latin American Studies and an MA in History from California State University, Los Angeles.

Short History Of...
The Conquistadors

Short History Of...