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Virginia Water Radio
Episode 636 (9-12-22): Two Shorebirds That Stand Out on Their Yellow Legs

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:27).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-9-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of September 12 and September 19, 2022. SOUNDS – ~2 sec – short examples of calls by Greater Yellowlegs (first) and Lesser Yellowlegs (second). In this episode, we feature two shorebirds whose long, colorful legs are a distinctive mark.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds and see if you can guess the name shared by these two species that's based on that characteristic.  And here's a hint: the name rhymes with what a person eats when they get two scrambled for breakfast. SOUNDS  - ~21 sec If you guessed yellowlegs, you're right!  You heard, first, the Greater Yellowlegs, and second, the Lesser Yellowlegs.  Both are known as “marsh sandpipers” or simply “marshpipers” because they're in the family of shorebirds called sandpipers and they prefer marshes or other wetland habitats.  Greater Yellowlegs are also sometimes called “tattlers” because of their noisy alarm calls.  The two species are the only tall sandpipers in North America with legs colored bright yellow or sometimes orange.  They're distinguished from one another by the somewhat larger size of the Greater Yellowlegs, by that species' bigger and slightly upturned bill, and by differences between their calls.  Both species breed in the tundra or forests of Canada and Alaska, and both then migrate to spend winter in the southern United States, Mexico, Central America, or South America.  The Lesser Yellowlegs is typically found in Virginia only during migration, but the Greater Yellowlegs can be found wintering along Virginia's coast.  These birds hunt in shallow water and on mud flats for their prey of fish, frogs, and a variety of invertebrate animals, such as insects, worms, snails, and shrimp. If you're visiting coastal Virginia between fall and spring and you're watching the birds, here's hoping you encounter some yellow-legged ones wading in shallow waters to find their food. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the yellowlegs' sounds, from the Stokes' Field Guide to Bird Songs, and we let the Greater Yellowlegs have the last call. SOUNDS – ~5 sec SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of “Cripple Creek” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The sounds of the Greater Yellowlegs and Lesser Yellowlegs were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Greater Yellowlegs, photographed at Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia, August 11, 2022.  Photo by iNaturalist user kenttrulsson, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/132685927(as of 9-12-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.Lesser Yellowlegs, at Virginia Beach, Va., May 3, 2022.  Photo by iNaturalist user hikerguy150, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/116695303(as of 9-12-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT GREATER YELLOWLEGS AND LESSER YELLOWLEGS The following information is excerpted from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, “Yellowlegs,” text by Richard Carstensen (undated), updated by David Tessler in 2007, online (as a PDF) at https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/education/wns/yellowlegs.pdf. “Mixed assemblages of small shorebirds combing our coastal wetlands in spring are likely to be accompanied by several yellowlegs, immediately recognizable by their greater size. As the “peeps” scurry over the mud and along the waters edge, the yellowlegs, with a more careful, heron-likeelegance, wade out into ponds and sloughs in search of different prey.“General description: Yellowlegs can be distinguished from other shorebirds by the long, straight oralmost imperceptibly upturned bill and the very long, bright yellow legs.  The neck is longer and moreslender than that of most shorebirds. ...Distinguishing betweenthe two...species of yellowlegs is more difficult.  Plumage of the two birds is nearly identical.  None of the following distinctions are completely reliable by themselves, and if possible they should be used in conjunction with each other.  When seen together, as often occurs in migration, the greater yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca) stands9-10 inches high (0.25 m), taller than the lesser yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes).  The greater yellowlegs has a somewhat thicker bill than the lesser, and it may turn upward very slightly, while that of the lesser yellowlegs is slighter and quite straight.  The calls of the two species are distinctive.  The greater yellowlegs has a louder and clearer call, often uttered in a three- or four-note sequence, ‘kyew kyew kyew,' with a falling inflection to each syllable.  The lesser yellowlegs tends to call once or twice.  Both species of yellowlegs have a ‘yodeling' song in addition to the better known sharp alarm calls.  This song is given either from the ground or during display flights and has been variously interpreted as ‘toowhee, toowhee,' ‘tweda, tweda,' or ‘whee-oodle, whee-oodle.'  It is heard both on the breeding grounds and in migration. ... “Life history: ...Fall migration begins in late July and lasts through September.  Primary routes are midcontinental (mostly west of the Mississippi River) in spring and both midcontinental and along the Atlantic coast in fall.  Wintering yellowlegs are scattered along the coasts from South America through California and Oregon.  In South America, birds concentrate where shallow lagoons and brackish herbaceous marshes lie adjacent to the outer coast.  Flooded agricultural fields, especially rice fields, have also become important.  In mild years greater yellowlegs winter as far north as southern Vancouver Island. “Behavior and feeding: The exaggerated legs of the Tringa genus are best explained by the custom of feeding in the water, often wading out beyond the belly depths of less elevated relatives.  Among shorebirds, long bills usually accompany long legs for the same reason.  The greater yellowlegs is an accomplished fisher, at times preying almost exclusively on small estuarine fishes such as sticklebacks and sculpins.  Sometimes groups of feeding yellowlegs will form lines, wading abreast to corner fish in the shallows.  Both yellowlegs, particularly the lesser, also eat invertebrates.  Adults and larvae of aquatic insects such as water boatmen, diving beetles, dragonfly nymphs, and flies are important in the diet, as are sand fleas and intertidal amphipods.  Terrestrial invertebrates such as ants,grasshoppers, snails, spiders and worms are also taken.  In spite of the length of the yellowlegs bill, it is rarely used for probing in sand or mud.  The greater yellowlegs will swing its bill from side to side in the water; the lesser yellowlegs does not. “Both yellowlegs breed in the boreal forest and the transitions between forest and tundra in wet bogs and open muskegs. During migration, both species frequent brackish tidal sloughs and mudflats, as well as the edges of freshwater lakes and ponds.  Lesser yellowlegs occasionally swim, an unusual practice amongshorebirds.  The lesser yellowlegs seems somewhat more gregarious than the greater, although both are seen in loose flocks.” SOURCES Used for Audio Alaska Department of Fish and Game, “Yellowlegs,” text by Richard Carstensen (undated), updated by David Tessler in 2007, online (as a PDF) at https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/education/wns/yellowlegs.pdf. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, 2001. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Greater Yellowlegs entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/greater_yellowlegs; there was no entry for Lesser Yellowlegs (as of 9-9-22). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.  The Greater Yellowlegs entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Greater_Yellowlegs/; the Lesser Yellowlegs entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Lesser_Yellowlegs/. Hugh Jennings, “Bird of the Month: Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs,” Eastside Audubon, August 23, 2018, online at https://www.eastsideaudubon.org/corvid-crier/2019/8/26/greaterlesser-yellowlegs. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  The Greater Yellowlegs entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040130&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19244; the Lesser Yellowlegs entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040131&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19244. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. For More Information about Birds in Virginia or Elsewhere University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin,” online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/.  This site and its accompanying mobile app allow identification of birds by photo or sound.Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here

united states america music relationships new york university california game canada world education college guide water state mexico fall zoom living land stand research society tech government foundation oregon north america environment press fish md normal natural web dark va rain baltimore alaska ocean birds animals atlantic snow cd behavior citizens agency south america cambridge stream mixed adults priority plants biology native environmental primary bay images yellow dynamic grade bio commonwealth index legs processes menu central america pond signature virginia tech arial merlin scales accent atlantic ocean life sciences lesser stokes natural resources virginia beach adaptations mississippi river compatibility colorful vancouver island populations msonormal ls field guides times new roman distinguishing aquatic sections watershed zoology organisms flooded chesapeake chesapeake bay minn taxonomy policymakers new standard acknowledgment terrestrial ornithology cambria math style definitions worddocument xeno virginia department stormwater wintering johns hopkins university press saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting sols lidthemeother x none lidthemeasian snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup subsup undovr latentstylecount donotpromoteqf mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin wrapindent rmargin defjc intlim narylim inaturalist defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked qformat semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles bmp table normal name title cripple creek name strong name emphasis name normal name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference birdsongs ebird living systems grades k wildlife resources biotic alaska department shorebirds name e cumberland gap plumage light accent dark accent colorful accent name list name date name plain text name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table killdeer inland fisheries name mention name hashtag name unresolved mention virginia society michigan museum all about birds audio notes lang elliott water center tmdl lang elliot virginia standards chandler s robbins
OBS
Sumpcypressens ögonblick gör människan gåtfull

OBS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 9:53


När är människan vild och när är hon civiliserad? Venetianarnas syn på skogen på 1700-talet kan lära oss mycket om vilka vi är och kan vara. Idéhistorikern Julia Nordblad reflekterar över trädens tid. ESSÄ: Detta är en text där skribenten reflekterar över ett ämne eller ett verk. Åsikter som uttrycks är skribentens egna. Ursprungligen publiceras 2020.Trädet kallades Senatorn, men eftersom det var så gammalt var det namnet förstås bara det senaste i en lång rad. När trädet en gång varit ungt hade varken kristendom eller islam funnits i världen, och när européer dök upp på den halvö på den nordamerikanska kontinenten där det levde, hade det redan stått där och långsamt låtit rötterna treva sig genom marken i tretusen år. En bra bit in på dess fjärde årtusende hade en svensk upplysningsman ordnat all världens växter och djur i ett enda system, och därmed givit trädet ett annat av dess namn: Taxodium distichum, sumpcypress.Stefano Mancuso och Alessandra Viola beskriver i boken Intelligenta växter: Den överraskande vetenskapen om växternas hemliga liv det evolutionära vägskäl som för femhundra miljoner år sedan skiljde växterna från djuren. Då föddes två radikalt olika, men båda framgångsrika, förslag på hur livet kan utvecklas och mångfaldiga sig in i framtiden. Ett stillastående och långsamt växtliv mot ett kortare, rörligt djurliv.Medan trädet i en oavbruten rörelse, decennium efter decennium, århundrade efter århundrade sträcker sig mot solen smattrar våra livstider förbi. Stater, ja hela civilisationer dyker upp och försvinner igen. Stillastående rör sig trädet förbi oss, in i framtiden.Vi lever sida vid sida genom ett helt människoliv, för trädet ett ögonblick. Trädets tid gör människan gåtfull: vilka är vi egentligen, vi rörliga, kortlivade?Många samhällen har försökt sträcka sig efter trädens tid för att säkra tillgången på timmer och bränsle. Inte hugga för tidigt, inte allt på en gång, ge sig till tåls. Genom hela moderniteten har statstjänstemän, politiker och filosofer brottats med frågan om vad som kan förmå människor att anpassa sig till den långa tiden? Svaren har varit olika, och varje samhälles förhållande till träden har därför också speglat vad det har trott om människan.I renässansrepubliken Venedig var trädens tid en ständig huvudvärk. Historiken Karl Appuhn beskriver i boken A Forest on the Sea hur Venedig byggde hela sin existens på handel och militära expeditioner sjövägen. Det var en stat vars glans och ära krävde skepp på skepp av trä, en hel skog på havet. För att garantera republikens fortlevnad byggde den venetianska politiska klassen under loppet av fyra hundra år upp ett intrikat system av lagar och institutioner för att hushålla med skogen så att det alltid skulle finnas timmer av tillräcklig storlek att bygga fartyg av.I början av 1700-talet skickade den venetianska senaten ut en skogsinspektör vid namn Leonardo Mocenigo för att inventera skogarna på fastlandet. Han gick grundligt till väga. Nöjde sig inte med att avlägga rapport om ekbeståndet, utan försökte också utveckla den politiska vokabulär han tyckte att ett samhälle behövde när det var helt beroende av en växt som tog flera århundraden på sig att bli färdig för skörd. Mocenigo hittade orden för vad han såg som principerna bakom en långsiktig skogspolitik.Genom att använda italienskans olika ord för skog illustrerade han hur skogspolitiken i grunden handlade om människan. Bosco var den skog som sköttes väl, det vill säga som brukades enligt republikens principer, med det allmänna bästa i meningen samhällets långsiktiga intressen för ögonen. Kontrasten var selva, vildmarken. Men inte vildmarken som vi tänker oss den idag, som den orörda naturen, utan vildmarken som den natur där den vilda människan fått härja och det kortsiktiga egenintresset styra. Både bosco och selva var alltså människans skogar. Den avgörande skillnaden låg inte i huruvida människan alls hade brukat naturen, utan i vem hon varit när hon gjort det. Vad hon låtit sig drivas av när hon planerat, och huggit eller avstått och låtit träden stå kvar. Hur långt framåt hon sett.Mocenigos sätt att föreställa sig relationen mellan människan, republiken och naturen var inte främmande för hans publik, alltså de venetianska senatorerna. De var vana vid att betrakta de politiska institutionerna som garanter för det långsiktiga allmänintresset. Men Mocenigos ord för skogen ställer frågor vi är mindre vana vid idag. När är människan vild och när är hon civiliserad? Vad behövs för att hålla den vilda, den kortsiktiga, människan borta från skogen?Venetianarnas framtid hängde på tillgången på högklassigt timmer och de byggde därför upp en byråkrati och ett politiskt språk som garanterade att träden fick stå i ett par hundra år. Vår framtid är beroende av riktiga skogar, för att dämpa den globala upphettningen och dess effekter, binda koldioxid och jord, rädda några av alla de arter som riskerar att försvinna för alltid. Venedigs villkor är på så sätt också vårt: utan träd ingen framtid. Kan vi lära oss något av venetianarna, deras institutioner och ord för trädens tid?Den sumpcypress som kallades Senatorn var välkänd i sin trakt i det som idag är Florida. Med sin nästan fyrtio meter höga, till stor del ihåliga stam var den ett landmärke i terrängen, liksom i människors minnen och vanor. Klockan halv sex på morgonen den sextonde januari 2012 kröp tjugosexåriga Sara Barnes in där, som hon brukade, för att i lugn och ro få röka sitt metamfetamin. Som vanligt gjorde hon upp en liten eld för att se bättre. Just den här dagen måste Sara ha varit ostadig på handen, för plötsligt hade elden spritt sig till trädets stam, och gick inte att släcka längre. När brandkåren kom brann sumpcypressen som en skorsten och var bortom räddning. Senatorn blev dess sista namn.Människan har potential för allt. Av alla rörliga livsformer är hon den rörligaste. Också hennes förhållande till tid är föränderligt. Hon kan offra vad som helst för ruset sju minuter bort, eller planera för de kommande tre hundra åren. Frågan är åt vilken människa ett samhälle anförtror skogen. Vårt förhållande till träden miljöfrågan om man så vill handlar inte så mycket om vårt förhållande till naturen som om vårt förhållande till oss själva. Vem vårt samhälle tror att människan är, och vem det gör henne till.Hur har vi det med trädens tid idag? Har vi ens ord för den? Är det selva eller bosco som Sveaskog kalhugger?Kortsynta myllrar vi kring trädens fötter, ägnar dem sällan någon uppmärksamhet. Ändå är vår tillvaro trädens och växternas verk. När de en gång i prekambrisk tid lämnade livet i havet förändrades allt. Det var de som syresatte luften, sänkte koldioxidhalten i atmosfären och temperaturen på jorden. Växterna skapade långsamt de rätta omständigheterna för en evolutionär explosion av alltmer komplexa livsformer. De genererade hela den biokemiska sfär på planetens yta där det rörliga livet kunde mångfaldigas, där människan kunde utvecklas. De skapade den enda värld vi kan leva i, den värld där solljus silas grönt och skuggor rör sig i vinden.Julia Nordblad, idéhistorikerLitteraturKarl Appuhn, A Forest on the Sea: Environmental Expertise in Renaissance Venice, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.Jaboury Ghazoul, Forests: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, 2015.Stefano Mancuso och Alessandra Viola, Intelligenta växter: Den överraskande vetenskapen om växternas hemliga liv, översättning Olov Hyllienmark, Bazar, 2018.Richard Powers, The Overstory, Random House UK, 2018.Rachel Sussman, The Oldest Living Things in the World, The University of Chicago Press, 2014.

the agile academic
Unraveling Faculty Burnout Chapter 2 Academic Identity

the agile academic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 8:56


Thanks for listening to this mini-episode of the agile academic podcast for women in higher ed based on my book Unraveling Faculty Burnout: Pathways for Reckoning and Renewal. The book is available from Johns Hopkins University Press, and you'll find a link to the page in the transcript. If you are interested in doing a book club on your campus and having me speak with your faculty, please email me at agilefaculty dot rpr at gmail dot com.

New Books Network
Hussein Banai, "Hidden Liberalism: Burdened Visions of Progress in Modern Iran" (Cambridge UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 56:06


Compared to rival ideologies, liberalism has fared rather poorly in modern Iran. This is all the more remarkable given the essentially liberal substance of various social and political struggles - for liberal legality, individual rights and freedoms, and pluralism - in the century-long period since the demise of the Qajar dynasty and the subsequent transformation of the country into a modern nation-state. The deeply felt but largely invisible purchase of liberal political ideas in Iran challenges us to think more expansively about the trajectory of various intellectual developments since the emergence of a movement for reform and constitutionalism in the late nineteenth century. It complicates parsimonious accounts of Shi'ism, secularism, socialism, nationalism, and royalism as defining or representative ideologies of particular eras. Hidden Liberalism: Burdened Visions of Progress in Modern Iran (Cambridge UP, 2020) offers a critical examination of the reasons behind liberalism's invisible yet influential status, and its attendant ethical quandaries, in Iranian political and intellectual discourses. Hussein Banai is an Associate Professor of International Studies in the Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, and a Research Affiliate at the Center for International Studies at MIT. Banai's research interests lie at the intersection of political thought and international relations, with a special focus on topics in democratic theory, non-Western liberal thought, diplomatic history and theory, US-Iran relations, and Iran's political development. He has published on these topics in academic, policy, and popular periodicals. In addition to Hidden Liberalism, he is the co-author of two volumes on US-Iran relations: Republics of Myth: National Narratives and the US-Iran Conflict (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2022); Becoming Enemies: U.S.-Iran Relations and the Iran-Iraq War, 1979–1988 (Rowman & Littlefield, 2012); and co-editor of Human Rights at the Intersections: Transformation through Local, Global, and Cosmopolitan Challenges (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2023).  Amir Sayadabdi is a Lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Terra X Geschichte – Der Podcast
Familie: eine Geschichte zwischen Ideal und Alltag

Terra X Geschichte – Der Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 55:30


Familie. Eine Gruppe von Menschen, die zusammengehören und die man sich normalerweise nicht aussuchen kann. Bis heute ist der Familienbegriff traditionell geprägt. Vater, Mutter, Kinder – die Kernfamilie. Doch die Realität sieht inzwischen oft ganz anders aus. In der Geschichte hat sich die Bedeutung von Familie immer wieder gewandelt. Bedeutet Familie immer nur Blutsverwandtschaft, oder können auch Freunde zur Familie werden? Ist Familie nicht vielleicht nur eine Konstruktion, die zeigt, wie Kindererziehung und Partnerschaft nach der vorherrschenden gesellschaftlichen und politischen Vorstellung aussehen sollten und welche Arten von Familie allgemein akzeptiert sind? Damit wird Familie zutiefst politisch, weil es bis heute vor allem traditionelle Kleinfamilien aus Vater, Mutter und Kindern sind, die staatlich geschützt und gefördert werden. Aber wie sah das in der Geschichte aus: was war Familie in der Geschichte der Menschheit und wie hat sich der Begriff gewandelt? Und wie könnte die Familie der Zukunft aussehen? **Weitere Gäste:** - Jakob Kelsch - Gianni Jovanovic - Lisa Paus **Literatur:** - Cato der Ältere, De agri cultura. - Gaius, Institutionen. - GEO EPOCHE (2010): Die Macht der Habsburger. 1273-1918. Glanz und Elend eines Herrscherhauses. Nr. 46. Hamburg, Gruner + Jahr. - Suzanne Dixon (1992): The Roman family - Ancient Society and History. Hrsg.: Johns Hopkins University Press. Johns Hopkins University Press. - Gianni Jovanovic/Oyindamola Alashe (2021): Ich, ein Kind der kleinen Mehrheit. Blumenbar. - Jakob Kelsch (2019): Father Knows Worst! Familiendarstellungen in der populärkulturellen US-amerikanischen Zeichentricksitcom. ididem Verlag. - Jakob Kelsch (2021): Binging Family. Die Konzeption von Familie in der Video-on-Demand-Serie. Springer VS. - Christopher Neumaier (2022): Hausfrau, Berufstätige, Mutter. Frauen im geteilten Deutschland. be.bra Verlag. - Christopher Neumaier (2019): Familien im 20. Jahrhundert. Konflikte um Ideale, Politiken und Praktiken. De Gruyter Oldenburg. - Geoffrey Parker (2020): Der Kaiser – die vielen Gesichter Karls V. 1. Aufl. Darmstadt, wbg. - Selwyn Raab (2005): Five Families: The Rise, Decline, and Resurgence of America's Most Powerful Mafia Empires. New York, Thomas Dunne Books. - Anne Waak (2020): Wir nennen es Familie. Edition Körber. Weitere Links: - www.geborgen-wachsen.de - https://www.familie-historisch.de/ - https://dbe.rah.es/biografias/10732/carlos-ii - https://elpais.com/diario/2009/04/15/sociedad/1239746409_850215.html - https://historia.nationalgeographic.com.es/a/boda-clandestina-reyes-catolicos_15525 - https://www.nature.com/articles/hdy201325 - https://sciencev2.orf.at/stories/1718990/index.html - https://www.bmfsfj.de/bmfsfj/themen/familie/chancen-und-teilhabe-fuer-familien/alleinerziehende - http://www.habsburger.net Für Themenvorschläge oder Feedback: terrax-online@zdf.de „Terra-X-Geschichte – der Podcast“ findet ihr jeden zweiten Freitag auf www.terra-x.zdf.de und überall, wo es Podcasts gibt. - Moderation: Mirko Drotschmann - Sprecher:innen: Janine Funke, Andrea Kath, Felix Liebelt, Jan Schattka, Daniela Ssymank, Michael Thielen - Autor:innen und Redaktion objektiv media GmbH: Janine Funke und Andrea Kath - Technik: Moritz Raestrup - Musik: Extreme Music - Fachliche Beratung: Daniela Ssymank - Produktion: objektiv media GmbH im Auftrag des ZDF - Redaktion ZDF: Katharina Kolvenbach

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Hussein Banai, "Hidden Liberalism: Burdened Visions of Progress in Modern Iran" (Cambridge UP, 2020)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 56:06


Compared to rival ideologies, liberalism has fared rather poorly in modern Iran. This is all the more remarkable given the essentially liberal substance of various social and political struggles - for liberal legality, individual rights and freedoms, and pluralism - in the century-long period since the demise of the Qajar dynasty and the subsequent transformation of the country into a modern nation-state. The deeply felt but largely invisible purchase of liberal political ideas in Iran challenges us to think more expansively about the trajectory of various intellectual developments since the emergence of a movement for reform and constitutionalism in the late nineteenth century. It complicates parsimonious accounts of Shi'ism, secularism, socialism, nationalism, and royalism as defining or representative ideologies of particular eras. Hidden Liberalism: Burdened Visions of Progress in Modern Iran (Cambridge UP, 2020) offers a critical examination of the reasons behind liberalism's invisible yet influential status, and its attendant ethical quandaries, in Iranian political and intellectual discourses. Hussein Banai is an Associate Professor of International Studies in the Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, and a Research Affiliate at the Center for International Studies at MIT. Banai's research interests lie at the intersection of political thought and international relations, with a special focus on topics in democratic theory, non-Western liberal thought, diplomatic history and theory, US-Iran relations, and Iran's political development. He has published on these topics in academic, policy, and popular periodicals. In addition to Hidden Liberalism, he is the co-author of two volumes on US-Iran relations: Republics of Myth: National Narratives and the US-Iran Conflict (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2022); Becoming Enemies: U.S.-Iran Relations and the Iran-Iraq War, 1979–1988 (Rowman & Littlefield, 2012); and co-editor of Human Rights at the Intersections: Transformation through Local, Global, and Cosmopolitan Challenges (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2023).  Amir Sayadabdi is a Lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in History
Hussein Banai, "Hidden Liberalism: Burdened Visions of Progress in Modern Iran" (Cambridge UP, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 56:06


Compared to rival ideologies, liberalism has fared rather poorly in modern Iran. This is all the more remarkable given the essentially liberal substance of various social and political struggles - for liberal legality, individual rights and freedoms, and pluralism - in the century-long period since the demise of the Qajar dynasty and the subsequent transformation of the country into a modern nation-state. The deeply felt but largely invisible purchase of liberal political ideas in Iran challenges us to think more expansively about the trajectory of various intellectual developments since the emergence of a movement for reform and constitutionalism in the late nineteenth century. It complicates parsimonious accounts of Shi'ism, secularism, socialism, nationalism, and royalism as defining or representative ideologies of particular eras. Hidden Liberalism: Burdened Visions of Progress in Modern Iran (Cambridge UP, 2020) offers a critical examination of the reasons behind liberalism's invisible yet influential status, and its attendant ethical quandaries, in Iranian political and intellectual discourses. Hussein Banai is an Associate Professor of International Studies in the Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, and a Research Affiliate at the Center for International Studies at MIT. Banai's research interests lie at the intersection of political thought and international relations, with a special focus on topics in democratic theory, non-Western liberal thought, diplomatic history and theory, US-Iran relations, and Iran's political development. He has published on these topics in academic, policy, and popular periodicals. In addition to Hidden Liberalism, he is the co-author of two volumes on US-Iran relations: Republics of Myth: National Narratives and the US-Iran Conflict (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2022); Becoming Enemies: U.S.-Iran Relations and the Iran-Iraq War, 1979–1988 (Rowman & Littlefield, 2012); and co-editor of Human Rights at the Intersections: Transformation through Local, Global, and Cosmopolitan Challenges (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2023).  Amir Sayadabdi is a Lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Islamic Studies
Hussein Banai, "Hidden Liberalism: Burdened Visions of Progress in Modern Iran" (Cambridge UP, 2020)

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 56:06


Compared to rival ideologies, liberalism has fared rather poorly in modern Iran. This is all the more remarkable given the essentially liberal substance of various social and political struggles - for liberal legality, individual rights and freedoms, and pluralism - in the century-long period since the demise of the Qajar dynasty and the subsequent transformation of the country into a modern nation-state. The deeply felt but largely invisible purchase of liberal political ideas in Iran challenges us to think more expansively about the trajectory of various intellectual developments since the emergence of a movement for reform and constitutionalism in the late nineteenth century. It complicates parsimonious accounts of Shi'ism, secularism, socialism, nationalism, and royalism as defining or representative ideologies of particular eras. Hidden Liberalism: Burdened Visions of Progress in Modern Iran (Cambridge UP, 2020) offers a critical examination of the reasons behind liberalism's invisible yet influential status, and its attendant ethical quandaries, in Iranian political and intellectual discourses. Hussein Banai is an Associate Professor of International Studies in the Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, and a Research Affiliate at the Center for International Studies at MIT. Banai's research interests lie at the intersection of political thought and international relations, with a special focus on topics in democratic theory, non-Western liberal thought, diplomatic history and theory, US-Iran relations, and Iran's political development. He has published on these topics in academic, policy, and popular periodicals. In addition to Hidden Liberalism, he is the co-author of two volumes on US-Iran relations: Republics of Myth: National Narratives and the US-Iran Conflict (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2022); Becoming Enemies: U.S.-Iran Relations and the Iran-Iraq War, 1979–1988 (Rowman & Littlefield, 2012); and co-editor of Human Rights at the Intersections: Transformation through Local, Global, and Cosmopolitan Challenges (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2023).  Amir Sayadabdi is a Lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

Crashing the War Party
"Why do they hate us?" John Tirman on the dueling myths keeping Iran and the US from getting together

Crashing the War Party

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 42:03


The U.S. has been locked in a delicate dance with its European partners and Iran over re-entry into the Iran nuclear deal for more than a year. Meanwhile, relations between the two countries are either frozen or dangerously hot — never in-between. How did it get this way? Is there anyone in the US government who doesn't view Tehran as the enemy? Will Iran's own mullahs dial down the rhetoric long enough to see their country through to a better way? Author and MIT researcher John Tirman shares his extensive research with Dan and Kelley this week. In the first segment, our hosts talk about Biden's "new" Africa strategy. Just more great power politics or an actual corner turned?More from John Tirman:Republics of Myth: National Narratives and the US-Iran Conflict, w/ Hussein Banai and Malcolm Byrne, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2022.How the war complicates Biden's Iran diplomacy, 4/6/22, Democracy in Exile (DAWN) This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit crashingthewarparty.substack.com

Healthy Cities in the SDG Era
16. Responsible Consumption and Production

Healthy Cities in the SDG Era

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 30:54


Sustainable Development Goal: 12 Responsible Consumption and Production focuses on ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns. Quinn Grundy is a registered nurse and an Assistant Professor with the Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing at the University of Toronto and a Faculty Associate with the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus. She is a fellow with the WHO's Collaborating Centre for Governance, Accountability, and Transparency in the Pharmaceutical Sector and the Centre for Sustainable Health Systems at the University of Toronto. Dr. Grundy's research explores the interactions between medically-related industry and the health system, health professionals, and the production of health-related research and the implications for equitable, sustainable public health care. She is the author of Infiltrating healthcare: How marketing works underground to influence nurses (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018). Daniel Eisenkraft Klein is a PhD Candidate at the University of Toronto's Dalla Lana School of Public Health. His SSHRC-funded doctoral research centres on how the pharmaceutical industry frames its involvement in the policymaking sphere. Daniel is presently also a Research Consultant for the Opioid Industry Documents Archive at John's Hopkins University, and has previously taught on the Commercial Determinants of Health at Simon Fraser University's Faculty of Health Sciences. CREDITS: This podcast is co-hosted by Dr. Erica Di Ruggiero, Director of the Centre for Global Health, and Ophelia Michaelides, Manager of the Centre for Global Health, at the DLSPH, U of T, and produced by Elizabeth Loftus. Audio editing is by Sylvia Lorico. Music is produced by Julien Fortier and Patrick May. It is made with the support of the School of Cities at U of T. 

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 633 (8-1-22): Two Great Waterbirds

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:58).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-1-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of August 1 and August 8, 2022.  This is a revised repeat of an episode from August 2015. SOUNDS – ~4 sec – call from Great Egret then from Great Blue Heron. In this episode, we feature two mystery sounds, and a guest voice, to explore two striking birds—striking in looks, and striking in how they hunt.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds, and see if you can guess these two long-necked, long-legged wading birds. SOUNDS AND GUEST VOICE – ~30 sec – Voice: “At once he stirs and steps into the water, wading with imperial self-possession on his three-pronged, dragonish feet.  The water could not tremble less at the passage of his stilt legs as he stalks his dinner.  His neck arches like the bending of a lithe bow, one of a piece with the snapping arrow of his beak.” If you guessed, egret or heron, you're right!  The first call was from a Great Egret and the second from a Great Blue Heron.  The guest voice was Alyson Quinn, reading part of her “Lesson from an Egret,” inspired by a September 2007 visit to the Potomac River.  The word “egret” derives from an old German word for “heron,” a fitting origin for the many similarities between these two big birds.  The Great Egret and the Great Blue Heron are the two largest of 12 North American species of herons, egrets, and bitterns.  The Great Egret is strikingly white, while the Great Blue has only a partially white head over a bluish-gray body.  But a white subspecies of the Great Blue, called the Great White Heron, occurs in Florida.  Great Egrets and Great Blues both typically feed in shallow water, taking fish, amphibians, and other prey by waiting and watching quietly, then quickly striking with their long, sharp beaks.  The two species also share a history of having been widely hunted for their long plumes in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; the impact on their populations helped lead to nationwide bird-conservation efforts and organizations. Distinctive looks, behavior, and history make these two “Greats” a memorable and meaningful sight along Virginia's rivers, ponds, marshes, and other areas.  Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use this week's sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and thanks to Alyson Quinn for permission to share her “Lesson from an Egret,” which gets this episode closing words. GUEST VOICE – ~18 sec – “I want to be more like the egret, with the patience to be still without exhaustion, to never mind the idle currents or be dazzled by the glamour of light on water; but, knowing the good thing I wait for, to coil my hope in constant readiness, and to act in brave certitude when it comes.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 277, 8-10-15. The sounds of the Great Egret and the Great Blue Heron were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Excerpts of “Lesson from an Egret” are courtesy of Alyson Quinn, from her blog “Winterpast” (September 21, 2007, post), available online at http://www.winterispast.blogspot.com/, used with permission.  Ms. Quinn made the recording after a visit to Algonkian Regional Park, located in Sterling, Va. (Loudoun County), part of the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority.  More information about the park is available online at https://www.novaparks.com/parks/algonkian-regional-park. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES (Except as otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Upper two images: Great Egret along the New River near Parrott, Va. (Pulaski County); photos by Robert Abraham, used with permission.  Third image: Great Blue Heron in a marsh at Wachapreague, Va. (Accomack County), October 5, 2007.  Bottom image: Great Blue Heron in a stormwater pond on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, July 28, 2015. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT GREAT EGRETS AND GREAT BLUE HERONS The following information is excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service”: Great Egret “Life History” entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040032&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202; and Great Blue Heron “Life History” entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040027&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202. Great Egret Physical Description“Large, heavy, white heron with yellow-orange bill, black legs, long, slender neck, and long plumes extending beyond tail….” Behavior“Male selects territory that is used for hostile and sexual displays, copulation and nesting.  Adjacent feeding areas vigorously defended, both sexes defend.  …Migration occurs in fall and early spring along coast; winters further south than Virginia. …Foraging: alone in open situations; prefers fresh or brackish waters, openings in swamps, along streams or ponds; wader: stalks prey; known to participate in the 'leap-frog' feeding when initiated by cattle egret (Bubulcus ibis).  Prey are taken in shallow waters; prey usually includes insects, fish, frogs (adults and tadpoles), small birds, snakes, crayfish, and many others.  Nesting: in trees or thickets, 3-90 ft. above water in willows, holly, red cedar, cypress, and bayberry on dry ground in marshes.” Population Comments“Dangerously near extermination in early part of [20th] century due to plume hunting; population comeback hampered by loss of habitat, exposure to DDT and other toxic chemicals and metals. …[Predators include] crows and vultures….” Great Blue Heron Physical Description“Large grayish heron with yellowish bill, white on head, cinnamon on neck, and black legs,” Behavior“Territoriality: known to have feeding territory in non-breeding seasons, defended against members of same species.  Range: breeds from central Canada to northern Central America and winters from middle United States throughout Central America; in Virginia, is a permanent resident of the Coastal Plain. …Foraging: stands motionless in shallow water waiting on prey; occasionally fishes on the wing along watercourses, meadows and fields far from water.  They also take frogs, snakes, insects, and other aquatic animals.  Nesting: predominately in tall cedar and pine swamps, but may also be found on the ground, rock ledges, and sea cliffs; nests on platform of sticks, generally in colonies….” Aquatic/Terrestrial Associations“Salt or fresh shallow waters of lakes, ponds, marshes, streams, bays, oceans, tidal flats, and sandbars; feeds in surf, wet meadows, pastures, and dry fields.” SOURCES Used for Audio Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home  (subscription required). Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 2006. Merriam-Webster  Dictionary:“Egret,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/egret;“Heron,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/heron. National Audubon Society, “History of Audubon and Science-based Bird Conservation,” online at http://www.audubon.org/content/history-audubon-and-waterbird-conservation. Oxford Dictionaries/Oxford University Press:“Egret,” online at http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/egret;“Heron,” online at http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/heron. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, 2001. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/:Great Blue Heron entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040027&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202;Great Egret entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040032&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202;“List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.The Waterbird Society, online at https://waterbirds.org/. Joel C. Welty, The Life of Birds, W. B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, Penn., 1975. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world.  RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on birds in the family of herons, egrets, night-herons, and bitterns.Episode 118, 7-9-12 – Summertime sampler of birds, including Great Blue Heron. Episode 127, 9-10-12 – Green Heron. Episode 235, 10-13-14 – Black-crowned Night Heron.Episode 381, 8-14-17 – Midnight sounds near water, including Great Blue Heron.Episode 430, 7-23-18 – Marsh birds in Virginia, including Great Blue Heron and Least Bittern.Episode 478, 6-24-19 – Little Blue Heron.Episode 603, 11-15-21 – Fall bird migration, including Green Heron and Snowy Egret. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post.2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive. 2.5 – Living things are part of a system. 3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment. 3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms. 4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive. 4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources.

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Your Superior Self
Love and God on Rt. 80- Dr. Stephen Post

Your Superior Self

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 66:16


An opinion leader and public speaker, Stephen G. Post, Ph.D. (University of Chicago, 1983) has served on the Board of the John Templeton Foundation (2008–2014), which focuses on virtue and public life. Post is a leader in research on the benefits of giving and on compassionate care in relation to improved patient outcomes and clinician well-being. He addressed the U.S. Congress on volunteerism and health, receiving the Congressional Certificate of Special Recognition for Outstanding Achievement. Post was co-recipient (2012) with Edmund D. Pellegrino MD of the Pioneer Medal for Outstanding Leadership in HealthCare from the HealthCare Chaplaincy Network, and the Kama Book Award in Medical Humanities from World Literacy Canada (2008). Co-Recipient of the 2019 National Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society Professionalism Award for development the Professional Identity Formation curriculum of the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University, Post has taught at the University of Chicago Medical School, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (1988–2008), and at Stony Brook (2008–present), where he is Director of the Center for Medical Humanities, Compassionate Care, and Bioethics. The Center was selected (2011) for special institutional excellence by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (AMA & AAMC accrediting body), the only humanities and ethics entity in American medical school history to receive this distinction. An elected member of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, the New York Academy of Medicine, and the Royal Society of Medicine, London, Post is the author of 300 articles in journals such as Science, the New England Journal of Medicine, Psychosomatic Medicine, Journal of the American Academy of Religion, and the Journal of the American Medical Association. Post's book The Moral Challenge of Alzheimer's Disease (Johns Hopkins University Press) was designated a “medical classic of the century” by the British Medical Journal (2009), which wrote, “Until this pioneering work was published in 1995 the ethical aspects of one of the most important illnesses of our aging populations were a neglected topic.” Post is a recipient of the Alzheimer's Association national distinguished service award “in recognition of personal and professional outreach to the Alzheimer's Association Chapters on ethics issues important to people with Alzheimer's and their families.” Post's culminating book in this field is Dignity for Deeply Forgetful People: How Caregivers Can Meet the Challenges of Alzheimer's Disease (in press, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2022).

Being LGBTQ
Episode 251: Davida Breier 'Sinkhole'

Being LGBTQ

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 45:11


Miami born bisexual author Davida Breier joins Sam to discuss her new book 'Sinkhole' which was released in May 2022. Davida currently works for Johns Hopkins University Press and has received high praise for her debut novel. Sam also chats to Davida about 80's nostalgia and how it can often cover up the truth. Learn more about Davida - http://davidabreier.com 

GSA on Aging
The Gerontologist Podcast: ”American Dementia” with Drs. Daniel George and Peter Whitehouse

GSA on Aging

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 27:43 Very Popular


Dr. Degenholtz interviewed Drs. Daniel George at Penn State College of Medicine and Peter Whitehouse at Case Western Reserve University about their co-authored book, “American Dementia: Brain Health in an Unhealthy Society,” published last year by Johns Hopkins University Press.  Information about the book can be found at http://www.AmericanDementia.com. The Gerontologist published a review of the book by Drs. Cameron J. Camp and Evan Shelton, “Zooming Out on Dementia: The Effects of American Society on Brain Health.”

New Books in Law
Michael Bérubé and Jennifer Ruth, "It's Not Free Speech: Race, Democracy, and the Future of Academic Freedom" (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 41:11


The protests of summer 2020 led to long-overdue reassessments of the legacy of racism and white supremacy in both American academe and cultural life more generally. But while universities have been willing to rename some buildings and schools or grapple with their role in the slave trade, no one has yet asked the most uncomfortable question: Does academic freedom extend to racist professors? It's Not Free Speech: Race, Democracy, and the Future of Academic Freedom (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2022) considers the ideal of academic freedom in the wake of the activism inspired by outrageous police brutality, white supremacy, and the #MeToo movement. Arguing that academic freedom must be rigorously distinguished from freedom of speech, Michael Bérubé and Jennifer Ruth take aim at explicit defenses of colonialism and theories of white supremacy—theories that have no intellectual legitimacy whatsoever. Approaching this question from two angles—one, the question of when a professor's intramural or extramural speech calls into question his or her fitness to serve, and two, the question of how to manage the simmering tension between the academic freedom of faculty and the antidiscrimination initiatives of campus offices of diversity, equity, and inclusion—they argue that the democracy-destroying potential of social media makes it very difficult to uphold the traditional liberal view that the best remedy for hate speech is more speech. In recent years, those with traditional liberal ideals have had very limited effectiveness in responding to the resurgence of white supremacism in American life. It is time, Bérubé and Ruth write, to ask whether that resurgence requires us to rethink the parameters and practices of academic freedom. Touching as well on contingent faculty, whose speech is often inadequately protected, It's Not Free Speech insists that we reimagine shared governance to augment both academic freedom and antidiscrimination initiatives on campuses.  Michael Bérubé (interviewed here) is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Literature at Pennsylvania State University; Jennifer Ruth is a professor of film at Portland State University. Both have served in various roles within the American Association of University Professors, and also coauthored The Humanities, Higher Education, and Academic Freedom: Three Necessary Arguments (2015). Catriona Gold is a PhD candidate in Geography at University College London, researching security and mobility in the 20-21st century United States. Her current work concerns the US Passport Office's role in the Cold War. She can be reached by email or on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

New Books in Education
Michael Bérubé and Jennifer Ruth, "It's Not Free Speech: Race, Democracy, and the Future of Academic Freedom" (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022)

New Books in Education

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 41:11


The protests of summer 2020 led to long-overdue reassessments of the legacy of racism and white supremacy in both American academe and cultural life more generally. But while universities have been willing to rename some buildings and schools or grapple with their role in the slave trade, no one has yet asked the most uncomfortable question: Does academic freedom extend to racist professors? It's Not Free Speech: Race, Democracy, and the Future of Academic Freedom (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2022) considers the ideal of academic freedom in the wake of the activism inspired by outrageous police brutality, white supremacy, and the #MeToo movement. Arguing that academic freedom must be rigorously distinguished from freedom of speech, Michael Bérubé and Jennifer Ruth take aim at explicit defenses of colonialism and theories of white supremacy—theories that have no intellectual legitimacy whatsoever. Approaching this question from two angles—one, the question of when a professor's intramural or extramural speech calls into question his or her fitness to serve, and two, the question of how to manage the simmering tension between the academic freedom of faculty and the antidiscrimination initiatives of campus offices of diversity, equity, and inclusion—they argue that the democracy-destroying potential of social media makes it very difficult to uphold the traditional liberal view that the best remedy for hate speech is more speech. In recent years, those with traditional liberal ideals have had very limited effectiveness in responding to the resurgence of white supremacism in American life. It is time, Bérubé and Ruth write, to ask whether that resurgence requires us to rethink the parameters and practices of academic freedom. Touching as well on contingent faculty, whose speech is often inadequately protected, It's Not Free Speech insists that we reimagine shared governance to augment both academic freedom and antidiscrimination initiatives on campuses.  Michael Bérubé (interviewed here) is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Literature at Pennsylvania State University; Jennifer Ruth is a professor of film at Portland State University. Both have served in various roles within the American Association of University Professors, and also coauthored The Humanities, Higher Education, and Academic Freedom: Three Necessary Arguments (2015). Catriona Gold is a PhD candidate in Geography at University College London, researching security and mobility in the 20-21st century United States. Her current work concerns the US Passport Office's role in the Cold War. She can be reached by email or on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/education

New Books in Communications
Michael Bérubé and Jennifer Ruth, "It's Not Free Speech: Race, Democracy, and the Future of Academic Freedom" (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022)

New Books in Communications

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 41:11


The protests of summer 2020 led to long-overdue reassessments of the legacy of racism and white supremacy in both American academe and cultural life more generally. But while universities have been willing to rename some buildings and schools or grapple with their role in the slave trade, no one has yet asked the most uncomfortable question: Does academic freedom extend to racist professors? It's Not Free Speech: Race, Democracy, and the Future of Academic Freedom (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2022) considers the ideal of academic freedom in the wake of the activism inspired by outrageous police brutality, white supremacy, and the #MeToo movement. Arguing that academic freedom must be rigorously distinguished from freedom of speech, Michael Bérubé and Jennifer Ruth take aim at explicit defenses of colonialism and theories of white supremacy—theories that have no intellectual legitimacy whatsoever. Approaching this question from two angles—one, the question of when a professor's intramural or extramural speech calls into question his or her fitness to serve, and two, the question of how to manage the simmering tension between the academic freedom of faculty and the antidiscrimination initiatives of campus offices of diversity, equity, and inclusion—they argue that the democracy-destroying potential of social media makes it very difficult to uphold the traditional liberal view that the best remedy for hate speech is more speech. In recent years, those with traditional liberal ideals have had very limited effectiveness in responding to the resurgence of white supremacism in American life. It is time, Bérubé and Ruth write, to ask whether that resurgence requires us to rethink the parameters and practices of academic freedom. Touching as well on contingent faculty, whose speech is often inadequately protected, It's Not Free Speech insists that we reimagine shared governance to augment both academic freedom and antidiscrimination initiatives on campuses.  Michael Bérubé (interviewed here) is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Literature at Pennsylvania State University; Jennifer Ruth is a professor of film at Portland State University. Both have served in various roles within the American Association of University Professors, and also coauthored The Humanities, Higher Education, and Academic Freedom: Three Necessary Arguments (2015). Catriona Gold is a PhD candidate in Geography at University College London, researching security and mobility in the 20-21st century United States. Her current work concerns the US Passport Office's role in the Cold War. She can be reached by email or on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/communications

New Books in Politics
Michael Bérubé and Jennifer Ruth, "It's Not Free Speech: Race, Democracy, and the Future of Academic Freedom" (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022)

New Books in Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 41:11


The protests of summer 2020 led to long-overdue reassessments of the legacy of racism and white supremacy in both American academe and cultural life more generally. But while universities have been willing to rename some buildings and schools or grapple with their role in the slave trade, no one has yet asked the most uncomfortable question: Does academic freedom extend to racist professors? It's Not Free Speech: Race, Democracy, and the Future of Academic Freedom (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2022) considers the ideal of academic freedom in the wake of the activism inspired by outrageous police brutality, white supremacy, and the #MeToo movement. Arguing that academic freedom must be rigorously distinguished from freedom of speech, Michael Bérubé and Jennifer Ruth take aim at explicit defenses of colonialism and theories of white supremacy—theories that have no intellectual legitimacy whatsoever. Approaching this question from two angles—one, the question of when a professor's intramural or extramural speech calls into question his or her fitness to serve, and two, the question of how to manage the simmering tension between the academic freedom of faculty and the antidiscrimination initiatives of campus offices of diversity, equity, and inclusion—they argue that the democracy-destroying potential of social media makes it very difficult to uphold the traditional liberal view that the best remedy for hate speech is more speech. In recent years, those with traditional liberal ideals have had very limited effectiveness in responding to the resurgence of white supremacism in American life. It is time, Bérubé and Ruth write, to ask whether that resurgence requires us to rethink the parameters and practices of academic freedom. Tou