Podcasts about Smith College

Private women's liberal arts college in Massachusetts

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Latest podcast episodes about Smith College

Language Lounge
47. Manie Musicale with Michelle Fournier and Stephanie Carbonneau

Language Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 43:44


Music + competition + community = Manie Musicale! Are you a French, Spanish or German Teacher? If you are not participating in Manie Musicale with your students you must. Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200. Join the Facebook group or head over to the Manie Musicale website. French Teachers, you will not find a more generous, enthusiastic and supportive community anywhere. There's amazing music, live streams and shout outs with famous Francophone singers, reveal videos… I'd write more but I have to fill out my bracket… Visit the Language Lounge on Twitter - https://twitter.com/langloungepod Connect with Michelle - https://twitter.com/michelleolah Have a comment or question? Leave a voicemail at (207) 888-9819 or email podcast@waysidepublishing.com Produced by Wayside Publishing - https://waysidepublishing.com Watch this episode on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/wayside Bios: Stephanie Carbonneau @mmeCarbonneau Stephanie Carbonneau, a middle school French teacher from Maine, has a Masters degree in Teaching Languages. She is known for her “Glow and Grow” approach to language learning in a mostly deskless environment that focuses on interactive communicative lessons, using authentic resources with CI strategies. Stephanie is co-creator of a Manie Musicale, now serving 3,000 schools both in the states and internationally. Michelle Fournier Michelle Fournier studied French language and literature at Smith College and spent her junior year abroad in Paris.  Following graduation, she was an assistante d'anglais in Clermont-Ferrand, France.  She taught high school for 22 years and now teaches at Falmouth Middle School in Falmouth, Maine.  She is a teacher leader in the state of Maine for many years, helping to bring proficiency-based teaching to classrooms throughout the state.  She is a member of the Alliance Française du Maine, AATF-Maine, and is secretary of EMME (Educators for a Multilingual Maine).  She was a Fulbright Exchange teacher in Bayeux, France in 2006-2007.   Michelle and Stephanie co-founded Manie Musicale in 2017. Michelle is married and has two adult children, a dog, and a granddog.  When not working on Manie, she enjoys making homemade jam, macarons, and other tasty treats.  She practices yoga and meditation and loves to read, travel, and play cards with her husband. Mentions: Manie Musicale Website: https://www.maniemusicale.info/ Manie Muicale Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2969896693074589 Locura de Marzo- Snr Ashbee https://www.senorashby.com/music-competitions.html MärzWahnsinn2023 https://sites.google.com/lexington1.net/marzwahnsinn2023/m%C3%A4rz-wahnsinn Mme Betty (AKA Nikkie Betty) AATF: American Association of Teachers of French

The Eating Disorder Trap Podcast
#126: Difficult Conversations To Have with Dr. Charlynn Small & Dr. Mazella Fuller (part two)

The Eating Disorder Trap Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 21:02


Dr. Mazella Fuller is a clinical associate on staff at the Counseling and Psychological Services of Duke University. Dr. Fuller provides clinical services, consultation, and training for social work and psychology interns. She has worked in education for many years as a high school teacher, adjunct instructor, consultant, and clinician. Dr. Fuller is an integrative health coach, and graduate of Duke Integrative Medicine. She is a certified member and approved supervisor (CEDS-S) of the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals (iaedp™) and completed the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Program through the Duke Integrative Medicine/Duke University Medical Center. Her clinical focus areas are brief therapy and young adult development, couples, gender and social justice, equity and inclusion, and women's leadership development. Dr. Fuller received her MSW from Smith College for Social Work in Northampton, Massachusetts, Amherst. Dr. Fuller has served as a member of the advisory board for the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD). She is the Co-Editor of Treating Black Women with Eating Disorders: A Clinician Guide. She is also the Co-Founder and Principal of the Institute for Antiracism and Equity. Dr. Charlynn Small, PhD, LCP, CEDS-S is Assistant Director for Health Promotions at the University of Richmond's Counseling and Psychological Services in Virginia. She received her PhD from Howard University's School of Education. Dr. Small is a member of the Board of Directors of the International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals Foundation (iaedpTM) and is a certified member and Approved Supervisor (CEDS-S) of iaedpTM. She co-founded the Foundation's African-American Eating Disorders Professionals (AAEDP) Committee and has also served on the Advisory Board for the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD). She is a frequent speaker at national and international conferences on the treatment of eating disorders in college populations. Dr. Small is co-founder of the Institute for Antiracism and Equity and also is the co-editor of Treating Black Women with Eating Disorders: A Clinician's Guide, Routledge, Taylor & Francis (July, 2021). We discuss topics including: Understanding Cultural Humility The importance of having a sense of belonging Learning to be uncomfortable with having conversations that make you feel uncomfortable Doing your own work and not being judgmental Learn about your own culture, ethnicity and values SHOW NOTES: https://www.antiracismandequity.com/ (book) Treating Black Women with Eating Disorders: A Clinician Guide csmall@richmond.edu mazella.fuller@duke.edu www.membershare.iaedp.com (African-American Eating Disorders Professionals (AAEDP) Committee and People of Color  (POC-AAEDP) Subcommittee ____________________________________________ If you have any questions regarding the topics discussed on this podcast, please reach out to Robyn directly via email: rlgrd@askaboutfood.com You can also connect with Robyn on social media by following her on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn. If you enjoyed this podcast, please leave a review on iTunes and subscribe. Visit Robyn's private practice website where you can subscribe to her free monthly insight newsletter, and receive your FREE GUIDE “Maximizing Your Time with Those Struggling with an Eating Disorder”. Your Recovery Resource, Robyn's new online course for navigating your loved one's eating disorder, is available now! For more information on Robyn's book “The Eating Disorder Trap”, please visit the Official "The Eating Disorder Trap" Website. “The Eating Disorder Trap” is also available for purchase on Amazon.

BBS Radio Station Streams
The Getting Real With Hilary Show, January 3, 2023

BBS Radio Station Streams

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 55:16


Guest, Rabbi Jill Hausman “Rabbi Jill” is a New Jersey native. Before coming to The Actors' Temple in 2006, she served for twelve years at Boro Park Progressive Synagogue as Cantor, and for two years, also as Assistant Rabbi. She has a background in classical singing and acting, and serves as both Rabbi and Cantor of The Actors' Temple. Rabbi Jill is a graduate of Smith College and received her Semicha from the Rabbinical Seminary International, under the aegis of Rabbi Joseph Gelberman (z''l). She is married, has two sons, and lives on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. She can sometimes be seen riding her bike to the office.

The Eating Disorder Trap Podcast
#125: Difficult Conversations To Have with Dr. Charlynn Small & Dr. Mazella Fuller (part one)

The Eating Disorder Trap Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 24:13


Dr. Mazella Fuller is a clinical associate on staff at the Counseling and Psychological Services of Duke University. Dr. Fuller provides clinical services, consultation, and training for social work and psychology interns. She has worked in education for many years as a high school teacher, adjunct instructor, consultant, and clinician. Dr. Fuller is an integrative health coach, and graduate of Duke Integrative Medicine. She is a certified member and approved supervisor (CEDS-S) of the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals (iaedp™) and completed the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Program through the Duke Integrative Medicine/Duke University Medical Center. Her clinical focus areas are brief therapy and young adult development, couples, gender and social justice, equity and inclusion, and women's leadership development. Dr. Fuller received her MSW from Smith College for Social Work in Northampton, Massachusetts, Amherst. Dr. Fuller has served as a member of the advisory board for the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD). She is the Co-Editor of Treating Black Women with Eating Disorders: A Clinician Guide. She is also the Co-Founder and Principal of the Institute for Antiracism and Equity. Dr. Charlynn Small, PhD, LCP, CEDS-S is Assistant Director for Health Promotions at the University of Richmond's Counseling and Psychological Services in Virginia. She received her PhD from Howard University's School of Education. Dr. Small is a member of the Board of Directors of the International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals Foundation (iaedpTM) and is a certified member and Approved Supervisor (CEDS-S) of iaedpTM. She co-founded the Foundation's African-American Eating Disorders Professionals (AAEDP) Committee and has also served on the Advisory Board for the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD). She is a frequent speaker at national and international conferences on the treatment of eating disorders in college populations. Dr. Small is co-founder of the Institute for Antiracism and Equity and also is the co-editor of Treating Black Women with Eating Disorders: A Clinician's Guide, Routledge, Taylor & Francis (July, 2021). We discuss topics including: The development of their book “Treating Black Women with Eating Disorders” HAES and black women Racism Beauty standards in the black community Assessing for sexual abuse  Reclaiming the word “fat” Structural racism and needing culturally competent providers What is REI (Race, Equity and Inclusion)?   SHOW NOTES: https://www.antiracismandequity.com/ (book) Treating Black Women with Eating Disorders: A Clinician Guide csmall@richmond.edu mazella.fuller@duke.edu www.membershare.iaedp.com  (African-American Eating Disorders Professionals (AAEDP) Committee and People of Color  (POC-AAEDP) Subcommittee ____________________________________________ If you have any questions regarding the topics discussed on this podcast, please reach out to Robyn directly via email: rlgrd@askaboutfood.com You can also connect with Robyn on social media by following her on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn. If you enjoyed this podcast, please leave a review on iTunes and subscribe. Visit Robyn's private practice website where you can subscribe to her free monthly insight newsletter, and receive your FREE GUIDE “Maximizing Your Time with Those Struggling with an Eating Disorder”. Your Recovery Resource, Robyn's new online course for navigating your loved one's eating disorder, is available now! For more information on Robyn's book “The Eating Disorder Trap”, please visit the Official "The Eating Disorder Trap" Website. “The Eating Disorder Trap” is also available for purchase on Amazon.

ALL GOOD VIBES
Kirsten Ring Murray - Olson Kundig Architects

ALL GOOD VIBES

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 41:54


Guest of this appointment is Kirsten Ring Murray, one of the principals and owners of the internationally renowned firm Olson Kundig Architects. Founded in 1966 by Jim Olson, the practice, Seattle-based, with a new office in New York City, during the five decades of its existence has enormously grown, expanding its portfolio beyond residences, which was a distinctive part of their realizations, covering more than fifteen countries on five continents, from amazing natural locations to crowded urban contexts. Their versatile full-service design besides residences, often for art collectors, includes museums, academic and commercial buildings, hospitality, interior design, master planning and landscape. The narrative and the design approach, contemplating the relationship between dwelling and landscape and encouraging the connection between people and surroundings continue, whether in a natural habitat or in an urban metropolis, bringing context to its existence and purpose, creating an experience of place, even along the street. Careful consideration of topographical and climatic conditions, use of materials worked in close collaboration with craftsmen and artists, leaving frequently, on purpose, visible maker's hand signs are the main ingredients, contributing to tell an authentic story of the place. The firm recognized by the AIA with the National Architecture Firm Award, has been named 4 times one of the Top Ten Most Innovative Companies in Architecture by Fast Company and included on the AD100 list 14 times. The owners have been honoured with some of the nations and world's highest design awards: Jim Olson, the Seattle AIA Medal of Honor, Tom Kundig a National Design Award in Architecture from the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum, an Academy Award in Architecture from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, inductions into Interior Design Magazine's Hall of Fame and the AIA Seattle Medal of Honor, only to mention a few. Their works published worldwide by the most prestigious magazines, on the covers of The New York Times magazine, ARCHITECT, Architectural Record, Architectural Digest, Wall Street Journal are collected in four monographs. Our guest, Kirsten Ring Murray, has realized a range of project types, nationally and internationally published, and awarded. She has received many AIA Honor Awards, in recognition of her contributions, playing a particularly relevant role in the firm's culture, expanding the boundaries of the corporatist spirit, pioneering programs, and injecting vital energy into core activities. The conversation starts exploring a background that may have led Kirsten to become an architect. Grown up, experiencing various places West of United States, passionate about drawing and reading, with a keen interest in science fiction, was particularly attracted by the environment as landscape, by an organic architecture tendency emerging at that time in Colorado, with the main attraction for Paolo Soleri's arcology and curiosity in the experimentation of arts and craft of Modernism. Joined the studio in Seattle in the late ‘89, a studio of 11 and now of over 250 people, she was drawn by different reasons as the firm's legacy grounded on craft, integration of architecture and art and always felt very comfortable in a place, where conversation and dialogue were highly appreciated and the individual expression unusually respected and encouraged. Challenging and active, the practice has over the years maintained this distinctive note, believing in the importance of debate and considering a precious opportunity to work with different personalities, many individual voices in a synergistic effort. Great contribution to strengthen teamwork collaboration and to open a dialogue with the external community goes to Kirsten, who has promoted a series of original and successful initiatives, especially through [storefront], a common space, part of their office building, transformed into an authentic laboratory of exchange and experimentation. We dwell then on the physical ambiance of their studio in Seattle, able to transmit with an extraordinary legibility an identity, mainly based on a continuous evolutive process and we analyze, in this regard, their capability to translate the peculiar character and core values of a company and its team in every workspace they realized. We dedicate a special reference to the recent LeBron James Innovation Center at Nike World Headquarters in Beaverton, Oregon, a new construction, that brilliantly communicates the brand's agenda of speed, innovation, craft, fostering collective collaborative spirit and to the conversion of a historic building into a new dynamic, healthy and versatile environment, in the respect of individuality, for a provocative New York City Media company. Search for custom-made solutions, kinetic elements, exposed ‘mechanical wizardry' and exquisitely refined, detailed finishes, visually and emotionally engaging, is an important peculiarity of the practice, especially of Tom Kundig, often referred to as a 'maker architect' and Kirsten explains the relevant and fascinating potentialities that this creative ‘pre-digital' process embodies. Architect as a ‘mediator' between nature and built, able to offer continuity between indoor-outdoor and authentic immersive, intimate experiences in the place, mediating rationality and poetry is another integral aspect of their design approach, that we explore in regard to residences, especially in magnificent and powerful natural contexts, as Slaughterhouse Beach, in Maui, Hawaii. Among extraordinary, at top commissions that have involved Kirsten, from practitioner to principal, there is an affordable condominium, conceived almost 15 years ago, 1111 East Pike, that, despite the economic constraints, still impresses for its innovative and fresh unconventionality, its visual appeal and flexible internal solutions, revealing a passionate commitment to enrich with any architectural gesture everyone's life. We conclude the conversation with a particularly rewarding project, Paradise Road Housing at Smith College, five apartment units arranged around a central courtyard, forming a community not only between students but between the campus and the larger Northampton community. A LEED® Gold housing complex intended for self-sufficient seniors and students, celebrating inter-generational social interaction and connections.

KPFA - UpFront
Protests in Peru; Plus UC academic workers unions are divided on tentative agreement

KPFA - UpFront

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 59:59


The picket line outside UC Berkeley campus, November 14, 2022. Image by Ian Castro courtesy of UAW. On today's show: 0:08 – Javier Puente (@puentevaldivia), Chair of Latin American and Latiné Studies at Smith College, and author of The Rural State, about sociopolitical conflict in the Peruvian Andes. He joins us from Lima to discuss the latest on the Peru protests. 0:45 – Mark Woodall, physics graduate student at UC Merced and one of the 15 union negotiators who signed onto a statement urging members to reject the tentative agreement. He is a member of the UAW 2865 bargaining team representing Academic Student Employees. The post Protests in Peru; Plus UC academic workers unions are divided on tentative agreement appeared first on KPFA.

10% Happier with Dan Harris
316: How to Call People In (Instead of Calling Them Out) | Loretta Ross

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 57:09 Very Popular


If you're tired of the venom, preening, and predatory listening so common on all sides of our various cultural divides, this episode is for you. My guest today is Loretta Ross, who believes that “calling out,” which is quite common on social media these days, is adding way too much toxicity to the discourse and alienating people who might otherwise be allies. Instead, she believes in “calling in,” which steadfastly insists on a large measure of grace, and rejects the impulse to dehumanize. On today's show, Loretta offers a compelling mode of engagement that is insistently open-minded and large-hearted, no matter where you stand on the political divide. Loretta describes herself as a radical Black feminist, activist, and public intellectual. She's a visiting Associate Professor at Smith College, and she also teaches an online course called, Calling in the Calling Out Culture. Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/loretta-ross-316-rerunSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

EconoFact Chats
The Economics of College Sports

EconoFact Chats

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 20:31


Football and basketball teams at Division I universities generate billions in revenue. But the student-athletes themselves do not receive salaries. Should they? Most have scholarships for their tuitions, but to what degree are they students, as well as athletes? And how does the money raised through these big-ticket sports support other, less high-profile sports, and the academic mission of these colleges and universities, if at all? Andrew Zimbalist joins EconoFact Chats to discuss these issues. Andy is the Robert A. Woods Professor Emeritus of Economics at Smith College. He has consulted in the sports industry for numerous players' associations, cities, companies, teams, and leagues.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2989 - FED RAISES RATES AGAIN; America's Fight Over Israel; Chaos In Peru w/ Eric Alterman & Javier Puente

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 100:07


In a pre-taped conversation, Sam's joined by Eric Alterman, Professor of English and Journalism at Brooklyn College, writer of the "Altercation" newsletter at The American Prospect, to discuss his recent book We Are Not One: A History of America's Fight Over Israel. Then, Emma speaks with Javier Puente, Associate Professor of Latin American and Latino/a Studies at Smith College, to discuss the recent civil unrest in Peru after former President Pedro Castillo threatened to dissolve the country's legislature and rule by decree before being removed from office.  First, Emma runs through updates on the Fed's newest interest rate hike, the House pouring more money into American policing, the return of free by-mail covid tests, Pulse Nightclub survivor Brandon Wolf's statements on Florida's transphobia, and the continued response to the Respect for Marriage Act. Then Sam and Eric Alterman join to tackle the history of American Jews and Zionism, first jumping back to the start of the 20th Century and the desire of the American Jewery to build America into their homeland, before shifting to the campaigning of Louis Brandeis in the 1920s for American Jews to push for the rights of their European brethren to colonize Palestine and return to Israel. Next, Professor Alterman and Sam tackle the mass shift in the American Jewish perspective on Zionism in the wake of the revelations of the Holocaust, particularly as it came after an era where the US (and its German-Jewish citizens) pushed against the immigration of Eastern European Jews. Moving to the wake of the Holocaust, Sam, and Eric explore the evacuation of the British from Israel leaving a colonial vacuum, and why the US saw it as an opportunity to build their power in the region, even with some conservative pushback from US politicians, before tackling the impact of the Six-Day War in bolstering the support for Israel among US Jews. They wrap up the interview by tackling the growing stratification between an increasingly conservative Israeli youth movement, and a more and more liberal American Jewish constituency, and where the future of Israel lies in US politics. Then Emma is joined by Javier Puente as attempts to contextualize the last week in Peruvian politics for us, from Pedro Castillo's coup attempt on the 7th to Dina Boluarte replacing him through similarly undemocratic means, before tackling why the hell he attempted the coup in the first place, and where the motivations of the protesters largely stand, feeling both betrayed by Castillo and wanting to push against a return for a far-right Peru. And in the Fun Half: Emma is joined by Brandon Sutton and Matt Binder as they explore Donald Trump's late arrival to the NFT game (and even later to the trading card one), discuss the Washington Posts' failed employee town hall, and take on Elon taking stock of his tanking stocks. They also dive into the continued fallout from Sam Bankman-Fried's fall from grace and FTX's massive collapse, plus, your calls and IMs!   Check out Eric's book here: https://www.basicbooks.com/titles/eric-alterman/we-are-not-one/9780465096312/   Check out Javier on Democracy Now: https://www.democracynow.org/2022/12/8/peru_political_crisis Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the ESVN YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/esvnshow Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here: https://am-quickie.ghost.io/ Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Get the free Majority Report App!: http://majority.fm/app Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Check out Ava Raiza's music here! https://avaraiza.bandcamp.com/ The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

Oral Arguments from the Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals
22-1547: Patricia Walker-Swinton vs Philander Smith College

Oral Arguments from the Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022


Oral argument argued before the Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals on or about 12/13/2022

The PR Pace Podcast
Op-Ed Tips with Washington Post Opinion Writer Helaine Olen

The PR Pace Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 55:49


Helaine Olen is an award-winning journalist who's a contributor to the Washington Post's opinion section. She and I connected because are both graduates from Smith College and have enjoyed working together in recent years. She offers some great advice for us PRs reaching out to journalists when pitching. Agency owner Scott Baradell also stops by to discuss his new book, Trust Signals.

Next Level Soul with Alex Ferrari: A Spirituality & Personal Growth Podcast
NLS 161: NDEs, The Afterlife & God - This Interview Will Give You Goosebumps! with Roberta Grimes

Next Level Soul with Alex Ferrari: A Spirituality & Personal Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 58:56


One night when she was eight years old, Roberta Grimes woke up and knew for certain that there is no God. And she was terrified! Then a bright light flashed, and a voice said, “You wouldn't know what it is to have me unless you knew what it is to be without me. I will never leave you again.” She thought, That's nice. If you forget there is a God, they remind you. And she went back to sleep. She went on to graduate from Smith College and Boston University School of Law, but that experience of light remained with her.She had to know where that light had come from! So even as she pursued a career as a small-business attorney, married and reared a family, Roberta spent more than half a century researching what actually happens at and after death as a compulsive hobby. The result has been her present highly enjoyable part-time career as a podcaster and afterlife and Gospels lecturer, and also as the author of seven nonfiction books, including The Fun of Dying and Liberating Jesus.Please enjoy my conversation with Roberta Grimes.

American Prestige
Special - The Peru Crisis w/ Javier Puente

American Prestige

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 5:02


This is a free preview of a paid episode. To hear more, visit www.americanprestigepod.comDanny and Derek speak with Javier Puente, associate professor of Latin American and Latino/a Studies and chair of Latin American and Latino/a Studies at Smith College, about the ongoing political crisis in Peru. Recorded Friday, December 9, 2022

Rattlecast
ep. 171 - Joan Kwon Glass

Rattlecast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 123:53


Joan Kwon Glass is the mixed-race, Korean American author of NIGHT SWIM (Diode Editions, 2022) & three chapbooks. She serves as Editor-in-Chief for Harbor Review, as a Brooklyn Poets Mentor, is a proud Smith College graduate & has been a public school educator for 20 years. She serves on the faculty of Hudson Valley Writers Center & the Fine Arts Work Center of Provincetown. Her work has won or been finalist for several prizes & her poems have been nominated for the Pushcart Prize & Sundress Anthology Best of the Net. Joan's poems have been published or are forthcoming in Prairie Schooner, Asian American Writer's Workshop (The Margins), RHINO, Rattle, Dialogist & elsewhere, and she is available for manuscript consultations, reading and workshops. Please follow her on Twitter @joanpglass and see her website at www.joankwonglass.com. She lives in Connecticut with her family. Find much more here: https://joankwonglass.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. A Zoom link will be provided in the chat window during the show before that segment begins. For links to all the past episodes, visit: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a list poem of choices, each line/choice ending with the line “and I will die on this hill.” It could be funny like “A bar of soap is better than any kind of body wash, and I will die on this hill.” Or heavier things. Another option is to write a longer poem detailing a choice which ends with the line. Next Week's Prompt: Victoria Chang radically changes the way in which we regard obituaries by writing an entire poetry collection using obits as form. Write an obituary for one of the following: a previous version of yourself, a friendship or romantic relationship, a body part, your adult child's childhood, or for someone who has not died but that you've lost (read “One Year After My Dying Father and I Stop Speaking to Each Other Again” by Eugenia Leigh in Split This Rock for inspiration!) The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley
The Geniuses Next Door: We chat with the Massachusetts MacArthur Genius awardees

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 58:00


This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Last month, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation named its class of 2022 “Genius” grant fellows — 25 recipients across academia, the arts, and sciences all of whom have demonstrated outstanding talent in their fields. In our series, “The Genius Next Door,” we gathered three of the awardees who work and teach here in Massachusetts. And, the daughter of one of New York's most prominent rabbis has a secret that only her best friend knows. Plus, a successful website designer dreams of her own Jewish food show. Both of them are temporarily stymied by the reappearance of young loves gone wrong. Their stories are the heart of two new romance novels set during Hanukkah, the annual festival of lights. Romance novelists Stacey Agdern and Jean Meltzer are the authors of “Love and Latkes” and “The Matzah Ball” our December selections for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” Guests:  Danna Freedman is a chemistry professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an associate editor for the Journal of the American Chemical Society.  Melanie Matchett Wood is a mathematics professor at Harvard University studying pure math and number theory. Loretta Ross is a reproductive justice and human rights activist, as well as a professor at Smith College.  Stacey Agdern is the author of four Hannukkah romance novels; her latest is “Love and Latkes.” The former award-winning bookseller has both reviewed and given talks on the romance genre. She also writes a romance/hockey for an anthology series called Connected Stories. And has written for HEA Happily Ever After, USA Today's online romance blog, and Romantic Times magazine.  Jean Meltzer is the author of two romances; The Matzah Ball is her first. She studied dramatic writing at New York University's Tisch. The Emmy award-winning former TV writer spent five years in rabbinical school before she started writing romance novels. “The Matzah Ball” will soon be a movie. 

Nothing Never Happens
"Links in the Chain of Freedom": A Conversation with Loretta Ross

Nothing Never Happens

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 72:40


What becomes possible when we anchor our pedagogical praxes in frameworks of reproductive justice and intersectional feminist care? What coalitions grow? What visions are revealed, and what worlds become more possible?Teacher, organizer, storyteller, and freedom-fighter Loretta Ross shares her wisdom on these questions and so much more. From judicial attacks on reproductive autonomy, to politicized teaching in a democratic classroom, to the history of Black women's organizing, to creative and effective protest tactics, to the "rotating international favorites" served at the West Point Military Academy dinner club.Loretta Ross is a movement visionary recently recognized as a Class of 2022 MacArthur Genius Fellow. After working at the Center for Democratic Renewal in Atlanta, she went on to found and then become the National Coordinator of SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. She has taught very widely, in and out of the university, as Founder of the National Center for Human Rights Education, as Program Director of the National Black Women's Health Project, and now as the Associate Professor in the Program on Women and Gender at Smith College.She is a prolific author, whose authored and co-authored works include Reproductive Justice: An Introduction (2017), Radical Reproductive Justice: Foundation, Theory, Practice, Critique (2017), and Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organizing for Reproductive Justice (2004). Her forthcoming book, Calling In the Calling Out Culture, will be out in 2023.Credits: Outro Music by Akrasis (Max Bowen, raps; Mark McKee, beats); audio editing by Aliyah Harris; production by Lucia Hulsether and Tina Pippin.Support us on Patreon!

Times Higher Education
THE Campus: An interview with Ruth Simmons, president of Prairie View A&M

Times Higher Education

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 38:21


Ruth Simmons was the first African American president of Brown University which she led for 11 years. Before that she was president at Smith College where she set up the first engineering programme at a women's institution. She was recently called out of retirement to lead Prairie View A&M an historically black institution in southeast Texas. As she approaches the end of her tenure there, THE Campus editor Sara Custer interviewed her for THE Campus Live US. Here she speaks about her pioneering work to research Brown's historical links to slavery, the future of affirmative action, legacy admissions and how to get more people that look like her into university leadership. 

Super Mother Unleashed
Kate Kripke (Author, Mental Health Coach & Psychotherapist) : SMU48

Super Mother Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 46:15 Transcription Available


In this episode, I am having a conversation with Kate Kripke, she is very special not only because she is a super mother, but she is special because of her work.Kate Kripke is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) and Perinatal Mental Health Counselor (PMH-C) who has worked with individuals and groups in periods of transition and change for more than 20 years. She's spent the past decade and a half supporting women and families as the Founding Director and Senior Supervising Psychotherapist of the Postpartum Wellness Center of Boulder, an organization she created in 2007 to bring evidence-based and collaborative care mental maternal and early family mental health support to mothers and families across Colorado (www.pwcboulder.com).  Kate has extensive experience and training in Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders with a BA in Sociology from the University of Colorado at Boulder and a Master's Degree in Clinical Social Work from Smith College. She has participated in numerous maternal mental health task forces, most recently sitting on the Pregnancy-Related Depression State Advisory Committee convened by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.In addition to her work at PWCB, Kate shares her expertise in supporting all maternal mental health and wellness through one-on-one and group coaching, online workshops, a weekly podcast “Motherhood Uncut,” and her upcoming book, Reinventing Supermom: Support & Strategies for New Mothers Who Feel Lost.I would request to all new moms and those mothers who are going to plan for their baby please read this book, this will work like a Guide for your throughout the process,and if any mother would like to reach this beautiful Mother Kate Kripe, visit her website, I am sharing the details for you all,Links ;https://www.katekripke.com/book (For buying the book)https://www.katekripke.com/ (Reference and Her details)and also you can keep in touch through her Instagram handle @katekripke.Request all of you to listen to this episode and share your view or if you have any topics or any thoughts about my podcast write to me at somathakur@gmail.com and follow me on Instagram @somathakur.mothercoach for more updates.

Tavis Smiley
Dr. Elizabeth Pryor on "Tavis Smiley"

Tavis Smiley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 42:56


Dr. Elizabeth Pryor - Associate Professor of History at Smith College, the author of an award-winning article, “The Etymology of [N-Word] Resistance, Language and the Politics of Freedom in the Antebellum North”, author of the book “Colored Travelers,” and daughter of legendary comedian Richard Pryor. She joins Tavis for a conversation about the history and complexities surrounding use of the n-word

The Flipping 50 Show
3 Brain Health Supplements Worth the Extra Pill

The Flipping 50 Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 35:54


Your brain health may need this.    Never has a client said, I love taking supplements. Frequently I've heard, but I eat healthy and choose to get my nutrients from food.    And I get it. However, wow in 2022 that can be a challenge. I did ask my guest, neurologist, Dr. Amelia Scott Barrett, MD about these and so much more. If you want to know from a brain standpoint the amounts of various nutrients recommended and hear why those labs telling you you're in the normal range may not be a reason to sigh relief just yet… tune in. My Guest:  Amelia Scott Barrett, MD is a Stanford-trained neurologist who shows people how to use neuroscience and new technology to get rid of their headaches. Dr. B has translated those scientific advances into actionable strategies that cut headaches in half in just 12 weeks. She and her team have coached thousands of people all over the world through the online course called “Migraine Relief Code.”   She graduated with Honors in Psychology from Smith College, and then attended the University of Colorado School of Medicine.  Dr. Barrett completed her residency training at Stanford University and then returned home to Colorado. She then founded Rocky Mountain Neurology, where she specializes in headache patients.  Questions we answer in this episode:  05:52 Does the brain need different nutrients than other organs?  08:10 Let's describe optimal brain health, function, mood, cognition… how does the brain work?  10:56 What is a junk food diet from the brain's standpoint?  14:30 What are your thoughts specifically on organ meats?  16:15 What is the effect of fasting on the brain?  18:06 Where is the most brain benefit happening - what fasting window?  19:40 Do supplements affect the neurotransmitters that occur naturally in the brain?  25:57 What are the most common symptoms people get from a deficiency of vitamins important for the brain?  27:32 B12 “norms” or is there an optimal level that you want to share?  29:16 Can we get adequate nutrients from food? Connect:  ameliascottbarrettmd.com Other Episodes (and seasonings) You May Like:  Organ Meats with Chef James Barry: https://www.flippingfifty.com/organ-meats My Organ Meat source: https://www.flippingfifty.com/eat-pluck

Wantrepreneur to Entrepreneur | Start and Grow Your Own Business
507: Be UNDERSTOOD with your branding w/ Maggie Bergin

Wantrepreneur to Entrepreneur | Start and Grow Your Own Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 38:49


Maggie is a Brand Strategist and Owner of Be Understood Branding. Maggie believes brand clarity is a kindness (everyone is exhausted!) AND a branding best practice. Maggie helps her clients carve away vagueness by building a crystal clear, distinct, irresistible brand. Be Understood Branding helps service-based businesses who are great at what they do but not-so-great at *talking* about what they do build a distinct, irresistible Brand Strategy so their work can BE UNDERSTOOD by their ideal clients.Maggie has a BA in Government from Smith College and has worked in the Communication industry since 2000. She lives with her husband and a four legged insistent clown named Django in Chicago.Visit Maggie's website at MaggieBergin.com and follow her on Instagram at @beunderstoodbranding

The Daily Gardener
November 17, 2022 Solway Moss, Henry Muhlenberg, Ethel Zoe Bailey, Shelby Foote, Rosa by Peter Kukielski, and Archibald Lampman

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 34:15


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events 1771 On this day, heavy rains caused the ancient raised peat bog known as the Solway Moss to burst over its earthen banks and flowed down into a valley covering four hundred acres of farmland. The next day, Solway Moss covered the surrounding land with 15 feet of thick feculent mud. Solway Moss was a one-by-two-mile-long moss land growing since the end of the last Ice Age. The raised bog was an estimated 50 feet higher than the surrounding farmland. The living surface of the Solway Moss was a unique mix of bog cotton, sphagnum, and heather. The porous soupy surface hosted a few shrubs and standing pools of water. But the rotting vegetation created a dangerous predicament that no man or cattle would dare traverse throughout the year. Over two hundred years before the Solway Moss burst, the English and the Scots fought over the land surrounding the bog in the Battle of Solway Moss. After the English victory, hundreds of Scots drowned in the bog as they tried to return home by crossing the moss hillside. Like a sponge, peat expands to absorb moisture when it gets wet. And, during wet months like November of 1771, the peat swells; in this case, the peat swelled until it bursts. The incredible event was recorded in a journal: A farmer who lived nearest the moss was alarmed with an unusual noise. The crust had at once given way, and the black deluge was rolling toward his house. He gave notice to his neighbors with all expedition; others received no other advice but... by its noise, many by its entrance into their houses.... some were surprised with it even in their beds. [while some] remaining totally ignorant…until the morning when their neighbors with difficulty got them out through the roof. The eruption burst… like a cataract of thick ink... intermixed with great fragments of peat... filling the whole valley... leaving... tremendous heaps of turf.   1785 Birth of Gotthilf Heinrich Ernst Muhlenberg, American Lutheran Pastor and botanist. He was always referred to by his second name Heinrich. The Muhlenberg family was a founding family of the United States, and Heinrich came from a long line of pastors. His father, Pastor Heinrich Melchior Mühlenberg, was known as the patriarch of the Lutheran Church in America. His brother was a major in the Revolutionary War, and his other brother was a Congressman. Muhlenberg's journals are a treasure trove of his thoughts on botanical self-improvement. He would write: How may I best advance myself in the knowledge of plants?   And Muhlenberg would set goals and reminders to challenge himself, writing: It is winter, and there is little to do . . . Toward spring I should go out and [put together] a chronology of the trees; how they come out, the flowers, how they appear,. . . . I should especially [take not of] the flowers and fruit. The grass Muhlenbergia was named for Heinrich Muhlenberg. Muhly grasses are beautiful native grasses with two critical strengths in their plant profile: drought tolerance and visual punch. In addition, Muhly grasses are easy-going, growing equally well in harsh conditions and perfectly manicured gardens. The Muhly cultivar 'White Cloud' offers gorgeous white plumes. When the coveted Pink Muhly blooms, people often stop and ask the name of the beautiful pink grass. Lindheimer's Muhly makes a fantastic screen, and Bamboo Muhly commands attention when it is featured in containers. All Muhly grasses like well-drained soil and full sun. If you plant them in the fall, be sure to get them situated and in the ground at least a month before the first frost. And here's an interesting side note: Muhlenberg also discovered the bog turtle. In 1801, the turtle was named Clemmys muhlenbergii in his honor.   1818 Death of England's Queen Charlotte, the wife of George III. Charlotte is remembered as the patroness of the arts, an amateur botanist, and a champion of Kew Gardens. In addition to the astounding fact that Charlotte gave birth to 15 children, she was a fascinating royal. Born in Mecklenburg-Strelitz, Germany, Charlotte was the first person in England to bring a Christmas tree indoors to celebrate the holiday season. Charlotte had gotten the idea from her home country of Germany. In December 1800, Charlotte selected a yew which was brought inside Windsor Castle and festively decorated. Charlotte and her husband, King George, both loved botany. After his mother died, George gained control of Kew and Charlotte set about expanding Kew Gardens. On the property, Charlotte had a little cottage installed along with a rustic cottage garden. Her daughter Elizabeth likely painted the attic room ceiling with nasturtium and morning glory. Charlotte was quite serious in her pursuit of botany. She collected plants and had a personal herbarium to help with her studies. The President of the Linnean Society, Sir James Edward Smith, personally tutored Charlotte in botany, along with her four daughters. And. George and Charlotte both became close friends with the botanical tissue paper artist Mary Delaney. At the end of Mary's life, George and Charlotte gave her a house at Windsor along with a pension. When plant hunters in South Africa discovered the Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia reginae) flower, it was sent to England and named for Charlotte's birthplace, Strelitz. The botanical name for the Bird of Paradise is Strelitzia reginae, "stray-LIT-zee-ah REJ-in-ee." The early part of Charlotte's reign occurred before the American Revolution, which is why so many American locations were named in Charlotte's honor. Eleven cities are named Charlotte, the most famous being Charlotte, North Carolina. It's no wonder that Charlotte, NC, has the nickname The Queen's City," and there's a 25-foot tall bronze statue of Charlotte outside the Charlotte airport. Mecklenburg County in North Carolina and Virginia are both named in honor of Charlotte's home in Germany. Charlotte died at 74 in the smallest English royal palace, Kew Palace, at Kew Gardens. She reigned for 57 years. Today, gardeners love the Japanese Anemone Queen Charlotte. It's the perfect plant for adding late color to the garden with light pink petals and golden-yellow centers.   1889 Birth of Ethel Zoe Bailey, American botanist. Ethel graduated from Smith College in 1911 after majoring in zoology. Ethel was the daughter of the American horticulturist Liberty Hyde Bailey. Her father instilled in her a love for botany, adventure, and archiving. Liberty brought Ethel along on his travels to Latin America and Asia in his quest for new plant discoveries. One of her obituaries shared a story from one of their more daring trips: One of the pair's most daring expeditions was to the wild jungle island of Barro Colorado in the Panama Canal Zone. Disregarding warnings about disease and boa constrictors, Miss Bailey her father, then 73, and a few other botanists trekked through hip-deep water of the Mohinja Swamp in search of a rare palm. They found it growing in the swamp, as Bailey had predicted, and photographed it in the pouring rain with the camera tripod almost submerged in water. In turn, Ethel became the curator of the Bailey herbarium above the Mann Library at Cornell University - a position she held for over two decades until 1957. For Ethel, maintaining the collection was her personal mission. She was essentially the steward of her father's work after he donated his private plant collection to Cornell University. For Ethel, Cornell was home. In fact, she was one of the few people to have the honor of being born on the Cornell campus on the spot where Phillips Hall now stands.   One biography of Ethel noted that  She continued to volunteer on a daily basis at the Hortorium, until her death in 1983. Still driving herself to and from work, Miss Bailey had reached the auspicious age of 93. Driving had always been an important part of Miss Bailey's life. She was the first woman in Ithaca to receive a chauffeur's (driver's) license. Ethel's remarkable ability to organize and catalog large amounts of information led to an impressive notecard filing system of every single plant that had been listed in most of the published plant catalogs during Ethel's lifetime. This massive indexing project on simple 3" x 5" cards helped Ethel's father with his research and became an invaluable resource to other researchers and plant experts worldwide. The catalog was later named the Ethel Z. Bailey Horticultural Catalogue in her honor. Ethel received much well-deserved recognition for her work during her lifetime, including the George Robert White Medal in 1967 from the Massachusetts Historical Society and the Smith College Medal in 1970.   1916 Birth of Shelby Foote, American writer, historian, and journalist.  He is remembered for his massive, three-volume, 3,000-page history of the Civil War - a project he completed in 1974. Shelby lived in Memphis and loved to spend days in his pajamas. He did most of his writing in his home study with a view of his small and tidy garden. Shelby was old-fashioned. He took to writing with hand-dipped pens, which slowed the pace of his writing - a practice he felt made him a better writer. One of his favorite books was The Black Flower by Howard Bahr, an acclaimed historical fiction book set during the Civil War.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation Rosa by Peter Kukielski ("Kooh-KEL-ski") This book came out in 2021, and the subtitle is The Story of the Rose. Peter is a world-renowned rosarian or rose expert. He has written many popular books on roses, including Roses Without Chemicals. He spent twelve years as the curator of the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden at the New York Botanical Garden. During that time, he oversaw a $2.5 million redesign of a massive rose collection in a garden designed by Beatrix Farrand. He helped lead the launch of the Royal Botanical Gardens in Ontario. He also promotes disease-resistant roses as a leader on the National EarthKind team. A review in Maine Gardener by Tom Atwell raved that this book is a beauty with lavish illustrations and the long, fascinating history of the rose. In chapter one, Kukielski lists all the plants other than roses in the Rosacea family (surprising ones include mountain ash, apples, raspberries and strawberries.) He also shows, with pictures (the book has 256 color illustrations in total), the many different classes of roses. Modern roses, defined as those introduced since 1867, get their own section.   Tom Atwell's review also revealed the origin story of this book. Three or four times, editors and publishers at Yale University Press asked Portland resident and rose expert Peter E Kukielski to please write a history of the rose. Kukielski kept saying no. The last time they asked, he responded, "Perhaps you should ask why I am saying no." When they did, he told them he'd had read many rose histories, and they all said the same thing. The world didn't need another one, he said. What Kukielsk wanted to do was tell stories about roses. Yes, include some history, but also encompasses the rose's role in religion, literature, art, music and movies. He wanted to offer true plant geeks a bit about the rose's botany, too. In the end, that's the book he was able to write.   In Rosa, Peter takes us on a chronological journey through the history of the rose, including a close look at the fascinating topic of the rose water or rose oil industry. These rose-based products were an essential part of life in the middle east and Asia, with entire population centers springing up around the craft. In a 2007 article in the Richmond Times-Dispatch, Peter shared that, the only way to know a rose is to grow roses. [Peter] grew up watching his grandmother tend her rose garden in Stone Mountain, Ga. Little did she know that she was planting the seed for her grandson's future career.   And in a 2008 article featured in the Red Deer Advocate, Peter shared great insights into why roses reign supreme in the fall. It turns out, as many gardeners will attest, roses often save their best blooms for fall. All year long, roses store energy, which is ultimately released at the end of their season, resulting in gorgeous showy blossoms in autumn. Peter advised, "In my opinion, late September into October is a very close second to June as far as beauty. The days are nicer, the nights are cooler and the sunlight is better, coating everything with a golden glow." Summer is hard on roses, which require a lot of energy to flower.  "It's hot, humid and exhausting. Roses have their fabulous spring, shut down a bit in summer and then display another burst of glorious colour in the fall when they're less stressed."   And in a 2021 interview with Margaret Roach, Peter shared his tip regarding what rose to plant.  Talk to the local rose society, Kukielski suggests, and neighbours who garden: "If the person down the street is growing Queen Elizabeth and it looks great, take that as a cue.   And that passion and pragmatism made Peter Kukielski the perfect author for this book on roses. This book is 256 of the story of the rose, the Queen of flowers, and her long reign through human history. You can get a copy of Rosa by Peter Kukielski and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $7.   Botanic Spark 1861 Birth of Archibald Lampman, Canadian poet, and naturalist. Archibald loved camping and the countryside. The natural world inspired his verse, and he became known as "The Canadian Keats." As a result of contracting rheumatic fever in his childhood, Archibald's life was cut short, and he died at 37. Archibald's poem Knowledge compares our quest for wisdom to a garden. What is more large than knowledge and more sweet; Knowledge of thoughts and deeds, of rights and wrongs, Of passions and of beauties and of songs; Knowledge of life; to feel its great heart beat Through all the soul upon her crystal seat; To see, to feel, and evermore to know; To till the old world's wisdom till it grow A garden for the wandering of our feet. Oh for a life of leisure and broad hours, To think and dream, to put away small things, This world's perpetual leaguer of dull naughts; To wander like the bee among the flowers Till old age find us weary, feet and wings Grown heavy with the gold of many thoughts.   Archibald is buried at Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, and a plaque near his grave is inscribed with his poem "In November," which ends with these words: The hills grow wintery white, and bleak winds moan About the naked uplands. I alone Am neither sad, nor shelterless, nor grey, Wrapped round with thought, content to watch and dream.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

Economic Update with Richard D. Wolff
The Terminal Crises of Global Capitalism

Economic Update with Richard D. Wolff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 29:01


Join d@w for virtual event Marxism For This Moment: A Conversation with Richard Wolff & David Harvey on Friday, November 18th at 1pm ET (New York, UTC-4).  Buy your tickets here: https://www.democracyatwork.info/marxism_for_this_moment_richard_wolff_david_harvey  **If you cannot make the live event but want to support d@w, consider purchasing a ticket anyway and we will send you access to the event recording. In this week's show, Prof. Wolff presents updates on students' solidarity with workers at Smith College; US car industry manipulates supply/demand to inflate prices, profits; Teamsters strike, solidarity defeat Sysco Systems; Starbucks provokes its 250 unionized stores, and why rising wages do not "cause" inflation. In the second half of the show, Wolff interviews Prof. William I. Robinson on global capitalism and its multiple crises he calls "terminal."    

Black Menaces Podcast
BMP 23: Drake isn't all that and White liberals did what?!

Black Menaces Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 50:39


In this episode, Nate and Rachel explore the toxic masculinity that exists within the rap and hip-hop industry. Along with a discussion about the differences that Black students face at more progressive universities after their recent visit to Smith College. Email us at blackmenacespodcast@gmail.com with questions you want to be featured on the podcast and/or Menace moments. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/black-menaces/support

Quotomania
QUOTOMANIA 343: Elizabeth Alexander

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 2:41


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Elizabeth Alexander is a prize-winning and New York Times bestselling author, renowned poet, educator, scholar, and cultural advocate.  She is also president of the Mellon Foundation, the nation's largest funder in the arts, culture, and humanities.Dr. Alexander's most recent book, The Trayvon Generation (2022), is a galvanizing meditation on the power of art and culture to illuminate America's unresolved problem with race and the challenges facing young Black America.  Among the fifteen books she has authored or co-authored, her poetry collection American Sublime was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Poetry in 2006, and her memoir, The Light of the World, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Biography and the National Book Critics Circle Award in 2015.  Other works include Crave Radiance:  New and Selected Poems 1990–2010 (2010), Power and Possibility:  Essays, Reviews, Interviews (2007), The Black Interior:  Essays (2004), Antebellum Dream Book (2001), Body of Life (1996), and The Venus Hottentot (1990). Over the course of an esteemed career in education, Dr. Alexander has held distinguished professorships at Smith College, Columbia University, and Yale University, where she taught for fifteen years and chaired the African American Studies Department.  She has been awarded the Jackson Poetry Prize, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, the George Kent Award, the National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, and three Pushcart Prizes for Poetry.  Notably, Dr. Alexander composed and delivered “Praise Song for the Day” for the 2009 inauguration of President Barack Obama.  Dr. Alexander is Chancellor Emeritus of the Academy of American Poets, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, serves on the Pulitzer Prize Board, and co-designed the Art for Justice Fund.From http://www.elizabethalexander.net/about. For more information about Elizabeth Alexander:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Elizabeth Alexander: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-062-elizabeth-alexander“Elizabeth Alexander”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/elizabeth-alexander“Elizabeth Alexander: The Desire to Know Each Other”: https://onbeing.org/programs/desire-know-elizabeth-alexander-2/The Trayvon Generation: https://www.grandcentralpublishing.com/titles/elizabeth-alexander/the-trayvon-generation/9781538737903/“Elizabeth Alexander: ‘We Can Never Give Up Hope'”: https://www.kirkusreviews.com/news-and-features/articles/elizabeth-alexander-trayvon-generation-interview/

The Courage to Change: A Recovery Podcast
Ask The Expert: Lee Shuer - Hoarding Disorder Recovery

The Courage to Change: A Recovery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 58:39


Lee Shuer is a Certified Peer Specialist and internationally recognized expert in Hoarding Disorder and has been at the forefront of developing self-help groups for people with HD. Lee's own complicated relationship with things started at age 3 years old when he began asking people the question “Do you have anything that you don't need?”. The first object he acquired was a lawnmower that finally gave away at age 43. Throughout his life he considered himself a collector and archivist, but as time went on he found that he was holding on to more and more objects, specifically those with sad memories attached.Soon his house was filled with World Trade Center memorabilia, Newspaper clippings from The Challenger Disaster and letters he'd failed to send to loved ones who passed away.Lee eventually sought the help he needed and went on to develop The Buried in Treasures Workshop Facilitator's Guide with Dr. Randy Frost, and co-authored WRAP® for Reducing Clutter with Dr. Mary Ellen Copeland.He's delivered his message about hoarding behaviors on CBS Sunday Morning, Scientific American, and The Chicago Tribune. As well as partnered with Stanford University, Columbia University, Smith College, and UCSF. Today he works with those who struggle with their relationship with things and tries to get people to stop using the word hoarder.Episode ResourcesMutual Support Consulting | mutual-support.comBuried in Treasures Book | Buried-Treasures-Compulsive-Acquiring-TreatmentsThe Clutter Movement | facebook.com/groups/TheClutterMovementIndividualSupportThe Copeland Center | copelandcenter.comConnect with LeeMutual Support Consulting | mutual-support.comConnect with The Courage to ChangePodcast Website | lionrock.life/couragetochangepodcastPodcast Instagram | @couragetochange_podcastYouTube | The Courage to Change PodcastTikTok | @ashleyloebblassingamePodcast Email | podcast@lionrock.lifePodcast Facebook | @thecouragetochangepodcastLionrock ResourcesLionrock Life Mobile App | lionrock.life/mobile-appSupport Group Meeting Schedule | lionrock.life/meetings

Top Coach Podcast
TC410: Marty Smith, College of Central Florida

Top Coach Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 52:40


Florida JUCO baseball is the real deal. Many names you recognize have come through this pipeline as players and coaches. One of the guys racking up the wins and developing big time players is Marty [...]

Egg Meets Sperm
The Emotional Fertility Rollercoaster

Egg Meets Sperm

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 32:01


Join us as our guest speaker talks about; Maternal mental health and wellness, Unmanaged and chronic stress impact our body's ability to function efficiently and effectively, and women who struggle through fertility are at a higher risk of developing symptoms of depression and anxiety postpartum. Our awesome guest for this week is Kate Kripke! Kate Kripke is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) and Perinatal Mental Health Counselor (PMH-C) who has worked with individuals and groups in periods of transition and change for more than 20 years. She's spent the past decade and a half supporting women and families as the Founding Director and Senior Supervising Psychotherapist of the Postpartum Wellness Center of Boulder, an organization she created in 2007.  Kate has extensive experience and training in Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders with a BA in Sociology from the University of Colorado at Boulder and a Master's Degree in Clinical Social Work from Smith College. She has participated in numerous maternal mental health task forces, most recently sitting on the Pregnancy-Related Depression State Advisory Committee convened by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. In addition to her work at PWCB, Kate shares her expertise through one-on-one and group coaching, online workshops, a weekly podcast “Motherhood Uncut,” and her upcoming book, Reinventing Supermom: Support & Strategies for New Mothers Who Feel Lost.   A gift for listeners: one month free in my healthy mom membership   Follow Kate Kripke on: Instagram: @katekripke   Follow me on: Instagram: @holisticfertilitydoctor TikTok:  @holisticfertilitydoctor Youtube:  @Holistic Fertility Expert Facebook: Join our private Fertile AF tribe!  

The Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast
Episode 112, ‘The Philosophy of Buddhism' with Jay Garfield (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)

The Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 49:02 Very Popular


A prick of the skin; the sorrow of grief; the inevitability of change; our dependence on the whim of the cosmos. Suffering bleeds into every aspect of our existence and, according to Siddhārtha Gautama (the Buddha), the anguish of our misfortune stems from our ignorance and confusion. If we were to see the world for how it really is – a place of impermanence, interdependence, and emptiness – then, according to Buddhism, we might free ourselves from illusion and discover the path to liberation and enlightenment. Today, this insight is shared by over half a billion people. Yet, most philosophy departments in Europe and America offer no courses in Buddhist philosophy and (within the leading journals) academic papers focusing on the central tenets of Buddhist philosophy of religion are vastly outweighed by their Abrahamic (and predominantly Christian) counterparts. Professor Jay Garfield, our guest for this episode, is the exception to this rule. Championing the globalisation of philosophy and reshaping perceptions of Buddhist scholarship, Professor Garfield is Chair of Philosophy at Smith College in Massachusetts, Visiting Professor at Harvard Divinity School, Professor at Melbourne University, and adjunct Professor at the Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies. Named amongst the 50 most influential philosophers of the past decade – with over 30 books and over 200 publications – it is safe to say that Professor Garfield is one of the leading exponents of Buddhist philosophy in contemporary academia. For Garfield, if philosophy won't diversify, then let's call it out for what it is: a colonial discipline that ignores the rich and relevant insights of non-Western thought. As philosophers, we cannot afford to ignore the metaphysical, ethical, epistemological, and existential insights of Buddhist scholarship. It's time to engage with Buddhism, and rid ourselves of our prejudices, ignorance, and confusion. Buddhism is a philosophy of the present, not a philosophy of the past, and it's time we treated it that way. This episode is produced in partnership with The Global Philosophy of Religion Project at University of Birmingham, led by Yujin Nagasawa and funded by the John Templeton Foundation. Contents Part I. The Nature of Reality Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion Links Jay Garfield, Personal Website. (Website) Jay Garfield, Engaging Buddhism. (Book) Jay Garfield, Practicing without a License. (Essay) Books by Jay Garfield. (Website)

The Roller Coaster
E281 - Why Bone Health and Exercise are Essentials at Midlife with Rebekah Rotstein

The Roller Coaster

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 30:52


Rebekah is an industry leader in Pilates, bone health and movement education. She is the founder of Buff Bones®, a medically endorsed exercise system for bone and joint health with on-demand classes and trained instructors in more than 30 countries. A former ballet dancer, Rebekah also worked in the Sports Medicine department of Smith College as a student athletic trainer. A diagnosis of osteoporosis at age 28 motivated her to advocate for others with low bone mass and to provide innovative education and programming for them. She has presented at numerous conferences in the Pilates industry, at the International Osteoporosis Foundation Worldwide Conference and for the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science. Rebekah is a member of the Ambassador Leadership Council for the Bone Health and Osteoporosis Foundation, an ambassador for American Bone Health and worked as a partner of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Women's Health. She recently served as part of the Bone Health Working Group for the Society for Women's Health and Research. The myths and realities of osteoporosis Why bone health should be at the forefront of your health list Ways to take charge of your bone health through movement Connect with Rebekah at www.buff-bones.com, Facebook @BuffHealthyBones and Instagram @gotbuffbones To grab your copy of Your Journaling Journey search for it on Amazon or with these links: Canada: https://amzn.to/3ACRHla USA: https://amzn.to/3B0A28l Follow The Roller Coaster: Facebook @therollercoasterpodcast Instagram @the_roller_coaster_podcast Pinterest @EmpoweredMidlifeMoms YouTube: @TheRollerCoasterPodcast TikTok @rollercoaster_podcast Website www.therollercoasterpodcast.com

Healing The Spirit: Astrology, Archetypes & Artmaking
34. Remembering Your Divine Self Through Astrology with Martha Alter Hines

Healing The Spirit: Astrology, Archetypes & Artmaking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 90:40


How do we work with astrology as a portal to deeper connections with the spirit world? How can we cultivate more easeful trust with our intuition and with our natural gifts? What role can expanding our framework for contemplations around gender and sexuality play in connecting us with our authentic selves? I feel honored to share this profound, grounded conversation with my friend, Martha Alter Hines.Recorded in late July 2022, I was deeply moved when I re-listened to this conversation this week because so much of what Martha shared here became seeds that have grown into gorgeous seedlings in my own path. It's a conversation that's taught me and helped me clarify my own path as an astrologer. I hope that you'll allow it to also deepen your connection to yourself.We discussed how Martha's astrological practice serves as a mirror to her connection to the spirit world and how to work with fears of the unknown through the lens of astrological transits. We also discussed her life journey as a clinical social worker who felt called to work with the spirit world and to be a channel for divine wisdom. We also discussed how devoting ourselves to investigating, expanding, and engaging with concepts and constructs around gender and sexuality can help us deepen into our authentic selves.Earlier in 2022, Martha organized an incredible free symposium, Re-Becoming The One, to promote the healing of gender, sexuality, and our relationship to Love and Life itself. Martha graciously invited me to be a part of this symposium and you can listen to our conversation on Mercury and the Non-binary experience here.Here's Martha's bio: First and foremost, I am a mom of two amazing kids, ages ten and fifteen. We live in BEAUTIFUL coastal California and feel so lucky to be here.I come from a big, international family.  I was born in Bangkok, Thailand, and grew up in Bangladesh, Pakistan, Kenya, and northern Virginia.  I received my Masters in Social Work from Smith College in Massachusetts in 2001.  I then worked as a clinical social worker, psychotherapist, and body worker for most of the past twenty years. I specialized in prevention, treatment, and investigation of child abuse, attachment, and trauma.In 2018, the spirit world made it very clear that it was time for me to move on from that very important work to the calling of my soul – assisting people to navigate the beautiful and often challenging experience of awakening to their ultimate, cosmic selves and souls.For many years, since I was 21 years old, I have had an ability to see many things beyond the physical world – spirits of all kinds, past lives, the structure of people's bodies and cells, and so on.In the work I do now, I bridge both the Earthly world and that of the spiritual and cosmic worlds to support us in coming into our personal and collective relationship with the spirit world and our own ways of living as conscious beings of both the Earth and the divine.I feel strongly that the world needs our wisdom, not only of our minds, but of our whole beings - our minds, hearts, bodies, spirits, and selves as beings of the Earth, cosmos, and infinity.I love this work that I do now and am honored and full of joy holding space for others to recognize their own beautiful, literally divine selves and to live the full life they are here to live.You can find Martha's offerings on her website. She's available for 1:1 sessions and has a beautiful membership community which hosts monthly gatherings.We also mentioned Joe G's talk on the non-binary experience.This podcast is hosted, produced, and edited by Jonathan Koe. Theme music is also composed by me! Special thanks to Alex Lai for the editing help for this episode. Connect with me through my newsletter, my Instagram @nate_qi, my music, and click here to book an astrology reading with me. For podcast-related inquiries, email me at healingthespiritpodcast@gmail.com.

Sex, Drugs, and Jesus
Episode #76: Racism In Drug Policy, Separate Healing Spaces For POC From White People & Stopping Whiteness From Controlling The Narrative, With Ifetayo Harvey, Founder Of The People Of Color Psychedelic Collective

Sex, Drugs, and Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 62:08


INTRODUCTION: Ifetayo Harvey is the founder and board president at the People of Color Psychedelic Collective. Ifetayo's experience of growing up with her father in prison brought her to drug policy reform work at the Drug Policy Alliance. In 2013, Ifetayo was the opening plenary speaker at the International Drug Policy Reform Conference in Denver, Colorado. Ifetayo briefly worked at the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies in 2015 where she was inspired by Kai Wingo's Women and Entheogens Conference in Cleveland, Ohio. Ifetayo worked at the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) for five years because of her passion for ending the war on drugs. While at DPA, Ifetayo penned the piece Why the Psychedelic Community Is So White in 2016 and began organizing other folks of color and allies in psychedelic circles. Ifetayo comes from a family of seven children raised by her mother in Charleston, South Carolina. She has a Bachelor's degree from Smith College in history and African studies. INCLUDED IN THIS EPISODE (But not limited to):  ·      Breakdown Of What The POCPC Is·      Whiteness Controlling The Narrative ·      Racism in Drug Policy·      White Fragility ·      The Need For POC To Have Healing Spaces Apart From White People·      The Benefits Of Psychedelics – And Risks·      Stories Of Racism In The South·      Theory Vs. Real Life·      Internalized Superiority & Internalized Inferiority ·      The Student Loan Forgiveness Hypocrisy   CONNECT WITH IFETAYO: Website: https://www.pocpc.org/Website:  https://www.ifetayo.meYouTube: https://bit.ly/3FS2Z9xFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/pocpsychedelics/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pocpsychedeliccollective/Twitter: https://twitter.com/POCpsychedelicsLinkedIn: https://bit.ly/3Fx8p9H  CONNECT WITH DE'VANNON: Website: https://www.SexDrugsAndJesus.comWebsite: https://www.DownUnderApparel.comYouTube: https://bit.ly/3daTqCMFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/SexDrugsAndJesus/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sexdrugsandjesuspodcast/Twitter: https://twitter.com/TabooTopixLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/devannonPinterest: https://www.pinterest.es/SexDrugsAndJesus/_saved/Email: DeVannon@SexDrugsAndJesus.com  DE'VANNON'S RECOMMENDATIONS: ·      Pray Away Documentary (NETFLIX)o  https://www.netflix.com/title/81040370o  TRAILER: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tk_CqGVfxEs ·      OverviewBible (Jeffrey Kranz)o  https://overviewbible.como  https://www.youtube.com/c/OverviewBible ·      Hillsong: A Megachurch Exposed (Documentary)o  https://press.discoveryplus.com/lifestyle/discovery-announces-key-participants-featured-in-upcoming-expose-of-the-hillsong-church-controversy-hillsong-a-megachurch-exposed/ ·      Leaving Hillsong Podcast With Tanya Levino  https://leavinghillsong.podbean.com  ·      Upwork: https://www.upwork.com·      FreeUp: https://freeup.net VETERAN'S SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS ·      Disabled American Veterans (DAV): https://www.dav.org·      American Legion: https://www.legion.org ·      What The World Needs Now (Dionne Warwick): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfHAs9cdTqg  INTERESTED IN PODCASTING OR BEING A GUEST?: ·      PodMatch is awesome! This application streamlines the process of finding guests for your show and also helps you find shows to be a guest on. The PodMatch Community is a part of this and that is where you can ask questions and get help from an entire network of people so that you save both money and time on your podcasting journey.https://podmatch.com/signup/devannon  TRANSCRIPT: [00:00:00]You're listening to the sex drugs and Jesus podcast, where we discuss whatever the fuck we want to! And yes, we can put sex and drugs and Jesus all in the same bed and still be all right at the end of the day. My name is De'Vannon and I'll be interviewing guests from every corner of this world as we dig into topics that are too risqué for the morning show, as we strive to help you understand what's really going on in your life.There is nothing off the table and we've got a lot to talk about. So let's dive right into this episode.De'Vannon: Ifetayo Harvey is the founder and board president at the People of Color, Psychedelic Collective, y'all. I love the name of that organization so much. I believe, I'll say it one more time. I said the people of color, psychedelic collective. Fat's experience of growing up with our father in prison ignited the spark that has led to this amazing individual's body of work in the area [00:01:00] of drug policy reform.Please join us today as we discuss politics, drugs, and how racism and whiteness plays into all of.Hello, all, all my beautiful souls out there. I appreciate each and every last one of you and the time that you take the tune into the sex drugs in Jesus podcast. Well, if today we're gonna be talking a lot more about drugs than we are gonna talking about the Lord, hallelujah. But I wouldn't be surprised if Jesus didn't do a little hit of something back in his day and you know what I mean?Just cuz it ain't written, don't mean it didn't happen. Hallelujah, tabernac and praise. So the day I have with me, lovely, lovely, lovely darling, lady by the name of Epi Atta darling, and she is the founder of the People of Color psychedelic Collective. Ain't that a fucking mouthful? I'm gonna say it again, [00:02:00] y'all.I'm say it again y'all. The people of color, psychedelic collective. My homeboy, Jay Schiffman, over at the Chooses Struggle podcast told me about this individual here and I felt like Dracula as we getting close to Halloween, I need to just sink my bangs into her. And today I have her. How are youIfetayo: Oh, I'm doing great now that I'm talking to you. Oh, how are you doing?De'Vannon: fan? Fucking fantastic. And you know, I'm on this whole new like drug discovery journey myself, and what I've been doing is working hard to siphon off out of my mind. The voices that I realized that were present affecting me that I didn't know. And what I mean by that, Voices from the military, voices from the church, voices from my parents' house.You know, I'm thinking, I say for instance, I used to really look [00:03:00] down upon drugs, you know, and things like that. Well, you know, I thought about it. It was like, okay, where the fuck did I get that from? Was that due to personal discovery? Was that what they told me? You know? And so many of the voices in my head I've been finding lately, even as I'm approaching 40, you know, it's still, you know, what they told me.And it's not actually my own voice. I've been angry about it. I've been pissed off about it. I've been up about it, I've been down about it. And so I love the work that you do. And it's so on tempo at the times right now, is this resurgence? You know, psychedelics is coming now. You started this back in 2017. And and so just tell us about. What in your words, the people of color psychedelic Collective is and why you started it?Ifetayo: Yeah, so people of Color Psych Collective, we are a non-profit doing education and community building for folks of color interested in learning about [00:04:00] psychedelics and ending the war on drugs. And so since we've started, we've done panel discussions, We've had a conference, we had a retreat and of course this covid started happening.We've done online workshops on varying topics. And the reason why I started was because I was tired of seeing whiteness dominate the conversation on psychedelics. And I was also tired of people trying to have conversations about race where they were afraid to speak directly on race and . Okay. I wanted to make a space for people to be able to.Talk about those things without having to worry about, Oh, what is this white person gonna think? Or, Oh, is white fragility gonna get in the way? Because a lot of times it does. So that was part of my motivation. The other part was [00:05:00] prior to me creating my organization, I worked at the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, which is also a mouthful. People call it maps. And they do clinical research on psychedelics. And so I worked there for about eight months and I was the only black person there. And it was clear during my time that like working on, you know, racial trauma for black folks was not a priority. Working on even unpacking. The whiteness of the organization was not a priority either. And even involving black folks or other folks of color in their research wasn't our priority. And to me, in my mind, I was just like, we as black people, we have, you know, some, some of the highest rates of trauma in this country. You know, just [00:06:00] given our, how we got here, our story in this country. You know, I, I grew up in Charleston, South Carolina, where we have a number of plantations, old historical sites is where a lot of us were brought through, right?A lot of our ancestors. So to me it just didn't make sense. , Black people's trauma wasn't being talked about. Indigenous folks'. Trauma wasn't being talked about or centered in these conversations around trauma. A lot of times it center just white, middle classness. Right. I was just tired of our trauma and our pain and our healing being second to theirs, and I wanted to create a space where we could talk about our experiences of using these substances, but also our experiences of the war on drugs and how it impacted our communities and how, you know, this new narrative of [00:07:00] psychedelics.You know, reemerging kind of leaves us out.De'Vannon: When you, Thank you for that beautiful breakdown. So when you mention the war on drugs, I like to to talk about it a little bit so, As I understand it, something I learned. I've been watching all my documentaries. I'm a documentary whore. I was watching that one, , How To Change Your Mind on Netflix. And then there's one on PBS called The History of Mental Illnesses.And they both went over like the different psychedelics. But what they, what they made me aware of was how psychedelics were used many years ago before, I think it was fdr, Franklin d Roosevelt, I think started that initial war on drugs. Don't quote me on that, but I think it was him. You know, And then all the clinical studies shut down because of the government policy.And so, and now we're seeing this resurgence of the psyche's coming back because the war on drugs clearly hasn't worked. And I was reading Emmi [00:08:00] Lord Emily Duff's book about, what's it called? Nope. I have to look that up because it's all about like marijuana. It's called grassroots and the rise and fall of marijuana, you know, in the book, her book and then the documentary gets into how, you know, drugs are demonized and they made it seem like people were gonna like, you know, smoke the weed and then go rape the white women, you know, and shit like that.You know, all of our mental health issues was us attacking someone else as opposed to something happening to us. But this is the trap we fall into when they, like you said earlier, going snatch our ancestors up out of Africa where they were just happy bouncing around doing them. Teddy's flopping in the red wind dick swinging as it should be Then here comes some people snatching you up and lo and behold, you [00:09:00] traveling internationally when you, you probably didn't know about no fucking other nations. And so, so the narrative was controlled by the people from CaucasianIfetayo: Mm-hmm.De'Vannon: so the c cassity of it all. And so I love how it's like, I feel like we're taking more of this power back or getting it for the first time maybe.You know, and a lot of this is coming through psychedelics, so I appreciate the fact that you, that you started this and then you stuck with it all this time. Covid has come, you still got it going on, so I commend you on that.Ifetayo: Oh, thank you. Thank you. Yeah. Yeah. And I think you make an interesting point about the history of drug prohibition in, in the US I will say. So it was Nixon who started the war on drugs, the official war on drugs, but even prior to Nicks and there were a lot of drug laws on the books. You know, we had alcohol [00:10:00] prohibition in the twenties and that didn't work.And lots of people die cuz they're making , you know, moon shine and other stuff. And it sometimes was poisoned or, you know and you're right, a lot of drug. Ma rooted in racism, just point blank period. I think you used the example of like the whole reefer madness talking about like the fear of you know, black men or Latino men smoking weed and going to have sex with white women.And that's pretty much, you know, the same for cocaine. Opium, It's, they've all been all these drugs have been used to build a certain narrative around racial groups, and it's all been built around white fear and white fragility. Yeah.De'Vannon: fragile though it don't take, it don't take much to piss Karen off. [00:11:00] Not at all. Not at all. And I, look, I'm not talking about all you white people out there. I've had to be so much white dick in my life. Real and I intend to have some more. So it's not all of y'all. You know who you are, Karen, probably not even listening to this type of show.maybe you are, of you're open minded. I had a dream like a couple of weeks or months ago or whatever, getting in this dream. It's like the Lord was telling me I've been a gifted dream or so It was about like four or five. That's how, that's how the spirit first revealed himself to me was it was like in this dream and I've been dreaming ever since,Ifetayo: mm-hmm.De'Vannon: but, but recently I had this dream and it was like, it was like these like conservative people, like white people were singing a song.Ifetayo: Hmm.De'Vannon: Whenever you hear music in a dream, a good thing, especially, well if it's melodious and.Ifetayo: I D.De'Vannon: but the heart song, like the heart message of it, the heart of the song was, is like they were [00:12:00] asking me like, is there a way, is there something they could do different? Is there, was there a way that they, something they could change?And I felt like, and I felt like, you know, that there is a, now we've always had like, you know, even back in slavery days, the, the white defectors, you know, the, our allies, you know, But in this dream here, these were people who have been closed minded to the struggles of minorities and people who are different from them.And it's like, in this dream, it's like the Lord is showing me that. Like, maybe he's like, he's turning their hearts or they're changing their minds, or something like that. And so I'm, I'm revealing this dream here to say that I think that the work that you're doing and stuff like that, even though these people might not, you know, go on the news, go on Fox News wherever, and say they're changing their minds. I think it's making a difference because otherwise that dream wouldn't have come to me because I don't, I don't invest a lot of energy into trying to change conservative people. I focus on the people they have hurt, [00:13:00] and so I really think that what you're doing is going a long way.Ifetayo: Well, thank you. Thank you. That's, that's, that means a lot especially, you know, caring or connecting that to your dream. Cuz I'm really into dream meetings. And yeah, it's, it sometimes feels like our country's progressing into old ideas or outdated ideas, but I, I still have hope that, you know, that's not the case for a majority of the people, even though sometimes the kids feel like.De'Vannon: Yeah, that's why it's good to take a media purge Sometimes I just don'tIfetayo: Oh yeah.De'Vannon: for like a few days and just detox a media detox.Ifetayo: Mm-hmm. . Mm-hmm.De'Vannon: So the services you provide, I'm gonna talk about 'em from your website, beautiful website, y'all. All that information will go in the showy [00:14:00] notes, as it always does. And then they're, they're on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, all of that will go in the showy notes. You know, you have like community building, education, arts and culture. So do kind a person like walk into like your office and receive some sort of service, or are you mainly doing outreach, like on the ground? What is it?Ifetayo: Mm-hmm. . Yeah. So interesting. We are remote based. We've always been remote based since before the pandemic. I live in New York and I've been in New York for about six years, and I have folks in DC Chicago go. Colorado and California, and Portland, Oregon. So we don't provide any direct services partly because a lot of these substances are illegal. So we cannot legally, I mean, in some states, , well, I would say [00:15:00] decriminalized, but in some, in some states it would be decriminalized. But we can, we can't do like psychedelic therapy or like a healing ceremony officially under our organization. But we do connect people, you know, if someone like reaches out to us and say like, Hey, I need help.We can connect people to other services practitioners and other resources out there. And you know, before the pandemic we would go to different cities. Events and, you know, do discussions. Theres, so, like back in 2018, we did a kind of like a partnership panel with the DC Psychedelic Society and the Philadelphia Psychedelic Society.And we talked about patriarchy and psychedelics and that, I mean, much needed conversation. So we'll do, we'll do things like that. I hope in the future we're able to do more direct [00:16:00] services. We've been really focused on building our capacity as an organization. So like we recently incorporated as a non-profit and we're waiting for our 5 0 1 C three to come in and we we received our first grant last year.So yeah, we're, we're, we're slowly building toward that. And I I put emphasis on the slowly because. I think that there's this trend in the site up space for everyone to wanna start their own group and just be known for psychedelics and . That's cool, but it's not sustainable. There's a lots of, you know, different people out there and, and psychedelics are powerful substances.And I am in no rush to, you know, I don't wanna say I'm, I'm not in a rush to give people psyched dogs. I mean, I'm not doing that, but I'm just not in a rush to do that because I know that they're [00:17:00] very powerful substances and it, they take some preparation and and it's also not something to play around with. I, I believe in building a strong container of care for folks if you're going to hold space for them. And I think you do that by being. Prepared. So studying and also just being ethical. So, yeah.De'Vannon: You all, I might have to get your Portland Connect and your New York connection referral cause I'll be in Portland at the end of the month dealing about doing some on the ground research.Ifetayo: Okay.De'Vannon: And I have some jet blue miles that I need to burn. And from New Orleans down here where near where I live, they Jet Blue only goes to New York Fort Lauderdale and Boston.And I've been all three of 'em already, so I may need to come fuck with y'all in the, in the end. Why?Ifetayo: [00:18:00] Yes.De'Vannon: So, so you mentioned a couple of other organizations that you partner with.Ifetayo: Mm-hmm.De'Vannon: You had mentioned maps already. I noticed that I dropped the donation on y'all earlier. You.no. No problem honey. But, and I'm not, I'm not really bragging about that.But when I did it, the, that, like the thank you page said like maps and everything like that. So are you still connected directly with.Ifetayo: Mm-hmm. . Yeah. Yeah. Funny how that works. We are fiscally sponsored by maps. So before, I would say from 2017 to 2020, we were I believe we were, yeah, we were incorporated as a non-profit. And when we got our grant, we were kind of in a time crunch because they were like, We wanna give you this money and we're going to offer you a match component, a $10,000 match. So we're like, Okay, well we don't have a 5 0 1 C [00:19:00] three, so how do we do this ? And they're like, Oh, well, if that's the case, we may not give you the money. . No, I'm just kidding. They didn't say that. But we had to figure out like, how are we gonna do this? And so maps, we looked at a couple other organizations maps had the internal infrastructure set up so we could do that quickly and be able to receive our grant fully.So in a way I kinda, I kind of look at it as like . It's kind of like, Oh yeah, y'all owe us this, you know, so it won't be forever. But you know, it's, it's for now.De'Vannon: Yeah. Well, congratulations on your 5 0 1 3 C status. I, I know it's there. I just know.Ifetayo: ThankDe'Vannon: And y'all for, for those of you who don't know, MAP stands for Multidisciplinary association folks, Psychedelic studies. I didn't know this much research in this much [00:20:00]organization, this many organizations was built around this.You let the news tell it. You know, you let the media tell it. Everything about shrooms and all the different psychedelics is just the devil. you know, that's not, that's just actually not the case at all Now. Now I mentioned earlier some of the pillars that you mentioned on your website, community building, education, arts, and culture.I love a quote that you have on there from arts and culture. Then I wanna talk about the art show you did in 2021. Now you said, quoting from the website along with policy and education, art in all its forms, brings about cultural change. End quote. What does that statement mean to you?Ifetayo: Well, to me it means that, Cultural change is just as impactful, if not more impactful than policy change. I've worked for a few organizations that do policy advocacy work, and I, I don't do policy advocacy work. That's not my day [00:21:00] job. I'm more of a digital communications person. But I'm not very motivated by policy work cause I don't like politicians. And I think, I mean, yeah, politicians aren't to be liked either, right? Like we treat politicians like celebrities and I mean, fuck celebrities too, but yeah, we treat them like they're our friends and it's like, no, like screw those people. So and I think. Honestly, Bureaucracy's gonna be the death of a lot of us.Like bureaucracy in this country just stops a lot of progress from happening. And the way that our political landscape is set up in this country is just, it's just a mess. So . So that's that. I do believe, I do believe that policy can change people's lives, but I do think cultural change can be more impactful.It can be more fun, [00:22:00] it can be more engaging. And at my day job, I work for a caregiver advocacy org. We have a culture change department. And so what they do a lot of times is work with influencers, celebrities, artists, musicians, actors, actresses, and get them to kind of look at our issue a little differently and maybe speak on our issue, work with us, some of the folks. In the culture change department. They also work in Hollywood writer's rooms, so getting our narratives on TV shows in film. And I, I do think that work like that gets people talking a lot quicker. I often find that policy is very jargony and not easily understandable by the average person. And I do think that's partly done by design But I'm also, you know, I'm a, I'm a child of music [00:23:00]education. I grew up you know, in South Carolina studying music since I was a kid. And it had a huge impact on my life. And I feel like what I've been noticing is. That's kind of fading away as a part of our education in the US music and arts education. And so something I'm, I'm very passionate about overall, I think that, you know, when we get, you know, people who, with influence speaking about our issues, whether it be a celebrity or just a community leader, people start to pay attention. People start to think about it differently. Unfortunately, that's just how our society works.We need a celebrity or someone with influence to speak on our to speak on our issue. And, you know, I, Hmm, Yeah, I think that, [00:24:00] that's all I'll say on that.De'Vannon: We'll love it. And, and y'all can check out a video that has to do with this art show on the website. There's lots of videos on the website and and, and of course, obviously on their YouTube channel. I love how, you know, your videos bring so much of your work to life. Can you talk to us about like the, the, the education leg, because on your website there's like you speaking at. These different conferences and things like that, there's the one conference that you spoke at you know, according to the website, you woke up with a stomach virus that day or in a food poisoning. You had food poisoning that instead of canceling it, you, you took a seat and you went on ahead and you let the Good times rollers, where, say, down here in the Cajun land, Leslie Le Bon. So, so, so, so talk to us about, about your, your speaking engagements and how, what it's been like to travel with your message.Ifetayo: Yeah, yeah. That particular speech you're [00:25:00] referencing was last year in Vegas at Meet Delic. And that was an interesting event because it was like very industry side. And so I was speaking about how we need to move beyond just the notion of wellness and how wellness has shortcomings. I think that along with the resurgence of psychedelics in the media and just in our communities in general, we're also seeing, you know, a lot of talk of varying healing modalities.And while important, I think we, we could sometimes use wellness as an escape from actually organizing. Improving our communities. And I think that there are a lot of people in the psychedelics space who, who think that by taking psychedelics, they're going to be more [00:26:00] involved, more liberated than other folks without any, doing any political work or community organizing or building or that kind of thing. So I'm often, you know, the person in a lot of these events and conferences, kind of reminding people that like structural oppression exists and psychedelics aren't coming to change that. Because I think that for a lot of folks, they just think like, Oh yeah, just take psyched dose and boom, that's, you know, and I wish it was that easy, but it's not.So I, I have to remind people that. Sure you could legalize, psyched dogs or decriminalize psychedelics, but are you integrating those substances into a burning house? Cause I mean, look at our healthcare system. Look at, I mean, just to say of our country in general. I've also given talks on like why the why people of color need our own intentional healing spaces away [00:27:00] from white folks.And for a lot of people, this is just common sense , obviously, we, you know, people don't wanna heal in the same places or with the same people who hurt them. And a lot of times when we do try to have complex conversations around race, whiteness gets in the way and detracts and sinners itself and makes everything about them.So a few years ago I gave a talk in Oakland, California. at the Women's Visionary Congress, this is in 2019. And so I was giving a talk about why p POC and digital healing spaces are necessary. And you know, I'm basically saying what I just said about how whiteness the tracks from our healing and all that.And it was a very powerful speech. I'm not saying that to brag, but I'm just I'm saying that to say like, I noticed people [00:28:00] had a very strong reaction to what I was saying. Like people did not, they were just like, Oh shit. Like, damn, you know, . And at first I initially, I told the some of the MCs at the event, I was like, I don't wanna do q and a, cuz I don't feel like dealing with any white nonsense.Right. And the person I'm seeing, there's a mix up and she took questions anyway. And so I was like, Okay, I'll, I'll answer one or two. And this white guy John Gilmore, I believe he's a, he's a board member at maps or donor maps, some rich white dude He basically says like, Oh, well what if I start a Whites only conference?Wouldn't that be racist? And I was like, Well, that's already how maps this conference is. So you wouldn't really be doing anything different than what you're already doing. And [00:29:00] if you want to compare POC and facial healing spaces to like whites only segregation in the us that's, that's on you. That's . And yeah, he thought he was being cute and he wasn't.He, there's actually a video of you wanna watch it, of this whole moment happening, But he felt real dumb after he said that. SoDe'Vannon: Honey, you opened the library on his ass. Mama RuPaul would be so proud of you. The library was open. So y'all, what she's talking about is like basically how, how did I learn this in college? Like it doesn't really, it's not gonna benefit us if individual parts are whole, but the sum total isn't whole. Kind of like that. So if, if a few of us are making it, but everybody else isn't making it, then we're all still fucked.OverallIfetayo: [00:30:00] Mm-hmm.De'Vannon: you know, But so like in the future, how I know. So, so psychedelics isn't gonna solve everything overnight, instantly. Is there, Can it benefit us getting further along as a.Ifetayo: Hm, mm-hmm. . I think that it can, but with a lot of caveats, I think, well there's this, okay, there's this notion in this psychedelic space, a lot of researchers, a lot of just advocates in general or over height, the benefits of psychedelics and totally under height, the risk associated with psychedelics.So I've been in meetings with people, I've been on panels with people who are like, Oh, psychedelics have a low risk profile. What does that mean? does it? Like, what does that mean? You know? There have [00:31:00] been plenty of people who've, who've been traumatized by using psychedelics. There have been people who killed themselves, or people who killed their families while using psyched.Right? So it's, it's kind of messed up to kind of present it as, oh, this, it's safe. The, the risks are low, or, Oh, it's super dangerous, like you're gonna die to do it. Like, we have to give people realistic information. And so that's why I say caveats. Psychedelics aren't for everyone. There are certain people who can't take it, whether they're pregnant, you know, they might be on a certain medication, they might have a certain disability where it's hard for them to take psychedelics.A lot of people, you know, in this country are poor. I grew up poor in the US and you know, my mom's a single parent of seven kids. She could not afford to take off a day to go do some mushrooms or go to a retreat. So those are [00:32:00] those things I just wanna acknowledge are real. But can psychedelics help people in general and with trauma and move our, move our culture forward?Some, I think, yeah, it does have that potential under the right conditions. Something that people say in the psychedelic and harm reduction space is set and setting, which is like kind of a harm reduction monster that people use or they're referring to the place you're in, the setting and the place you're in also in your mind and in life in general and who you're what to say that you should only use second of substances in a place where you're comfortable and with people you trust.And I think that also applies on a macro level too. Psychedelics have the potential to yes, move us forward create better mental health options for folks given the right set and setting. [00:33:00] If we don't have universal healthcare, how much forward is it gonna move us if psychedelic therapy's outta reach?For most folks, if psychedelic therapy's the only thing legalized and recreational use to psyched dust is still legal, then people are still going to be arrested. So I believe that we have to make the conditions right for psyched ups to have a positive impact because if not, it's just going to be, you know, done into our already existing circus. And I don't think that will necessarily make a lasting, impactful change.De'Vannon: right? So you're saying if, if you gonna do this shit, do this shit, write, know, realistically cover everybody and be sure everyone has access to it and dribble the shit around and henpeck at it.Ifetayo: Yeah.De'Vannon: [00:34:00] So, so I wanted to to echo, so, you know, when, when she says like, poc, that's like people of color, like, like that's what that the elder peopleIfetayo: Mm-hmm.De'Vannon: would tell me, like the stories of the things that white people would do to them when they were younger. Now these people were born in like, say like, teens, twenties, 19 teens, twenties, thirties, growing up in the south here in Louisiana. I got called a nigger once,Ifetayo: All right.De'Vannon: there were other, like, I got called like a, like an a or monkey by this white boy one time, you know, in school, you know, things like that.Ifetayo: Mm-hmm.De'Vannon: Didn't happen so much that I would say like, that cemented my perception of white people because I've also had a lot of white people open doors for me in my life, whereas the black people stood in my way. So I was like at a juxtaposition in a crossroads and not really understanding some of the things, you know, some of [00:35:00] the trauma that the elders still held onto.But now that I'm older, I get how hard it can be to really heal of some things. And I would tend to stick with you even if, if you don't want it to. And I never could get it, but I get it now and I don't hold that against them. And so they would tell us how they'd be walking to school because, no, the black people didn't have cars.You know, they didn't have backpacks cuz they took like strings to just tie the books together and the white people would zoom by them in their cars and run them into dishes and stuff like that, you know, and try to, you know, and just, you know, You know, just mean shit like that. That doesn't make any sense.You're already in a, in a, in a nice vehicle. They're on the street walking to the same place you're going, You're even not even gonna offer to, to r pick them up and take them. That's, that's not bad enough. You're gonna try to run them over on the way just for shits and giggles, and, and that sort of shit.And now these people are like in [00:36:00] elementary school, low grade schools when this is happening. And when they grew up into worse racism. And, and then this trickles down into people who, you know, into, even in my generation. And so this is why, you know, you know when, when my guest here says that black people don't need to be around white people sometimes when we heal, this is whyIfetayo: Yeah. Oh yeah, a hundred percent. And it's, I've been in like those racial justice trainings with white folks. And for me it's really frustrating when I have to witness a white person, like realize that black people are people for the first time. It's really frustrating. And I, and I know a lot of white people, even some black people will be like, Oh, well what's the big deal?Like, why can't you just, you know, be in this racial justice training together? And I'm like, It's no, like, this isn't, this to, for them is theory for us. It's our [00:37:00] lives. And so, you know, what you were just sharing about the elders in your family know, stuff like dealing with those races attached is something that I grew up with.You know, my mom was born in the fifties in North Georgia. and she also told me stories of, you know, the night riders or you know, white people shoot a or cops beating up family members for no reason. Even my grandma, my grandma will be 86 this year. She , Her memory is amazing. But she was telling my sister that when she was a kid, Yeah, white kids used to call the niggers too.And she's like, Yeah, we pulled our pants down at 'em . So we, I think we as black people have to realize that like, yeah, this trauma shit is real. It's in our parents, our grandparents, it's in us too. [00:38:00] And if that means, you know, letting your white friend know that, Hey, I wanna talk about this. I've had white people try to talk about, you know, mass incarceration with me or, and you know, other things that.Hit close to home to me. And I don't like talking to him about it because if it's not something you experience, you aren't gonna have the same perspective as I do. Right. Just like I don't have the same perspective as my dad is, you know, he's someone who's actually been in prison. I wasn't. So, I can only share it from my perspective, but a lot of people will use these topics like incarceration as just spotter for conversation and or to look cool.And I'm just, I'm, I don't, that's not why I do this. Yeah. And a and a lot of people will say that, you know, they're [00:39:00] against their war on drugs or they're against this, they're against that. And I think on an intellectual or academic level, a lot of folks are, But when it comes to. on the street. It's a lot different.So I, that's why I think it's so important for us as black people to have our own space. And other folks of color too, because we're at a different level when we talk about these things. We're like in the senior seminar course, the white kids are in the one on one freshman course when they talk about it. A lot of them think that they're on our level when it comes to talking about this stuff, but they're not. And even, you know, I know my organization called the POC Psyched Collective, but same goes for a lot of non-black people of color too. Some of them just, some of them are racist a lot. Some of them are more racist than the white rednecks I grew up with. [00:40:00] So, yeah.De'Vannon: Oh, those are those Mexicans for Trump and shit like that, and the damn gay Republicans and shit.Ifetayo: Yeah, yeah, yeah. You'd be like, Why are you so damn racist? Like, what is, where is this coming from? You know? But yeah, it's, it's a real thing, so,De'Vannon: Well, I think a lot of it gets back to what I was saying at the top of the show about how like the voices, you know, in my head, they mimic themselves as being my own, but they're not, you know, a kid isn't really just born racist. Somebody taught his little as that shit, you know, You know. But they haven't yet come to a point where they go, Maybe the elders in my family were wrong about a black person only being three fourths of a person.You know, They haven't reconciled their own voice yet, you know? Cause no logical person with a heart and a soul can look at, you know, things that happened in our country now and then in the history and [00:41:00] make the, make it logical. But when people's parents tell them that a black person is less than you, that Mexican person is less than you, that gay person is less than you, that gets ingrained in them.And it's, and I and I, I've studied hypnotherapy. I'm a licensed hypnotist. It is difficult. To upo, somebody's upbringing. You know those, that those voices out of their head. Now some people, some white people I know can't fucking stand their families. They're like, I can't racist sons of bitches. You know, I know some white people who, who have such white guilt, they're just like, God damn, and I was born the wrong raise.These white people ain't worth shit. And it stars my family up. They all burn in hell.Ifetayo: Hmm.De'Vannon: Who am I to argue with them? Know they family. I do.Ifetayo: Mm-hmm. . Yeah. Yeah. And I think you know what you're saying [00:42:00] about the voices in your mind, like not always being you, but maybe mimicking you. Goes to show that a lot of this stuff, whether it be drug propaganda or white supremacy, takes a lifetime to unpack. You know, like a lot of times people, when they come to like an event I'm speaking at, they're like, Oh, well how can I get involved?I wanna do something. And I'm like, I, I'll tell people to slow down. I'm like, Just, y'all need to read first. , y'all need to read and learn first, because we all have that intern. Jaga, we all have biases against people who use drugs, especially people addicted, especially black drug users. And we also have internalized white supremacy, like black people do.We have internalized inferiority and white people. They have internalized superiority. And it, it kills me when I, you know, see why people who, they don't necessarily say this, but they act like they've done the work [00:43:00] on anti-racism and they're good. And it's like, no, this is a, this is a lifetime of work.And then some, you know, so you should never stop learningDe'Vannon: Knowledge is power. And as you're saying that, I was thinking about it, I was reading this report cuz I follow like the the decriminalization of the drugs in Oregon because I think that's one of the most miraculous and great. That's happening in my fucking lifetime, and I cannot wait to get there at the end of the month to show my ass.But one of these cops was whining because they were like, The power's been taken for us. The streets are just running rampant with drugs and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And I'm all like, Bishop, you already, they're already running rampant with drugs. Stop being a drama queen. And what he's really whining about though, is his ability to be superior over people for having a chrome of dope or a half a tablet, half a Phoenix or whatever, and throwing a black boy in jail for one fucking pill, you know, for 15 [00:44:00] months or whatever.They, they can't do that to us anymore. So they're trying to act like, you know, the, the city's just lawless outta control, but really they hurt. They bud hurt, they hurt probably just cuz they can't dominate us and they ain't got the power no moreIfetayo: Yep. Yep. That's, that's facts. That's facts. And yeah. There's, there's so many like. Unfounded Narrows being pushed right now in a lot of major cities. Here in New York, it's the homelessness and the crime epidemic apparent, like quotes around that . But yeah, people there. I, so I worked on the campaign in Oregon.My old organization, Drug Policy Alliance funded that campaign. And so I was working the night that it got found or that the bow initiative got passed. And it was really crazy because being online and seeing people's reaction to it, [00:45:00] they were just like, what? Like people could not believe that it was real.And that was so fascinating to me because for a lot of folks, like my mom who's, who's 66, she never thought that she would be able to walk into a dispensary and buy weed. That was not the thing she thought about in the seventies, but she was my age. And now it's the thing in some places. So, yeah, it's, it's interesting and I think a lot of people are losing their shit over the fact that, yeah, they don't have power over us anymore.I mean, look at how many people reacted to the whole student loan forgiveness program that Biden in and out. People are mad. People are mad that black people have a chance at getting further in. That we have less barriers to go to college, that we have less barriers to get opportunities that makes people mad.And a lot of the progress that's hindered in this country is because of that. [00:46:00] Cuz white folks do not want us to have the same opportunities as them. That's why our public transit infrastructure in the US sucks. That's why people are okay with defunding public education because anything that benefits poor black people, , they don't care about, they're okay with increasing police budgets because that means there'll be more of them to keep us in check.De'Vannon: As the Lord said, amen and amen system. I mean it in the most non churchy way. But, but as the Lord said it, you know, in the Bible, you know, freely you have received, bitch freely give, I'm adding the bitch to it. Jesus didn't say that, but he probably thinking it. it, they, people are coming from a very, very bitter place when they bitter energy, whatever you wanna call it, negative space, LDL below, whoever.The shit ain't good when you have made it and you're gonna be particular about how the fuck somebody else makes it. So maybe you didn't get your [00:47:00] student loan forgiven, but I bet you somewhere in your life somebody gave you some shit you didn't really deserve and you took that shit, scooped it on up and I throwing off into the sunset and, and, you know, and ain't never even looked back.And you may not have even said thank you. And You know, so this is how people become hypocrites and stuff. The sort of stuff Jesus preach. Again, you may not think you being hypocritical, but the Lord remembers that time when, and even though you may have forgotten it, so the fuck what? I don't care my forgiven because I'm a 100% disabled veteran.I was praying, Lord, just wipe it all out for, you know, I don't care this, just let it go because I'm not a bitter broken bitch. And so I'm not sitting around here trying to find ways to be mad at people's progress. You know? Then half the politicians bitching. I love how the White House read them forIfetayo: Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. That was funny.De'Vannon: you wanna, wanna complain about them getting this forgiven, but you got a few hundred thousand forgiven.Ifetayo: Yeah. Right, right. [00:48:00] Yeah,De'Vannon: 10,000, but you got half a million. Bitch, go set on your ass somewhere.Ifetayo: yeah,De'Vannon: have several seeds,Ifetayo: yeah. They're proud to be hypocrites. Like they're tol. It's like no moral compass. Just, and then the crazy thing is, is that they'll say they're Christians and it's like, and you know, it's funny, I didn't grow up Christian. I grew up in South Harris, so I was around a lot of Christians, but I didn't grow up Christian.And there's so many people who give Christians a bad name like that, who I'm just like, This is not what Jesus was about. like Jesus, Jesus was about. You know, like you were saying, giving freely, he fucked with sex workers. You know, he hung out with us gays. Like he, he was not about all this shit that they make him seem about, and he probably spoke some weed too, or did some shoes, I don't know.De'Vannon: Right. That's cause it's not written. No mean it didn't happen. There's a whole [00:49:00]30, the 31st, 30 years of his life isn't really, really recorded. After he ran away from his parents in the temple, he didn't really run away, but he was like, Y'all, I got shit to do. You know, So who fuck knows what he did. And so I think he experienced life personally. Yeah.I wanna talk about before we wrap it up, I wanna talk about some of the good things. So, so what have we talked about so far? Some of the stigma surrounding psychedelics, A lot about what your organization does because I want everyone to go to your website. I'm having my assistant add your website to my resources page.Ifetayo: Well, thank you.De'Vannon: yes indeed. Any time, my dear. Because I was inspired to go on a psychedelics journey when I watched you know how to change your mind on Netflix and the history of mental illnesses on pbs. I was watching how the veterans and everything like that who have been struggling with ptsd. I'm a veteran with ptsd, you know, all this psych drugs, they give us the VA to shit don't work, it just be having us like zombies.And I'm watching these documentaries. They did two or three MDMA trips and they haven't had the [00:50:00] ptsd, PTSD problems since. So I'm here for it for the veterans. I'm here for Joe Bidens trying to get the M D M. Legalize, even if it's just at the clinic level, bitch, I will take it because I have been locked up in the mental hospital for some of these veterans before I got four felonies and I'd probably been in the mental hospital about 4, 5, 10, 50, 11 times too.You, if, if MD a is what it'll take for some of my fellow veterans to stop imagining the square tiles on the floor moving and shit like that. The shit that I witnessed when I was in there and shitting all over the floor and whatnot. Bitch give him his goddamn M D M A now. What have you witnessed in your, in like, I know y'all don't give the drugs to people cuz you can't and stuff like that, but have you heard of any stories where somebody was this way and then they got better after doing the psychedelic therapy?You know, with, with a therapist or in a safe space, any positive tells, You can tell.Ifetayo: Yeah. Yeah. I'm happy to share a little about my [00:51:00] story psychedelics, but in general, you know, I've heard people so many stories of folks saying that psychedelics have helped them with body image issues. Depression, ptsd, anxiety, O c D all kinds of things. For me personally, I got into psychedelics when I was in college. I was really depressed my senior year. And I was dealing with suicidal thoughts. I felt just passively suicidal. And it was my senior year, so, you know, when you're a senior, like turn up, you know, everybody's trying to be that . And for me, the depression hit me hard, like really, really hard that year.And it was debilitating. And, you know, I was, I had been in therapy for some time and I got prescribed like, well be shrimp. And I decided not to [00:52:00] take it cuz I, I was a little scared, I was cautious. My mom's also like a herbalist and they get a homeopathic stuff, so she's like against all that stuff.And so that's how, that was my upbringing. You know, I have a lot of friends who, Take antidepressants and it works really well for them. So I'm not, I'm not knocking it. But for me, I was, I was scared. , they said it would take away my sex drive. I was like, Oh no. Hell nowSo, so it was kind of crazy looking back at it. So basically I had interned at the Drug Policy Alliance as a media intern. I started writing about my experience of my dad going to prison and being deported, and they invited me to their conference to speak. So I spoke my first time really speaking in an audience that big. I like broke down in tears.It was [00:53:00] really cathartic for me. And, but at the same time, I knew I was under all that, I was still depressed. So I went to this panel on like end of life. End of life anxiety and p and psychedelics. So they were talking about treating people with like terminal illnesses like cancer with L S D. And I was like, Huh, this is interesting.For some reason I related to it, so I was like, I'm gonna go and do some mushrooms. So I went back to school after the conference and I was talking to my friends cuz I knew they dabbled in psychedelic. I was like how do I do mushrooms, ? At that point I only tried alcohol and wheat. I was so sonner in college.I, I still am. And so they're like, take three and a half grams, maybe put in some peanut butter cuz they taste kind of nasty. And then they're, then they're like, yeah, [00:54:00] like go in the woods or something. Like go in nature. Oh yeah. Have a sitter too. So I got my, I got my friend to, to sit for me and I ate the three and a half grams of mushrooms and went on a walk in the woods on this nature trail.It's really beautiful, overwhelming, at the same time. Experience. It lasted about eight hours for me, and it felt like a jolt that I needed in that time, like being really depressed and suicidal. I felt like I had this jolt just being like, ah, you know, like, of like release, but also happiness and beauty.Like it was showing me the beauty of life, why we're here. Yeah, it just, it, it just showed me a different side of life. It reminded me of my childhood imagination. Like we were in the woods and like the, the trees were glistening. The. The plants were talking [00:55:00] like, it, it just felt very surreal. I was, I was kind of freaking out.I was like, This is too much. So me and my friend, she took me back to my room and I felt a little bit better there. I was like, less freaked out. But yeah, it, it helped me see myself in a different context. When you are depressed, you're so used to a certain narrative that you have about yourself. It could be, Oh, I'm stupid, I'm dumb, I'm worthless, blah, blah, blah. when you take mushrooms or some other psychedelic, maybe you're seeing yourself from a, like, like, you're basically seeing yourself from a different person's perspective, like almost from the outside. And it helps you have a lot more compassion for yourself. Like you see yourself as a person, not as like,You. So I think that can be helpful [00:56:00] for anyone who's stuck in a rut, whether it be depression whether it be, you know, just bad habits that you've been trying to break for a long time. Yeah, and it, I mean, and the most important thing was that it just made me feel really happy. Like, I was laughing, like I never laughed before like giggling like a baby, you know?And that was really important because when you're depressed and down, your body forgets what it's like to laugh, like. And when you laugh like that, it's like, whoa. Like that feeling is so amazing. And when you're on Trus, you, I mean, for me at least, I laugh, I laugh a lot. things could be really, really funny.You could also go from crying to laughing, like in five seconds, , just like that. But I think that's beautiful too because that's how life can be. You know, things can be good. One minute and boom, things can change and you have to adjust and you have to [00:57:00] keep going and learn how to adapt with all those things.And for me, my, that's kind of what my work is about. You know, we're all adapting, we're all changing, but we can also use these substances as tools to change our worlds and help people like, help people with disabilities, help people who, you know, are born without certain privileges. A better place for them.De'Vannon: See the Lord is giving us everything we need right outside nature and how, how dare the white man tried to, to tell us something's wrong with these things that just grow naturally. Shrooms and weed and the, the fucking mold on the wheat that they make the fucking l s d out of and stuff like that. It's all line naturality.It's organic nun gmo, gmo, all of that. I'm sorry. You went through all those things. You went through being depressed during, during what's [00:58:00] so supposed to be such a happy time, but I'm glad you got your breakthrough. Yes. From those documentaries I watched, it seems like they were suggesting that these psychedelics have the power to rewrite like the, the neuro connectivity of the brain.So like, like you're saying, when you get, when you get sad and you get stuck in that ruck rut where you're teaching, where your mind learns how to be sad, and then these psyched dealers can remind your mind what it's like to be happy and rewire the way you process information and process life. So it can give you a whole new framework to work from. So,Ifetayo: Mm-hmm.De'Vannon: and I didn't really get into the types of psychedelics because I was watching like, I think on your YouTube channel of, I think it's in the intro video on there, you had this panel of people like y'all, y'all if Fatal, Ifta loves her panels, he loves a panel.Ifetayo: You'reDe'Vannon: It is good to have all those perspectives.But the [00:59:00] one you had, they were going over all the different psychedelics and I knew about the Melin and the, the celli and the ganja, you know, and all that. But then they started going down. He was like, But it's like, you know, designer, now you have all these different wands. And it's like, so I was like, Oh shit, I don'tIfetayo: Yeah.De'Vannon: but y'all go to the website to learn more about the different types of psyched dials. Listen to their, the information or YouTube channel she mentioned like dismantling the patriarchy. There's information and in other shows she's gone on, on her website that mentions. That, that you can access through the website that I would put in the show notes. Grief loss to death and harm reduction, things like that. You know, that you mentioned all of these are potential benefits for psychedelics when it's done right and in the right setting. I'm so happy that it's coming back around cuz all this Ritalin and shit, they got kids on calling them adhd, whatever the fuck that is.You know, all this medicine that they've had us hopped up [01:00:00] on, all it is is legal drugs. We should be able to have our shit, not just what they tell us is okay because they haven't so,So I'm gonna let you have the last word. Say whatever is you want to.Ifetayo: Oh man, you . I, I'll just say you've been an amazing host. I, I was not expecting this. You're awesome. You've like, I do a lot of podcasts, interviews and you've been the most fun. So IDe'Vannon: Well, damn. Thank you. Thank, I'll take, I'll take allIfetayo: Yes. Keep doing. You Don't change. And thank you to all your listeners. Check us out www.pocpc.org. Thank you for having me.De'Vannon: Absolutely. Thank you very much. Fat Tayo. Thank y'all so [01:01:00] much for listening and we'll see you next time on the Sex Drugs in Jesus podcast and tell them don't listen to nobody but show self.Thank you all so much for taking time to listen to the Sex Drugs and Jesus podcast. It really means everything to me. Look, if you love the show, you can find more information and resources at SexDrugsAndJesus.com or wherever you listen to your podcast. Feel free to reach out to me directly at DeVannon@SexDrugsAndJesus.com and on Twitter and Facebook as well.My name is De'Vannon, and it's been wonderful being your host today. And just remember that everything is gonna be all right. 

The Define Success Podcast with Matt Lupi
EP95: Prioritizing Sleep for Personal Success w/ Kathryn Fantauzzi

The Define Success Podcast with Matt Lupi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 40:20


Kathryn Fantauzzi is the co-founder & CEO of Apollo Neuroscience, the company that developed and launched the first scientifically-validated wearable technology that actively improves energy, focus & sleep. Originating from research at the University of Pittsburgh, the Apollo Neuro wearable sends gentle vibrations to the body that signal safety to the brain through the sense of touch. The simple yet elegant tool retrains the nervous system to recover from stress, like meditation, without effort on the part of the user.As CEO, Kathryn has raised over $21.2M including a $15M Series A while building  a highly-skilled team of physicians, scientists, engineers, and designers to transform the Apollo technology from a futuristic concept into a simple but powerful tool. Launched in January of 2020, Apollo Neuro has already helped tens of thousands of users access improved mental health, without drugs or side effects.  Kathryn has in-depth experience in incubating early-stage technology startups. Prior to founding Apollo, Kathryn developed and launched a $20M tech commercialization accelerator through the NY State Energy Research & Development Authority. Born & raised in upstate New York, Kathryn holds a B.A. from Smith College and a Master of Public Administration (MPA), with a focus on behavioral economics and finance, from the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy. She and her co-founder are happily married, and split their time between Monterey, California and Pittsburgh, PA.In this episode of the Define Success Podcast, Kathryn and Matt discuss:Her journey as a CEOWhat is Apollo Neuro and how has it helped thousands of people globally?Linking sleep to productivity, stress and moreThe importance of good sleepMastering transitions throughout the day to be at your bestEffects of sleep deprivation How much sleep do we need?Much more!

Quotomania
QUOTOMANIA 332: Madeleine L'Engle

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 1:36


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Madeleine L'Engle (1918-2007) was the Newbery Medal-winning author of more than 60 books, including the much-loved A Wrinkle in Time. Born in 1918, L'Engle grew up in New York City, Switzerland, South Carolina and Massachusetts. Her father was a reporter and her mother had studied to be a pianist, and their house was always full of musicians and theater people. L'Engle graduated cum laude from Smith College, then returned to New York to work in the theater. While touring with a play, she wrote her first book, The Small Rain, originally published in 1945. She met her future husband, Hugh Franklin, when they both appeared in The Cherry Orchard. Upon becoming Mrs. Franklin, L'Engle gave up the stage in favor of the typewriter. In the years her three children were growing up, she wrote four more novels. Hugh Franklin temporarily retired from the theater, and the family moved to western Connecticut and for ten years ran a general store. Her book Meet the Austins, an American Library Association Notable Children's Book of 1960, was based on this experience. Her science fantasy classic A Wrinkle in Time was awarded the 1963 Newbery Medal. Two companion novels, A Wind in the Door and A Swiftly Tilting Planet (a Newbery Honor book), complete what has come to be known as The Time Trilogy, a series that continues to grow in popularity with a new generation of readers. Her 1980 book A Ring of Endless Light won the Newbery Honor. L'Engle passed away in 2007 in Litchfield, Connecticut.From https://us.macmillan.com/author/madeleinelengle. For more information about Madeleine L'Engle:“New York Day by Day; Author to Readers”: https://www.nytimes.com/1985/04/25/nyregion/new-york-day-by-day-author-to-readers.html“Meet Madeleine L'Engle”: https://www.kennedy-center.org/education/resources-for-educators/classroom-resources/media-and-interactives/media/literary-arts/meet-madeleine-lengle/“Madeleine L'Engle's Inventions”: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2004/04/12/the-storyteller-cynthia-zarin

The Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast
Episode 112, ‘The Philosophy of Buddhism' with Jay Garfield (Part I - The Nature of Reality)

The Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 55:04 Very Popular


A prick of the skin; the sorrow of grief; the inevitability of change; our dependence on the whim of the cosmos. Suffering bleeds into every aspect of our existence and, according to Siddhārtha Gautama (the Buddha), the anguish of our misfortune stems from our ignorance and confusion. If we were to see the world for how it really is – a place of impermanence, interdependence, and emptiness – then, according to Buddhism, we might free ourselves from illusion and discover the path to liberation and enlightenment. Today, this insight is shared by over half a billion people. Yet, most philosophy departments in Europe and America offer no courses in Buddhist philosophy and (within the leading journals) academic papers focusing on the central tenets of Buddhist philosophy of religion are vastly outweighed by their Abrahamic (and predominantly Christian) counterparts. Professor Jay Garfield, our guest for this episode, is the exception to this rule. Championing the globalisation of philosophy and reshaping perceptions of Buddhist scholarship, Professor Garfield is Chair of Philosophy at Smith College in Massachusetts, Visiting Professor at Harvard Divinity School, Professor at Melbourne University, and adjunct Professor at the Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies. Named amongst the 50 most influential philosophers of the past decade – with over 30 books and over 200 publications – it is safe to say that Professor Garfield is one of the leading exponents of Buddhist philosophy in contemporary academia. For Garfield, if philosophy won't diversify, then let's call it out for what it is: a colonial discipline that ignores the rich and relevant insights of non-Western thought. As philosophers, we cannot afford to ignore the metaphysical, ethical, epistemological, and existential insights of Buddhist scholarship. It's time to engage with Buddhism, and rid ourselves of our prejudices, ignorance, and confusion. Buddhism is a philosophy of the present, not a philosophy of the past, and it's time we treated it that way. This episode is produced in partnership with The Global Philosophy of Religion Project at University of Birmingham, led by Yujin Nagasawa and funded by the John Templeton Foundation. Contents Part I. The Nature of Reality Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion Links Jay Garfield, Personal Website. (Website) Jay Garfield, Engaging Buddhism. (Book) Jay Garfield, Practicing without a License. (Essay) Books by Jay Garfield. (Website)