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dunc tank
Jed Rasula - Dada

dunc tank

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 66:24


Jed Rasula is a professor at the University of Georgia, and the author of Destruction Was My Beatrice: Dada and the Unmaking of the Twentieth Century.

The James Altucher Show
The Long Century: 1870-2010 | J. Bradford DeLong

The James Altucher Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 72:39 Very Popular


"This is one of the best economic history books I've ever read."J. Bradford "Brad" DeLong, Berkeley economics professor, former Clinton-era Treasury official, and pioneering economics blogger* joins today's conversation on the heels of his latest book release, Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century. Part history lesson, part economic theory discussion, Brad and James debate what DeLong has dubbed the "long twentieth century" from 1870 to 2010 where the "last three institutional blocks" fell into place: the industrial research lab, the modern corporation, and the modern globalized market.Additional Topics Include:How Westinghouse was able to utilize Nikola Tesla's genius (07:30)Reagan's experiment with "Trickle Down" theory (22:27)Do "the 99%" have more equal income distribution than in previous eras? (28:16)Public Colleges' funding model switch from taxpayers to attendees in the 1970s (35:28)Secular Stagnation in the Post-2010 Economy (50:40)"The people with the want don't have the money, and the people with the money don't have the want" (58:39)What the Federal Reserve should do over the next 18 months (01:05:03)Editor's note: Topic times don't account for sponsor ads and may appear a few minutes later in the episode on your podcast player)------------Visit Notepd.com to read our idea lists & sign up to create your own!My new book Skip the Line is out! Make sure you get a copy wherever books are sold!Join the You Should Run for President 2.0 Facebook Group, where we discuss why you should run for President.I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast.------------Thank you so much for listening! If you like this episode, please rate, review, and subscribe  to “The James Altucher Show” wherever you get your podcasts: Apple PodcastsStitcheriHeart RadioSpotifyFollow me on Social Media:YouTubeTwitterFacebook

New Books in American Studies
Jim Cullen, "1980: America's Pivotal Year" (Rutgers UP, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 42:44


1980 was a turning point in American history. When the year began, it was still very much the 1970s, with Jimmy Carter in the White House, a sluggish economy marked by high inflation, and the disco still riding the airwaves. When it ended, Ronald Reagan won the presidency in a landslide, inaugurating a rightward turn in American politics and culture. We still feel the effects of this tectonic shift today, as even subsequent Democratic administrations have offered neoliberal economic and social policies that owe more to Reagan than to FDR or LBJ. To understand what the American public was thinking during this pivotal year, we need to examine what they were reading, listening to, and watching. 1980: America's Pivotal Year (Rutgers UP, 2022) puts the news events of the era—everything from the Iran hostage crisis to the rise of televangelism—into conversation with the year's popular culture. Separate chapters focus on the movies, television shows, songs, and books that Americans were talking about that year, including both the biggest hits and some notable flops that failed to capture the shifting zeitgeist. As he looks at the events that had Americans glued to their screens, from the Miracle on Ice to the mystery of Who Shot JR, cultural historian Jim Cullen garners surprising insights about how Americans' attitudes were changing as they entered the 1980s. Jim Cullen is the author of numerous books, including The American Dream: A Short History of an Idea that Shaped a Nation, Those Were the Days: Why ‘All in the Family' Still Matters, and From Memory to History: Television Versions of the Twentieth Century. He teaches history at the newly-founded upper division of Greenwich Country Day School. Jackson Reinhardt is a graduate of University of Southern California and Vanderbilt University. He is currently an independent scholar, freelance writer, and research assistant. You can reach Jackson at jtreinhardt1997@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter @JTRhardt Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in American Politics
Jim Cullen, "1980: America's Pivotal Year" (Rutgers UP, 2022)

New Books in American Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 42:44


1980 was a turning point in American history. When the year began, it was still very much the 1970s, with Jimmy Carter in the White House, a sluggish economy marked by high inflation, and the disco still riding the airwaves. When it ended, Ronald Reagan won the presidency in a landslide, inaugurating a rightward turn in American politics and culture. We still feel the effects of this tectonic shift today, as even subsequent Democratic administrations have offered neoliberal economic and social policies that owe more to Reagan than to FDR or LBJ. To understand what the American public was thinking during this pivotal year, we need to examine what they were reading, listening to, and watching. 1980: America's Pivotal Year (Rutgers UP, 2022) puts the news events of the era—everything from the Iran hostage crisis to the rise of televangelism—into conversation with the year's popular culture. Separate chapters focus on the movies, television shows, songs, and books that Americans were talking about that year, including both the biggest hits and some notable flops that failed to capture the shifting zeitgeist. As he looks at the events that had Americans glued to their screens, from the Miracle on Ice to the mystery of Who Shot JR, cultural historian Jim Cullen garners surprising insights about how Americans' attitudes were changing as they entered the 1980s. Jim Cullen is the author of numerous books, including The American Dream: A Short History of an Idea that Shaped a Nation, Those Were the Days: Why ‘All in the Family' Still Matters, and From Memory to History: Television Versions of the Twentieth Century. He teaches history at the newly-founded upper division of Greenwich Country Day School. Jackson Reinhardt is a graduate of University of Southern California and Vanderbilt University. He is currently an independent scholar, freelance writer, and research assistant. You can reach Jackson at jtreinhardt1997@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter @JTRhardt Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books Network
Jim Cullen, "1980: America's Pivotal Year" (Rutgers UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 42:44


1980 was a turning point in American history. When the year began, it was still very much the 1970s, with Jimmy Carter in the White House, a sluggish economy marked by high inflation, and the disco still riding the airwaves. When it ended, Ronald Reagan won the presidency in a landslide, inaugurating a rightward turn in American politics and culture. We still feel the effects of this tectonic shift today, as even subsequent Democratic administrations have offered neoliberal economic and social policies that owe more to Reagan than to FDR or LBJ. To understand what the American public was thinking during this pivotal year, we need to examine what they were reading, listening to, and watching. 1980: America's Pivotal Year (Rutgers UP, 2022) puts the news events of the era—everything from the Iran hostage crisis to the rise of televangelism—into conversation with the year's popular culture. Separate chapters focus on the movies, television shows, songs, and books that Americans were talking about that year, including both the biggest hits and some notable flops that failed to capture the shifting zeitgeist. As he looks at the events that had Americans glued to their screens, from the Miracle on Ice to the mystery of Who Shot JR, cultural historian Jim Cullen garners surprising insights about how Americans' attitudes were changing as they entered the 1980s. Jim Cullen is the author of numerous books, including The American Dream: A Short History of an Idea that Shaped a Nation, Those Were the Days: Why ‘All in the Family' Still Matters, and From Memory to History: Television Versions of the Twentieth Century. He teaches history at the newly-founded upper division of Greenwich Country Day School. Jackson Reinhardt is a graduate of University of Southern California and Vanderbilt University. He is currently an independent scholar, freelance writer, and research assistant. You can reach Jackson at jtreinhardt1997@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter @JTRhardt Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Popular Culture
Jim Cullen, "1980: America's Pivotal Year" (Rutgers UP, 2022)

New Books in Popular Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 42:44


1980 was a turning point in American history. When the year began, it was still very much the 1970s, with Jimmy Carter in the White House, a sluggish economy marked by high inflation, and the disco still riding the airwaves. When it ended, Ronald Reagan won the presidency in a landslide, inaugurating a rightward turn in American politics and culture. We still feel the effects of this tectonic shift today, as even subsequent Democratic administrations have offered neoliberal economic and social policies that owe more to Reagan than to FDR or LBJ. To understand what the American public was thinking during this pivotal year, we need to examine what they were reading, listening to, and watching. 1980: America's Pivotal Year (Rutgers UP, 2022) puts the news events of the era—everything from the Iran hostage crisis to the rise of televangelism—into conversation with the year's popular culture. Separate chapters focus on the movies, television shows, songs, and books that Americans were talking about that year, including both the biggest hits and some notable flops that failed to capture the shifting zeitgeist. As he looks at the events that had Americans glued to their screens, from the Miracle on Ice to the mystery of Who Shot JR, cultural historian Jim Cullen garners surprising insights about how Americans' attitudes were changing as they entered the 1980s. Jim Cullen is the author of numerous books, including The American Dream: A Short History of an Idea that Shaped a Nation, Those Were the Days: Why ‘All in the Family' Still Matters, and From Memory to History: Television Versions of the Twentieth Century. He teaches history at the newly-founded upper division of Greenwich Country Day School. Jackson Reinhardt is a graduate of University of Southern California and Vanderbilt University. He is currently an independent scholar, freelance writer, and research assistant. You can reach Jackson at jtreinhardt1997@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter @JTRhardt Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/popular-culture

New Books in History
Jim Cullen, "1980: America's Pivotal Year" (Rutgers UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 42:44


1980 was a turning point in American history. When the year began, it was still very much the 1970s, with Jimmy Carter in the White House, a sluggish economy marked by high inflation, and the disco still riding the airwaves. When it ended, Ronald Reagan won the presidency in a landslide, inaugurating a rightward turn in American politics and culture. We still feel the effects of this tectonic shift today, as even subsequent Democratic administrations have offered neoliberal economic and social policies that owe more to Reagan than to FDR or LBJ. To understand what the American public was thinking during this pivotal year, we need to examine what they were reading, listening to, and watching. 1980: America's Pivotal Year (Rutgers UP, 2022) puts the news events of the era—everything from the Iran hostage crisis to the rise of televangelism—into conversation with the year's popular culture. Separate chapters focus on the movies, television shows, songs, and books that Americans were talking about that year, including both the biggest hits and some notable flops that failed to capture the shifting zeitgeist. As he looks at the events that had Americans glued to their screens, from the Miracle on Ice to the mystery of Who Shot JR, cultural historian Jim Cullen garners surprising insights about how Americans' attitudes were changing as they entered the 1980s. Jim Cullen is the author of numerous books, including The American Dream: A Short History of an Idea that Shaped a Nation, Those Were the Days: Why ‘All in the Family' Still Matters, and From Memory to History: Television Versions of the Twentieth Century. He teaches history at the newly-founded upper division of Greenwich Country Day School. Jackson Reinhardt is a graduate of University of Southern California and Vanderbilt University. He is currently an independent scholar, freelance writer, and research assistant. You can reach Jackson at jtreinhardt1997@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter @JTRhardt Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Living Words
Mark Three: A Biblical Understanding of the Gospel

Living Words

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022


Mark Three: A Biblical Understanding of the Gospel by William Klock Faithful preaching of God's word is the first mark of a healthy and faithful church.  These last two Sundays we've begun to explore what that looks like.  First, we saw that we must preach the word in such a way that we give it priority and let it be our guide, and that means that we commit ourselves to preaching expositionally.  And last Sunday I talked about the importance of allowing the Bible, as we preach it and immerse ourselves in it, to shape and define our understanding of God.  The Bible is, after all, his revelation of himself to us.  We cannot know him apart from his word.  And that leads us to today's topic: A healthy church will have a Bible-informed understanding of the gospel.  Now, no one ever sets out deliberately to preach an unbiblical gospel, but that doesn't mean such things aren't preached.  Sometimes we unwittingly allow unbiblical cultural ideas, values, and philosophies to colour our gospel.  Sometimes, when the Church is beset by controversy over gospel issues, we can over-react to one error by falling into its opposite.  Sometimes the errors are small, but sometimes they're great—to the point of apostasy.  The antidote, Brothers and Sistes, is to preach God's word faithfully and systematically. So what is the gospel?  Our English word “gospel” is from Old English god spel, literally meaning “good news”.  The Greek word used by the New Testament writers and the ancient Jewish translators of the Old Testament is euangelion.  Originally euangelion was the reward that was given to someone for bringing good news, but by the time the Bible was written it had come to mean the good news itself.  The related verb, euangelizo, means to proclaim this good news.  This is where we get the English word “evangelical”.  We are people of the good news.  This is a good place to start.  The gospel is good news.  For example, think back to the death of Saul and Jonathan in 2 Samuel.  David mourned their deaths and the messengers came with the news, he said: Tell it not in Geth, and proclaim it not in the exits of Ascalon…lest daughters of the uncircumcised exult. (2 Samuel 1:20 NETS) In the Greek Old Testament, when it says “proclaim”, it's using this word for proclaiming good news.  The Philistines would take the death of Saul as good news.  When the messenger brought this news to David, he thought it was good news, too.  David's enemy had been defeated.  Now, for personal reasons David didn't take it that way.  To him it was bad news, but he knew that to everyone else it was good news—a victory had been won and that victory meant things were about to change.  And, notice, the natural thing to do with good news is to proclaim it.  The heralds were ready to do just that until David told them not to. Or think of Isaiah.  Israel had been defeated, but he saw a vision of Jerusalem as the herald of good news.  The Lord would come and deliver his people from their exile. Go on up to a high mountain,          O Zion, herald of good news; lift up your voice with strength,          O Jerusalem, herald of good news;          lift it up, fear not; say to the cities of Judah,          “Behold your God!” (Isaiah 40:9) And Isaiah uses this concept as he envisions the messenger, running across the mountains with this good news: How beautiful upon the mountains          are the feet of him who brings good news, who publishes peace, who brings good news of happiness,          who publishes salvation,          who says to Zion, “Your God reigns.” (Isaiah 52:7) Something was about to happen.  The Lord was going to act and he would act in such a way that things would never be the same.  God was finally going to take up his throne as King.  This is exactly what Jesus had in mind when we read Mark's account of him saying: “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent and believe in the gospel.” (Mark 1:15) The Lord was about to act.  Specifically, he was about to act as King in such a way that everything was about to change.  And Jesus isn't just saying that people in Judea needed to “believe” in the sense of giving their intellectual assent to some new theological truth.  When “good news” happens, it's a world-changing event.  To “believe” means to change one's life in order to take part in what's about to happen and be part of its benefits.  In Jesus, God was becoming king—as he had promised so long before.  To refuse to believe, to refuse to recognise this change and this new reality is, at best, to be left behind and, at worst, well…it wasn't good.  Let's look at how the Greeks and Romans used this term, “gospel”. If you're familiar with Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra or Mankiewicz' 1963 Cleopatra with Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, you know something about the aftermath of the Roman civil war.  On the death of Julius Caesar the Empire was plunged into conflict.  On one side was Caesar's heir, Octavian, and on the other his friend, Mark Antony.  Octavian defeated Antony in a great naval battle at Actium.  Antony fled to Egypt, where he eventually committed suicide with Cleopatra.  Octavian was enthroned as Caesar Augustus and euangelion—the good news—was proclaimed throughout the empire.  Augustus had defeated the enemies of Rome.  He had brought peace at last and, with it, prosperity.  He even started using the title “son of God”.  He was the saviour of the empire. Now, what did this good news mean to the people of the empire?  Imagine if you'd been a local official or ruler and you'd been a firm supporter of Mark Antony during the war.  The good news about Caesar Augustus meant that everything had changed and you had to make a choice.  There was no continuing on supporting the losing side.  That was treason and it would lead to only one thing: execution.  This was the choice King Herod faced when this good news reached him.  He'd backed Antony.  He was no dummy.  Hearing the news, he went straight to the new Caesar and pledged his loyalty.  The world had changed and he committed himself to the side where he got to live—and keep his throne. So, now, think about “good news”.  It means that something has happened—or is happening or is about to happen—something that changes everything.  Nothing will ever be the same again and, in light of it, everyone has got to make a choice.  There's no fence sitting.  And there are consequences if you make the wrong choice.  If Herod, for example, had continued to back Antony's forces it would have meant the end of Herod.  In Jesus, Israel's God has become King and he calls for our allegiance—to him, to his kingdom, to everything it stands for.  Sin and death are defeated and everything about the world that was shaped by them is being undone by Jesus and his act of new creation.  The gospel calls us to make a choice, to announce our allegiance.  Do we continue to give our allegiance to—as we say in our baptism—the world, the flesh, and the devil, or to Jesus, his new creation, and the Holy Spirit? And this points to something else important about the gospel.  Good news isn't quietly whispered.  It's always proclaimed.  It's announced with great fanfare.  The announcement that Jesus is Lord, that in him the God of Israel has come as King, that's not some private truth to keep to ourselves or to whisper to our friends.  But that's not far off from how many people treat it.  Something changed in the first half of the Twentieth Century and we started talking about “sharing” the gospel.  Christians had never used that kind of language before.  But it goes along with a shift that slowly took place over the last two hundred years or so.  Instead of seeing the gospel as good news, we started treating it instead like good advice.  We've made this shift subtly in how we do evangelism.  We often present the gospel—the good news about Jesus—as if it's just another offering on the religious or philosophical smorgasbord and suggest that people give Jesus a try. Maybe they'll like him and believe—or maybe they won't, which would be sad, but…whatever.  But, Brothers and Sisters, the gospel is not good advice.  It's not like a stock tip or a life hack or a new recipe.  It's good news.  It's not just a message that will change your life.  It's a message that will change your life, because it's a message that in Jesus the whole world has changed. Consider Peter's sermon on Pentecost, recorded in Acts 2.  He starts out: “Men of Judea and all who dwell in Jerusalem, let this be known to you, and give ear to my words. (Acts 2:14) I think we pass over this introduction too quickly in order to get to the meat of his sermon, but notice how he proclaims this good news like the royal herald that he is.  This isn't a good piece of advice.  It's not a pro tip.  It's not something that might be worth giving a shot.  It's good news.  It demands action.  And Peter goes on, reminding the people of the promises the Lord had made to Israel—promises to set things to rights by sending his King.  He tells them: “Men of Israel, hear these words: Jesus of Nazareth, a man attested to you by God with mighty works and wonders and signs that God did through him in your midst, as you yourselves know—this Jesus, delivered up according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed by the hands of lawless men.  God raised him up, loosing the pangs of death, because it was not possible for him to be held by it. (Acts 2:22-24) “You killed him,” Peter says, “but God raised him up.”  What does that mean?  Peter, again, looks back to the promises God had made to Israel—particularly through David.  For Peter, Jesus' death was vitally important, but the crucifixion of Jesus wasn't the thing that changed the world.  Ultimately, it was his resurrection from the dead that did that.  In his resurrection, Peter says, God has loosed the pangs of death.  By his resurrection, he says, Jesus has been exalted at the right hand of God and given to his people the gift of the Holy Spirit.  Jesus has fulfilled all the Lord's promises.  But Peter ends with the most powerful note of all in verse 36: “Let all the house of Israel therefore know for certain that God has made him both Lord and [Messiah], this Jesus whom you crucified.”   By raising Jesus from the dead, God has declared him to be Lord and Messiah—to be not just any king, but to be the King—the one who will set all to rights—not just his people, but eventually the whole of this broken creation. The crowd, Luke says, were cut to the heart and asked Peter what they should do.  In other words, they knew this good news meant that the world has changed and they wanted to know what they had to do to in response.  And Peter says to them in verses 38-39: “Repent and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.  For the promise is for you and for your children and for all who are far off, everyone whom the Lord our God calls to himself.”   Luke says about three thousand were baptised that day.  But what did Peter mean by “repent and be baptised”?  To repent is to turn around.  The good news is the announcement that in Jesus the world has changed, there's a new King, and God's kingdom is breaking in.  The good news calls us to turn aside and to leave behind the old regime, the old order—our rebellion, our sin, our idolatry—and to take hold of the new King and his kingdom in faith.  In Jesus, God has become king.  Peter's sermon is incredibly important, because in it he reminds us of what the Lord had promised to Israel, and then he explains that it has all been fulfilled or is in the process of being fulfilled by Jesus—and those promises point to what the good news is all about.  The promises remind us that what Jesus has done is far bigger and all-encompassing than what we often think.  It's about all of creation being set right and made new.  It's about Jesus binding the devil and triumphing over the powers and principalities that have corrupted this world.  It's about the old gods being cast down and the true God being raised up.  It's about humanity being made right with God to finally live in his presence and to take up our vocation again—the one that Adam and Eve rejected—to be his image-bearers, the priests of his temple, as we steward his creation.  It's about heaven and earth, about God and man finally being reunited. Jews knew that one day God would set things right and that when he did so he would judge—and destroy—everything and everyone who was opposed to him.  They called that day “the day of the Lord”.  Throughout his ministry Jesus warned that it was coming—and soon.  When he warned about the easy way that leads to destruction and urged people to follow him on the hard and narrow way that leads to life, that's what he was talking about.  He was pointing to the events we read about in our study of Revelation when Jerusalem and the temple were thrown down by the Romans as an act of judgement by God on his unbelieving people—much as he'd done six centuries earlier, although that time it had been the Babylonians.  Jesus wasn't warning about some event thousands of years in the future.  He was warning of a judgement that was just around the corner.  That judgement certainly foreshadows that last great day of final judgement when every last enemy of God will be wiped from creation.  But Jesus—and Peter—were focused on Israel and her near future.  Again, Peter's hearers were cut to the heart, because they realised that this is what Peter was talking about too.  They wanted to know how to escape the coming judgement and to be part of God's new people in the age to come. If people thought the victory of Octavian over Antony was a world-shaking event—so much so that King Herod went to grovel before the new emperor that he might have a place in it, imagine how much greater, how all-encompassing this good news about Jesus is.  If the Lord was going to come with both salvation and judgement to set Israel to rights and to deal with the unrepentant in her midst, one day he will surely do the same for the whole world. This ought to put our attention on another aspect of the good news.  Herod could only speculate about where he stood with Octavian.  He could very easily have gone home headless.  By his resurrection Jesus has inaugurated God's new world, and Brothers and Sisters, by his death he has shown his mercy.  We need but repent—to turn aside from the old gods, the old ways, the old systems—to believe—to take hold of him in faith and to give him our allegiance, and we can be sure of where we stand before him.  The first step we take after repentance is to be baptised.  The waters of baptism hold his promise of forgiveness and new life and as we pass through them in faith, he washes us clean and fills us with his Spirit.  He makes us his own.  As St. Paul writes in Romans: For you did not receive the spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received the Spirit of adoption as sons, by whom we cry, “Abba! Father!”  (Romans 8:15) Jesus' Father becomes our Father and he loves us as he loves his own son. But speaking of Paul…  How do the Gentiles find a place in this good news.  Jesus was Israel's Messiah.  He came in fulfilment of the Lord's promises to Israel.  Even in his death by crucifixion, he died the very death that the unbelieving Jewish rebels would suffer a generation later when God's judgement fell on Jerusalem.  Jesus and the good news are integrally tied to Israel and to Israel's story.  How is it good news for the rest of the world?  We see the struggle in Acts.  The Spirit all but summoned Peter and John to Samaria.  The good news had reached people there and they believed, but—a mystery to the apostles—they did not receive the Spirit.  The apostles had to go and lay hands on these new non-Jewish believers.  It was a not-so-subtle hint from the Spirit that the good news was for everyone.  An angel directed Philip to his meeting with a man from Ethiopia.  The Spirit had to convince Peter, against everything he thought he knew was right, to go to the home of Cornelius, a gentile centurion.  And what was to be done with these gentile converts?  Did they have to become Jews first?  Be circumcised, keep the law, and all of that.  And then along came Paul.  Or, more precisely, along came the risen Messiah to meet Paul on the road to Damascus. Maybe more than anyone else, Paul realised just how much the resurrection of Jesus changes everything.  C. S. Lewis famously wrote, “I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen.  Not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.”  The resurrection of Jesus was just like that for Paul.  And Paul realised that if the Lord's promises to Israel were fulfilled in Jesus, in his resurrection, and in the outpouring of the Spirit to create this new people of God called the Church, then all of this was for the gentiles too.  Israel had always been called to be a light to the nations and so too must this new Israel.  Paul thought back to the Lord's deliverance of Israel in the Exodus—something that shaped Israel's identity and is there behind so much of Paul's writing.  The Lord delivered his people from their bondage and in doing so, he made his might and his glory known to the nations—especially to Egypt.  Her king and her gods were exposed for the powerless frauds they were.  And yet there was no mass conversion of the Egyptians in the wake of the Exodus.  The whole thing was an embarrassment that they expunged from their records so that they could continue in the idolatry. But Paul recognized that in Jesus and in this new exodus, there was a new element that had been missing in the old and that was the outpouring of the Holy Spirit.  Paul knew that this good news about a crucified Messiah was, as he writes to the Corinthians “a stumbling block to Jews and folly to Gentiles” (1 Corinthians 1:23).  A crucified Messiah was blasphemy to the Jews.  And it was just stupid nonsense to the gentiles.  Paul knew this first hand.  The Jews stoned him for the things he said and the Gentiles threw him in jail.  “But,” he goes on in that same verse, “to those who are called, both Jews and Greeks, the Messiah—the power of God and the wisdom of God.”  That was the key—those who are called, those in whom the Spirit of God is at work. How does the Spirit work?  It seems like it's different for everyone.  For Paul it was the realization that Jesus really had risen from the dead and that that truth changed everything he'd ever known.  He had to go off by himself for a few years to work it all through, but work it through he did.  For others it was simply the realization that in Jesus the God of Israel was truly at work.  This time the Gentiles saw the God of Israel in this mighty act of redemption that proved his faithfulness to his promises and instead of forgetting about it like the Egyptians had so long ago, they recognized the living God and they threw all their idols away.  For others it was the fact that in Jesus, God drew near.  By his Spirit they somehow knew him and experienced him—something that never happened with the pagan gods.  Paul recognized that this good news was for everyone.  As he wrote to the Galatians: There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is no male and female, for you are all one in Jesus the Messiah. (Galatians 3:28) This time the gentiles saw the mighty and saving deeds of the God of Israel and they believed—because of the Spirit—and they were welcomed into this new people of God to share in the forgiveness and the new life and the future hope that Jesus had given them. But, in closing, what's the significance?  Where does the good news take us?  What are we supposed to do with it?  If we understand that the death and resurrection of Jesus give us a place in the renewed people of God and that Jesus is setting everything to rights, that itself should point us in the right direction.  The problem is that in the 19th and early 20th Centuries, liberal Protestants largely turned the gospel into a message of good works—and then, gradually, those good works became more and more like the values of secular culture and Leftist politics and Jesus became nothing more than an example.  In response, fundamentalists and evangelicals rightly re-emphasised the personal and spiritual nature of redemption and the forgiveness of sins, but often over-reacted when it came to the good works.  We've made the gospel a message very narrowly of forgiveness of sin and restored fellowship with God.  Salvation should result in a changed life and good works, but we've stressed—wrongly—that those good works are the fruit of the gospel, but not the gospel itself.  So on one side the gospel is proclaimed as a message of public welfare and on the other as a personal or private spirituality.  Then, throw into that mix the misconception that the end goal of all of this is someday to leave this world behind so that we can live a kind of disembodied spiritual existence in heaven, and we make a right mess of the gospel. Brothers and Sisters, this is why we've got to preach the scriptures—so that we remember the big story.  This is what Peter did on Pentecost.  And when we do that we find that this faithful God we spoke about last Sunday has been working all along not to give us a plan to escape this fallen Creation, but rather a means to set this fallen creation to rights and us along with it.  We're creation's stewards—or at least that's what we were created to be—but we rebelled and made a mess of everything.  And so the Lord has called a people through whom he will work, and he's sent his Messiah to set us to rights, to fill us with his Spirit, and to get us back on task: to make him known, to do justice and mercy in this world, to bear the fruit of the Spirit, and to proclaim his King in the knowledge that the same Spirit who is in us, is also working in the hearts of men and women around the world, men and women just waiting to hear our proclamation of the good news about Jesus.  Men and women read to believe, to repent, to be baptised, to join in the life and work of the kingdom—they simply need to hear our proclamation of this good news.  It is a stumbling block and it is foolishness to many, but to those who are called, to those in whom the Spirit is at work, it is the power of God—for our salvation and for the salvation of the whole world. As we've seen recently in Revelation, Jesus has prepared the way.  He has bound the devil and brought low the principalities and powers that once held this world captive.  This is the good news: that Jesus died for our sins and was raised by God, victorious over sin and death.  He is the Messiah—the Lord, the King—and he is making all things new.  This new creation, our hope is summed up in those words of the Lord's prayer: on earth as in heaven.  Those words ought to shape us as gospel people.  Don't just pray them.  Live them.  For the sake of the world, lift the veil and show the world a glimpse of God's new creation.  And while you do it, remember that we are royal heralds of the King, commissioned to proclaim this good news to everyone around us. Let's pray: Merciful Father, we thank you this morning that you have made Jesus your King.  By his death you give a means of forgiveness and reconciliation and by his resurrection you've restored to us the life we had once rejected in our rebellion against you.  We thank you for those in whom you have worked by your word and Spirit who proclaimed this good news to us.  And we pray that your word and Spirit will now be at work in us to make us the gospel people you desire us to be.  Renew our hearts.  Turn them ever more towards you.  Strengthen our allegiance to Jesus and fill our heats with love for you.  Make us a people full of life and of hope, a people of mercy and love and grace, a holy people—an on-earth-as-in-heaven people eager to show the world your kingdom and to proclaim the good news that Jesus is Lord.  Through him we pray.  Amen.

SAG-AFTRA Foundation Conversations
Conversations with Kristin Chenoweth (2015)

SAG-AFTRA Foundation Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 80:57


Career Q&A with Kristin Chenoweth. Moderated by Richard Ridge, Broadway World. Emmy and Tony Award winning actress and singer, Kristin Chenoweth, takes the lead in a career that spans film, television, voiceover and stage, effortlessly. She received an Emmy Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series for her work on the ABC series Pushing Daisies (Pushing Daisies was also nominated for a Golden Globe Award and Emmy Award for “Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy.”) More recently, Chenoweth lit up the stage of McKinley High as a former student who returned to town with more than the baggage from her flight, on Fox's hit comedy, Glee. Though Kristin has often come into our livingrooms on hit shows such as The West Wing (where she starred as Annabeth Schott) and as a guest judge on both American Idol and Project Runway, she may be most remembered by Broadway lovers everywhere for her origination of the role of Glinda the Good Witch in Wicked, which earned her a Tony Award Nomination, and her Tony-winning performance in You're A Good Man, Charlie Brown, for which she stole the show and many hearts in the process. Chenoweth will next be seen on-screen in the Universal film The Boy Next Door, alongside Jennifer Lopez, and in the animated Lucas film fairy tale musical Strange Magic, both set to be released on January 23. She will also be seen in the film A Bet's A Bet (International title: The Opposite Sex), releasing in January. She's completed production on the indie teen drama entitled Hard Sell and the Disney Channel's live-action original movie Descendants, in which she will play the classic Sleeping Beauty villain Maleficent. Chenoweth will return to Broadway, playing the glamorous film star, Lily Garland, in the Roundabout Theatre Company's 20-week limited engagement of On the Twentieth Century in March. In addition to her starring roles on stage and screen, in 2009, Kristin also wrote an upliftingly candid, comedic chronicle of her life so far, in, A Little Bit Wicked, which was released by Simon & Schuster, and debuted at # 12 on the New York Times Hardcover Non-Fiction Best Seller List. Kristin is also a passionate supporter of charities which dedicate their time and efforts to helping those in need, such as: the Kristin Chenoweth Art & Education Fund, The Red Cross, Broadway Cares EFA, The Point Foundation, ASTEP, breast cancer awareness, adoption advocacy and organizations supporting animal welfare. Chenoweth earned a Bachelor's degree in Musical Theater and a Master's degree in Opera Performance from Oklahoma City University. She was also presented with Honorary Doctorate degrees from both the University of North Carolina School of the Arts and her alma mater, Oklahoma City University. Kristin is an inductee into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, as well as the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame.

Busted Business Bureau
Monsanto 5: Bovine Growth Hormone

Busted Business Bureau

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 72:53


This one's a banger, no way around it. This one will give a detailed history of Monsanto's relationship with the FDA -- spoilers, it literally goes ALL the way back -- and how the FDA was complicit in the expediting of Bovine Growth Hormone. We also go on a very long tangent on if the father of food safety was a fellow homosexual (Because it's my podcast! And I get to do whatever I want!) This episode is full of such compelling characters; it's a shattering reminder that there are always people fighting the good fight. Hope you're enjoying the season so far! My description-writing game has dramatically weakened. Need to redirect my brain power into the episodes lol. But if you like this podcast, please keep telling your friends! I can tell a lot of you have been already!! Follow the mysterious and hilarious @BlenderBluid and @HelloAmyDo LIVE SHOW TICKET LINK OCTOBER 1 2022 PATREON LINK SOURCES: The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the Twentieth Century, Deborah Blum 2018 Harvey W. Wiley: An Autobiography, Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley, New York: Bobs-Merrill Company 1930 The 19th-Century Fight Against Bacteria-Ridden Milk Preserved With Embalming Fluid, Deborah Blum, Undark Magazine 2018 The World According to Monsanto, Marie-Monique Robin 2008 Bovine Somatotropin (bST), FDA.gov April 2022 Pushing RBST: How the Law and the Political Process Were Used to Sell Recombinant Bovine Somatotropin to America, David Aboulafia, PACE Environmental Law Review 1998 Monsanto lobbying: an attack on us, our planet, and democracy, Nina Holland and Benjamin Sourice, Corporate EuropeObservatory 2016 Torturing Animals with Monsanto’s Genetically Engineered Feed, Katherine Paul, Truthout 2013

New Books in Latin American Studies
Kaysha Corinealdi, "Panama in Black: Afro-Caribbean World Making in the Twentieth Century" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 66:02


In Panama in Black: Afro-Caribbean World Making in the Twentieth Century (Duke UP, 2022), Kaysha Corinealdi traces the multigenerational activism of Afro-Caribbean Panamanians as they forged diasporic communities in Panama and the United States throughout the twentieth century. Drawing on a rich array of sources including speeches, yearbooks, photographs, government reports, radio broadcasts, newspaper editorials, and oral histories, Corinealdi presents the Panamanian isthmus as a crucial site in the making of an Afro-diasporic world that linked cities and towns like Colón, Kingston, Panamá, Brooklyn, Bridgetown, and La Boca. In Panama, Afro-Caribbean Panamanians created a diasporic worldview of the Caribbean that privileged the potential of Black innovation. Corinealdi maps this innovation by examining the longest-running Black newspaper in Central America, the rise of civic associations created to counter policies that stripped Afro-Caribbean Panamanians of citizenship, the creation of scholarship-granting organizations that supported the education of Black students, and the emergence of national conferences and organizations that linked anti-imperialism and Black Liberation. By showing how Afro-Caribbean Panamanians used these methods to navigate anti-Blackness, xenophobia, and white supremacy, Corinealdi offers a new mode of understanding activism, community, and diaspora formation.  Nicole Ramsey is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African & African American Studies at the University of Virginia. Her research examines formations of blackness, indigeneity, identity, and nation in Belize and the circum-Caribbean. On Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books in History
Kaysha Corinealdi, "Panama in Black: Afro-Caribbean World Making in the Twentieth Century" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 66:02


In Panama in Black: Afro-Caribbean World Making in the Twentieth Century (Duke UP, 2022), Kaysha Corinealdi traces the multigenerational activism of Afro-Caribbean Panamanians as they forged diasporic communities in Panama and the United States throughout the twentieth century. Drawing on a rich array of sources including speeches, yearbooks, photographs, government reports, radio broadcasts, newspaper editorials, and oral histories, Corinealdi presents the Panamanian isthmus as a crucial site in the making of an Afro-diasporic world that linked cities and towns like Colón, Kingston, Panamá, Brooklyn, Bridgetown, and La Boca. In Panama, Afro-Caribbean Panamanians created a diasporic worldview of the Caribbean that privileged the potential of Black innovation. Corinealdi maps this innovation by examining the longest-running Black newspaper in Central America, the rise of civic associations created to counter policies that stripped Afro-Caribbean Panamanians of citizenship, the creation of scholarship-granting organizations that supported the education of Black students, and the emergence of national conferences and organizations that linked anti-imperialism and Black Liberation. By showing how Afro-Caribbean Panamanians used these methods to navigate anti-Blackness, xenophobia, and white supremacy, Corinealdi offers a new mode of understanding activism, community, and diaspora formation.  Nicole Ramsey is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African & African American Studies at the University of Virginia. Her research examines formations of blackness, indigeneity, identity, and nation in Belize and the circum-Caribbean. On Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Caribbean Studies
Kaysha Corinealdi, "Panama in Black: Afro-Caribbean World Making in the Twentieth Century" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Caribbean Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 66:02


In Panama in Black: Afro-Caribbean World Making in the Twentieth Century (Duke UP, 2022), Kaysha Corinealdi traces the multigenerational activism of Afro-Caribbean Panamanians as they forged diasporic communities in Panama and the United States throughout the twentieth century. Drawing on a rich array of sources including speeches, yearbooks, photographs, government reports, radio broadcasts, newspaper editorials, and oral histories, Corinealdi presents the Panamanian isthmus as a crucial site in the making of an Afro-diasporic world that linked cities and towns like Colón, Kingston, Panamá, Brooklyn, Bridgetown, and La Boca. In Panama, Afro-Caribbean Panamanians created a diasporic worldview of the Caribbean that privileged the potential of Black innovation. Corinealdi maps this innovation by examining the longest-running Black newspaper in Central America, the rise of civic associations created to counter policies that stripped Afro-Caribbean Panamanians of citizenship, the creation of scholarship-granting organizations that supported the education of Black students, and the emergence of national conferences and organizations that linked anti-imperialism and Black Liberation. By showing how Afro-Caribbean Panamanians used these methods to navigate anti-Blackness, xenophobia, and white supremacy, Corinealdi offers a new mode of understanding activism, community, and diaspora formation.  Nicole Ramsey is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African & African American Studies at the University of Virginia. Her research examines formations of blackness, indigeneity, identity, and nation in Belize and the circum-Caribbean. On Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/caribbean-studies

New Books Network
Kaysha Corinealdi, "Panama in Black: Afro-Caribbean World Making in the Twentieth Century" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 66:02


In Panama in Black: Afro-Caribbean World Making in the Twentieth Century (Duke UP, 2022), Kaysha Corinealdi traces the multigenerational activism of Afro-Caribbean Panamanians as they forged diasporic communities in Panama and the United States throughout the twentieth century. Drawing on a rich array of sources including speeches, yearbooks, photographs, government reports, radio broadcasts, newspaper editorials, and oral histories, Corinealdi presents the Panamanian isthmus as a crucial site in the making of an Afro-diasporic world that linked cities and towns like Colón, Kingston, Panamá, Brooklyn, Bridgetown, and La Boca. In Panama, Afro-Caribbean Panamanians created a diasporic worldview of the Caribbean that privileged the potential of Black innovation. Corinealdi maps this innovation by examining the longest-running Black newspaper in Central America, the rise of civic associations created to counter policies that stripped Afro-Caribbean Panamanians of citizenship, the creation of scholarship-granting organizations that supported the education of Black students, and the emergence of national conferences and organizations that linked anti-imperialism and Black Liberation. By showing how Afro-Caribbean Panamanians used these methods to navigate anti-Blackness, xenophobia, and white supremacy, Corinealdi offers a new mode of understanding activism, community, and diaspora formation.  Nicole Ramsey is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African & African American Studies at the University of Virginia. Her research examines formations of blackness, indigeneity, identity, and nation in Belize and the circum-Caribbean. On Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in African American Studies
Kaysha Corinealdi, "Panama in Black: Afro-Caribbean World Making in the Twentieth Century" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 66:02


In Panama in Black: Afro-Caribbean World Making in the Twentieth Century (Duke UP, 2022), Kaysha Corinealdi traces the multigenerational activism of Afro-Caribbean Panamanians as they forged diasporic communities in Panama and the United States throughout the twentieth century. Drawing on a rich array of sources including speeches, yearbooks, photographs, government reports, radio broadcasts, newspaper editorials, and oral histories, Corinealdi presents the Panamanian isthmus as a crucial site in the making of an Afro-diasporic world that linked cities and towns like Colón, Kingston, Panamá, Brooklyn, Bridgetown, and La Boca. In Panama, Afro-Caribbean Panamanians created a diasporic worldview of the Caribbean that privileged the potential of Black innovation. Corinealdi maps this innovation by examining the longest-running Black newspaper in Central America, the rise of civic associations created to counter policies that stripped Afro-Caribbean Panamanians of citizenship, the creation of scholarship-granting organizations that supported the education of Black students, and the emergence of national conferences and organizations that linked anti-imperialism and Black Liberation. By showing how Afro-Caribbean Panamanians used these methods to navigate anti-Blackness, xenophobia, and white supremacy, Corinealdi offers a new mode of understanding activism, community, and diaspora formation.  Nicole Ramsey is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African & African American Studies at the University of Virginia. Her research examines formations of blackness, indigeneity, identity, and nation in Belize and the circum-Caribbean. On Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in History
Elizabeth Quay Hutchison, "Workers Like All the Rest of Them: Domestic Service and the Rights of Labor in Twentieth-Century Chile" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 59:56


Leah Cargin (Ph.D student, University of Oklahoma) speaks with Elizabeth Quay Hutchison (Professor, University of New Mexico) about Hutchison's recent book, Workers Like All the Rest of Them: Domestic Service and the Rights of Labor in Twentieth-Century Chile (Duke University Press, 2021). In this episode, Leah Cargin invites Elizabeth Hutchison to consider the long-term influences that have shaped her personal and professional interests in Latin American history and gender history, and to reflect on how these commitments led to this recent book. Hutchison introduces us to a few of the cooks, nannies, gardeners, and housekeepers who mobilized for recognition as workers in twentieth-century Chile, including Doña Elba Bravo and Aída Moreno Valenzuela. Rooted in oral histories with leaders and allies of the domestic service workers' movement, Hutchison analyzes how changing constructions of domestic service labor impacted women's work in this underpaid and under-regulated sector over the course of the twentieth century. The ‘living archive' of activists' testimony, in combination with congressional and associational records, enables Hutchison to narrate large-scale social and political change in Chile, centering the perspective of women domestic workers, and showcasing the alliances they forged with leadership in the Catholic Church, left-wing political organizations, and feminist organizations. Throughout this conversation, Hutchison observes the obligations and rewards of politically- and socially-engaged scholarship. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Gender Studies
Elizabeth Quay Hutchison, "Workers Like All the Rest of Them: Domestic Service and the Rights of Labor in Twentieth-Century Chile" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 59:56


Leah Cargin (Ph.D student, University of Oklahoma) speaks with Elizabeth Quay Hutchison (Professor, University of New Mexico) about Hutchison's recent book, Workers Like All the Rest of Them: Domestic Service and the Rights of Labor in Twentieth-Century Chile (Duke University Press, 2021). In this episode, Leah Cargin invites Elizabeth Hutchison to consider the long-term influences that have shaped her personal and professional interests in Latin American history and gender history, and to reflect on how these commitments led to this recent book. Hutchison introduces us to a few of the cooks, nannies, gardeners, and housekeepers who mobilized for recognition as workers in twentieth-century Chile, including Doña Elba Bravo and Aída Moreno Valenzuela. Rooted in oral histories with leaders and allies of the domestic service workers' movement, Hutchison analyzes how changing constructions of domestic service labor impacted women's work in this underpaid and under-regulated sector over the course of the twentieth century. The ‘living archive' of activists' testimony, in combination with congressional and associational records, enables Hutchison to narrate large-scale social and political change in Chile, centering the perspective of women domestic workers, and showcasing the alliances they forged with leadership in the Catholic Church, left-wing political organizations, and feminist organizations. Throughout this conversation, Hutchison observes the obligations and rewards of politically- and socially-engaged scholarship. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in Women's History
Elizabeth Quay Hutchison, "Workers Like All the Rest of Them: Domestic Service and the Rights of Labor in Twentieth-Century Chile" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Women's History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 59:56


Leah Cargin (Ph.D student, University of Oklahoma) speaks with Elizabeth Quay Hutchison (Professor, University of New Mexico) about Hutchison's recent book, Workers Like All the Rest of Them: Domestic Service and the Rights of Labor in Twentieth-Century Chile (Duke University Press, 2021). In this episode, Leah Cargin invites Elizabeth Hutchison to consider the long-term influences that have shaped her personal and professional interests in Latin American history and gender history, and to reflect on how these commitments led to this recent book. Hutchison introduces us to a few of the cooks, nannies, gardeners, and housekeepers who mobilized for recognition as workers in twentieth-century Chile, including Doña Elba Bravo and Aída Moreno Valenzuela. Rooted in oral histories with leaders and allies of the domestic service workers' movement, Hutchison analyzes how changing constructions of domestic service labor impacted women's work in this underpaid and under-regulated sector over the course of the twentieth century. The ‘living archive' of activists' testimony, in combination with congressional and associational records, enables Hutchison to narrate large-scale social and political change in Chile, centering the perspective of women domestic workers, and showcasing the alliances they forged with leadership in the Catholic Church, left-wing political organizations, and feminist organizations. Throughout this conversation, Hutchison observes the obligations and rewards of politically- and socially-engaged scholarship. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Economic and Business History
Elizabeth Quay Hutchison, "Workers Like All the Rest of Them: Domestic Service and the Rights of Labor in Twentieth-Century Chile" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Economic and Business History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 59:56


Leah Cargin (Ph.D student, University of Oklahoma) speaks with Elizabeth Quay Hutchison (Professor, University of New Mexico) about Hutchison's recent book, Workers Like All the Rest of Them: Domestic Service and the Rights of Labor in Twentieth-Century Chile (Duke University Press, 2021). In this episode, Leah Cargin invites Elizabeth Hutchison to consider the long-term influences that have shaped her personal and professional interests in Latin American history and gender history, and to reflect on how these commitments led to this recent book. Hutchison introduces us to a few of the cooks, nannies, gardeners, and housekeepers who mobilized for recognition as workers in twentieth-century Chile, including Doña Elba Bravo and Aída Moreno Valenzuela. Rooted in oral histories with leaders and allies of the domestic service workers' movement, Hutchison analyzes how changing constructions of domestic service labor impacted women's work in this underpaid and under-regulated sector over the course of the twentieth century. The ‘living archive' of activists' testimony, in combination with congressional and associational records, enables Hutchison to narrate large-scale social and political change in Chile, centering the perspective of women domestic workers, and showcasing the alliances they forged with leadership in the Catholic Church, left-wing political organizations, and feminist organizations. Throughout this conversation, Hutchison observes the obligations and rewards of politically- and socially-engaged scholarship. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Latin American Studies
Elizabeth Quay Hutchison, "Workers Like All the Rest of Them: Domestic Service and the Rights of Labor in Twentieth-Century Chile" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 59:56


Leah Cargin (Ph.D student, University of Oklahoma) speaks with Elizabeth Quay Hutchison (Professor, University of New Mexico) about Hutchison's recent book, Workers Like All the Rest of Them: Domestic Service and the Rights of Labor in Twentieth-Century Chile (Duke University Press, 2021). In this episode, Leah Cargin invites Elizabeth Hutchison to consider the long-term influences that have shaped her personal and professional interests in Latin American history and gender history, and to reflect on how these commitments led to this recent book. Hutchison introduces us to a few of the cooks, nannies, gardeners, and housekeepers who mobilized for recognition as workers in twentieth-century Chile, including Doña Elba Bravo and Aída Moreno Valenzuela. Rooted in oral histories with leaders and allies of the domestic service workers' movement, Hutchison analyzes how changing constructions of domestic service labor impacted women's work in this underpaid and under-regulated sector over the course of the twentieth century. The ‘living archive' of activists' testimony, in combination with congressional and associational records, enables Hutchison to narrate large-scale social and political change in Chile, centering the perspective of women domestic workers, and showcasing the alliances they forged with leadership in the Catholic Church, left-wing political organizations, and feminist organizations. Throughout this conversation, Hutchison observes the obligations and rewards of politically- and socially-engaged scholarship. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books Network
Elizabeth Quay Hutchison, "Workers Like All the Rest of Them: Domestic Service and the Rights of Labor in Twentieth-Century Chile" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 59:56


Leah Cargin (Ph.D student, University of Oklahoma) speaks with Elizabeth Quay Hutchison (Professor, University of New Mexico) about Hutchison's recent book, Workers Like All the Rest of Them: Domestic Service and the Rights of Labor in Twentieth-Century Chile (Duke University Press, 2021). In this episode, Leah Cargin invites Elizabeth Hutchison to consider the long-term influences that have shaped her personal and professional interests in Latin American history and gender history, and to reflect on how these commitments led to this recent book. Hutchison introduces us to a few of the cooks, nannies, gardeners, and housekeepers who mobilized for recognition as workers in twentieth-century Chile, including Doña Elba Bravo and Aída Moreno Valenzuela. Rooted in oral histories with leaders and allies of the domestic service workers' movement, Hutchison analyzes how changing constructions of domestic service labor impacted women's work in this underpaid and under-regulated sector over the course of the twentieth century. The ‘living archive' of activists' testimony, in combination with congressional and associational records, enables Hutchison to narrate large-scale social and political change in Chile, centering the perspective of women domestic workers, and showcasing the alliances they forged with leadership in the Catholic Church, left-wing political organizations, and feminist organizations. Throughout this conversation, Hutchison observes the obligations and rewards of politically- and socially-engaged scholarship. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Dr. Junkie Show
#112: The Opium Wars

The Dr. Junkie Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 25:06


We often think of the War on Drugs as beginning some time during the Twentieth Century, either with Harry Anslinger in the 1920s, or Richard Nixon in the 1970s. But the first war against drugs was a war against opium, and it started in the 1700s, turning into a political war between China and England, then again, later, between China and a number of aligned countries, including England. In this episode I talk about the roots of the original war on drugs, the Opium Wars, and what they can teach us about the current ongoing war on drugs. All music from Pixabay 

New Books Network en español
Ángela Vergara, "Fighting Unemployment in Twentieth-Century Chile" (2021)

New Books Network en español

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 65:22


En "Fighting Unemployment in Twentieth-Century Chile", Ángela Vergara narra la historia de cómo los trabajadores industriales y mineros, los campesinos y los jornaleros, así como los empleados de cuello azul y de cuello blanco, se ganaron la vida durante períodos de inestabilidad económica, política y social en el Chile del siglo XX. La Gran Depresión transformó la forma en que los chilenos veían el trabajo y los derechos de bienestar y cómo se relacionaban con las instituciones públicas. Influido por los debates mundiales y regionales, el Estado puso en marcha organismos modernos para contar y asistir a los pobres y ampliar sus derechos sociales y económicos. Entrelazando enfoques transnacionales y de abajo hacia arriba, Vergara subraya los límites de estas políticas y demuestra cómo los beneficios y las protecciones del trabajo asalariado se convirtieron en algo central para la vida y la cultura de la gente, y cómo las recesiones económicas globales, la opresión política y los empleadores abusivos amenazaron su cultura de clase trabajadora. "Fighting Unemployment in Twentieth-Century Chile" contribuye a comprender la profunda desigualdad que impregna la historia chilena a través de un análisis detallado de la relación entre los profesionales del estado de bienestar y los desempleados, la interpretación de las leyes laborales y las actitudes cotidianas de los empleadores. Ángela Vergara es licenciada en historia (Universidad Católica de Chile) y doctora en historia (Universidad de California, San Diego). Actualmente se desempeña como docente e investigadora en California State University, Los Angeles. Sus principales áreas de investigación son la historia social y laboral. Luka Haeberle es un entusiasta estudiante de la historia latinoamericana. Sus principales áreas de interés son la economía política, la historia laboral y la teoría política. Puedes encontrarlo en Twitter: @ChepoteLuka .

Keen On Democracy
Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell: Feminist or Feminine? A Twentieth-Century History of Skirts

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 26:32


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell, author of Skirts: Fashioning Modern Femininity in the Twentieth Century. Dr. Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell is an award-winning fashion historian, curator, and journalist. She has worked as a consultant and educator for museums and universities around the world. She is the author of Fashion Victims: Dress at the Court of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette, Worn on This Day: The Clothes That Made History, The Way We Wed: A Global History of Wedding Fashion, and Red, White, and Blue on the Runway. She frequently writes about fashion, art, and culture for scholarly journals and news outlets including The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, and Politico, and has appeared on NPR, the Biography Channel, Reelz, and numerous podcasts. She lives in Los Angeles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas
209 | Brad DeLong on Why the 20th Century Fell Short of Utopia

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 84:26 Very Popular


People throughout history have imagined ideal societies of various sorts. As the twentieth century dawned, advances in manufacturing and communication arguably brought the idea of utopia within our practical reach, at least as far as economic necessities are concerned. But we failed to achieve it, to say the least. Brad DeLong's new book, Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century, investigates why. He compares the competing political and economic systems that dominated the “long 20th century” from 1870 to 2010, and how we managed to create such enormous wealth and still be left with such intractable problems.Support Mindscape on Patreon.J. Bradford DeLong received his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. He is currently a professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley. and chief economist at the Blum Center for Developing Economies. He previously served as deputy assistant secretary of the U.S. Treasury for Economic Policy from 1993 to 1995. He has been a long-running blogger, now moved to Substack. He is a co-editor of The Economists' Voice.Web siteBerkeley web pageSubstack/blogGoogle Scholar publicationsPodcast (with Noah Smith)WikipediaTwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
J. Bradford DeLong, "Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century" (Basic Books, 2020)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 59:42


From one of the world's leading economists, a grand narrative of the century that made us richer than ever, yet left us unsatisfied Before 1870, humanity lived in dire poverty, with a slow crawl of invention offset by a growing population. Then came a great shift: invention sprinted forward, doubling our technological capabilities each generation and utterly transforming the economy again and again. Our ancestors would have presumed we would have used such powers to build utopia. But it was not so. When 1870-2010 ended, the world instead saw global warming; economic depression, uncertainty, and inequality; and broad rejection of the status quo.  Brad DeLong's Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century (Basic Books, 2022) tells the story of how this unprecedented explosion of material wealth occurred, how it transformed the globe--and why it failed to deliver us to utopia. Of remarkable breadth and ambition, it uncovers the last century to have been less a march of progress than a slouch in the right direction. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

New Books in Finance
J. Bradford DeLong, "Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century" (Basic Books, 2020)

New Books in Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 59:42


From one of the world's leading economists, a grand narrative of the century that made us richer than ever, yet left us unsatisfied Before 1870, humanity lived in dire poverty, with a slow crawl of invention offset by a growing population. Then came a great shift: invention sprinted forward, doubling our technological capabilities each generation and utterly transforming the economy again and again. Our ancestors would have presumed we would have used such powers to build utopia. But it was not so. When 1870-2010 ended, the world instead saw global warming; economic depression, uncertainty, and inequality; and broad rejection of the status quo.  Brad DeLong's Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century (Basic Books, 2022) tells the story of how this unprecedented explosion of material wealth occurred, how it transformed the globe--and why it failed to deliver us to utopia. Of remarkable breadth and ambition, it uncovers the last century to have been less a march of progress than a slouch in the right direction. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/finance

New Books in German Studies
J. Bradford DeLong, "Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century" (Basic Books, 2020)

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 59:42


From one of the world's leading economists, a grand narrative of the century that made us richer than ever, yet left us unsatisfied Before 1870, humanity lived in dire poverty, with a slow crawl of invention offset by a growing population. Then came a great shift: invention sprinted forward, doubling our technological capabilities each generation and utterly transforming the economy again and again. Our ancestors would have presumed we would have used such powers to build utopia. But it was not so. When 1870-2010 ended, the world instead saw global warming; economic depression, uncertainty, and inequality; and broad rejection of the status quo.  Brad DeLong's Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century (Basic Books, 2022) tells the story of how this unprecedented explosion of material wealth occurred, how it transformed the globe--and why it failed to deliver us to utopia. Of remarkable breadth and ambition, it uncovers the last century to have been less a march of progress than a slouch in the right direction. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

New Books in History
J. Bradford DeLong, "Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century" (Basic Books, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 59:42


From one of the world's leading economists, a grand narrative of the century that made us richer than ever, yet left us unsatisfied Before 1870, humanity lived in dire poverty, with a slow crawl of invention offset by a growing population. Then came a great shift: invention sprinted forward, doubling our technological capabilities each generation and utterly transforming the economy again and again. Our ancestors would have presumed we would have used such powers to build utopia. But it was not so. When 1870-2010 ended, the world instead saw global warming; economic depression, uncertainty, and inequality; and broad rejection of the status quo.  Brad DeLong's Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century (Basic Books, 2022) tells the story of how this unprecedented explosion of material wealth occurred, how it transformed the globe--and why it failed to deliver us to utopia. Of remarkable breadth and ambition, it uncovers the last century to have been less a march of progress than a slouch in the right direction. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in World Affairs
J. Bradford DeLong, "Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century" (Basic Books, 2020)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 59:42


From one of the world's leading economists, a grand narrative of the century that made us richer than ever, yet left us unsatisfied Before 1870, humanity lived in dire poverty, with a slow crawl of invention offset by a growing population. Then came a great shift: invention sprinted forward, doubling our technological capabilities each generation and utterly transforming the economy again and again. Our ancestors would have presumed we would have used such powers to build utopia. But it was not so. When 1870-2010 ended, the world instead saw global warming; economic depression, uncertainty, and inequality; and broad rejection of the status quo.  Brad DeLong's Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century (Basic Books, 2022) tells the story of how this unprecedented explosion of material wealth occurred, how it transformed the globe--and why it failed to deliver us to utopia. Of remarkable breadth and ambition, it uncovers the last century to have been less a march of progress than a slouch in the right direction. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books Network
J. Bradford DeLong, "Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century" (Basic Books, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 59:42


From one of the world's leading economists, a grand narrative of the century that made us richer than ever, yet left us unsatisfied Before 1870, humanity lived in dire poverty, with a slow crawl of invention offset by a growing population. Then came a great shift: invention sprinted forward, doubling our technological capabilities each generation and utterly transforming the economy again and again. Our ancestors would have presumed we would have used such powers to build utopia. But it was not so. When 1870-2010 ended, the world instead saw global warming; economic depression, uncertainty, and inequality; and broad rejection of the status quo.  Brad DeLong's Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century (Basic Books, 2022) tells the story of how this unprecedented explosion of material wealth occurred, how it transformed the globe--and why it failed to deliver us to utopia. Of remarkable breadth and ambition, it uncovers the last century to have been less a march of progress than a slouch in the right direction. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Technology
J. Bradford DeLong, "Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century" (Basic Books, 2020)

New Books in Technology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 59:42


From one of the world's leading economists, a grand narrative of the century that made us richer than ever, yet left us unsatisfied Before 1870, humanity lived in dire poverty, with a slow crawl of invention offset by a growing population. Then came a great shift: invention sprinted forward, doubling our technological capabilities each generation and utterly transforming the economy again and again. Our ancestors would have presumed we would have used such powers to build utopia. But it was not so. When 1870-2010 ended, the world instead saw global warming; economic depression, uncertainty, and inequality; and broad rejection of the status quo.  Brad DeLong's Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century (Basic Books, 2022) tells the story of how this unprecedented explosion of material wealth occurred, how it transformed the globe--and why it failed to deliver us to utopia. Of remarkable breadth and ambition, it uncovers the last century to have been less a march of progress than a slouch in the right direction. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/technology

New Books in Economics
J. Bradford DeLong, "Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century" (Basic Books, 2020)

New Books in Economics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 59:42


From one of the world's leading economists, a grand narrative of the century that made us richer than ever, yet left us unsatisfied Before 1870, humanity lived in dire poverty, with a slow crawl of invention offset by a growing population. Then came a great shift: invention sprinted forward, doubling our technological capabilities each generation and utterly transforming the economy again and again. Our ancestors would have presumed we would have used such powers to build utopia. But it was not so. When 1870-2010 ended, the world instead saw global warming; economic depression, uncertainty, and inequality; and broad rejection of the status quo.  Brad DeLong's Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century (Basic Books, 2022) tells the story of how this unprecedented explosion of material wealth occurred, how it transformed the globe--and why it failed to deliver us to utopia. Of remarkable breadth and ambition, it uncovers the last century to have been less a march of progress than a slouch in the right direction. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/economics

New Books in Economic and Business History
J. Bradford DeLong, "Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century" (Basic Books, 2020)

New Books in Economic and Business History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 59:42


From one of the world's leading economists, a grand narrative of the century that made us richer than ever, yet left us unsatisfied Before 1870, humanity lived in dire poverty, with a slow crawl of invention offset by a growing population. Then came a great shift: invention sprinted forward, doubling our technological capabilities each generation and utterly transforming the economy again and again. Our ancestors would have presumed we would have used such powers to build utopia. But it was not so. When 1870-2010 ended, the world instead saw global warming; economic depression, uncertainty, and inequality; and broad rejection of the status quo.  Brad DeLong's Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century (Basic Books, 2022) tells the story of how this unprecedented explosion of material wealth occurred, how it transformed the globe--and why it failed to deliver us to utopia. Of remarkable breadth and ambition, it uncovers the last century to have been less a march of progress than a slouch in the right direction. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Keen On Democracy
J. Bradford DeLong on Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Wealthy and Miserable 20th Century

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 48:00


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by J. Bradford DeLong, author of Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century. J. Bradford DeLong, an economic historian, is a professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley. He was a deputy assistant secretary of the U.S. Treasury during the Clinton administration. He writes a widely read economics blog, now at braddelong.substack.com. He lives in Berkeley, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Junk Food Dinner
JFD633: 20th Century, Stone, Night Killer

Junk Food Dinner

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022


Y'all ever see that movie where Australian bikers face off against an Italian Nitemare Feddy aboard a lavish train in 1930s America? Oh, maybe that was actually three different movies. Maybe the three our Patreon pals picked for us this week. Up first! We board a cross-country train with John Barrymore and Carole Lombard in the knee-slapping screwball yarn Twentieth Century (from 1934), directed by Howard Hawks and picked by Listener Luke! Next up! We head on over to Australia with a buncha sleazy bikers and a skeezy copper in 1974's Stone, a bonafide Ozploitation classic from a dude who sadly never directed anything else & picked by the legendary Expat Elise! Finally! Of course, it's 1990's Night Killer, a movie that is neither a Texas Chainsaw nor a Nightmare on Elm St, no matter what Claudio Fragasso and Eric from Nashville tell ya! All this plus sweaty men stewing in their juices and smelling burnt turds, the home decor repor(t), the fireworks reporks, Parker's an Otaku Son of a Bitch, yes Sean does say the word 'jazz' at least once, Sweetman's Wrestlechats, bogus Clue boardgames make Kevin wanna puke, a dangerous political sidebar, the Carole Lombard Repord, there's no wrong way to enjoy Troll 2, nerd news and even more! Recorded live-to-tape on Buttered Corn Day, 2022!! Direct Donloyd HereGot a movie suggestion for the show, or better yet an opinion on next week's movies? Drop us a line at JFDPodcast@gmail.com. Or leave us a voicemail: 347-746-JUNK (5865). Add it to your telephone now! JOIN THE CONVERSATION!Also, if you like the show, please take a minute and subscribe and/or comment on us on iTunes, Stitcher, Blubrry or Podfeed.net. Check us out on Facebook and Twitter! We'd love to see some of your love on Patreon - it's super easy and fun to sign up for the extra bonus content. We'll saddle up with the Grave Diggaz for your love and support. With picks like these, you GOTTA #DonloydNow and listen in!

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history
Season 3, Ep. 14: Returning Home: Diné Poetry, Essays, Art & Journalism from Utah's Intermountain Indian School (1950-1983, Brigham City, UT)

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 103:27


Date: November 29, 2021 (Season 3, Episode 14: 102 minutes long). Click Here to see the SYP webpage page which includes art from the book, photos of the co-authors, recommended readings and a site plan for Intermountain Indian School, circa 1980s. Are you interested in other episodes of Speak Your Piece? Click here.Podcast Content: This episode is about literary and creative expressions--works of poetry, essays, art and journalism--produced by Diné or Navajo junior high and high school students, and older students ages 18 to 24, who returned to complete their high school years at IIS. For nine months of each year, most of the school's student body boarded chartered buses that took them to and from Brigham City's Intermountain Indian School (IIS: 1950-1983). Living hundreds of miles from their families and communities, these children, some as young as five years of age, lived in dormitories and attended school on a sprawling and somewhat isolated north Utah campus. Our guests for this episode: Farina King (Diné, historian, Univ. of Oklahoma), Mike Taylor (English and Native American Studies, BYU) and James Swensen (photographic/art historian, BYU). Each read their favorite poems and excerpts, shared personal insights and discoveries, and expressed their awe and wonder, at the youthful creative output covering relationships, youthful love, protest, homelands and family, and above all else, their affirmations of Indiginous knowledge and identity.The IIS campus, which was managed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, remains partially standing, located just below the incline to Sardine Canyon on US Route 89. Tens of thousands of Navajo students attended what was for its time, the largest Indian boarding school in the USA. During the school's last ten years the school became Inter-tribal facility, inviting both Navajo and students from other tribal nations.      This richly illustrated book describes, interpretes, and amassing hundreds of Diné student works into one volume. This book expands the known canon of mid 20th century Indigious art, literature and journalism. King, Taylor and Swensen's analysis, and their gathering of youthful Diné creative works, are both nationally and regionally significant, for Indigious Studies, American history, and our nation's interest in seeking out, and making publically available, more inclusive works in the Humanities and in the arts. Bios : Dr. Farina King--a citizen of the Navajo Nation--is the Horizon Chair of Native American Ecology & Culture, and an Associate Professor of Native American Studies at the Univ. of Oklahoma. King specializes in twentieth-century Native American Studies.  Besides this book she is the author of The Earth Memory Compass: Diné Landscapes and Education in the Twentieth Century.  Dr. Michael P. Taylor is Assistant Professor of English and Associate Director of American Indian Studies at BYU. He is a coauthor of Returning Home (the book in discussion). His research engages Indigenous archives to expand Indigenous literary histories and support community-centered initiatives of Indigenous resurgence. Dr. James R. Swensen is an associate professor of art history and the history of photography at BYU. He is the author of Picturing Migrants: The Grapes of Wrath and New Deal Documentary Photography (Univ. of Oklahoma Press, 2015), In a Rugged Land: Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, and the Three Mormon Towns Collaboration, 1953-1954  (Univ. of Utah Press, 2018) and co-author of Returning Home  (the book in discussion).

Songbook
06 Kate Molleson

Songbook

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 37:56


Writer and BBC Radio 3 presenter Kate Molleson joins Jude to talk about the book Bessie Smith by Jackie Kay.As well as digging into the life of Bessie they also discuss how music provides solace, childhood encounters with music, whether women are allowed to be straight up authorities on music, radical lyrics and the complications of discussing a female musician's clothes.Books mentioned in the podcast:Sound Within Sound: Opening Our Ears to the Twentieth Century by Kate Molleson https://bit.ly/3bZkZC2Us Conductors by Sean Michaels https://uk.bookshop.org/books/us-conductors/9781408868690The Musical Life of Gustav Mole by Kathryn Meyrick https://uk.bookshop.org/books/the-musical-life-of-gustav-mole/9780859533331Bessie Smith by Jackie Kay https://bit.ly/3wddpuFYou can buy Jude's book The Sound of Being Human: How Music Shapes Our Lives here: https://uk.bookshop.org/books/the-sound-of-being-human-how-music-shapes-our-lives/9781474622929Finally White Rabbit's Spotify Playlist of 'booksongs' - songs inspired by books loved by our guests - is here: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/7chuHOeTs9jpyKpmgXV6uo Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism
W.E.B. and Shirley Graham Du Bois in China with Dr. Gao Yunxiang

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 39:52


In this episode we interview Dr. Gao Yunxiang. Dr. Gao is professor of history at Toronto Metropolitan University and the author of Sporting Gender: Women Athletes and Celebrity-Making during China's National Crisis, 1931-1945. For this conversation we are honored to have Dr. Gao join us to talk about her book Arise, Africa! Roar, China! Black and Chinese Citizens of the World in the Twentieth Century. It is a very interesting book that examines the lives and interconnectedness of three seminal figures of the Black Left in W.E.B. Du Bois, Paul Robeson, and Langston Hughes as well as two very interesting Chinese internationalist cultural workers and activists Liu Liangmo and Sylvia Si-lan Chen. Of course in examining Du Bois and Robeson the work also examines the politics and lives of Shirley Graham Du Bois and Eslanda Robeson. We initially planned to have a conversation on the whole book for this episode, but due to some time constraints we recorded this as a part 1 primarily focusing on W.E.B. Du Bois and Shirley Graham Du Bois and Yunxiang's scholarship on them which breaks ground from archival sources that have often been ignored by western academics due to lack of access to Chinese archives or due to linguistic barriers. At a later date we plan to record an additional conversation that looks more in-depth at the other central figures in Dr. Gao's book, namely Langston Hughes, Si-Lan Chen, Liu Liangmo and the Robesons.  This discussion examines the conversation behind the famous photo of W.E.B. Du Bois laughing with Chairman Mao, the impact of Shirley Graham Du Bois and Eslanda Robeson on their husband's views toward Communist China, and why Shirley Graham Du Bois is buried in China. As well as, how she navigated the Sino-Soviet split and her role within China through  the shifting landscapes of Chinese Communist policy, including the Cultural Revolution. This is our 4th episode of the month. We're on a current push to add 10 patrons before the end of the month. You can be one of those 10 folks to help us meet that goal for as little as $1 a month. We want to extend our gratitude to all the patrons of the show and to folks who share these episodes with friends, family and comrades. You can become a patron of the show at patreon.com/millennialsarekillingcapitalism.  Documentary on Du Bois in China mentioned in the episode.

Rik's Mind Podcast
Episode 97- Nelson Lichtenstein: The Battle for Labor Rights, Dignity and A Living Wage

Rik's Mind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022


Today we are joined by Nelson Lichtenstein. Nelson is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of History at the University of California Santa Barbara, where he directs the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy. He received his B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1966 and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1974. Thereafter he worked in publishing in New York and taught at The Catholic University of America and at the University of Virginia before joining the UCSB faculty in 2001.He is the author or editor of 16 books, including a biography of the labor leader Walter Reuther and State of the Union: A Century of American Labor (2002, 2013 revised). His most recent books are Achieving Workers' Rights in the Global Economy (2016); The Port Huron Statement: Sources and Legacies of the New Left's Founding Manifesto (2015); The ILO From Geneva to the Pacific Rim (2015);The Retail Revolution: How Wal-Mart Created a Brave New World of Business (2009, 2010); The Right and Labor in America: Politics, Ideology, and Imagination (2012); A Contest of Ideas: Capital, Politics and Labor (2013); and American Capitalism: Social Thought and Political Economy in the Twentieth Century (2006). He has served on the editorial board of numerous journals and now is a member of the editorial board of the University of Illinois Press series in working-class history.As director of the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy, Lichtenstein and other UCSB faculty, including Alice O'Connor, Mary Furner, Eileen Boris and Stephen Weatherford, have created an interdisciplinary research and education initiative that hosts conferences and workshops that contribute to an understanding of the issues and ideas, past and present, illuminating the character of American capitalism and of the working class that sustains it. The Center administers an undergraduate minor in Labor Studies and a graduate-level Colloquium in Work, Labor, and Political Economy. Recent conferences, including “Beyond the New Deal Order” (2015), “The American Labor Movement: Crisis and Creativity” (2014), and “The Port Huron Statement at 50” (2012), are designed to probe historically resonate issues and help train a new generation of labor intellectuals.Professor Lichtenstein has held fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Rockefeller and Guggenheim Foundations, the University of California, and from the Fulbright Commission and the Oregon Center for the Humanities. In 2008 he was elected to the Society of American Historians and in 2012 the Sidney Hillman Foundation awarded him its Sol Stetin Award for lifetime achievement in labor history. His reviews and opinion pieces have appeared in The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, Dissent, New Labor Forum, American Prospect, and academic journals. Reporters often seek is comments when they write on labor, politics, and supply chain issues. You can find more about Nelson on his Twitter @NelsonLichtens1.Show Notes:Nelson Lichtenstein | Department of History, University of California Santa Barbara@NelsonLichtens1 | Twitter The Making of the New Left | The New YorkerWhat Made the Battle of Blair Mountain the Largest Labor Uprising in American History | Smithsonian MagazineThe Mine Wars (Documentary) | PBSThe Significance of the Battle of Blair Mountain, 100 Years Later | The Appalachian VoiceMajorities of adults see decline of union membership as bad for the U.S. and working people | Pew Research CenterThe Upstart Union Challenging Starbucks | The New Yorker@SBWorkersUnited | TwitterWhat Company Owns The Most Real Estate? | Prudential California Fredrickson, et al. v. Starbucks Corporation Case No. 1212-15734 | Starbucksoregonclassaction.comThe Teamsters' new chief is readying UPS drivers for a strike as he heads toward contract negotiations — and key moves show he's not bluffing | Business InsiderUPS Teamsters Kick Off Contract Fight | International Brotherhood of TeamstersAmazon Workers Are Organizing a Global Struggle | The Intercept‘What Choice Do I Have?' Freight Train Conductors Are Forced to Work Tired, Sick, and Stressed | Motherboad, Tech By Vice NewsJimmy Hoffa: A closer look at the labor leader's life, work and disappearance | WDIV Local 4 DetroitU.S. Steel Tower | Official Website

New Books Network en español
Iñigo L. García-Bryce, "Haya de la Torre and the Pursuit of Power in Twentieth-century Peru and Latin America" (2018)

New Books Network en español

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 64:12


Al igual que Fidel Castro y el Che Guevara, el peruano Víctor Raúl Haya de la Torre (1895-1979) fue uno de los principales líderes revolucionarios de América Latina, muy conocido más allá de las fronteras peruanas. La biografía de Iñigo García-Bryce relata su dramática odisea política como fundador de la influyente Alianza Popular Revolucionaria Americana (APRA), como teórico político cuya filosofía cambió gradualmente del marxismo a la democracia liberal, y como figura de la oposición encarcelada y exiliada repetidamente por su propio gobierno. En Haya de la Torre and the Pursuit of Power in Twentieth-Century Peru and Latin America García-Bryce destaca la dedicación de Haya a forjar el populismo como estilo político aplicable tanto a la izquierda como a la derecha, y a su visión de un movimiento político pan-latinoamericano. Haya, un gran orador que se dirigía a miles de peruanos, impulsó el movimiento del Aprismo, buscando el desarrollo de la "Indoamérica" mediante la promoción de los derechos de los pueblos indígenas, así como de los trabajadores y las mujeres. Dirigiendo su partido hacia el centro del espectro político durante la mayor parte de la Guerra Fría, Haya fue elegido presidente en 1962, pero los militares le impidieron asumir el cargo, jugando con su rumoreada homosexualidad. Aun así, la insistencia de Haya en que los partidos políticos deben cultivar las raíces indígenas y oponerse a la violencia como medio para alcanzar el poder político ha dejado un poderoso legado en toda América Latina. El Dr. García-Bryce creció en Perú y ha mantenido sus vínculos con el país a través de sus investigaciones. Escribió su tesis sobre los artesanos de Lima durante el siglo XIX, explorando las formas en que se organizaron social y políticamente para afrontar los nuevos retos de la "globalización" a medida que América Latina adoptaba cada vez más el libre comercio y los ideales políticos democráticos. Fue publicado por la University of New Mexico Press en 2004 con el título Crafting the Republic: Lima's Artisans and Nation-Building in Peru, 1821-1879, y fue traducido y publicado por el Instituto de Estudios Peruanos en 2008 con el título República con ciudadanos: los artesanos de Lima, 1821-1879. Actualmente está terminando una recopilación de historias orales realizadas con miembros del APRA de edad avanzada cuyos recuerdos se remontan a las décadas de 1930 y 1940. También está trabajando en una historia del Ferrocarril Central del Perú. Luka Haeberle es un entusiasta estudiante de la historia latinoamericana. Sus principales áreas de interés son la economía política, la historia laboral y la teoría política. Puedes encontrarlo en Twitter: @ChepoteLuka

Holy C of E
Peter Webster on E.L. Mascall - Orthodoxy, Classical Theism and the Twentieth Century Challenge from Liberalism

Holy C of E

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 48:58


For this special episode, regular host Clinton Collister was joined by independent researcher Dr. Peter Webster to talk about the legacy of Anglican systematic theologian E.L. Mascall. Peter Webster is a historian of contemporary British Christianity. Details of his work on Eric Mascall, including the article discussed in the podcast, may be found at:  https://peterwebster.me/mascall/ E.L.Mascall was a proponent of orthodox Anglican theology and classical theism in the middle of the twentieth century, a time during which orthodoxy increasingly came under pressure as liberal trends exerted an ever more powerful influence in the Church. Peter and Clinton help us to understand the significance of Mascall as a priestly theologian and why his work is so important to engage with today.Thanks for listening. To get in touch, please send an email to holycofe@gmail.com and follow us on Twitter @holycofe1.