Podcasts about southerners

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Best podcasts about southerners

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Latest podcast episodes about southerners

The Mike Hosking Breakfast
Aaron Hawkins: Dunedin Mayor says there is local demand for southern passenger rail

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 4:16


The call is out to bring passenger rail back in the south. Dunedin City Council has approved a submission to central government calling for the return of passenger rail between Christchurch, Dunedin and Invercargill. The Southerner express service ran between the three cities until 2002. Mayor Aaron Hawkins told Mike Hosking they know there's demand locally for this service. He says people are increasingly in search of options to travel around the country, without flying or driving. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

That Pretentious Book Club
Falling Kingdoms

That Pretentious Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 131:31


Welcome to Season 4 Episode 16 of That Pretentious Book Club! In this episode, the club is joined by long-lost pod-nurse Haleigh to cover a personal recommendation, Falling Kingdoms by Morgan Rhodes. This YA Fantasy offers an intoxicating combination of game of thrones intensity vibes with all the fast-paced young adult fantasy elements we love - and you've never heard it discussed by more passionate hosts. From ship wars to EXTREMELY questionable love interests, the debate rages on - and in cloaks too. Join the hosts as they find plenty to laugh about after this read of Falling Kingdoms.Skippers jump to 23:13Pour yourself a cup of tea, raise a pinky, and join the club for this discussion of Falling Kingdoms.Support Leah, Jacob, and their beautiful family at GoFundMe! Every bit helps!  https://gofund.me/3941ad83 Find this episode's book and more by shopping at https://bookshop.org/shop/storysirensstudio to support the club AND local bookstores!Visit us at storysirensstudio.com or find us on social media @thatpretentiousbookclub.Looking for exclusive TPBC content? Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/storysirensstudioCheck out sister podcast The Scripturient Society for writers!Find Space Aliens, Southerners, and Saving the World  by Ash Leigh O'Rourke on Amazon.Support the show

Play It By Ear
Episode 110: Deep Graffiti; Southern phrases that non-Southerners need a dictionary to define

Play It By Ear

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 91:03


The Play It By Ear Podcast takes another deep dive into the English Language in Episode 110. The show starts with Brady and a topic on funny and ironic graffiti that has been found on walls. Aric has the second topic with a list of phrases and terms that originated in the South that may, or may not, be commonly used elsewhere.  Visit our website at www.playitbyearpodcast.com. To support our podcast by becoming a member visit playitbyearpodcast.com/support. To purchase a t-shirt visit playitbyearpodcast.com/store #earbudsunite! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/playitbyearpodcast/message

Kris Clink's Writing Table
Sarah McCraw Crow & The Wrong Kind of Woman

Kris Clink's Writing Table

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 29:32


Sarah McCraw Crow is the author of the novel The Wrong Kind of Woman (MIRA Books). She is a longtime magazine writer, editor, and book reviewer, and her articles, essays, and reviews have run in BookPage, The Christian Science Monitor, Prime Number, Family Circle, Ladies' Home Journal, Parents, Parenting, American Baby, Baby Talk, and Working Mother, among others. Her short fiction has won prizes from So to Speak and Good Housekeeping, and her stories have been honored as contest finalists by Press 53, New Letters, Yemasee, and Stanford Alumni Magazine.As a child, Sarah lived in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and Texas as her dad finished his medical training and served in the military, but she did most of her growing up in Virginia. For the past twenty years, she has called New Hampshire home. She lives with her husband and three almost-grown children on an old farm, where she gardens in the summer and snowshoes in the winter, if there's snow. And although she's a transplanted Southerner, she has come to realize that temperamentally, she's a northern New Englander.She is a graduate of Dartmouth College (AB, history), Stanford University (MA, journalism), and Vermont College of Fine Arts (MFA in writing), and she's a member of Grub Street, Boston, and the National Book Critics Circle.Learn more at https://sarahmccrawcrow.com

Razib Khan's Unsupervised Learning
Kerry of Mary Lincolniana: America made in the image of Massachusetts

Razib Khan's Unsupervised Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 81:27 Very Popular


“Yankee go home!” has often been hurled at Americans indiscriminately. But the reality is that Yankee as a category initially meant the people of New England and its colonies across the northern fringe United States, from upstate New York to Minnesota. Yankees were a minority of Northerners during the American Civil War. Nevertheless, Yankee spearheading the Northern cause meant that Southerners disparaged all their occupiers with that label. This reflects the core insight that Yankees were, and arguably still are, far more influential in American culture and history than the raw weight of their numbers would indicate.  On this episode of The Unsupervised Learning podcast, Razib talks to Kerry of the Mary Lincolniana Substack about the role New England culture has played in shaping America and the world. A native New Englander, she does not flinch from asserting that in many fundamental ways, being American is a product of the norms and values of New England culture. Kerry argues the formative history of the colony of Massachusetts set the template for the later United States of America. Razib and Kerry discuss the possibility that the rise of a Southern elite counterculture was mainly a reaction to the preeminence of New England as an intellectual superpower in the early 19th century. They also explore the idea that America's middle-class egalitarianism today reflects the aspirations of the founders of the New England colonies specifically, where the early focus was on literacy, communal debate, respect and rank accrued by those who attained erudition and learning. Kerry believes that the New England model of acculturating immigrants through a path of ascendance up the class hierarchy, starting with the Irish of the 1830's, informed America's later success with the mass migration of the late 19th and early 20th century. She also argues that 21st-century America could still learn much from the New England model of a well-educated and socially engaged populace.  

Changing the Rules
E: 122 No Ordinary Soldier, My Father's Two Wars, Guest, Liz Williams

Changing the Rules

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 20:27


Transcription:Intro  00:04Welcome to Changing the Rules, a weekly podcast about people who are living their best lives and advice on how you can achieve that too. Join us with your lively host, Ray Lowe, better known as the luckiest guy in the world.Ray Loewe00:20Welcome, everybody. And thanks for joining us here at Changing the Rules. We're lucky enough this morning, we're sitting in our brand new podcast facilities in Willow Street, Pennsylvania, we have our super engineer Luke Cagno sitting here at the board. And he's the person who makes us sound good or not. So, I have to kind of behave when he's around because he can do damage to me. And we have a great guest today. But before we get into our guest, let me remind everybody that the luckiest people in the world, and that's what this podcast is all about, are people who take control of their own lives, redesign them to meet their own specs, and live them under their own terms. And the name of our show, Changing the Rules, is all about the fact that the luckiest people in the world managed to handle rules really well. You know, all our lives we're thrown new rules. Were given them by our parents when we're born. The church comes in and gives us rules. The schools give us rules, our jobs give us rules. And the next thing we know, we have rules all over the place and rules do two things. They tell us what we can't do and what we must do. And Steve Jobs, the Apple guy, the big Apple guy, came up with a statement a while ago and he said, you know, if you're living your life under somebody else's rules, you're not living your life. So we have a young lady today who is certainly changing the rules. She certainly has a fascinating life. And the real interesting kind of summary that I'm going to start with is that she's going to tell you that her life, all of her life was preparing her for a unique opportunity that she didn't know was going to come. But when it came, she had all the pieces together based on her life so that she was able to take advantage of an opportunity. So Liz Williams, welcome to changing the rules. Say hi to everybody.Liz Williams02:21Hi, thanks for having me, Ray.Ray Loewe02:23Okay, so let's start a little bit with your background as you grew up, where and how many family members did you have? Tell us a little bit about your background.Liz Williams02:33I grew up in the Philadelphia suburbs, which was a wonderful place to grow up. I had three sisters, two parents, my father worked nights, my mother worked a lot, and back in those days of the 50s and 60s, mothers didn't work that much. But she did work as a secretary. So I had two working parents, adored all my sisters. I lost my older sister, April, in 2008, which was a devastating blow but I still have two younger sisters. And it was a great place to grow up.Ray Loewe03:05Okay, so you had a relatively happy life growing up. And you went away to college, right? And where'd you go to school?Liz Williams03:11I went to Shippensburg State, which is a state college here in Pennsylvania, loved Shippensburg.Ray Loewe03:16And what did you major in?Liz Williams03:18I majored in urban studies, my father had died. The September I left for college, my father died. So I had to pick a major that I thought would be very, very practical. I picked Urban Studies, which was kind of an up-and-coming thing. City planning, that kind of thing. So that's what I picked and I enjoyed it. It was part geography, part political science. And I loved it, I loved all my college.Ray Loewe03:47Okay, and then you went into the workforce, and basically give us kind of a short version of what kinds of things did you do? What skills did you use in your jobs?Liz Williams03:59The first job where I worked for my County Planning Commission, which was Delaware County, and again, in suburban Philadelphia, I did a lot of actually going to meetings, local meetings, and so forth. And I realized when I was doing that, I love to write. That was the only thing about that job that I really liked. I found after about two and a half years, I was like no, I don't think this is for me. But I did love the writing and I never forgot that. One thing that I did do there that I enjoyed was we, myself, and the librarian there at the planning commission, they actually had a library in there because they had so much materials to store. We came up with a county library plan for the county and it was one of the early library systems. Up until then, local towns just had their own little libraries. But this was a county-wide system where you get a library card at one library and it's good for all of the libraries there. So we did the foundation for that. So that was something I was proud of there. But I would say after about three years, I followed in my older sister's footsteps and I became a flight attendant.Ray Loewe05:18Okay, now we're getting into excitement. Right? Okay, so the early years basically gave you the tools that you needed to write Liz Williams05:28Yes. Ray Loewe05:29And kind of taught you what to do, right? But also didn't give you any excitement in your life?Liz Williams05:36Not much. Ray Loewe05:37All right. So now you're a flight attendant, you're a woman of the world. So who did you fly for? Where did you go? What did you do?Liz Williams05:45I flew for Piedmont Airlines, which was based in Winston Salem, North Carolina. It was a regional airline for the South. It grew to eventually fly overseas. But I only flew for seven years, I'd had enough after seven years, but it was fun. I met great friends. I did get to see some of Europe, some of South America, some of the Caribbean, in my 20s, which was kind of unusual back then. Not that many people got to travel that much at that age, so it did make me meet a woman of the world, actually. And we flew for very little because we had discounts. Sometimes you'd fly for free. Sometimes you got moved to first class for nothing. So that was great. But as I say, after about seven years that kind of got tiresome too.Ray Loewe06:37Okay, so who did you meet on your flights that were interesting stories?Liz Williams06:41Oh, I had John McEnroe, once, who was truly rude. He wouldn't put his tennis racket in the overhead bin like he was supposed to, insisted on it going in the hang-up closet for the garment bags. And you know, I wasn't going to argue with him. I just wasn't going to get into it with him, because maybe he'd report me to the management or something, you know. So I didn't do that. And I had Lynda Bird Johnson, who was pregnant at the time. With her, I think it was her third child, and I never had children. So I never understood why you'd want to have three children. And so I actually said to her, are you pregnant again? It was rather rude, but you know, it just kind of came out. And I also had General Westmoreland on there who was very quiet, he had not done so well in the Vietnam War. And I don't think he was, you know, a very popular person. So he kind of sat to himself, but we all knew he was. But mainly, you know, the bulk of our customers were Southerners. And when I went to flight attendant training, I was from Pennsylvania, so I was the only one from the north and I was the token Yankee. I had never been referred to as a Yankee before and it was a little daunting, but you know, everyone was lovely. They weren't mean to me or anything was just an odd situation to, you know, realize that, oh my, they're different. And I'm different to them. And, you know, they still kind of think like that, but as I say, they were lovely.Ray Loewe08:20Yeah. So anyway, the first part of your life, you had a fairly happy childhood, you know, moving along got a good education and a sequence of jobs that taught you writing. And then you became more of a woman of the world out there. And then something happened. So let me read this for you. You're an author, you've written a book. And this is where we're going here. And the intro to your book over here is as a young man from a gritty Pennsylvania mill town enlists in the Army Air Corps, and heads to Hawaii, the paradise of the Pacific. There he and his buddies defend a O'ahu while it explodes and burns in the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the worst surges, his bombers squadron ships out to primitive Pacific outposts amid air raid, stifling heat, outbreaks of tropical disease. He clings to sanity through letters that he and his wife share. Letters found years later saved in the attic. A poignant event, wasn't it? Liz Williams09:30Yes. Ray Loewe09:31All right. And here's where your life came together in something that is significant, and I know it's truly meaning to you, so tell us the  story and fill in the details. Liz Williams09:46You set me up terrifically here, Ray. After seven years of being a flight attendant, I actually well, it was probably after six years, I started working at a part-time job. Because as a flight attendant, you have a lot of time off, you probably only work three or four days a week. The other days you're off. So I started working part-time at a printing company locally there based in Arlington, Virginia. And I always excelled in English. And I knew that I had loved to write. So I thought, well, I'll do this part-time, it'll be fun. So basically, I was just finding mistakes. But that job led me to look more seriously at my career and find something in writing and editing rather than being a flight attendant. So I did. So I ended up working for well, in Washington, they were known as beltway bandits. They were trade associations or organizations that would have contracts with the federal government. And they would write proposals and so there was some proposal writing I did for a couple organizations, then I went to work for a trade association. Then I ended up working for the federal government, I worked for the General Accounting Office, which is now called the Government Accountability Office, and the Congressional Budget Office. And in those jobs, I basically wrote and edited reports that were read by the public, they were ordered by a congressperson to investigate or study a program that was already in existence. For example, healthcare for the military, or a welfare program, something like that, they wanted to see where taxpayers' dollars being used to the best advantage. So a lot of the people employed by both GAO and CBO, Congressional Budget Office, were auditors, or economists, or technical experts in some way. So they would collect the data to study these programs. And then the writers and editors such as myself would come along and, you know, make it a finished product, make sure it was organized well, make sure the message was right up front, make sure there weren't spelling or grammatical errors. Because those kinds of errors would undermine the report, they really had to be perfect. And I became a tremendous expert in grammar, I know everything about grammar. And I enjoyed that, it was in a way an organizational task, deciding what goes where, and how it should be presented. And I loved it. I loved my work in Washington, I really enjoyed it a lot.Ray Loewe12:42Okay, so how did this get to the letters that we found?Liz Williams12:47Okay, I did diverge a little bit.Ray Loewe12:49Well, that's okay.Liz Williams12:50Okay. Well, in the early 2000s, my mother downsized, and I helped her clean out her house, and she found a big box of letters from my father in World War II. And she said, do you want these? And I said, yeah, I do. Because by then I had become a pretty good writer. And I looked at them, I said, you know, that's going to be a book, I want to write a book and that's what it's going to be. And when I first thought of the project, I thought, well, it'll just be a straight nonfiction book, it'll just be letters. But when I started reading them, they were very substantive. My father was an excellent writer. And my mother was a good writer, too. Now, he had saved her letters that she wrote him and sent them back to her for safekeeping. So I had a very rich collection, I had both sides of the correspondence. And I started reading and I thought, you know, I think this is really a story, it's not just going to be a collection of letters. So the book turned out to be a war story, a love story, and my story of getting to know my father. Because as I mentioned earlier, he died when I was 18, I really didn't get to know him like you would get to know your parent as a young person. And in the course of my research, I discovered that my father was most likely a gay or bisexual man. So I don't share this with most of my readers because it's rather the climax of my book. And I refer to it as a secret most of the times I talk about my book when I give a talk about my book. But for your audience, Ray, I'm gonna go ahead and just say what it is because there are no WWII stories out there that I know of, that have a gay theme. And I have one. And I don't know for a fact the trail was too cold to really track down men who had known my dad as a young man to really confirm this. But the fact is, I asked my mother about it. I asked my older sister about it, who, as I mentioned, passed away. And she's the one that really tipped me off about it. She said, you know, I interviewed her for the book because she knew him better than my other sisters or myself because as I say, he died young. She said, you know, I think looking back, I think Daddy was gay. And as soon as she said that, I was having an epiphany. I literally looked outside through her window at the leaves on the trees and they became well defined. That was the nature of the epiphany because so many things made sense when she said that. How he was so fixated on the fact that I shouldn't be allowed to wear bangs, so fixated on our hair, what we wore. You know, he had four daughters. There's one other book that I know of on the market. It's called Fun Home, that a young lady wrote who she had a father who was gay. Now, she didn't know it as a child that her father was gay. But she became aware of it because actually, he kind of preyed on young boys, which my father didn't do anything like that. So she came from a lot of dysfunction. But her book became a Broadway play and won a bunch of Tony Awards. But it doesn't have anything to do with World War II. This does, there were, according to my research, at least 40,000 men in the military in World War II who were gay, there were probably more. They did conduct tests and screenings to eliminate those kinds of men, so they wouldn't get in the service. But obviously, they didn't succeed in eliminating all of them. And a lot of them served like my father with a lot of dignity and honor and sacrificed a lot for our country. I think that should be recognized.Ray Loewe17:10So here you are, all of your background kind of culminated in this opportunity. And when it occurred, you knew what to do. And the book that you wrote is No Ordinary Soldier: My Father's Two Wars. Right? Liz Williams17:28That's right. Ray Loewe17:29You won an award for your book.Liz Williams17:32I did. In 2018, I submitted it to, I think, three contests. And one of them I placed as a finalist, there was one all-time winner, let's say top winner, and then there were two finalists in the genre, which was military history that I entered. And the award was the 2018 International Book Awards Contest, which is a contest that Publishers Weekly does recommend that authors enter. So it is a reputable contest. And I was just thrilled by the award.Ray Loewe18:02So let's kind of think about this. Well, first of all, you have a book out there, and everybody should buy this book, right? Just because you wrote it, and it's available on Amazon. Liz Williams18:15It has five stars. Ray Loewe18:16And what we'll do is we'll put a listing on our podcast notes when we're done so that people can find this. But I think the thing that's really interesting about you is how your background enabled you to be prepared to do something. And, you know, from knowing you, I think you consider yourself one of the luckiest people in the world because you've taken this career that was diverse pieces. And you're a writer. Liz Williams18:45I am a writer. Ray Loewe18:46And that's what you are going to be from now on. So, cool. So do you have any closing comments before we sum up?Liz Williams18:55I just want to thank you very much for having me, Ray, it's been a pleasure.Ray Loewe18:58Well, we've been talking with Liz Williams. Liz is a person who has written a book, an award-winning book, and it's available on Amazon through Kindle anytime you want to read it. And it's a war story. And it's not fiction. It's true, but it's how do you describe it? Liz Williams19:21It's a creative nonfiction book. It's actually a hybrid. It's a combination history memoir, and what they call creative nonfiction. In other words, it's a true story, but I use creative techniques such as metaphors, similes. It's a good read. It's not boring.Ray Loewe19:38And you're gonna make it into a TV series at some point, right?Liz Williams19:41Ken Burns, if you're listening, I'm available.Ray Loewe19:44Okay, so thanks, Liz for being with us. You're certainly one of the luckiest people in the world and you found your way to doing what you really want to do. And thanks for being here. And Luke sign us off, please. Outro  20:01Thank you for listening to Changing the Rules. Join us next week for more conversation, our special guest, and to hear more from the luckiest guy in the world.

Jess Get Hired
Episode 33: When is it time to leave a job? The Fruit Loop Story featuring Chellie Phillips

Jess Get Hired

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 34:17


What do Fruit Loops have to do with a career podcast?  Well, you have to hear Chellie Phillips story to understand that a bad boss caused her to realize it was time to leave a 20+ year career and she calls it her "Fruit Loop Story." Chellie Phillips joins the Jess Get Hired Podcast to share a conversation about when it is time to leave a job.  Here's a rundown of some things to look for: You keep getting passed up for opportunities Your workplace is toxic and morale is low You quit giving it your all.....(have you heard the term, "quiet quitting?" You say out loud more than once, "I hate my job" or "I hate my boss!" You reach a point of burnout, stress, depression or more There is constant restructure at your workplace, the company is cutting corners You work for a leader who is only that by title - they have NO clue how to manage or lead. You dread going to work - You constantly get the Sunday Scaries or the Monday Blues. Chellie Phillips is a sweet-tea sipping, sassy Southerner with a passion for helping dynamic, driven, and career-minded professionals write their own success stories!  She's a coach, corporate trainer, motivational speaker, and author of two award-winning books: "When In Doubt, Delete It"  and "Get Noticed, Get Hired." Chellie's “Successfully Ever After” formula is designed to land you in an ideal career, perfectly matched to your skillset.  She also leads corporate training helping companies create a culture that encourages employee support, growth, and community.  (www.chelliephillips.com) About the Jess Get Hired Podcast: Jessica Fiesta George, a Talent Acquisition Leader, Recruiting Strategist, and Employer Branding Specialist, hosts one of the nation's most popular business and career podcasts, Jess Get Hired. This podcast is for job seekers, business professionals, hiring managers, recruiters, business owners, the underemployed, and underappreciated employees who want to level up their opportunities. The podcast focuses on personal branding, introduces new HR technology, discusses job market trends, and provides perspectives from top CEOs and small business coaches on what is disrupting the talent space today. More: https://linktr.ee/jessgethired Sponsors: Newsly.Me - Code: JESS Kitcaster - Be a Guest on Top Podcasts - Find out how:  kitcaster.com/jessgethired  --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jessgethired/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jessgethired/support

That Pretentious Book Club
Great Expectations

That Pretentious Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 107:04


Welcome to Season 4 Episode 15 of That Pretentious Book Club! In this episode, the club covers long-awaited and much-dreaded (at least by Wheezy) classic, Great Expectations by Charles Dickens. If you've visited the club a time or two, you probably know that this author has acted as the inciting (and only) real source of conflict between the hosts, with one believing this author to be one of the greatest writers of all time, with the other believes he is unnecessarily long-winded at best. Join the hosts as they find plenty to laugh and find out what Wheezy really thinks of this book after her latest read of Great Expectations.Skippers jump to 13:52Pour yourself a cup of tea, raise a pinky, and join the club for this discussion of Great Expectations.Find this episode's book and more by shopping at https://bookshop.org/shop/storysirensstudio to support the club AND local bookstores!Visit us at storysirensstudio.com or find us on social media @thatpretentiousbookclub.Looking for exclusive TPBC content? Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/storysirensstudioCheck out sister podcast The Scripturient Society for writers!Find Space Aliens, Southerners, and Saving the World  by Ash Leigh O'Rourke on Amazon.Support the show

CANCEL LINCOLN
Ep.12 - Lincoln Didn't Give a F*CK About Blacks

CANCEL LINCOLN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 7:19


After the war, most former slaves had no other way of making a living other than sharecropping or tenant farming, basically a system in which land owners would lend land to poor farmers in return for either regular rent payments, or half of their crop yield every season. As author and New York Times contributor Phillip Leigh writes, “Sharecropping was not a choice freely made by Southerners after the Civil War.…It was compelled by a regional capital shortage when the only alternative was starvation.” He also writes "If not chattel [legal] slavery, it was a peonage system that enslaved the cropper to a cycle of annual debts and perpetual backbreaking labor. Children as young as four regularly worked in the fields. Poor health was a consequence.”Follow me on:Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/3SgJIq54ZZ0O/Odyssee: https://odysee.com/@vice_signal:5?r=hMkwyZNi3fs2HJ6F96QhBHqF8MWnQqnFRumble: https://rumble.com/account/content?type=allTwitter: https://twitter.com/cancellincolnFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/cancelproofideas/?ref=page_internal

LIVE! From City Lights
Defending Choice: Roe vs. Wade and the Battle to Preserve Women's Reproductive Rights

LIVE! From City Lights

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 90:44


City Lights in conjunction with Mother Jones (https://www.motherjones.com) present "Defending Choice: Roe vs. Wade and the Battle to Preserve Women's Reproductive Rights." This event was originally broadcast via Zoom, hosted by Peter Maravelis, and moderated by Becca Andrews of Mother Jones Magazine with Jenny Brown, Dr. Katherine Brown, Joshua Prager, and Mary Ziegler. You can purchase copies of the panelists' books directly from City Lights here: "Dollars for Life: The Anti-Abortion Movement and the Fall of the Republican Establishment" - by Mary Ziegler: https://citylights.com/dollars-for-life-anti-abortion-movemen/ "Without Apology: The Abortion Struggle Now" - by Jenny Brown: https://citylights.com/praxis/without-apology-abortion-struggle-now/ "The Family Roe: An American Story" - by Joshua Prager: https://citylights.com/north-america/family-roe-amer-story/ Becca Andrews is a reporter at Mother Jones. A Southerner, she most often writes about the Southeast, gender, and culture. Before joining Mother Jones as an editorial fellow, she wrote for newspapers in Tennessee. Her work has also appeared in Slate, The New Republic, Wired, and Jezebel, among others. Her first book, "No Choice," on the dwindling access to abortion in the United States, is due out in October 2022 from Hachette's Public Affairs imprint. Jenny Brown was a leader in the fight to get the morning-after pill over the counter in the US and a plaintiff in the winning lawsuit. She is co-author of the Redstockings book "Women's Liberation and National Health Care: Confronting the Myth of America." While editor at Labor Notes magazine, she coauthored "How to Jump-Start Your Union: Lessons from the Chicago Teachers." She writes, teaches, and organizes with the feminist group National Women's Liberation and is the author of "Birth Strike: The Hidden Fight over Women's Work." Verso Books published her book "WITHOUT APOLOGY: The Abortion Struggle Now." Dr. Katherine Brown is a general obstetrician-gynecologist and is fellowship-trained in family planning at UCSF. She provides full-scope reproductive healthcare. She is a passionate advocate for reproductive health, choice, and justice. Her research focuses on exploring and improving the reproductive health experiences of Black women. Joshua Prager, a former senior writer for The Wall Street Journal, has written about historical secrets—revealing all from the hidden scheme that led to baseball's most famous moment (Bobby Thomson's “Shot Heard Round the World”) to the only-ever anonymous recipient of a Pulitzer Prize (a photographer he tracked down in Iran). His work, described by George Will as “exemplary journalistic sleuthing,” has shed new light on our cultural touchstones. So does his new book, "The Family Roe," illuminating unknown stories and people behind Roe v. Wade, and enabling the public, for the first time, to see the abortion debate in America in its full social and personal context. The book was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Mary Ziegler is the Stearns Weaver Miller Professor at Florida State University College of Law. She specializes in the legal history of reproduction, the family, sexuality, and the Constitution. In the spring of 2022, she is visiting at Harvard Law School. Her most recent book, "Abortion and the Law in America: A Legal History, Roe v. Wade to the Present," was published by Cambridge University Press in 2020, and received positive reviews in outlets from the Washington Post to the Christian Science Monitor. Her new book, "Dollars for Life: The Antiabortion Movement and the Fall of the Republican Establishment," was published by Yale University Press in June of 2022. She also has a forthcoming book with "Routledge, Reproduction and the Constitution." Her next project, What Roe Means: A History, will be published by Yale in 2023. This event was made possible by support from the City Lights Foundation: citylights.com/foundation

Let's Find Common Ground
Two Young Southerners Speak Up on Guns

Let's Find Common Ground

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 26:45


Our guests on today's show are part of the school shooting generation. Each grew up with active shooter drills and concerns that their school could be next, concepts that were unthinkable when most of today's politicians were in the classroom.  Sophie Holtzman and Jackson Hoppe are sophomores at George Washington University. They are also joint vice presidents of their college's chapter of BridgeUSA, a group that brings students of different ideologies together to have open discussions on political issues.  Sophie, a liberal, and Jackson, a conservative, share stories of being raised in the South, their experiences with guns, and how listening to others' opinions on the topic is a vital first step to finding common ground. 

Bridge and Spida - Gold FM 92.5 Gold Coast
NEED TO KNOW | Southerners Still Flocking To Coast, NightQuarter Helensvale Update And Women Training Women To Drive Buses

Bridge and Spida - Gold FM 92.5 Gold Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 2:25


Keeping you informed for today's water-cooler conversations. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

That Pretentious Book Club
Leven Thumps and the Gateway to Foo

That Pretentious Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 73:23


Welcome to Season 4 Episode 14 of That Pretentious Book Club! In this episode, the club covers middle-grade favorite Leven  Thumps and the Gateway to Foo by Obert Skye - a book recommendation from Dr. Spoons Palermo herself! Vacillating wildely from aggressively whimsical to alarmingly grim, this is a read that adults can enjoy just as much as their inner child. Join the hosts as they find plenty to laugh about in this book club coverage of Leven Thumps and then Gateway to Foo. Skippers jump to 11:15Pour yourself a cup of tea, raise a pinky, and join the club for this discussion of Leven Thumps and the Gateway to Foo.Find this episode's book and more by shopping at https://bookshop.org/shop/storysirensstudio to support the club AND local bookstores!Visit us at storysirensstudio.com or find us on social media @thatpretentiousbookclub.Looking for exclusive TPBC content? Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/storysirensstudioCheck out sister podcast The Scripturient Society for writers!Find Space Aliens, Southerners, and Saving the World  by Ash Leigh O'Rourke on Amazon.Smells Like HumansLike spending time with funny friends talking about curious human behavior. Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Garden Basics with Farmer FredThe healthiest food you can eat is the food you grow yourself. We have the tips!Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices
Mahabali Founded Bali ,Discovered Americas ,Polynesia South East Asia?

Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 5:22


The Vamana Avatar of Vishnu ,comparatively speaking,is less dicussed about and the temples for Vamana and Vishnu revealing himself as Trivikrama are limited. Vamana's famius temple from where He took His step to measure the world given to Him by Mahabali is in Kerala and there is a Temple for Trivikrama ,when Vishnu measured the world is in Kanchipuram,Tamil Nadu. The incident narrated about Vamana Avatar is this. King Mahabali ,Grandson of Prahlada and son of Virochana was found harassing the Dhanavas and Lord Vishnu took the Avatar as Vamana,Dwarf to discipline him. Mahabali,because of his pious nature and the boons he had received,was difficult to vanquish by any done by warfare. So,when Mahabali performed a Yagnya,Lord Vishnu,in the form of a Dwarf,Vamana took part in the Yagnya. It is mandatory to gift Brahmins,the Realized ones,at the end of the Yagnya. When Vamana,the Dwarf,asked for Three Feet of Land measured by his feet,Mahabali gave him the gift despite the warning by his Guru Sukracharya. Vamana,it is interpreted,measured the Earth with his first step,the sky with the second and as there was nothing else was available to measure for the third step,Mahabali offered his head as the third step and Vamana pushed Mahabali to Patala Loka and gran.ted him the boon to visit his people once a year. This visitation by Mahabali is celebrated as Onam Festival in Kerala every year even today. Now,Indian texts have three meanings,at least. One is the word to word textual meaning, The second the philosophical interpretation and the third, Historical/esoteric/tantric interpretation. In this incident word by word interpretation narrates the story and conveys that,however mighty one may be,if he is overwhelmed by power and resorts to unrighteous conduct he will be ruined. If he has bee pious,Divine Grace shall prevent total ruin. At the philosophical level,one who is steeped in Ahankaara ,the feeling of ‘I' and attachments to power and riches would be blessed by Divine Grace to remember his Sattivic Swabhava or nature and realize the Reality. I am providing the historical interpretation below. Kerala was a part of Tamil kingdom in Lemuria and Lemurians were referred to as the Southerners,Dravida and were reported to be in Patala,down the earth. The territories we call as south east Asia Australia were in the south. One must remember that the landmass of the earth was different then. Lemuria and MU territories encompassed these areas. Ramayana and Sumerian texts state that Lemurians lived there. Shiva,who predates Sanatana Dharma was in the south. Shiva's trishul marks are found as Nazca lines in Peru. The Incas,Mayas were the descendants of the Tamils. https://ramanan50.wordpress.com/2015/02/01/incas-of-peru-ancestors-tamils-celebrate-makara-sankaranti/ You may read more articles on these subjects by following the related articles in the link provided above. Indra and Virochana( father of Bali) are found in Bali. Vedas are called Catur Veda Sira in Bali Ancient Brahmin Village is in Bali Moving to Patala Loka by Bali means that Bali moved further south or down to the areas we now know as SouthEast Asia,Asia-Pacific. The Tolltechs,Incas,Mayas have a close link with Tamils/Keralites. Spanish has affinity to Tamil. ‘Prahlada's son was Virochana and his son was Bali (Mahabali). When Bali was performing Yagna under supervision of his guru Sukracharya, Vishnu came as Vamana(dwarf or kid) and asked for donation of ‘three pada Bhoomi.' This is wrongly interpreted as 3 foot land. Infact it is 3 quarters of Land (pada here is similar to nakshatra pada in vedic astrology, where each nakshatra is divided into 4 padas [quarters]). At that time, Bali was ruling over Asia, Europe and Africa. So he donated these 3 human inhabitated lands to Vamana and decided to leave. Vamana was satisfied with Bali and gave him a boon of https://ramanisblog.in/2016/12/26/mahabali-founded-bali-discovered-americas-polynesia-south-eas --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ramanispodcast/message

That Pretentious Book Club
Treasure Island

That Pretentious Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 107:48


Welcome to Season 4 Episode 13 of That Pretentious Book Club! In this episode, the club covers dubious classic Treasure Island by famous author Robert Louis Stephenson. From thorough comparisons to the different media adaptations of this well-known story to critical character analyses and whole breadth of completely nonsensical opinions, the hosts find plenty to laugh about in this book club coverage of Treasure Island. Skippers jump to 16:45Pour yourself a cup of tea, raise a pinky, and join the club for this discussion of Treasure Island.Find this episode's book and more by shopping at https://bookshop.org/shop/storysirensstudio to support the club AND local bookstores!Visit us at storysirensstudio.com or find us on social media @thatpretentiousbookclub.Looking for exclusive TPBC content? Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/storysirensstudioCheck out sister podcast The Scripturient Society for writers!Find Space Aliens, Southerners, and Saving the World  by Ash Leigh O'Rourke on Amazon.Support the show

Gravy
Southern Barbecue Goes West

Gravy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 25:28 Very Popular


In “Grandpa's Barbecue Blooms Out West,” Gravy producer Monica Gokey takes listeners to Idaho Falls, Idaho, to explore what happens when a Southerner leaves the South and opens a barbecue joint in the West.  Grandpa's Southern Bar-B-Q originally opened in the small town of Arco, Idaho, which is obscurely famous for being the first community in the U.S. powered by nuclear energy. At the time Grandpa's opened, Arco's population was about a thousand people. It was an unlikely location for any restaurant, much less a Southern food restaurant.  Menu items like smoked brisket, collard greens, gumbo, and buttermilk pie were new fare for many locals, and it wasn't the locals who patronized Grandpa's at first. It was tourists—either passing through Arco on their way to Yellowstone or the nearby Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve.  Craters of the Moon is aptly named, and in 1969, Apollo 14 astronauts flew to Craters for a bootcamp on rocks. Their Apollo mission was focused on lunar exploration, and they spent time at Craters learning how to be field geologists. Thirty years later, park administrators got the idea to invite the surviving Apollo 14 astronauts back to Craters to commemorate the Monument's 75th anniversary.  Grandpa's had been open for four years at that point. A reporter who was in town to cover the Apollo 14 astronauts' return to Idaho stopped in for barbecue, and ended up doing a short feature on Grandpa's for the Idaho Statesman. That news story in Idaho's largest daily was something of a lift-off moment for Grandpa's. Spoiler alert: Grandpa's flourished. It became a destination eatery—so much so that the owners, the Westbrook family, started keeping guest registries for visitors from around the world. Grandpa's has since moved to the larger city of Idaho Falls, where you can sometimes find three generations of Westbrooks working the restaurant. The food has stayed true to its roots. At 79 years young, Lloyd is the pitmaster. His wife Loretta is the queen of desserts and sides. Kids and grandkids also help out. That familial atmosphere is something the Westbrooks extend to their customers, too. Everyone is treated like family when they step through the door.  When Grandpa's first opened its doors, the Westbrooks were the only African American family living in Arco. They saw it as an opportunity to build bridges, and even taught a Black history curriculum at the local school.  For this episode, Monica Gokey talks to Lloyd and Loretta Westbrook, co-owners of Grandpa's Southern Bar-B-Q, to learn how they built a thriving barbecue restaurant in the West. Listen to hear how the Westbrooks have learned to use food and friendliness as a vessel to build bridges in their community.

Sevenfold Coaching
When You Are Ready To Clear Your Throat Speak Your Truth | Work Life Video Interviews Oracle Cards

Sevenfold Coaching

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 2:44


The Pandemic led Paulomi Raiji Campbell to start her own business so she can balance her career and personal life. However, she was not feeling steady about starting it, because she was not confident that Southerners would embrace her practice style. Watch as she is encouraged to speak her truth with tips to strengthen her throat chakra. Heard the phrase “work smarter, not harder”? Felicia Miller Johnson is Awe Intuitive Life Coach & Webcaster who encourages people to "Live SMART". She conducts work-life video interviews with career professionals that become an Awe Intuitive Conversation. Awe happens as Felicia asks intuitive questions and channels spiritual intuitive feedback. Awe Intuitive Conversation with Paulomi Campbell on May 3, 2022 Work Life Video Interviews Oracle Cards #worklife #videointerviews #oraclecards

Steel Magnolias - Holding on to the good of The South

TODAY WE ANNOUNCED… OUR FIRST LIVE EVENT! We are doing our first ever LIVE podcast event October 30th at the Franklin Theatre with a very special guest, one of our favorite Southerners, Sean Dietrich, aka Sean of the South… if you know Sean's work then you know this is gonna be a night of songs, storytelling and the nostalgia that blesses our heart immensely. We will get to interview Sean and discuss his new book that releases this fall! We get to do all of this at the historic Franklin Theatre and we've set up a pre-sale link for y'all to grab tickets right now!  Link to buy: https://bit.ly/3wArGS3 Tickets go on sale to the general public this Friday Sept 2.      TENNESSEE WOODWORKS Thank you to our sponsor for this episode- Tennessee Woodworks - they hand craft custom farmhouse style furniture from cutting boards to tables and bedroom furniture. Go check their selection at TennesseeWoodworks.com, and we thank them very much for supporting this show!   COLLEGE FOOTBALL BATTLE CRIES Fall is peaking in! That means FOOTBALL! Some of the battle cries heard at games in the South are pretty unusual, so we are gonna Roll Tide and Gig ‘Em all the way til we Anchor Down!    PREVIOUS EPISODES that we referenced: College Football Traditions: https://steelmagnoliaspodcast.com/episode/college-football-traditions Tailgating in the South: https://steelmagnoliaspodcast.com/episode/tailgating-in-the-south Marching Bands & Majorettes: https://steelmagnoliaspodcast.com/episode/southern-marching-bands-majorettes   Want to connect? Join our Patreon Community of supporters for a Southern Sister Chat BONUS episode, perks and SWAG: https://www.patreon.com/steelmagnolias Sign up for our mailing list: https://mailchi.mp/e3cef217a5e7/sweetnews  Instagram @SteelMagnoliasPodcast Episode Transcript: https://steelmagnoliaspodcast.com

That Pretentious Book Club

Welcome to Season 4 Episode 12 of That Pretentious Book Club! In this episode, the club covers the beautiful novel well-known for its equally beautiful movie adaptation, Brooklyn by Colm Tóibín. Set in the 1950s, when young Irish woman Eilis Lacey ventures to America in search of work for herself and her family, her life changes in ways she never could have expected, but leaving home behind is harder than she thought. While the hosts themselves may be particularly deranged this episode, their takeaways from the book are as potent as ever.  Join the hosts as they find plenty to adore and laugh about it in this gorgeous and inspiring novel.Skippers jump to 41:45Pour yourself a cup of tea, raise a pinky, and join the club for this discussion of Brooklyn.Find this episode's book and more by shopping at https://bookshop.org/shop/storysirensstudio to support the club AND local bookstores!Visit us at storysirensstudio.com or find us on social media @thatpretentiousbookclub.Looking for exclusive TPBC content? Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/storysirensstudioCheck out sister podcast The Scripturient Society for writers!Find Space Aliens, Southerners, and Saving the World  by Ash Leigh O'Rourke on Amazon.Support the show

That Pretentious Book Club
Anne of Green Gables

That Pretentious Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 110:42


Welcome to Season 4 Episode 11 of That Pretentious Book Club! In this episode, the club covers beloved favorite Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery. This Canadian classic has captured the hearts and minds of the cottage-core lovers long before the term came into existence. Join the hosts as they find plenty to adore and laugh about it in this soul-sweet novel.Skippers jump to 22:00Pour yourself a cup of tea, raise a pinky, and join the club for this discussion of Anne of Green Gables.*Please note: this episode contains brief discussion of depression and suicide. If you are struggling with depression or suicidal thoughts, reach out to someone close to you and/or call or text the suicide help line at 988Find this episode's book and more by shopping at https://bookshop.org/shop/storysirensstudio to support the club AND local bookstores!Visit us at storysirensstudio.com or find us on social media @thatpretentiousbookclub.Looking for exclusive TPBC content? Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/storysirensstudioCheck out sister podcast The Scripturient Society for writers!Find Space Aliens, Southerners, and Saving the World  by Ash Leigh O'Rourke on Amazon.Support the show

The Laura Flanders Show
What if a different part of the women's movement had gained more attention?

The Laura Flanders Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 30:00


In 2022, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v Wade, imperiling all women's freedoms, and creating a new pipeline to prison for the vulnerable just as the world is learning how counterproductive most incarceration - solutions are. Today's guests argue that things could have been very different. If the white dominated “choice” movement had paid closer attention to all women's choices, or lack thereof; If anti-violence advocates had rejected criminalization and incarceration as a solution to the violence in women's lives. Things could have been different, our guests argue, if a different part of the US women's movement had gained more attention - attention it is beginning to get now. There has always been such a movement, they know, because they were there. Today we talk to Black abolitionist feminist Beth Richie and Queer southern feminist Suzanne Pharr have worked together, for abolition, feminism, and a systemicly different world for forty years.  What have they learned? And what is their message for us now, when so much hangs in the balance?GuestsSuzanne Pharr, Co-founder, Southerners on New Ground. Author, Transformation: Toward a People's DemocracyBeth Richie, Director, Institute for Research on Race & Public Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago. Author, Compelled to Crime: the Gender Entrapment of Black Battered Women & Abolition. Feminism. Now. note:  this program was recorded January 2022 prior to the US Supreme Court overturning Roe v Wade.

For People with Bishop Rob Wright
A Southerner with Chuck Reece

For People with Bishop Rob Wright

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 31:58


To be southern is to love the south. The good and bad. All that she is. Chuck Reece LOVES the South. But he didn't always. Before Salvation South, Chuck founded The Bitter Southener. No longer bitter, he wanted to show the world the gentler and hopeful South that he experiences. In this episode, Bishop Wright has a conversation with Chuck Reece about the South, her stories of diversity, her goodness, and one of her greatest creations - gumbo. A dish that came together because of the influences of immigrants in the south. A dish that displays diversity both in history and flavor. Listen in for the full conversation. A word from Chuck about Salvation South.My name is Chuck Reece. You might remember me as the founding editor-in-chief of a publication called The Bitter Southerner. But I'm not bitter anymore.What I am is hopeful. Some might say to be hopeful is to be nuts, in these times when it seems everybody has picked one side or another, locked themselves in, and just want to yell at each other. But I know a lot of people who would rather do something different: They want to talk. And these people — the ones who want to have conversations that might bring a little more peace into this world — need a place of their own.My talented wife Stacy and I created Salvation South for that kind of people.Salvation South is inspired by hope and healing and — most importantly — the desire to create a place on the web and a community of people where civil conversation can happen.Read Salvation South: https://www.salvationsouth.com/

Beard Laws Podcast
TTT Show | He Stole The Wrong Duffle Bag and Arcade Game For Pig Lovers | S02EP32

Beard Laws Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 65:16


Does anyone like merch? We have some especially those sick TTT Findlay hats. Check them out https://beardlaws.com/findlay This week TTT Show is back and going to show you some of if not the best TikToks you have ever seen. He Stole The Wrong Duffle Bag at least for most people. Toby I think might actually have this duffle bag. Allegedly. Arcade Game For Pig Lovers. This has to be a game that was designed for Southerners. (No offense) TTT Show is a podcast/live show where Beard Laws, Toby (tobynangel, theycallemetoby2), Yuban Whakinov, and Richie Tatum showcase the best TikTok videos all in one show. Beard Laws and the boys find videos and the amazing viewers submit them as well. Support our friends of the show (if you want) Copper Johns Beard Company: https://lddy.no/1c3fvPopdarts - https://popdartsgame.com/?ref=beardlawsMustache Mate - https://mustachemate.com/Bones Coffee (Code BEARDLAWS) - https://www.bonescoffee.com/Brio 4 Life - https://bit.ly/3QDvoCeSolo Stove - https://www.solostove.com/en-us?rfsn=5739395.3bd95eFindlay Hats (Code BEARDLAWS) - https://www.findlayhats.com/Lori Wall Beds - https://www.loriwallbeds.com/?aff=52 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beardlaws/support

The Jeffersonian Tradition
Episode 127 Northern Treason? (Jefferson and Jacobinism)

The Jeffersonian Tradition

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 19:42


Howdy everyone, and thanks again for tuning in to The Jeffersonian Tradition. In today's episode, we wrap up this portion of the study of The War for Southern Independence in the long view by looking at what Timothy Pickering thought of Southerners and the common man in the wake of the Louisiana Purchase. If you want me to cover a topic or elaborate further on any given episode, then reach out to me through the show's private MeWe group, or by contacting me at the show email address, which is mrjeffersonian@outlook.com. If you find value in the podcast, please consider becoming a supporting listener. One-time contributions can be sent to the show's cash app, http://cash.app/$MrJeffersonian . Recurring contributions can be made through the Anchor supporting listener link. Thanks again for tuning in to The Jeffersonian Tradition! Sign up for MeWe today: https://mewe.com. Fuel the Jeffersonian Revolution today and buy your goldbacks here: Defy the Grid. Help us out with Little Miss Jeffersonian HERE --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mr-jeffersonian/support

That Pretentious Book Club
Midnight for Charlie Bone (Children of the Red King, #1)

That Pretentious Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 63:21


Welcome to Season #4 Episode #10 of That Pretentious Book Club! In this episode, the club covers listener-recommendation Midnight for Charlie Bone, the first book in the Children of the Red King series by Jenny Nimmo. This middle-grade urban fantasy offers strong Harry Potter vibes with a quick, snappy writing style that keeps the plot moving for a quick read you can't put down. A great choice to recommend to any middle grade reader or lover of middle grade fiction, this is a book Wheezy would have been obsessed with as a twelve-year-old. Join the hosts as they find plenty to laugh about both on and off topic in this delightfully bookish episode.Skippers jump to 20:48Pour yourself a cup of tea, raise a pinky, and join the club for this discussion of Midnight for Charlie Bone.Find this episode's book and more by shopping at https://bookshop.org/shop/storysirensstudio to support the club AND local bookstores!Visit us at storysirensstudio.com or find us on social media @thatpretentiousbookclub.Looking for exclusive TPBC content? Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/storysirensstudioCheck out sister podcast The Scripturient Society for writers!Find Space Aliens, Southerners, and Saving the World  by Ash Leigh O'Rourke on Amazon.The Short Box: A Comic Book Podcast Join four lifelong friends for entertaining discussions about comics and culture.Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Business RadioX ® Network
Don Ross and Tara Gilbert-Ross, The Boujee Southerner Experience, and Samantha McElhaney, SouthState Bank

Business RadioX ® Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022


Don Ross and Tara Gilbert-Ross, The Boujee Southerner Experience, and Samantha McElhaney, SouthState Bank (Family Business Radio, Episode 35) Host Anthony Chen profiled Don Ross and Tara Gilbert-Ross, The Boujee Southerner Experience, and banker Samantha McElhaney, SouthState Bank, on this edition of “Family Business Radio.” Don and Tara discussed their journey as entrepreneurs, their military […]

Family Business Radio
Don Ross and Tara Gilbert-Ross, The Boujee Southerner Experience, and Samantha McElhaney, SouthState Bank

Family Business Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022


Don Ross and Tara Gilbert-Ross, The Boujee Southerner Experience, and Samantha McElhaney, SouthState Bank (Family Business Radio, Episode 35) Host Anthony Chen profiled Don Ross and Tara Gilbert-Ross, The Boujee Southerner Experience, and banker Samantha McElhaney, SouthState Bank, on this edition of “Family Business Radio.” Don and Tara discussed their journey as entrepreneurs, their military […] The post Don Ross and Tara Gilbert-Ross, The Boujee Southerner Experience, and Samantha McElhaney, SouthState Bank appeared first on Business RadioX ®.

That Pretentious Book Club
The Importance of Being Earnest

That Pretentious Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 66:00


Welcome to Season #4 Episode #9 of That Pretentious Book Club! In this episode, the club covers all-time favorite and one of the most objectively hilarious plays ever written, The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde. This truly hysterical three-act play is rife with satire and vibrant yet nonsensical characters that make for what feels like a completely frivolous and yet deeply clever story both on the page and on the stage. Join the hosts as they discuss the merits of a cult dedicated to Oscar Wilde and all the bookish comedy bestowed by him and others that make laughter positively irresistible.Skippers jump to 15:35Pour yourself a cup of tea, raise a pinky, and join the club for this discussion of The Importance of Being Earnest.Find this episode's book and more by shopping at https://bookshop.org/shop/storysirensstudio to support the club AND local bookstores!Visit us at storysirensstudio.com or find us on social media @thatpretentiousbookclub.Looking for exclusive TPBC content? Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/storysirensstudioCheck out sister podcast The Scripturient Society for writers!Find Space Aliens, Southerners, and Saving the World  by Ash Leigh O'Rourke on Amazon.Support the show

Tara Talks
132: How to go from invisible to irresistible in the workplace

Tara Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 37:19


This episode is a little different as it's focused on the employee rather than the business owner!Today, I'm joined by Chellie Phillips. Chellie is a sweet-tea-sipping, sassy Southerner with a passion for helping dynamic, career-minded professionals stand out for all the right reasons. She's a coach, corporate trainer and motivational speaker, as well as the author of two books: When In Doubt, Delete It! and Get Noticed, Get Hired. Her Successfully Ever After™ formula is designed to make you irresistible in the workforce. Whether you're looking to land an ideal career, perfectly matched to your skillset so work feels more like a “get to” than a “got to,” or you want to create a culture where employees thrive, she'll show you how personal branding sets you up for success.In this episode we discuss,1. No one will pay you what you're worth, only what they think you're worth. Great news - you control what they think. 2. Your personal brand isn't just social media. 3. Personal branding can help you move your career forward. 4. You must be intentional about brand building. If not, someone else will be curating your brand. Connect with Chellie online - https://www.facebook.com/chellie.phillipshttps://www.facebook.com/chelliephttps://www.linkedin.com/in/chellie-phillips/https://www.instagram.com/chellie_phillips/https://www.pinterest.com/chellie_phttps://twitter.com/p_chelliehttps://www.chelliephillips.com/planner

The Southern Fork
Vishwesh Bhatt: Snackbar (Oxford, MS)

The Southern Fork

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 33:45


Vishwesh Bhatt has been a part of Chef John Currence's City Grocery Restaurant Group in Oxford, MS since 1997. He started off as a prep cook at City Grocery and worked his way up to Executive Chef at Snackbar, where he has developed a menu that intertwines both Southern and subcontinental foodways. His new cookbook, I Am From Here: Stories and Recipes from a Southern Chef, celebrates and explores this intertwining of cultures through his own unique personal lens, and it was masterfully photographed by past guest Angie Mosier. Vish was Southern Living's 2019 Southerner of the Year and that same year won James Beard Foundation Best Chef: South. I wanted to catch up with him on his debut week before it took months for our paths to cross, but as is sometimes the case in the life of an independent podcast, my fancy remote recording equipment went wonky because of our respective locations, so we resorted to an old fashioned phone call. It was nevertheless a wonderful conversation, as you'll soon hear.

Vox Vomitus
Sarah McCraw Crow, author of "Wrong Kind of Woman"

Vox Vomitus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 56:28


Episode 102 Sarah McCraw Crow is the author of the novel The Wrong Kind of Woman (MIRA Books, October 6, 2020). She is a longtime magazine writer, editor, and book reviewer, and her articles, essays, and reviews have run in BookPage, The Christian Science Monitor, Prime Number, Family Circle, Ladies' Home Journal, Parents, Parenting, American Baby, Baby Talk, and Working Mother, among others. Her short fiction has won prizes from So to Speak and Good Housekeeping, and her stories have been honored as contest finalists by Press 53, New Letters, Yemasee, and Stanford Alumni Magazine. As a child, Sarah lived in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and Texas as her dad finished his medical training and served in the military, but she did most of her growing up in Virginia. For the past twenty years, she has called New Hampshire home. She lives with her husband and three almost-grown children on an old farm, where she gardens in the summer and snowshoes in the winter, if there's snow. And although she's a transplanted Southerner, she has come to realize that temperamentally, she's a northern New Englander. She is a graduate of Dartmouth College (AB, history), Stanford University (MA, journalism), and Vermont College of Fine Arts (MFA in writing), and she's a member of Grub Street, Boston, and the National Book Critics Circle. VOX VOMITUS: Sometimes, it's not what goes right in the writing process, it's what goes horribly wrong. Host/Literary horror novelist Jennifer Anne Gordon with help from her co-host/author Allison Martine, chat with some of the best authors of the day. www.jenniferannegordon.com www.afictionalhubbard.com https://www.facebook.com/VoxVomituspodcast https://twitter.com/VoxVomitus #voxvomitus #voxvomituspodcast #authorswhopodcast #authors #authorlife #authorsoninstagram #authorsinterviewingauthors #livevideopodcast #livepodcast #bookstagram #liveauthorinterview #voxvomituslivevideopodcast #Jennifergordon #AllisonMartine #JenniferAnneGordon #AllisonMartineHubbard #AllisonHubbard #SarahMcCrawCrow #WrongKindofWoman --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/voxvomitus/support

That Pretentious Book Club

Welcome to Season #4 Episode #8 of That Pretentious Book Club! In this episode, the club covers childhood-favorite Inkheart by Cornelia Funke. This famous middle-grade fantasy originally written in German is a world-renowned children's tale rife with danger, magic, and adventure - the likes of which has never been seen in a children's fantasy book before. Join the hosts as they gush, fangirl, and laugh about all of things thatmake this read a scholastic book fair and all-time favorite.Skippers jump to 13:50 Pour yourself a cup of tea, raise a pinky, and join the club for this discussion of Inkheart.Find this episode's book and more by shopping at https://bookshop.org/shop/storysirensstudio to support the club AND local bookstores!Visit us at storysirensstudio.com or find us on social media @thatpretentiousbookclub.Looking for exclusive TPBC content? Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/storysirensstudioCheck out sister podcast The Scripturient Society for writers!Find Space Aliens, Southerners, and Saving the World  by Ash Leigh O'Rourke on Amazon.Support the show

Book Marketing Success Podcast
Sara Cannon: Get Out Quickly

Book Marketing Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 1:20


Sara Cannon shares a quick little Southern phrase that will help you get off a phone call or Zoom session or even an awkward in-person meeting—especially when you don’t have a ready excuse to leave.Here’s the powerful little phrase that polite Southerners use: “Well, let me let you go.”Easy-peasy, yes?Try it sometime when you need to extricate yourself from a boring meeting or a lengthy Zoom session or a phone call that simply won’t end.You’ll be amazed by how more effective your book marketing will be when you move on from a boring meeting or an ineffective phone call. Move on with a simple little phrase, “Well, let me let you go.”Book Marketing Success is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.Resources from John KremerBook Marketing Bestsellers website: https://www.bookmarketingbestsellers.com1001 Ways to Market Your Books: https://amzn.to/3ICjpAsBook Title Critiques by John Kremer: https://bookmarketingbestsellers.com/book-title-critiquesBook me as a podcast guest or be a guest for my podcast. Connect here: https://www.matchmaker.fm/podcast-guest/john-kremer-bd46ecCheck out my LinkTree: https://linktr.ee/bookmarketingAsk me a question and I'll answer back with a video: https://snipfeed.co/bookmarketing/shoutouts/U2hvdXRvdXQ6NjIxZjBmNDFkNTVjODUwMDIzZWQxMzk5Become my patron to support all my book marketing work, especially the Billion Book Initiative: https://www.patreon.com/bookmarketingJoin my Book Marketing Success Group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/BookMarketingSuccessStories This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit bookmarketing.substack.com/subscribe

Louisiana Insider
Episode 95: In Search of Places Worth Saving

Louisiana Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 40:42


Some of the state's most interesting places were built for everyday people to do great things. There were the Rosenwald Schools built by a wealthy Southerner who, in the pre-Civil Rights days, wanted to provide settings for Black kids to have a better learning environment. A couple hundred were built in Louisiana each including classroom buildings and two houses for the teachers. Elsewhere, there were also churches and office buildings some deigned with an extra flourish, begging for re-use today. Brian Davis, the Executive Director for the Louisiana Trust for Historic Preservation joins Louisiana Life Executive Editor Errol Laborde, along with podcast producer Kelly Massicot to talk about the Trust's latest endangered building list each with a great history. Oh yes, we will also hear about a building that Davis personally helped save. He lives in it now.

The PT Podcast
Episode 41 - What Do Southerners Do That We Find HILARIOUS???

The PT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 40:57


Episode 41 - What Do Southerners Do That We Find HILARIOUS??? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theawkwardtapes/support

That Pretentious Book Club
The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (The Chronicles of Narnia, #1)

That Pretentious Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 115:23


Welcome to Season #4 Episode #7 of That Pretentious Book Club! In this episode, the club covers listener recommendation and all-time favorite, The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis. This first book in The Chronicles of Narnia series remains one of the most beloved  stories for children and adults alike, from magical fantasy lands to surprising allies, complex sibling relationships and more, this story offers layers and layers of meaning - as well as plenty to laugh about (at least if you're the hosts). Join the hosts as they step through the wardrobe into a book it would be a dream to live.Skippers jump to 21:05Pour yourself a cup of tea, raise a pinky, and join the club for this discussion of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.Find this episode's book and more by shopping at https://bookshop.org/shop/storysirensstudio to support the club AND local bookstores!Visit us at storysirensstudio.com or find us on social media @thatpretentiousbookclub.Looking for exclusive TPBC content? Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/storysirensstudioCheck out sister podcast The Scripturient Society for writers!Find Space Aliens, Southerners, and Saving the World  by Ash Leigh O'Rourke on Amazon.Smells Like HumansLike spending time with funny friends talking about curious human behavior. Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify School Reading ListThe School Reading List Podcast - presented by Tom Tolkien.Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

The Nerve! Conversations with Movement Elders
Mapping Activist Lineages: Mandy Carter & Chasyn Carter

The Nerve! Conversations with Movement Elders

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 31:39


Mandy Carter is co-founder of Southerners on New Ground and a proud Black southern lesbian. She traces the activist influences through her movement work with Chasyn, a dynamic youth organizer in North Carolina.

The Ryan Kelley Morning After
07-19-22 Segment 1 Ken's Memory Maze

The Ryan Kelley Morning After

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 103:21 Transcription Available


Juan Soto, how do you do? Albert couldn't vanquish the future Cardinal. It was honestly fun to watch. Iggy was happy to see Albert happy. Albert could be a tad prickly with the media back in the day, but that wasn't indictive of his personality. Big Mac was somewhat similar. Iggy understands what it's like to be bombarded by the media. Early days of internet cybering. Someone comes after Plowsy for his Tiger football takes. Iggy's former mustache. Which one is Pepper and which one is Geenie? Favorite career moments was the topic de jour yesterday on P & G. Plowsy's origin story. Recovering Alcoholic. Chris Naegel Monday qualified again for the 3M Open in Minnesota. This Naegel is hot, hot, hot. He's got that instinct. Doug is the Jack W. Nicklaus of the DFS Showdown. Throw a little cash on Naegel. PGA Tour twitter account showing Naegel some love. Cam Smith's up and down on 17 on Sunday. How is the hinge situation in Minneapolis? Iggy then spins a yarn about sleeping with a Viking cheerleader. Southerners and Northerners. Doug's life in Miami. Where would you want to live in Florida? Tim will bring us stuff from MIA. How long does it take to get to Little Rock? Iggy's tales of spring break. Prod Joe claims the Minnesota Vikings didn't have cheerleaders until 1984. Now it's getting uncomfortable. Trivia Night finna be a pony. St. Gabe's Gymnasium. Now Iggy is being questioned about when he graduated high school. “It's quite obvious someone is being lied too”. Larry Nickel joins us for the WWE Recap. Michael Wellington joins the presentation. Iggy's academic career. Ken would take his financial aid and use it for spring break. Welly talks about the run of the Monday qualifiers Naegel is on. Welly claims the hinge situation in Tahoe was choice. “Gentleman” Doug Vaughn. Welly is looking forward to meeting a Nordic woman. Tim's situation with a looper at Algonquin. Iggy claims to be fired as a caddy at Westborough. Michael talks about what it takes to compete at this level for Naegel.

That Pretentious Book Club
The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

That Pretentious Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 83:24


Welcome to Season #4 Episode #6 of That Pretentious Book Club! In this episode, the club covers listener recommendation The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows. This epistolary novel reads like the wind, full to the brim of sparkling wit, vivid characters, and themes of recovery and growth following extreme adversity - in this case, World War II. Set in England following the war, this book offers a beautifully aesthetic-yet-realistic view of post-war London and the channel islands, offering insight into the German occupation the way it affected real, everyday people, all while revealing the power of reading to bring people out of darkness. Join the hosts as they dive into this impeccably written novel, finding plenty to laugh about and even more to be moved by in this book that everyone should read at least once.Skippers jump to 24:43 Pour yourself a cup of tea, raise a pinky, and join the club for this discussion of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.Find this episode's book and more by shopping at https://bookshop.org/shop/storysirensstudio to support the club AND local bookstores!Visit us at storysirensstudio.com or find us on social media @thatpretentiousbookclub.Looking for exclusive TPBC content? Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/storysirensstudioCheck out sister podcast The Scripturient Society for writers!Find Space Aliens, Southerners, and Saving the World  by Ash Leigh O'Rourke on Amazon.Visit SHEPODCASTSLIVE.com and use the code PBC to get $50 off your ticket!SERVER CHAT UNCENSOREDI WILL BE TALKING ABOUT THE SERVER INDUSTRY THE HIGH AND THE LOWS THE TIPPING, GUEST...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Two Lit ChicksLike desert island discs, but for books. Join hosts Jen Hyatt and Julia Boggio...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Sharp & Benning
July 18 Seg 1 Cameron Smith, Australian or Stylish Southerner?

Sharp & Benning

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 23:21


Gary Sharp and Damon Benning host weekday mornings 6 am - 10 am on 1620 the Zone.

Teaching What It Takes ®
I’M BLACK; YOU’RE WHITE–NOW WHAT [Ep. 22] What’s the history of slavery in the North? Teaching What It Takes

Teaching What It Takes ®

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 72:32


Special guest, Barbara Rimkunas, Co-Executive Director of the Exeter Historical Society, unveils stunning evidence of white New Hampshire residence owning Black slaves both before and after the Emancipation Proclamation. Hear why "Southerners owned slaves, but Northerners didn't" is an overgeneralization we need to confront and understand.

That Pretentious Book Club
A Midsummer Night's Dream

That Pretentious Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 65:08


Welcome to Season #4 Episode #5 of That Pretentious Book Club! In this episode, the club covers a favorite of many by William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream. From short girl power to utterly absurd conflict premises and fangirling over these fae in particular, this story has plenty to offer - even to Shakespeare skeptics. Join the hosts as they dive into this ridiculous and whimsical play, finding plenty to laugh about in this authentically comedic comedy.Skippers jump to 20:12Pour yourself a cup of tea, raise a pinky, and join the club for this discussion of A Midsummer Night's Dream.*please note: there are some audio quality issues with this episode, but fear not! Next episode our audio quality should be restored to pristine condition.Find this episode's book and more by shopping at https://bookshop.org/shop/storysirensstudio to support the club AND local bookstores!Visit us at storysirensstudio.com or find us on social media @thatpretentiousbookclub.Looking for exclusive TPBC content? Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/storysirensstudioCheck out sister podcast The Scripturient Society for writers!Find Space Aliens, Southerners, and Saving the World  by Ash Leigh O'Rourke on Amazon.Smells Like HumansLike spending time with funny friends talking about curious human behavior. Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Dip Down Games & AnimeThere will be anime tears and gaming rage, but it will always be funny here at Dip Down!Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify SERVER CHAT UNCENSOREDI WILL BE TALKING ABOUT THE SERVER INDUSTRY THE HIGH AND THE LOWS THE TIPPING, GUEST...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 4, 2022 is: Yankee • YANG-kee • noun Yankee can refer broadly to anyone born or living in the U.S., or it can refer more narrowly only to those in the northern U.S., or even more narrowly, only to those in the states of New England. The broadest use is especially common outside the U.S. // It took the children some time to adjust to being the only Southerners in a classroom full of Yankees. See the entry > Examples: "We're pretty good here in Vermont about being mindful about recycling. It is in our genes. Depression-era residents used to keep everything, from small jars for nails, to the nails themselves after they were retrieved from old boards. That Yankee ingenuity absolutely comes from the resourcefulness and ability not to waste anything." — editorial, The Rutland (Vermont) Herald, 31 May 2022 Did you know? We don't know the origin of Yankee but we do know that it began as an insult. British General James Wolfe used the term in a 1758 letter to express his low opinion of the New England troops assigned to him, and from around the same time period there is a report of British troops using Yankee as a term of abuse for the citizens of Boston. In 1775, however, after the battles of Lexington and Concord showed that colonials could stand up to British regulars, Yankee was proudly adopted by colonials as a self-descriptor in defiance of the pejorative use. Both derisive and respectable uses have existed ever since.

BATCH, A Bitter Southerner Podcast
The Bitter Southerner introduces BATCH. Episode 1 : The Difference Between Happiness And Joy.

BATCH, A Bitter Southerner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 40:37


Finally, The Bitter Southerner returns to your ears, your mind, your heart… with BATCH. Yep, we're digging into our archives to read and record batches of our favorite stories; the stories you love. In BATCH #1, we focus on food - how we make it, how we feel about it, and in episode #1, how a meal can change or sometimes save a life. Travel with us to Brewton, AL and a restaurant unlike any other, run by an incredible woman doing everything she can to make a difference. Listen to “The Difference Between Happiness and Joy” - Written and read by Jennifer Kornegay. Credits Hosted by Kyle Tibbs Jones Produced by Ryan Engelberger Engineered by Kayla Dover and Kyle Gassiot Featuring original music by Curt Castle Recorded at Chase Park Transduction, Troy Public Radio and Tweed Recording

BATCH, A Bitter Southerner Podcast
Teaser for Season 1 of BATCH: A Bitter Southerner Podcast

BATCH, A Bitter Southerner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 2:33


Finally, The Bitter Southerner returns to your ears, your mind, your heart… with the first episode of our new podcast : BATCH. Yep, we're digging into our archives to read and record batches of our favorite stories; the stories' you all love. In BATCH #1, we'll focus on food - how we make it, how we feel about it, and in episode #1, how a meal can change or sometimes save a life. We start in Brewton, AL at a restaurant unlike any other, run by an incredible woman doing everything she can to make a difference. Listen to “The Difference Between Happiness and Joy” - Written and read by Jennifer Kornegay. Welcome to BATCH, y'all. Credits Hosted by Kyle Tibbs Jones Produced by Ryan Engelberger Engineered by Kayla Dover and Kyle Gassiot Featuring original music by Curt Castle Recorded at Chase Park Transduction, Troy Public Radio and Tweed Recording

Sweet Tea & TV
Designing Women S3 E4 - A Little Long on Drywall, And A Little Short On Studs

Sweet Tea & TV

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 83:07


Cue the wedding bells: Bernice is getting married, and to a local “celebrity” no less. But our gals are preoccupied with other things: they all hate their “wedding costumes”, Suzanne is PMS-ing again, and Julia is stark-raving mad about another news article hatin' on Southerners. Stick around for this week's “Extra Sugar”, where we play a word association game about Southern traditions.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 150: “All You Need is Love” by the Beatles

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


This week's episode looks at “All You Need is Love”, the Our World TV special, and the career of the Beatles from April 1966 through August 1967. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a thirteen-minute bonus episode available, on "Rain" by the Beatles. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ NB for the first few hours this was up, there was a slight editing glitch. If you downloaded the old version and don't want to redownload the whole thing, just look in the transcript for "Other than fixing John's two flubbed" for the text of the two missing paragraphs. Errata I say "Come Together" was a B-side, but the single was actually a double A-side. Also, I say the Lennon interview by Maureen Cleave appeared in Detroit magazine. That's what my source (Steve Turner's book) says, but someone on Twitter says that rather than Detroit magazine it was the Detroit Free Press. Also at one point I say "the videos for 'Paperback Writer' and 'Penny Lane'". I meant to say "Rain" rather than "Penny Lane" there. Resources No Mixcloud this week due to the number of songs by the Beatles. I have read literally dozens of books on the Beatles, and used bits of information from many of them. All my Beatles episodes refer to: The Complete Beatles Chronicle by Mark Lewisohn, All The Songs: The Stories Behind Every Beatles Release by Jean-Michel Guesdon, And The Band Begins To Play: The Definitive Guide To The Songs of The Beatles by Steve Lambley, The Beatles By Ear by Kevin Moore, Revolution in the Head by Ian MacDonald, and The Beatles Anthology. For this episode, I also referred to Last Interview by David Sheff, a longform interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono from shortly before Lennon's death; Many Years From Now by Barry Miles, an authorised biography of Paul McCartney; and Here, There, and Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of the Beatles by Geoff Emerick and Howard Massey. Particularly useful this time was Steve Turner's book Beatles '66. I also used Turner's The Beatles: The Stories Behind the Songs 1967-1970. Johnny Rogan's Starmakers and Svengalis had some information on Epstein I hadn't seen anywhere else. Some information about the "Bigger than Jesus" scandal comes from Ward, B. (2012). “The ‘C' is for Christ”: Arthur Unger, Datebook Magazine and the Beatles. Popular Music and Society, 35(4), 541-560. https://doi.org/10.1080/03007766.2011.608978 Information on Robert Stigwood comes from Mr Showbiz by Stephen Dando-Collins. And the quote at the end from Simon Napier-Bell is from You Don't Have to Say You Love Me, which is more entertaining than it is accurate, but is very entertaining. Sadly the only way to get the single mix of "All You Need is Love" is on this ludicrously-expensive out-of-print box set, but the stereo mix is easily available on Magical Mystery Tour. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before I start the episode -- this episode deals, in part, with the deaths of three gay men -- one by murder, one by suicide, and one by an accidental overdose, all linked at least in part to societal homophobia. I will try to deal with this as tactfully as I can, but anyone who's upset by those things might want to read the transcript instead of listening to the episode. This is also a very, very, *very* long episode -- this is likely to be the longest episode I *ever* do of this podcast, so settle in. We're going to be here a while. I obviously don't know how long it's going to be while I'm still recording, but based on the word count of my script, probably in the region of three hours. You have been warned. In 1967 the actor Patrick McGoohan was tired. He had been working on the hit series Danger Man for many years -- Danger Man had originally run from 1960 through 1962, then had taken a break, and had come back, retooled, with longer episodes in 1964. That longer series was a big hit, both in the UK and in the US, where it was retitled Secret Agent and had a new theme tune written by PF Sloan and Steve Barri and recorded by Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But McGoohan was tired of playing John Drake, the agent, and announced he was going to quit the series. Instead, with the help of George Markstein, Danger Man's script editor, he created a totally new series, in which McGoohan would star, and which McGoohan would also write and direct key episodes of. This new series, The Prisoner, featured a spy who is only ever given the name Number Six, and who many fans -- though not McGoohan himself -- took to be the same character as John Drake. Number Six resigns from his job as a secret agent, and is kidnapped and taken to a place known only as The Village -- the series was filmed in Portmeirion, an unusual-looking town in Gwynnedd, in North Wales -- which is full of other ex-agents. There he is interrogated to try to find out why he has quit his job. It's never made clear whether the interrogators are his old employers or their enemies, and there's a certain suggestion that maybe there is no real distinction between the two sides, that they're both running the Village together. He spends the entire series trying to escape, but refuses to explain himself -- and there's some debate among viewers as to whether it's implied or not that part of the reason he doesn't explain himself is that he knows his interrogators wouldn't understand why he quit: [Excerpt: The Prisoner intro, from episode Once Upon a Time, ] Certainly that explanation would fit in with McGoohan's own personality. According to McGoohan, the final episode of The Prisoner was, at the time, the most watched TV show ever broadcast in the UK, as people tuned in to find out the identity of Number One, the person behind the Village, and to see if Number Six would break free. I don't think that's actually the case, but it's what McGoohan always claimed, and it was certainly a very popular series. I won't spoil the ending for those of you who haven't watched it -- it's a remarkable series -- but ultimately the series seems to decide that such questions don't matter and that even asking them is missing the point. It's a work that's open to multiple interpretations, and is left deliberately ambiguous, but one of the messages many people have taken away from it is that not only are we trapped by a society that oppresses us, we're also trapped by our own identities. You can run from the trap that society has placed you in, from other people's interpretations of your life, your work, and your motives, but you ultimately can't run from yourself, and any time you try to break out of a prison, you'll find yourself trapped in another prison of your own making. The most horrifying implication of the episode is that possibly even death itself won't be a release, and you will spend all eternity trying to escape from an identity you're trapped in. Viewers became so outraged, according to McGoohan, that he had to go into hiding for an extended period, and while his later claims that he never worked in Britain again are an exaggeration, it is true that for the remainder of his life he concentrated on doing work in the US instead, where he hadn't created such anger. That final episode of The Prisoner was also the only one to use a piece of contemporary pop music, in two crucial scenes: [Excerpt: The Prisoner, "Fall Out", "All You Need is Love"] Back in October 2020, we started what I thought would be a year-long look at the period from late 1962 through early 1967, but which has turned out for reasons beyond my control to take more like twenty months, with a song which was one of the last of the big pre-Beatles pop hits, though we looked at it after their first single, "Telstar" by the Tornadoes: [Excerpt: The Tornadoes, "Telstar"] There were many reasons for choosing that as one of the bookends for this fifty-episode chunk of the podcast -- you'll see many connections between that episode and this one if you listen to them back-to-back -- but among them was that it's a song inspired by the launch of the first ever communications satellite, and a sign of how the world was going to become smaller as the sixties went on. Of course, to start with communications satellites didn't do much in that regard -- they were expensive to use, and had limited bandwidth, and were only available during limited time windows, but symbolically they meant that for the first time ever, people could see and hear events thousands of miles away as they were happening. It's not a coincidence that Britain and France signed the agreement to develop Concorde, the first supersonic airliner, a month after the first Beatles single and four months after the Telstar satellite was launched. The world was becoming ever more interconnected -- people were travelling faster and further, getting news from other countries quicker, and there was more cultural conversation – and misunderstanding – between countries thousands of miles apart. The Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan, the man who also coined the phrase “the medium is the message”, thought that this ever-faster connection would fundamentally change basic modes of thought in the Western world. McLuhan thought that technology made possible whole new modes of thought, and that just as the printing press had, in his view, caused Western liberalism and individualism, so these new electronic media would cause the rise of a new collective mode of thought. In 1962, the year of Concorde, Telstar, and “Love Me Do”, McLuhan wrote a book called The Gutenberg Galaxy, in which he said: “Instead of tending towards a vast Alexandrian library the world has become a computer, an electronic brain, exactly as an infantile piece of science fiction. And as our senses have gone outside us, Big Brother goes inside. So, unless aware of this dynamic, we shall at once move into a phase of panic terrors, exactly befitting a small world of tribal drums, total interdependence, and superimposed co-existence.… Terror is the normal state of any oral society, for in it everything affects everything all the time.…” He coined the term “the Global Village” to describe this new collectivism. The story we've seen over the last fifty episodes is one of a sort of cultural ping-pong between the USA and the UK, with innovations in American music inspiring British musicians, who in turn inspired American ones, whether that being the Beatles covering the Isley Brothers or the Rolling Stones doing a Bobby Womack song, or Paul Simon and Bob Dylan coming over to the UK and learning folk songs and guitar techniques from Martin Carthy. And increasingly we're going to see those influences spread to other countries, and influences coming *from* other countries. We've already seen one Jamaican artist, and the influence of Indian music has become very apparent. While the focus of this series is going to remain principally in the British Isles and North America, rock music was and is a worldwide phenomenon, and that's going to become increasingly a part of the story. And so in this episode we're going to look at a live performance -- well, mostly live -- that was seen by hundreds of millions of people all over the world as it happened, thanks to the magic of satellites: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "All You Need is Love"] When we left the Beatles, they had just finished recording "Tomorrow Never Knows", the most experimental track they had recorded up to that date, and if not the most experimental thing they *ever* recorded certainly in the top handful. But "Tomorrow Never Knows" was only the first track they recorded in the sessions for what would become arguably their greatest album, and certainly the one that currently has the most respect from critics. It's interesting to note that that album could have been very, very, different. When we think of Revolver now, we think of the innovative production of George Martin, and of Geoff Emerick and Ken Townshend's inventive ideas for pushing the sound of the equipment in Abbey Road studios, but until very late in the day the album was going to be recorded in the Stax studios in Memphis, with Steve Cropper producing -- whether George Martin would have been involved or not is something we don't even know. In 1965, the Rolling Stones had, as we've seen, started making records in the US, recording in LA and at the Chess studios in Chicago, and the Yardbirds had also been doing the same thing. Mick Jagger had become a convert to the idea of using American studios and working with American musicians, and he had constantly been telling Paul McCartney that the Beatles should do the same. Indeed, they'd put some feelers out in 1965 about the possibility of the group making an album with Holland, Dozier, and Holland in Detroit. Quite how this would have worked is hard to figure out -- Holland, Dozier, and Holland's skills were as songwriters, and in their work with a particular set of musicians -- so it's unsurprising that came to nothing. But recording at Stax was a different matter.  While Steve Cropper was a great songwriter in his own right, he was also adept at getting great sounds on covers of other people's material -- like on Otis Blue, the album he produced for Otis Redding in late 1965, which doesn't include a single Cropper original: [Excerpt: Otis Redding, "Satisfaction"] And the Beatles were very influenced by the records Stax were putting out, often namechecking Wilson Pickett in particular, and during the Rubber Soul sessions they had recorded a "Green Onions" soundalike track, imaginatively titled "12-Bar Original": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "12-Bar Original"] The idea of the group recording at Stax got far enough that they were actually booked in for two weeks starting the ninth of April, and there was even an offer from Elvis to let them stay at Graceland while they recorded, but then a couple of weeks earlier, the news leaked to the press, and Brian Epstein cancelled the booking. According to Cropper, Epstein talked about recording at the Atlantic studios in New York with him instead, but nothing went any further. It's hard to imagine what a Stax-based Beatles album would have been like, but even though it might have been a great album, it certainly wouldn't have been the Revolver we've come to know. Revolver is an unusual album in many ways, and one of the ways it's most distinct from the earlier Beatles albums is the dominance of keyboards. Both Lennon and McCartney had often written at the piano as well as the guitar -- McCartney more so than Lennon, but both had done so regularly -- but up to this point it had been normal for them to arrange the songs for guitars rather than keyboards, no matter how they'd started out. There had been the odd track where one of them, usually Lennon, would play a simple keyboard part, songs like "I'm Down" or "We Can Work it Out", but even those had been guitar records first and foremost. But on Revolver, that changed dramatically. There seems to have been a complex web of cause and effect here. Paul was becoming increasingly interested in moving his basslines away from simple walking basslines and root notes and the other staples of rock and roll basslines up to this point. As the sixties progressed, rock basslines were becoming ever more complex, and Tyler Mahan Coe has made a good case that this is largely down to innovations in production pioneered by Owen Bradley, and McCartney was certainly aware of Bradley's work -- he was a fan of Brenda Lee, who Bradley produced, for example. But the two influences that McCartney has mentioned most often in this regard are the busy, jazz-influenced, basslines that James Jamerson was playing at Motown: [Excerpt: The Four Tops, "It's the Same Old Song"] And the basslines that Brian Wilson was writing for various Wrecking Crew bassists to play for the Beach Boys: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Don't Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder)"] Just to be clear, McCartney didn't hear that particular track until partway through the recording of Revolver, when Bruce Johnston visited the UK and brought with him an advance copy of Pet Sounds, but Pet Sounds influenced the later part of Revolver's recording, and Wilson had already started his experiments in that direction with the group's 1965 work. It's much easier to write a song with this kind of bassline, one that's integral to the composition, on the piano than it is to write it on a guitar, as you can work out the bassline with your left hand while working out the chords and melody with your right, so the habit that McCartney had already developed of writing on the piano made this easier. But also, starting with the recording of "Paperback Writer", McCartney switched his style of working in the studio. Where up to this point it had been normal for him to play bass as part of the recording of the basic track, playing with the other Beatles, he now started to take advantage of multitracking to overdub his bass later, so he could spend extra time getting the bassline exactly right. McCartney lived closer to Abbey Road than the other three Beatles, and so could more easily get there early or stay late and tweak his parts. But if McCartney wasn't playing bass while the guitars and drums were being recorded, that meant he could play something else, and so increasingly he would play piano during the recording of the basic track. And that in turn would mean that there wouldn't always *be* a need for guitars on the track, because the harmonic support they would provide would be provided by the piano instead. This, as much as anything else, is the reason that Revolver sounds so radically different to any other Beatles album. Up to this point, with *very* rare exceptions like "Yesterday", every Beatles record, more or less, featured all four of the Beatles playing instruments. Now John and George weren't playing on "Good Day Sunshine" or "For No One", John wasn't playing on "Here, There, and Everywhere", "Eleanor Rigby" features no guitars or drums at all, and George's "Love You To" only features himself, plus a little tambourine from Ringo (Paul recorded a part for that one, but it doesn't seem to appear on the finished track). Of the three songwriting Beatles, the only one who at this point was consistently requiring the instrumental contributions of all the other band members was John, and even he did without Paul on "She Said, She Said", which by all accounts features either John or George on bass, after Paul had a rare bout of unprofessionalism and left the studio. Revolver is still an album made by a group -- and most of those tracks that don't feature John or George instrumentally still feature them vocally -- it's still a collaborative work in all the best ways. But it's no longer an album made by four people playing together in the same room at the same time. After starting work on "Tomorrow Never Knows", the next track they started work on was Paul's "Got to Get You Into My Life", but as it would turn out they would work on that song throughout most of the sessions for the album -- in a sign of how the group would increasingly work from this point on, Paul's song was subject to multiple re-recordings and tweakings in the studio, as he tinkered to try to make it perfect. The first recording to be completed for the album, though, was almost as much of a departure in its own way as "Tomorrow Never Knows" had been. George's song "Love You To" shows just how inspired he was by the music of Ravi Shankar, and how devoted he was to Indian music. While a few months earlier he had just about managed to pick out a simple melody on the sitar for "Norwegian Wood", by this point he was comfortable enough with Indian classical music that I've seen many, many sources claim that an outside session player is playing sitar on the track, though Anil Bhagwat, the tabla player on the track, always insisted that it was entirely Harrison's playing: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] There is a *lot* of debate as to whether it's George playing on the track, and I feel a little uncomfortable making a definitive statement in either direction. On the one hand I find it hard to believe that Harrison got that good that quickly on an unfamiliar instrument, when we know he wasn't a naturally facile musician. All the stories we have about his work in the studio suggest that he had to work very hard on his guitar solos, and that he would frequently fluff them. As a technical guitarist, Harrison was only mediocre -- his value lay in his inventiveness, not in technical ability -- and he had been playing guitar for over a decade, but sitar only a few months. There's also some session documentation suggesting that an unknown sitar player was hired. On the other hand there's the testimony of Anil Bhagwat that Harrison played the part himself, and he has been very firm on the subject, saying "If you go on the Internet there are a lot of questions asked about "Love You To". They say 'It's not George playing the sitar'. I can tell you here and now -- 100 percent it was George on sitar throughout. There were no other musicians involved. It was just me and him." And several people who are more knowledgeable than myself about the instrument have suggested that the sitar part on the track is played the way that a rock guitarist would play rather than the way someone with more knowledge of Indian classical music would play -- there's a blues feeling to some of the bends that apparently no genuine Indian classical musician would naturally do. I would suggest that the best explanation is that there's a professional sitar player trying to replicate a part that Harrison had previously demonstrated, while Harrison was in turn trying his best to replicate the sound of Ravi Shankar's work. Certainly the instrumental section sounds far more fluent, and far more stylistically correct, than one would expect: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] Where previous attempts at what got called "raga-rock" had taken a couple of surface features of Indian music -- some form of a drone, perhaps a modal scale -- and had generally used a guitar made to sound a little bit like a sitar, or had a sitar playing normal rock riffs, Harrison's song seems to be a genuine attempt to hybridise Indian ragas and rock music, combining the instrumentation, modes, and rhythmic complexity of someone like Ravi Shankar with lyrics that are seemingly inspired by Bob Dylan and a fairly conventional pop song structure (and a tiny bit of fuzz guitar). It's a record that could only be made by someone who properly understood both the Indian music he's emulating and the conventions of the Western pop song, and understood how those conventions could work together. Indeed, one thing I've rarely seen pointed out is how cleverly the album is sequenced, so that "Love You To" is followed by possibly the most conventional song on Revolver, "Here, There, and Everywhere", which was recorded towards the end of the sessions. Both songs share a distinctive feature not shared by the rest of the album, so the two songs can sound more of a pair than they otherwise would, retrospectively making "Love You To" seem more conventional than it is and "Here, There, and Everywhere" more unconventional -- both have as an introduction a separate piece of music that states some of the melodic themes of the rest of the song but isn't repeated later. In the case of "Love You To" it's the free-tempo bit at the beginning, characteristic of a lot of Indian music: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] While in the case of "Here, There, and Everywhere" it's the part that mimics an older style of songwriting, a separate intro of the type that would have been called a verse when written by the Gershwins or Cole Porter, but of course in the intervening decades "verse" had come to mean something else, so we now no longer have a specific term for this kind of intro -- but as you can hear, it's doing very much the same thing as that "Love You To" intro: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Here, There, and Everywhere"] In the same day as the group completed "Love You To", overdubbing George's vocal and Ringo's tambourine, they also started work on a song that would show off a lot of the new techniques they had been working on in very different ways. Paul's "Paperback Writer" could indeed be seen as part of a loose trilogy with "Love You To" and "Tomorrow Never Knows", one song by each of the group's three songwriters exploring the idea of a song that's almost all on one chord. Both "Tomorrow Never Knows" and "Love You To" are based on a drone with occasional hints towards moving to one other chord. In the case of "Paperback Writer", the entire song stays on a single chord until the title -- it's on a G7 throughout until the first use of the word "writer", when it quickly goes to a C for two bars. I'm afraid I'm going to have to sing to show you how little the chords actually change, because the riff disguises this lack of movement somewhat, but the melody is also far more horizontal than most of McCartney's, so this shouldn't sound too painful, I hope: [demonstrates] This is essentially the exact same thing that both "Love You To" and "Tomorrow Never Knows" do, and all three have very similarly structured rising and falling modal melodies. There's also a bit of "Paperback Writer" that seems to tie directly into "Love You To", but also points to a possible very non-Indian inspiration for part of "Love You To". The Beach Boys' single "Sloop John B" was released in the UK a couple of days after the sessions for "Paperback Writer" and "Love You To", but it had been released in the US a month before, and the Beatles all got copies of every record in the American top thirty shipped to them. McCartney and Harrison have specifically pointed to it as an influence on "Paperback Writer". "Sloop John B" has a section where all the instruments drop out and we're left with just the group's vocal harmonies: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B"] And that seems to have been the inspiration behind the similar moment at a similar point in "Paperback Writer", which is used in place of a middle eight and also used for the song's intro: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] Which is very close to what Harrison does at the end of each verse of "Love You To", where the instruments drop out for him to sing a long melismatic syllable before coming back in: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] Essentially, other than "Got to Get You Into My Life", which is an outlier and should not be counted, the first three songs attempted during the Revolver sessions are variations on a common theme, and it's a sign that no matter how different the results might  sound, the Beatles really were very much a group at this point, and were sharing ideas among themselves and developing those ideas in similar ways. "Paperback Writer" disguises what it's doing somewhat by having such a strong riff. Lennon referred to "Paperback Writer" as "son of 'Day Tripper'", and in terms of the Beatles' singles it's actually their third iteration of this riff idea, which they originally got from Bobby Parker's "Watch Your Step": [Excerpt: Bobby Parker, "Watch Your Step"] Which became the inspiration for "I Feel Fine": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] Which they varied for "Day Tripper": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Day Tripper"] And which then in turn got varied for "Paperback Writer": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] As well as compositional ideas, there are sonic ideas shared between "Paperback Writer", "Tomorrow Never Knows", and "Love You To", and which would be shared by the rest of the tracks the Beatles recorded in the first half of 1966. Since Geoff Emerick had become the group's principal engineer, they'd started paying more attention to how to get a fuller sound, and so Emerick had miced the tabla on "Love You To" much more closely than anyone would normally mic an instrument from classical music, creating a deep, thudding sound, and similarly he had changed the way they recorded the drums on "Tomorrow Never Knows", again giving a much fuller sound. But the group also wanted the kind of big bass sounds they'd loved on records coming out of America -- sounds that no British studio was getting, largely because it was believed that if you cut too loud a bass sound into a record it would make the needle jump out of the groove. The new engineering team of Geoff Emerick and Ken Scott, though, thought that it was likely you could keep the needle in the groove if you had a smoother frequency response. You could do that if you used a microphone with a larger diaphragm to record the bass, but how could you do that? Inspiration finally struck -- loudspeakers are actually the same thing as microphones wired the other way round, so if you wired up a loudspeaker as if it were a microphone you could get a *really big* speaker, place it in front of the bass amp, and get a much stronger bass sound. The experiment wasn't a total success -- the sound they got had to be processed quite extensively to get rid of room noise, and then compressed in order to further prevent the needle-jumping issue, and so it's a muddier, less defined, tone than they would have liked, but one thing that can't be denied is that "Paperback Writer"'s bass sound is much, much, louder than on any previous Beatles record: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] Almost every track the group recorded during the Revolver sessions involved all sorts of studio innovations, though rarely anything as truly revolutionary as the artificial double-tracking they'd used on "Tomorrow Never Knows", and which also appeared on "Paperback Writer" -- indeed, as "Paperback Writer" was released several months before Revolver, it became the first record released to use the technique. I could easily devote a good ten minutes to every track on Revolver, and to "Paperback Writer"s B-side, "Rain", but this is already shaping up to be an extraordinarily long episode and there's a lot of material to get through, so I'll break my usual pattern of devoting a Patreon bonus episode to something relatively obscure, and this week's bonus will be on "Rain" itself. "Paperback Writer", though, deserved the attention here even though it was not one of the group's more successful singles -- it did go to number one, but it didn't hit number one in the UK charts straight away, being kept off the top by "Strangers in the Night" by Frank Sinatra for the first week: [Excerpt: Frank Sinatra, "Strangers in the Night"] Coincidentally, "Strangers in the Night" was co-written by Bert Kaempfert, the German musician who had produced the group's very first recording sessions with Tony Sheridan back in 1961. On the group's German tour in 1966 they met up with Kaempfert again, and John greeted him by singing the first couple of lines of the Sinatra record. The single was the lowest-selling Beatles single in the UK since "Love Me Do". In the US it only made number one for two non-consecutive weeks, with "Strangers in the Night" knocking it off for a week in between. Now, by literally any other band's standards, that's still a massive hit, and it was the Beatles' tenth UK number one in a row (or ninth, depending on which chart you use for "Please Please Me"), but it's a sign that the group were moving out of the first phase of total unequivocal dominance of the charts. It was a turning point in a lot of other ways as well. Up to this point, while the group had been experimenting with different lyrical subjects on album tracks, every single had lyrics about romantic relationships -- with the possible exception of "Help!", which was about Lennon's emotional state but written in such a way that it could be heard as a plea to a lover. But in the case of "Paperback Writer", McCartney was inspired by his Aunt Mill asking him "Why do you write songs about love all the time? Can you ever write about a horse or the summit conference or something interesting?" His response was to think "All right, Aunt Mill, I'll show you", and to come up with a lyric that was very much in the style of the social satires that bands like the Kinks were releasing at the time. People often miss the humour in the lyric for "Paperback Writer", but there's a huge amount of comedy in lyrics about someone writing to a publisher saying they'd written a book based on someone else's book, and one can only imagine the feeling of weary recognition in slush-pile readers throughout the world as they heard the enthusiastic "It's a thousand pages, give or take a few, I'll be writing more in a week or two. I can make it longer..." From this point on, the group wouldn't release a single that was unambiguously about a romantic relationship until "The Ballad of John and Yoko",  the last single released while the band were still together. "Paperback Writer" also saw the Beatles for the first time making a promotional film -- what we would now call a rock video -- rather than make personal appearances on TV shows. The film was directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg, who the group would work with again in 1969, and shows Paul with a chipped front tooth -- he'd been in an accident while riding mopeds with his friend Tara Browne a few months earlier, and hadn't yet got round to having the tooth capped. When he did, the change in his teeth was one of the many bits of evidence used by conspiracy theorists to prove that the real Paul McCartney was dead and replaced by a lookalike. It also marks a change in who the most prominent Beatle on the group's A-sides was. Up to this point, Paul had had one solo lead on an A-side -- "Can't Buy Me Love" -- and everything else had been either a song with multiple vocalists like "Day Tripper" or "Love Me Do", or a song with a clear John lead like "Ticket to Ride" or "I Feel Fine". In the rest of their career, counting "Paperback Writer", the group would release nine new singles that hadn't already been included on an album. Of those nine singles, one was a double A-side with one John song and one Paul song, two had John songs on the A-side, and the other six were Paul. Where up to this point John had been "lead Beatle", for the rest of the sixties, Paul would be the group's driving force. Oddly, Paul got rather defensive about the record when asked about it in interviews after it failed to go straight to the top, saying "It's not our best single by any means, but we're very satisfied with it". But especially in its original mono mix it actually packs a powerful punch: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] When the "Paperback Writer" single was released, an unusual image was used in the advertising -- a photo of the Beatles dressed in butchers' smocks, covered in blood, with chunks of meat and the dismembered body parts of baby dolls lying around on them. The image was meant as part of a triptych parodying religious art -- the photo on the left was to be an image showing the four Beatles connected to a woman by an umbilical cord made of sausages, the middle panel was meant to be this image, but with halos added over the Beatles' heads, and the panel on the right was George hammering a nail into John's head, symbolising both crucifixion and that the group were real, physical, people, not just images to be worshipped -- these weren't imaginary nails, and they weren't imaginary people. The photographer Robert Whittaker later said: “I did a photograph of the Beatles covered in raw meat, dolls and false teeth. Putting meat, dolls and false teeth with The Beatles is essentially part of the same thing, the breakdown of what is regarded as normal. The actual conception for what I still call “Somnambulant Adventure” was Moses coming down from Mount Sinai with the Ten Commandments. He comes across people worshipping a golden calf. All over the world I'd watched people worshiping like idols, like gods, four Beatles. To me they were just stock standard normal people. But this emotion that fans poured on them made me wonder where Christianity was heading.” The image wasn't that controversial in the UK, when it was used to advertise "Paperback Writer", but in the US it was initially used for the cover of an album, Yesterday... And Today, which was made up of a few tracks that had been left off the US versions of the Rubber Soul and Help! albums, plus both sides of the "We Can Work It Out"/"Day Tripper" single, and three rough mixes of songs that had been recorded for Revolver -- "Doctor Robert", "And Your Bird Can Sing", and "I'm Only Sleeping", which was the song that sounded most different from the mixes that were finally released: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I'm Only Sleeping (Yesterday... and Today mix)"] Those three songs were all Lennon songs, which had the unfortunate effect that when the US version of Revolver was brought out later in the year, only two of the songs on the album were by Lennon, with six by McCartney and three by Harrison. Some have suggested that this was the motivation for the use of the butcher image on the cover of Yesterday... And Today -- saying it was the Beatles' protest against Capitol "butchering" their albums -- but in truth it was just that Capitol's art director chose the cover because he liked the image. Alan Livingston, the president of Capitol was not so sure, and called Brian Epstein to ask if the group would be OK with them using a different image. Epstein checked with John Lennon, but Lennon liked the image and so Epstein told Livingston the group insisted on them using that cover. Even though for the album cover the bloodstains on the butchers' smocks were airbrushed out, after Capitol had pressed up a million copies of the mono version of the album and two hundred thousand copies of the stereo version, and they'd sent out sixty thousand promo copies, they discovered that no record shops would stock the album with that cover. It cost Capitol more than two hundred thousand dollars to recall the album and replace the cover with a new one -- though while many of the covers were destroyed, others had the new cover, with a more acceptable photo of the group, pasted over them, and people have later carefully steamed off the sticker to reveal the original. This would not be the last time in 1966 that something that was intended as a statement on religion and the way people viewed the Beatles would cause the group trouble in America. In the middle of the recording sessions for Revolver, the group also made what turned out to be their last ever UK live performance in front of a paying audience. The group had played the NME Poll-Winners' Party every year since 1963, and they were always shows that featured all the biggest acts in the country at the time -- the 1966 show featured, as well as the Beatles and a bunch of smaller acts, the Rolling Stones, the Who, the Yardbirds, Roy Orbison, Cliff Richard and the Shadows, the Seekers, the Small Faces, the Walker Brothers, and Dusty Springfield. Unfortunately, while these events were always filmed for TV broadcast, the Beatles' performance on the first of May wasn't filmed. There are various stories about what happened, but the crux appears to be a disagreement between Andrew Oldham and Brian Epstein, sparked by John Lennon. When the Beatles got to the show, they were upset to discover that they had to wait around before going on stage -- normally, the awards would all be presented at the end, after all the performances, but the Rolling Stones had asked that the Beatles not follow them directly, so after the Stones finished their set, there would be a break for the awards to be given out, and then the Beatles would play their set, in front of an audience that had been bored by twenty-five minutes of awards ceremony, rather than one that had been excited by all the bands that came before them. John Lennon was annoyed, and insisted that the Beatles were going to go on straight after the Rolling Stones -- he seems to have taken this as some sort of power play by the Stones and to have got his hackles up about it. He told Epstein to deal with the people from the NME. But the NME people said that they had a contract with Andrew Oldham, and they weren't going to break it. Oldham refused to change the terms of the contract. Lennon said that he wasn't going to go on stage if they didn't directly follow the Stones. Maurice Kinn, the publisher of the NME, told Epstein that he wasn't going to break the contract with Oldham, and that if the Beatles didn't appear on stage, he would get Jimmy Savile, who was compering the show, to go out on stage and tell the ten thousand fans in the audience that the Beatles were backstage refusing to appear. He would then sue NEMS for breach of contract *and* NEMS would be liable for any damage caused by the rioting that was sure to happen. Lennon screamed a lot of abuse at Kinn, and told him the group would never play one of their events again, but the group did go on stage -- but because they hadn't yet signed the agreement to allow their performance to be filmed, they refused to allow it to be recorded. Apparently Andrew Oldham took all this as a sign that Epstein was starting to lose control of the group. Also during May 1966 there were visits from musicians from other countries, continuing the cultural exchange that was increasingly influencing the Beatles' art. Bruce Johnston of the Beach Boys came over to promote the group's new LP, Pet Sounds, which had been largely the work of Brian Wilson, who had retired from touring to concentrate on working in the studio. Johnston played the record for John and Paul, who listened to it twice, all the way through, in silence, in Johnston's hotel room: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "God Only Knows"] According to Johnston, after they'd listened through the album twice, they went over to a piano and started whispering to each other, picking out chords. Certainly the influence of Pet Sounds is very noticeable on songs like "Here, There, and Everywhere", written and recorded a few weeks after this meeting: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Here, There, and Everywhere"] That track, and the last track recorded for the album, "She Said She Said" were unusual in one very important respect -- they were recorded while the Beatles were no longer under contract to EMI Records. Their contract expired on the fifth of June, 1966, and they finished Revolver without it having been renewed -- it would be several months before their new contract was signed, and it's rather lucky for music lovers that Brian Epstein was the kind of manager who considered personal relationships and basic honour and decency more important than the legal niceties, unlike any other managers of the era, otherwise we would not have Revolver in the form we know it today. After the meeting with Johnston, but before the recording of those last couple of Revolver tracks, the Beatles also met up again with Bob Dylan, who was on a UK tour with a new, loud, band he was working with called The Hawks. While the Beatles and Dylan all admired each other, there was by this point a lot of wariness on both sides, especially between Lennon and Dylan, both of them very similar personality types and neither wanting to let their guard down around the other or appear unhip. There's a famous half-hour-long film sequence of Lennon and Dylan sharing a taxi, which is a fascinating, excruciating, example of two insecure but arrogant men both trying desperately to impress the other but also equally desperate not to let the other know that they want to impress them: [Excerpt: Dylan and Lennon taxi ride] The day that was filmed, Lennon and Harrison also went to see Dylan play at the Royal Albert Hall. This tour had been controversial, because Dylan's band were loud and raucous, and Dylan's fans in the UK still thought of him as a folk musician. At one gig, earlier on the tour, an audience member had famously yelled out "Judas!" -- (just on the tiny chance that any of my listeners don't know that, Judas was the disciple who betrayed Jesus to the authorities, leading to his crucifixion) -- and that show was for many years bootlegged as the "Royal Albert Hall" show, though in fact it was recorded at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester. One of the *actual* Royal Albert Hall shows was released a few years ago -- the one the night before Lennon and Harrison saw Dylan: [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Like a Rolling Stone", Royal Albert Hall 1966] The show Lennon and Harrison saw would be Dylan's last for many years. Shortly after returning to the US, Dylan was in a motorbike accident, the details of which are still mysterious, and which some fans claim was faked altogether. The accident caused him to cancel all the concert dates he had booked, and devote himself to working in the studio for several years just like Brian Wilson. And from even further afield than America, Ravi Shankar came over to Britain, to work with his friend the violinist Yehudi Menuhin, on a duet album, West Meets East, that was an example in the classical world of the same kind of international cross-fertilisation that was happening in the pop world: [Excerpt: Yehudi Menuhin and Ravi Shankar, "Prabhati (based on Raga Gunkali)"] While he was in the UK, Shankar also performed at the Royal Festival Hall, and George Harrison went to the show. He'd seen Shankar live the year before, but this time he met up with him afterwards, and later said "He was the first person that impressed me in a way that was beyond just being a famous celebrity. Ravi was my link to the Vedic world. Ravi plugged me into the whole of reality. Elvis impressed me when I was a kid, and impressed me when I met him, but you couldn't later on go round to him and say 'Elvis, what's happening with the universe?'" After completing recording and mixing the as-yet-unnamed album, which had been by far the longest recording process of their career, and which still nearly sixty years later regularly tops polls of the best album of all time, the Beatles took a well-earned break. For a whole two days, at which point they flew off to Germany to do a three-day tour, on their way to Japan, where they were booked to play five shows at the Budokan. Unfortunately for the group, while they had no idea of this when they were booked to do the shows, many in Japan saw the Budokan as sacred ground, and they were the first ever Western group to play there. This led to numerous death threats and loud protests from far-right activists offended at the Beatles defiling their religious and nationalistic sensibilities. As a result, the police were on high alert -- so high that there were three thousand police in the audience for the shows, in a venue which only held ten thousand audience members. That's according to Mark Lewisohn's Complete Beatles Chronicle, though I have to say that the rather blurry footage of the audience in the video of those shows doesn't seem to show anything like those numbers. But frankly I'll take Lewisohn's word over that footage, as he's not someone to put out incorrect information. The threats to the group also meant that they had to be kept in their hotel rooms at all times except when actually performing, though they did make attempts to get out. At the press conference for the Tokyo shows, the group were also asked publicly for the first time their views on the war in Vietnam, and John replied "Well, we think about it every day, and we don't agree with it and we think that it's wrong. That's how much interest we take. That's all we can do about it... and say that we don't like it". I say they were asked publicly for the first time, because George had been asked about it for a series of interviews Maureen Cleave had done with the group a couple of months earlier, as we'll see in a bit, but nobody was paying attention to those interviews. Brian Epstein was upset that the question had gone to John. He had hoped that the inevitable Vietnam question would go to Paul, who he thought might be a bit more tactful. The last thing he needed was John Lennon saying something that would upset the Americans before their tour there a few weeks later. Luckily, people in America seemed to have better things to do than pay attention to John Lennon's opinions. The support acts for the Japanese shows included  several of the biggest names in Japanese rock music -- or "group sounds" as the genre was called there, Japanese people having realised that trying to say the phrase "rock and roll" would open them up to ridicule given that it had both "r" and "l" sounds in the phrase. The man who had coined the term "group sounds", Jackey Yoshikawa, was there with his group the Blue Comets, as was Isao Bito, who did a rather good cover version of Cliff Richard's "Dynamite": [Excerpt: Isao Bito, "Dynamite"] Bito, the Blue Comets, and the other two support acts, Yuya Uchida and the Blue Jeans, all got together to perform a specially written song, "Welcome Beatles": [Excerpt: "Welcome Beatles" ] But while the Japanese audience were enthusiastic, they were much less vocal about their enthusiasm than the audiences the Beatles were used to playing for. The group were used, of course, to playing in front of hordes of screaming teenagers who could not hear a single note, but because of the fear that a far-right terrorist would assassinate one of the group members, the police had imposed very, very, strict rules on the audience. Nobody in the audience was allowed to get out of their seat for any reason, and the police would clamp down very firmly on anyone who was too demonstrative. Because of that, the group could actually hear themselves, and they sounded sloppy as hell, especially on the newer material. Not that there was much of that. The only song they did from the Revolver sessions was "Paperback Writer", the new single, and while they did do a couple of tracks from Rubber Soul, those were under-rehearsed. As John said at the start of this tour, "I can't play any of Rubber Soul, it's so unrehearsed. The only time I played any of the numbers on it was when I recorded it. I forget about songs. They're only valid for a certain time." That's certainly borne out by the sound of their performances of Rubber Soul material at the Budokan: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "If I Needed Someone (live at the Budokan)"] It was while they were in Japan as well that they finally came up with the title for their new album. They'd been thinking of all sorts of ideas, like Abracadabra and Magic Circle, and tossing names around with increasing desperation for several days -- at one point they seem to have just started riffing on other groups' albums, and seem to have apparently seriously thought about naming the record in parodic tribute to their favourite artists -- suggestions included The Beatles On Safari, after the Beach Boys' Surfin' Safari (and possibly with a nod to their recent Pet Sounds album cover with animals, too), The Freewheelin' Beatles, after Dylan's second album, and my favourite, Ringo's suggestion After Geography, for the Rolling Stones' Aftermath. But eventually Paul came up with Revolver -- like Rubber Soul, a pun, in this case because the record itself revolves when on a turntable. Then it was off to the Philippines, and if the group thought Japan had been stressful, they had no idea what was coming. The trouble started in the Philippines from the moment they stepped off the plane, when they were bundled into a car without Neil Aspinall or Brian Epstein, and without their luggage, which was sent to customs. This was a problem in itself -- the group had got used to essentially being treated like diplomats, and to having their baggage let through customs without being searched, and so they'd started freely carrying various illicit substances with them. This would obviously be a problem -- but as it turned out, this was just to get a "customs charge" paid by Brian Epstein. But during their initial press conference the group were worried, given the hostility they'd faced from officialdom, that they were going to be arrested during the conference itself. They were asked what they would tell the Rolling Stones, who were going to be visiting the Philippines shortly after, and Lennon just said "We'll warn them". They also asked "is there a war on in the Philippines? Why is everybody armed?" At this time, the Philippines had a new leader, Ferdinand Marcos -- who is not to be confused with his son, Ferdinand Marcos Jr, also known as Bongbong Marcos, who just became President-Elect there last month. Marcos Sr was a dictatorial kleptocrat, one of the worst leaders of the latter half of the twentieth century, but that wasn't evident yet. He'd been elected only a few months earlier, and had presented himself as a Kennedy-like figure -- a young man who was also a war hero. He'd recently switched parties from the Liberal party to the right-wing Nacionalista Party, but wasn't yet being thought of as the monstrous dictator he later became. The person organising the Philippines shows had been ordered to get the Beatles to visit Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos at 11AM on the day of the show, but for some reason had instead put on their itinerary just the *suggestion* that the group should meet the Marcoses, and had put the time down as 3PM, and the Beatles chose to ignore that suggestion -- they'd refused to do that kind of government-official meet-and-greet ever since an incident in 1964 at the British Embassy in Washington where someone had cut off a bit of Ringo's hair. A military escort turned up at the group's hotel in the morning, to take them for their meeting. The group were all still in their rooms, and Brian Epstein was still eating breakfast and refused to disturb them, saying "Go back and tell the generals we're not coming." The group gave their performances as scheduled, but meanwhile there was outrage at the way the Beatles had refused to meet the Marcos family, who had brought hundreds of children -- friends of their own children, and relatives of top officials -- to a party to meet the group. Brian Epstein went on TV and tried to smooth things over, but the broadcast was interrupted by static and his message didn't get through to anyone. The next day, the group's security was taken away, as were the cars to take them to the airport. When they got to the airport, the escalators were turned off and the group were beaten up at the arrangement of the airport manager, who said in 1984 "I beat up the Beatles. I really thumped them. First I socked Epstein and he went down... then I socked Lennon and Ringo in the face. I was kicking them. They were pleading like frightened chickens. That's what happens when you insult the First Lady." Even on the plane there were further problems -- Brian Epstein and the group's road manager Mal Evans were both made to get off the plane to sort out supposed financial discrepancies, which led to them worrying that they were going to be arrested or worse -- Evans told the group to tell his wife he loved her as he left the plane. But eventually, they were able to leave, and after a brief layover in India -- which Ringo later said was the first time he felt he'd been somewhere truly foreign, as opposed to places like Germany or the USA which felt basically like home -- they got back to England: [Excerpt: "Ordinary passenger!"] When asked what they were going to do next, George replied “We're going to have a couple of weeks to recuperate before we go and get beaten up by the Americans,” The story of the "we're bigger than Jesus" controversy is one of the most widely misreported events in the lives of the Beatles, which is saying a great deal. One book that I've encountered, and one book only, Steve Turner's Beatles '66, tells the story of what actually happened, and even that book seems to miss some emphases. I've pieced what follows together from Turner's book and from an academic journal article I found which has some more detail. As far as I can tell, every single other book on the Beatles released up to this point bases their account of the story on an inaccurate press statement put out by Brian Epstein, not on the truth. Here's the story as it's generally told. John Lennon gave an interview to his friend, Maureen Cleave of the Evening Standard, during which he made some comments about how it was depressing that Christianity was losing relevance in the eyes of the public, and that the Beatles are more popular than Jesus, speaking casually because he was talking to a friend. That story was run in the Evening Standard more-or-less unnoticed, but then an American teen magazine picked up on the line about the Beatles being bigger than Jesus, reprinted chunks of the interview out of context and without the Beatles' knowledge or permission, as a way to stir up controversy, and there was an outcry, with people burning Beatles records and death threats from the Ku Klux Klan. That's... not exactly what happened. The first thing that you need to understand to know what happened is that Datebook wasn't a typical teen magazine. It *looked* just like a typical teen magazine, certainly, and much of its content was the kind of thing that you would get in Tiger Beat or any of the other magazines aimed at teenage girls -- the September 1966 issue was full of articles like "Life with the Walker Brothers... by their Road Manager", and interviews with the Dave Clark Five -- but it also had a long history of publishing material that was intended to make its readers think about social issues of the time, particularly Civil Rights. Arthur Unger, the magazine's editor and publisher, was a gay man in an interracial relationship, and while the subject of homosexuality was too taboo in the late fifties and sixties for him to have his magazine cover that, he did regularly include articles decrying segregation and calling for the girls reading the magazine to do their part on a personal level to stamp out racism. Datebook had regularly contained articles like one from 1963 talking about how segregation wasn't just a problem in the South, saying "If we are so ‘integrated' why must men in my own city of Philadelphia, the city of Brotherly Love, picket city hall because they are discriminated against when it comes to getting a job? And how come I am still unable to take my dark- complexioned friends to the same roller skating rink or swimming pool that I attend?” One of the writers for the magazine later said “We were much more than an entertainment magazine . . . . We tried to get kids involved in social issues . . . . It was a well-received magazine, recommended by libraries and schools, but during the Civil Rights period we did get pulled off a lot of stands in the South because of our views on integration” Art Unger, the editor and publisher, wasn't the only one pushing this liberal, integrationist, agenda. The managing editor at the time, Danny Fields, was another gay man who wanted to push the magazine even further than Unger, and who would later go on to manage the Stooges and the Ramones, being credited by some as being the single most important figure in punk rock's development, and being immortalised by the Ramones in their song "Danny Says": [Excerpt: The Ramones, "Danny Says"] So this was not a normal teen magazine, and that's certainly shown by the cover of the September 1966 issue, which as well as talking about the interviews with John Lennon and Paul McCartney inside, also advertised articles on Timothy Leary advising people to turn on, tune in, and drop out; an editorial about how interracial dating must be the next step after desegregation of schools, and a piece on "the ten adults you dig/hate the most" -- apparently the adult most teens dug in 1966 was Jackie Kennedy, the most hated was Barry Goldwater, and President Johnson, Billy Graham, and Martin Luther King appeared in the top ten on both lists. Now, in the early part of the year Maureen Cleave had done a whole series of articles on the Beatles -- double-page spreads on each band member, plus Brian Epstein, visiting them in their own homes (apart from Paul, who she met at a restaurant) and discussing their daily lives, their thoughts, and portraying them as rounded individuals. These articles are actually fascinating, because of something that everyone who met the Beatles in this period pointed out. When interviewed separately, all of them came across as thoughtful individuals, with their own opinions about all sorts of subjects, and their own tastes and senses of humour. But when two or more of them were together -- especially when John and Paul were interviewed together, but even in social situations, they would immediately revert to flip in-jokes and riffing on each other's statements, never revealing anything about themselves as individuals, but just going into Beatle mode -- simultaneously preserving the band's image, closing off outsiders, *and* making sure they didn't do or say anything that would get them mocked by the others. Cleave, as someone who actually took them all seriously, managed to get some very revealing information about all of them. In the article on Ringo, which is the most superficial -- one gets the impression that Cleave found him rather difficult to talk to when compared to the other, more verbally facile, band members -- she talked about how he had a lot of Wild West and military memorabilia, how he was a devoted family man and also devoted to his friends -- he had moved to the suburbs to be close to John and George, who already lived there. The most revealing quote about Ringo's personality was him saying "Of course that's the great thing about being married -- you have a house to sit in and company all the time. And you can still go to clubs, a bonus for being married. I love being a family man." While she looked at the other Beatles' tastes in literature in detail, she'd noted that the only books Ringo owned that weren't just for show were a few science fiction paperbacks, but that as he said "I'm not thick, it's just that I'm not educated. People can use words and I won't know what they mean. I say 'me' instead of 'my'." Ringo also didn't have a drum kit at home, saying he only played when he was on stage or in the studio, and that you couldn't practice on your own, you needed to play with other people. In the article on George, she talked about how he was learning the sitar,  and how he was thinking that it might be a good idea to go to India to study the sitar with Ravi Shankar for six months. She also talks about how during the interview, he played the guitar pretty much constantly, playing everything from songs from "Hello Dolly" to pieces by Bach to "the Trumpet Voluntary", by which she presumably means Clarke's "Prince of Denmark's March": [Excerpt: Jeremiah Clarke, "Prince of Denmark's March"] George was also the most outspoken on the subjects of politics, religion, and society, linking the ongoing war in Vietnam with the UK's reverence for the Second World War, saying "I think about it every day and it's wrong. Anything to do with war is wrong. They're all wrapped up in their Nelsons and their Churchills and their Montys -- always talking about war heroes. Look at All Our Yesterdays [a show on ITV that showed twenty-five-year-old newsreels] -- how we killed a few more Huns here and there. Makes me sick. They're the sort who are leaning on their walking sticks and telling us a few years in the army would do us good." He also had very strong words to say about religion, saying "I think religion falls flat on its face. All this 'love thy neighbour' but none of them are doing it. How can anybody get into the position of being Pope and accept all the glory and the money and the Mercedes-Benz and that? I could never be Pope until I'd sold my rich gates and my posh hat. I couldn't sit there with all that money on me and believe I was religious. Why can't we bring all this out in the open? Why is there all this stuff about blasphemy? If Christianity's as good as they say it is, it should stand up to a bit of discussion." Harrison also comes across as a very private person, saying "People keep saying, ‘We made you what you are,' well, I made Mr. Hovis what he is and I don't go round crawling over his gates and smashing up the wall round his house." (Hovis is a British company that makes bread and wholegrain flour). But more than anything else he comes across as an instinctive anti-authoritarian, being angry at bullying teachers, Popes, and Prime Ministers. McCartney's profile has him as the most self-consciously arty -- he talks about the plays of Alfred Jarry and the music of Karlheinz Stockhausen and Luciano Berio: [Excerpt: Luciano Berio, "Momenti (for magnetic tape)"] Though he was very worried that he might be sounding a little too pretentious, saying “I don't want to sound like Jonathan Miller going on" --