Podcasts about The Providence Journal

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Newspaper published in Providence, Rhode Island, United States

  • 106PODCASTS
  • 261EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST
The Providence Journal

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Best podcasts about The Providence Journal

Latest podcast episodes about The Providence Journal

FanGraphs Baseball
FanGraphs Audio: Bill Koch on Baseball's Raucous October

FanGraphs Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 54:34


Episode 944 This week on FanGraphs Audio, we go over the first round of the playoffs before looking ahead to both Championship Series. To begin the program, David Laurila welcomes Bill Koch of The Providence Journal to talk about Boston's ALDS win over the Rays. Not many expected the team's season to go this way, […]

The News with Gene Valicenti
Johnston Mayor Joe Polisena - Controversial ProJo Picture - 10-13-21

The News with Gene Valicenti

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 6:32


Johnston Mayor Joe Polisena joined Gene to discuss a controversial photo in the Providence Journal which put high school students in front of Wise Guys Deli on Columbus Day.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The News with Gene Valicenti
North Providence Mayor Charlie Lombardi - Controversial ProJo Picture - 10-13-21

The News with Gene Valicenti

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 7:01


North Providence Mayor Charlie Lombardi joined Gene to discuss a controversial photo in the Providence Journal which put high school students in front of Wise Guys Deli on Columbus Day.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Westerly Sun
Westerly Sun - 2021-10-12: Allen Michael Doyle, New RI Heritage Hall of Fame Inductees, and John Czerkiewicz, Sr.

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 6:01


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now for some trivia. Did you know that Rhode Island native, Allen Michael Doyle was a professional golfer who played on the Nike Tour, PGA Tour, and Champions Tour? Despite winning numerous amateur titles, he did not turn professional until he was 46. In 1995, his first full professional season, he won three times on the Nike Tour. From 1996 to 1998 Doyle competed in 58 PGA Tour events, making the cut in 31, including two top-10 finishes. Doyle joined the Senior PGA Tour when he turned 50 and became the oldest US Senior Open Champion at nearly 58 years old, his fourth senior major championship win. Now for our feature story: The Rhode Island Heritage Hall of Fame recently announced nine inductees for 2021. The Hall of Fame is composed of illustrious Rhode Islanders, from Roger Williams and the chief sachems of the Narragansett and the Wampanoag tribes to those of the present day. The Hall was created in 1965 to honor “any individual who has brought credit to Rhode Island, brought Rhode Island into prominence, and contributed to the history and heritage of the state.” Inductees, according to board of trustees President Patrick Conley, must have been born in Rhode Island, lived, studied or worked in Rhode Island for a significant time, or made his or her reputation here. The 56th induction ceremony will take place on Oct. 23 at the Crowne Plaza in Warwick. The following are the inductees: Charles Butler is a Pioneering Black athlete who starred on several local integrated amateur and semi-professional championship baseball teams in the late 1940s. Timothy “Tim” Gray is A national award-winning documentary film director, producer and writer, especially for PBS, and founder of the prestigious World War II Foundation. James H. Leach is a Major real estate developer and chairman of numerous public and private boards, including the Rhode Island PBS Foundation. William P. McCormick was U.S. Ambassador to New Zealand and co-founder of the 93-restaurant chain McCormick & Schmick's. John M. Murphy Sr. is a Leader of the Home Loan Investment Bank, financier, public official, civic leader, philanthropist and humanitarian. Elizabeth Morancy is a Strong advocate for social change and justice, first as a religious sister, then as a state representative and finally as a director of several important humanitarian organizations. Dr. William Oh is a Nationally prominent pioneer and researcher in the field of neonatal medicine, teacher and author of 443 peer-reviewed studies in pediatrics, most in his specialty — neonatal intensive care. William “Bill” Reynolds is a Prolific columnist and sports writer for the Providence Journal, star athlete and author of several highly regarded books on local sports, especially basketball. Louis Yip is a Major Blackstone Valley real estate developer, prominent restaurateur, humanitarian and philanthropist. For more about the coronavirus pandemic, the recovery, and the latest on all things in and around Westerly, head over to westerlysun.com. There are a lot of businesses in our community that are hiring right now, so we're excited to tell you about some new job listings. Today's Job posting comes from Crimmins Residential Staffing in Westerly. A couple in Watch Hill is looking for a part-time housekeeper. Pay is $35 per hour and you'll work there 3 days per week in season and one day per week during the off-season. For more job requirements, check out the link in the description: https://www.indeed.com/jobs?l=Westerly%2C%20RI&mna=5&aceid&gclid=Cj0KCQjwpf2IBhDkARIsAGVo0D2S3gEb-328GyRpBuTTeeKPdn3-klOh0KYAsfete6MEZmI5S4qTg-4aAnQkEALw_wcB&vjk=028da372fc87d663 Today we're remembering the life of John Czerkiewicz, Sr., of Rockville. Born in West Warwick, John was a loving devoted father. John also leaves his loving partner, Maureen Power of Chepachet. He is survived by his brother, sister along with all his loving nieces and nephews, 7 grandchildren who he cherished and enjoyed taking them for hikes, ATV rides and teaching them his love for animals and his land. John worked at Arnold's Motorcycles in Providence as their Service Manager from the 1960's till the close of business. He was a member of Arnold's Harley-Davidson Racing team and personally drag raced for Harley-Davidson, where he won and set numerous International and National records. John also would periodically assist Harley-Davidson with product design. John then continued his love for motorcycles and opened his own shop on his farm, where riding enthusiasts would come from all over the country for his expertise and knowledge of the Harley-Davidsons. For many years, John worked with the Rhode Island State Police Motorcycle Division as one of their instructors. John was an avid woodsman who enjoyed countless days with his friends hunting, hiking, ATV riding and beekeeping. His farm consisted of many animals throughout the years. His compassion to nurse and care for injured deer was witnessed by all who knew him. One of his greatest pleasures in life was having his family and friends around to share his passion. If you were John's friend, you knew you were always welcome to stop by, hang at the garage and share some stories with all the guys. The echoes of laughter from John, Randy, Mikey, Sal, CJ, Pete, and his countless other best friends (too many to name) can be heard the minute you drive up to the farm. These memories will always be treasured by all who knew him. This is just a short story of his life. John was truly a unique and amazing man, but always humble. He accomplished so much yet he lived life simply. He had so much more to teach everyone, and his Spirit will live on in the woods he loved so much. Thank you for taking a moment with us today to remember and celebrate John's life. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Patriots Playbook
Patriots Playbook 10/7: Previewing the Texans, NFL Week 5 Predictions, Gilmore Trade Reaction

Patriots Playbook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 119:40


Tune-in as John Rooke is joined by Erik Scalavino of Patriots.com and Aaron Reiss from The Athletic to preview Sunday's Patriots game against the Houston Texans. We are joined by Mark Daniels from The Providence Journal to discuss the trade of Stephon Gilmore to the Carolina Panthers. Plus, we talk with Russell Baxter from ProFootballGuru.com to preview the NFL Week 5 slate of games and offer a few predictions.

The Westerly Sun
Westerly Sun - 2021-10-07: Al Del Greco, 30-day vaccine mandate extension, and Julia Felicetti

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 3:06


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now for some trivia. Did you know that Rhode Island native, Al Del Greco is a former football placekicker and a current sports radio personality. Del Greco finished his 17 NFL seasons with 347 of 449 field goals and 551 of 554 extra points, giving him a total of 1,592 points. Now, for our feature story: More than 90 health care facilities have requested a 30-day extension to meet Gov. Dan McKee's requirement to get all workers vaccinated against COVID-19, the Rhode Island Department of Health announced last week. The list includes some of the largest hospitals in the state, including Rhode Island Hospital and the Miriam Hospital, along with dozens of nursing facilities. A total of 92 health care facilities have requested extensions to meet the vaccine requirement, which took effect last Friday. All have plans to meet the mandate by Oct. 31, according to the health department. Another 215 facilities reported that they are in compliance with the requirement, including Kent County Memorial Hospital and Our Lady of Fatima Hospital. McKee announced in August that all healthcare workers would be required to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 by Oct. 1. On Friday, the health department separately ordered a Cranston dentist to stop practicing after he told The Providence Journal he would defy the mandate. The agency said Dr. Stephen Skoly must stop seeing patients until he meets the requirement. For more information on all things Westerly and Rhode Island, check out this story and more at thewesterlysun.com Are you interested in a new opportunity? You're in luck! Today's Job posting comes from Randall Realtors Compass in Westerly. They're looking for real estate agents. You'll need to obtain a real estate license before you start. Pay can be $100,000 or more per year. If you're interested and think you'd be a good fit for the role you can apply using the link in our episode description. https://www.indeed.com/jobs?l=Westerly%2C%20RI&mna=5&aceid&gclid=Cj0KCQjwpf2IBhDkARIsAGVo0D2S3gEb-328GyRpBuTTeeKPdn3-klOh0KYAsfete6MEZmI5S4qTg-4aAnQkEALw_wcB&vjk=ca280a731c2da875&advn=7652287743140876 Today we're remembering the life of Julia Felicetti, of Granite Street in Westerly who passed away at the age of 98. She was the wife of the late Ernest Felicetti. Born in Westerly, Julia was predeceased by her daughter Linda Felicetti; and her siblings. Julia was known for her volunteer work at The Westerly Hospital and she spent over 29,000 hours crocheting blankets for hospital patients. Thank you for taking a moment with us today to remember and celebrate Julia's life. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Adam Jones Show
Mark Daniels Calls-In - 10/5/21

The Adam Jones Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 10:48


Mark Daniels of the Providence Journal joins Adam to discuss the latest Pats news with the Texans coming up this weekend. The guys discuss the Pats loss to the Bucs last Sunday night.

Boston Balling
NFL season is in full swing!

Boston Balling

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 47:20


We're now two weeks into the NFL season and the Patriots are sitting at 1-1. Host Gabby Hurlbut and guest Mark Daniels, Patriots beat writer for the Providence Journal, discuss the first two games and take a look at the remaining schedule.

Story in the Public Square
A Look Ahead at the COVID-19 Pandemic with Dr. Ashish Jha

Story in the Public Square

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 28:10


When schools finished the academic year earlier this summer, they looked forward to the fall with the first cautious optimism anyone had felt in years.  But Dr. Ashish Jha has offered level-headed wisdom that the pandemic simply is not over. Ashish K. Jha, MD, MPH, is a physician, health policy researcher, and the Dean of the Brown University School of Public Health.  Before joining Brown, he was the K.T. Li Professor of Global Health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Director of the Harvard Global Health Institute.  An internationally respected and consulted pandemic expert, Jha strongly believes that communication with the public is an essential part of public health, and never more important than during a public-health emergency like COVID-19.  He appears regularly on national news network shows, is active on social media, and is the authoritative voice on the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast, available from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY Network.  In addition to his duties at Brown, maintains a clinical practice at the Providence VA Medical Center. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Axelbank Reports History and Today
#59: Amy Russo - "Women of the White House"

Axelbank Reports History and Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 49:35


Listen as we tag along with Providence Journal reporter Amy Russo as she takes us on a history of America's First Ladies, as told in her book, "Women of the White House: The Illustrated Story of the First Ladies of the United States of America." She explains how visual representations have become so important in how we understand our first families, and how vital the role of First Lady has been to the presidency and American culture. She also explains how the role has taken on added meaning given Dr. Jill Biden is the first to carry a full time job during her time as First Lady. Russo shows how from Martha Washington to Sarah Polk to Mary Todd to Betty Ford, to understand America, you must know our First Ladies.Amy Russo is on Twitter at twitter.com/amymrussoSupport our show at patreon.com/axelbankhistory**A portion of every contribution is given to a charity for children's literacy**"Axelbank Reports History and Today" can be found on social media at twitter.com/axelbankhistoryinstagram.com/axelbankhistoryfacebook.com/axelbankhistory

The Bartholomewtown Podcast (RIpodcast.com)
Amy Russo (The Providence Journal)

The Bartholomewtown Podcast (RIpodcast.com)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 25:12


Bill Bartholomew welcomes Amy Russo of The Providence Journal for a conversation about her move from NYC to Rhode Island, her weekly column exploring The Ocean State, RI politics as a sport, RI media and much more.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bartholomewtown?fan_landing=true)

The Adam Jones Show
Mark Daniels Joins the Show 9/13/2021

The Adam Jones Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 11:52


  (0:00) Mark Daniels from the Providence Journal joins Jones to talk about the Patriots loss to the Dolphins and what he saw from Mac Jones and how much the team misses Stephen Gilmore.

The Baseball Hour with Tony Mazz
Hardcore Baseball: Have the Red Sox turned it around?

The Baseball Hour with Tony Mazz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 49:02


Amid a COVID outbreak and following a tough August, the Red Sox have opened September on a winning streak. Bill Koch of the Providence Journal joins Matt McCarthy to discuss this mini-turnaround, the impact of Kyle Schwarber and Chris Sale, whether the Red Sox will hold on for one of the wild card spots, and what a wild card game in Yankee Stadium would look like.

Felger & Massarotti
Hardcore Baseball: Have the Red Sox turned it around?

Felger & Massarotti

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 49:02


Amid a COVID outbreak and following a tough August, the Red Sox have opened September on a winning streak. Bill Koch of the Providence Journal joins Matt McCarthy to discuss this mini-turnaround, the impact of Kyle Schwarber and Chris Sale, whether the Red Sox will hold on for one of the wild card spots, and what a wild card game in Yankee Stadium would look like.

Book Dreams
Ep. 69 - The Truth About the Gospel of Jesus's Wife, with Ariel Sabar

Book Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 44:57


What happens when a Harvard professor puts the weight of her reputation behind an alleged ancient gospel with monumental implications for the Roman Catholic Church, and the gospel turns out to be a fake? In 2012, Karen King, the Hollis Professor of Divinity at Harvard's Divinity School, announced the discovery of a gospel in which Jesus refers to “my wife.” Investigative reporter Ariel Sabar, author of Veritas: A Harvard Professor, a Con Man, and the Gospel of Jesus's Wife, was present at the announcement and helped uncover the actuality of the gospel's forgery. This week on Book Dreams, Ariel talks with Eve and Julie about what it was like to be in the room, across the street from the Vatican itself, when Karen King unveiled the alleged gospel. He describes the steps taken to establish that the document was forged, and his own, successful efforts to identify the man who is almost certainly the mastermind behind the forgery. And he discusses what this saga illustrates about the nature of truth and the significance of authenticity, with a consideration of the influence of Karen King's postmodernist thinking. Ariel Sabar is an award-winning journalist whose work has appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, Smithsonian Magazine, Harper's Bazaar, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal. He's worked as a staff writer at the Providence Journal, The Baltimore Sun, and Christian Science Monitor. Ariel won the National Book Critics Circle Award for his first book, My Father's Paradise: A Son's Search for His Jewish Past. Veritas, his book about Karen King and the Gospel of Jesus's Wife, was a finalist for the Edgar Award for best true crime book of the year and for the investigative reporters and editors book award. Find us on Twitter (@bookdreamspod) and Instagram (@bookdreamspodcast), or email us at contact@bookdreamspodcast.com. We encourage you to visit our website and sign up for our newsletter for information about our episodes, guests, and more. Book Dreams is a part of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate network, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. For more information on how The Podglomerate treats data, please see our Privacy Policy. Since you're listening to Book Dreams, we'd like to suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows about literature, writing, and storytelling like Storybound and The History of Literature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

After Hours with Amy Lawrence
Mark Daniels | Patriots Beat Writer for The Providence Journal

After Hours with Amy Lawrence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 12:34


 Patriots Beat Writer for The Providence Journal Mark Daniels joins the show to break down Cam Newton's release from New England, Mac Jones' future as QB 1, and the look of the defense ahead of Week 1. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

After Hours with Amy Lawrence
9-1-21 After Hours with Amy Lawrence PODCAST: Hour 1

After Hours with Amy Lawrence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 41:27


Javy Baez plays hero just one day after calling out Mets fans | NL West race heats up... Dodgers win, Giants lose | Mark Daniels, Patriots beat writer for The Providence Journal joins the show. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

E2G Sports Network
One Patriots Place | 8-16-2021

E2G Sports Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 47:48


This week on One Patriots Place Steve, Murph and Clare are joined by Mark Daniels of the Providence Journal to talk Patriots preseason performance, training camp injuries and which one player would they clone if they could.

Toucher & Rich
Bill Koch of The Providence Journal // Fantasy Football Preview // The Stack! - 8/6 (Hour 4)

Toucher & Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 44:20


(0:00) Bill Koch of The Providence Journal joins the show to hit on the Red Sox.  (13:32) Mike Lockhart gives us a Fantasy Football Preview.  (27:58) The Stack!!

Down Time with Cranston Public Library
68 - Walking Rhode Island with John Kostrzewa

Down Time with Cranston Public Library

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 51:40


This week Tayla is joined by Dave from Central and John Kostrzewa from the Providence Journal to talk about his weekly column "Walking Rhode Island." He shares the story behind his column as well as advice for beginning hikers. They also talk about what makes a good spy novel, hope-punk sci-fi, and classic filmmaking. During The Last Chapter they discuss: what is your favorite hike in RI? Like what you hear? Rate and review Down Time on Apple Podcasts or your podcast player of choice! If you'd like to submit a topic for The Last Chapter you can send your topic suggestions to downtime@cranstonlibrary.org. Our theme music is Day Trips by Ketsa and our ad music is Happy Ukulele by Scott Holmes. Thanks for listening! Books The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson Agent Running in the Field by John Le Carré Slough House by Mick Herron Bubble by Jordan Morris, Sarah Morgan, Tony Cliff, and Natalie Riess The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers Aetherbound by E. K. Johnston Walks and Rambles in Rhode Island by Ken Weber AV The Bookshop (2017) What We Do In the Shadows (2014) Dial M For Murder (1954) Good Omens (2019) Other Kanopy Streaming Movies at the Library Rhode Island Land Trust Council AllTrails.com John Kostrzewa on Facebook Beavertail Trail, Narragansett, RI RI Audubon Caratunk Wildlife Refuge, Seekonk, MA Goddard Memorial State Park, Warwick, RI

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 33 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 19:09


PROVIDENCE – With the Delta variant now widespread, the World Health Organization recently repeated longstanding guidance that all people -- vaccinated or not – should wear masks. Some places in the U.S., including sprawling Los Angeles County, have advised mask-wearing for all indoors.   But the CDC differs.  Pandemic expert Dr. Ashish Jha on Thursday cut through the confusion, offering advice keyed to one's vaccine status and where one lives.  “I largely agree with the CDC,” Jha said during taping of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast. “What they're really trying to do is say these decisions should be made locally and that's my view as well.”  He gave the examples of Rhode Island and Massachusetts, which each have high vaccination rates and low numbers of new infections. Fully vaccinated people in the two states, he said, do not need to wear masks at indoor events with others who are fully vaccinated.  “If you're hanging around vaccinated people in a low-infection community, you're fine,” said Jha. But it's a different story in some other parts of the U.S., he said.  “Let's say you're in southwest Missouri right now. What you're seeing is a horrible outbreak and vaccination rates are low. Even if you're vaccinated, I'd wear a mask.”  Jha, dean of Brown University's School of Public Health, addressed the latest study, published in nature, that suggests immunity acquired through the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines may last years.    “It is more evidence, but not definitive evidence, that these vaccines are going to last a while,” Jha said. “We're going to have reasonably long-term immunity.” Further study will provide more definitive answers over time, he said.  The scientist also discussed the emergence of yet another COVID-19 variant -- a new version of the troublesome Delta variant that has been dubbed “Delta Plus.”    “I just had a long conversation about this with people in India, where it was first identified and is really spreading,” Jha said. “I'm not super worried about it. I don't think it'll become a major problem. Delta is a major problem. I don't think [Delta Plus] will be a problem even bigger than Delta. but we don't know for sure.” Like others, he awaits more data.  During recording of this 33rd episode of the podcast, Jha answered four audience questions.  ◘ A mother of three young boys living near Dusseldorf, Germany, asked Jha's opinion on her government's reluctance to recommend vaccinations for children aged 12 to 18. That group is eligible in the U.S.  “I think people should be getting vaccinated,” Jha said. “I think kids should be getting vaccinated.”  ◘ A psychotherapist living in Wisconsin had several questions regarding Long COVID. Jha spent two minutes answering.  ◘ A Boston resident asked about home tests. Jha endorsed them, but said he hopes the price will come down.  ◘ A Rhode Island woman asked about the need for a booster shot for people who have received the Johnson & Johnson one-shot vaccine. Jha devoted two minutes to this topic, too.    Available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK, this podcast is hosted by G. Wayne Miller, health reporter for The Providence Journal. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Adam Jones Show
Mark Daniels of The Providence Journal joins the show - 6/15/21

The Adam Jones Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 10:00


Mark Daniels of The Providence Journal joins the show to discuss the New England Patriots. Daniels discusses the quarterback battle at camp for the Patriots, Stephon Gilmore and his contract holdout, and more!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 32 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 10:36


PROVIDENCE – The growing dominance of the deadly Delta variant will pose a grave risk this summer to people who are not fully vaccinated, pandemic expert Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University's School of Public Health, said during the latest recording of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast.  “If you have not gotten vaccinated, this is a potentially very dangerous time because the Delta variant is spreading,” Jha said. “It's about 6% of infections in the United States right now, doubling every two weeks. If you do the math, in about four to six weeks we'll start getting close to half… By mid-August, it'll be the dominant variant in the United States.”  Jha said that when he assesses risk posed by variants, he examines three factors: ease of contagion, potential for high mortality, and “does it evade immunity from vaccines or prior infections?”  The Delta variant, first detected in India, scores alarmingly on all three, Jha said.  “It is the most contagious variant we have ever seen in this pandemic and that's going to be a huge problem,” Jha said. “Second, it does look like it's a bit more deadly than other variants. And there is some evidence that it has more ‘immune escape' as well. So, it may be one of the first sort of true triple threats.”  Bottom line?  “If you have not started getting vaccinated, it's time to start,” Jha said.  “Now here's the good news on the Delta variant,” Jha added. “If you've gotten two shots of the mRNA vaccines -- Pfizer or Moderna -- you've got 90% protection against the Delta variant. That is amazing. Thank goodness.”  As for the single-shot vaccine available now across the U.S., Jha said “I think the Johnson & Johnson data will come in the same. We just don't have as much data. But if you got the J&J vaccine, don't freak out. You'll have almost certainly have very good protection.”  On another topic, Jha responded to recent reports in science publications Nature and BioRxiv that once acquired, immunity to COVID-10 is long-lasting – perhaps even as long as a lifetime.   “I don't think lifetime,” Jha said. “I'd love it if our vaccines lasted a lifetime and then we're just good to go forever. I'd be surprised. But it does really push back against this narrative that some people have been saying that we're going to need boosters in six months. I don't see us needing boosters in six months.   “And if immunity is long-lived from a previous infection or from two doses of an mRNA vaccine or a Johnson & Johnson vaccine, I can easily imagine going at least a year and maybe even a couple of years without needing a booster.”  Jha applauded recently reported results of clinical trials of the Novavax vaccine showing a 90.4% overall effectiveness, nearly as good as Pfizer's and Moderna's, and a 100% efficacy in preventing moderate or severe disease.  But with ample supplies of Pfizer, Moderna and J&J in the U.S., Jha envisions the vaccine playing a critical role elsewhere on the planet.  “I am thrilled beyond belief,” Jha said. “Because if things go well, they are on track to make as many as 1 billion doses by the end of the calendar year. That would be very helpful for the world. So as a global vaccination strategy, Novavax could end up being a really, really important player.”  Jha also answered two audience questions: “Would you take a baby or toddler under two, who cannot wear a mask, to a grocery store?” and “Would you take a baby or toddler under two, who cannot wear a mask, on a plane?”  Jha said in many instances, a two-year-old would be safe in a grocery store or on a plane. But his “caveat” was that geography must be considered, given the uneven status of the pandemic in different states and regions. And he said as the summer unfolds, the situation could change, especially in light of the Delta variant.    Recorded weekly since October, the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast, available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK, is now being produced less frequently. This is the 32nd episode.    This podcast is hosted by G. Wayne Miller, health reporter for The Providence Journal. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Westerly Sun
Westerly Sun - 2021-06-10: Thomas Ince, North Kingston COVID Memorial, and Gladys Hawkins

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 4:24


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now for some trivia. Did you know that famed early film producer, Thomas Ince, was born in Rhode Island in 1880? He was prolific silent film producer, director, screenwriter, and actor. Ince was known as the "Father of the Western" and was responsible for making over 800 films. He revolutionized the motion picture industry by creating the first major Hollywood studio facility and invented movie production by introducing the "assembly line" system of filmmaking. He was the first mogul to build his own film studio dubbed "Inceville" in Palisades Highlands and was instrumental in developing the role of the producer in motion pictures. Two of his films, The Italian (1915), for which he wrote the screenplay, and Civilization (1916), which he directed, were selected for preservation by the National Film Registry. He later entered into a partnership with D. W. Griffith and Mack Sennett to form the Triangle Motion Picture Company, whose studios are the present-day site of Sony Pictures. He then built a new studio about a mile from Triangle, which is now the site of Culver Studios. Ince's untimely death at the height of his career at age 44, after he became severely ill aboard the private yacht of media tycoon William Randolph Hearst, has caused much speculation…. although the official cause of his death was heart failure. Now, for our feature story: North Kingston has unveiled a memorial to residents that died from COVID-19. A public unveiling of the memorial was held Saturday evening outside the Old Meeting House and included music, candlelight and remarks from local residents. The Providence Journal reported artist Nancy Rafi and community volunteers created the display of white flags staked into the ground to honor the more than 80 residents that have died in the town of roughly 26,000. Some of the flags include the names of the victims, as well as the date they died, a photograph and some words of remembrance. Rafi told the newspaper that the display will be up for several months and that volunteers will continue to make additional flags as needed. The North Kingstown Arts Council provided a $1,500 grant for the effort but organizers are also allowing anyone to sponsor a flag. And in Connecticut, Hartford's Puerto Rican Day parade returned to city streets Saturday for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic started, with colorful floats winding their way through neighborhoods. People on the floats and in vehicles in the caravan waved the red, white and blue flags of Puerto Rico and played music as hundreds of onlookers cheered and displayed their own flags. This year's procession was smaller than in previous years. Last year's parade was canceled because of the pandemic. Saturday's event also honored health care workers, first responders and other essential personnel for their work during the pandemic. Parade watcher Juliany Polar said the parade had the atmosphere of a neighborhood party. “People are happy,” Polar told the Hartford Courant. “People are ready to get out and about and enjoy the better weather, the better rates against COVID.” For more information on all things Westerly, check out this story and more at thewesterlysun.com Are you interested in a new opportunity? You're in luck! Today's Job posting comes from the United States Postal Service in Rockville. They're looking for a full-time sales, services, and distribution associate. The job performs a variety of important functions. Pay starts at $18.49 per hour. If you're interested and think you'd be a good fit for the role you can apply using the link in our episode description. https://www.indeed.com/l-Westerly,-RI-jobs.html?vjk=b09cec8dcc0241b2 Today we're remembering the life of Gladys Hawkins of Exeter, who passed away surrounded by the love of her family. Born in Providence in 1938, she enjoyed reading, gardening, birdwatching, and spending time with her grandchildren. She will be sadly missed by her two children and Her 5 grandchildren. She is survived by her sister and her brother. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation in her name to the American Cancer Society. Thank you for taking the time today to remember and celebrate Gladys's life. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bartholomewtown Podcast (RIpodcast.com)
Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea is Running for Governor

The Bartholomewtown Podcast (RIpodcast.com)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 18:42


Bill Bartholomew welcomes back BTOWN regular, RI Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea for a discussion on her recent announcement that she is running for Governor in the 2022 election. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bartholomewtown?fan_landing=true)

Weekend Shows
FITZY & MEGO - Mark Daniels from the Providence Journal joins for Patriots OTAs

Weekend Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2021 39:37


Hour 3: During Pat's OTAs, Cam Newton was injured, Mac Jones looks really good, but Stidham is creating a lot of buzz. We hear from Mark Daniels of the Providence Journal on Patriots OTAs. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A Lively Experiment - Presented by Rhode Island PBS
RI House of Reps Returns/Providence Teachers Union

A Lively Experiment - Presented by Rhode Island PBS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 29:00


This week on A Lively Experiment, The Rhode Island House of Representatives returns to it's chamber for the homestretch of this years session. We have an interview with speaker Shekarchi. And, the education commissioner remains under fire from the Providence Teachers Union.Joining us this week, Patrick Anderson, State house reporter for the Providence Journal. Target 12 Investigator Steph Machado, and Ed Fitzpatrick, reporter for The Boston Globe.Support the show (http://ripbs.org)

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 31 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 14:17


PROVIDENCE – Children under 12 are not yet eligible for vaccination against coronavirus disease -- but despite lacking that protection, their fully vaccinated parents and guardians should not be overly anxious about their chances of becoming sick.   Rather, they should practice a degree of common sense – and, with a few exceptions, let their children be children.  That was the gist of a discussion on Tuesday by pandemic expert Dr. Ashish Jha, who also explored other subjects, including the “social science” aspects of mask-wearing now that fully vaccinated people need not wear face coverings in most settings.  “The single biggest way, the best method, for protecting kids under 12 from COVID is for adults to get vaccinated,” Jha said. “Because when adults get vaccinated, adults in general, they bring infection numbers down. And when the adults around the kid get vaccinated, they essentially create a ring of protection around the child.”  What about play dates with other children under 12 who also are not vaccinated?  Jha gave the example of his family. He and his wife have three children, one of them younger than 12.  “We tend to think about spending time with families whose parents are also vaccinated,” Jha said. “If the broad community around kids is vaccinated, then the chance that a kid will pick up the infection gets very, very, very low. That's sort of rule number one: Make sure that you're hanging out with vaccinated adults because their kids are also less likely to be infected.”  What about high-risk situations, such as long-lasting indoor gatherings with large numbers of people?  “Probably reasonable to keep your kid masked for a little bit longer,” Jha, dean of Brown University’s School of Public Health, said during taping of the 31st episode of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast.  And what about children under the age of two, who are unlikely to keep a mask on for long regardless of circumstances?  “No masks, but they're not at super high risk of getting infected,” Jha said.  In recent podcasts, Jha has repeatedly emphasized the importance of community. Transmission rates of COVID-19 vary by state, region and municipality and thus your local situation, the physician and scientist asserts, is key.  “If you're in a community with very, very low levels of transmission, your child is not going to get infected,” he said. “Even if you get super-duper unlucky and your child ends up getting infected, they will almost surely do very well.”  The disease “for kids in general is milder than the flu,” Jha said. “My general feeling on this is we can't stress excessively about kids. Use common sense, hang around vaccinated people, and we’ll be fine.”  During taping of the podcast, available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK, Jha answered several audience questions, including from a pediatrician in Pennsylvania who asked about New York Yankees players testing positive for COVID.  Jha’s answer, in part: “The broad point is in a population of vaccinated people, you don't need to do ongoing asymptotic testing.”  The dean also responded to a mother of a seven-year-old girl in Illinois. Her questions: “Is it still recommended for kids to wear masks outside with their unvaccinated friends; there are times when they are not socially distant from each other. Also, if my daughter is the only unvaccinated person in a group of nine vaccinated people at a family home inside, should she wear a mask?”  Jha said: “She's the only unvaccinated person in a family home indoors with nine vaccinated people -- no mask, she doesn't need it. She's fine because she's surrounded by vaccinated people. She's not going to pick up the infection.”  Jha’s caveat was that risk, while negligible, is never zero for pretty much anything. Still, he said, “the risk is so incredibly low that I would not have my child wearing a mask if he or she were surrounded by vaccinated people.”  Outdoor play, he said, poses similarly low risk.   “No mask outdoors playing with other kids,” he said. Not necessary. I know they're not socially distanced, but it’s incredibly rare to pick up infections outdoors.”  He added: “If your child has some severe health problem, you have to take my advice with a bit more nuance. Talk to your doctor. But for healthy kids, their chances of getting infected in either of those scenarios is exceedingly low. And if you are that very unlikely person who gets infected, he'll do fine.”  This podcast is hosted by G. Wayne Miller, health reporter for The Providence Journal See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Story in the Public Square
Jonathan Karp Matches Books with their Readers

Story in the Public Square

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 28:11


Books have always seemed like self-contained worlds to me.  Pick up a book, and you can transport yourself to any time in history—or the future. Delve into the mystical or the romantic.  Books help us to open our minds and our hearts, and over the last 30 years, Jonathan Karp has put more of those books into the hands of readers than just about anyone else. Jonathan Karp has been president and CEO of Simon & Schuster since May 2020. He joined Simon & Schuster in June 2010 as publisher of their flagship imprint and was promoted to president and publisher of Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing in 2018.  Karp worked briefly as a reporter for The Providence Journal and then The Miami Herald before being hired in 1989 by Random House.  He worked there for 16 years, rising to editor-in-chief of the Random House division.  He moved to Hachette Book Group in 2005, where he founded the Twelve imprint.  There, Karp published the acclaimed bestselling works, “True Compass” by Edward M. Kennedy, “God Is Not Great” by Christopher Hitchens, and “War” by Sebastian Junger.  Since joining Simon & Schuster, Karp has overseen the publication of “Steve Jobs” by Walter Isaacson, “What Happened” by Hillary Clinton, “Fear” by Bob Woodward, “Frederick Douglass” by David Blight, the winner of the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in History, “Born to Run” by Bruce Springsteen, “In One Person” by John Irving, and “The Library Book” by Susan Orlean. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 30 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 13:00


PROVIDENCE – “A breakthrough” was Dr. Ashish Jha’s assessment Tuesday of the CDC guidance that fully vaccinated people need not wear masks in most situations.   “You basically can return to life as it was in 2019 and that’s pretty profound,” said the dean of Brown University’s School of Public Health.   But Jha acknowledged questions surrounding the ruling as states, municipalities, and businesses adopt policies while the COVID-19 pandemic continues to ease in much of the U.S. And he spent several minutes discussing the broad and fine points of mask-free living in an effort to cut through what he described as “confusion and complexities.”  “If you're fully vaccinated, you're good to go,” Jha said. “You don't need to be wearing a mask outdoors. You don't need to be wearing a mask indoors. You don't need to do to be socially distanced from vaccinated people. You don't need to be socially distant from unvaccinated people. If you're fully vaccinated, it doesn't matter what's happening around you, with a few exceptions.”  Jha listed three.  “A super-crowded stadium, a packed indoor concert, potentially a packed outdoor concert, someplace where you're essentially going to be breathing somebody's else's respirations for hours,” he said. “That's probably where maybe we should do something different,” such as wearing masks and practice distancing, or not attending at all.  Other exceptions where the CDC said masks and distancing are still required include health-care settings, facilities that serve people experiencing homelessness, and public transportation: buses, trains, airplanes and the airports and stations that serve them.  Jha acknowledged that in most settings currently an honor system, not actual proof of full vaccination, is the method of verification. Given the example of a health club or gym that might ask patrons if they are fully vaccinated, the scientist and physician said while recording the 30th episode of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast:  “If you're fully vaccinated, the CDC is saying, ‘why do you care?’ If someone is deceptive and lies and says they're vaccinated when they're not and they go in -- if you're fully vaccinated, it doesn't make any difference to you… You're not going to get infected or if you do, you're not going to get sick.”  The discussion turned to the eventual likelihood that reliable means will be developed allowing an individual to demonstrate full vaccination status beyond presentation of a paper card – vaccine passports, as they have been called.  “I don't think the government's going to be issuing vaccine passports, but let me assure you there are a whole bunch of private companies that are working on developing these things because businesses want them, gyms want them, restaurants want them,” Jha said.   “You can imagine that some restaurants know that some patrons are going to feel a lot more comfortable doing indoor dining if they know everyone is vaccinated. So as a restaurant, you could say ‘we have a vaccinated-only policy.’ And if you can verify who is vaccinated, that restaurant becomes exceedingly safe for everyone.”  And that would be a big selling point, Jha said.  “The basic point is that these vaccine passports are coming, but they’re going to be private-sector solutions,” he said.  During the recording, Jha also explored the possibility that come cold and flu season, people may choose to wear masks in certain situations to avoid becoming sick. Reflecting the experience of other countries where mask-wearing has been mandated until now, the just-ended annual flu season in America was comparatively mild.  “If everybody wears masks or some chunk of people wear masks, it’ll reduce the amount of flu,” said Jha. “And if we continue hand-washing and surface-cleaning, we will definitely make an impact on the flu as well. So I expect to have a milder flu season. Knock on wood, I haven't gotten a cold in a year.”  For the first time since the podcast, available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK, debuted in October, the recording took place not by Zoom but in-person at Jha’s Providence office. Both Jha and Miller are fully vaccinated.  Jha also answered an audience question from a professor at a New England college who asked:  “Due to the potential lower efficacy of J&J in comparison to other vaccines, could (or should) one who is vaccinated with J&J consider doubling up with either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine, especially if the current demand is lower than supply? Would there be a downside to doing that?”  Jha answered that he is impressed with the Johnson & Johnson one-shot vaccine and added: The CDC and a bunch of immunologists are working on guidelines on this. So, what I would say to this person is: ‘As a whole, infection numbers are down, They’re very, very well protected with a really terrific vaccine that will protect them from severe illness and death.’  “ ‘Let's see what the next few months bring in terms of science and data on mixing and matching of vaccines.’ ”    To hear Dr. Jha’s full answers to these questions and learn more details about other issues discussed in this 30th episode, please download the podcast. This weekly podcast is hosted by G. Wayne Miller, health reporter for The Providence Journal.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 29 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 17:04


PROVIDENCE – Dr. Ashish Jha on Tuesday welcomed the FDA’s Monday approval of the Pfizer vaccine for children 12 to 15 years old, declaring that it will keep those who receive it safe while moving the general population closer to population immunity.   The CDC’s COVID vaccine advisory committee is soon expected to follow suit, which means children in this age group should be able to get their first shots within days.   “This is about 16 million people kids,” Jha said while recording the 29th episode of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast. “My expectation is that about half to two-thirds will end up getting vaccinated in the first month or two and that will help with population immunity, which is going to be great. Of course, the most important thing is it'll protect them.”  Jha has two daughters in that age group and he said both are “excited” to soon be eligible.  Pediatricians will play a critical role in arranging for vaccinations, said Jha, dean of Brown University’s School of Public Health – and also in easing concerns that some parents and guardians may have.   “I'm very comfortable with the safety data, but not everybody's going to be, and [these parents and guardians] should absolutely talk to their pediatrician and have informed conversations from informed experts. I think that's going to make a big difference.”  Jha said that “one challenge” will be getting children to vaccination sites that have the means to store the Pfizer shots at the required frigid temperature. Most pediatricians and primary care providers do not have such refrigeration capabilities in their offices.  “That will present a bit of a barrier,” Jha said. Visiting a site equipped to administer the Pfizer product, he said, “may slow some people down,” but with the Pfizer vaccine in abundant supply and walk-in shots available, that shouldn’t discourage them.  Jha hailed a recent article in Science, the peer-reviewed journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, about scientists who are combing the Brazilian rain forest looking for animal disease that could cross over into humans, as COVID-19 did. One goal is to identify and contain such diseases before they reach people.  “It’s a really important effort” that will be useful in predicting potential outbreaks, Jha said. But as COVID has demonstrated so tragically, he added, “we also still need to be prepared for a virus that we weren't expecting.” That means a global public-health, he said.  Jha also discussed Japan’s planned summer Olympics, saying there is “a theoretical way” to make them safe that involves vaccinations for all participants, officials and others. He has not seen the latest plans, however, and thus could not properly assess them.  The scientist and physician also answered several audience questions during taping of the podcast, available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK.  -- A 67-year-old woman with autoimmune disease who was vaccinated yet spent 12 days in the hospital after testing positive for coronavirus disease wrote the podcast stating that “my doctor says I have no vaccine antibodies.” Her question: “Where do I go from here?  Jha expressed his empathy and said “it's not like you have no protection. You have T-cell immunity that kicks in again. I don't know about the autoimmune condition specifically that the person has, but my point is that you still have some degree of protection.”  -- Another listener who is immunocompromised and has been vaccinated asked: “Is there a reliable test to check for vaccine response?  It would greatly relieve my anxiety to know I made antibodies.”  Such tests do exist but are experimental, Jha said, “but unless there's a compelling reason, I wouldn't worry about getting tested.”     -- Another listener who wrote that “Dr. Jha tells it like it is, but always injects a ray of hope, even on the darkest days” asked when someone should receive a third or “booster” shot. Some have suggested six months after the second shot of the Pfizer or Moderna products, which would be August for this listener.  Jha’s response: “This has gotten a lot of attention. So I will give you my personal feeling, which is stop thinking about boosters. I have no idea if or when we will need a booster, but I am quite confident that this person will not need one in August… vaccine-induced immunity is quite good.” Jha expects it to last “at least a year but probably longer.” Only time will tell, he said.  -- A fourth listener who tested positive for COVID in March but quickly recovered asked “when can I receive my second Covid vaccine? I have been advised of a timeline of 90 days after positive test results to any time after symptoms disappear.”  Jha said: “I think it's very reasonable to wait 90 days. That’s what I have been saying and what the CDC says as well, and that's where most of us in the public-health and medical communities are. If you want to get it sooner than that you can, but I don't think there's any major advantage.”    To hear Dr. Jha’s full answers to these questions and learn more details about other issues discussed in this 29th episode, please download the podcast at  This weekly podcast is hosted by G. Wayne Miller, health reporter for The Providence Journal.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Westerly Sun
Westerly Sun - 2021-05-07: Blake Rodgers's High-Five Record, The Green Stitch, and Richard Ira Millar

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 5:12


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now, some trivia. Did you know that Blake Rodgers of Cranston, R.I. once held the record for most high-fives in a 24-hour period? He was able to get 3,131 at the Dunkin' Donuts center. Unfortunately he was beaten by an Australian who received 14,607 in the same time. It's Friday and almost the weekend. Tomorrow, The Green Stitch: knitting community together is a creative outreach project that uses simple crafts such as sewing and knitting as a vehicle to engage the community while bringing environmental awareness to topics that are specific to Southern RI. They have partnered with the Rhode Island Natural History Survey and Save the Bay to bring in guest speakers and to do a craft. Head over to the Saugatucket Park facebook page to find out more. Next, We're continuing our series of great weekend hikes in and around Westerly. Find a quiet spot to go for a hike with the Westerly Land Trust. Whether you head to the Avondale Farm Preserve, Barlow Nature Preserve, or other great places to take a walk, you can find maps and directions at westerlylandtrust.org. Lastly, it's a new year and we've seen just how important journalism is over the past few years. Remember that reporting the local news is an important part of what it means to live here. Head over to Westerlysun.com and help us tell the stories of our community each and every day. Digital access starts at just 50 cents a day and makes all the difference in the world. Are you interested in a new opportunity? Look no further, we're here again with another new job listing. Today's posting comes from the US Customs and Border Protection. They're looking for full-time border patrol agents. Pay is competitive and there are opportunities for overtime.  If you're interested, you can read more and apply by using the link in our episode description. https://www.cbp.gov/careers/border-patrol-agent-apply-now Today we're remembering the life of Richard Ira Millar. "Dick" joins his wife of 60 years, Patricia Ann in eternity. She predeceased him in 2019. Born in Providence in 1933, Dick enjoyed his childhood with his brother, Raymond. While still in elementary school, the two were featured in the Providence Journal for their extensive model train layout. His teenage summers were spent at Beach Pond in Voluntown, CT, along with many cousins with whom he still played canasta until the pandemic kept them home-bound. Dick graduated from the University of Rhode Island in 1954 with a major in agriculture. The first interview question he was asked when he applied for his first post-college job was, "Have you done your time, son?" So, he enlisted in the army and served in Germany for two years from 1954-1956. Following his service in the army, he returned to URI where he earned his Master's in Poultry Science. It was there he met Patty. They married in 1958 and he began his career in the poultry science industry working in both Illinois and New York. After the births of their four children, the family moved to Richmond, Rhode Island in 1967. Dick again returned to URI, this time as the East Farm Poultry Complex supervisor, state Poultry Cooperative Extension Specialist, and instructor. Dick retired as an Associate Professor after 26 years having served as Chairman of the Department of Animal and Veterinary Science from 1975-1979. He also was a member of several state and regional agricultural committees, councils, and organizations including the RI Poultry Producers Association and the RI Agricultural Council. The communities with which Dick was involved benefitted from his lifetime of service. He belonged to the Carolina-Richmond Volunteer Fire Department where he was treasurer for many years. He served on the Chariho School Committee and was a constant presence at Richmond Town Council meetings. As a member of Richmond Grange, he regularly volunteered at the Washington County Fairgrounds for over 50 years. He most recently served on the Richmond Planning Board and the Richmond Senior Activities Committee. The Kappa Rho Chapter of Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity honored Dick for his decades of service as the alumni house manager with the Distinguished Fiji Award. Dick and Patty also supported a thriving town by providing land for a local church, fire department station, the Meadowbrook Waldorf School, and the Nature Conservancy. Dick and Patty regularly attended St. Elizabeth's Episcopal Church for over 50 years. His life of service lives on through his children, his grandchildren, and his great-grandchildren. "Poppa" will be missed by his family, but will live on through one phrase he always used when faced with a disappointing outcome, "That's the way it goes, Jimmy!" Thank you for taking a moment with us today to remember and celebrate Dick's life. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 28 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2021 13:26


PROVIDENCE – The FDA is expected to soon authorize use of the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine for adolescents 12 to 15 years old, a development that pandemic expert Dr. Ashish Jha on Tuesday greeted with enthusiasm for its anticipated effect on the general population -- and prospects for fully reopening high schools in the fall.  “It’s really helpful,” Jha said. “It’s big.”  When adolescents in that age group begin getting shots, Jha said, “they add to population immunity. Right now, we have about 44 percent of Americans who have gotten at least one shot.  These twelve to fifteen-year-olds represent another about four or five percent of the population -- about 16 million. Let’s say half of them get vaccinated in the next month or so. That will cause another dampening effect on lowering infection rates across the country.”  During Tuesday’s taping of the 28th episode of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast, Jha, dean of Brown University’s School of Public Health, said “we had schools open this past year and it was always the high schools that were the hardest hit…”  Come summer’s end, Jha said “every high-schooler who wants a vaccine will be vaccinated. Every teacher in a high school and staff in a high school who wants to be vaccinated already is vaccinated. There just is no explanation anymore and no medical and public-health reason that high schools cannot be open 100%, full-time normal this fall.”  On another topic, Jha took a nuanced view of a recent report in The New York Times that cited experts who maintain reaching herd immunity is unlikely in the U.S.  “I think it's mostly right, but maybe I'm a little more optimistic,” Jha said. “This is not about the level of immunity in America. This is about level of immunity in your state or in your city… It's really about what's happening in your community.”  He added: “And I actually am more optimistic than the Times article about whether we'll get to 80% immunity. Because remember, there are a lot of people have been infected as well who have not gotten the vaccine. And so we've got to count their immunity.”  Regarding a recent study in the journal Nature that found that 73,000 people in America who were infected by COVID-19 but were not sick enough to be hospitalized had a 60% higher rate of death than non-infected people, Jha said:  “What it seems to me is something that I have been saying for a long time, which is we should not be cavalier with this virus. We should not kind of work with the assumption that ‘hey, if it doesn't kill you, it makes you stronger.’ In fact, not at all. We know there are long-term complications. We know a lot of people have long-term symptoms.”   Jha also addressed the prospect that the federal government in the next weeks will lift the emergency use authorization label from the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. No longer “experimental,” as some who decline to be vaccinated have asserted, the vaccines could be become more appealing to people who hesitate to get the shots.  “I believe you're going to see both Moderna and Pfizer get what's called a full license probably sometime this summer,” Jha said. “It could be as early as next month, but certainly, before the end of the summer. In my mind, I already know that the evidence here has been so rigorous that they're well above the bar on full license.  “And if that helps some people feel better, that'll be great. But what I've been saying to people is, ‘don't worry about the designation. Look at the underlying evidence and data. We have so much safety data on so many people.’ ”  During taping of the podcast, available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK, Jha answered an audience question from a woman in Raleigh, N.C., who asked: “Can you explain ‘asymptotic?’ I understand you don’t have symptoms, but how would you know when you are no longer contagious? Unless you are being tested regularly, you don’t know you could be infecting others. Are you asymptotic for a few days or weeks or longer?”  Jha’s answer: “We know that a lot of spread happens when people are asymptomatic, but the majority of that is for people who are really pre-symptomatic. So let me explain what I mean. Let's say I got infected today, which is unlikely since I've been vaccinated, but let's say I was unvaccinated and I got infected today.   “In about three, four days, I would potentially become contagious, but may not have symptoms. For a couple of days I'd been walking around, totally feeling fine like I'm normal -- but I could be spreading the virus. This is why the virus spreads so efficiently in pre-symptomatic people.”    This weekly podcast is hosted by G. Wayne Miller, health reporter for The Providence Journal. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

America Speaks Podcast
Caroline Leavitt: A Unique and Dynamic Novelist Who Transforms Us

America Speaks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2021 63:01


Caroline Leavitt is the recipient of a New York Foundation for the Arts Award in Fiction, and a Goldenberg Fiction Prize. She was also a National Magazine Award, Nominee in Personal Essay, a finalist in the Nickelodeon Screenwriting Awards and a finalist in the Sundance Screenwriters Lab. A book critic for The Boston Globe, The San Francisco Chronicle and People, she has also published in New York Magazine, Psychology Today, More, Redbook, Parenting, and more. Cruel Beautiful World was named one of the Best Books of the Year by BlogCritics and by The Pulpwood Queens. Pictures of You was named one of the Best Books of the year by the San Francisco Chronicle, The Providence Journal, Bookmarks, and one of the top five books by Kirkus Reviews. Is This Tomorrow was named one of the Best Books of the Year by January magazine, and was long-listed for the Maine Prize, as well as being a Jewish Book Council BookClub Pick.

Twin Bills: The Red Sox Podcast
The Twin Garretts - both helping Sox win games as offense cools

Twin Bills: The Red Sox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 58:10


Providence Journal sportswriter Bill Koch and Sports editor Bill Corey are encouraged by Garrett Richards' last outing against the Mets, thanks in part to a change in mechanics, and Rule 5 pick-up Garrett Whitlock continues to impress, even as the Boston bats seemed to take a few days off. And in a few short months, Fenway's stands will be full once again! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Patriots Playbook
Patriots Playbook 4/28: Draft Preview and Beat Writers Predict the Patriots Picks

Patriots Playbook

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 127:50


Tune-in as John Rooke previews the 2021 NFL Draft and polls Patriots beat writers to predict who New England will draft and more. Guests today are Ryan Hannable from WEEI, Jeff Howe from The Athletic, Mark Daniels from the Providence Journal, Doug Kyed from NESN, Phil Perry from NBC Sports Boston and Russell Baxter from ProFootballGuru.com.

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 27 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2021 10:04


PROVIDENCE – Even though a single dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine provides a significant degree of immunity against coronavirus disease, it is imperative that those who have received one return for their second. The same holds true for those who have received only one shot of the Moderna product. So stated Dr. Ashish Jha on Tuesday during taping of the 27th episode of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast. His observation comes amidst reports that some five million Americans have missed their second dose as many experience pandemic exhaustion.  “One dose alone gives you a high degree of protection,” Jha said, “but here's the ‘but’: We don't think it lasts that long. Ten weeks, maybe 12 weeks, but I certainly have no idea that it will last much longer than that. There's an issue of that durability of protection. So everybody needs a second dose.”  Feeling that pandemic fatigue and been putting it off?   Jha, dean of Brown University’s School of Public Health, said no worries.    Just get the second dose.  “What I say to folks is, ‘You missed it, that’s not great, ideal to get [the second], but I wouldn't sweat it. Go get your second. You don't have to start all over again. No one's going to be mad at you that you miss the second dose. Just go get your second dose. Everybody needs their second dose of both Moderna and Pfizer.   “ ‘If you ended up missing at for a couple of weeks because life got busy, you ended up having some work thing or personal thing, don't sweat it. Go get the second dose. Better late than never. One dose does provide some protection but it won't last long enough and you need that second dose.’ ”  During taping of the podcast, available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK, Jha gave the latest update on the pandemic around the U.S. and the planet. It remains a dramatically mixed picture, with some states and nations in relatively good shape while others suffer horrifically.   “These are some of the worst days globally for the pandemic,” Jha said. “We’re getting close to a million new cases a day happening around the world.”  The epicenter now is India, where Jha was born and spent his early childhood. That country has now recorded several straight days of some 350,000 or more new cases.   “Their hospitals are just completely overwhelmed,” Jha said. “People are dying on the streets because they can't get access to oxygen. It is really, really, really bad. And so this weekend, I was thrilled to see the Biden administration step in and say, they're going to help. A lot of other countries are also stepping in. This is a global pandemic. We’ve got to help each other out when other counties get into trouble.”  Jha also answered an audience question from a woman in Los Angeles who wanted him to address “the very real concerns of the immunocompromised and transplant patient populations with regards to COVID vax protection and risk mitigation. Many of these medically vulnerable adults, myself included, rushed to get the vaccine as soon as it was available to them.”  Her question: “What advice does Dr. Jha have for the immunocompromised regarding risk mitigation and what understanding does he have of how the vaccine may or may not protect us, i.e. T cells, antibodies, etc.?”  His answer, in part:  “There are a group of Americans who have immunocompromised states for a variety of different conditions for whom the vaccines may work less well. The antibody response may be lower. We don't know as much about the T-cell response and so it stands to reason until we have better evidence that these people will have some protection, but not the full degree of protection. It will probably vary by immunocompromised state: different ones will have different levels of response.”  What can be done?  “We’ve got to drive the infection numbers down, down, down. We have to get vaccinations numbers really, really high. Because the best way to protect that immunocompromise person with weak protection after vaccination is to make sure that they are exposed to the virus as infrequently as possible.   “And so, if we can drive infection numbers down to 5,000 or 10,000 infections a day in the United States, it will make it dramatically safer. The alternative is to keep public health restrictions in forever. That's not going to be possible. It's not advisable. I think people will not tolerate it.”      This weekly podcast is hosted by G. Wayne Miller, health reporter for The Providence Journal.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 26 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 14:16


PROVIDENCE – Pandemic authority Dr. Ashish Jha on Tuesday hailed this week’s opening of coronavirus vaccines to all U.S. residents age 16 and older – but strongly urged officials to simplify the process by which shots go into arms so all can take advantage.   The current patchwork of web sites and phone numbers used now in cities and states across America to schedule vaccinations, Jha said, is cumbersome and confusing and discourages many people who want protection quickly and easily.   “Nationally, we're at about 50 percent of adults who have been vaccinated,” Jha said. “We are now through the people who were ‘avid vaccine seekers’ -- the people who desperately, desperately wanted the vaccine, who were the equivalent of people who camp out all night for the new iPhone that's going to open up in the morning.”   People, he said, who have been willing to spend hours repeatedly refreshing their browsers until an appointment materialized and they could grab it.  But now, said the dean of Brown University’s School of Public Health, “there’s got to be an easier way. We shouldn’t make it hard for people.”  Jha said “the next ten to 20 percent” of people needed to help toward the goal of herd immunity are not anti-vaxxers, but rather individuals who do not fall in the “avid vaccine seeker” category.  How to reach them?  “Make it super-easy,” said Jha. “Things like no scheduled appointments -- just show up and you'll get a vaccine. Do outreach. Go to work sites. People have been talking about construction sites and construction workers, so send a vaccine van out to the construction site and vaccinate everybody who's willing to get vaccinated that day.  “There are all sorts of things we can do to get the next ten to twenty percent. If we just continue doing what we're doing, we're going to find that we're hitting a wall in terms of people getting vaccinated and that's going to be a huge problem because we're at 50 percent nationally now. We’ve got to get to 70, 80 % of adults before this disease really breaks and starts getting under full control.”  Regarding the federally recommended pause in administering the Johnson & Johnson vaccine last week following reports of a rare blood-clotting complication involving six women age 18 to 48 who received the company’s one-injection product, Jha repeated his assertion “that it was irresponsible.”  Jha said he expects the federal government will mostly lift the pause by the end of the week after a CDC scientific advisory board reports its findings. The CDC could, he said, “give an advisory for women [age 18 to 48] to get a little extra monitoring” after being inoculated.  “If they don't unpause it by Friday, I think that's a huge problem,” Jha said during Tuesday’s recording of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast, available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK.  Jha also discusses COVID-19 mutations, saying “the reality of pandemics is that you're going to see new variants. We have seen new variants emerging out of India and one of them particularly has gotten a lot of attention. A lot of people are concerned about the implications and the bigger picture.  “The point is not to focus excessively on that variant per se but to really talk about the fact that variants are going to be coming for weeks and months and years and we need a strategy for how to identify them, how to track them, how to understand them, and whether they mean anything or not.”    The conversation turned to the safety of swimming pools, with Jha declaring that outdoor pools are safe and any risk associated with them would come after emerging, “when you're sitting with somebody for two hours and chatting and you're sitting right next to them. But passing by, you're not going to get it.”  Similarly, Jha said, transmission will not occur while swimming in an indoor pool, but if after “you sit with a friend for two hours right next to them and you’re not wearing a mask, that's a different thing.” In other words, risky.  Jha also answered two audience questions, one from a man in California who works for the Walt Disney Company who asked about the CDC’s V-SAFE monitoring program. Jha said it has value, but so do other programs that report adverse events.  Another woman asked about how best to discuss vaccinations with an adult daughter who is hesitant to be inoculated.   Jha said “lecturing and scare tactics almost never work” and he advised conversations about the benefits and safety of vaccines “and of course to listen to the questions that are driving the anxiety or the concerns” and respond with information and understanding.  This weekly podcast is hosted by G. Wayne Miller, health reporter for The Providence Journal. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Toucher & Rich
Vegas Buffets are Coming Back // Bill Koch from Providence Journal // Bird Checks In - 4/20 (Hour 2)

Toucher & Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 42:42


(00:00) GOOD NEWS: Buffets are closer to returning in Clark County. Joe Murray shares his thoughts on 4/20. (13:10) Bill Koch is the Red Sox Beat Writer for the Providence Journal and joins the show to talk about the team’s early season success, the struggling Yankees and much more. (29:18) Bird joins the show to discussed whether Fenway Park still plays “Sweet Caroline”. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 25 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2021 17:38


PROVIDENCE – The decision by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration to recommend an immediate pause in administration of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine demonstrates that “the system is working,” pandemic expert Dr. Ashish Jha said on Tuesday while recording the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast.  The federal recommendation follows reports of six women, ages 18 to 48, who developed an unusual blood-clotting disorder after receiving the single-dose vaccine. One died and a second woman is hospitalized in critical condition.  “Obviously, none of us wish this had happened,” said Jha, a physician, scientist and dean of Brown University’s School of Public Health. But he added: “We have a system that always errors on the side of safety and I like that.”  Despite this setback to plans to get more people vaccinated in hopes of reaching herd immunity as soon as possible so that life can begin to return to a semblance of normalcy, Jha said “I remain very confident that the J&J vaccine is very safe.”  And he brought context to the situation, noting the importance of millions of people having received the protection of a Johnson & Johnson shot.  “We are aware of six cases out of seven million people vaccinated,” he said, “so these are exceedingly rare events… If you compare that to what would have happened for those seven million people -- if even a chunk of them had gotten COVID -- the complication numbers would have been dramatically higher.”  Scientists are now analyzing data “to make sure: Are there other cases out there that we're not aware of, that we haven’t caught,” Jha said, and also to determine why all six cases of the disorder were experienced by women and what implications that will have in deciding what recommendations come next.  “So then the question is: Should we make decisions like, say, let's unpause but let's not give women 18 to 48 this vaccine and let's have them get Moderna or Pfizer.”  As the news broke Tuesday morning, an audience member whose 18-year-old daughter received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine on Sunday was quick to ask: “What should we be watching for,” in terms of possible complications.  The rare disorder, Jha said, is known as “cerebral venous sinus thrombosis,” which he defined as “basically the veins in your in your brain, in your head, get clots. And so, as you might imagine, it's pretty serious -- but treatable if you catch it early. So what are the main symptoms? Pretty severe headaches, double vision, other neurologic symptoms.  “Typically, this has happened in this small number of cases [about] six to 14 days after and what I would say to folks is: Just keep an eye out for any untoward symptoms. Certainly, if you start developing severe headaches, if you start developing problems with your vision, things that would trigger alarm bells anyway,” don’t ignore what is happening.  “These are not subtle things like ‘oh, I woke up this morning and I feel a little bit off.’ If you feel any of these symptoms, take it seriously, go get it checked out and let's figure out if you're one of the very, very unlucky people who's had it.”  He concluded: “It's a very rare thing. If the numbers end up being six in seven million -- or about a one-in-a-million overall risk -- that's a lower risk than like your risk of getting hit by lightning in a given year. We have to keep things in perspective.”  Also during recording of this 25th episode of the weekly podcast, available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK, Jha analyzed the crises in Michigan and India, where he was born and still has relatives and friends. Both the state and nation are suffering significantly now from COVID-19.  Jha also answered more audience questions sent to the podcast (they can be submitted by emailing gwmiller@providencejournal.com):  ◘ A man from southern New England asked about reactions to the second doses of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, which vary from none to mild to severe: “Is there any correlation between your immune system reacting and the expected effectiveness of the vaccine?”  Jha’s abbreviated answer: No, the vaccines are effective regardless of reaction. For those who have no reaction and wonder if they have been immunized, Jha gave assurance that they have. “What I say to people who don't have a reaction is ‘Mazel tov, you got lucky. Good for you!’ ”  ◘ Another person wanted to know if it is safe to sing in a community chorus again.  Jha answered: Not yet.  ◘ A listener in New York City asked about her children, who may want to visit Europe in the next few months after being vaccinated. Given the B117 variant and other factors, would that be safe?  “Most Western European countries will have a good chunk of people vaccinated and case numbers very low by late summer, but probably not early summer,” Jha said. “So I would be I would be hesitant about making plans right now because there's so much uncertainty across all these countries.”  This weekly podcast is hosted by G. Wayne Miller, health reporter for The Providence Journal. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Method and Madness
Episode 12: The Road Rage Murder

Method and Madness

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2021 26:23


It was Warwick Rhode Island- Adam Emery and Jason Bass would cross paths; 2 men that never met but only one of them would walk away alive. What started as a minor car accident escalated to murder. Researched and written by Dawn Gandhi Music by Timmoor from Pixabay Sources https://turnto10.com/news/local/30th-anniversary-of-jason-bass-killing-renews-interest-in-adam-emery-case https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/when-adam-lost-the-taillight-of-his-tbird-things-got-bad-then-they-got-worse-a-truthisstrangerthanfiction-story-keith-botsford-reports-1396426.html https://www.newportthisweek.com/articles/the-mysterious-case-of-adam-emery/ The Providence Journal -written by Katie Mulvaney https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/1994/09/25/a-leap-of-fate/00f97615-edb2-48e4-add4-ecff04bd4170/ Newsweek article 12/19/93 Mystery: A Double Suicide Smacks Of A Scam Unsolved Mysteries: Adam Emery

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 24 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2021 15:57


PROVIDENCE – The emergence of the B117 variant combined with the fact that a majority of Americans 65 and older have been vaccinated has resulted in larger numbers of young people, including children and adolescents, becoming infected with coronavirus disease.  That is the conclusion reached by Brown University School of Public Health dean Dr. Ashish Jha, the pandemic expert who elaborated on the topic during Tuesday's taping of the national “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast, available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK.   “These more infectious variants, especially B117,” often called the British or UK variant, “are now widespread,” Jha said. “In many states, it is causing a surge in infections. In other states, it may not be surging but it's still at a high level. And this is in the context of the fact that a vast majority of people over 65 have gotten at least one shot and they're largely protected.  “And so what you're seeing is a shift in the demographics where, under this more contagious variant, it's young people who are getting primarily affected and in relatively large numbers,” Jha said.  Asked if a higher percentage of young people who are infected have a more severe course than they would have before the B117 variant became dominant, the scientist said: “Maybe. There is some evidence that B117 is more deadly as well and can get people sicker than the original version of this virus. But I think largely we're really seeing the effect on young people because of the dramatic effect of older people being protected and not being part of the pool.”  Jha said the reopening of schools to in-person learning can be a factor in higher infection rates of young people – depending on the system and school and the state of buildings, the protective resources available, and other factors.  “Some schools do better than others, and if you don't do a good job of mask-wearing and ventilation, you can see outbreaks,” Jha said.  Athletic events are also implicated in contagion in some instances, the Brown dean said.  “Let's say you’re playing soccer, playing football, or playing field hockey. Those aren't going to get you in trouble being outside. But what happens is then kids will go into a locker room afterwards -- or before -- and those basic things that we’ve got to make sure people do are not happening in many places,” things like distancing and wearing masks, Jha said.  “What I'm saying is if you want to have sports, you absolutely can,” he continued. “But keep it outside. Don't have locker rooms -- have people dress up before, and after, go home on their own. And really try to avoid the large social gatherings because that is starting to spread a lot of disease.”  Safe participation in indoor sports such as hockey, volleyball and basketball, Jha said, require even greater precautions.  During the taping, Jha also said that given the high numbers of people already vaccinated, he is optimistic that a fourth, post-Easter, surge some are predicting will not be as severe as the three that have already occurred.   He also discussed the possible need for booster shots and preparations researchers and manufacturers are already taking.   And he addressed the effect on the pandemic of the substantial number of people who do not intended to be vaccinated, some for religious reasons.  Jha answered two audience questions, which are put to the podcast by emailing gwmiller@providencejournal.com:  ◘ A woman who identified herself as “Grandma” wrote that “my daughter is refusing to get the vaccine as she insists her doctor has indicated that it might cause sterility. Is there any data to support that?”  The short answer?   “There is no data to support that,” Jha said.  ◘ The second question was from retired industrial hygienist Becky Randolph, who wanted to learn more about the extent and value of contact tracing. Jha discussed that, saying, among other things, that it “did generate quite a bit of good data.”             This weekly podcast is hosted by G. Wayne Miller, health reporter for The Providence Journal. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rhody Radio: RI Library Radio Online
Brown & Sharpe: The Rhode Island Company Behind the Modern World

Rhody Radio: RI Library Radio Online

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2021 28:07


Historian Ged Carbone tells the story of Brown & Sharpe, the Rhode Island manufacturing powerhouse that designed and built the precision tools that enabled the creation of our modern world. The story of Brown & Sharpe follows the story of U.S. manufacturing and tells us how we got from being an industrial center to the place we’re in today. Ged Carbone is a journalist who reported for the Providence Journal. He’s a graduate of Brown University with a Master’s degree in Public Humanities, and he’s the author of two biographies on George Washington and Nathanael Greene. His most recent work has been investigating Rhode Island’s industrial history, including writing a book on Brown & Sharpe. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rhodyradio/message

Pick and Pop College Hoops Podcast
Transfer news from Bryant, Providence, URI and Brown, NCAA Tournament review and more

Pick and Pop College Hoops Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2021 92:23


Latest edition of the Providence Journal's college basketball podcast is here. Sports writer Bill Koch is joined by ABC 6 sports director and WEEI weekend co-host Nick Coit for a jam-packed episode. Bryant wrapped up its season by falling in the College Basketball Invitational and has already hit the recruiting trail for 2021-22 (1:45). Providence will return Nate Watson for a fifth year but now has four open scholarships after the departure of Jimmy Nichols Jr., Kris Monroe and Greg Gantt (7:55). Rhode Island experienced a pair of mildly surprising roster decisions, returning Jeremy Sheppard but losing Fatts Russell as a graduate transfer (18:30). Brown says goodbye to Barrington native Matt DeWolf, who is off to Washington State for a fifth season (25:15). Cumberland native and Atlantic 10 Rookie of the Year Tyler Kolek has entered the transfer portal and is exploring a move away from George Mason (30:20). We also review our NCAA Tournament brackets to date entering the Sweet 16 (39:05) and take a look at a pair of intriguing names on the coaching carousel -- Porter Moser and Shaka Smart (74:45). Thanks for joining us. Hope this finds everyone healthy and enjoying the return of March Madness.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bartholomewtown Podcast (RIpodcast.com)
G. Wayne Miller talks "Blue Hill", covering C19, multimedia output and more

The Bartholomewtown Podcast (RIpodcast.com)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2021 43:06


Bill Bartholomew welcomes journalist, author and podcaster G. Wayne Miller back to BTOWN to discuss his latest fiction book "Blue Hill", covering Covid19 for The Providence Journal, podcasting and national TV show, and much more.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bartholomewtown?fan_landing=true)

Fruitloops: Serial Killers of Color
E115: Aeman Presley

Fruitloops: Serial Killers of Color

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2021 67:26


This week Beth and Wendy discuss the case of Aeman Lovel Presley, an aspiring actor in Atlanta Georgia, who began killing random people as his acting career floundered. Thanks for listening! This is a weekly podcast and new episodes drop every Thursday, so until next time... look alive guys, it's crazy out there! Shout Outs The Comey Rule https://www.sho.com/the-comey-rule Suave Podcast https://www.futuromediagroup.org/suave/ Where to find us: Our Facebook page is Fruitloopspod and our discussion group is Fruitloopspod Discussion on Facebook; https://www.facebook.com/groups/fruitloopspod/ We are also on Twitter and Instagram @fruitloopspod Please send any questions or comments to fruitloopspod@gmail.com or leave us a voicemail at 602-935-6294.  We just might read your email or play your voicemail on the show! Want to Support the show? You can support the show by rating and reviewing Fruitloops on iTunes, or anywhere else that you get your podcasts from.  We would love it if you gave us 5 stars! You can make a donation on the Cash App https://cash.me/$fruitloopspod Or become a monthly Patron through our Podbean Patron page https://patron.podbean.com/fruitloopspod Articles/Websites Wikipedia contributors. (02/23/21). Aeman Presley. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 03/04/2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Aeman_Presley&oldid=1008512678 Corson, Pete. (06/18/2019). How the AJC covered the Tommy Mims case from “ATL Homicide”. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved 03/04/2021 from https://www.ajc.com/news/local/how-the-ajc-covered-the-tommy-mims-case-from-atl-homicide/qAZ3uNSpK0wlzDlRtccbJM/ Visser, Steve. (09/23/2016). Suspected DeKalb serial killer has death penalty hearing today. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved 03/04/2021 from https://www.ajc.com/news/crime--law/suspected-dekalb-serial-killer-has-death-penalty-hearing-today/6IJuKw0JMaiiEmlRqcPV8M/ CBS News. (04/21/2015). "Bloodlust" drove Ga. man who killed four, police say. Retrieved 03/04/2021 from https://www.cbsnews.com/news/bloodlust-drove-georgia-man-charged-with-killing-four-police-say/ Lindstrom, Rebecca. (12/15/2014). Accused killer Presley threatened to kill his own mother. Citizen Times. Retrieved 03/04/2021 from https://www.citizen-times.com/story/news/crime/2014/12/15/presley-threatened-to-kill-mother/20456783/ CBS News. (12/16/2014). Cops: Ga. serial killer linked to 4th death. Retrieved 03/04/2021 from https://www.cbsnews.com/news/cops-atlanta-serial-killer-linked-to-4th-death/ Boone, Christian. (12/19/2016). Alleged serial killer’s life a deep well of rage. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved 03/05/2021 from https://www.ajc.com/news/local/alleged-serial-killer-life-deep-well-rage/PqMHMsIp9UpdPOsgpRKHnN/ Boone, Christian. (12/27/2014). Details arise on suspect in Georgia slayings. Providence Journal. Retrieved 03/06/2021 from https://www.providencejournal.com/article/20141227/NEWS/312279949 Carter, Dontaye. (12/15/2014). Suspected serial killer was once homeless. CBS46. Retrieved 03/06/2021 from2 https://www.cbs46.com/news/suspected-serial-killer-was-once-homeless/article_a9661e3d-0c6d-5322-b7a8-18542ddc04f1.html WSB-TV. (01/20/2017). Killer says he was helping homeless man by killing him. Retrieved 03/07/2021 from https://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/atlanta/killer-says-he-was-helping-homeless-man-by-killing-him/486495405/ WSB-TV. (10/20/2014). Man's family makes emotional plea after brutal shooting death. Retrieved 03/07/2021 from https://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/mans-family-makes-emotional-plea-after-brutal-shoo/137187717/ Walston, Charles. (11/30/1995). On The Streets: ‘We’ve Got it All Here’. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved 03/07/2021 from https://www.newspapers.com/image/403835231/ The Covington News. (12/18/2014). Suspected serial killer had Rockdale history. Retrieved 03/07/2021 from https://www.covnews.com/rockdale-archives/suspected-serial-killer-had-rockdale-history/ NBC news. (12/16/2014). Atlanta Police: Suspected Murderer Aeman Presley Linked to Fourth Slaying. Retrieved 03/07/2021 from https://www.nbcnews.com/news/crime-courts/atlanta-police-suspected-murderer-aeman-presley-linked-fourth-slaying-n269151 WSB-TV2 Atlanta. (12/19/2014). Co-worker speaks about about suspected serial killer. Retrieved 03/07/2021 from https://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/co-worker-speaks-about-about-suspected-serial-kill/137017279/ History Wikipedia contributors. (06/22/2020). Demographics of Atlanta. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 09/06/2020 from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Demographics_of_Atlanta&oldid=963991094 Bryant, Jonathan M. (08/11/2020). Ku Klux Klan in the Reconstruction Era. New Georgia Encyclopedia. Retrieved 09/06/2020 from https://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/history-archaeology/ku-klux-klan-reconstruction-era Wormser, Richard. (n.d.). Jim Crow Stories: Ku Klux Klan. Thirteen.org. Retrieved on 9/5/2020 from https://www.thirteen.org/wnet/jimcrow/stories_org_kkk.html Engebretson, Jess. (07/24/2019). How the Birthplace of the Modern Ku Klux Klan Became the Site of America's Largest Confederate Monument. KQED. Retrieved 09/10/2020 from https://www.kqed.org/lowdown/19119/stone-mountains-hidden-history-americas-biggest-confederate-memorial-and-birthplace-of-the-modern-ku-klux-klan Thomas, Becky. (n.d.). Stone Mountain: A Theme Park for White Supremacists. ArcGIS Online. Retrieved 09/10/2020 from https://www.arcgis.com/apps/Cascade/index.html?appid=695684ed6d1d47e8a7b33418907cf1ce Wikipedia contributors. (09/04/2020). Lost Cause of the Confederacy. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 09/12/2020 from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Lost_Cause_of_the_Confederacy&oldid=976728390 McKinney, Debra. (02/10/2018). Stone Mountain: A Monumental Dilemma. The Southern Poverty Law Center. Retrieved 09/12/2020 from https://www.splcenter.org/fighting-hate/intelligence-report/2018/stone-mountain-monumental-dilemma Looch, Cassam. (08/28/2018). How Georgia Overtook Hollywood to Become the Film Capital of the World. Culture Trip. Retrieved 03/06/2021 from https://theculturetrip.com/north-america/usa/georgia/articles/how-georgia-overtook-hollywood-to-become-the-film-capital-of-the-world/ Dockterman, Eliana. (07/26/2018). How Georgia Became the Hollywood of the South: TIME Goes Behind the Scenes. TIME. Retrieved 03/06/2021 from https://time.com/longform/hollywood-in-georgia/ SouthernHollows.com. (01/28/2018). A 1905 Silent Movie Revolutionizes American Film—and Radicalizes American Nationalists. Retrieved 03/07/2021 from http://www.southernhollows.com/episodes/birthofanation How Not to Get Murdered 10 Self-Defense Tips That Could Save Your Life https://www.rd.com/health/wellness/self-defense-moves/ Promo  Suspiria Podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/suspiria-a-true-crime-podcast/id1392143691 Music “Abyss” by Alasen: ●https://soundcloud.com/alasen●https://twitter.com/icemantrap ●https://instagram.com/icemanbass/●https://soundcloud.com/therealfrozenguy● Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License “Too Much Ice” & “Fake Friends” by Yung Kartz https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Yung_Kartz Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License “Furious Freak” by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3791-furious-freak License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Connect with us on: Twitter @FruitLoopsPod Instagram https://www.instagram.com/fruitloopspod Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Fruitloopspod and https://www.facebook.com/groups/fruitloopspod

Pick and Pop College Hoops Podcast
March Madness is back!

Pick and Pop College Hoops Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 99:14


We're making history this week on the Providence Journal's college basketball podcast. This marks the first three-man weave edition of the production in 2020-21. Journal sports writer Bill Koch is joined by both of his normal co-conspirators -- Nick Coit of ABC 6/WEEI-Providence and Morey Hershgordon of WPRI 12/Fox Providence. We take a deep dive on some local news and your NCAA Tournament brackets.  Greg Gantt is transferring out of Providence (2:50) and Tre Mitchell will leave the Atlantic 10 after announcing a transfer from Massachusetts (7:30). That's just the appetizer for the main course -- a look at general March Madness trends (12:25) followed by in-depth conversations on the West Region (26:15), East Region (47:25), South Region (65:45) and Midwest Region (80:55). Thanks for joining us. Hope this finds everyone well. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Motherhood Unstressed
How to Transform Crisis into Spiritual Growth with Author of "More Than You Can Handle: A Rare Disease, A Family in Crisis, and the Cutting Edge Medicine that Cured the Incurable" Miguel Sancho and CGD Association of America Founder Felicia Morton

Motherhood Unstressed

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2021 45:14


Sponsored by: Hiya Children's Vitamins - Essential Super Nutrients for Kids. Use code Unstressed to save 50% Motherhood Unstressed CBD - Stressed and in the US? Use code Podcast to save 20% Life irrevocably changed when Miguel Sancho and Felicia Morton discovered that their son, Sebastian, had chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a disease which increases the body’s susceptibility to infections caused by certain bacteria and fungi. In this episode learn how their personal crises taught them how to manage chaos through various modalities of self-help, including faith, therapy, and meditation, and how you can incorporate those hard-earned lessons of survival into your life. Their story reminds us that although life can be chaotic, with the right mindset and the right tools, we have the ability to persevere. Get the Book "More Than You Can Handle" Twitter @CGDAofAmerica and @masancho3 Facebook @CGDAofAmerica Instagram @CGDAofAmerica   www.cgdaa.org   Want to hear more? Check out some of our most popular past episodes and sure to leave a review on Apple Podcasts and subscribe! Best Selling Faith Writer Sarah Bessey ON: The Renewing Power of Praye‪r‬ Alexa and Carlos PenaVega on Why You Need to Put Your Marriage First Self-Love and Shadow Work with Artist and Author Tori Press "Bringing Up Bebe" Author Pamela Druckerman ON: New Book "Paris By Phone", France's Undeniable Influence on World Culture, and How You Too Can Live La Vie en Ros‪e‬ The Power of Now Meditation - Know Your Mind So You Can Change I‪t‬ Resources: Felicia Morton is the president and CEO of Morton PR, a full-service communications firm. Felicia has an extensive background in public relations, managing clients for Manning, Selvage & Lee and GolinHarris in Manhattan. Felicia has also worked as a journalist in the United States and Europe. Her articles have appeared in The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal,The Providence Journal, Variety, The Hollywood Reporter, The Boston Globe, The Toronto Star, and The Prague Post. Felicia has a Bachelor of Arts degree from Columbia College and a combined Master’s degree (Communications & MBA) from Boston University. Why advocacy? Felicia Morton has dedicated her career to bringing people and ideas together to raise awareness for primary immune deficiencies.  When her son, Sebastian, was diagnosed with Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD)  in 2012, she found it difficult to find reliable information,  medical professionals, opportunities for patients to connect, especially while her son was in and out of the hospital with infections.  She was determined to use her skills to bring resources together and make it available to others in similar crisis. To that end, Felicia became: Founder and Executive Director of the CGD Association of America (CGDAA), a Sec.501c3 organization, whose mission is to advocate on behalf of patients, carriers, and families in the CGD community by providing clear, accurate, and independent news and information about CGD and advancing CGD research.  Was named as Patient Advocate Liaison for CGD for the Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC),  funded by the National Institutes of Health, which consists of 43 centers in North America whose shared goal is to improve the outcome of patients with rare, life threatening, inherited disorders of the immune system CGDAA listed below as a resource: https://www.rarediseasesnetwork.org/cms/pidtc/Get-Involved/Patient-Advocacy https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/6100/chronic-granulomatous-disease Was named as CGD Patient Organization for the National Institutes of Health National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences - GARD Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center CGDAA listed below as a resource Listed with NORD, National Organization of Rare Disorders CGDAA affiliated organizations: Primary Immune Deficiency Consortium https://www.rarediseasesnetwork.org/cms/pidtc/ Contact: Dr. Jennifer Puck UCSF Dept of Pediatrics Allergy Immunology and, and Blood and Marrow Transplant  NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders) Contact: Debbie Drell, Allie Crafton, Ashanthi DeSilva https://rarediseases.org/organizations/the-cgd-association-of-america/ Remember the Girls Contact: Taylor Kane, Executive Director https://www.rememberthegirls.org/ Jeffrey Modell Foundation Contact: Fred & Vicki Modell http://www.info4pi.org/wjmf/breaking-news CGD Society, United Kingdom Contact: Claire Jeffries, Operations Manager https://cgdsociety.org/ Global Genes Felicia Morton Nominated as Global Genes Rare Champion of Hope in 2020: https://globalgenes.org/rare-champion-of-hope-award-nominees/ Immune Deficiency Foundation Contact: John Boyle, President & CEO  Affiliated via PIDTC and RDCRN https://www.rarediseasesnetwork.org/cms/pidtc/Get-Involved/Patient-Advocacy https://www.rarediseasesnetwork.org/pags Named to IDF’s PI Connect Governance Committee https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/immune-deficiency-foundation-welcomes-additional-patients-and-caregivers-to-pi-connect-governance-committee-300077065.html Why innovation for the patient population? In addition to providing a central clearinghouse of information for CGD patients, families and physicians, this work is innovative because the CGDAA will soon start an IRB approved Principal Investigator driven study using the database of carriers that Felicia created to study the symptoms and diseases experienced by X linked female CGD carriers.  It has only recently been discovered that X linked carriers, long thought to be asymptomatic, actually experience medical problems linked to their genetic status.  This research may lead to earlier diagnosis of treatable illness. How does candidate inspire others? Felicia inspires, educates and supports in diverse ways including: 1. Be The Match stem cell donor drives.   Stem cell transplant is a curative option for patients with CGD, however, many patients lack a suitable donor because of ethnic diversity.  Felicia's Finnish background mixed with her husband's Costa Rican background made finding a donor for her son difficult.  She organized others to run stem cell donor drives to sign people to the Be the Match Registry to increase the available pool of donors, including drives at the NIH and Georgetown University.  2. Presenter at Conferences Felicia has represented the CGD community by speaking at the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) conference.  She also spoke at the Rare Disease Awareness Day sponsored by Orchard Therapeutics.  3. E-newsletter and blog Felicia writes the CGDAA  e-blog and newsletter that is sent electronically to the community. 4. CDGAA Mentoring Network of Volunteers Felicia recruits, trains and mentors the volunteers who in turn mentor families. 5. Family support Perhaps, most importantly, Felicia is always directly available to speak with, and reassure, patients, parents, caregivers and carriers affected by the CGD mutation. She inspires and empowers families to take an active role in getting quality care for their family members. What challenges have they overcome? Starting a not-for-profit from scratch with no funding is a daunting challenge.  Felicia completed an arduous and extensive application to the Pro Bono Clearing House Organization in the hope of being chosen and matched with a law firm to help her set up a 501c3 organization.  Her application was deemed 'compelling' and in 2019 she successfully matched, and after many months, succeeded in achieving 501c3 status.  The next challenge was to bring together medical experts to join the team as advisors.  Harry Malech, MD, Chief, Genetic Immunotherapy Section, Deputy Chief, Laboratory of Clinical Immunology and Microbiology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, National Institute of Health volunteered to lead the CGDAA Advisory Board and recruit other top CGD physician specialists in the US.   Other member of her board include: Kathleen Sullivan, MD, PhD, Chief of the Division of Allergy and Immunology, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Jennifer Leiding, MD, Immunologist and Allergy Specialist, Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital Rebecca Marsh, MD, Clinical Director, Primary Immune Deficiency Program and Co-Director, Diagnostic Immunology Laboratories, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital  Mary Dinauer, MD, PhD, Fred M. Saigh Distinguished Chair of Pediatric Research, Professor of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine - St. Louis Children’s Hospital  Fundraising is another challenge that is ongoing, however, two large pharmaceutical companies have already supported the new organization. Finally, and most personally, Felicia worked as a CGD advocate, which formed the building blocks of the CGDAA, while seeing her son through multiple hospitalizations for infections until he received a successful stem cell transplant done at a large institution in NC.  She is an X-linked carrier of CGD, the daughter herself of an X-linked mother, a wife and owner of her own PR firm.  Miguel Sancho is an Executive Producer currently showrunning and developing projects with Six West Productions. His upcoming project, The Proof Is Out There, premiered on the History Channel in January 2021. His other recent projects include the A&E unscripted series Jail Cam; the History Channel special Black Patriots: Heroes of the Revolution; and Lifetime’s Beyond the Headlines: The Watts Family Tragedy. Prior to that he was executive producer on the documentary series The Untold Story hosted by Elizabeth Vargas, a strand of 2-hour specials airing in spring 2019. He worked as showrunner on some of these specials himself, overseeing staffing, budgets, shoots, scripts, and edits; on others he served as a senior supervising consultant. He performed a similar role on the A&E series Cults and Extreme Belief which aired in the summer of 2018. He also works as a consultant for development and scripting for Efran Films on various true crime series.  Prior to his work at A+E Networks, Miguel accumulated more than two decades of experience producing national television news broadcasts, most recently as senior producer for the ABC News program 20/20. He has conceived and managed the production of hundreds of primetime broadcasts, ranging from long-term documentary projects to live breaking news specials. Known as a prolific originator of ideas, a masterful script editor and a dexterous problem-solver, Miguel was responsible for many of the most high-profile projects in the program’s recent history, working extensively with top talent such as Diane Sawyer, Barbara Walters, Elizabeth Vargas, David Muir, Dan Harris, Chris Cuomo, and John Stossel. With a background in investigative reporting, he oversaw many of the most legally sensitive projects the network aired during his tenure there. He and his teams have won many of the industry’s top journalism awards, including the Edward R. Murrow, the George Polk, the Sigma Delta Chi, the IRE Award. Most recently, he won a 2017 Emmy for an hour-long documentary special on the Las Vegas massacre, and the Black Patriots project is currently nominated for a 2020 Emmy.  He enjoys the teaching of television journalism as much as the practice of it, and has conducted numerous staff seminars on writing and shooting. He also served on the ABC News committee on Diversity, Growth, and Development. Prior to his time at ABC, Miguel spent eight years as producer at the CBS News magazine 48 Hours, where he developed his skills as cinematic storyteller in the long-form format. During his years in the field he’s covered stories all across the US and abroad, including Latin America, Europe, Africa, and the Middle-East. He speaks Spanish and has basic knowledge of French, German, Russian, and Arabic.

Too Tall Sports Podcast
Steve Krasner - Baseball Writer, Hall of Fame Voter

Too Tall Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2021 83:22


It's not often you get to talk to a journalist of 33 years at one newspaper or publication. And even more rare to talk to a Baseball Hall of Fame voter. We get both of those things today with my guest, Steve Krasner. The Rhode Island native played college baseball at Columbia and also wrote for the school paper. He eventually got a job with the Providence Journal where he covered all sports, primarily the Boston Red Sox and New England Patriots.He's written 2 books titled: "Play Ball Like the Hall of Famers" and "Play Ball Like the Pros" The latter won the Parents' Choice Silver Award in 2002.[2]We discuss what it's like to receive letters to the editor, getting stories in before deadlines, and the crazy sporting events that he covered over the years. Also, why he votes the way he does for the Hall of Fame, what it was like in 1986 World Series in Boston, the 1989 Bay Area earthquake series, and the 2004 Red Sox improbable run to a World Series.Steve does writing workshops with the next generation called Nudging The Imagination - - - www.nudgingtheimagination.com - - -You will really enjoy this episode today and let me know you thoughts below on these links!Follow Me and SUBSCRIBE, LIKE and REVIEW the Too Tall Sports Podcast:Instagram: @tootallsportspodcastTwitter: @TooTallSportsFacebook Group: TooTallSportsPodcastApple Podcasts: Too Tall Sports PodcastSpotify: Too Tall Sports PodcastYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOT1dawh_079qckq7OmFHAQPandora: https://www.pandora.com/podcast/too-tall-sports-podcast/PC:52128Email: tootallsportspodcast@gmail.com

Left Coast Pirates - The No. 1 Seton Hall Basketball Podcast
Left Coast Pirates Live - Podcast # 96 - Behind Enemy Lines w/ Bill Koch (2021-02-02)

Left Coast Pirates - The No. 1 Seton Hall Basketball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2021 44:44


Seton Hall enters a pivotal week with a trip to New England. We go Behind Enemy Lines with Providence Journal reporter Bill Koch to preview the rematch with the Friars in Rhode Island. We also preview our encounter with the UConn Huskies in Storrs.