Podcasts about forty

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Natural number, composite number

  • 2,744PODCASTS
  • 5,309EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 23, 2021LATEST
forty

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Best podcasts about forty

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Latest podcast episodes about forty

Science Salon
220. Charles Foster on Being a Human: Adventures in Forty Thousand Years of Consciousness

Science Salon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 117:24


Drawing on psychology, neuroscience, natural history, agriculture, medical law and ethics, Charles Foster, in Being a Human, makes an audacious attempt to feel a connection with 45,000 years of human history. He experiences the Upper Paleolithic era by living in makeshift shelters without amenities in the rural woods of England. He tests his five impoverished senses to forage for berries and roadkill and he undertakes shamanic journeys to explore the connection of wakeful dreaming to religion. For the Neolithic period, he moves to a reconstructed Neolithic settlement. Finally, to explore the Enlightenment, he inspects Oxford colleges, dissecting rooms, cafes, and art galleries. He finds his world and himself bizarre and disembodied, and he rues the atrophy of our senses, the cause for much of what ails us. This glorious, fiercely imaginative journey from our origins to a possible future ultimately shows how we might best live on earth — and thrive.

Byte Sized Blessings
46: Episode Forty-six: The Interview-Adam Halley

Byte Sized Blessings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 25:07


Adam builds drones. He's also a music producer, filmmaker and autistic. In this longer episode Adam tells how,  at the community college, while trying to break up a fight happening outside the classroom, he had his miracle.

Byte Sized Blessings
46: Episode Forty-six: The Byte-Adam Halley

Byte Sized Blessings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 14:34


Adam builds drones. He's also a music producer, filmmaker and autistic. In this byte-sized episode Adam tells how,  at the community college, while trying to break up a fight happening outside the classroom, he had his miracle.

Survivor Top Ten
Season 41, ep 5 - "Forty-Oneth"

Survivor Top Ten

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 84:23


It's the fifth episode of the 41st season and it's really heating up. We recapped the top ten moments. Some highlights:   Josh invents "Forty-One-th" Will Ricard vote out Shan? Will Shan vote out Ricard? Will they stick it out to the end. We all feel differently. Knowledge is power, but is it too much power. Will Genie play again? And much, much more!   Follow us on Twitter for live tweets during the show and make sure to subscribe!

Wayne Dupree Show
S10E1402: 62 Percent of American Voters Believe Biden Is Responsible for Inflation

Wayne Dupree Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 73:13


Sixty-two percent of American voters believe President Biden is responsible for the rising inflation, a Politico/Morning Consult poll found Wednesday. Forty-one percent of Democrats agree that inflation is a result of Biden's failed polices, along with 61 percent of independents and 85 percent of Republican voters. Support the show: https://patreon.com/wdshow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Positively West Virginia
Episode 190 – Crystal Mersh – 1982 Foundation

Positively West Virginia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 41:03


Born and raised in Calhoun County, Crystal graduated with a degree in Chemistry and was shortly after forced to leave her home state in order to find employment. Forty years later, Crystal has returned to WV in an effort to revitalize Calhoun County.  Her plan for revitalization revolves around the generosity of The 1982 Foundation […]

Speculate!
Episode 275 of Speculate!–Blades in the Dark–Part Forty-Nine of The Case of the Cindered Seal!

Speculate!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 40:22


This episode carries content warnings for flashbacks to trauma, violence between children, anger blackout, disassociation, violent outburst, and arcane visions The players pick a crew upgrade for the crew, only several months after earning it. The Strange Friends continue to struggle with how to deal with their captive and press her for answers as Skelly […]

Full On Church Of Rock 'N' Roll
EPISODE FORTY SEVEN: MUSIC X MARTIAL ARTS WITH DON FRACK

Full On Church Of Rock 'N' Roll

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 52:20


Owner/Instructor at Martial Art Innovations - Don Frack joins the gang to talk Music and Martial Arts!

Answers with Ken Ham
They Don't Care If God Exists?

Answers with Ken Ham

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


According to a new survey, forty-three percent of young adults in America “don't know, care, or believe God exists.” Forty-three percent!

The Bike Shed
313: Forty-Seven Percent

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 42:05


Steph talks about binging a few Things Worth Learning podcast episodes and particularly enjoyed an episode that featured one of thoughtbot's design directors, Sameera Kapila. Sam shared her expertise about management and inclusion, and Steph shares her favorite parts. Chris shares the story of a surprising error and the resulting journey through database transactions and Sidekiq that eventually resolved the issue. He also shares some follow up on the broken build and the merging process changes they introduced (spoiler, the process changes have been rolled back). Leading Inclusively, with Sameera Kapila - Things Worth Learning Podcast (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiV6_3pZFc0) How to Skim a Pull Request (https://thoughtbot.com/blog/a-smelly-list) Isolator (https://github.com/palkan/isolator) aftercommiteverywhere (https://github.com/Envek/after_commit_everywhere) timefora_boolean (https://github.com/calebhearth/time_for_a_boolean) Transcript: STEPH: Oh man, I'm about to stop eating my pop-tart. I'll put it away. It's within distance. I'm going to eat it. CHRIS: Your high-fat content unfrosted pop-tart. STEPH: You know, surprise Sunday twist: it has icing on it. CHRIS: Steph, who even are you? STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: There are a few canonical anchor facts that one knows about other people, and when one of those... STEPH: I like to keep everyone, including myself, on their toes. CHRIS: Or you've just secretly accepted that the icing adds another textural flavor adventure component. It's just better with icing. STEPH: All right, all right, all right. There's a complicated answer to this. And the complicated [chuckles] answer to this is that the more organic ingredients that I recognize when reading about pop-tarts are by a particular company, and they all have frosting on them. And the more generic pop-tarts that don't have frosting on them, I don't know how to pronounce a lot of those ingredients. So I'm like, no, but okay, I still eat them. But I prefer the ingredients I can pronounce. So I either go with the ingredients I can't pronounce or have a little bit of frosting on my pop-tart. And I'm going with the non-cancer route for today. CHRIS: For today, in this moment, and accepting the frosting. Okay, all right. Well, that is complicated. [laughs] It's tricky out there. Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Steph, what's new in your world? STEPH: Hey, Chris. So the weather, I'm going to talk about the weather for a little bit. [chuckles] It's been almost non-stop rain for the past several days, which is fine. I'm sure it's great for plant life. But it's really hard on my dog Utah because then we can't go outside for our normal walks and playtime. Although he is my four-legged water baby because he absolutely loves water, and puddles, and playing in the rain. So he's very fine with going outside and playing for a long time. But then I have to essentially give him a full-on bath before I want to bring him back in. So not wanting to have to give him a bath each time, in the spirit of improvising, we started finding more indoor games to play. And I've started teaching him to play hide and seek. And he's not great at it mainly because he will only stay until I'm out of eyesight, and then he will come and find me. And so I have to be really, really fast at finding a hiding spot to like dash around a corner or hide behind the door. But I think he enjoys it because he will find me and then he seems very excited. And we go back, and we play again. And so I just have to work on teaching him to wait a bit longer so I can find better hiding spots. CHRIS: When you said that, at first, I was like, how did you teach him to hide? But I realize he's only playing the seek part of the game, and you're only playing the hide part of the game. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: I'm just so used to you exchange roles back and forth. First, you hide, then you seek, and then you switch it up. That would be a lot to get your dog to be like, now I'm going to secretly hide. STEPH: [laughs] I'd be very impressed. Yes, we have very distinct roles in this game. I am the one that always counts and hides. But he's a very good seeker. So that's been fun. We just got to work on getting a little better at it. But on a more tech-related note, one of the design directors at thoughtbot, Sameera Kapila, who also goes by Sam, was a guest on the podcast Things Worth Learning, which is hosted by Matt Stauffer. And Matt is also the host of The Five-Minute Geek Show and The Laravel Podcast. And in the show Things Worth Learning, Matt meets with individuals that are excited to share something that they're deeply passionate about; maybe it's tech, maybe it's not. And I've binged a couple of those episodes. And I really like how you can choose between the podcast format or the YouTube format. So then you can really watch the conversation unfold, which I know you and I a couple of times have thought it would be fun if people could see us because there are so many facial emotions and gestures that go along with conversations. So it was really delightful. And speaking of delightful, Sam shared her expertise about management and inclusion. And I definitely recommend listening to the episode because I can't share everything that Sam shared. But a couple of the topics that Sam mentioned that I really enjoyed and would love to chat about, so the first one is about helping someone, in this case, someone that you manage that comes to you with a concern. So there's often a presumption that just because someone comes to you with a concern or an issue that they've experienced at work, that they're the ones that will also want to work to address that concern, and that's often not true. It can be true; maybe that person wants to be involved. But they're often coming to you in the leadership or management role to say, "Hey, I've had this issue," and they really want help with that instead of walking away with homework for it. Because then that trains people to essentially be in this mindset of well, if I bring up this concern, then I'm going to be the one that has to address it, even if I'm the one that's most negatively impacted by this. And addressing this concern could be actively harmful to me. And she shared a really great real-world example from her own experience where her and another co-worker had noticed a concern about the hiring process. And her and that co-worker got together, and they talked about the concerns. They even rehearsed for the meeting because they were trained by the tech industry to say, "Hey, if you bring up a concern, you're going to be responsible for addressing and then resolving that concern." And so they had that meeting with the person in leadership. And they were pretty nervous about how it was going to go. And that person in leadership said to them, "Thank you both so much for sharing that. That must have been such a burden. And this is my responsibility to fix. And here are what my next steps are." And that was amazing because it allowed Sam and the other person to go back to client work. And they also received follow-up conversations about how that issue was being addressed. So there was even that feedback loop as to how things were going to change. And I have a personal example that...I really resonated with the example that Sam provided because I remember there are different teams that I've been a part of, where often I was one of the few women engineers on the team. And so we often have conversations about how do we get more women engineers into the company? And they're wonderful conversations. But there's a part of me that always felt resentful about, like, why am I here? Why am I the one fixing this? I understand I have some more insight and expertise, and experience in this area. But I was also frustrated by the fact that I was the one that was in that meeting often with other women, and it felt like our responsibility to fix this. And I used to feel bad about feeling resentful towards that. Because I was like, shouldn't I want to help other people? And I do. But Sam's example really helped remind me and clarify that yes, just because there's a concern doesn't necessarily mean you should be the one to address it. And it really takes everybody involved, or it takes leadership to step up and address that concern. CHRIS: Oh, that's really interesting the way Sam is framing that and describing the situation of not having any problem that you bring in be now your work to solve. Like, oh, I found the issue, and now we've got to go do this. But the idea that you can bring something to light and then be able to walk away from it. And the particular thing that you were saying that if your interaction is always that when you reference something when you bring in a concern that then your manager works with you to figure out how you can solve it, then you get this mental block of like, well, do I even want to say anything? Because I don't want to try and deal with big, amorphous unclear issues. So maybe I just won't even say anything. And so this as a way to make sure that there's room for all of the conversation is a really interesting framing that I hadn't really thought about, frankly, but it's very interesting. I haven't seen this interview either. So I'm definitely excited to give this a look because Sam is wonderful. And the topic that you're describing here sounds fantastic as well. STEPH: Yeah. There was an important moment for me where...one of my managers is Matt Sumner, who's been on the show. And when Matt was my manager, at one point, we were having a one on one, and we would often go for walks for our one on one. And I mentioned something about "I have this concern, or I have this problem, but I don't really know how to fix it. So I'm not sure I'm ready to talk about it." And Matt, in his delightful way, was like, "We can still talk about it. You don't have to have an answer or a solution." I'm like, "Yeah, but I feel like I should be able to fix it. Like, if you have a concern, or if you have something that you want to gripe about, then you should come to the table with solutions for it." And Matt was like, "No, you don't need to do that at all. We can totally gripe about stuff or talk about concerns and then either figure out the solutions together or go to other people for ideas." And that was really important to me because, like you'd mentioned, otherwise, it felt like this mental block where then it feels like you can't air out some of the things that you're worried about or have concerns about because then you think you're the only one responsible. And you may not be able to come up with the best solution. You may need other people to then help you strategize and come up with ideas. And I just love, love, love that part of Sam's discussion. And oh, there was one other part about the conversation. Well, there are lots of parts that were amazing. But another one in particular that blew my mind is about Comic Sans, the font, the font that everyone loves to hate. [chuckles] And I learned that it's one of the most legible fonts for kids. And it's one of the more accessible fonts for people with dyslexia. And it's actually recommended...I think there are still more academic studies that need to be done to really classify fonts that are best for people that have dyslexia. But Comic Sans is recommended by The British Dyslexia Association and the Dyslexia Association of Ireland. And there are some other really great posts that talk about the benefits of using a font like Comic Sans because the typeface has long ascenders and descenders and generous letter spacing and asymmetrical lowercase b and d to then help distinguish those letters. And I just thought that was so cool. This font that everybody wants to rip apart because it seems whimsical, unprofessional gets overused. There are lots of reasons, I suppose. [laughs] But there's a really big benefit to it, and it can help others. And I just found that very whimsical in itself. CHRIS: I love the idea that there are multiple levels of knowing about Comic Sans. First, you're just like, I don't even know the name, but it's that comic book-looking font. And then obviously, the next step is to be like Comic Sans? How could you ever use that? It's an atrocity. And then it's like, but actually, Comic Sans has some things going for it. And it is a really interesting consideration and something that you wouldn't necessarily think of. But then once you learn it, you're like, okay. Man, I wonder how many other things in the world have this interesting shape to them? Hmm. STEPH: Do you know the history behind Comic Sans? CHRIS: I do not. STEPH: I read about it fairly recently, but I'm probably going to botch some of the details. But I believe it was designed or created by Vincent Connare. And it was created for Microsoft. And Vincent was working on a project where I think there was a dog that was essentially going to have these bubbles that would then show you different parts of the application and walk you through the different features. And the dog had a very comic book feel to the character. And so then Vincent designed a font to go along with that comic book character, this dog and came up with Comic Sans. I don't think the dog actually launched with that particular font. But since the font was still developed, it was released as part of the available fonts. And there we go, there is the birth of Comic Sans. And then it just received so much love and ire all throughout history. [chuckles] CHRIS: There's something that you said there that I want to loop back on when you were talking about chatting with Matt Sumner and saying, "Here's this thing, but I don't know how to solve it. So I don't even want to bring it up." I really liked the framing that you gave and the fact that Matt was like, "No, no, we can still talk about it. We can at least explore this thing, have a conversation." I think that's really wonderful. There's a very similar thing that I experience a lot when doing code review, particularly when I'm in more of a leadership role within a team, which is I often want to highlight something that feels a little bit off to me in the code, but I may not have a specific solution. Like, I may see a variable name, or I may see a controller action that feels like it's the wrong shape or something. And I'll often name it but explicitly say, "I actually don't have a better idea here. So feel free to continue on with this, but I want to name it. So in case that sparks something in you, if you were also feeling some incongruousness, maybe it's worth you spending another minute to think about it, but I want to make sure my comment isn't blocking or otherwise making you feel uncomfortable." If I just come to you and I'm like, "This feels wrong," and that's all I say, that to me is unacceptable code review. Because now I want all of my code review feedback to be very actionable, it's either here's the thing that I feel strongly I think we should definitely change this. If you disagree, let's have a conversation. But yeah, this one definitely needs to change. Here's the thing that, like, I don't know, maybe we could break this into two lines and split it up. But if you don't like that, that's fine. Do whatever. And so then it's I've given the person my thoughts but given them clarity and a free rein to do whatever they want with that information. And then there are ones where I'm like, I don't even know what I think we should do here, but I think something. But if you don't have any ideas...like, I don't have any ideas specifically. If you don't have any ideas, it's fine. We'll continue on with this and maybe revisit it down the road. But I want to make sure each of those different tiers is actionable for the other person, and I'm not just giving them homework or something to be sad about because that would be bad code review. STEPH: I'm just imagining a PR comment that says, "I don't know what we should do here. But I don't think this is it," [laughs] and that just creating sadness. That's so interesting to me because I have flip-flopped with that opinion in regards to there are times that I very much resonate and do what you just said where I will point out to someone where I'm like, "I'm not sure why, but I just have concerns about this. And I don't know if you also ran into anything that was weird about this and would like to talk about it. I don't have any really great ideas, so I think this is good for now. And we should keep moving forward, so we're not blocked on it," but just wanted to, as you mentioned, highlight it in case it sparks something for the other person or for someone else that's reviewing the code. And then there are other times where I'll look at something, and I'm like, "Yeah, it's not great. There's something that feels brittle or potentially maybe hard to maintain or things like that. But I don't have a better idea." And I don't comment on it because I'm like, I don't want to distract that person or block them. And I do think it's good enough, and I don't have anything to add to the conversation, so I just leave it out. So it's interesting to me where is that line of when I feel like it's important enough to comment to then potentially spark some conversation versus just letting it go so then I don't add any distraction to their work? CHRIS: I think it's when the spidey-sense gets past 47%. It's a very specific number. I do the same thing where there's something, and I'm like, you know what? I can't even clearly express what about this makes me feel something off, and so I won't even comment on it, and I agree. And then there are things that trip past some magical line in the sand. And I'm like, you know what? I think I'm going to say something here, but I don't even have a recommendation. And then there's a whole spectrum of the nature of code review and, again, 47% being the specific number. STEPH: There's actually a thoughtbot blog post that correlates nicely to that concept of spidey sense. It's written by Mike Burns, and it's titled How to Skim a Pull Request. But essentially, grabbing from one of the lines here is where Mike presents an unexplained, incomplete, and arbitrarily grouped list of keywords that will cause us thoughtboters to read your code with more care and suspicion. [laughs] That feels perfectly aligned with that idea of spidey sense, spidey-sense 101. I'll be sure to include a link in the show notes. Or, you know, 40%. CHRIS: I think it was 47%. It's a very precise number. [chuckles] STEPH: Very precise nonsensical number. Got it. [laughs] CHRIS: If I'm making up fake statistics, I'm not going to have them round to an even 10. [laughter] STEPH: Makes it seem more legit somehow. CHRIS: Exactly. STEPH: But that's really the novelties that I wanted to chat about. Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is leading-edge application performance monitoring that's designed to help Rails developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature bloat. With a developer-centric UI and tracing logic that ties bottlenecks to source code, you can quickly pinpoint and resolve those performance abnormalities like N+1 queries, slow database queries, memory bloat, and much more. Scout's real-time alerting and weekly digest emails let you rest easy knowing Scout's on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers ever see them. Scout has also launched its new error monitoring feature add-on for Python applications. Now you can connect your error reporting and application monitoring data on one platform. See for yourself why developers call Scout their best friend and try our error monitoring and APM free for 14 days; no credit card needed. And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. STEPH: What's new in your world? CHRIS: I have some follow up on a recent topic that we talked about. So we had a kerfuffle which I described where we had a branch that got merged and the rebase some stuff got out of hand. And so we introduced some process, the protected branch configuration within GitHub that required the branches to be up-to-date before they can be merged and CI to be passing. And everybody was happy. It was like, this is great. Turns out it was never turned on. That's actually the day I was like, man; this is really straightforward. There's been no annoyance here. And then I got to the point where it was like; this seems weird because we just merged a lot of things in rapid succession. I went and checked, and it turns out what I thought was the name of the branch protection rule in GitHub's UI is, in fact, a regular expression pattern. It might not be a full regular expression but like a wildcard pattern for the branch name to match to, and so it's specific. I created this rule, and in small, gray text underneath, it said, "This applies to zero branches." I missed that the first time but then the second time going back, I was like, oh, I actually wanted it to apply to more than zero branches. So I went back in and changed that. It's a great example of very subtle UI that just slipped past me. STEPH: I was going to say in your defense, the very subtle gray font to say, "This applies to zero," feels tricky. CHRIS: That...also, going through the work of creating this thing and if that results in zero branches that would match, maybe that's the thing to emphasize on creation. I would love that. Because in my case, I was trying very specifically to target an existing branch. There is the ability to say, "Oh, any bugfix-* named branch," if you're using branch naming strategies like that, you can use this for that sort of thing. So it may be that currently, there are no branches with that name. But in my case, I was just like, please, main, anytime anything is happening on main, that is what we want to do. I just needed to put the word main there. But anyway, once I actually turned it on, insufferable, absolutely not, cannot survive in this world. We have a relatively small team. There are three of us, and not everyone is even full-time, and my time is pulled in a lot of different directions. So I'm actually not pushing as much code as I might otherwise. Even with that, nope, absolutely not. Our CI is like; I don't know, five-ish minutes per run. Turns out, especially Monday mornings, we have a volley of things that will have been reviewed and trickled in through Friday afternoon. And then there's a bunch of work we want to land Monday morning. And then, just at any point, it turns out, yes, this was untenable. So we have turned it off. I would like to revisit this down the road and introduce the MergeQueue functionality, so the idea of being able to say, "Yeah, you just name when you want something to go in, and then the system will manage the annoying finicky work there." But for now, I had to give up on my dream of everything running on CI, on a feature branch, before it gets merged. STEPH: Ooph, that phrase, "I had to give up on my dream," that breaks my heart for you. [laughs] CHRIS: I may be going a little bit fanciful with my language but, like, a little. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: I liked this thing. I want to exist in that world. But it is not feasible given the current state of the world. And that will only get worse over time, is my expectation. So I get to revisit this when I have the time to more thoroughly figure a thing out. But for now, I don't know, merge whatever; it will be fun. STEPH: There's a small part of me that feels a little reassured that it was a terrible time, although I hate that it was a terrible time. But I have felt that pain on so many other projects where I am constantly waiting, and I'm constantly checking to be like, can I merge? Can I merge? Can I merge? And then I can merge, but then someone beats me to it. And I'm like, oh, then I got to restart. And I got to wait, and I'm constantly checking. So that feels like it helps validate my experience. [chuckles] I am excited for that MergeQueue. I would be super excited to try that out and hear about how it goes just because that seems more like the dream where you can just say, hey, I want this PR to go whenever it can go. Just take care of it. I want it to be rebased, whatever the flow is, and have it be merged, so I don't ever have to check on it again. CHRIS: But once we configured this, there was a new thing that appeared in the GitHub UI, which was auto-merge. And so that was a button where I could say like, "Hey, merge this whenever CI passes," which was a nice upgrade, but it didn't have the additional logic of and rebase as necessary. Or the more subtle logic of like, you don't actually want to rebase where you have five different branches that are all trying to merge, and they keep rebasing. You want to have the idea of a queue, and so you get in line. And you rebase when it's your turn, and then you run the CI. And you try and be as smart as possible about that. If anyone at GitHub is listening, I would love if you all threw this into your platform, and then you could ping Slack if anything went wrong. But otherwise, there are, like I said, existing tools. At some point, I will probably, I don't know, over a long weekend or something like that, sit down with a large cup of coffee and explore these. But today is not that day. STEPH: I'm excited to hear about that day. CHRIS: So that is a tale of woe and sadness. But luckily, I get to balance it out with a tale of happiness and good outcomes. So that's good. The happiness and good outcome story does start with trouble, as they always do. So we had a bug that occurred in the application where something was supposed to have happened. And then there was an email that needed to go out to tell the user that this thing had happened. And the bug popped up within AppSignal and said something was nil that shouldn't have been nil. Particularly, we're using a gem called Time For a Boolean, which is by Caleb Hearth. And he's a former thoughtboter and maintains this wonderful gem that instead of having a Boolean for like, is this thing approved, or is it paid? Or is it processed? You use a timestamp. And then this gem gives you nice Boolean-like methods on top of that timestamp. Because it turns out, very often just having the Boolean of like, this was paid, it turns out you really want to know when it was paid. That would be a really useful piece of information. And so, while you're still in Postgres land, it's nice to be able to reach for this and have the affordances of the Boolean-like interface but also have the timestamp where available. So anyway, the email was trying to process but that timestamp...let's pretend that it was paid as the one that matters here so paid at was nil, which was very concerning. Because this was the email that's like, hey, that thing was processed. Or let's say it was processed, actually, because that's closer to what it was. Hey, this thing was processed, and here's an email notification to tell you that. But the process timestamp was nil. I was like, oh no. Oh no. And so when I saw this pop up, I was like, this is very bad. Everything is very bad. Oh goodness. Turns out what had happened was...because I very quickly chased after this, looked in the background job queue, looked in Sidekiq's UI, and the job was gone. So it had been processed. I was like, wait a minute, how? How did this fix itself? Like, that's not the kind of bug that resolves itself, except, in this case, it was. This was an interaction that I'd run into many times before. Sidekiq was immediately processing the job. But the job was being enqueued from within the context of a database transaction. And the database transaction had not been committed yet. But Sidekiq was already off to the races trying to process. So the record that was being worked on, the database record, had local changes within the context of that transaction, but that hadn't been committed. Sidekiq then reads that record from the database, but it's now out of sync because that tiny bit of Sidekiq is apparently very fast off to the races immediately. And so there's just this tiny little bit of time that can occur. And this is also a fun one where this isn't going to happen every time. It's only going to happen sometimes. Like, if the queue had a couple of other things in it, Sidekiq probably would have not gotten to this until the database transaction had fully closed. So the failure mode here is super annoying. But the solution is pretty easy. You just have to make sure that you enqueue outside of the database transaction. But I'm going to be honest, that's difficult to always do right. STEPH: That's a gnarly bug or something to investigate that I don't think I have run into before. Could you talk a little bit more about enqueueing the job outside the database transaction? CHRIS: Sure. And I think I've talked about this on a previous episode a while back because I have run into this one a few times. But I think it is sufficiently rare; like, you need almost a perfect storm because the database transaction is going to close very quickly. Sidekiq needs to be all that much more speedy in picking up the job in order for this to happen. But basically, the idea is within some processing logic that we have in our system; we find a record, we do some work. And then we need to update that record to assign this timestamp or whatever it is. And then we also want to inform the user, so we're going to enqueue a job to send the email notification. But for all of the database work, we are wrapping it in a transaction because we want it to either succeed or fail atomically. So there are three different records that we need to update. We want all of them to be updated or none of them to be updated. So, therefore, we wrap it in a transaction. And the way we had written, this was to also enqueue the job from within the transaction. That wasn't something we were actively intentionally doing because those are different systems. It doesn't really mean anything. But we were still within the block of ApplicationRecord.transaction do. We're now inside of that block. We're doing all of the record updates. And then the last piece of work that we want to think about is enqueueing the job to send the email. The problem is if we're still within that database transaction if it's yet to be committed, then when Sidekiq picks up that job to run it, it will see the prior state of the world. And it's only if the Sidekiq job waits a little bit that then the database transaction will have been committed. The record is now updated and available to be read by Sidekiq in the correct updated state. And so there's this tiny little bit of inconsistency that can happen. It's basically because Sidekiq is going out to Redis, which is a distinct system. It doesn't have any knowledge of the database transaction at play. That's why I sometimes consider using a Postgres-backed background job system because then actually the job can be as part of the database transaction. STEPH: Cool. That's helpful. That makes a lot of sense the way you explained the whole you're actually enqueueing the job from inside that transaction. I'm curious, that prompts another question. In the case where you mentioned you're using a transaction because you want to make sure that if something fails to update so, everything gets updated together, in the event that something does fail to update because you were previously enqueueing that job from the transaction, does that mean that the update could have failed but that email would still have gone out? CHRIS: That does not. And the reason for that is because we're within dry-monad world. And so dry-monad will implicitly capture the ActiveRecord rollback, which I think is an exception that gets raised or somehow...But basically, if that database transaction fails for any reason and ends up getting rolled back, then dry-monads will not continue processing through the rest of the sequential operation. And so, therefore, even if we move the enqueuing of the email outside of the database transaction, the sequential nature of that processing and the dry-monad stuff that we have in play will handle that. And I think that would more generally be true because I think Rails raises an exception on rollback. Not certain there. But I know in our case, we're fine on that. And we have actually explicitly checked7 for that sort of thing. STEPH: So I meant a slightly different question because that makes sense to me everything that you just said where if it's outside of the transaction, then that sequential order won't fire because of that ActiveRecord migration error. But when you have the enqueuing inside of the transaction because then that's going to be inside of the sequential order, maybe before the rollback error gets raised. Does that make sense? CHRIS: Yes. I think what you're asking is basically like, do we make sure to not send the job if the rest of the stuff didn't succeed? STEPH: I'm just wondering from a transaction perspective, actually. If you have a transaction wrapped block and then you have in there, like, update this record, send email, end block, let's say update...well, I guess it's going raise because you've got probably like an update bank. Okay, so then yeah, you won't get to the next line. Got it. Got it. Got it. I just had to walk myself through that because I forgot that you probably...I have to visualize [laughs] as to what that code probably looks like. All right, that answered my question. CHRIS: Okay. So back up to the top level then, this is the problem that we have. And looking through the codebase, we actually have it in a bunch of different places. So the solution in any one of those cases is to just take the line of code where we're saying enqueue UserMailer.deliver_later take that line of code, move it outside of the database transaction, and make sure it only happens if the database transaction succeeds. That's very easy to do in one case. But my concern was this is a very easy failure mode to end up in. And this is a very easy incorrect version of the code to write. As far as I can tell, we never want to write the code where this is happening inside of the transaction because it has this failure mode. But how do we enforce that? That was the thing that came to mind. So I immediately did a quick look of like, is there a RuboCop thing I can do here or something? And I actually found something even more specific, which was so exciting to find. It's a gem called Isolator. And its job is to detect non-atomic interactions within database transactions. And so it's fantastic. I was like, wait, really? Is this going to do the thing? And so I just installed the gem, configured it where I wanted, and then ran the test suite. And it showed me every place throughout the app right now where we were doing this pattern of behavior like enqueueing work from within a database transaction, which was great. STEPH: Ooh, that's really nifty. I kind of want to install that and just run it on my current client's codebase and see what I find. CHRIS: This feels like something like strong migrations where it's like, yeah, this is great. I kind of want to have this as part of my core toolset now. This one feels even perhaps slightly more so because sometimes I look at strong migrations, and I'm like, no, no, no, strong migrations, I get why you would say that, but for reasons, this is actually fine. And they have configurations within it to say, like, no, this is okay. Isolator feels like it's always telling me something I want to know. So this, very quickly, I'm like, I think this might be part of my toolset moving forward on every single app forever. And actually, there's another gem that I used. It's made by the same team. So this is from the folks over at Evil Martians, which is another Rails consultancy out there in the world. And the Isolator gem is one thing that they've produced. And then I think the same author of it who is an Evil Martian's employee created the aftercommiteverywhere gem. So aftercommit is one of Rails' ActiveRecord callbacks. But in this case, it allows you to use it everywhere, as the name implies. And so rather than actually having to take that line of code out of the database transaction block, which is naturally where we would write it because that's how we think about the code and how we want to express it, you can just use this aftercommit method, wrap the call in that, so it's after_commit, and then a block. So either braces or do..end. That enqueueing of the email now just gets wrapped in that. And so what that does is it says, "Defer this until after the transaction commits. If the transaction does not commit, if we roll it back, then don't run it." And what was nice is the actual code change when I finally submitted all of this was add the gem to the gem file. And then everywhere that we're doing the wrong thing, which running the test suite told me, I just went in, and I wrapped that line in after_commit and a block. And it was such a nice, clean...like, I didn't have to move the code around or actually shift the lines, which was my first attempt at this. I was able to just annotate each of those lines and say, "You're special, you're special, you're special," And then I'm done. And again, the first gem told me every case where I needed to do that. It's like, well, this is a wonderful little outcome here. STEPH: That's really nice, yeah, how you can make the changes and then, like you said, re-run the test or re-run that gem, and it lets you know what else still needs to be updated. I'm intrigued where you mentioned you didn't have to move any lines, though. Maybe I just need to look at the gem and see it, but I'm still envisioning that you have your transaction do block. And then you're doing some things; you're updating records, and then you have your end. And then after that, it's when you want to enqueue the email. And with this after_commit, you actually added that method call inside of the transaction but then wrapped the call to Sidekiq to send the email inside of that block. CHRIS: Correct. Yeah. So it's basically like saying, "Here's almost an anonymous function." If you think about a Ruby block in that nomenclature, you're saying, like, here's some work to do when and if the transaction succeeds. And so it meant that I was able to keep the code in the way that we as humans would talk about it but deal with the murky details, and edge cases of database transactions, and Sidekiq, and whatnot. Sort of just handle it by saying like...it almost feels like an annotation or a decoration or something like that. But it was this, in my mind, almost like a perfect melding of I don't want to think about this. Oh, cool. Okay, here's a quick, easy way to deal with it but to not have to fundamentally change how I write the code. STEPH: Interesting. So I like all the things you're saying. I'll be honest, I'm not totally sold, and I'm trying to think of why. I think the benefits...one, as you mentioned, it's something you don't have to think about or at least signals to others that hey, maybe you should think about this to the extent that you use after_commit. And so that way, you don't have these asynchronous events taking place inside the transaction. So I like that visibility and communication to the rest of the team. Putting it inside of the transaction feels interesting. I don't know why; I feel a little weird about this. [laughs] I'm bringing my true self. CHRIS: That's fair. So if we're being honest, I solved this first by finding the Isolator gem. Well, I solved it first by just doing it manually. I went through the app, and I found all the places. And I was like, you know what? I'm worried that the next person authoring code like this, it's so easy to fall into this trap. Like, this is such a subtle little thing that our brains are not thinking about. And so I had first fixed it, and so I had a diff that involved moving lots of lines of code, every instance of this moved from being in the database transaction out of it. And that was fine. I was fine with that as a solution. But it was a little bit noisy because I was moving a bunch of lines. So then I brought in the Isolator gem. I actually reset that, and I went back to before I had made the fix, ran the test just to make sure Isolator was actually finding every instance. They did; that was great. So I was like, all right, cool. This is better because now I have this thing that will tell anyone when this happens. So I'm very happy about that. Because frankly, this is some hard-earned knowledge that I had to read Sidekiq and remember how database transactions work and convince myself of what was going on here and finally come to what I believe the solution is. And now Isolator is just like, cool, that's encapsulated. And it gives a very nice failure message in the test suite. So it's like, excellent. I really like this. But still looking at it, the diff, the amount of code that I had to change, it's like, well, naturally, this is how we want to write this code, but for reasons, we can't. And it's appeasing the computer more than it's appeasing the reader or the author of the code. And so then I happen to be reading through the Isolator gem's README, and they mention the aftercommiteverywhere gem. And I was like, oh, that's interesting. So one more time, I reset. And then I really tried fixing it with after_commit. And the look of the diff there felt nice to me because the lines got a little more on them, but they didn't move. And so it's like, this is how we naturally would have authored it, and now it works correctly. And I liked that. But I understand your hesitation because you're like, but the thing is, it's wrong. And so you've made the wrong not wrong anymore, but you didn't...and so I get your hesitation. I still like the fancy version. STEPH: Yeah, I think you just helped me figure out my grumpiness with it or why I'm not totally sold on it. And it was in regards to adding a dependency to avoid a noisy diff is the oversimplified version that I was processing or the reason that I was a bit grumpy about adding this other gem for that. But then you also just brought a lot of other really good reasons. One thing that you said that I do really like is adding tools that help us author code in a more natural style, the way that we want to highlight this process, and how this application does work, and how this business logic flows. So given in that light, that makes me feel better about it. But yeah, I think that was my initial grumpiness. I was like, it'll be a noisy diff. It's okay. CHRIS: I think I definitely share your hesitation, or you're like, hmm, that's an interesting reason to bring more code into the application. But at the same time, I think the counterpoint that comes to mind for me is we're using Ruby because of its expressiveness; at least, that's why I'm using Ruby. I really want the code that I write to be as close as possible to the thing that I would say to another human about like, oh okay, when a user signs up for the application, we need to create a record in our system, and then we need to send them an email. And then we need to do this other thing. And so, the closer that our code is to those words that I would use to describe to another human, the happier I am. And I will put in some pretty significant effort to hold that line as long as the code can also be correct. And so, the Isolator gem here does a great job of enforcing that correctness. And then after_commit allows me to still maintain that expressiveness and not have to think about the murky details as much or not have to reshape my code to match the murky realities of different persistence engines. But I do agree. I think it's a good thing to look at and ask, like, is it worth it? Are you sure? And in this case, I will say, "Yeah, I think so," but with that amount of certainty in my voice, [chuckles] which is not a ton. STEPH: I think this is going back to my days of working with dependency bot PRs where every time there was an upgrade for a gem, I always ask, what do you do here? [chuckles] Do we need to upgrade you? Can we just remove you from the codebase? So I'm fairly...I don't know, resistant is a strong word. I'm skeptical of when we're adding stuff in, and I just want to question the value that it's adding. But I want to circle back to something that you said, and that is hard-earned knowledge. And that part I understand so much where when you have gone through a fair amount of work to uncover an issue, and then you want to make sure that others don't have to go through that. This is a really nice way to highlight; hey, there's something that's tricky about computers and software here, and we need to watch out for that. And I want to help you lookout for that. Versus this is just inherit information where this needs to happen outside or after that transaction. And so that makes a really nice entry point where someone can look to say, "Why did we add this gem?" And then there's a commit message that goes with it that explains this is why we use this after_commit gem because we're specifically looking to avoid this type of bug. And I love that. CHRIS: Yeah, I think more lines of git commit message than diff on this one. So yeah, I wrote a short novel describing all of the features, describing the different pieces that are coming together. And then it's actually a +28 -6 diff. So it's a very small code change. But yeah, lots of story captured there. STEPH: And if you had just moved the lines, you could still have that commit message. But it's not likely that someone's going to look up that git commit change or that message that went along with it because they're not going to know to blame that one. But if they look at that particular edition of after_commit, they're more likely to find that historical context. So long story short, I think you have walked me through my initial grumpiness and provided some really good ways to avoid that really tricky failure mode for other developers. CHRIS: Well, thank you. I'm getting Steph's seal of approval starting from grumpy places. [laughs] I feel good. All right. STEPH: I'll have some special Stephanie's approval stickers designed and printed for you. CHRIS: I hope you're not joking because I very much want a yellow heart that says, "Steph-approved." STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: And I can put it on PRs, and I can put it on the wall. [laughs] STEPH: Well, now I have to find a sticker designer and make a...well, it's just a yellow heart. I can probably handle this. I'm going to use Comic Sans. That will be the approved part. [laughs] Yellow hearts and Comic Sans for everybody. CHRIS: Well, with that absolutely fantastic call back to earlier parts of the episode, shall we wrap up? STEPH: Let's wrap up. CHRIS: The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeeee! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Pop Culture Leftovers
Marvel's Wastelanders: Hawkeye Sneak Peek!

Pop Culture Leftovers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 6:59


Marvel's Wastelanders: Hawkeye is the second installment in the Marvel's Wastelanders audio epic. Forty years ago, the villains of the world rose up and killed all the heroes.  Well, all the heroes that mattered. The sole survivor of the Avengers, Hawkeye (Stephen Lang) is now a sideshow freak, re-living the worst day of his life for paying audiences. He's surly, broken, and losing his sight, but there's still that fire in him to be a hero, to avenge his friends. And he's ready to do what needs to be done: killing every last person responsible for the deaths of those he loved the most. Marvel's Wastelanders: Hawkeye is the second installment in the Marvel's Wastelanders audio epic. Written by J. Holtham (Supergirl, Jessica Jones), directed by Rachel Chavkin (Hadestown), with sound design by One Thousand Birds and an original score by James Harrison Monaco and Jerome Ellis. Learn more at marvel.com/wastelanders.

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show
Facing Forty and Still Free

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 4:05


WOW!!! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The John Batchelor Show
1772: Holly Fretwell #Unbound. National Forests. The complete, forty-minute interview. April 12, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 40:59


Photo:  Woodland path at Hotel Aspinwall, Lenox, Mass CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Holly Fretwell  #Unbound. The complete, forty-minute interview.  April 12, 2021. Fix America's Forests: Reforms to Restore National Forests and Tackle the Wildfire Crisis. Holly Fretwell , Jonathan Wood April 12, 2021   https://www.perc.org/2021/04/12/fix-americas-forests-reforms-to-restore-national-forests-and-tackle-the-wildfire-crisis/ In 2020, the largest wildfire in California history scorched six counties in the northern part of the state. The August Complex Fire burned more than one million acres across three national forests and destroyed hundreds of structures. But devastating fires are not limited to California. Across the West, more than 10 million acres burned in 2020—a record in modern history. These fires consumed more than 17,500 structures and more than $3.5 billion in firefighting costs. Tragically, dozens of lives were lost, and many more people were displaced by evacuation orders. Fires released smoke that degraded air quality nearby and hundreds of miles away. They also destroyed wildlife habitat, including for imperiled species, and the fires' aftereffects will soon lead to erosion that harms water quality in local watersheds. .

The John Batchelor Show
1772: Russell Shorto, Smalltime: A Story of My Family and the Mob. #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview, April 22, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 41:00


Photo: Mob violence: Tarring and feathering Joseph Smith CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Russell Shorto #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview, April 22, 2021. Smalltime: A Story of My Family and the Mob. Hardcover – February 2, 2021, by Russell Shorto   https://www.amazon.com/Smalltime-Story-My-Family-Mob/dp/0393245586/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Family secrets emerge as a best-selling author dives into the history of the mob in small-town America. The best-selling author Russell Shorto, praised for his incisive works of narrative history, never thought to write about his own past. He grew up knowing his grandfather and namesake was a small-town mob boss but maintained an unspoken family vow of silence. Then an elderly relative prodded: You're a writer―what are you gonna do about the story? Smalltime is a mob story straight out of central casting―but with a difference, for the small-town mob, which stretched from Schenectady to Fresno, is a mostly unknown world. The location is the brawny postwar factory town of Johnstown, Pennsylvania. The setting is City Cigar, a storefront next to City Hall, behind which Russ and his brother-in-law, “Little Joe,” operate a gambling empire and effectively run the town. Smalltime is a riveting American immigrant story that travels back to Risorgimento Sicily, to the ancient, dusty, hill-town home of Antonino Sciotto, the author's great-grandfather, who leaves his wife and children in grinding poverty for a new life―and wife―in a Pennsylvania mining town. It's a tale of Italian Americans living in squalor and prejudice, and of the rise of Russ, who, like thousands of other young men, created a copy of the American establishment that excluded him. Smalltime draws an intimate portrait of a mobster and his wife, sudden riches, and the toll a lawless life takes on one family. But Smalltime is something more. The author enlists his ailing father―Tony, the mobster's son―as his partner in the search for their troubled patriarch. As secrets are revealed and Tony's health deteriorates, the book becomes an urgent and intimate exploration of three generations of the American immigrant experience. Moving, wryly funny, and richly detailed, Smalltime is an irresistible memoir by a masterful writer of historical narrative. 8 black-and-white illustrations

The John Batchelor Show
1772: Jeff McCausland #Unbound. Gettysburg Leadership—the complete, forty-minute interview. May 21, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 41:20


Photo:  The pursuit of Gen. Lee's rebel army. The heavy guns - 30 pounders - going to the front during a rain storm / E.F. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Jeff McCausland #Unbound. The complete, forty-minute interview. May 21, 2021. Battle Tested! Gettysburg Leadership Lessons for 21st Century Leaders, by Jeffrey D. McCausland (Author), Tom Vossler (Author), Walter Dixon (Narrator), Gildan Media (Publisher). Audible Audiobook– Unabridged https://www.amazon.com/Battle-Tested-Gettysburg-Leadership-Lessons/dp/1642934534 In order to be a truly effective leader, it is necessary to learn as much as possible from the examples of history—the disasters as well as the triumphs. At Gettysburg, Union and Confederate commanders faced a series of critical leadership challenges under the enormous stress of combat. The fate of the nation hung in the balance. Each of these leaders  responded in different ways, but the concepts and principles they applied during those traumatic three days contain critical lessons for today's leaders that are both useful and applicable—whether those leaders manage operations at a large corporation, supervise a public institution, lead an athletic team, or govern a state or municipality.   In the twenty-first century, leadership is the indispensable quality that separates successful organizations from failures. Successful leaders communicate vision, motivate team members, and inspire trust. One must move both people and the collective organization into the future while, at the same time, dealing with the past. A leader must learn to master the dynamic requirements of decision-making and change.

To The Infinity Saga and Beyond: A Marvel Fan Podcast
Episode Forty: Venom: Let There Be Carnage Review

To The Infinity Saga and Beyond: A Marvel Fan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 19:48


Jordan is back to talk about Venom: Let There Be Carnage. He then theorizes on what the mid credit scene means for the MCU and Sony. Follow the Show: Email: Marvelplusrecaps@gmail.com Twitter: @toinfinitysaga Facebook: Facebook.com/infinitysagabeyond Anchor: https://anchor.fm/infinitysagabeyond LinkTree: https://linktr.ee/toinfinitysagaandbeyond --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/infinitysagabeyond/message

The John Batchelor Show
1770: James Tooley #Unbound: Really good schools. The complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 41:00


Photo:   SER-Niños Charter School, a charter school in the Gulfton area of Houston, Texas CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow  James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education –  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley  “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

Le Batard & Friends Network
MC- Episode One Hundred - Forty-Nine

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 52:25


On this week's Mystery Crate, our weekly roundtable with the Meadowlarkers. Kate Fagan, Amin Elhassan, Howard Bryant, and Tom Haberstroh discuss the past week's developments surrounding the firing of Jon Gruden and how it connects to the broader culture inside football and outside of football. Plus, a conversation about the Adam Schefter email leak. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate
Episode One Hundred - Forty-Nine

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 52:25


On this week's Mystery Crate, our weekly roundtable with the Meadowlarkers. Kate Fagan, Amin Elhassan, Howard Bryant, and Tom Haberstroh discuss the past week's developments surrounding the firing of Jon Gruden and how it connects to the broader culture inside football and outside of football. Plus, a conversation about the Adam Schefter email leak. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Smith and Marx Walk into a Bar: A History of Economics Podcast

In this month's episode, Çınla, Scott, Jennifer, and Carlos are joined by Antoine Missemer and Marco Paulo Franco to discuss their work on ecological economics and their forthcoming co-authored book on the history of the field.  Smith and Marx Walk into a Bar is supported by a grant from the History of Economics Society: http://historyofeconomics.org

FANGIRL FORUM
Episode Forty-Three | Once Upon A Time & The Fandom: All Magic Comes With A Price

FANGIRL FORUM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 63:08


Welcome back for another trek into the Enchanted Forest. With Once Upon A Time turning 10 years old, I'm reflecting on my time with the OUAT fandom with the friends I made along the way. In Part 2, I'm looking back at fan conventions: meeting the actors, as well as fellow fans from all over the world. Plus, I share with you behind the curtain of what it was like going to the OUAT set in Vancouver. Hang in there with me as we continue on this quest through the fandom. Listen now! This is a SPOILER-FILLED episode. Spoilers are ahead for Once Upon A Time (I'm serious) YOU HAVE BEEN PROPERLY WARNED! Follow Fangirl Forum on Twitter: @FangirlForumPod Don't forget to subscribe, rate, comment, and share with the masses! Music by Jonathan Segev. Copyright Jonathan Segev 2018

Passive Wealth Strategies for Busy Professionals
Flipping Real Estate Out of State in 2 Hours a Month with Sharad Mehta

Passive Wealth Strategies for Busy Professionals

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 37:08


Sharad Mehta is a very active real estate investor who founded REsimpli, a cloud-based system that makes real estate investing more efficient by automating tasks and helping investors manage their business more efficiently. Sharad has done over 400 deals in the last 6 years since he became a full-time real estate investor and over the years he has developed systems to automate many parts of his real estate investing. Sharad is a very active investor in Lake County, Indiana market and he manages his entire business from Carlsbad, California, where he lives. Using the systems that Sharad has developed, he is able to manage 3-4 rehabs a month from a distance.    [00:01 - 05:46] Opening Segment Get to know Sharad Mehta Sharad and his Australian dollars Beginning real estate and starting his own software company   [05:47 - 10:04] Forty to Fifty Flips a Year How to Do Forty to Fifty Flips a Year Sharad's Time Spent in Each Flip One Good Thing in Chicago! Is it Too Early in the Business?   [10:05 - 30:17]  Flipping Real Estate Out of State in 2 Hours a Month Sharad talks about The E-Myth Why you should start documenting and the advantages of documenting How Sharad manages his software company “We're a little bit more picky about deals” How Sharad is going to rebuild his business someplace else Changing variables in marketing teams Documenting and making a checklist Finding a good contractor A Unique Closing in Tanzania    [30:18 - 37:08] Closing Segment Quick break for our sponsorsGroundfloor offers short-term, high-yield real estate debt investments to the general public. Check www.passivewealthstrategy.com/groundfloor/ to get started. What is the best investment you've ever made other than your education?10-Unit Property Wholesale Sharad's worst investmentLosing $20,000 in a deal in an unfamiliar area What is the most important lesson that you've learned in business and investing?“Just be better at one thing than anybody else.” Connect with my guest. See the links below.   Resources Mentioned: The E-Myth   Tweetable Quotes: “Start documenting things in your business even if you feel like you don't have time for it.” - Sharad Mehta “People lie, numbers never lie.” - Sharad Mehta “Take one thing, everything outside of that is noise.” - Sharad Mehta ------------ Connect with Sharad Mehta through LinkedIn.  Visit their website https://resimpli.com/.   Invest passively in multiple commercial real estate assets such as apartments, self storage, medical facilities, hotels and more through https://www.passivewealthstrategy.com/crowdstreet/ Participate directly in real estate investment loans on a fractional basis. Go to www.passivewealthstrategy.com/groundfloor/ and get ready to invest on your own terms.  LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to explode their business growth by sharing this episode or click here to listen to our previous episodes                   

Nice, Naughty and Forty
The Nice Sweet Spot

Nice, Naughty and Forty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 2:33


Tanya, one half of Nice, Naughty and Forty, decided to check off something on her bucket list for her birthday and launched a new YouTube channel: Nice Sweet Spot.

On Israel with Ben Caspit, an Al-Monitor podcast
International security expert Eviatar Matania: 40% of global cyber investments reach Israel

On Israel with Ben Caspit, an Al-Monitor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 39:48


Ben Caspit hosts this week on his podcast Professor Eviatar Matania of Tel-Aviv University, who has played a key role in turning Israel into a world cyber power. The book he coauthored recently with Amir Rapaport, titled Cybermania, has created a stir in Israel and elsewhere. Matania explains that in this domain, Israel is a real player, not just per capita, but in absolute numbers. “Forty percent of global private investments in cyber reach Israel, and one third of the unicorn companies belong to Israelis. These are real numbers of a global power,” he notes. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

A Way with Words — language, linguistics, and callers from all over

This week on "A Way with Words": When there's no evening meal planned at home, what do you call that scramble to cobble together your own dinner? Some people apply acronyms like YOYO -- "you're on your own" -- or CORN, for "Clean out your refrigerator night." Plus, when a barista hands you hot coffee in a paper cup, you may ask for a sleeve to put it in. The technical term for that cardboard ring is zarf -- but will you get a weird look if you ask for one? Finally, the ongoing search for an alternative to the term senior citizen. Read full show notes, hear hundreds of free episodes, send your thoughts and questions, and learn more on the A Way with Words website: https://waywordradio.org/contact. Be a part of the show: call 1 (877) 929-9673 toll-free in the United States and Canada; worldwide, call or text/SMS +1 (619) 800-4443. Email words@waywordradio.org. Twitter @wayword. Copyright Wayword, Inc., a 501(c)(3) corporation.

The John Batchelor Show
1754: John Tamny #Unbound. When Politicians Panicked: the complete, forty-minute interview. March 28, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 41:19


Photo:  A London Board of Health hunting after cases like a cholera.   John Tamny #Unbound. When Politicians Panicked: the complete, forty-minute interview. March 28, 2021. When Politicians Panicked: The New Coronavirus, Expert Opinion, and a Tragic Lapse of Reason   /  Hardcover – March 30, 2021 by John Tamny  (Author), George Gilder (Foreword) https://www.amazon.com/When-Politicians-Panicked-Coronavirus-Opinion/dp/1642938378/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= When Politicians Panicked tells the tragic story of how, in response to a spreading virus, global politicians mindlessly pursued economic desperation, starvation, and death as the cure. The global economy was booming as 2020 dawned, but within a few short months wreckage, death, and desperation borne of economic contraction were the new normal. What happened? In When Politicians Panicked, economic commentator John Tamny tells the heart-wrenching story of a time when politicians were tragically relieved of basic common sense in their response to the new coronavirus. In March of 2020, the virus quickly became a major news item as political panic about it traveled around the world. Even though anecdotal and market-based evidence from the virus's epicenter indicated very low lethality, politicians quickly imposed economy-crushing lockdowns on the rather specious assumption that unemployment, bankruptcy, and starvation would somehow halt the virus's spread. Tamny methodically dismantles the political consensus by showing how economic growth has long been the first and last answer to death and disease. He then shows how politicians, having mindlessly crushed a growing economy, proceeded to double down on their mistakes by throwing taxpayer money at their shocking errors. Throughout When Politicians Panicked, Tamny makes a relentless case that free people don't just produce the wealth that renders today's killers yesterday's news. They also produce crucial information about health threats that shine a light on that which threatens us. Lockdowns suffocate economic progress, but they also blind us to how we can progress—as Tamny makes plain in what will go down as an essential history for anyone seeking to understand the coronavirus panic of 2020.   .. Permissions: Description | A London Board of Health hunting after cases like a cholera.Wellcome Images Keywords: Caricatures; Cholera Credit line |  | This file comes from Wellcome Images, a website operated by Wellcome Trust, a global charitable foundation based in the United Kingdom. Refer to Wellcome blog post (archive). This tag does not indicate the copyright status of the attached work. A normal copyright tag is still required. See Commons:Licensing. References | Library reference: Slide number 5152Photo number: L0006896 Source/Photographer | https://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/obf_images/8b/c3/77736f655087735cb0f7db494122.jpgGallery: https://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/image/L0006896.htmlWellcome Collection gallery (2018-03-22): https://wellcomecollection.org/works/d5vcm8mc CC-BY-4.0 | This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. | You are free: to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work; to remix – to adapt the workUnder the following conditions: attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use. ..

The John Batchelor Show
1754: Sophie Pedder #UNBOUND. Révolution Française, the complete forty-minute interview, July 17, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 41:00


Pnoto:  La Révolution française est une période de bouleversements sociaux et politiques de grande envergure en France, dans ses colonies et en Europe à la fin du xviiie siècle.  Here:  architecture from "The History of the French Revolution, 1789 to 1795; or a country without a God" Sophie Pedder #UNBOUND. Révolution Française, the complete forty-minute interview, July 17, 2021. Révolution Française, by Sophie Pedder.  @PedderSophie  https://www.amazon.com/Revolution-Française-Emmanuel-Macron-reinvent/dp/1472948602 The extraordinary story of how an outsider candidate—an unknown technocrat and economics minister on the fringes of French politics—made his way to the Élysée palace, with expert analysis of his first year in office. Two years after Emmanuel Macron came from nowhere to seize the French presidency, Sophie Pedder, The Economist's Paris bureau chief, tells the story of his remarkable rise and time in office so far. In this paperback edition, published with a new foreword by the author, Pedder reflects on Macron's troubles and triumphs: his dwindling popularity; the 'gilets jaunes'protests and resulting civil unrest; his efforts to transform France and lead the global fight against climate change; the Benalla affair; his erratic relationships with Angela Merkel, Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin and Theresa May, and the future of the European project.  On the eve of important European elections, and with nationalist and populist forces rising across the continent, she considers whether Macron can hold the centre ground and defend the multilateral liberal order against the axis of such figures as Italy's Matteo Salvini and Hungary's Viktor Orbán. Pedder also analyses the domestic situation in France, the evolution of En Marche, and the fall-out from Macron's controversial reforms. Meticulously researched and written in Pedder's gripping and immensely readable style, this is the essential, authoritative account for anyone wishing to understand Macron and the future of France in the world.

ToledoTalks!
Episode Forty-Seven - 10.07.21

ToledoTalks!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 21:06


Interview with Mac Driscoll, candidate for Toledo City Council at large.

The Inner Room- Emotions in the Bible
Episode 470 - Repenting from our ways

The Inner Room- Emotions in the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 12:14


Jon 3:1-10 The word of the LORD came to Jonah a second time: “Set out for the great city of Nineveh, and announce to it the message that I will tell you.” So Jonah made ready and went to Nineveh, according to the LORD's bidding. Now Nineveh was an enormously large city; it took three days to go through it. Jonah began his journey through the city, and had gone but a single day's walk announcing, “Forty days more and Nineveh shall be destroyed,” when the people of Nineveh believed God; they proclaimed a fast and all of them, great and small, put on sackcloth. When the news reached the king of Nineveh, he rose from his throne, laid aside his robe, covered himself with sackcloth, and sat in the ashes. Then he had this proclaimed throughout Nineveh, by decree of the king and his nobles: “Neither man nor beast, neither cattle nor sheep, shall taste anything; they shall not eat, nor shall they drink water. Man and beast shall be covered with sackcloth and call loudly to God; every man shall turn from his evil way and from the violence he has in hand. Who knows, God may relent and forgive, and withhold his blazing wrath, so that we shall not perish.” When God saw by their actions how they turned from their evil way, he repented of the evil that he had threatened to do to them; he did not carry it out. Psalm 130:1b-2, 3-4ab, 7-8 R. (3) If you, O Lord, mark iniquities, who can stand? Out of the depths I cry to you, O LORD LORD, hear my voice! Let your ears be attentive to my voice in supplication. R. If you, O Lord, mark iniquities, who can stand? If you, O LORD, mark iniquities, LORD, who can stand? But with you is forgiveness, that you may be revered. R. If you, O Lord, mark iniquities, who can stand? Let Israel wait for the LORD, For with the LORD is kindness and with him is plenteous redemption; And he will redeem Israel from all their iniquities. Lk 10:38-42 Jesus entered a village where a woman whose name was Martha welcomed him. She had a sister named Mary who sat beside the Lord at his feet listening to him speak. Martha, burdened with much serving, came to him and said, “Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me by myself to do the serving? Tell her to help me.” The Lord said to her in reply, “Martha, Martha, you are anxious and worried about many things. There is need of only one thing. Mary has chosen the better part and it will not be taken from her.” --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sofia-fonseca7/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sofia-fonseca7/support

Full On Church Of Rock 'N' Roll
EPISODE FORTY SIX: TRUTH AND SOUL WITH CHAKA MALIK

Full On Church Of Rock 'N' Roll

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 56:19


Truth and Soul with Chaka Malik - BURN/Orange 9mm/Ghost Decibels and so much more. WARNING: Contains free, independent thinking.

Get Healthy Alabama
21-40 What's Wrong With This Picture?

Get Healthy Alabama

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 19:50


Episode 21:40 What's Wrong With This Picture? Do me a favor and take a look at the picture that accompanies this episode. It's a picture of my (Dr. George Burroughs) first grade class from approximately 50 years ago. Notice how many students there are: Forty-five. Then notice how many teachers there are: One. Yes, one teacher, Mrs. Manco, with 45 first graders (I'm the handsome kid standing right in front of her.) Now, answer me this question: What's wrong with this picture? The answer, of course, is NOTHING. Nothing is wrong with this picture. What's WRONG is the health of today's children. Let me explain: Having 45 students in a first grade class with just one teacher would be unheard of today. Fifty years ago it was normal. Today, those 45 students would be split up into two… possible three classes. Here's another thing: If for some reason there was a class of 45 first graders today, there certainly would be a “teachers aide” assigned to help the teacher. Not back then. Nor was there any “special ed” classes or teachers. Heck, we didn't even have a school nurse… despite having nearly 700 students at the school. And, with the exception of possibly one student who may have had asthma (I'm not sure), no one in my class required a daily medication of any kind. To repeat: 45 kids in a first grade class with just one teacher… and we had NO problems. On top of that we were extremely healthy, well behaved, and intelligent. However, please don't think I'm bragging on myself or my classmates. I'm not. You see, most classrooms were similar to this back then. It's true. Fifty years ago it was common to see large classrooms filled with healthy kids... all fully capable of learning. Not today. Today it would be considered criminal to fill a first grade classroom with 45 kids and only one teacher. Why? Because kids today aren't nearly as healthy as they were fifty years ago and, for many of them, learning is a challenge. For this reason nurses and special education services are a necessity today in schools. To be clear, I am NOT bringing all of this up to belittle the students of today. Instead, I'm bringing it up so that we can ask a very important question: WHAT HAS HAPPENED??? That is, what has happened in the past 50 years that has resulted in today's children being less healthy and less able to be educated in a typical classroom setting? On this episode we explore four specific changes in American culture have had a tremendous NEGATIVE impact on the physical and mental health of our society… especially our children. More importantly, we explore what can be done to correct it. Please give this a good listen and then share it with anyone you know that has kids… or cares about kids. Thanks! ———————- Want to learn more? Continue the conversation regarding this episode, and all future episodes, by signing up for our daily emails. Simply visit: GetHealthyAlabama.com Once there, download the “Symptom Survey” and you will automatically added to our email list. ———————- Also, if you haven't already, we'd appreciate it if you'd subscribe to the podcast, leave a comment and give us a rating. (Thanks!!!) 

On Facebook? Connect with us at Facebook.com/GetHealthyAlabama

 * This podcast is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any disease. Please consult with your health care provider before making any health-related changes.

Marvel's Wastelanders: Star-Lord
A Sneak Peek of Marvel's Wastelanders: Hawkeye!

Marvel's Wastelanders: Star-Lord

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 5:37


Forty years ago, the villains of the world rose up and killed all the heroes. Well, all the heroes that mattered. The sole survivor of the Avengers, Hawkeye (Stephen Lang) is now a sideshow freak, re-living the worst day of his life for paying audiences. He's surly, broken, and losing his sight, but there's still that fire in him to be a hero, to avenge his friends. And he's ready to do what needs to be done: killing every last person responsible for the deaths of those he loved the most. Marvel's Wastelanders: Hawkeye is the second installment in the Marvel's Wastelanders audio epic. Written by J. Holtham (Supergirl, Jessica Jones), directed by Rachel Chavkin (Hadestown), with sound design by One Thousand Birds and an original score by James Harrison Monaco and JJJJJerome Ellis. Learn more at marvel.com/wastelanders.

This Week in Marvel
Marvel's Wastelanders: Hawkeye Sneak Peek!

This Week in Marvel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 5:37


Forty years ago, the villains of the world rose up and killed all the heroes. Well, all the heroes that mattered. The sole survivor of the Avengers, Hawkeye (Stephen Lang) is now a sideshow freak, re-living the worst day of his life for paying audiences. He's surly, broken, and losing his sight, but there's still that fire in him to be a hero, to avenge his friends. And he's ready to do what needs to be done: killing every last person responsible for the deaths of those he loved the most. Marvel's Wastelanders: Hawkeye is the second installment in the Marvel's Wastelanders audio epic. Written by J. Holtham (Supergirl, Jessica Jones), directed by Rachel Chavkin (Hadestown), with sound design by One Thousand Birds and an original score by James Harrison Monaco and JJJJJerome Ellis. Learn more at marvel.com/wastelanders.

Women of Marvel
Marvel's Wastelanders: Hawkeye Sneak Peek!

Women of Marvel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 5:37


Forty years ago, the villains of the world rose up and killed all the heroes. Well, all the heroes that mattered. The sole survivor of the Avengers, Hawkeye (Stephen Lang) is now a sideshow freak, re-living the worst day of his life for paying audiences. He's surly, broken, and losing his sight, but there's still that fire in him to be a hero, to avenge his friends. And he's ready to do what needs to be done: killing every last person responsible for the deaths of those he loved the most. Marvel's Wastelanders: Hawkeye is the second installment in the Marvel's Wastelanders audio epic. Written by J. Holtham (Supergirl, Jessica Jones), directed by Rachel Chavkin (Hadestown), with sound design by One Thousand Birds and an original score by James Harrison Monaco and JJJJJerome Ellis. Learn more at marvel.com/wastelanders.

The John Batchelor Show
1736: Nicholas Wapshott #UNBOUND. Samuelson Friedman: The complete, forty-minute interview, July 24, 2016.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 41:00


Photo: Second dinner held by the Economic Club of New York at the Hotel Astor. CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Nicholas Wapshott #UNBOUND. Samuelson Friedman:The complete forty-minute interview, July 24, 2016. Samuelson Friedman: The Battle Over the Free Market, by Nicholas Wapshott  https://www.amazon.com/Samuelson-Friedman-Battle-Over-Market-ebook/dp/B08589Z7M9/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Nicholas+Wapshott+%2B+samuelson&qid=1627690920&s=digital-text&sr=1-1 From the author of Keynes Hayek, the next great duel in the history of economics. In 1966 two columnists joined Newsweek magazine. Their assignment: debate the world of business and economics. Paul Samuelson was a towering figure in Keynesian economics, which supported the management of the economy along lines prescribed by John Maynard Keynes's General Theory. Milton Friedman, little known at that time outside of conservative academic circles, championed “monetarism” and insisted the Federal Reserve maintain tight control over the amount of money circulating in the economy. In Samuelson Friedman, the author and journalist Nicholas Wapshott brings narrative verve and puckish charm to the story of these two giants of modern economics, their braided lives and colossal intellectual battles. Samuelson, a forbidding technical genius, grew up a child of relative privilege and went on to revolutionize macroeconomics. He wrote the best-selling economics textbook of all time, famously remarking "I don't care who writes a nation's laws—or crafts its advanced treatises—if I can write its economics textbooks." His friend and adversary for decades, Milton Friedman, studied the Great Depression and with Anna Schwartz wrote the seminal books The Great Contraction and A Monetary History of the United States. Like Friedrich Hayek before him, Friedman found fortune writing a treatise, Capitalism and Freedom, that yoked free markets and libertarian politics in a potent argument that remains a lodestar for economic conservatives today. In Wapshott's nimble hands, Samuelson and Friedman's decades-long argument over how—or whether—to manage the economy becomes a window onto one of the longest periods of economic turmoil in the United States. As the soaring economy of the 1950s gave way to decades stalked by declining prosperity and "stagflation," it was a time when the theory and practice of economics became the preoccupation of politicians and the focus of national debate. It is an argument that continues today.

Victim 2 Victor - Surviving Abuse and Overcoming Trauma
“We Heal Better Together” WeToo Author, Advocate & Survivor Mary DeMuth, Healing From Abuse & Trauma

Victim 2 Victor - Surviving Abuse and Overcoming Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 38:18


Mary DeMuth is an international speaker, literary agent, podcaster, and she's the novelist and non-fiction author of over FORTY books, including The Most Misunderstood Women of the Bible. She lives in Texas with her husband of 31 years and is the mom to three adult children and loves to help people to find hope and healing to re-story their lives.From the age of just 5 years old, Mary was groomed by her father and sexually abused repeatedly by teenage boys which scarred her for life as she suffered traumatic consequences. Her coping mechanism was to disconnect from what was happening to her and so she was able to tolerate the abuse.Her life turned around at the age of 15 when she eventually met Christ. She says “I have the privilege of speaking openly about this issue that most keep hidden (that is the grace of God), and pray for people, and see them taste freedom, too. What a privilege!”We who were abused can serve as agents of healing, change, life, renewal and hope and we can now lend voices to those who can't speak. Even in this space of the internet, we can learn to be brave and tell our stories, to cry alongside, to be good community for each other and usher in healing. Find out more about Mary at marydemuth.com. She also hosts a popular daily prayer podcast show which has over 2 Million downloads and a space where you can be prayed for daily: prayeveryday.show. For a vast range of worldwide sexual abuse resources, visit wetoo.org.  For cards, prints, and artsy fun go to https://www.marydemuth.com/artIf you have a book that you are looking to be published then you can find out what she is looking for as a literary agent by visiting her page here: https://www.booksandsuch.com/our-agen...Thanks For Watching!========================================================Follow us on:- Website:   https://victim2victor.net/- FACEBOOK:   https://www.facebook.com/victim2victor- TWITTER:    https://twitter.com/V2V_healing- Victim 2 Victor Audio Book Audible: https://adbl.co/3akVNCu - Victim 2 Victor Book on Amazon: 

The John Batchelor Show
1734: Four Weeks after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, September 13, 2021. @LongWarJournal

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 41:00


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow Four Weeks after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, September 13, 2021. @LongWarJournal

The John Batchelor Show
1734: Five Weeks after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, September 20, 2021. @LongWarJournal

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 41:00


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow Five Weeks after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, September 20, 2021. @LongWarJournal

The John Batchelor Show
1734: Six Weeks after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, September 27, 2021. @LongWarJournal

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 41:00


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow Six Weeks after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, September 27, 2021. @LongWarJournal

The John Batchelor Show
1734: One Week after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, August 23, 2021. @LongWarJournal.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 41:00


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow One Week after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, August 23, 2021. @LongWarJournal.

The John Batchelor Show
1734: Two Weeks after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, August 30, 2021. @LongWarJournal.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 40:59


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow Two Weeks after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, August 30, 2021. @LongWarJournal.

The John Batchelor Show
1734: Roya Hakakian #Unbound. The complete, forty-minute interview. May 29, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 42:51


Photo:  Persian food in Teherangeles (Westwood, Los Angeles). Highly recommended. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Roya Hakakian #Unbound. The complete, forty-minute interview. May 29, 2021 A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious. Hardcover – Deckle Edge, March 16, 2021. by Roya Hakakian https://www.amazon.com/Beginners-Guide-America-Immigrant-Curious/dp/0525656065/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1622853677&sr=1-1 A stirring, witty, and poignant glimpse into the bewildering American immigrant experience from someone who has lived it. Also, a mirror held up to America. Into the maelstrom of unprecedented contemporary debates about immigrants in the United States, this perfectly timed book gives us a portrait of what the new immigrant experience in America is really like. Written as a "guide" for the newly arrived, and providing "practical information and advice," Roya Hakakian, an immigrant herself, reveals what those who settle here love about the country, what they miss about their homes, the cruelty of some Americans, and the unceasing generosity of others. She captures the texture of life in a new place in all its complexity, laying bare both its beauty and its darkness as she discusses race, sex, love, death, consumerism, and what it is like to be from a country that is in America's crosshairs. Her tenderly perceptive and surprisingly humorous account invites us to see ourselves as we appear to others, making it possible for us to rediscover our many American gifts through the perspective of the outsider. In shattering myths and embracing painful contradictions that are unique to this place, A Beginner's Guide to America is Hakakian's candid love letter to America   ..  ..  ..   Permissions: 1.  I, the copyright holder of this work, release this work into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In some countries this may not be legally possible; if so: I grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law. 2.  English: A typical Persian / Iranian cuisine often served not on a table. Date | 2006  Source | Own work     Author | Asadi Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled GNU Free Documentation License. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. | You are free: to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work; to remix – to adapt the workUnder the following conditions: attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

The John Batchelor Show
1734: David Grantham #Unbound. (Intell.) The complete, forty-minute interview, April 5, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 41:20


Photo:  A United States Marine asks a local woman about weapons in Fallujah, Iraq CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow David Grantham #Unbound. The complete, forty-minute interview, April 5, 2021. Consequences: An Intelligence Officer's War; Paperback – November 11, 2020. by David Grantham https://www.amazon.com/Consequences-Intelligence-Officers-David-Grantham/dp/098440631X/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= “Very little has been written on the U.S. Air Force Office of Special Investigations efforts in the global war on terror. Consequences by David Grantham provides a unique and fascinating window into the nuts and bolts of OSI counterintelligence operations. You won't be disappointed.”– Fred Burton, author of Beirut Rules: The Murder of a CIA Station Chief and Hezbollah's War Against America    In 2020, ISIS followers are being encouraged to use COVID-19 to sicken Westerners. An ISIS supporter attacked a Naval base in Corpus Christi, Texas. Iran and the United States exchanged blows in Iraq. We are still living in the long shadow of the Iraq War. In 2006, David Grantham was fresh out of college and serving as a counterintelligence officer with the elite and secretive Air Force Office of Special Investigations. Iraq was veering toward civil war. The U.S. military desperately needed better on-the-ground intelligence to turn the tide. Grantham found himself in Kuwait and Afghanistan, then at Iraq's infamous American prison, Camp Bucca. Not only was Bucca the breeding ground for the Islamic State, it was in southern Iraq, where America's deadly fight with Iran was an open secret. Consequences is both a riveting, behind-the-scenes look at intelligence operations at the height of the Iraq war, and a charming and sobering story of one man's journey through the pleasures and consequences that come with wartime intelligence.

The John Batchelor Show
1734: Jerry Hendrix #Unbound: Naval primacy. The complete, forty-minute interview, March 23, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 42:31


Photo:  The Spanish Armada fighting the English navy at the Battle of Gravelines in 1588 CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Jerry Hendrix #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview, March 23, 2021 To Provide and Maintain a Navy: Why Naval Primacy Is America's First, Best Strategy, Hardcover – December 19, 2020 by Henry J Hendrix https://www.amazon.com/Provide-Maintain-Navy-Americas-Strategy/dp/0960039198 The national conversation regarding the United States Navy has, for far too long, been focused on the popular question of how many ships does the service need? To Provide and Maintain a Navy, a succinct but encompassing treatise on sea power by Dr. Henry J "Jerry" Hendrix, goes beyond the numbers to reveal the crucial importance of Mare Liberum (Free Sea) to the development of the Western thought and the rules-based order that currently govern the global commons that is the high seas. Proceeding from this philosophical basis, Hendrix explores how a "free sea" gave way to free trade and the central role sea-borne commercial trade has played in the overall rise in global living standards. This is followed by analysis of how the relative naval balance of power has played out in naval battles and wars over the centuries and how the dominance of the United States Navy following World War II has resulted in seven decades of unprecedented peace on the world's oceans. He further considers how, in the years that followed the demise of the Soviet Union, both China and Russia began laying the groundwork to challenge the United States's maritime leadership and upend five centuries of naval precedents in order to establish a new approach to sovereignty over the world's seas. It is only at this point that Dr. Hendrix approaches the question of the number of ships required for the United States Navy, the industrial base required to build them, and the importance of once again aligning the nation's strategic outlook to that of a "sea power" in order effectively and efficiently to address the rising threat. To Provide and Maintain a Navy is brief enough to be read in a weekend but deep enough to inform the reader as to the numerous complexities surrounding what promises to be the most important strategic conversation facing the United States as it enters a new age of great power competition with not one, but two, nations who seek nothing less than to close and control the world's seas

The John Batchelor Show
1734: Terry Anderson #Unbound. The complete, forty-minute interview. April 6, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 41:33


Photo:   A demonstration. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Terry Anderson #Unbound. The complete, forty-minute interview. April 6, 2021 Adapt and Be Adept: Market Responses to Climate Change.  Paperback – April 1, 2021. by Terry Anderson  (Editor) https://www.amazon.com/Adapt-Be-Adept-Responses-Climate/dp/0817924558/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&qid=1619395663&refinements=p_27%3ATerry+Anderson&s=books&sr=1-1 How can markets help us adapt to the challenges of climate change? The editor Terry L. Anderson brings together this collection of essays featuring the work of nine leading policy analysts, who argue that market forces are just as important as government regulation in shaping climate policy—and should be at the heart of our response to helping societies adapt to climate change. Anderson notes in his introduction that most current climate policies such as the Paris Agreement require hard-to-enforce collective action and focus on reducing or mitigating greenhouse gases rather than adapting to their negative effects. Adaptive actions can typically deliver much more, faster and more cheaply than any realistic climate policy. The authors tackle a range of issues: the hidden costs of renewable energy sources, the political obstacles surrounding climate change policy, insurance and financial instruments for pricing risk of exposure to the effects of climate change, and more. Reliance on emerging renewable energies and a carbon tax are not enough to prevent the effects of global warming, they argue. We must encourage more private action and market incentives to adapt to a rapidly changing climate.  .. Permissions: I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby publish it under the following license: This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.  The person who associated a work with this deed has dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of their rights to the work worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law. You can copy, modify, distribute and perform the work, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.

Le Batard & Friends Network
Episode One Hundred - Forty-Seven

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 52:06


On this episode of Mystery Crate, Billy has a bone to pick with HBO Max, Chris Cote has a hot take every will disagree with, and Tony has dreams of a secret life he wants to lead. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate
Episode One Hundred - Forty-Seven

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 52:06


On this episode of Mystery Crate, Billy has a bone to pick with HBO Max, Chris Cote has a hot take every will disagree with, and Tony has dreams of a secret life he wants to lead. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The John Batchelor Show
1718: Mark Piesing, #UNBOUND, the complete, forty-minute interview, Arctic exploration; August 28, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 41:00


Photo:  MARIA, PASSING THE DIAMONDS Image extracted from page 25 of  A Narrative of the Cruise of the Yacht Maria among the Feroe Islands in the Summer of 1854  N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia,  by Mark Piesing.  PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting, true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527

The John Batchelor Show
1717: Nicholas Thomas #Unbound Voyagers: The Settlement of the Pacific Hardcover. The complete, forty-minute interview, June 15, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 41:00


Photo: Fijian druas CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Nicholas Thomas: #Unbound the complete, 40-minute interview, June 15, 2021 Voyagers: The Settlement of the Pacific. Hardcover – June 15, 2021; by Nicholas Thomas An award-winning scholar explores the sixty-thousand-year history of the Pacific islands in this dazzling, deeply researched account. The islands of Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia stretch across a huge expanse of ocean and encompass a multitude of different peoples. Starting with Captain James Cook, the earliest European explorers to visit the Pacific were astounded and perplexed to find populations thriving thousands of miles from continents. Who were these people? From where did they come? And how were they able to reach islands dispersed over such vast tracts of ocean? In Voyagers, the distinguished anthropologist Nicholas Thomas charts the course of the seaborne migrations that populated the islands between Asia and the Americas from late prehistory onward. Drawing on the latest research, including insights gained from genetics, linguistics, and archaeology, Thomas provides a dazzling account of these long-distance migrations, the seagoing technologies that enabled them, and the societies they left in their wake.

The John Batchelor Show
1717: William Damon #UNBOUND (family; golf): The complete, forty-minute interview. July 3, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 41:00


Photo: Royal Montreal Golf Club 1882  . CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow William Damon #UNBOUND: The complete, forty-minute interview. July 3, 2021. A Round of Golf with My Father, by William Damon.    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Round-Golf-Father-Psychology-Exploring/dp/1599475634 Viewing our past through the Eye of maturity can reveal insights that our younger selves could not see. Lessons that eluded us become apparent. Encounters that once felt like misfortunes now become understood as valued parts of who we are. We realize what we've learned and what we have to teach. And we're encouraged to chart a future that is rich with purpose.  In A Round of Golf with My Father, William Damon introduces us to the “life review.” This is a process of looking with clarity and curiosity at the paths we've traveled, examining our pasts in a frank yet positive manner, and using what we've learned to write purposeful next chapters for our lives.