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Best podcasts about Intercept

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Latest podcast episodes about Intercept

The New Yorker Radio Hour
The Trials of a Whistle-blower

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 27:09


As a nurse at the Irwin County Detention Center—a Georgia facility run by LaSalle Corrections, a private company operating an immigration-detention contract with ICE—Dawn Wooten became aware of some frightening violations, including numerous hysterectomies and other medical procedures performed without patient consent. When she asked questions, she was demoted and eventually pushed out. Wooten supplied critical information for two complaints about I.C.D.C., which were submitted to the Office of Inspector General at the Department of Homeland Security. The complaints were first reported in The Intercept in September, 2020, and then covered widely in the national press. Last May, in a victory for Wooten, the detained women who spoke up about their mistreatment, and the advocacy groups that had fought on their behalf, ICE ended its I.C.D.C. contract with LaSalle. Wooten's own troubles, however, had just begun. Receiving death threats and kidnapping threats, she and her five children stayed under security in a series of hotels. Her whistle-blower-retaliation complaint with the federal government is still awaiting a finding, as the Office of the Inspector General has requested two extensions on its legally required deadlines. Meanwhile, Wooten found that hardly anyone would hire a nurse who had made front-page headlines: despite her twelve years of experience, she was rejected from more than a hundred jobs during a national nursing shortage. She couldn't get hired at McDonald's. Wooten, and the detained women who shared their stories at great risk, are still awaiting justice. For Sarah Stillman, who covers immigration for The New Yorker, Wooten's case draws attention to the fact that low-wage whistle-blowers, in particular, can face almost insurmountable obstacles to coming forward to expose wrongdoing.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 01.20.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 59:57


Magnesium is essential for the immune system, including in the fight against cancer University of Basel (Switzerland), January 19, 2022 Previous studies have shown that cancerous growths spread faster in the bodies of mice when the animals received a low-magnesium diet – and that their defense against flu viruses was also impaired. However, there has so far been little research into how exactly this mineral affects the immune system. Now, researchers have discovered that T cells can eliminate abnormal or infected cells efficiently only in a magnesium-rich environment. Specifically, magnesium is important for the function of a T cell surface protein called LFA-1. (NEXT) More lycopene linked to longer lives for people with metabolic syndrome University of Nebraska Medical Center, January 16, 2022 Higher blood levels of lycopene may reduce the risk of mortality in people with metabolic syndrome, says a new study from the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Lycopene is an antioxidant that is present in red- and pink-colored fruits and vegetables. As well as being used as a food coloring, it is also used in supplements and functional foods and beverages. New data published in Nutrition Research suggests that higher serum levels of lycopene were associated with greater survival times for people with metabolic syndrome, compared to low serum levels. (NEXT) Too much sugar during adolescence may alter brain's reward circuits European Journal of Neuroscience, January 19, 2022 A new study in rats may provide significant insights into the long-term impacts of over-consumption of sugary foods during adolescence. The study shows that the enjoyment of such foods later in adulthood is reduced in those who over-consumed early in life. Investigators found that this decrease in reward relates to reduced activity in one of the key hubs of the brain's reward circuitry, called the nucleus accumbens. Such long-lasting alterations could have important implications for reward-related disorders such as substance abuse or eating disorders. (NEXT) Unveiled the epigenetic mechanism by which vitamin D modulates the tolerance of the immune system Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute (Germany), January 19, 2022 In autoimmunity, the mechanisms that guarantee that our defense system does not attack our own body - tolerance to oneself - does not work properly. Multiple sclerosis, which affects one in every 1,000 people in Spain, is a serious autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the myelin sheath of some types of neurons, causing progressive neurological disability. Dr. Esteban Ballestar, leader of the Epigenetics and immune diseases group at the Josep Carrreras Leukaemia Research Institute, and Dr. Eva Martínez-Cáceres, leader of the Immunopathology group at the IGTP-Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, have recently published in the prestigious journal Cell Reports the mechanism by which vitamin D activates the tolerance program of dendritic cells. (NEXT) Study links poor sleep in seniors to more severe arteriosclerosis University of Toronto, January 19, 2022 Poor sleep quality in older people is associated with more severe arteriosclerosis in the brain as well as a greater burden of oxygen-starved tissue (infarcts) in the brain, both of which can contribute to the risk of stroke and cognitive impairment, according to the newest findings reported in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke. The relationship between cardiovascular disease and so-called "fragmented" sleep has been studied in the past, but this is the first study to look specifically for an association between sleep fragmentation and detailed microscopic measures of blood vessel damage and infarcts in autopsied brain tissue from the same individuals. Fragmented sleep occurs when sleep is interrupted by repeated awakenings or arousals. In this study, sleep was disrupted on average almost seven times per hour. Researchers found that greater sleep fragmentation was associated with 27 percent higher odds of having severe arteriosclerosis. Moreover, for each additional two arousals during one hour of sleep, researchers reported a 30 percent increase in the odds that subjects had visible signs of oxygen deprivation in their brain. (OTHER NEWS) America's New Class War Chris Hedges, January 18, 2022 There is one last hope for the United States. It does not lie in the ballot box. It lies in the union organizing and strikes by workers at Amazon, Starbucks, Uber, Lyft, John Deere, Kellogg, the Special Metals plant in Huntington, West Virginia, owned by Berkshire Hathaway, the Northwest Carpenters Union, Kroger, teachers in Chicago, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Arizona, fast-food workers, hundreds of nurses in Worcester, Massachusetts, and the members of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees. Organized workers, often defying their timid union leadership, are on the march across the United States. Over four million workers, about 3% of the work force, mostly from accommodation and food services, healthcare and social assistance, transportation, housing, and utilities have walked away from jobs, rejecting poor pay along with punishing and risky working conditions. There is a growing consensus – 68% in a recent Gallup poll with that number climbing to 77% of those between the ages of 18 and 34 – that the only way left to alter the balance of power and force concessions from the ruling capitalist class is to mobilize and strike, although only 9% of the U.S. work force is unionized. Forget the woke Democrats. This is a class war. The Democratic Party will not push through the kind of radical New Deal reforms that in the 1930s staved off fascism and communism. Its empty political theater, which stretches back to the Clinton administration, was on full display in Atlanta when Biden called for revoking the filibuster to pass the Freedom to Vote Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, knowing that his chances of success are zero. Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams, along with several of the state's voting rights groups, boycotted the event in a very public rebuke. They were acutely aware of Biden's cynical ploy. When the Democrats were in the minority, they clung to the filibuster like a life raft. Then Sen. Barack Obama, along with other Democrats, campaigned for it to remain in place. And a few days ago, the Democratic leadership employed the filibuster to block legislation proposed by Sen. Ted Cruz. The Democrats have been full partners in the dismantling of our democracy, refusing to banish dark and corporate money from the electoral process and governing, as Obama did, through presidential executive actions, agency “guidance,” notices and other regulatory dark matter that bypass Congress. The Democrats, who helped launch and perpetuate our endless wars, were also co-architects of trade deals such as NAFTA, expanded surveillance of citizens, militarized police, the largest prison system in the world and a raft of anti-terrorism laws such as Special Administrative Measures (SAMs) that abolish nearly all rights, including due process and attorney-client privilege, to allow suspects to be convicted and imprisoned with secret evidence they and their lawyers are not permitted to see. The squandering of staggering resources to the military — $777.7 billion a year — passed in the Senate with an 89-10 vote and in the House of Representatives with a 363-70 vote, coupled with the $80 billion spent annually on the intelligence agencies has made the military and the intelligence services, many run by private contractors such as Booz Allen Hamilton, nearly omnipotent. The Democrats long ago walked out on workers and unions. The Democratic governor of Maine, Janet Mills, for example, killed a bill a few days ago that would have allowed farm workers in the state to unionize. On all the major structural issues there is no difference between the Republicans and the Democrats. The longer the Democratic Party does not deliver real reforms to ameliorate the economic hardship, exacerbated by soaring inflation rates, the more it feeds the frustration of many of its supporters, widespread apathy (there are 80 million eligible voters, a third of the electorate, who do not cast ballots) and the hatred of the “liberal” elites stoked by Donald Trump's cultish Republican Party. Its signature infrastructure package, Build Back Better, when you read the fine print, is yet another infusion of billions of government money into corporate bank accounts. This should not surprise anyone, given who funds and controls the Democratic Party. The rapacious pillage by the elites, many of whom bankroll the Democratic Party, has accelerated since the financial crash of 2008 and the pandemic. Wall Street banks recorded record profits for 2021. As the Financial Times noted, they milked the underwriting fees from Fed-based borrowing and profited from mergers and acquisitions. They have pumped their profits, fueled by roughly $5 trillion in Fed spending since the beginning of the pandemic, as Matt Taibbi points out, into massive pay bonuses and stock buybacks. “The bulk of this new wealth—most—is being converted into compensation for a handful of executives,” Taibbi writes. “Buybacks have also been rampant in defense, pharmaceuticals, and oil & gas, all of which also just finished their second straight year of record, skyrocketing profits. We're now up to about 745 billionaires in the U.S., who've collectively seen their net worth grow about $2.1 trillion to $5 trillion since March 2020, with almost all that wealth increase tied to the Fed's ballooning balance sheet.” Kroger is typical. The corporation, which operates some 2,800 stores under different brands, including Baker's, City Market, Dillons, Food 4 Less, Foods Co., Fred Meyer, Fry's, Gerbes, Jay C Food Store, King Soopers, Mariano's, Metro Market, Pay-Less Super Markets, Pick'n Save, QFC, Ralphs, Ruler and Smith's Food and Drug, earned $4.1 billion in profits in 2020. By the end of the third quarter of 2021, it had $2.28 billion in cash, an increase of $399 million in the first quarter of 2020. Kroger CEO Rodney McMullen made over $22 million, nearly doubling the $12 million he made in 2018. This is over 900 times the salary of the average Kroger worker. Kroger in the first three quarters of 2021 also spent an estimated $1.3 billion on stock buybacks. Class struggle defines most of human history. Marx got this right. It is not a new story. The rich, throughout history, have found ways to subjugate and re-subjugate the masses. And the masses, throughout history, have cyclically awoken to throw off their chains. (NEXT) Was Peter Daszak Working For The Central Intelligence Agency? Kanekoa, January 18, 2022 “We found other coronaviruses in bats, a whole host of them, some of them looked very similar to SARS. So we sequenced the spike protein: the protein that attaches to cells. Then we… Well, I didn't do this work, but my colleagues in China did the work. You create pseudo particles, you insert the spike proteins from those viruses, see if they bind to human cells. At each step of this, you move closer and closer to this virus could really become pathogenic in people. You end up with a small number of viruses that really do look like killers." This statement was said by EcoHealth Alliance President Peter Daszak at a 2016 forum discussing “emerging infectious diseases and the next pandemic”. Daszak, who received more than $118 million in grants and contracts from federal agencies, including $53 million from USAID, $42 million from DOD, and $15 million from HHS, appeared to boast about the manipulation of “killer” SARS-like coronaviruses carried out by his “colleagues in China” at the now infamous Wuhan Institute of Virology. According to investigative research done by independent-journalist Sam Husseini and The Intercept, much of the money awarded to EcoHealth Alliance did not focus on health or ecology, but rather on biowarfare, bioterrorism, and other dangerous uses of deadly pathogens. EcoHealth Alliance received the majority of its funding from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), a State Department subsidiary that serves as a frequent cover for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Their second largest source of funding was from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), which is a branch of the Department of Defense (DOD) which states it is tasked to “counter and deter weapons of mass destruction and improvised threat networks.” The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has a long history of acting as a contract vehicle for various CIA covert activities. With an annual budget of over $27 billion and operations in over 100 countries, one former USAID director, John Gilligan, once admitted it was “infiltrated from top to bottom with CIA people.” Gilligan explained that “the idea was to plant operatives in every kind of activity we had overseas; government, volunteer, religious, every kind.” From 2009 to 2019, USAID partnered with EcoHealth Alliance on their PREDICT program which identified over 1,200 new viruses, including over 160 coronavirus strains; trained roughly 5,000 people around the world to identify new diseases; and improved or developed 60 research laboratories. What better way for the CIA to collect intelligence on the world's biological warfare capabilities? Dr. Andrew Huff received his Ph.D. in Environmental Health specializing in emerging diseases before becoming an Associate Vice President at EcoHealth Alliance, where he developed novel methods of bio-surveillance, data analytics, and visualization for disease detection. On January 12, 2022, Dr. Andrew Huff issued a public statement (on Twitter) in which he claimed, Peter Daszak, the President of EcoHealth Alliance, told him that he was working for the CIA. Dr. Huff continued, “…I wouldn't be surprised if the CIA / IC community orchestrated the COVID coverup acting as an intermediary between Fauci, Collins, Daszak, Baric, and many others. At best, it was the biggest criminal conspiracy in US history by bureaucrats or political appointees.” In February 2020, Daszak told University of North Carolina coronavirus researcher Dr. Ralph Baric that they should not sign the statement condemning the lab-leak theory so that it seems more independent and credible. “You, me and him should not sign this statement, so it has some distance from us and therefore doesn't work in a counterproductive way,” Daszak wrote. More unredacted emails have revealed that while these scientists held the private belief that the lab release was the most likely scenario, they still worked to seed the natural origin narrative for the public through the papers published in Nature Medicineand The Lancet. If Dr. Andrew Huff is telling the truth, Fauci, Collins, and Daszak might be covering up the lab origin not only for themselves, but also for the Central Intelligence Agency, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Government.

Murderville
Introducing Season 2: Welcome to Murderville, Texas

Murderville

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 2:05


Season two takes Intercept reporters Liliana Segura and Jordan Smith to the death penalty capital of the country, where they investigate a disturbing crime, a startling confession, and a story that doesn't add up. A production of The Intercept and First Look Media, Murderville, Texas drops February 1.If you'd like to support our work, go to theintercept.com/donate — your donation, no matter what the amount, makes a real difference. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill
“Don't Look Up” and Fighting Capitalism With Naomi Klein

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 44:45


As 2022 begins, the world continues to see the effects of the climate crisis — from the severe drought in East Africa to the odd snowfall in British Columbia. But since December 5, a new film has been sounding the alarm. In Adam McKay's “Don't Look Up,” an allegory about the impending climate disaster, scientists discover an approaching comet that will destroy Earth. But the media, politicians, and elite in the U.S. fail at every opportunity to prevent the impending doom. The Intercept's senior correspondent Naomi Klein joins senior writer Jon Schwarz to discuss the film, how present-day elites are failing to address the climate crisis, and the future of the climate justice movement. Klein is a professor of climate justice at the University of British Columbia and the author of many books on climate change, including her latest, “How to Change Everything: The Young Human's Guide to Protecting the Planet and Each Other.” join.theintercept.com/donate/now See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

As It Is - Voice of America
Taiwanese Air Force Trains to Intercept Chinese Planes Amid Tensions - January 05, 2022

As It Is - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 2:20


Relentless Daring
Aswad Khan: Without Due Process

Relentless Daring

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 58:45


On this episode, I am joined by Aswad Khan from Karachi, Pakistan. In 2012 he was approached by the FBI to be a confidential informant after returning from Karachi on a work visa after caring for his sick father. Special thanks to The Intercept's Murtaza Hussein for reaching out to Aswad and helping set up this interview.   Support the show by donating or buying merch at www.relentlessdaring.com   Be sure to support our sponsors American Pride Roasters, Built Bar, Keto Chow, or Drizly Follow me on social media Twitter @TylerProduces Facebook @RelentlessDaring Parler @RelentlessDaring Instagram @RelentlessDaring    Email tyler@relentlessdaring.com   Ad music and intro music used with permission from Purple Planet www.purple-planet.com 

The Sunday Triple M NRL Catch Up - Paul Kent, Gorden Tallis, Ryan Girdler, Anthony Maroon
Triple M Footy's Best Of 2021 | GOODBYE! Stephen Crichton's Premiership Winning Intercept Try

The Sunday Triple M NRL Catch Up - Paul Kent, Gorden Tallis, Ryan Girdler, Anthony Maroon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 4:32


Triple M Footy's Best Of 2021 | GOODBYE! Stephen Crichton's Premiership Winning Intercept Try See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Triple M Rocks Footy NRL
Triple M Footy's Best Of 2021 | GOODBYE! Stephen Crichton's Premiership Winning Intercept Try

The Triple M Rocks Footy NRL

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 4:32


Triple M Footy's Best Of 2021 | GOODBYE! Stephen Crichton's Premiership Winning Intercept Try See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1463 People Are Waking Back Up To The Need For Labor Unions

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 75:20


Air Date 12/22/2021 Today we take a look at some of the history of labor struggles in America and the current wave of strikes that is giving renewed energy to the labor union movement and the struggle for better working conditions for all. Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript BestOfTheLeft.com/Support (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) Check out Coffee from the Unf*cking the Republic podcast! BestOfTheLeft.com/Store BotL MERCHANDISE! BestOfTheLeft.com/Advertise Sponsor the show! SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: Lessons from the Luddites - On the Media - Air Date 12-10-21 Gavin Mueller [@gavinmuellerphd], assistant professor of New Media and Digital Culture at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, on what modern lessons can be learned from the Luddite workers of 19th century England. Ch. 2: Victory at Starbucks, Struggle at Kellogg's Part 1 - Jacobin Radio - Air Date 12-13-21 Suzi talks with John Logan about the unionization victory at Starbucks in Buffalo, and the continuing Kellogg Co. strike. Ch. 3: Strike Wave Workers Flex Their Muscle in Tight Labor Market Part 1 - Intercepted - Air Date 11-10-21 We hear from Kaiser Permanente workers, and then Labor Notes' Jonah Furman joins The Intercept's Washington Editor Nausicaa Renner to discuss this year's strike wave. Ch. 4: Labor Unions From Pullman to Kelloggs. Labors long, hard road. - Unf*cking The Republic (UNFTR) - Air Date 12-18-21 The episode includes a blow-by-blow analysis of a recent interview with the CEO of Kellogg's to translate Wall Street speak for “how to fuck workers and influence inflation.” Ch. 5: Victory at Starbucks, Struggle at Kellogg's Part 2 - Jacobin Radio - Air Date 12-13-21 Suzi talks with John Logan about the unionization victory at Starbucks in Buffalo, and the continuing Kellogg Co. strike. Ch. 6: Class Struggles in the US Today - Economic Update with Richard D. Wolff - Air Date 12-2-21 The "labor shortage" isn't, "Build Back Better" does not begin to approach what Europe already has. Ch. 7: Can Child Labor Solve Labor Shortage The GOP Thinks So... - Thom Hartmann Program - Air Date 12-2-21 Republican-controlled legislatures in several states have come up with a novel way to stem the effects of an ongoing labor shortage: loosen child labor laws governing the number of hours and times that teenagers are allowed to work. Ch. 8: Strike Wave Workers Flex Their Muscle in Tight Labor Market Part 2 - Intercepted - Air Date 11-10-21 We hear from Kaiser Permanente workers, and then Labor Notes' Jonah Furman joins The Intercept's Washington Editor Nausicaa Renner to discuss this year's strike wave. MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 9: Lessons from the Luddites Part 2 - On the Media - Air Date 12-10-21 Gavin Mueller [@gavinmuellerphd], assistant professor of New Media and Digital Culture at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, on what modern lessons can be learned from the Luddite workers of 19th century England. Ch. 10: Labor Unions From Pullman to Kelloggs. Labors long, hard road. Part 2 - Unf*cking The Republic (UNFTR) - Air Date 12-18-21 VOICEMAILS Ch. 11: Fear that Democrats will lose the House - Alan from Connecticut Ch. 12: Thoughts on multiple tiers of humans - Nick From California FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 13: Final comments on how progressive thinking embraces equality while conservative thinking often requires division MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Voicemail Music: Low Key Lost Feeling Electro by Alex Stinnent Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com

None of the Above
The Footprint of Industrialized War (from the archive)

None of the Above

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 25:06


Speaking at the United Nations Climate Conference this November, President Biden called climate change “the existential threat to human existence.” And in October, the Department of Defense issued its own warning, noting the effects of climate change are “exacerbating existing risks and creating new security challenges for U.S. interests.” But while the Pentagon takes climate change's risks seriously, it remains one of the worlds largest emitters of greenhouse gasses. This week, we're revisiting another favorite episode from season 1 with Murtaza Hussain, a political and national security reporter for The Intercept, who helped us understand the ecological and health ramifications of America's wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and how the military's expansive footprint exacerbates the climate crisis. Murtaza Hussain is a journalist for The Intercept whose work focuses on national security, foreign policy, and human rights. He is the author of the 2019 article, “Industrialized Militaries Are a Bigger Part of the Climate Emergency Than You Know.”

Student of the Gun Radio
Why Nuremberg is Still Important & #JusticeForJussie | SOTG 1114

Student of the Gun Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 60:57


#JusticeForJussie, that's what the leftist and Democrats were tweeting and screaming for in 2019. Well, it took a while, but Jussie's attacker was finally convicted this week and the left owes America an apology. What is the significance of the Nuremberg Trials? Why is the Nuremberg defense still being tried today by members of the government? What does this mean to you as a citizen?  We have a Duracoat Finished Firearm of the week for you. Actually, we have two; one done by Professor Paul and another honorable mention by one of you. Thanks for being a part of SOTG! We hope you find value in the message we share. If you've got any questions, here are some options to contact us: • Send an Email • Send a Text • Call Us Enjoy the show! And remember…You're a Beginner Once, a Student For Life! TOPICS COVERED THIS EPISODE • [0:01:54] BROWNELLS Big Iron Giveaway (2 Days Left) • [0:10:40] #JusticeForJussie    - ‘Jussie Smollett Can Rest Knowing That His Attacker Has Been Convicted' www.dailywire.com • [0:20:44] DuraCoat Finished Firearms - DuraCoat University     - TOPIC: Mission Specific PSL-54• Huge thanks to our Partners:SDS Imports | Brownells | CrossBreed | Duracoat | Hi-Point Firearms • [0:32:16] What were the Nuremberg Trials and why are they still important?    - The Trials: www.history.com    - The Modern Day: theintercept.com/2018/ FEATURING: Daily Wire, History.com, The Intercept, Madison Rising, Jarrad Markel, Paul Markel, SOTG University PARTNERS: SDS Imports, Brownells Inc, CrossBreed Holsters, DuraCoat Firearm Finishes, Hi-Point Firearms FIND US ON: Full30, Parler, MeWe.com, iTunes, Stitcher, AppleTV, Roku, Amazon, GooglePlay, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, tumblr SOURCES From www.dailywire.com: ( #JusticeForJussie ) After actor Jussie Smollett was found guilty on five counts of disorderly conduct in relation to an alleged hate crime hoax he orchestrated, social media blew up with reaction. “Tonight, Jussie Smollett can rest knowing that his attacker has been convicted,” Daily Wire emeritus Ben Shapiro mocked. “Jussie Smollett guilty on first five counts. Sixth count not guilty,” posted The Hill media columnist Joe Concha. “Justice obviously served.” (Click Here for Full Article)   From www.history.com: Held for the purpose of bringing Nazi war criminals to justice, the Nuremberg trials were a series of 13 trials carried out in Nuremberg, Germany, between 1945 and 1949. The defendants, who included Nazi Party officials and high-ranking military officers along with German industrialists, lawyers and doctors, were indicted on such charges as crimes against peace and crimes against humanity. Nazi leader Adolf Hitler (1889-1945) committed suicide and was never brought to trial. Although the legal justifications for the trials and their procedural innovations were controversial at the time, the Nuremberg trials are now regarded as a milestone toward the establishment of a permanent international court, and an important precedent for dealing with later instances of genocide and other crimes against humanity. (Click Here for Full Article)

The Final Straw Radio
The Perils of Prison Mail Digitization

The Final Straw Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 65:40


Leigh Lassiter from prison books collective in Durham, North Carolina, a nonprofit project that sends zines and books to prisoners in Alabama in North Carolina prisons and jails comes on this week to tell us about recent changes by the NCDPS to use the private company techs behind to scan all incoming and outgoing mail track, their contents surveil the outside users and mailers, and to make a profit on an already indigent population. We also talk about the work of sending literature, to incarcerated folks privatization and digitization of other services, and what literature gets rejected. More about the press books collective at PrisonBooks.Info or check out their linktr.ee You can also check out local books to prisoners projects in your area that you could get involved with by visiting PrisonBooks.Org/PrisonBooksNetwork. There're also a couple of really good articles from The Intercept about this and related surveillance services topics within you as prisons and jails. “Prisons Across The US Are Quietly Building Databases of Incarcerated People's Voice Prints” by George Joseph and Debbie Nathan “Federal Prisons Switch To Scanning Mail In A Surveillance Nightmare” by Lauren Gill Or check out the following resources: Prison Policy Initiative Prison Legal News Criminal Legal News Zine Updates Just a reminder, a comrade's been compiling our zines into a catalog, for easy mailing into prisons. You can check out the latest, December 2021 list at the top of https://TFSR.WTF/Zines as a pdf. . … . .. Featured Track: I Want To Break Free by Queen

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts
Sudan Coup: Analysis from the Ground

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 58:41


This event was co-organised by the LSE Middle East Centre and the Firoz Lalji Institute for Africa at the LSE. On 25 October 2021, General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan declared a state of emergency in Sudan, dissolving the government and detaining civilian leadership. Burhan is leader of the joint ruling council. The council's official goal is to hand over leadership to civilians ahead of elections in 2023 Since the beginning of the coup, the Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors, an independent union of medics, have estimated that more than 200 people have been wounded in anti-coup protests and at least 23 been killed (as of 15 November 2021). Civilians have been taking to the streets daily, promising to keep up the pressure on the transitional military-civilian authority. Speakers will discuss the historical and political context of the latest coup, the effects of the military crackdown on the ground and the international response. Muzan Alneel is a Nonresident Fellow at the Tahrir Institute for Middle East Policy (TIMEP) focusing on people-centric approach to economy, industry, and environment in Sudan. She is a writer and public speaker with an interdisciplinary professional and academic background (engineering, socioeconomics, public policy). Muzan is the co-founder of The Innovation, Science and Technology Think-tank for People Centered Development (ISTiNAD) – Sudan. Nafisa Eltahir is a correspondent covering political and economic news in Sudan as well as Egypt for Reuters News. Before her current posting she reported on the Gulf out of Dubai, and was a fellow at The Intercept. Magdi el-Gizouli is a scholar of the Sudans and a fellow of the Rift Valley Institute. He writes mostly on Sudans' affairs, often on his blog StillSUDAN. Laura Mann is a sociologist and research affiliate of the Firoz Lalji Institute for Africa, whose research focuses on the political economy of development, knowledge and technology. Her regional focus is East Africa, particularly Sudan, Kenya and Rwanda, where she has conducted collaborative research on ICTs and digitisation within global agriculture. Before joining the LSE as an assistant professor, she worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford and at the African Studies Centre in Leiden, and received her PhD from the University of Edinburgh. She is on the Editorial Working Group of the Review of African Political Economy.

Deconstructed with Mehdi Hasan
Congress Caves To Saudi Arabia On Yemen War

Deconstructed with Mehdi Hasan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 33:23


This week the senate voted down a resolution that would have blocked a defensive weapons sale to Saudi Arabia. The measure attracted support from senators of both parties for its potential to pressure the Saudis to end the war in Yemen. Intercept reporters Sara Sirota and Ken Klippenstein join Ryan Grim to discuss what the politics surrounding Saudi Arabia look like with a democrat back in the White House.https://join.theintercept.com/donate/now See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apple News Today
Was Elizabeth Holmes's testimony enough to save her?

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 9:35


The case of Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes may turn on her testimony. The Wall Street Journal looks at the moments that might sway jurors. Forbes explores how Biden’s massive spending plan would change tax policy. Chalkbeat reports on how the enhanced child tax credit has done a lot for families, but says Congress may not keep it. The recent Michigan killings are reigniting a debate over school safety. The Intercept has the story. Ballet companies are reinventing The Nutcracker. CBS New York reports on how Brooklyn Ballet is adding in new dance styles. And BBC covers how the Scottish Ballet is making subtle changes in a bid to erase old stereotypes.

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
12/3/21 Bob Murphy and Jon Schwarz on Whether Current Inflation Is a Good Thing

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 80:35


Jon Schwarz wrote an article for the Intercept last month that stirred up quite a buzz. In the piece, Schwarz makes the argument that, because it's hurting creditors and shrinking the real value of debt, inflation should be viewed as good news for most people. Scott brought Schwarz on together with Austrian economist Bob Murphey to have a discussion about Schwarz's argument and monetary policy more broadly.   Discussed on the show: “Inflation Is Good for You” (The Intercept) Understanding Money Mechanics by Bob Murphy Secrets of the Temple: How the Federal Reserve Runs the Country by William Greider Jon Schwarz is a writer for The Intercept, and has written for the New Yorker, the New York Times, The Atlantic, the Wall Street Journal, “Saturday Night Live,” and many others. Find him on his blog, A Tiny Revolution, or on Twitter @schwarz. Bob Murphy is an economist with the Institute for Energy Research, a research fellow with the Independent Institute, and a senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute. He is the author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism and Choice: Cooperation, Enterprise, and Human Action. Find him on Twitter @BobMurphyEcon and listen to his podcast The Bob Murphy Show. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
12/3/21 Bob Murphy and Jon Schwartz on Whether Current Inflation Is a Good Thing

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 80:35


Jon Schwarz wrote an article for the Intercept last month that stirred up quite a buzz. In the piece, Schwarz makes the argument that, because it's hurting creditors and shrinking the real value of debt, inflation should be viewed as good news for most people. Scott brought Schwarz on together with Austrian economist Bob Murphey to have a discussion about Schwarz's argument and monetary policy more broadly.   Discussed on the show: “Inflation Is Good for You” (The Intercept) Understanding Money Mechanics by Bob Murphy Secrets of the Temple: How the Federal Reserve Runs the Country by William Greider Jon Schwarz is a writer for The Intercept, and has written for the New Yorker, the New York Times, The Atlantic, the Wall Street Journal, “Saturday Night Live,” and many others. Find him on his blog, A Tiny Revolution, or on Twitter @schwarz. Bob Murphy is an economist with the Institute for Energy Research, a research fellow with the Independent Institute, and a senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute. He is the author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism and Choice: Cooperation, Enterprise, and Human Action. Find him on Twitter @BobMurphyEcon and listen to his podcast The Bob Murphy Show. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
Dark Money Network Pushing Pro-Saudi/UAE Policies w/ Eli Clifton

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 57:20


On this edition of Parallax Views, a group launched over the summer called the Turkish Democracy Project appears to be pushing pro-Saudi/UAE policies with the potential backing of a dark money netowork say Eli Clifton and Murtaza Hussain in Responsible Statecraft and The Intercept. Interestingly, the Turkish Democracy Project has no Turkish people sans two figures who were removed from the site's advisory board membership shortly after launch. A number of notoriously hawkish foreign policy figure including Sen. Joe Lieberman, Frances Townsend, and John Bolton are involved with the project. But the figures of interest of most interest to Clifton and Hussain are Mark Wallace,  a former George W. Bush administration ambassador to the United Nations, and Wallace's close associate the billionaire investor Thomas Kaplan, the latter of whom has boasted of his business ties to the United Arab Emirates. In this conversation, Eli and I discuss the connections between Kaplan, Wallace, Electrum Group, United Against a Nuclear Iran, and the Counter Extremism Project. The story doesn't end their though as a lawsuit was launched attempting to ascertain whether CEP was obtaining foreign funding. Then the government "an unusual invocation of state secrets as a third-party intervenor in a civil suit" claiming "that permitting the case to move forward would jeopardize U.S. national security". Clifton lays all this out as well as discussing Kaplan's over $800,000 to the UANI, a "treasure trove" of fascinating leaked emails including figures like the aforementioned Frances Townsend and UAE Ambassador to the U.S. Yousef al Otaiba, whether the Foreign Agent Registration Act (FARA) pertains to this case, the relationship between Iran and Saudi Arabia, the relationship between Saudi Arabia and Israel, Sen. Norm Coleman (now a Saudi lobbyist), foreign lobbying and influence efforts, lack of transparency around funding rather the lobbying itself being the biggest concern for many, Qatar, the relationship between Turkey and the Gulf States, Turkish anger over the Turkish Democracy Project's launch, geopolitics, the "Blob" and the foreign policy establishment, The Arab Lobby, AIPAC, the foreign policy establishment's protesting that its critics are just populist Know-Nothings, and much, much more!

Haymarket Books Live
Taking Children, Taking the Land: Nick Estes with Rebecca Nagle

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 88:29


Join Nick Estes and Rebecca Nagle for an urgent discussion of the ongoing attack on Indigenous children and Indigenous land. Nick Estes puts into historical context recent headlines surrounding the discovery of mass graves of Native children at Canadian residential schools. The removal of Indigenous children from their communities and families has a long genocidal legacy that persists today, well beyond the boarding school era in Canada and the United States. The attack on Indigenous children is an attack on Indigenous sovereignty and land, and there is urgency to uphold protections that are under assault by the right wing, such as the Indian Child Welfare Act. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Nick Estes is a citizen of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe. He is the author of Our History Is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance (Verso, 2019), coeditor with Jaskiran Dhillon of Standing with Standing Rock: Voices from the #NoDAPL Movement (University of Minnesota Press, 2019), and coauthor with Melanie K. Yazzie, Jennifer Nez Denetdale, and David Correia of Red Nation Rising: From Bordertown Violence to Native Liberation (PM Press, 2021). In 2014 he cofounded The Red Nation, an Indigenous resistance organization, and he is cohost of The Red Nation podcast. His writing has appeared in the Guardian, Intercept, Jacobin, Indian Country Today, High Country News, and other publications. Estes was an American Democracy Fellow at the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University (2017–2018) and until 2021 was an assistant professor in the American Studies Department at the University of New Mexico. He joins the faculty of the University of Minnesota Department of American Indian Studies in 2022. Rebecca Nagle is an award-winning journalist and citizen of the Cherokee Nation. Nagle hosted Crooked Media's podcast This Land, telling the story of a Supreme Court case about tribal land in Oklahoma, the small town murder that started the case, and the surprising connection to her own family history. You can find her writing on issues of Native representation and tribal sovereignty in the Atlantic, the Washington Post, the Guardian, USA Today, Teen Vogue, Indian Country Today, and other publications. Nagle was awarded the 2020 American Mosaic Journalism Prize for her reporting. She has also been named to the YBCA 100 and the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development's Native American 40 under 40. Nagle lives in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is a partnership between Lannan Foundation and Haymarket Books. Lannan Foundation's Readings & Conversations series features inspired writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, as well as cultural freedom advocates with a social, political, and environmental justice focus. We are excited to offer these programs online to a global audience. Video and audio recordings of all events are available at lannan.org. Haymarket Books is a radical, independent, nonprofit book publisher based in Chicago. Our mission is to publish books that contribute to struggles for social and economic justice. We strive to make our books a vibrant and organic part of social movements and the education and development of a critical, engaged, international left. Lannan Foundation is a family foundation dedicated to cultural freedom, diversity, and creativity through projects that support exceptional contemporary artists and writers, inspired Native activists in rural communities, and social justice advocates. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/rE52UHthmLM Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill
The Intercept's Work Has Never Been More Urgent

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 3:32


Over the past year, Intercepted has been bringing you more stories from the people behind The Intercept's reporting. For Giving Tuesday, we're asking you to contribute to The Intercept so that we can continue to provide hard-hitting investigative journalism. Your help allows us to report on abuses of power and serve as an independent source of news. Please visit theintercept.com/join. Thank you for listening. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

First Class Fatherhood
#561 Glenn Greenwald

First Class Fatherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 31:06


Episode 561 Glenn Greenwald is a First Class Father, award winning journalist and New York Times Bestselling Author. He is a former constitutional lawyer and co-founder of The Intercept and The Intercept Brasil, has earned numerous awards for his commentary and investigative journalism, including the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service and the George Polk Award for national security reporting. His 2014 book No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the US Security State, was a New York Times bestseller. He currently publishes on Substack, an online newsletter-based journalism platform and has also become a frequent guest on Fox News and other media outlets. In this Episode, Glenn shares his fatherhood journey which includes two children and guardianship of his nephew. He discusses why he and his husband decided to adopt instead of going through a surrogacy process. He describes his discipline style as a dad. He talks about the state of journalism and the trouble with clickbait headlines. He offers some great advice for new or about to be Dads and more! Subscribe to First Class Fatherhood and watch on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCD6cjYptutjJWYlM0Kk6cQ?sub_confirmation=1 SPONSORS: SeatGeek - https://seatgeek.com Promo Code: FirstClass Save: $20 off tickets MY PILLOW - https://www.mypillow.com Promo Code: Fatherhood Save Up To 66% Off 1-800-875-0219 More Ways To Listen - https://linktr.ee/alec_lace Follow me on instagram - https://instagram.com/alec_lace?igshid=ebfecg0yvbap For information about becoming a Sponsor of First Class Fatherhood please hit me with an email: FirstClassFatherhood@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/alec-lace/support

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill
Kyle Rittenhouse, Ahmaud Arbery, and the Future of Right-Wing Vigilantism

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 41:14


Jurors in the trial of three men accused of killing Ahmaud Arbery began deliberations Tuesday. Last week, a jury acquitted Kyle Rittenhouse of all charges, including two counts of homicide. This week on Intercepted: We discuss the details of these two cases, how they differ, and the questions they raise about the normalization of violence in the U.S. On Friday, Rittenhouse, the teenager who killed two protesters and injured a third at a Black Lives Matter protest, was found not guilty on all charges. Meanwhile, the trial for three men charged with the murder of Ahmaud Arbery — Gregory McMichael, Travis McMichael, and William Bryan — was wrapping up. The Intercept's Washington Editor Nausicaa Renner is joined by George Chidi, a writer for the Atlanta Objective and contributor to The Intercept, and Robert Mackey, a senior writer for The Intercept. Renner, Chidi, and Mackey break down the Rittenhouse verdict, the video evidence presented during the trial, and bigger questions about what this means for the future of protesting, the far right, and racism in the U.S. join.theintercept.com/donate/now See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Final Straw Radio
Eric Stanley on "Structuring Antagonism and the Trans/Queer Ungovernable"

The Final Straw Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 75:19


This week, Scott spoke with Eric A Stanley about their new book, Atmospheres of Violence: Structuring Antagonism and the Trans/Queer Ungovernable, which was just published by Duke University Press. Eric A. Stanley is an associate professor in the Department of Gender and Women's Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. In collaboration with Chris Vargas, they directed the films Homotopia (2006) and Criminal Queers (2019). Eric is also an editor, along with Tourmaline and Johanna Burton, of Trap Door: Trans Cultural Production and the Politics of Visibility (MIT Press 2017) and with Nat Smith, Captive Genders: Trans Embodiment and the Prison Industrial Complex (AK Press, 2015/11). In this chat, they talk about racialized violence against trans/queer people as a foundational part of the modern US state; trace this in the formation of the US settler state and how it persists today. They also discuss the improvised ways trans and queer people learn and share survival tactics and thrive under these condition in order to envision a new world. Announcements Dan Baker Has Been Transferred Anarchist and antifascist prisoner, Daniel Baker, who was convicted of transmitting threats while calling for anti-racists to show up in Tallahassee and stop a possible Trumpist coup received 44 months in prison and 3 years of probation. His legal defense is appealing and we'll be re-airing an interview with his support crew soon. Meanwhile, there's a great article by Natasha Leonard in The Intercept on the outcome of the case and we wanted to let you know that Dan has been transferred to FCI Memphis. You can write him and send him books at: Daniel Baker #25765-509 FCI Memphis P.O, Box 34550 Memphis, TN 38184 United States Note that he cannot receive photos or colored envelopes. You can find his book list plus a bunch of other info by visiting PrisonerSolidarity.Com and searching his name, alongside a bunch of other political prisoners of the so-called US & elsewhere. Blue Ridge ABC Letter Writing If you're in the asheville area, just a reminder that Blue Ridge ABC will be hosting a letter writing at West Asheville Park on the 1st Sunday of December, only THIS time it's from 3-5pm to handle the available natural light.   B(A)D News Episode 50 If you're looking for more anarchist perspectives, check out episode 50 of the A-Radio Network's BAD News: Angry Voices From Around The World. This November 2021 episode of our monthly offering features a shortened version of our talk with ASP, updates from Frequenz-A in northern Germany about the situation on the Belarusian and Polish border, Elephant In The Room from Dresden with updates on repression and resistance in Belarus, A-Radio Berlin sharing on the racist police killing of the migrant Giorgos Zantiotis in a Wuppertal jail cell and resulting protests and Crna Luknja from Lubjlana talking about the refugee situation in the Western Balkans. . ... . .. Featured Tracks: Dicks Hate The Police by Dicks from Kill From The Heart Riot (prod by Gobby) by Mykki Blanco from Cosmic Angel: The Illuminati Prince/ss

Bitcoin, Blockchain, and the Technologies of Our Future
Glenn Greenwald says Decentralized Media is the Ultimate Solution

Bitcoin, Blockchain, and the Technologies of Our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 21:23


"Ultimately the only real solution ... is to stop using platforms and start using protocols, things like Ghost and Odysee and places like that. There is no CEO that you can sufficiently pressure into deplatforming somebody. It just technologically can't be done because of how decentralized blockchain is."That is what Glenn Greenwald said in an interview with me this week, but he also recognized that he's not sure these protocols are pervasive and user friendly enough yet. Greenwald has been embracing the world of alternative media platforms recently, building one of the most successful Substacks, where he sends regular articles directly to his subscribers without fear of censorship. 00:00 Intro00:14 The Fourth Estate05:12 Government Control of the Narrative11:34 The Migration to Alternative Media20:06 The Ultimate Solution to CensorshipGlenn Greenwald was central to the publication of the Snowden revelations, was awarded the 2013 George Polk Award, and his journalism led to The Guardian and The Washington Post winning a Pulitzer Prize. In 2014, he launched The Intercept with Laura Poitras and Jeremy Scahill, and was co-founding editor until he resigned in October 2020 over censorship.Since then has been publishing on Substack, an online newsletter-based journalism platform, which you can find here: https://greenwald.substack.com/Huge thank you to Priv8 for inviting me to moderate this discussion! Priv8 is a forum dedicated to exploring digital privacy, brought to you by Orchid and Handshake. Priv8: https://www.orchid.com/priv8/To make a tax-deductible (in the US) donation to NBTV, visit https://www.nbtv.media/supportSign up for the free CryptoBeat newsletter here:https://cryptobeat.substack.com/Beware of scammers, I will never give you a phone number or reach out to you with investment advice. I do not give investment advice.Visit the NBTV website:https://nbtv.mediaSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/naomibrockwell)

The New Abnormal
Pam and Tommy Would Have Broken the Internet w/ Nick Offerman

The New Abnormal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 44:12


Nick Offerman talks with Molly about what playing Ron Swanson taught him about libertarianism, and about Pam and Tommy's sex tape and what things were like before the internet. Plus, The Intercept's Ken Klipperstein explains how the murder of Jamal Khashoggi helps account for rising gas prices now, and the Washington Post's Dan Diamond breaks down what we're just learning now about how the Trump administration tampered with the CDC.If you haven't heard, every single week The New Abnormal does a special bonus episode for Beast Inside, the Daily Beast's membership program. where Sometimes we interview Senators like Cory Booker or the folks who explain our world in media like Jim Acosta or Soledad O'Brien. Sometimes we just have fun and talk to our favorite comedians and actors like Busy Phillips or Billy Eichner and sometimes its just discussing the fuckery. You can get all of our episodes in your favorite podcast app of choice by becoming a Beast Inside member where you'll support The Beast's fearless journalism. Plus! You'll also get full access to podcasts and articles. To become a member head to newabnormal.thedailybeast.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WAMU: Local News
Listen: Prince George's County Students' Social Media Under Surveillance By Local Homeland Security

WAMU: Local News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 6:36


We spoke with Rachel Cohen, a reporter with the Intercept, about her recent story highlighting the surveillance program.

RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE
Ep. 220: An Inflated Sense of Inflation (w/ Stephanie Kelton)

RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 69:36


To help us untangle the lies around inflation panic, the so-called “labor shortage,” and Build Back Better, Mike is joined by Professor of Economics and Public Policy at Stony Brook University, Stephanie Kelton. They also discuss why it is foolish for Democrats to place the fate of their agenda in the hands of the Congressional Budget Office, and what's really going on with the economy, as capitalists attempt to keep a pool of workers chronically unemployed and underemployed and desperate for work. Stephanie's latest piece “Hate the Game” on her Substack: https://stephaniekelton.substack.com/p/hate-the-game Read her book, “The Deficit Myth: Modern Monetary Theory and the Birth of the People's Economy” https://bookshop.org/a/1381/9781541736184 And check out Jon Schwarz's piece in The Intercept about inflation: https://theintercept.com/2021/11/10/inflation-economy-debt-milk-prices/ A Thanksgiving Episode Ask Send me your questions or concerns you have before entering your Thanksgiving dinner debate with Uncle Ned or your QAnon-following Aunt. What questions do you need an answer to? Email: Mike@MichaelMoore.com Or send a voicemail here: https://anchor.fm/rumble-with-michael-moore/message Welcome To The Moore Store Check out The Moore Store where you can buy hats, shirts, hoodies, mugs and stickers – and a portion of proceeds will go to progressive groups and organizations fighting to teach the arts and civics in public schools. https://store.michaelmoore.com/ Music in the episode: Indigo Girls - Closer to Fine https://youtu.be/HUgwM1Ky228 Underwriters: 1. You can get a free thirty day supply with your first purchase at SuperBeets.com/RUMBLE 2. Go right now to Truebill.com/RUMBLE to save thousands per year Sign-up for Michael Moore's FREE email list at: MichaelMoore.com A full transcript of this episode can be found here: https://rumble.media/category/podcast/transcripts/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rumble-with-michael-moore/message

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman
'BradCast' 11/17/2021 (Guest: Jon Schwarz of The Intercept deflates inflation panic)

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 58:14


The Brian Lehrer Show
Why Some NJ Residents Are Worried About Their Water

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 19:29


Recently, Middlesex Water in Middlesex County, New Jersey issued a warning that the supply has high levels of the chemical PFOA. Sharon Lerner, investigative reporter at The Intercept, explains what this chemical is, and why residents are alarmed by its presence in the water. Read Sharon's reporting about PFOA and other PFAS here.

MicroFamous
Should You Offer Paid Podcast Content? What Coaches & Consultants Need to Know Right Now About Paid Subscriptions

MicroFamous

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 14:35


With Apple releasinghttps://podcasters.apple.com/878-subscriptions ( paid and freemium podcast subscriptions), there's a lot of talk in the podcast world about this new option for monetizing podcasts. So this is a perfect opportunity to cover an idea I've talked about behind the scenes but isn't in the MicroFamous book (at least, not this current version). There's a big difference between a product that helps you build demand for you, versus a product that harvests demand that already exists. Let's give a couple examples. Dan Kennedy tells a story of him taking his personal swipe file and offering it to his email list and making a quick 6 figures, then offering it out through affiliates and making another quick 6 figures. What gets left out of that story is all the years he spent investing in that email list.  Sending out high-value content. Making promises and then keeping them. Building trust over time. Then he can release a product that capitalizes on the demand and trust that already exists. If no one knew who Dan Kennedy was, no one cares about his swipe file and he doesn't make multiple 6 figures off that product. Let's look at another example, the rise ofhttps://substack.com/ ( Substack) and alternative journalism. Take someone likehttps://greenwald.substack.com/ ( Glenn Greenwald), now an independent journalist, but in the past someone who contributed to big name outlets like the Guardian and the Washington Post, where he won a Pulitzer Prize, then went out to found the Intercept. Now he publishes on Substack, a platform for paid newsletters. Estimates are that he has 20k-40k subscribers each paying at least $5 a month, which puts his yearly earnings around 2 million.  With podcasting opening up the option for paid subscriptions, we're going to see some similar success stories in that space. Here's my opinion: Paid subscriptions capitalize on existing demand. They don't carry the heavy lifting of creating new demand. So should an expert - like a coach, consultant or business book author - jump into the world of paid subscriptions? It depends on whether you have an existing audience or not. What we forget about folks like Glenn Greenwald is that they spent years writing for big name publications, going on TV, writing books or speaking.  They spent years, maybe even decades building their influence, creating trust, gaining notoriety, attracting attention, getting their content in front of thousands, maybe even millions. So unless you have already done that, remember that the economics of paid subscriptions may not be in your favor. In my point of view, paid subscriptions are like harvesting a crop you've been growing all season. But it doesn't plant new seeds. So the success stories we're about to hear in paid subscriptions will probably be those who already had an audience. They are “harvesting” from the crop of fame, influence and demand they built over years. Demand is how much of YOU people want.  When there's more demand for you than supply, you can harvest that demand in different ways. You can launch a book or an online membership. You can raise your speaking fees or your coaching fees. You can launch certifications or group coaching where your involvement is minimal Why? Because there's more demand for you than supply. What if you don't have that level of demand yet? What if you're still in the phase of attracting an audience and becoming MicroFamous in your space? Then my advice is that you're just in a different season. It's your time to plant, not harvest. And this is important because a detour into paid subscriptions has consequences. When you release a harvesting type product without a high level of demand, you'll put a ton of effort into something that only a small portion of your audience signs up for. Which means you aren't...

The CyberWire
Cyberespionage from Tehran. Clopp ransomware operators exploit vulnerable SolarWinds instances. Mercenaries and lawful intercept vendors. Patch Tuesday.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 23:46


Tehran's Lyceum group expands its activities against ISPs and telcos in Israel, Morocco, Tunisia, and Saudi Arabia. Clopp is going after unpatched instances of SolarWinds. Cyber mercenaries are quietly competing with lawful intercept vendors. NSO Group receives a setback from the US 9th Circuit. Mexico makes an arrest in its Pegasus investigation. Carole Theriault shares her thoughts on the supply chain. Josh Ray from Accenture Security on Moving Left of the Ransomware Boom. And notes on Patch Tuesday.  For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/217

Legion 99: Your Star Wars Legion Podcast
Turn Zero Lists - Episode 20.3 - Rogue Two

Legion 99: Your Star Wars Legion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 20:34


In the wrap up of our SoCal list series (and the final before the new points!) Keegan chats with Jdgnielson about his twist on a Rogue One style list!   799/800 10 Activations Cassian Andor 90 + 10 = 100 --A280-CFE (10) R2-D2 45 + 15 = 60 --C-3PO (15) K-2SO 70 + 10 = 80 --Jyn's SE-14 Blaster (10) 3x Rebel Troopers 40 x 3 = 120 Rebel Pathfinders 58 + 36 = 94 --Bistan (28), Offensive Push (4), Targeting Scopes (4), A-300 (0) Wookiee Warriors 69 + 8 = 77 --Offensive Push (4), Tenacity (4) T-47 Airspeeder 130 + 1 = 131 --Wedge Antilles (1), Mo/Dk Power Harpoon (0) A-A5 Speeder Truck 75 + 62 = 137 --Unorthodox Tactician (10), Refurbished "Gonk" Droid (10), Reckless Driver (6), AG-2G Quad Laser (36) Crack Shot•, Blast Off!•, Push••, Last Stand••, Assault•••, Volunteer Mission•••, Standing Orders•••• Major Offensive, Battle Lines, Advanced Positions, Danger Close Recover the Supplies, Breakthrough, Sabotage the Moisture Vaporators, Intercept the Transmissions Rapid Reinforcements, Minefield, Limited Visibility, Fortified Positions

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill
Strike Wave: Workers Flex Their Muscle in Tight Labor Market

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 44:54


Since January, there have been nearly 300 strikes throughout the U.S. This week on Intercepted: a look at the labor movement in 2021. Last week, tens of thousands of Kaiser Permanente health care workers announced that they will go on strike on November 15 if a collective bargaining agreement is not reached. If they take to the picket line, they will join hundreds of thousands of other workers nationwide who have used their labor power to demand better wages and working conditions in the aftermath of the Covid-19 pandemic. We hear from Kaiser Permanente workers, and then Labor Notes' Jonah Furman joins The Intercept's Washington Editor Nausicaa Renner to discuss this year's strike wave, the continued strike at John Deere, and the political implications of 2021's rise in labor activism. join.theintercept.com/donate/now See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tornado Trackers
S2E5 The 50 Yard Intercept

Tornado Trackers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 53:15


On this episode of the Tornado Trackers Podcast, Gabe shares the story behind one of his wildest solo chases ever.  After a day of emotional ups and downs, Gabe finds himself within 50 yards of a multivortex tornado as it begins to move into the town of Selden, KS during the 2021 chase season. The team discusses the importance of having outside perspective during stressful moments, and of persistence when motivation is low. Selden, KS Tornado (Extended Cut): https://youtu.be/qkpcCaRX_fITornado Trackers Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Intro/Outro Music:  NEW HORIZONS - Lesion X 

In The Thick
Get It Together

In The Thick

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 36:42


Julio and guest co-host Imara Jones, founder and CEO of TransLash Media, are joined by Akela Lacy, politics reporter at The Intercept, and Renée Graham, associate editor and columnist for The Boston Globe's Op-Ed section. They talk about the World Series games in Atlanta, and the racism behind the Tomahawk Chop. They also get into the latest with the investigation into January 6, and they hear from Antonia Hylton, a correspondent for NBC News and MSNBC, on Republican strategies behind school board elections.ITT Staff Picks: Stefan Fatsis reports on the history of the racist Tomahawk Chop, including its hand motion and music origins, for Slate Magazine. On the recent uptick in threats against local officials and teachers, Renée Graham writes that “the endgame is taking shape — to replace them with people fixated on toxic ideologies instead of serving the public good,” for The Boston Globe.Corporate interest groups, conservative groups tied to Donald Trump, congressional Republicans and the Koch network are lobbying against Biden's Build Back Better plan, reports Akela Lacy for The Intercept. Photo credit: AP Photo/Steve Helber See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Military Mom Talk Radio
Andrews & Wilson: Dark Intercept

Military Mom Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 49:58


Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1376 Tell Stories, Not Myths: America is a Force But Not Always For Good (Repost + Bonus Clips)

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 88:22


Air Date 10/21/2020 Today we take a look at some of the many zany foreign misadventures the United States has had over the past 100 years. And by "zany misadventures" I mean the naked pursuit of capitalism at any cost, the support of military coups and other undemocratic overthrows of foreign governments and wars for oil and resources in an unabashed attempt to keep America wealthy and the rest of the world less so - all while maintaining an anti-imperial, pro-democracy, pro-freedom, live-and-let-live poker face. Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript BECOME A MEMBER! (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: The bipartisan empire machine that runs the United States - Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill - Air Date 9-26-18 Trump lies all the time but he's also continuing one of the great lies of America Ch. 2: Empire Unhinged with Aslı Bâli & Aziz Rana - The Dig - Air Date 6-11-20 Dan interviews returning guests Aslı Bâli and Aziz Rana on the long history behind the crisis of American imperial legitimation that has become so manifest amid the pandemic. Ch. 3: American Empire Part 1 - Scene on Radio - Air Date 4-29-20 “America” and “empire.” Do those words go together? If so, what kind of imperialism does the U.S. practice, and how has American empire changed over time? By host and producer John Biewen, with series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika. Ch. 4: Ghosts of Mossadegh: The Iran Cables, U.S. Empire, and the Arc of History - Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill - Air Date 11-20-19 The Intercept's investigative series The Iran Cables offers historical insight into Iran's operations in neighboring Iraq, which are informed by the bloody history of the Iran-Iraq War, the U.S. invasion, and subsequent occupation of Iraq Ch. 5: 2020 Hindsight on Iraq - Open Source with Christopher Lydon - Air Date 1-9-20 America's "original sin" in the Middle East: the CIA's (and Britain's) coup d'etat in Iran in 1953. Ch. 6: American Empire Part 2 - Scene on Radio - Air Date 4-29-20 Ch. 7: Voting Is Not Enough - 2 WEEKS LEFT, GET OUT THE VOTE - Best of the Left Ch. 8: American Empire Part 3 - Scene on Radio - Air Date 4-29-20 Ch. 9: The Always Stumbling US Empire - Citations Needed - Air Date 10-25-17 "Stumbling", "sliding", "drawn into" war––the media frequently assumes the US is bumbling its way around the world. The idea that the United States operates in “good faith” is taken for granted for most of the American press. Ch. 10: The Other 9/11: Part One - Making Contact - Air Date 9-3-13 Before 2001, there was another 9/11. In 1973, a military coup backed by the United States, overthrew the Chilean government and ushered in seventeen years of brutal dictatorship. In the first of a two part series; we hear stories of the Chilean 9/11. Ch. 11: Empire Unhinged with Aslı Bâli & Aziz Rana Part 2 - The Dig - Air Date 6-11-20 VOICEMAILS Ch. 12: Domestic focus is about setting a good example - Chris from San Diego Ch. 13: Thoughts on right-wing vs left-wing anarchism - Alex Ch. 14: Fighting for legitimacy - Dave from Olympia, WA FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 15: Final comments on the dangers and paranoia that come with illegitimate power MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Voicemail Music: Low Key Lost Feeling Electro by Alex Stinnent Activism Music: This Fickle World by Theo Bard Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com

The Katie Halper Show
Alec Baldwin Shooting 'NOT a Freak Accident' With Alex Press & Jonah Furman

The Katie Halper Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 50:36


(Patreon-only Rose McGowan interview here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/rose-mcgowan-57953217) Labor journalists Alex Press (https://twitter.com/alexnpress) & Jonah Furman (https://twitter.com/JonahFurman) discuss the labor movement, strikes, John Deere and what it has to do with Alec Baldwin's deadly shooting of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins. Alex Press is a writer and editor at Jacobin Magazine, whose latest article is "Halyna Hutchins's Death on the Set of Rust Was 'Not a Freak Accident'."Jonah Furman is a labor movement organizer and writer for Labor Notes (https://twitter.com/labornotes), the media and organizing project that since 1979 has amplified the voice of workers and labor militants. He is also a frequent contributor to The Intercept.

The Fifth Column - Analysis, Commentary, Sedition
334 w/ Zaid Jilani "Jeff Toobin, Fapping Antifascist; The Terror Parents of Northern Virginia; A Bad Bisexual in a Bad Vest"

The Fifth Column - Analysis, Commentary, Sedition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 102:48


w/ Zaid Jilani, former reporter at The Intercept and current substacker (inquiremore.com)Kmele, missing in a mudslide?Zaid, the most left-wing staffer at the Center for American ProgressCable news is horrible / Jeff Toobin slays white supremacySchool board chaos in VirginiaCreating wee lil' apparatchiksWhy do we care about the stupid VA governor's race?Words don't mean anything anymore, part 322We are all India-Pakistan nowThe steady hand in DC is trembling Dumb Republicans still have no economic programDear lord, she's wearing a vest!The collapsing Biden economic agendaIs Kyrsten Sinema a bad politician? Bad dresser? Bad bisexual?Matt discovers his white privilege (and he likes it) Recorded: 10/28/21Posted: 10/28/21 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apple News Today
Here's what to watch in next week's governor's races

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 8:24


Next week’s governor’s races in Virginia and New Jersey will be watched for national implications. Vox explains what to look out for, and why we should be careful not to read too much into the contests. A review of a migrant’s death by suicide raises questions about the treatment of people in American detention facilities. The Intercept has been following the story. NPR reports on why what’s happening in Sudan matters to the U.S. Even if you’re not a baseball fan, you might enjoy the World Series antics of Jim “Mattress Mack” McIngvale. The New York Post has details of his multimillion-dollar bet on the Houston Astros, his hometown team. And the Houston Chronicle covers how he’s buying tickets for dozens of nuns.

Congressional Dish
CD 241: 20th Anniversary of the Patriot Act

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 89:55


The Patriot Act: A law that is still governing us after 20 years despite being almost universally hated. In this episode, we take a close look at the lesser known parts of the Patriot Act that became permanent immediately, examine the status of the few provisions that had to be reauthorized over the years, find out how the law was crafted in the first place, and see what happened to the members of Congress who voted for this rights-destroying legislation. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD236: January 6: The Capitol Riot CD235: The Safe Haven of Sanctions Evaders CD160: Equifax Breach CD105: Anthrax CD098: USA Freedom Act: Privatization of the Patriot Act CD048: The Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) Patriot Act Overviews Charles Doyle. April 18, 2002. The USA PATRIOT Act: A Sketch, RS21203.” Congressional Research Service. Charles Doyle. December 10, 2001. Terrorism: Section by Section Analysis of the USA PATRIOT Act, RL31200. Congressional Research Service. Indefinite Detention Anna Mulrine Grobe. October 7, 2021. “Guantanamo: A former prosecutor's solution to an ‘unsolvable problem.'” The Christian Science Monitor. Jessica Corbett. July 22, 2020. “ACLU Says Release of Adham Hassoun Confirms US Government Lacks Power to 'Lock Someone Up Without Due Process.'” Common Dreams. Carol Rosenberg. June 29, 2020. “Judge Rejects U.S. Effort to Hold Palestinian Man After Prison Term.” The New York Times. Nino Guruli. February 24, 2020. “The Unreasonableness of the Citizenship Distinction: Section 412 of the USA PATRIOT Act and Lessons from Abroad.” The University of Chicago Law Review Online. Jennifer K. Elsea and Michael John Garcia. March 14, 2016. Wartime Detention Provisions in Recent Defense Authorization Legislation, R42143 Congressional Research Service. ACLU. December 31, 2011. “President Obama Signs Indefinite Detention Bill Into Law.” ACLU. October 23, 2001. “How the Anti-Terrorism Bill Permits Indefinite Detention of Immigrants.” Credit Reporting Agencies Ken Sweet. October 6, 2017. “Equifax Collects Your Data, and Then Sells It.” Inc. “Experian Revenue.” Craft. “Equifax Revenue 2006-2021| EFX.” Macrotrends. “TransUnion Revenue 2011-2021 | TRU” Macrotrends. 15 U.S. Code § 1681v - Disclosures to governmental agencies for counterterrorism purposes. Cornell Law School Legal Information Institute. Reauthorizations and Expirations Charlie Savage. August 14, 2020. “McConnell Appears Set to Quietly Suffocate Long-Debated F.B.I. Surveillance Bill.” The New York Times. India McKinney and Andrew Crocker. April 16, 2020. “Yes, Section 215 Expired. Now What?” EFF. Charlie Savage. March 27, 2020. “House Departs Without Vote to Extend Expired F.B.I. Spy Tools” The New York Times. Office of the Press Secretary. March 9, 2006. “President Signs USA PATRIOT Improvement and Reauthorization Act.” The White House. Steven M. Martinez. April 21, 2005. “Testimony Before the House Judiciary Committee, Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security.” archives.fbi.gov Brain Duignan. “USA PATRIOT Act: Reauthorizations.” Britannica. ACLU. “The Sun Also Sets: Understanding the Patriot Act ‘Sunsets.'” Surveillance Charlie Savage. January 22, 2021. “Intelligence Analysts Use U.S. Smartphone Location Data Without Warrants, Memo Says” The New York Times. Charlie Savage. December 3, 2020. “U.S. Used Patriot Act to Gather Logs of Website Visitors” The New Times. Charlie Savage. March 31, 2020. “Problems in F.B.I. Wiretap Applications Go Beyond Trump Aide Surveillance, Review Finds.” The New York Times. Byron Tau and Michelle Hackman. February 7, 2020. “Federal Agencies Use Cellphone Location Data for Immigration Enforcement.” The Wall Street Journal. Charlie Savage. December 11, 2019. “We Just Got a Rare Look at National Security Surveillance. It Was Ugly.” The New York Times. Sharon Bradford Franklin. July 25, 2018. “Carpenter and the End of Bulk Surveillance of Americans.” Lawfare. Adam Liptak. June 22, 2018. “In Ruling on Cellphone Location Data, Supreme Court Makes Statement on Digital Privacy.” The New York Times. International Impact Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe Bill Weinberg. June 15, 2018. “USA PATRIOT Act Threatens Uruguay Banks Over Legal Cannabis System.” Cannabis Now. Bills and Laws The Patriot Act United and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism (USA Patriot Act) of 2001 House Vote Senate Vote Law Outline TITLE I: ENHANCING DOMESTIC SECURITY AGAINST TERRORISM Sec. 106: Presidential Authority Expanded the authority of the President to "investigate, regulate, or prohibit" financial transactions to include "any person, or with respect to any property, subject to the jurisdiction of the United States." Expanded the authority of the President to block transactions and property of "any person, or with respect to any property, subject to the jurisdiction of the United States" "during the pendency of an investigation". Expands the authority of the President to confiscate property "of any foreign person, foreign organization, or foreign country" when the US has been "attacked by a foreign country or foreign nationals" and the President can then decide what to do with that property "for the benefit of the United States." These provisions remain in current law as of 10/18/21 TITLE II: ENHANCED SURVEILLANCE PROCEDURES Sec. 201: Authority to Intercept Wire, Oral, and Electronic Communications Relating to Terrorism Expands the list of suspected actions that can justify the Attorney General and some subordinates obtaining judicial permission for wiretaps (a list that has since been expanded further) to include terrorism related crimes. Sec. 203: Authority to Share Criminal Investigate Information Allows grand jury information to be shared with "any Federal law enforcement, intelligence, protective, immigration, national defense, or national security official" if the matter involves "foreign intelligence or counterintelligence" The government official who receives the information has to notify the court that it got the information, but that notification can be in secret and they have to submit it "within a reasonable time after such disclosure", which is not defined. The government official who receives the information is authorized to share it with "any other Federal law enforcement, intelligence, protective, immigration, national defense, or national security official" if it includes "foreign intelligence or counterintelligence" The procedures for sharing the information was left up to the Attorney General to decide. Sec. 205: Employment of Translators by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Authorizes the FBI to speed up the hiring of translators Sec. 206: Roving Surveillance Authority Under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 If a person is a "foreign power or an agent of a foreign power", the government can authorize wiretapping a "common carrier, landlord, custodian, or other specified person" if the court finds that the target is using communications that "may have the effect of thwarting the identification" of the target. Sec. 207: Duration of FISA Surveillance of Non-United States Persons Who Are Agents of a Foreign Power The warrants can be issued for up to 120 days fi they are for targeting individuals and can be for up to a year if targeting a "foreign power" Sec. 209: Seizure of Voicemail Messages Pursuant to Warrants Allows the government to seize the contents of voicemails using a warrant instead of a surveillance order, which is a faster method for authorization. Sec. 210: Scope of Subpoenas For Records of Electronic Communications Expands the information that can be subpoenaed from telecom companies to include connection records, records of call times and duration, types of services used, telephone numbers, IP addresses, and method of payments included credit card or bank account numbers. This provision had no sunset. Sec. 212: Emergency Disclosure of Electronic Communications to Protect Life and Limb Allows the telecom companies to provide customer data to the government if it "reasonably believes that an emergency involving immediate danger of death or serous physical injury to any person requires disclosure of the information with delay" Allows the telecom companies to provide customer data "to any person other than a governmental entity" Allows the government to require a telecom company to disclose customer records, which was previously an option decided by the telecoms. Sec. 213: Authority for Delaying Notice of the Execution of a Warrant Allows the government to delay notifying their target about a warrant if they court finds that the notification "may have an adverse result" such as an individual fleeing prosecution, endangerment of someone's life, tampering with evidence, witness intimidation, or jeopardizing the investigation. This provision allowed "sneak and peek" warrants, which allowed the government to secretly enter - physically or electronically - a target's property to search, take pictures, copy documents, download files, etc. as long as they didn't take any property with them. This provision had no sunset. Sec. 214: Pen Register and Trap and Trace Authority Under FISA Eliminates the requirements that trace devices only be applied to devices and facilities used by foreign persons, so that now they can be used on devices belonging to US citizens so long as the devices are likely to provide information related to a foreign intelligence investigation. Sec. 215: Access to Records and Other items under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act Authorizes the FBI to order "the production of any tangible items" for their investigations into international terrorism, as long as the investigation of a US citizen or company is "not conducted solely upon the basis of activities protected by the first amendment to the Constitution." The entity turning over the property can not tell anyone that they gave the FBI whatever they requested or tell anyone about the investigation's existence, and in return, the entity that produced the items "shall not be liable to any other person for such production." Sec. 216: Modification of Authorities Relating to Use of Pen Registers and Trap and Trace Devices Requires that the court "shall" authorize the installation of trace devices "anywhere within the United States" if the court finds that the government has shown that the information likely obtained from the devices "is relevant to an ongoing criminal investigation." The order "shall apply to any personal or entity providing wire or electronic communication services in the United states" A record must be kept of which officers installed the device, the date and time it was installed and uninstalled, the date, times, and durations that the device is accessed for information, and the information collected from the device. The record must be provided to the court "under seal" within 30 days "after termination of the order". There was no sunset for this provision. Sec. 217: Interception of Computer Trespasser Communications Allows companies to voluntarily request law enforcement monitoring of intruders on their networks and authorizes the government to intercept information transmitted by a "computer trespasser" Sec. 219: Single-Jurisdiction Search Warrants for Terrorism Allows judges to issue search warrants outside of the districts where the property to be searched is located. There was no sunset for this provision. Sec. 222: Assistance to Law Enforcement Agencies Requires that companies that help the government install tracing devices authorized by Section 216 on their network be "reasonably compensated for such reasonable expenditures incurred in providing such facilities or assistance." Sec. 223: Civil Liability for Certain Unauthorized Disclosures If a court finds that an employee of the United States has disclosed information collected improperly, the government has to conduct a proceeding to determine if discipline is warranted. Damages can be awarded of at least $10,000 plus litigation costs. Sec. 224: Sunset Sets an expiration date of December 31, 2005 for Sections 203(a), 203(c), 205, 208, 210, 211, 213, 216, 219, 221, and 222. Sec. 225: Immunity for Compliance with FISA Wiretap Provides immunity to anyone who complies with a FISA wiretap, including private and government persons. TITLE III: INTERNATIONAL MONEY LAUNDERING ABATEMENT AND ANTITERRORIST FINANCING ACT OF 2001 Subtitle A - International Counter Money Laundering and Related Measures Sec. 311: Special Measures for Jurisdictions, Financial Institutions, or International Transactions of Primary Money Laundering Concern Authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to require domestic financial institutions to maintain records and file reports, including personally identifiable information, about transactions in a location outside the United States or between foreign financial institutions. Authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to prohibit or impose conditions upon accounts being opened in domestic financial institutions by people from foreign jurisdictions. Sec. 312: Special Due Diligence for Correspondent Accounts and Private Banking Accounts Requires banks that open accounts for non-US citizens to investigate the background of the account opener or owner for money laundering red flags. Sec. 313: Prohibition on United States Correspondent Accounts With Foreign Shell Banks Prohibits domestic financial institutions from opening or maintaining accounts for a foreign bank that doesn't have a physical presence in any country. Sec. 314: Cooperative Efforts to Deter Money Laundering Orders the Secretary of the Treasury to write regulations that encourage law enforcement and financial institutions to share information about individuals, entities, and organizations, with a specific focus on charitable organizations, non-profit organizations, and nongovernmental organizations. A financial institution that shares information that "may involve terrorist acts or money laundering activities" can not be held liable "under any law or regulation of the United States" or of any state or contract and they can not be held liable for failing to inform their customer that their information was shared. Sec. 315: Inclusion of Foreign Corruption Offenses as Money Laundering Crimes Expands what qualifies as "money laundering" to include "bribery of a public official, or the misappropriation, theft, or embezzlement of public funds by or for the benefit of public official" and some smuggling and firearm offenses. Sec. 316: Anti-Terrorist Forfeiture Protection An owner of property that is confiscated under US laws that allow the seizure of assets of suspected international terrorists can contest that confiscation, but the government can use evidence against them to justify the confiscation that is "otherwise inadmissible under the Federal Rules of Evidence" if it finds that "compliance with the Federal Rules of Evidence may jeopardize the national security interests of the United States." Sec. 319: Forfeiture of Funds in United States Interbank Accounts If funds are deposited by suspect into an account at a foreign bank that has an account in the United States, the money in that bank's account -up to the amount deposited in the target's account - can be held or seized from the bank's account. If a foreign bank doesn't terminate their relationship with the suspect, that foreign bank can be fined up to $10,000 per day until that relationship is terminated. If a convicted criminal hides their property, the court "shall" order other property up to the value of the missing property to be seized. Sec. 320: Proceeds of Foreign Crimes Expands the government's power to seize property held inside the United States if the property was obtained via felony drug offenses if the offense would be punishable by death or more than one year in prison under the foreign nation's or the US's laws. Sec. 323: Enforcement of Foreign Judgments The government can apply for and the courts can grant restraining orders to hold property that is the subject of investigations being conducted by foreign governments as long as the offense would have been illegal if committed in the United States. No one can object to the restraining order. The defendant is no longer required to have received notice of the proceedings in time to act but instead the foreign court has to "take steps" to notify the defendant. Sec. 326: Verification of Identification The Secretary of the Treasury has to write regulations that require banks to verify the identity of their customers and check a list of suspected terrorists to make sure that those people are not trying to open accounts at their bank. Sec. 328: Criminal Penalties Any official or employee of the US Federal Government, or any one who helps them, commit fraud on the United States "shall be fined in an amount not more than 3 times the monetary equivalent of the thing of value, or imprisoned for not more than 15 years, or both. Subtitle B - Bank Secrecy Act Amendments and Related Improvements Sec. 351: Amendments Relating to Reporting of Suspicious Activities Provides immunity to "any financial institution" that makes a voluntary disclosure of a possible violation of law to a government agency Prohibits the financial institution or anyone in it and the officers and employees of the Federal Government from notifying the customer that their suspicious transaction has been reported to the government. Sec. 355: Authorization to Include Suspicions of Illegal Activity in Written Employment References Authorizes employees of "any insured depository institution" (which includes "any uninsured branch or agency of a foreign bank") to "disclose in any written employment reference" of a current or former employee information about "the possible involvement" of that person in "potentially unlawful activity." If the information is shared "with malicious intent", the institution sharing the information can be sued. Sec. 358: Bank Secrecy Provisions and Activities of United States Intelligence Agencies to Fight International Terrorism Consumer reporting agencies "shall furnish a consumer report of a consumer and all other information in a consumer's file to a government agency authorized to conduct investigations of, or intelligence or counterintelligence activities or analysis related to, international terrorism when presented with a written certification by such government agency that such information is necessary" for the agency's investigation. The consumer reporting agency is not allowed to tell the consumer that the government requested the information or that the government received it. Provides immunity for a consumer reporting agency that complies with the government request. Sec. 361: Financial Crimes Enforcement Network Transforms the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) into a bureau in the Department of the Treasury. Sec. 363: Increase in Civil and Criminal Penalties for Money Laundering The Secretary of the Treasury may impose civil money penalties equal to or more than 2 times the amount of the transaction but not more than $1 million on any financial institution that violates the money laundering laws and special measures. Sec. 365: Reports Relating to Coins and Currency Received in Non-Financial Trade or Business Requires that any coin or currency transaction that is over $10,000 be reported to FinCEN. The reports must include the name and address of the recipient, the amount, the date and nature of the transaction, and the name of the person filing the report. This does not apply to any transaction if the entire transaction occurs outside of the United States. Subtitle C - Currency Crimes and Protection Sec. 371: Bulk Cash Smuggling Into or Out of the United States Creates the crime of "currency smuggling", which is when someone knowingly conceals more than $10,000 in currency or other monetary instruments on themselves or in their luggage or containers and transports it, or attempts to transport it, into or out of the United States. Punishment: Up to 5 years in prison and forfeiture of the money involved in the smuggling, or an equal amount from the suspect's personal belongings. Sec. 373: Illegal Money Transmitting Businesses Anyone who "knowingly conducts, controls, manages, supervises, directs, or owns all or part of an unlicensed money transmitting business" can be imprisoned for 5 years, fined, or both. Sec. 374: Counterfeiting Domestic Currency and Obligations Expands the definition and punishments for counterfeiting to include analog, digital, and electronic images. Lengthens prison sentences for a range of counterfeiting offenses. Sec. 375: Counterfeiting Foreign Currency and Obligations Dramatically expands prison sentences for counterfeiting foreign currencies from single digit year sentences to 20-25 years. Sec. 376: Laundering the Proceeds of Terrorism Expands the applicability of computer fraud offenses committed outside the United States if they involve devices issued by a company inside the United States, like a credit card, or if the defendant used any property within the United States to commit the crime. TITLE IV: PROTECTING THE BORDER Subtitle A - Protecting the Northern Border Sec. 402: Northern Border Personnel Authorizes unlimited funds to triple the number of border patrol agents, customs agents, and INS inspectors on our northern border along with an additional $50 million to update technology. Sec. 403: Access by the Department of State and the INS to Certain Identifying Information in the Criminal History Records of Visa Applicants and Applicants For Admission to the United States The Attorney General and the FBI will provide criminal history records to the State Department Subtitle B - Enhanced Immigration Provisions Sec. 411: Definitions Relating to Terrorism Adds being a representative of a foreign terrorist organization as designated by the Secretary of State or being a representative of an organization that publicly endorses terrorist activity to the grounds to denial of entry into the United States. If the endorsement of terrorist activity has occurred in the last five years, that person's spouse and children are also barred from entering the United States (this can be waived by the Attorney General if it can be proved that the spouse/children didn't know or has renounced the behavior). Defines "terrorist activity" "To commit or to incite to commit under circumstances indicating an intention to cause death or serious bodily injury To gather information on potential targets for terrorist activity To solicit funds or other things of value for a terrorist activity, a terrorist organization (unless the solicitor can demonstrate that he did not know, and should not reasonably have known, that the solicitation would further the organization's terrorist activity). To solicit any individual to engage in terrorist activity or membership in a terrorist organization (unless the solicitor can demonstrate that he did not know, and should not reasonably have known, that the solicitation would further the organization's terrorist activity). To commit an act that the actor knows, or reasonably should know, affords material support, including a safe house, transportation, communications, funds, transfer of funds or other material financial benefit, false documentation or identification, weapons (including chemical, biological, or radiological weapons), explosives, or training for the commission of a terrorist activity, to any individual who the actor knows, or reasonably should know, has committed or plans to commit a terrorist activity, or to a terrorist organization (unless the actor can demonstrate that he did not know, and should not reasonably have known, that the act would further the organization's terrorist activity.) Defines a "terrorist organization" A group designated, upon publication in the Federal Register, by the Secretary of State in consultation with or upon the request of the Attorney General, as a terrorist organization, after finding that the organization engages in "terrorist activity" or that the organization provides material support to further terrorist activity A group of two or more individuals, whether organized or not, which engages in "terrorist activity" Sec. 412: Mandatory Detention of Suspected Terrorists; Habeas Corpus; Judicial Review The Attorney General "may" certify that an "alien" is "engaged in any other activity that endangers the national security of the United States" An alien who is certified "shall" be taken into custody by the Attorney General "The Attorney General shall maintain custody of such an alien until the alien is removed from the United States... such custody shall be maintained irrespective of any relief from removal granted the alien, until the Attorney General determines that the alien is no longer an alien who may be certified" If the alien is finally determined to not be removable, detention "shall terminate" but an alien who has not been removed "and whose removal is unlikely in the reasonably foreseeable future, may be detained for additional periods of up to six months only if the release of the alien will threaten the national security of the United States or the safety of the community or any person." Judicial review of "any action or decision" relating to this section ("including judicial review of the merits of a determination") is available exclusively in habeas corpus proceedings. Outside of that, "no court shall have jurisdiction to review, by habeas corpus petition or otherwise, any such action or decision." The habeas corpus proceedings that are allowed may be initiated only by an application filed with the Supreme Court, any circuit judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, or "any district court otherwise having jurisdiction to entertain it." The final order "shall be subject to review, on appeal, by the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. There shall be no right of appeal in such proceedings to any other circuit court of appeals." Section 413: Multilateral Cooperation Against Terrorists Allows the Secretary of State to share information with other countries about "individual aliens" for the "purpose of preventing, investigating, or punishing acts that would constitute a crime in the United States" Subtitle C - Preservation of Immigration Benefits for Victims of Terrorism Sections 421-428: Provide leniency to immigrants who were either direct victims of 9/11 or whose US citizen spouse or parent died on 9/11. TITLE V: REMOVING OBSTACLES TO INVESTIGATING TERRORISM Sec. 501: Attorney General's Authority to Pay Rewards to Combat Terrorism Allows the Attorney General to offer rewards via public advertisements for assisting the Justice Department to "defend the Nation against terrorist acts" The money can come from "any executive agency or military department" "Neither the failure to of the Attorney General to authorize a payment nor the amount authorized shall be subject to judicial review" Sec. 502: Secretary of State's Authority to Pay Rewards Allows the Secretary of State to pay rewards - including rewards over $5 million - for "the identification or location of an individual who holds a key leadership position in a terrorist organization" The reward limit has since been increased to $25 million, but higher amounts can be personally authorized by the Secretary of State Rewards up to $100,000 do not need to be approved by the Secretary of State Current law: "A determination made by the Secretary under this section shall be final and conclusive and shall not be subject to judicial review" Sec. 504: Coordination With Law Enforcement Allows Federal officers who conduct electronic surveillance or physical searches to coordinate with Federal law enforcement officers to "investigate or protect against" actual or potential attacks, sabotage, or clandestine intelligence activities by agents of a foreign power. Sec. 505: Miscellaneous National Security Authorities Authorizes FBI investigators to collect the name, address, length of service, and toll billing records of telephone, financial records, and consumer reports of US citizens as long as the investigation is "not conducted solely on the basis of activities protected by the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States." Allows the FBI to obtain records faster using National Security Letters instead of the previous process where they had to document specific and facts showing that the person is an agent of a foreign power Sec. 507: Disclosure of Educational Records Allows the Attorney General (or high ranking designee) to request a court order for educational records that are relevant to investigations into "an act of domestic or international terrorism" The application to the court "shall certify that there are specific and articulable facts giving reason to believe" that the records will likely contain information related to their terrorism investigation. Provides immunity to educational agencies and institutions that comply with the court orders TITLE VI: PROVIDING FOR VICTIMS OF TERRORISM, PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS, AND THEIR FAMILIES Subtitle A - Aid to Families of Public Safety Officers Sec. 613: Public Safety Officers Benefit Program Payment Increase Increases the death or severe disability payment amount from $100,000 to $250,000 Subtitle B - Amendments to the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 Sec. 621: Crime Victims Fund Allocates money specifically to 9/11 victims and ensures that the payments do not count as income in order to reduce any government assistance that victim receives. TITLE VII: INCREASED INFORMATION SHARING FOR CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Sec. 701: Expansion of Regional Information Sharing System to Facilitate Federal-State-Local Law Enforcement Response Related to Terrorist Attacks Funds new information sharing networks TITLE VIII: STRENGTHENING THE CRIMINAL LAWS AGAINST TERRORISM Sec. 801: Terrorist Attacks and Other Acts of Violence Against Mass Transportation Systems Sets penalties for attacking mass transportation systems For attacks or plots that don't kill anyone or have passengers on board: Fines and up to 20 years in prison For attacks on vessels carrying at least one passenger or that result in "the death of any person", fines and up to life in prison. Sec. 802: Definition of Domestic Terrorism "The term 'domestic terrorism' means activities that involve acts dangerous to human life that are a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of any State; appear to be intended to intimidate or coerce a civilian population; to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion; or to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping; and occur primarily within the territorial jurisdiction of the United States." Current law maintains this definition Sec. 803: Prohibition Against Harboring Terrorists Establishes punishments for anyone who "harbors or conceals any person who he knows, or has reasonable grounds to believe, has committed, or is about to commit" a list of terrorism related crimes. They can be fined, sent to prison for up to 10 years, or both. Any Federal judicial district court can prosecuted these offenses. Sec. 804: Jurisdiction Over Crimes Committed at U.S. Facilities Abroad Gives the Federal Government jurisdiction over crimes committed by or against Americans that take place on property used - not necessarily owned - by the United States in foreign countries and in the residences used by United States personnel assigned to foreign missions. Sec. 806: Assets of Terrorist Organizations Subjects to civil forfeiture "all assets, foreign and domestic of any individual, entity, or organization engaged in planning or perpetrating any act of domestic or international terrorism against the United States, citizens or residents of the United States, or their property, and all assets, foreign or domestic, affording any person a source of influence over any such entity or organization; acquired or maintained by any person with the intent and for the purpose of supporting, planning, conducting, or concealing an act of domestic or international terrorism... or derived from, involved in, or used or intended to be used to commit any act of domestic or international terrorism..." The language 'any act of domestic or international terrorism' has since be changed to 'any Federal crime of terrorism' Sec. 809: No Statute of Limitation for Certain Terrorism Offenses Exempts terrorism crimes that result in or created a forseeable risk of death or serious bodily injury from an 8 year statute of limitations. Sec. 810: Alternate Maximum Penalties for Terrorism Offenses Increases penalties for crimes Arson prison sentences increase from a maximum of 20 years to a maximum of life Destruction of energy facilities increase from a maximum of 10 years to a maximum of 20 years Arson or energy facility destruction crimes that result in a death can be given life sentences Material support to terrorists and terrorist organization prison sentences increased from a maximum of 10 years to 15 years Material support to terrorists or terrorist organizations that result in a death can be given life sentences Destruction of national defense material crimes and sabotage of nuclear facilities or fuel prison sentences increased from a maximum of 10 years to 20 years Destruction of national defense material crimes and sabotage of nuclear facilities or fuel that result in a death can be given life sentences Damaging or destroying an interstate gas or hazardous liquid pipeline facility crimes prison sentences increased from a maximum 15 years to 20 years Damaging or destroying an interstate gas or hazardous liquid pipeline facility crimes that result in a death can be given life sentences Sec. 811: Penalties for Terrorist Conspiracies Adds people who conspire to commit crimes including arson, killings in Federal facilities, destruction of communications lines, stations, or systems, wrecking trains, material support to terrorists, torture, conspiracy, sabotage of nuclear facilities or fuel, interference with flight crew members and attendants, damaging or destroying an interstate gas or hazardous liquid pipeline facility, and a few others to the list of those who can be punished with fines and prison sentences. Sec. 814: Deterrence and Prevention of Cyberterrorism Increases the penalty for intentionally damaging a federal computer from up to 5 years in prison to up to 10 years in prison (up to 20 years for a repeat offender). Sec. 817: Expansion of the Biological Weapons Statute Establishes a maximum 10 year prison sentence and a fine for anyone who "knowingly possesses any biological agent, toxin, or delivery system of a type or in a quantity... that is not reasonably justified by a prophylactic, protective, bona fide research, or other peaceful purpose." TITLE IX: IMPROVED INTELLIGENCE Sec. 901: Responsibilities of Director of Central Intelligence Regarding Foreign Intelligence Collected Under Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 Because only the President and Attorney General are able to initiate a FISA surveillance order, this provision facilitates information sharing from the Attorney General to the CIA in a way that ensures that the CIA "Director shall have no authority to direct, manage, or undertake electronic surveillance or physical search operations." Sec. 905: Disclosure to Director of Central Intelligence of Foreign Intelligence-Related Information With Respect to Criminal Investigations The Attorney General or the head of "any other department or agency of the Federal Government" with law enforcement responsibilities "shall expeditiously disclose" to the Director of Central Intelligence foreign intelligence gotten in the course of a criminal investigation. TITLE X: MISCELLANEOUS Sec. 1005: First Responders Assistance Act Creates a grant program where the Attorney General will fund States and local governments for hiring additional law enforcement personal dedicated to "intelligence gathering", purchasing spying equipment such as wire-tap, pen links, cameras, and computer hardware/software, protective equipment for patrol officers, and communications operations for improved interoperability among surrounding jurisdictions. Sec. 1007: Authorization of Funds for DEA Police Training in South and Central Asia Authorizes $5 million for fiscal year 2002 for "regional antidrug training in the Republic of Turkey" by the DEA for police and "increased precursor chemical control efforts in the South and Central Asia region." Sec. 1010: Temporary Authority to Contract with Local and State Governments for Performance of Security Functions at United States Military Installations "During the period of time that United States armed forces are engaged in Operation Enduring Freedom and for the period of 180 days thereafter", the Department of Defense is allowed to use their money to contract out security at their military bases in the United States to local and State governments. Sec. 1012: Limitation on Issuance of Hazmat Licenses The Attorney General will complete background checks at the request of the States on people applying for a license to transport hazardous material Sec. 1016: Critical Infrastructure Protection Creates the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) Hearings House Session - October 23, 2001 Sound Clip Transcripts 1:26:29 Rep. Bobby Scott: First of all, I think it's appropriate to comment on the process by which the bill is coming to us. This is not the bill that was reported and deliberated on in the Judiciary Committee. It came to us late on the floor. No one has really had an opportunity to look at the bill to see what's in it since we've been out of our offices. The report has just come to us. And it would be helpful if we'd wait for some period of time so that we can at least review what we're voting on. But I guess that's not gonna stop us. So here we go. 1:27:26 Rep. Bobby Scott: This bill makes three significant changes. One, it reduces s+tandards for getting a foreign intelligence wiretap from one where it is the reason you're getting it, to it is a significant reason for getting the wiretap, much less. Then you wonder, well, if it's not the primary reason, why are you getting the wiretap? Second, it allows the roving wiretap so once you find a target, if he's using cell phones, for example, you can go and find them wherever he is. And third, you can use the information in a criminal investigation and the combination gives you the situation where there's very little standard, and you can essentially conduct a criminal investigation without probable cause. If you have, for example, a target, who is using cell phones, you get the the wiretap, he uses a payphone, you can listen to anybody using the payphone. If he's in a club or organization, in a business, you can go on you tap the phones there, if he's visiting the democratic national headquarters, maybe you can tap all the phones there. 1:29:47 Rep. Bobby Scott: There are provisions that allow attention under certain circumstances that may be indefinite, we expand the ability of the government to conduct secret searches and so called sneak and peek where you don't tell people they're even being investigated. And you can start targeting domestic organizations, designated domestic groups, as terrorist groups and you can start getting the CIA into designating these groups as targets for criminal investigations. There's a lot in this bill that we have not appropriately considered. And that's why we need more time to think of it because it goes way past terrorism. This is the way you're going to be conducting criminal investigations and therefore the bill ought to be defeated. 1:39:09 Rep. Spencer Bachus: You know, we may not have understood and appreciated the word “terrorism” and what terrorists were before September 11. We certainly do today. We know who they are. We know what they're capable of. We may not have appreciated the need for this legislation before September 11, but surely today, we appreciate the need for this legislation and the urgency of such legislation. 1:44:04 Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee: I'm concerned that the legislation still permits the Attorney General indefinitely to incarcerate or detain non-citizens based on mere suspicion and to deny readmission to the United States of such non-citizens. I'm also concerned that the AG and the Secretary of State have the power to designate domestic terrorists. You might simply be paying dues and be declared part of a terrorist organization. It has widespread investigation of Americans just on the basis of intelligence purposes. It allows searches of highly personal financial records, and allows student records to be searched. I would say this, Mr. Speaker, let us show America's character and bring forth a bill that all of us will find a good balance. We'll review this bill but I hope that we'll vote on a good bill and provide the leadership that we need to lead. 1:46:41 Rep. Marge Roukema: I would like to say to some of the naysayers that complain about the provisions, the question as to whether or not they deny due process or whatever. The question has been asked, Are we endangering the rights and privacy of innocent Americans? The answer is no. But it does give our law enforcement officials the requirements that they need for their careful investigation. It gives our regulators and law enforcement officials what they need to get the job done. 1:52:25 Rep. Zoe Lofgren: I would also like to note, however, that there's been a lot of loose language among people who oppose this bill, and people are perfectly free to disagree with it, but it's important that we not be incorrect about what's actually in the bill. I actually heard someone say that the bill would provide for indefinite incarceration on a mere suspicion by the Attorney General, that's simply not the case. The Attorney General may detain persons but he has to certify and he has to have reasonable reasonable grounds to believe that the individuals have involved in terrorism and that decision is reviewable by a court. So that is really the to say it's a mere suspicion and indefinite is certainly not the case. 2:07:48 Rep. Mel Watt: Some groups in our country have had their rights violated, trampled on, by the law enforcement authorities in this country and so we don't have the luxury of being able to just sit back and give authority, more authority, than is warranted, the authority possibly to abuse due process, to law enforcement, even in the context of what we're going through now. This is a very difficult time. I acknowledge that it is. But I think we are giving the government and law enforcement too much authority in this bill. 2:18:15 Rep. Barney Frank: Mr. Speaker, I don't know how I'm gonna vote on this bill yet, because I have this notion that in a bill of this weight, I ought to read it. So what I want to talk about now is my deep disappointment at the procedure. The gentleman from Wisconsin, the chair of the committee, has fought hard for a fair chance for the members to look at things. But on the whole, his efforts have not been honored. We now, for the second time, are debating on the floor a bill of very profound significance for the constitutional structure and security of our country and in neither case has any member been allowed to offer a single amendment. At no point in the debate in this very profound set of issues, have we had a procedure whereby the most democratic institution in our government, the House of Representatives, engages in democracy. Who decided that to defend democracy we had to degrade it? Who decided that the very openness and participation and debate and weighing of issues, who decided that was a defect at a time of crisis? This is a chance for us to show the world that democracy is a source of strength, that with our military strength and our determination and our unity of purpose goes to continued respect for the profound way in which our democracy functions. And this bill ironically, this bill which has been given all these high flying acronyms, it's the Patriot bill, it's the USA bill, it's that stand up and sing the Star Spangled Banner bill, has been debated in the most undemocratic way possible. And that's not worthy of this institution. 2:21:13 Rep. John Conyers: The members of the judiciary committee, who had a free and open debate, and then we came to a bill that even though imperfect, was unanimously agreed on. That was removed from us and we're now debating at this hour of the night, with only two copies of the bill that we're being asked to vote on available to the members on this side of the aisle. 2:22:18 Rep. John Conyers: Although I like the the money laundering provisions in the bill, I detest the work product that bears the name of my committee on it that has now been joined with this bill. And for this reason, as we close this debate, my inclination is not to support the bill. 2:23:12 Rep. James Sensenbrenner: Mr. Speaker, this is the latest step in a long process to attempt to pass a bill and send to the president that is vitally needed. It is vitally needed by our law enforcement officials, who are fighting the battle at home. We don't know how this battle will be fought. We don't know what tactics the enemy will take. We don't know what agents the enemy will use. And what we need is we need to get the intelligence necessary to protect the people of the United States of America from whatever the enemy has planned up its sleeve. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

craft office university performance trap america americans local current definition lessons crime north director south state congress new york times records house turkey president scope oral material united states white house federal terrorism security states employment prevention cia civil fbi families carpenter wisconsin constitution activities prohibition destruction authority code cooperation secretary inclusion aclu defense republic abroad columbia donations responsibilities bills speaker wall street journal patriot habeas corpus central asia intercept contract provide execution supreme court federal government limitations seizure effort fisa verification victims arson disclosure laundering coins ip compliance proceeds martinez reporting sec expansion hwy treasury enforcement immigrants dea patriot act fines judicial star spangled banner translators damages music alley expanded modification ins appeals attorney general subcommittee christian science monitor homeland security immunity assets forfeiture cia director assistance deterrence operation enduring freedom eff justice department federal bureau united states court funds 20th anniversary efx terrorist attacks britannica expired sections state government foreign intelligence surveillance act penalties other acts financial institutions macro trends defines federal register federal rules fincen authorization congressional research service disclosures congressional dish central intelligence jurisdictions issuance house judiciary committee us federal government damaging expands judiciary committee strengthening america national security letters lawfare press secretary common dreams usa patriot act andrew crocker prohibits adam liptak columbia circuit cover art design immigration enforcement authorizes steven m digital privacy charlie savage interceptions david ippolito crestview january 6th
Deconstructed with Mehdi Hasan
Ro Khanna on Reconciliation

Deconstructed with Mehdi Hasan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 47:13


As the negotiations over President Biden's sweeping budget reconciliation bill drag on, Democrats are struggling to find a set of compromises that will satisfy congressional progressives while still securing the votes of intransigent senators Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema. California representative Ro Khanna, a member of the House Progressive Caucus, joins Ryan Grim to discuss the state of play. Then, investigative reporter Dan Boguslaw talks about his recent reporting for the Intercept on Senator Manchin's coal entanglements in West Virginia.https://join.theintercept.com/donate/now See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

In The Thick
ITT Sound Off: Criminal Charges

In The Thick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 20:19


Maria and Julio get into the Senate confirmation hearing for Chris Magnus, President Biden's pick to lead Customs and Border Protection. They also debrief the latest developments from the House committee investigating the January 6th insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. And, they talk about a Senate committee investigation in Brazil to hold President Jair Bolsonaro accountable for the failures in his response to the coronavirus pandemic. Staff PicksPresident Biden's pick for Customs and Border Protection commissioner, Chris Magnus, supports two Trump-era border tactics, reports Ryan Devereaux for The Intercept. The public already knows that Steve Bannon, an ally to former President Donald Trump, played a role in the insurrection at the Capitol on January 6, reports Dan Friedman for Mother Jones.In his latest column, Julio writes “Brazil's president has been all-in on what has become an apparently effective strategy for modern-day authoritarians,” for MSNBC.Photo credit: AP Photo/Eraldo Peres See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Congressional Dish
Thank You Manchin The Corruption Preserver

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 133:16


Most press coverage right now is focusing on Sen. Joe Manchin's efforts to gut the Democratic Party's "Build Back Better" bill, but his efforts to gut the For The People Act might have much larger consequences for the future of the country. In this bonus "thank you" episode, learn about Senator Manchin's effort to maintain Congressional corruption in our election systems before Jen and Husband Joe thank producers and respond to their feedback, much of it about BIF: The Infrastructure Bill. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Joe Manchin. “Voting Legislation for the People Act Compromise.” Politico. Donald Shaw. October 5, 2021. “While Inquiring on Facebook's Bottom Line, Hickenlooper is Invested in the Company.” Sludge. Christian Stafford. October 5, 2021. “Caught Our Eye: Sen. Hickenlooper holds financial interest in Facebook.” LegiStorm. Donald Shaw. September 23, 2021. “Manchin Poised to Profit From Mine Reclamation Funding He Championed.” The American Prospect. David Moore. September 20, 2021. “Manchin Removes Ethics Provisions From Democratic Reform Bill.” Sludge. David Moore. June 16, 2021. “Manchin's Proposal Cuts Campaign Finance and Ethics Reforms From S1.” Sludge. Ryan Grim. April 8, 2021. “Republicans Are Poised to Gerrymander Their Way Back to the Majority.” The Intercept. Campaign Legal Center. February 23, 2021. “Three Big Ways the For the People Act Would Fix the FEC.” campaignlegal.org. Justin Glawe. July 8, 2020. “EXPOSED: Reps Pass Bills That Benefit Their Own Private Companies.” Sludge. The Associated Press. August 10, 2018. “Can Congress members sit on corporate boards? It's allowed.” CBS News. Vern Buchanan. November 14, 2016. “Letter from Congressman Vern Buchanan to then-Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and then-Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.” buchanan.house.gov Producer-recommended Sources Joe Biden. October 4, 2021. “Joe Biden to address debt ceiling situation.” The Guardian on Youtube. Andy Brown. July 18, 2019. “Uses of Hydrogen in Industry.” The Chemical Engineer. Linda Martin Alcoff. 2018. Rape And Resistance: Understanding The Complexities Of Sexual Violation. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press. Mike Conley and Tim Maloney. 2017. Roadmap to Nowhere: The Myth of Powering the Nation With Renewable Energy. roadmaptonowhere.com. Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

Apple News Today
The latest moves in the Capitol-attack investigation

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 6:42


The House committee probing the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol subpoenaed a former Justice Department official described as having been at the center of then-president Donald Trump’s attempts to overturn the 2020 election results. Bloomberg has details. An investigation from the Intercept found that a network of right-wing health-care providers made millions selling bogus COVID treatments. America’s national parks are drawing huge crowds, and the National Park Service is making changes to balance access and preservation. The Deseret News reports from Arches National Park in Utah. Only 33 living people have been the son or daughter of a president. People talked to some about the quirks and perks.

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
10/11/21 Andrew Quilty on the Afghan War Criminals being Brought to the United States

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 58:49


Scott interviews Andrew Quilty, a journalist who's stayed in Kabul, about a recent article he wrote for the Intercept. The article talks about the Zero Units which were militia groups of Afghan commandos led by CIA advisors, or handlers. These units gained notoriety during the war and have been accused of numerous war crimes. Many refer to them as CIA Death Squads. Quilty explains how members of these Death Squads were given priority in the evacuation from Kabul and how they will be resettled in the United States. Quilty also gives his account of how things are in Afghanistan after the U.S. has pulled out. Discussed on the show: “The CIA's Afghan Proxis, Accused of War Crimes, will get a Fresh Start in the U.S.” (The Intercept) “The Other Afghan Women” (The New Yorker) No Good Men Among The Living by Anand Gopel “Looser rules, more civilian deaths, a Taliban takeover: Inside America's failed Afghan drone campaign” (Connecting Vets)  “Surprise, panic and fateful choices: The day America lost its longest war” (Washington Post) BBC reporting about eyewitness claims that soldiers fired into the crowd after the suicide attack.  Andrew Quilty is an Australian freelance photojournalist and reporter. A winner of Polk and World Press Photo awards, he has been based in Kabul since 2013. Follow him on Twitter or at andrewquilty.com. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Dröm; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill
Far-Right Health Care Companies Made Millions Prescribing Unproven Covid Remedies

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 36:24


As the national push to vaccinate people against Covid-19 continues, hundreds of thousands of hacked documents show how a group of doctors is explicitly pushing unproven and potentially dangerous alternatives on people hesitant to follow public health authorities' recommendations to get vaccinated, wear a mask, and socially distance. This week on Intercepted: Nausicaa Renner, The Intercept's Washington editor, and Micah Lee, director of information security for The Intercept, discuss how a network of right-wing health care companies have been charging millions from people around the U.S. by promoting, prescribing, and selling unproven and ineffective medications for Covid-19. Lee, who received a trove of records from an anonymous hacker, was able to break down the complex network of organizations and companies involved in the operation. At the heart of it is America's Frontline Doctors, a group of far-right doctors led anti-vaccine physician Simone Gold that promotes and prescribes unproven medications like hydroxychloroquine and ivermectin. The data Lee received not only shows how profitable the operation is, but also how wide the falsehoods pushed by this organization have spread. join.theintercept.com/donate/now See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill
The Quest for Covid's Origins

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 41:16


In late September, the World Health Organization announced that it had assembled a new team of scientists to revive its investigation into the origins of the virus that causes Covid-19. The new group will be tasked with examining whether the virus could have originated in a lab, months after its predecessor deemed the possibility too unlikely for serious consideration.This week on Intercepted: Intercept investigative reporters Sharon Lerner and Mara Hvistendahl join editor Maia Hibbett to discuss the competing theories on the origins of Covid-19. The Intercept obtained documents that shed new light on controversial lab experiments, raising questions about the origins of the coronavirus pandemic. With neither of the main theories -- natural spillover versus a lab leak -- yet proved true, the Intercept is seeking answers as to how much officials knew about proposed behind-the-scenes experiments. As Georgetown virologist Angela Rasmussen, a staunch critic of the lab-leak theory, said after the first WHO investigation, “There are still major stones that need to be unturned.” See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Today, Explained
The humanitarian crisis at Rikers Island

Today, Explained

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 31:09


Twelve people at Rikers Island have died in custody so far this year. The pandemic is only part of the problem, explains Nick Pinto, who is covering the string of deaths for the Intercept. Today's show was produced by Victoria Chamberlin, edited by Matt Collette, engineered by Efim Shapiro, fact-checked by Laura Bullard and hosted by Haleema Shah. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained. Support Today, Explained by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Megyn Kelly Show
The Russiagate ‘Scandal' and Media's Shaming of the Unvaccinated with Glenn Greenwald | Ep. 162

The Megyn Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 94:21


Megyn Kelly is joined by co-founder of “The Intercept”, author of “Securing Democracy”, and Pulitzer-prize winning journalist, Glenn Greenwald, to discuss the new proof that the ‘Russiagate' scandal targeting Donald Trump was created by the Hillary Clinton campaign, the unprecedented migrant problem in Texas, the drone ban placed on journalists trying to cover the surge, General Mark Milley's defense of calls to China as ‘perfectly within the scope of the job', Don Lemon's pubic shunning of unvaccinated Americans, Anna Wintour's crusade to make the Met Gala even more exclusive and insufferable, Meghan and Harry's airbrushed Time Magazine cover (and life), and more.Follow The Megyn Kelly Show on all social platforms:YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/MegynKellyTwitter: http://Twitter.com/MegynKellyShowInstagram: http://Instagram.com/MegynKellyShowFacebook: http://Facebook.com/MegynKellyShow Find out more information at: https://www.devilmaycaremedia.com/megynkellyshow