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Public research university in Cambridge, United Kingdom

  • 1,804PODCASTS
  • 2,951EPISODES
  • 42mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 12, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about cambridge university

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Latest podcast episodes about cambridge university

Ukrainecast
Kept at gunpoint in a nuclear plant

Ukrainecast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 30:53


As the nuclear plant in Zaporizhzhia is attacked again, we hear from workers inside about what it's like to work in such fear as soldiers hold them at gunpoint. Victoria and Vitaliy are joined by medical students who worked to save people in the bunkers of Kharkiv who are now in the UK studying at Cambridge University. The BBC's defence correspondent Jonathan Beale details his interview with leading UK military commander Jim Hockenhull and the state of play in the war. The lawyer of detained US basketball star Brittney Griner, speaks to us about the verdict that saw her client sentenced to nine years in Russian prison for drug possession. This episode of Ukrainecast was made by Phil Marzouk with Ivana Davidovic and Arsenii Sokolov. The planning producer was Louise Hidalgo. The technical producer was Emma Crowe. The editor is Jonathan Aspinwall. Email Ukrainecast@bbc.co.uk or WhatsApp us on +44 330 1239480 with your questions and comments.

Woman's Hour
The Partition of India in 1947 and its impact on Women

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 51:08


It's been described as one of the most seismic events of the 20th century, but how did the Partition of the former imperial domain of British India into two countries, India and Pakistan, affect women? The split led to violence, disruption and death with women facing kidnapping, rape and forced suicide. It was a time of huge destruction and disruption but it was also a time of courage, compassion and survival of the women who overcame trauma to somehow rebuild their lives. We hear from Shruti Kapila, professor of Indian History at Cambridge University and Ritu Menon, feminist publisher and writer, and author of Borders & Boundaries: Women in India's Partition, as they discuss the stories of women at this time. Marvel, famous for its superhero comics, series and films has bought the story of Partition alive on screen in the new hit series Ms Marvel which features a Muslim female superhero for the first time. But is entertainment a good way to bring historical events to a new audience and generation? We hear from Fatima Asghar one of the writers responsible for an episode in the series dedicated to Partition. She explains how her own family story has influenced her writing. The poet and musician Amrit Kaur uses her love of music to help raise awareness of the women whose lives were affected by Partition. She started learning the Indian classical instrument at the age of 13 and since then has travelled the world using music to share the struggles of women through her music, which also includes the use of Punjabi folk songs. She performs a Punjabi poem written by Amrita Pritam. How are the events of the 1947 Partition remembered and understood by the younger generations? How does this type of trauma affect generations to come? We speak to three young women Unzela Khan, Dr Binita Kane and Amrit Kaur to talk about how the events of 1947 have shaped their lives and how it's contributed to who they are today. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed

Women Your Mother Warned You About
Storyselling with Bernadette McClelland

Women Your Mother Warned You About

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 50:01


Today Gina and Susanna welcome back a good friend, sales coach, author, renowned international speaker, and Alien of Exceptional Ability (you'll have to listen to find out), Bernadette McClelland,  Bernadette dives right into her specialty, sales Leadership. She talks about the different types of sales leaders. Micro-managers, glorified sellers, deal-makers, needle movers, courageous leaders and more. She expresses how top leaders have empathy, are present with their team, put their egos to the side, while simultaneously being outcome focused, aspiring for better, and inspiring their team for growth. There is a balance to it that isn't always easy. They discuss the power of cultivating ideas from your team to build trust, and the difference between being task-focused and purpose-focused. The conversation turns to feedback. People that arrive in leadership positions should be proactively looking for feedback from their team. They should receive it with an open mind and work to improve in any ways that they can. Also looking to other leaders as mentors can be invaluable. Finally Bernadette explains the effectiveness of ‘storyselling', and the three components of it, storytelling, storycatching and storyseeking. And of course they get into much, much more including Bernadette doing sales role play with both Susanna and Gina, and she explains the amazing difference between “what” vs. “why.” Find out more about Bernadette Come and grow with Sales Gravy & Sales Gravy University More about Gina Engagement Expert – Speaker – Sales Trainer – Entrepreneur – Improv Comic Gina is a Master Sales Trainer for Jeb Blount's Sales Gravy who combines street smarts and improv comedy skills with her experience in the corporate and entrepreneurial worlds, which sets her apart from her competition.  “Sass without too much crass” is how Gina Trimarco describes herself. A high energy entrepreneur, engager, speaker, trainer, improv comedienne and podcast producer, Gina credits most of her success on her upbringing by her Italian mobster dad and German immigrant mother. Prior to joining Sales Gravy, Gina founded and operated Carolina Improv Company, an improv comedy school and theater, in addition to Pivot10 Results, a sales training company. Thanks to this podcast, Gina was able to “stalk” her business role model Jeb Blount and convince him to hire her … and sponsor this podcast! More About Susanna After graduating from Cambridge University in Music and Education, Susanna took her first sales role selling advertising space on websites. She's always been intrigued by the unfair negative stigma associated with sales and the way that after their initial excitement to work in sales, people will do everything they can to avoid actual prospecting. With 14 years of experience in recruitment, Susanna challenges this mindset through her successful business sourcing sales professionals into recruitment roles. Susanna decided to become a Sales Gravy Master Trainer because Sales Gravy's vision matches her own beliefs and values. She is committed to providing excellence and dedication to all of her trainees so that they can achieve their goals and succeed in sales.

SHINING MIND PODCAST
Episode #97. Make your brain smarter and faster with brain training. Dr Susanne Jaeggi, world expert, citizen science project. Come join in!

SHINING MIND PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 45:01


We are joined by Susanne M. Jaeggi, Ph.D discusses how working memory is an essential system that underlies the performance of virtually all complex cognitive activities. People differ in terms of how much information they can hold in working memory, and also, how easily they can hold that information in the face of distraction. These individual differences are related to the fact that the functioning of the working memory system is highly predictive of scholastic achievement and educational success, and in general, working memory capacity is crucial for our general ability to acquire knowledge and learn new skills. Given the relevance of working memory to daily life and educational settings, the mission of my research program lies in the development of working memory interventions with the aim that that participants not only improve their working memory skills, but also general skills that go beyond the trained domain. By means of behavioral and neuroimaging methods, I seek to understand the underlying cognitive and neural mechanisms that drive training-related changes.Besides research on training and transfer, my lab also investigates individual differences in working memory capacity and executive control, as well as the nature of working memory limitations across the lifespan.https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/does-brain-training-actually-work/"To overcome these limitations, our team is currently leveraging the power of citizen science. Similar to a large-scale study in the United Kingdom (Brain Test Britain, promoted by Cambridge University and the BBC), we are seeking to recruit thousands of participants to help us uncover the potential merits of memory training. But unlike Brain Test Britain's simple question of whether brain training works, we are looking to engage the U.S. population in a new challenge to test why and for whom brain training works, and under which conditions.To accomplish our goal, we have launched a new study funded by the National Institutes of Health that aims to recruit 30,000 volunteers to participate in a memory training study that compares multiple approaches to train working memory. The study will use a common set of assessment measures to evaluate potential training gains, and it will focus on individual differences. Anyone older than 18 can join our study and help generate the data required to change the debate and move forward with a new paradigm of precision brain training. If you might be interested in joining our trial, go to the registration site at the University of California, Riverside"https://braingamecenter.ucr.edu/train-my-memory/Susanne M. Jaeggi, Ph.D.Principal Investigatorsmjaeggi@uci.edu949-824-5896Susanne Jaeggi  (read: /ˈyakee/) grew up in a tiny village 5,407 ft above sea level in the mountains of Switzerland. She found her way down to Bern, where she completed her Ph.D.s in Psychology and Neuroscience. She later moved to Ann Arbor to expand her horizon as a Post-Doc at the University of Michigan, before joining the Department of Psychology and the Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive Science (NACS) at the University of Maryland as an Assistant Professor.  She is now a Professor at the UCI School of Education where she directs the Working Memory and Plasticity Laboratory. She also has a courtesy appointment in the Department of Cognitive Sciences, and is a Fellow at the UCI Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. As a Cognitive Neuroscientist and Experimental PsSupport the show

The Science Hour
Synthetic mouse embryos with brains and hearts

The Science Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 56:40 Very Popular


This week two research groups announced that they have made synthetic mouse embryos that developed brains and beating hearts in the test tube, starting only with embryonic stem cells. No sperm and eggs were involved. Previously, embryos created this way have never got beyond the stage of being a tiny ball of cells. These embryos grew and developed organs through 8 days – more than a third of the way through the gestation period for a mouse. Roland Pease talks to the leader of one of the teams, developmental biologist Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz of Cambridge University and Caltech about how and why they did this, and the ethical issues around this research. Also in the programme: the latest research on how we spread the SARS-CoV-2 virus when we breathe. Infectious disease researcher Kristen Coleman of the University of Maryland tells us about her experiments that have measured the amounts of virus in the tiny aerosol particles emanating from the airways of recently infected people. The results underscore the value of mask-wearing and effective ventilation in buildings. We also hear about new approaches to vaccines against the virus – Kevin Ng of the Crick Institute in London talks about the possibility of a universal coronavirus vaccine based on his research, and immunologist Akiko Iwasaki of Yale University extolls the advantages of nasal vaccines against SARS-CoV-2. From dumping raw sewage into rivers to littering the streets with our trash, humans don't have a great track record when it comes to dealing with our waste. It's something that CrowdScience listener and civil engineer Marc has noticed: he wonders if humans are particularly prone to messing up our surroundings, while other species are instinctively more hygienic and well-organised. Are we, by nature, really less clean and tidy than other animals? Farming and technology have allowed us to live more densely and generate more rubbish - maybe our cleaning instincts just aren't up to the vast quantities of waste we spew out? CrowdScience digs into the past to see if early human rubbish heaps can turn up any answers. We follow a sewer down to the River Thames to hear about The Great Stink of Victorian London; turn to ants for housekeeping inspiration; and find out how to raise hygiene standards by tapping into our feelings of disgust and our desire to follow rules. (Image: Stem cell built mouse embryo at 8 days. Credit: Zernicka-Goetz Lab)

Scrubbed In
E107: Building a Passport Career in Medicine - Jessica O'Logbon (Med Student + Progress with Jess Founder)

Scrubbed In

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 48:05


In this week's episode Jess shares her journey into medical school despite being rejected the first time, her passion for leveling the playing field and her love for side hustles. We delve into her pursuit for building a passport career within medicine, her incredible e-books which are helping doctors with the process of re-locating and med students get funding including why she still wants to be a doctor!    We discuss her life as a medical student sharing insights on social media and more recently her MPhil at Cambridge University. Jess shares her advice for other medics who wish to follow a similar pursuit. Jessica O'Logbon is a Medical Student at King's College London, currently doing an MPhil at Cambridge University. She is the founder of Progress with Jess, a platform where she explores the diverse routes available within a career in healthcare. She has been involved in healthcare leadership, innovation and research, and continuously strive to make a change in my local and global communities.  Check out her blog posts and e-books helping you fulfill your potential at medical school and beyond! https://www.progresswithjess.co.uk/ Instagram: @jess.olo ------------------------------------- Episode Sponsor: Locum's Nest The Locum's Nest app has been revolutionising the way NHS doctors are supported by technology since 2015 and is now wired across all NHS professions. On a mission to remove barriers to workforce mobility across the NHS, Locum's Nest has pioneered the formation of digital collaborative workforce banks across the country, enabling cross-covering of shifts across an ever-growing number of NHS Trusts. Currently the best-rated app for flexible working in the NHS, Locum's Nest is transforming shift work in the NHS into a more inclusive and fulfilling experience by giving healthcare professionals ownership and control of their work life balance. Download the app Now: Apple App Store & Google Play Store Manage your shifts, your rosters and your pay all from one secure place! https://locumsnest.co.uk/healthcare-professionals ------------------------------------- Check out our latest platform Peerr Where healthcare professionals learn from the best educators - your peers! ✍️ Make your own quizzes for revision - An invaluable learning tool

The MindBodyBrain Project
Brain retraining for physical and mental health with Ashok Gupta

The MindBodyBrain Project

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 50:12


My Guest today is Ashok Gupta, the founder of the Gupta neuroplasticity training program that is used to treat a range of conditions, such as chronic fatigue, Long Covid, Fibromyalgia, chronic pain, anxiety and others.Ashok suffered from ME, or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, over 25 years ago when he was studying at Cambridge University. Through neurological research he conducted, Ashok managed to fully heal himself from chronic illness.  He then created the Gupta Program, which has published clinical trials on its benefits.Today, we discuss what happens in the body and brain to cause these chronic conditions and why Ashok says they can be reversed using his revolutionary brain retraining techniques called Amygdala and Insula Retraining.There are a number of free videos on the Gupta website and you can also do a 28-day free trial, which, unlike many free trials, does not require your credit card details. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Brain Inspired
BI 143 Rodolphe Sepulchre: Mixed Feedback Control

Brain Inspired

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 84:53


Check out my short video series about what's missing in AI and Neuroscience. Support the show to get full episodes and join the Discord community. Rodolphe Sepulchre is a control engineer and theorist at Cambridge University. He focuses on applying feedback control engineering principles to build circuits that model neurons and neuronal circuits. We discuss his work on mixed feedback control - positive and negative - as an underlying principle of the mixed digital and analog brain signals,, the role of neuromodulation as a controller, applying these principles to Eve Marder's lobster/crab neural circuits, building mixed-feedback neuromorphics, some feedback control history, and how "If you wish to contribute original work, be prepared to face loneliness," among other topics. Rodolphe's website.Related papersSpiking Control Systems.Control Across Scales by Positive and Negative Feedback.Neuromorphic control. (arXiv version)Related episodes:BI 130 Eve Marder: Modulation of NetworksBI 119 Henry Yin: The Crisis in Neuroscience 0:00 - Intro 4:38 - Control engineer 9:52 - Control vs. dynamical systems 13:34 - Building vs. understanding 17:38 - Mixed feedback signals 26:00 - Robustness 28:28 - Eve Marder 32:00 - Loneliness 37:35 - Across levels 44:04 - Neuromorphics and neuromodulation 52:15 - Barrier to adopting neuromorphics 54:40 - Deep learning influence 58:04 - Beyond energy efficiency 1:02:02 - Deep learning for neuro 1:14:15 - Role of philosophy 1:16:43 - Doing it right

Women Your Mother Warned You About
Introverts, Extroverts, Systems and Sales with Matthew Pollard

Women Your Mother Warned You About

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 37:13


Are you an introvert or extrovert? After listening to today's episode you may be surprised. Matthew Pollard, author, keynote speaker, and rapid growth business authority, joins the show to talk about what he knows best - the "Introvert's Edge."   First Matthew, Gina and Susanna discuss what really defines an introvert and extrovert. Matthew then delves into introverts natural strengths, like listening and being empathetic. What an introvert needs to go to the next level is practice. Practice with wording and delivery which brings security and confidence in presentation. This allows them to move to active listening and being vulnerable with the audience which is what draws them in emotionally to them and their story. He also talks about the importance of systems and whether you are an introvert, or an extrovert, training and systems are needed. The ones that use them are the most successful. He then touches on the fact that many people think they have to push themselves to act extroverted to be successful in sales and networking, which he will explain, just isn't true. Also, find out if Gina and Susanna are introverts or extroverts. Find out more about Matthew and how he can help you. Come and grow with Sales Gravy & Sales Gravy University More about Gina Engagement Expert – Speaker – Sales Trainer – Entrepreneur – Improv Comic Gina is a Master Sales Trainer for Jeb Blount's Sales Gravy who combines street smarts and improv comedy skills with her experience in the corporate and entrepreneurial worlds, which sets her apart from her competition.  “Sass without too much crass” is how Gina Trimarco describes herself. A high energy entrepreneur, engager, speaker, trainer, improv comedienne and podcast producer, Gina credits most of her success on her upbringing by her Italian mobster dad and German immigrant mother. Prior to joining Sales Gravy, Gina founded and operated Carolina Improv Company, an improv comedy school and theater, in addition to Pivot10 Results, a sales training company. Thanks to this podcast, Gina was able to “stalk” her business role model Jeb Blount and convince him to hire her … and sponsor this podcast! More About Susanna After graduating from Cambridge University in Music and Education, Susanna took her first sales role selling advertising space on websites. She's always been intrigued by the unfair negative stigma associated with sales and the way that after their initial excitement to work in sales, people will do everything they can to avoid actual prospecting. With 14 years of experience in recruitment, Susanna challenges this mindset through her successful business sourcing sales professionals into recruitment roles. Susanna decided to become a Sales Gravy Master Trainer because Sales Gravy's vision matches her own beliefs and values. She is committed to providing excellence and dedication to all of her trainees so that they can achieve their goals and succeed in sales.

Science in Action
Synthetic mouse embryos with brains and hearts

Science in Action

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 29:38


This week two research groups announced that they have made synthetic mouse embryos that developed brains and beating hearts in the test tube, starting only with embryonic stem cells. No sperm and eggs were involved. Previously, embryos created this way have never got beyond the stage of being a tiny ball of cells. These embryos grew and developed organs through 8 days – more than a third of the way through the gestation period for a mouse. Roland Pease talks to the leader of one of the teams, developmental biologist Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz of Cambridge University and Caltech about how and why they did this, and the ethical issues around this research. Also in the programme: the latest research on how we spread the SARS-CoV-2 virus when we breathe. Infectious disease researcher Kristen Coleman of the University of Maryland tells us about her experiments that have measured the amounts of virus in the tiny aerosol particles emanating from the airways of recently infected people. The results underscore the value of mask-wearing and effective ventilation in buildings. We also hear about new approaches to vaccines against the virus – Kevin Ng of the Crick Institute in London talks about the possibility of a universal coronavirus vaccine based on his research, and immunologist Akiko Iwasaki of Yale University extolls the advantages of nasal vaccines against SARS-CoV-2. (Image: Stem cell built mouse embryo at 8 days. Credit: Zernicka-Goetz Lab) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

The National Security Podcast
Cold winds - How Finland sees national security

The National Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 42:33


In this episode of the National Security Podcast, Dr Mika Aaltola, Director of the Finnish Institute of International Affairs, joins Rory Medcalf to shine a light on the distinctly Finnish way of safeguarding a small democracy's national security in an unforgiving strategic environment.A major consequence of Russia's invasion of Ukraine is the historic decision by Finland and Sweden to join NATO. But Finland is no stranger to countering military aggression from Moscow. In this episode of the National Security Podcast, Dr Mika Aaltola, Director of the Finnish Institute of International Affairs (FIIA), joins Professor Rory Medcalf, Head of the National Security College, who recently visited Helsinki in his capacity as a member of the FIIA advisory council, to shine a light on the distinctly Finnish way of safeguarding a small democracy's national security in an unforgiving strategic environment. Dr Mika Aaltola is the Director of the Finnish Institute of International Affairs and has been a Visiting Fellow at Cambridge University, Le Centre de recherches internationals at Sciences Po, and Johns Hopkins University. His areas of expertise include the global role of the United States, dynamics of major power politics, democratic vulnerability, pandemic security, and Finnish foreign policy. Professor Rory Medcalf is Head of ANU National Security College. His professional experience spans more than two decades across diplomacy, intelligence analysis, think tanks, and journalism.We'd love to hear from you! Send in your questions, comments, and suggestions to NatSecPod@anu.edu.au. You can tweet us @NSC_ANU and be sure to subscribe so you don't miss out on future episodes. The National Security Podcast is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and wherever you get your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Progressive Commentary Hour
The Progressive Commentary Hour - 08.02.22

Progressive Commentary Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 57:50


Dr. Roger Hodkinson Dr. Roger Hodkinson is a highly respected board certified pathologist in the US and Canada, and serves as the the CEO and Medical Director of MedMalDoctors, which provides evidence-based counseling to legal firms and institutions on medical malpractice. In Canada, Dr Hodkinson has made a name for himself as a popular and leading opponent to the Trudeau government's authoritarian Covid pandemic policies. He is a sharp critic of the abuse of medical science and knowledge in the handling of the pandemic and the push to mandate the vaccines and institutionalize vaccine IDs and passports. Roger has a very lengthy and impressive background. He is the chairman of an American company doing DNA sequencing. He has been recognized by the Court of the Queen's Bench in Alberta as an expert on pathology and is a former chairman of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada Examination Committee. Roger was also the president of the Alberta Society of Laboratory Physicians and taught on the faculty of the University of Alberta's Medical School. He received most of his education, including his medical degrees at Cambridge University in the UK. 

PEP Talk
With Sarah Irving-Stonebraker

PEP Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 24:04


We have recently heard more stories of Christians "deconstructing" their faith before eventually leaving it. But today we speak with an academic and historian about how her atheism was "deconstructed" when she discovered its true implications for morality, value and equality.  She goes on to show how hospitality and relationship can be radical evangelistic tools in the context of our secular individualised culture. Sarah Irving-Stonebraker is an Australian-based academic, focusing on the history of Britain and the colonial world and especially the intersection of religion, science, and politics. She was awarded her PhD in History from Cambridge University and has lectured at Western Sydney University since 2012. Sarah and her husband, Johnathan, have three children. The family lives in the Hawkesbury region outside of Sydney where they are active members of a Sydney Anglican Church.Support the show

New Books in History
Megan Threlkeld, "Citizens of the World: U. S. Women and Global Government" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 44:21


In Citizens of the World: U.S. Women and Global Government (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2022), Megan Threlkeld profiles nine American women in the first half of the 20th century who invoked world citizenship as they promoted world government. These women agreed neither on the best form for such a government nor on the best means to achieve it, and they had different definitions of peace and different levels of commitment to genuine equality. But they all saw themselves as part of a global effort to end war that required their participation in the international body politic. This book argues that the phrase “citizen of the world” was not simply a rhetorical flourish; it represented a demand to participate in shaping the global polity and an expression of women's obligation to work for peace and equality. It gave them a language with which to advocate for international cooperation. Citizens of the World not only provides a more complete understanding of the kind of world these women envisioned, it also draws attention to the ways in which they were excluded from international institution-building and to the critiques many of them leveled at those institutions. Women's arguments for world government and their practices of world citizenship represented an alternative reaction to the crises of the first half of the twentieth century, one predicated on cooperation and equality rather than competition and force. Rebecca Turkington is a PhD Candidate in History at Cambridge University studying transnational women's networks.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in World Affairs
Megan Threlkeld, "Citizens of the World: U. S. Women and Global Government" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2022)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 44:21


In Citizens of the World: U.S. Women and Global Government (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2022), Megan Threlkeld profiles nine American women in the first half of the 20th century who invoked world citizenship as they promoted world government. These women agreed neither on the best form for such a government nor on the best means to achieve it, and they had different definitions of peace and different levels of commitment to genuine equality. But they all saw themselves as part of a global effort to end war that required their participation in the international body politic. This book argues that the phrase “citizen of the world” was not simply a rhetorical flourish; it represented a demand to participate in shaping the global polity and an expression of women's obligation to work for peace and equality. It gave them a language with which to advocate for international cooperation. Citizens of the World not only provides a more complete understanding of the kind of world these women envisioned, it also draws attention to the ways in which they were excluded from international institution-building and to the critiques many of them leveled at those institutions. Women's arguments for world government and their practices of world citizenship represented an alternative reaction to the crises of the first half of the twentieth century, one predicated on cooperation and equality rather than competition and force. Rebecca Turkington is a PhD Candidate in History at Cambridge University studying transnational women's networks.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Intellectual History
Megan Threlkeld, "Citizens of the World: U. S. Women and Global Government" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2022)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 44:21


In Citizens of the World: U.S. Women and Global Government (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2022), Megan Threlkeld profiles nine American women in the first half of the 20th century who invoked world citizenship as they promoted world government. These women agreed neither on the best form for such a government nor on the best means to achieve it, and they had different definitions of peace and different levels of commitment to genuine equality. But they all saw themselves as part of a global effort to end war that required their participation in the international body politic. This book argues that the phrase “citizen of the world” was not simply a rhetorical flourish; it represented a demand to participate in shaping the global polity and an expression of women's obligation to work for peace and equality. It gave them a language with which to advocate for international cooperation. Citizens of the World not only provides a more complete understanding of the kind of world these women envisioned, it also draws attention to the ways in which they were excluded from international institution-building and to the critiques many of them leveled at those institutions. Women's arguments for world government and their practices of world citizenship represented an alternative reaction to the crises of the first half of the twentieth century, one predicated on cooperation and equality rather than competition and force. Rebecca Turkington is a PhD Candidate in History at Cambridge University studying transnational women's networks.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in American Studies
Megan Threlkeld, "Citizens of the World: U. S. Women and Global Government" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 44:21


In Citizens of the World: U.S. Women and Global Government (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2022), Megan Threlkeld profiles nine American women in the first half of the 20th century who invoked world citizenship as they promoted world government. These women agreed neither on the best form for such a government nor on the best means to achieve it, and they had different definitions of peace and different levels of commitment to genuine equality. But they all saw themselves as part of a global effort to end war that required their participation in the international body politic. This book argues that the phrase “citizen of the world” was not simply a rhetorical flourish; it represented a demand to participate in shaping the global polity and an expression of women's obligation to work for peace and equality. It gave them a language with which to advocate for international cooperation. Citizens of the World not only provides a more complete understanding of the kind of world these women envisioned, it also draws attention to the ways in which they were excluded from international institution-building and to the critiques many of them leveled at those institutions. Women's arguments for world government and their practices of world citizenship represented an alternative reaction to the crises of the first half of the twentieth century, one predicated on cooperation and equality rather than competition and force. Rebecca Turkington is a PhD Candidate in History at Cambridge University studying transnational women's networks.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Gender Studies
Megan Threlkeld, "Citizens of the World: U. S. Women and Global Government" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2022)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 44:21


In Citizens of the World: U.S. Women and Global Government (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2022), Megan Threlkeld profiles nine American women in the first half of the 20th century who invoked world citizenship as they promoted world government. These women agreed neither on the best form for such a government nor on the best means to achieve it, and they had different definitions of peace and different levels of commitment to genuine equality. But they all saw themselves as part of a global effort to end war that required their participation in the international body politic. This book argues that the phrase “citizen of the world” was not simply a rhetorical flourish; it represented a demand to participate in shaping the global polity and an expression of women's obligation to work for peace and equality. It gave them a language with which to advocate for international cooperation. Citizens of the World not only provides a more complete understanding of the kind of world these women envisioned, it also draws attention to the ways in which they were excluded from international institution-building and to the critiques many of them leveled at those institutions. Women's arguments for world government and their practices of world citizenship represented an alternative reaction to the crises of the first half of the twentieth century, one predicated on cooperation and equality rather than competition and force. Rebecca Turkington is a PhD Candidate in History at Cambridge University studying transnational women's networks.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books Network
Megan Threlkeld, "Citizens of the World: U. S. Women and Global Government" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 44:21


In Citizens of the World: U.S. Women and Global Government (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2022), Megan Threlkeld profiles nine American women in the first half of the 20th century who invoked world citizenship as they promoted world government. These women agreed neither on the best form for such a government nor on the best means to achieve it, and they had different definitions of peace and different levels of commitment to genuine equality. But they all saw themselves as part of a global effort to end war that required their participation in the international body politic. This book argues that the phrase “citizen of the world” was not simply a rhetorical flourish; it represented a demand to participate in shaping the global polity and an expression of women's obligation to work for peace and equality. It gave them a language with which to advocate for international cooperation. Citizens of the World not only provides a more complete understanding of the kind of world these women envisioned, it also draws attention to the ways in which they were excluded from international institution-building and to the critiques many of them leveled at those institutions. Women's arguments for world government and their practices of world citizenship represented an alternative reaction to the crises of the first half of the twentieth century, one predicated on cooperation and equality rather than competition and force. Rebecca Turkington is a PhD Candidate in History at Cambridge University studying transnational women's networks.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Reliable Truth
The Validity of the Bible in an Age of Skepticism - Part 3

Reliable Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 50:09


Are science and religious beliefs at war with each other? There are three different ways that people see the relationship between science and God. The first is the belief that science and faith are at war with each other. This is the approach that Richard Dawkins and Sam Harris take - that science has the edge in credibility because it's about provable facts, and religion depends on faith. The second is that they have nothing to do with each other. The great paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould of Harvard was an atheist and believed that science and faith occupy distinctly different domains. He said that science covers the empirical universe, while religion extends to the issue of morality, values, and meaning. The final one is that the testimony of science points to, it doesn't prove, but points to the existence of God. Dr. Steven Meyer, who has degrees in physics, geology, and a doctor's degree in history and philosophy of science, all from the prestigious Cambridge University, says that, “new evidence has come to light in the last 50 years across a wide range of the sciences that supports a belief in God.” Dr. Allan Rex Sandage, who is considered the greatest observations cosmologist in the world, turned heads when he became a Christian at the age of 50. He said that the Big Bang was a supernatural event that cannot be explained within the realm of physics as we know it. He said, "It was my science that drove me to this conclusion. It was only through the supernatural that I can understand the mystery of existence." And then he said, "Many scientists are now driven to faith by their very work."

Discovery
Plant based promises, sustainability

Discovery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 28:14


In Plant Based Promises, Giles Yeo a foodie and academic at Cambridge University, asks how sustainable are commercial plant based products? This is a fast growing sector with a potential value of $162 billion by 2030. Giles travels to the Netherlands Food Valley to look at companies developing plant based alternatives and to find out what role they have to play in changing diets. And Giles designs, his own plant based Yeo Deli range online, but discovers that new markets are already causing shortages of alternative proteins so what will the future look like? In 2019 the Eat Lancet Commission set up specific targets for a healthy diet and sustainable food production. The aim was to keep global warming to within 1.5 degrees and to be able to feed the world's 10 billion people by 2050. The Commission's recommendations are best visualised as a plate of food, half fruits vegetables and nuts and the other half whole grains, beans, legumes and pulses, plant oils and modest amounts of meat and dairy. Is there room on the plate for Giles Yeo Deli Baloney range.

The Science Hour
The first galaxies at the universe's dawn

The Science Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 54:59 Very Popular


n the last week, teams of astronomers have rushed to report ever deeper views of the universe thanks to the James Webb Space Telescope. These are galaxies of stars more than 13.5 billion light years from us and we see them as they were when the universe was in its infancy, less than 300 million years after the Big Bang. As University of Texas astronomer Steve Finkelstein tell us, there are some real surprises in these glimpses of the cosmic dawn. The super-distant galaxy that Steve's group has identified is named after his daughter Maisie. Also in the programme: a 550 million year old fossil which is much the oldest representative of a large group of animals still with us today. The early jellyfish relative lived at a time known as the Ediacaran period when all other known complex organisms were weird, alien-looking lifeforms with no surviving descendants. Roland Pease talks palaeontologist Frankie Dunn at the University of Oxford who's led the study of Auroralumina attenboroughii. Did the cultural invention of romantic kissing five thousand years ago lead to the spread of today's dominant strain of the cold sore virus (Herpes simplex 1) across Europe and Asia? That's the hypothesis of a team of virologists and ancient DNA experts who've been studying viral DNA remnants extracted from four very old teeth. Cambridge University's Charlotte Houldcroft explains the reasoning. And, If a tree falls in a forest, and no-one is there to hear it, does it make a sound? This is an age-old debate that listener Richard and his family have been arguing about for years. Can CrowdScience settle it once and for all? Caroline Steel speaks to experts in hearing, biology, philosophy, physics and sound design, which takes her to some unexpected places. Professor Stefan Bleek is an expert in psychoacoustics who says that sounds only exist in our heads. Dr Eleanor Knox and Dr Bryan Roberts are philosophers that make her question if anything exists outside our own perception. Professor Lilach Hadany wonders if it's limited to humans and animals - could other plants hear the falling tree too? And Mat Eric Hart is a sound designer who says that sound is subjective – it's always tangled up with our own interpretations. Things get truly weird as we delve into the strange implications of quantum physics. If there is such a thing as reality, doesn't it change when we're there to observe it? Does the tree even fall if we aren't there? Image: Maisie's Galaxy aka CEERSJ141946.35-525632.8. Credit: CEERS Collaboration

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning
Ashok Gupta on ”Health and Happiness: Getting to the Root of Chronic Pain and Illness (Long Covid, Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue and Others).

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 44:16


“If you do not make time for your wellness, you be forced to make time for your illness.” Watch this interview on YouTube here https://youtu.be/3u2sCwB_mSg Welcome back to The Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast, where we cover the science-based evidence behind social and emotional learning (for schools) and emotional intelligence training (in the workplace) with tools, ideas and strategies that we can all use for immediate results. I'm Andrea Samadi, an author, and educator with a passion for learning specifically on the topics of health, wellbeing and productivity, and launched this podcast to share how important an understanding of our brain is to our everyday life and results--whether we are a teacher in the classroom, a student, or in the modern workplace. This month, you might have noticed that we are breaking into a new season on the podcast, Season 8, where we are focusing on brain health and learning with a look at how an understanding of our brain can have an immediate improvement on our life, as well as our future generations. If you have followed our past few episodes, you'll recall me mentioning our guest for today, Ashok Gupta, who is a well-known Neuroplasticity "brain retraining" expert who has spent the last 25 years researching the effects of the brain and the mind on illness. He suffered from a condition called ME, or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, around 25 years ago when he was studying at Cambridge University. Through neurological research that he conducted, he managed to get himself 100% better. He then set up a clinic to treat others, and published the well- known neuroplasticity “brain retraining” recovery program he created, known as the Gupta Program[i] in 2007. He has published several medical papers, interviews experts in the field himself, like his recent interview with Dr. Joe Mather, medical director of a well-known functional medicine clinic in England called the Ruscio (ru-show) Institute[ii],  and is continually researching these chronic conditions. Recently, a randomized controlled trial was published showing the Gupta Program (that Ashok created himself) was highly effective compared to a control. The program now is used to support people with a wide variety of chronic illnesses, (like Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Fibromyalgia, among others that you can see listed on his website) and Ashok  Gupta is now on a mission to research and support people with chronic illness through this drug free and revolutionary, integrated and holistic approach. When I was first introduced to Ashok and his brain-training program I thought of all the people I know personally who have had the frustrating experience of going to the doctor for something they know feels “off” in their body (whether an illness, or pain from an accident or injury” and the doctor says “there's nothing physically wrong with them” and sends them off with a prescription for something (anti-anxiety medicine, or an anti-depressant) which doesn't work, because it doesn't come close to addressing the root cause. If you've ever wondered why our body seems to hold onto an old injury, or what's at the root of chronic disease like fibromyalgia, that causes years of frustration, lack of focus in the workplace and decreased productivity, there is a solution, and the answer shockingly comes with an understanding of our brain. Let's meet Ashok Gupta, and see how neuroscience is connected to chronic pain, and illness, and what he has seen from thousands of his patients around the world who use The Gupta Program. Welcome Ashok, thank you for coming on the podcast to share the years of research you have done in the field of chronic pain and illness. What part of the UK have we reached you today? INTRO Q:  To begin, I want to start from the beginning of your story because it really is incredible to see what you have built. I have watched some of your recent podcasts that people can access in the show notes[iii] and everything you share in all your interviews I find fascinating, and even ground-breaking. Can you share where this all started for you beginning with your own illness?   Q1: Ashok, the whole reason we launched this podcast, was to connect the brain to learning, and I heard you say it yourself that “most medicine is based on what's measureable, and what is measureable is in the body. But the brain is a black box.” Without looking at the brain with fMRI scans, we just don't know what's happening (in medicine and with learning/education). How did you first think to look at the brain with chronic illness that led you to your hypothesis that I will let you share and explain?   How did you come to discover or hypothesize that in the case of chronic pain or illness that “maybe the brain is creating an artificial environment in the body because it's overprotecting the system to ensure its survival” explaining why we feel pain or discomfort that doctors say isn't there? 1B: We've all had an injury or something where the pain just never seems to go away or neck pain I've always had, if I came to see you about it, would you say that it's a conditioned, or learned response? Perhaps tied to my posture at my desk, by not sitting up straight—what's happening in this case? Why would the pain from an injury a long time ago still remain in my neck years later?  How does my brain create the inflammation/irritation I feel and how does it create a viscous loop building up more inflammation and pain in the body? 1C: What about hypnotherapy for pain reduction? With everything you have learned studying the brain and pain, why do some people respond really well to this type of therapy, while visits to the chiropractor seem to have very little impact on long-term pain relief? 1D: Has modern medicine caught up with brain retraining as a viable solution for chronic pain or disease? Q2: When you discovered how the brain, specifically the amygdala and insula were connected to chronic pain and disease, what happened next? You obviously knew how it helped you with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, but what about Long-Haul Covid, Fibromyalgia, Chemical or Mold Sensitivities, Gut Issues, Anxiety, Lyme Disease? There's at least 12 conditions listed on your website and more listed in the Member's Area. Is the solution to finding relief with all of these chronic diseases held within the amygdala and insula of our brain? 2B: Is emotional pain the same as physical pain? 2C: For people who want to learn more about your hypothesis, as well as your published medical papers, clinical study and new randomized control trial, they can read those on your website.[iv] How important was it for you that you were the FIRST original neuroplasticity or brain retraining program with over 20 years of experience? How has this helped you to pave the way in the brain-retraining industry? Q3: Let's talk about the Gupta Program that you developed. I signed up for your 28-day free trail[v] to see what your program offered, and I was impressed from the start. The FREE Trial gives you access to the first 3/15 sessions. Like you, I'm a course creator, and my earlier courses began on DVD (in the olden days) so I'm picky when it comes to online courses, with the eye from the creator point of view, and you have done an incredible job with your online program. How did you create such beautiful videos? Were you actually shooting in the mountains somewhere? Your program is definitely easy to use which does help new users looking for answers! (I'm guessing it's on the Kajabi Platform?) 3B: I've just started the program, and have completed the first session out of 8. (Are there 8 session or 15?) I love it so far.  Will the brain retraining in the Gupta Program  help people like me with chronic pain, or is it just for the conditions we listed above? Q4: What are the results that people are seeing using your program? I did watch the video testimonials that you have listed on your website[vi]. They are impressive! There's a lot of success with Chronic Fatigue, and I also watched your interview with Dr. Joe Mather and his mold exposure story. When people aren't feeling well, what would be your recommendation? To use your brain-retraining program in conjunction with working with a medical doctor? What's the best way to use your program? Where would people begin? Q5: What's next for you? Q6: Is there anything important about your work that we have missed? Q7: How did you learn to navigate your way through scientific articles on Pubmed? For people to learn more about the Gupta Program, they can go to your website and like me, sign up for a free trial https://www.guptaprogram.com/free-trial/ They can also follow you: FOLLOW DR. ASHOK GUPTA Facebook https://www.facebook.com/guptaprogram Twitter https://twitter.com/AshokGuptaTV Ashok, Thank you very much for sharing your phenomenal program with us today. It's clear that you have a heart to help people all over the world, especially those who don't know where to turn.  I hope that anyone listening, feels “off” with their wellness visits your website to learn more and give your program a try. I know you are already helping people globally, just from reading the testimonials on your website, and do look forward to learning from you as a pioneer in mindfulness and mediation for improved well-being. Thank you so much Dr. Gupta. REFERENCES: [i] https://www.guptaprogram.com/ [ii] Dr. Gupta interviews Dr. Joe Mather, Medical Director of the Ruscio Institute, June 7th, 2022 https://www.facebook.com/watch/?ref=search&v=1210685199469705&external_log_id=ea24049b-d07c-4d70-a576-1f747a984ee1&q=dr%20joe%20mather [iii] Sam Visnic Podcast with Ashok Gupta on Retraining Your Brain for Chronic Conditions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8z81QhEHYiQ&t=2235s [iv] Learn more about Dr. Gupta's research https://www.guptaprogram.com/conditions/treatment-for-other-chronic-conditions/ [v] 28 day free trial  of The Gupta Program https://www.guptaprogram.com/free-trial/ [vi] The Gupta Program Success Stories https://www.guptaprogram.com/success-stories/  

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News.. Restoring insulin production, Tandem acquires Capillary Biomedical, "Purple Hearts" movie features T1D & more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 6:32


It's In the News! The tops diabetes stories this week include: Australian scientists say they have a new way to restore insulin production using an existing and approved drug, Tandem rolls out bolus by phone for wider release and acquires Capillary Biomedical, an infusion set maker. Dexcom adds Spanish as a language option for the G6, a necklace is said to be able to monitor glucose levels and Netflix's Purple Hearts focuses on type 1 medical costs as a plot point. Learn more about the T1D Exchange: https://t1dexchange.org/stacey/ Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!) Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible! *Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD* *Click here to learn more about AFREZZA* *Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*   Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. XX In the news is brought to you by T1D Exchange! T1D Exchange is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving outcomes for the entire T1D population. https://t1dexchange.org/stacey/ XX Australian scientists say they have a new way to restore insulin production in pancreatic cells, using a drug that's already approved for use in humans. In lab experiments on pancreatic stem cells from donors with type 1 diabetes, the team was able to activate them to begin expressing insulin by exposing them to a drug compound known as GSK126. These cells don't normally produce insulin, but the drug let them functionally step into the shoes of the beta cells that had stopped working. In principle, a single course of this kind of drug over a few days could replace the need for regular insulin shots in diabetics. The new treatment would work much faster, within a matter of days, and without the need for surgery. But perhaps the biggest advantage is that GSK126 is already approved by the US FDA and elsewhere in the world as a treatment for cancer. Its safety profile is already being assessed in clinical trials, which could reduce hurdles down the road for its use against diabetes. That said, the scientists caution that it is still very early days. These experiments were conducted on cells in culture – not even in animals yet – so there's still plenty of work to do. Nevertheless, it remains an intriguing new possible tool. https://newatlas.com/medical/diabetes-breakthrough-insulin-production-existing-drug/   XX Couple of big announcements from Tandem Diabetes this week. They've widened the roll out of their Mobile Bolus feature, now open to all customers with in-warranty tslim x2 pumps and compatible smart phones. Approved earlier this year, it has been available for a few weeks to a small group of users. https://www.tandemdiabetes.com/products/software-apps/tconnect-mobile XX Tandem also announced it acquired infusion set developer Capillary Biomedical, an infusion set maker. To quote the press release: Capillary Biomedical's unique extended wear infusion set technology is currently in development and not commercially available. The company designed its SteadiFlow seven-day-wear infusion set technology to significantly extend patient wear time to a week and maintain insulin stability. Capillary Biomedical received FDA investigational device exemption for the platform in January of this year. https://www.drugdeliverybusiness.com/tandem-diabetes-acquires-capillary-biomedical-infusion/ XX Dexcom is launching their G6 mobile app in Spanish. It is estimated that 11.8% of U.S. Latino adults have diagnosed diabetes. Dexcom says, “ “Launching the Dexcom G6 app in Spanish is a positive step toward improving health equity for individuals with diabetes who primarily speak Spanish.” To access the Dexcom G6 mobile app in Spanish, users need to install the latest version of the app and set their compatible iOS (v1.10.1) or Android (v1.10.0) smartphone* language to Spanish (any dialect/region). The app will automatically display in Spanish as long as the phone language is set to Spanish. XX   Big issue for a diabetes app in the UK. CamAps FX is an automated insulin delivery system that works with Dexcom and Tandem. But Google has blocked it from the Play Store and won't let it send text message alerts. Camdiab, the company behind it, is having to send the messages via another service and pay for each one individually. Google said it doesn't allow any apps, other than the designated text message app on a device, to send SMS messages. CamAps FX spent 15 years in development by experts at Cambridge University and was the first system of its kind to be recommended by the NHS for use by children from the age of one, and pregnant people. We'll see if the court of public opinion has any sway on what happens here.   https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-62184812 XX   Should we get excited about a new smart necklace said to measure glucose in sweat? Ohio State University recently presented the necklace, which has a clasp and pendant with biochemical sensors installed on the back so that when placed around the neck, it could capture the sweat and analyze glucose, serotonin, sodium, potassium, and hydrogen levels. In one experiment where people cycled  and drank sugary drinks, the sweat measured the increased glucose levels with a 98.9% accuracy. They didn't really say what that means, though. Long way to go here but interesting idea.   https://www.sciencetimes.com/articles/38989/20220726/smart-necklace-track-wearers-health-status-98-9-accuracy-using.htm XX The T1D Exchange Registry is a research study conducted online over time, designed to foster innovation and improve the lives of people with T1D. The platform is open to both adults and children with T1D living in the U.S. Personal information remains confidential and participation is fully voluntary. Once enrolled, participants will complete annual surveys and have the opportunity to sign up for other studies on specific topics related to T1D. The registry aims to improve knowledge of T1D, accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments and technologies, and generate evidence to support policy or insurance changes that help the T1D community. By sharing opinions, experiences and data, patients can help advance meaningful T1D treatment, care and policy. The registry is now available on the T1D Exchange website and is simple to navigate, mobile and user-friendly. For more information or to register, go to www.t1dregistry.org/stacey XX A new Netflix movie featuring type 1 is getting a lot of attention: Called Purple Hearts, it tells the story of Aspiring singer-songwriter Cassie Salazar (Sofia Carson). The synopsis says: Chasing her dreams isn't exactly easy when she's juggling multiple jobs and trying to keep her Type I diabetes at bay. Raised by an immigrant single mother and navigating a cruel health-care system, Cassie has seen how the “Land of the Free” has been everything but for people like her. After learning that Marine spouses get full health benefits and extra pay, Cassie comes up with an idea to marry one. Although the marriage is temporary, their true feelings for each other are revealed when an unexpected tragedy sends her now husband home earlier than expected. I've reached out to the film makers. We'll see if this one gets type 1 right.. but it sounds like they understand some of the health care system. XX Next week I'm talking to Jeff Ryan, who was diagnosed with type 1 as a little kid back in 1971. He also lives with an essential tremor, and was one of the first people to have brain surgery for it. Which was very successful. The long format episode out right now is with Sebastien Sassville who tals about completed the race across America – a coast to coast cycling race in just 12 days. Listen wherever you get your podcasts That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Habits for Happiness
EP 33:The Habit of Completion w. Bestselling Author: John Purkiss

Habits for Happiness

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 60:00


Join me and the bestselling author The Power of Letting Go, John Purkiss, as we discuss the powerful habit of Completion as it relates to learning to let go and live in The Flow. John grew up in England and studied economics at Cambridge University. He began his career with The First National Bank of Chicago and completed his MBA at INSEAD in France, where he won first prize. John was then diagnosed with clinical depression, which nearly proved fatal. He realised that he didn't know how to live a successful and fulfilling life. John began to look for answers while co-founding a software company and working in sales and marketing – in the UK and continental Europe. One day he learned to meditate while reading a novel. He let go and asked to be guided. Within six months he was in the perfect job, achieving his financial goals with ease. John now recruits senior executives and board members for a wide range of companies. He is also a co-founder of Enlighten Ventures. His latest book is called The Power of Letting Go. It describes the completion technique, which he learned from his guru SPH Sri Nithyananda Paramshivam (known as Swamiji) in 2014. The completion technique removes the pain patterns which are preventing us from manifesting what we want in life.

Buddha at the Gas Pump
656. Bernard Carr

Buddha at the Gas Pump

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 149:08 Very Popular


Bernard Carr is Emeritus Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy at Queen Mary University of London. As an undergraduate, he read mathematics at Cambridge University and for his Ph.D. he studied the first second of the Universe, working under Stephen Hawking. He was elected to a Fellowship at Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1975, and in 1980 spent a year traveling around America as a Lindemann Fellow before taking up a Senior Research Fellowship at the Institute of Astronomy in Cambridge. In 1984 he was awarded the Adams Prize, one of the UK's most prestigious mathematical awards. In 1985 he moved to Queen Mary and he became a Professor there in 1995. He has also held Visiting Professorships at various institutes in America, Canada, and Japan. His professional area of research is cosmology and astrophysics and includes such topics as the early universe, black holes, dark matter, and the anthropic principle. He is the author of around 300 papers and the books Universe or Multiverse? and Quantum Black Holes. He is also very interested in the role of consciousness as a fundamental rather than incidental feature of the Universe. In particular, he is developing a new psychophysical paradigm linking matter and mind which accommodates normal, paranormal, and mystical experiences. He also has a long-standing interest in the relationship between science and religion, especially Buddhism, having been the coholder of a grant from the Templeton Foundation for a project entitled “Fundamental Physics, Cosmology and the Problem of our Existence". He is President of The Scientific and Medical Network and a former President of the Society for Psychical Research. Transcript of this interview Discussion of this interview in the BatGap Community Facebook Group. Interview recorded July 24, 2022 Video and audio below. Audio also available as a Podcast.

Asian Review of Books
Lachlan Fleetwood, "Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

Asian Review of Books

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:51


Today, the idea that the Himalayas have the world's tallest peaks—by a large margin—is entirely uncontroversial. Just about anyone can name Mount Everest and K2 as the world's tallest and second-tallest mountains respectively. But the idea that this mountain range had the highest summits used to be quite controversial. Mountaineers claimed that the Himalayas could not be taller than peaks in Europe or South America, like Ecuador's Chimborazo. Even when it was proven that the Himalayas were taller, mountaineers would praised the aesthetic quality of European and South American peaks—essentially giving the nineteenth-century equivalent of “height isn't everything” That's merely one of the historical details from Lachlan Fleetwood's Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya (Cambridge University Press, 2022), which studies the first attempts to survey this mountain range. Fleetwood's book examines not just the expeditions themselves, but also how surveyors procured their equipment, how they handled altitude sickness, and the fossils they found (among other details), in order to analyze the connection between knowledge, the frontier, and empire. Lachlan Fleetwood is a historian of science, empire, geography and environment. He holds a PhD in history from Cambridge University, and is currently a research fellow at University College Dublin. He is currently developing a new project that examines climatic sciences and environmental determinism in imperial surveys of Central Asia and Mesopotamia in the long nineteenth century. In this interview, Lachlan and I talk about the Himalayas, how the first surveyors studied them, and why these early efforts to understand this mountain range are important to how we understand the history of science. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Science on the Roof of the World. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/asian-review

Science in Action
The first galaxies at the universe's dawn

Science in Action

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 27:44


In the last week, teams of astronomers have rushed to report ever deeper views of the universe thanks to the James Webb Space Telescope. These are galaxies of stars more than 13.5 billion light years from us and we see them as they were when the universe was in its infancy, less than 300 million years after the Big Bang. As University of Texas astronomer Steve Finkelstein tell us, there are some real surprises in these glimpses of the cosmic dawn. The super-distant galaxy that Steve's group has identified is named after his daughter Maisie. Also in the programme: a 550 million year old fossil which is much the oldest representative of a large group of animals still with us today. The early jellyfish relative lived at a time known as the Ediacaran period when all other known complex organisms were weird, alien-looking lifeforms with no surviving descendants. Roland Pease talks palaeontologist Frankie Dunn at the University of Oxford who's led the study of Auroralumina attenboroughii. Did the cultural invention of romantic kissing five thousand years ago lead to the spread of today's dominant strain of the cold sore virus (Herpes simplex 1) across Europe and Asia? That's the hypothesis of a team of virologists and ancient DNA experts who've been studying viral DNA remnants extracted from four very old teeth. Cambridge University's Charlotte Houldcroft explains the reasoning. Image: Maisie's Galaxy aka CEERSJ141946.35-525632.8. Credit: CEERS Collaboration Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

Women Your Mother Warned You About
Your Unfair Advantage with Stu Heinecke

Women Your Mother Warned You About

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:43


Today Gina and Susanna welcome Stu Heinecke back to the show! Stu is an author, speaker, a WSJ cartoonist, and is known as 'The father of contact marketing.' He will also be presenting at this year's Outbound Conference. He starts with the subject of his latest book, How To Grow Your Business Like a Weed, and how people in business and sales need to strive to act more like a weed. Persistent, relentless, adaptable, overtaking territory, probing every possibility to take root and grow. How are weeds able to do this? Stu explains that it's because they have many unfair advantages, and he shows you how you can discover your unique unfair advantages in order to leverage them. He continues giving priceless advice on how to stand out, how to get any meeting, humanizing yourself, making yourself irresistible to potential clients, the superpower of engaging both the right and left side of your brain, and using “yes and” to pivot out of anything that's thrown at you. Go check out all of Stu's books books, including How To Grow Your Business Like a Weed Come and grow with Sales Gravy & Sales Gravy University More about Gina Engagement Expert – Speaker – Sales Trainer – Entrepreneur – Improv Comic Gina is a Master Sales Trainer for Jeb Blount's Sales Gravy who combines street smarts and improv comedy skills with her experience in the corporate and entrepreneurial worlds, which sets her apart from her competition.  “Sass without too much crass” is how Gina Trimarco describes herself. A high energy entrepreneur, engager, speaker, trainer, improv comedienne and podcast producer, Gina credits most of her success on her upbringing by her Italian mobster dad and German immigrant mother. Prior to joining Sales Gravy, Gina founded and operated Carolina Improv Company, an improv comedy school and theater, in addition to Pivot10 Results, a sales training company. Thanks to this podcast, Gina was able to “stalk” her business role model Jeb Blount and convince him to hire her … and sponsor this podcast! More About Susanna After graduating from Cambridge University in Music and Education, Susanna took her first sales role selling advertising space on websites. She's always been intrigued by the unfair negative stigma associated with sales and the way that after their initial excitement to work in sales, people will do everything they can to avoid actual prospecting. With 14 years of experience in recruitment, Susanna challenges this mindset through her successful business sourcing sales professionals into recruitment roles. Susanna decided to become a Sales Gravy Master Trainer because Sales Gravy's vision matches her own beliefs and values. She is committed to providing excellence and dedication to all of her trainees so that they can achieve their goals and succeed in sales.

New Books in South Asian Studies
Lachlan Fleetwood, "Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in South Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:51


Today, the idea that the Himalayas have the world's tallest peaks—by a large margin—is entirely uncontroversial. Just about anyone can name Mount Everest and K2 as the world's tallest and second-tallest mountains respectively. But the idea that this mountain range had the highest summits used to be quite controversial. Mountaineers claimed that the Himalayas could not be taller than peaks in Europe or South America, like Ecuador's Chimborazo. Even when it was proven that the Himalayas were taller, mountaineers would praised the aesthetic quality of European and South American peaks—essentially giving the nineteenth-century equivalent of “height isn't everything” That's merely one of the historical details from Lachlan Fleetwood's Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya (Cambridge University Press, 2022), which studies the first attempts to survey this mountain range. Fleetwood's book examines not just the expeditions themselves, but also how surveyors procured their equipment, how they handled altitude sickness, and the fossils they found (among other details), in order to analyze the connection between knowledge, the frontier, and empire. Lachlan Fleetwood is a historian of science, empire, geography and environment. He holds a PhD in history from Cambridge University, and is currently a research fellow at University College Dublin. He is currently developing a new project that examines climatic sciences and environmental determinism in imperial surveys of Central Asia and Mesopotamia in the long nineteenth century. In this interview, Lachlan and I talk about the Himalayas, how the first surveyors studied them, and why these early efforts to understand this mountain range are important to how we understand the history of science. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Science on the Roof of the World. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/south-asian-studies

New Books Network
Lachlan Fleetwood, "Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:51


Today, the idea that the Himalayas have the world's tallest peaks—by a large margin—is entirely uncontroversial. Just about anyone can name Mount Everest and K2 as the world's tallest and second-tallest mountains respectively. But the idea that this mountain range had the highest summits used to be quite controversial. Mountaineers claimed that the Himalayas could not be taller than peaks in Europe or South America, like Ecuador's Chimborazo. Even when it was proven that the Himalayas were taller, mountaineers would praised the aesthetic quality of European and South American peaks—essentially giving the nineteenth-century equivalent of “height isn't everything” That's merely one of the historical details from Lachlan Fleetwood's Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya (Cambridge University Press, 2022), which studies the first attempts to survey this mountain range. Fleetwood's book examines not just the expeditions themselves, but also how surveyors procured their equipment, how they handled altitude sickness, and the fossils they found (among other details), in order to analyze the connection between knowledge, the frontier, and empire. Lachlan Fleetwood is a historian of science, empire, geography and environment. He holds a PhD in history from Cambridge University, and is currently a research fellow at University College Dublin. He is currently developing a new project that examines climatic sciences and environmental determinism in imperial surveys of Central Asia and Mesopotamia in the long nineteenth century. In this interview, Lachlan and I talk about the Himalayas, how the first surveyors studied them, and why these early efforts to understand this mountain range are important to how we understand the history of science. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Science on the Roof of the World. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Lachlan Fleetwood, "Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:51


Today, the idea that the Himalayas have the world's tallest peaks—by a large margin—is entirely uncontroversial. Just about anyone can name Mount Everest and K2 as the world's tallest and second-tallest mountains respectively. But the idea that this mountain range had the highest summits used to be quite controversial. Mountaineers claimed that the Himalayas could not be taller than peaks in Europe or South America, like Ecuador's Chimborazo. Even when it was proven that the Himalayas were taller, mountaineers would praised the aesthetic quality of European and South American peaks—essentially giving the nineteenth-century equivalent of “height isn't everything” That's merely one of the historical details from Lachlan Fleetwood's Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya (Cambridge University Press, 2022), which studies the first attempts to survey this mountain range. Fleetwood's book examines not just the expeditions themselves, but also how surveyors procured their equipment, how they handled altitude sickness, and the fossils they found (among other details), in order to analyze the connection between knowledge, the frontier, and empire. Lachlan Fleetwood is a historian of science, empire, geography and environment. He holds a PhD in history from Cambridge University, and is currently a research fellow at University College Dublin. He is currently developing a new project that examines climatic sciences and environmental determinism in imperial surveys of Central Asia and Mesopotamia in the long nineteenth century. In this interview, Lachlan and I talk about the Himalayas, how the first surveyors studied them, and why these early efforts to understand this mountain range are important to how we understand the history of science. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Science on the Roof of the World. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Lachlan Fleetwood, "Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:51


Today, the idea that the Himalayas have the world's tallest peaks—by a large margin—is entirely uncontroversial. Just about anyone can name Mount Everest and K2 as the world's tallest and second-tallest mountains respectively. But the idea that this mountain range had the highest summits used to be quite controversial. Mountaineers claimed that the Himalayas could not be taller than peaks in Europe or South America, like Ecuador's Chimborazo. Even when it was proven that the Himalayas were taller, mountaineers would praised the aesthetic quality of European and South American peaks—essentially giving the nineteenth-century equivalent of “height isn't everything” That's merely one of the historical details from Lachlan Fleetwood's Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya (Cambridge University Press, 2022), which studies the first attempts to survey this mountain range. Fleetwood's book examines not just the expeditions themselves, but also how surveyors procured their equipment, how they handled altitude sickness, and the fossils they found (among other details), in order to analyze the connection between knowledge, the frontier, and empire. Lachlan Fleetwood is a historian of science, empire, geography and environment. He holds a PhD in history from Cambridge University, and is currently a research fellow at University College Dublin. He is currently developing a new project that examines climatic sciences and environmental determinism in imperial surveys of Central Asia and Mesopotamia in the long nineteenth century. In this interview, Lachlan and I talk about the Himalayas, how the first surveyors studied them, and why these early efforts to understand this mountain range are important to how we understand the history of science. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Science on the Roof of the World. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

New Books in Geography
Lachlan Fleetwood, "Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Geography

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:51


Today, the idea that the Himalayas have the world's tallest peaks—by a large margin—is entirely uncontroversial. Just about anyone can name Mount Everest and K2 as the world's tallest and second-tallest mountains respectively. But the idea that this mountain range had the highest summits used to be quite controversial. Mountaineers claimed that the Himalayas could not be taller than peaks in Europe or South America, like Ecuador's Chimborazo. Even when it was proven that the Himalayas were taller, mountaineers would praised the aesthetic quality of European and South American peaks—essentially giving the nineteenth-century equivalent of “height isn't everything” That's merely one of the historical details from Lachlan Fleetwood's Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya (Cambridge University Press, 2022), which studies the first attempts to survey this mountain range. Fleetwood's book examines not just the expeditions themselves, but also how surveyors procured their equipment, how they handled altitude sickness, and the fossils they found (among other details), in order to analyze the connection between knowledge, the frontier, and empire. Lachlan Fleetwood is a historian of science, empire, geography and environment. He holds a PhD in history from Cambridge University, and is currently a research fellow at University College Dublin. He is currently developing a new project that examines climatic sciences and environmental determinism in imperial surveys of Central Asia and Mesopotamia in the long nineteenth century. In this interview, Lachlan and I talk about the Himalayas, how the first surveyors studied them, and why these early efforts to understand this mountain range are important to how we understand the history of science. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Science on the Roof of the World. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography

Goon Pod
An Adult Entertainment: Spike Milligan With Jeremy Taylor Live At Cambridge University (LP, 1974)

Goon Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 65:58


Recorded at Cambridge University in December 1973 and issued as a double LP in Spring 1974, An Adult Entertainment brought together the inspired lunacy of Spike Milligan and the musical whimsy of Jeremy Taylor. Spike read extracts from some of his books, recited poetry, shared anecdotes and generally treated the audience to a cornucopia of classic Milligana. Jeremy Taylor played some of his songs, some satirical, others sweetly melancholy, all of them shrewd observations of the human condition. Not all of it worked but what resulted was an interesting confection which could have benefited from more structure and consideration of content - however, all in all it is a record to make you smile and occasionally laugh out loud. Joining Tyler this week is musician and podcaster Paul Abbott whose parents had the record in their collection when he was growing up and he explains its appeal. Paul's band Good Grief have recently released a new album, Shake Your Faith: https://goodgriefliverpool.bandcamp.com/album/shake-your-faith

Climate Risk Podcast
30,000 Years in 30 Minutes: Climate Risk from an Archaeologist's Perspective

Climate Risk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 30:10


Hear from Prof. Brian Fagan, Distinguished Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, as we dig up lessons in climate risk from the ancient world of our ancestors. Humanity has been subject to extreme weather and natural climate change for millions of years, and we can trace its impacts back to even our most ancient civilizations. A recent revolution in climate archaeology offers us a window into the climate risk management practices of the past. Just as contemporary risk management relies on historical data, ancient humans relied on the knowledge of their ancestors to deal with the risks of climate change. Although much of this ancient risk management tradition has been lost to time, powerful archaeological techniques allow us to piece together stories of how humanity has dealt with the social, economic, and political consequences of climate change over the last 30,000 years. That's why in today's episode, we'll explore the history of humanity's relationship with climate change, including insights on: What the past can teach us about risk management in the modern era; How climate change has shaped (and sometimes devastated) human societies in the past; And the scientific breakthroughs that have allowed archaeologists to bring this knowledge into the present. Links from today's discussion: Brian's bibliography - https://www.biblio.com/brian-m-fagan/author/5110 The 1997-98 El Niño event - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1997%E2%80%9398_El_Ni%C3%B1o_event Brian on The Daily Show with John Stewart - https://www.cc.com/video/9jg7ty/the-daily-show-with-jon-stewart-brian-fagan Brian's article on Hubert Lamb's ‘church steeple meteorology' - https://www.jstor.org/stable/3986152  Speaker's Bio(s) Prof. Brian Fagan, Distinguished Emeritus Professor at the University of California Brian is Distinguished Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Brian studied archaeology and anthropology at Cambridge University, before spending seven years in East and Central Africa, where he became a pioneering scholar of African history. A prolific author, many of Brian's books explore the history of Earth's climate, examining the impacts the environment has had on human civilization (and vice versa) since the dawn of time. These works include “Floods, Famines, and Emperors”, “The Little Ice Age”, “The Great Warming”, and the topic of today's discussion, “Climate Chaos: Lessons on Survival from Our Ancestors,” which he co-authored with fellow archaeologist Dr. Nadia Durrani.

New Books in Sociology
Sarah Lamb, "Being Single in India: Stories of Gender, Exclusion, and Possibility" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 52:41


Today, the majority of the world's population lives in a country with falling marriage rates, a phenomenon with profound impacts on women, gender, and sexuality.  In Being Single in India: Stories of Gender, Exclusion, and Possibility (U California Press, 2022), Sarah Lamb probes the gendered trend of single women living in India, examining what makes living outside marriage for women increasingly possible and yet incredibly challenging. Featuring the stories of never-married women as young as 35 and as old as 92, the book offers a remarkable portrait of a way of life experienced by women across class and caste divides, from urban professionals and rural day laborers, to those who identify as heterosexual and lesbian, to others who evaded marriage both by choice and by circumstance. For women in India, complex social-cultural and political-economic contexts are foundational to their lives and decisions, and evading marriage is often an unintended consequence of other pressing life priorities. Arguing that never-married women are able to illuminate their society's broader social-cultural values, Lamb offers a new and startling look at prevailing systems of gender, sexuality, kinship, freedom, and social belonging in India today. Garima Jaju is currently a post-doc at Cambridge University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in LGBTQ+ Studies
Sarah Lamb, "Being Single in India: Stories of Gender, Exclusion, and Possibility" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in LGBTQ+ Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 52:41


Today, the majority of the world's population lives in a country with falling marriage rates, a phenomenon with profound impacts on women, gender, and sexuality.  In Being Single in India: Stories of Gender, Exclusion, and Possibility (U California Press, 2022), Sarah Lamb probes the gendered trend of single women living in India, examining what makes living outside marriage for women increasingly possible and yet incredibly challenging. Featuring the stories of never-married women as young as 35 and as old as 92, the book offers a remarkable portrait of a way of life experienced by women across class and caste divides, from urban professionals and rural day laborers, to those who identify as heterosexual and lesbian, to others who evaded marriage both by choice and by circumstance. For women in India, complex social-cultural and political-economic contexts are foundational to their lives and decisions, and evading marriage is often an unintended consequence of other pressing life priorities. Arguing that never-married women are able to illuminate their society's broader social-cultural values, Lamb offers a new and startling look at prevailing systems of gender, sexuality, kinship, freedom, and social belonging in India today. Garima Jaju is currently a post-doc at Cambridge University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/lgbtq-studies

New Books Network
Sarah Lamb, "Being Single in India: Stories of Gender, Exclusion, and Possibility" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 52:41


Today, the majority of the world's population lives in a country with falling marriage rates, a phenomenon with profound impacts on women, gender, and sexuality.  In Being Single in India: Stories of Gender, Exclusion, and Possibility (U California Press, 2022), Sarah Lamb probes the gendered trend of single women living in India, examining what makes living outside marriage for women increasingly possible and yet incredibly challenging. Featuring the stories of never-married women as young as 35 and as old as 92, the book offers a remarkable portrait of a way of life experienced by women across class and caste divides, from urban professionals and rural day laborers, to those who identify as heterosexual and lesbian, to others who evaded marriage both by choice and by circumstance. For women in India, complex social-cultural and political-economic contexts are foundational to their lives and decisions, and evading marriage is often an unintended consequence of other pressing life priorities. Arguing that never-married women are able to illuminate their society's broader social-cultural values, Lamb offers a new and startling look at prevailing systems of gender, sexuality, kinship, freedom, and social belonging in India today. Garima Jaju is currently a post-doc at Cambridge University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in South Asian Studies
Sarah Lamb, "Being Single in India: Stories of Gender, Exclusion, and Possibility" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in South Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 52:41


Today, the majority of the world's population lives in a country with falling marriage rates, a phenomenon with profound impacts on women, gender, and sexuality.  In Being Single in India: Stories of Gender, Exclusion, and Possibility (U California Press, 2022), Sarah Lamb probes the gendered trend of single women living in India, examining what makes living outside marriage for women increasingly possible and yet incredibly challenging. Featuring the stories of never-married women as young as 35 and as old as 92, the book offers a remarkable portrait of a way of life experienced by women across class and caste divides, from urban professionals and rural day laborers, to those who identify as heterosexual and lesbian, to others who evaded marriage both by choice and by circumstance. For women in India, complex social-cultural and political-economic contexts are foundational to their lives and decisions, and evading marriage is often an unintended consequence of other pressing life priorities. Arguing that never-married women are able to illuminate their society's broader social-cultural values, Lamb offers a new and startling look at prevailing systems of gender, sexuality, kinship, freedom, and social belonging in India today. Garima Jaju is currently a post-doc at Cambridge University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/south-asian-studies

New Books in Gender Studies
Sarah Lamb, "Being Single in India: Stories of Gender, Exclusion, and Possibility" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 52:41


Today, the majority of the world's population lives in a country with falling marriage rates, a phenomenon with profound impacts on women, gender, and sexuality.  In Being Single in India: Stories of Gender, Exclusion, and Possibility (U California Press, 2022), Sarah Lamb probes the gendered trend of single women living in India, examining what makes living outside marriage for women increasingly possible and yet incredibly challenging. Featuring the stories of never-married women as young as 35 and as old as 92, the book offers a remarkable portrait of a way of life experienced by women across class and caste divides, from urban professionals and rural day laborers, to those who identify as heterosexual and lesbian, to others who evaded marriage both by choice and by circumstance. For women in India, complex social-cultural and political-economic contexts are foundational to their lives and decisions, and evading marriage is often an unintended consequence of other pressing life priorities. Arguing that never-married women are able to illuminate their society's broader social-cultural values, Lamb offers a new and startling look at prevailing systems of gender, sexuality, kinship, freedom, and social belonging in India today. Garima Jaju is currently a post-doc at Cambridge University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in Anthropology
Sarah Lamb, "Being Single in India: Stories of Gender, Exclusion, and Possibility" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 52:41


Today, the majority of the world's population lives in a country with falling marriage rates, a phenomenon with profound impacts on women, gender, and sexuality.  In Being Single in India: Stories of Gender, Exclusion, and Possibility (U California Press, 2022), Sarah Lamb probes the gendered trend of single women living in India, examining what makes living outside marriage for women increasingly possible and yet incredibly challenging. Featuring the stories of never-married women as young as 35 and as old as 92, the book offers a remarkable portrait of a way of life experienced by women across class and caste divides, from urban professionals and rural day laborers, to those who identify as heterosexual and lesbian, to others who evaded marriage both by choice and by circumstance. For women in India, complex social-cultural and political-economic contexts are foundational to their lives and decisions, and evading marriage is often an unintended consequence of other pressing life priorities. Arguing that never-married women are able to illuminate their society's broader social-cultural values, Lamb offers a new and startling look at prevailing systems of gender, sexuality, kinship, freedom, and social belonging in India today. Garima Jaju is currently a post-doc at Cambridge University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

The Political Animals
Religious Liberty: A History, with Dr Sarah Irving-Stonebraker

The Political Animals

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 83:04


Intellectual historian Sarah Irving-Stonebraker joins the show for a conversation about the history of religious liberty, exploring the emergence and development of the concept from its first explicit usage by the third century church father Tertullian to its more recent secular evolution towards the present. Key moments in the history of religious liberty are covered, including the medieval period, the Reformation, colonisation, the American constitution and the French Revolution, conscientious objection and the Australian context. Dr Sarah Irving-Stonebraker is Senior Lecturer in History at Western Sydney University and co-editor of the Journal of Religious History. She was awarded her PhD in History from Cambridge University (2007) and has been an Assistant Professor at Florida State University and a Junior Research Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford University. Her first book, Natural Science and the Origins of the British Empire (Cambridge), was awarded The Royal Society of Literature and Jerwood Foundation Award for Non-fiction. She has two current book projects: Forgotten Histories of Religious Liberty in Australia, 1788- Present and The Death of History and the Hope of Christianity. The Political Animals is hosted by Dr Jonathan Cole, an academic, writer, speaker and translator specialising in political theology: the intersection of religion and politics. Jonathan was a senior terrorism analyst at Australian intelligence agency the Office of National Assessments where he worked on Islamist terrorism and the global jihadist movement. He is the author of Christian Political Theology in an Age of Discontent: Mediating Scripture, Doctrine, and Political Reality. You can follow Jonathan and the show on Twitter and Facebook.

Lex Fridman Podcast
#305 – Martin Rees: Black Holes, Alien Life, Dark Matter, and the Big Bang

Lex Fridman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 139:10 Very Popular


Lord Martin Rees is a cosmologist and astrophysicist at Cambridge University and co-founder of the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk. Please support this podcast by checking out our sponsors: – Lambda: https://lambdalabs.com/lex – InsideTracker: https://insidetracker.com/lex to get 20% off – Indeed: https://indeed.com/lex to get $75 credit – ExpressVPN: https://expressvpn.com/lexpod and use code LexPod to get 3 months free – Onnit: https://lexfridman.com/onnit to get up to 10% off EPISODE LINKS: Martin's Twitter: https://twitter.com/lordmartinrees Martin's Website: https://www.martinrees.uk Martin's Books: If Science is to Save Us: https://amzn.to/3yXRqsc The End of Astronauts: https://amzn.to/3B604ro On the Future: https://amzn.to/3OlzLjB PODCAST INFO: Podcast website: https://lexfridman.com/podcast

Active Pause: Demystifying Mindfulness
Elizabeth English: A gentle approach to mindfulness

Active Pause: Demystifying Mindfulness

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 23:51


In this conversation, we talk about freeing meditation from the pressures of what we believe it should be and welcoming every aspect of our inner experience. Dr. Elizabeth English began meditating as a student in 1983. Three decades later, she was appointed as Cambridge University's first ever Mindfulness Practitioner. Her courses are the subject of research published in The […]

Somatic Perspectives: Mindfulness & Psychotherapy
Elizabeth English: A gentle approach to mindfulness

Somatic Perspectives: Mindfulness & Psychotherapy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 23:51


In this conversation, we talk about freeing meditation from the pressures of what we believe it should be and welcoming every aspect of our inner experience. Dr. Elizabeth English began meditating as a student in 1983. Three decades later, she was appointed as Cambridge University's first ever Mindfulness Practitioner. Her courses are the subject of research published in The […]

Women Your Mother Warned You About
A Clearer Lens Into Sales with Anthony Iannarino

Women Your Mother Warned You About

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 64:27


As we ramp up to Outbound 2022, Gina and Susanna are bringing some of the amazing speakers that will be at the event on the podcast. There's no better way to kick it off than with the incomparable Anthony Iannarino. Anthony gives a sneak peek of what he is bringing to the Outbound stage, discussing personality types and sales. He will help you to sharpen your message to clients by knowing how to avoid triggering them, how best to build a relationship with them, know what motivates them, and how to get their buy-in. The group discusses how to be cognizant of where you're selling. Each geographic area of the country brings its own diverse communication and regional attitudes. If you don't adjust accordingly, you could lose a deal before you even start. Anthony tells an incredible story about how knowledge that comes from personal experience beats theoretical learning any day. He also gives insight from his new book 'Elite Sales Strategies' including the mistakes being made by sales leaders when it comes to increasing effectiveness of the sales team, the wrong questions that salespeople are asking which tanks their positioning, knowing the problem, using discovery to get to the root cause and then leading them to change. Plus, why to drop your logo list, the importance of truly differentiating yourself, why to act like a consultant, an overview of the sales landscape during the great resignation, and lessons he learned from his mom. Get Anthony's new book here! Come and grow with Sales Gravy & Sales Gravy University More about Gina Engagement Expert – Speaker – Sales Trainer – Entrepreneur – Improv Comic Gina is a Master Sales Trainer for Jeb Blount's Sales Gravy who combines street smarts and improv comedy skills with her experience in the corporate and entrepreneurial worlds, which sets her apart from her competition.  “Sass without too much crass” is how Gina Trimarco describes herself. A high energy entrepreneur, engager, speaker, trainer, improv comedienne and podcast producer, Gina credits most of her success on her upbringing by her Italian mobster dad and German immigrant mother. Prior to joining Sales Gravy, Gina founded and operated Carolina Improv Company, an improv comedy school and theater, in addition to Pivot10 Results, a sales training company. Thanks to this podcast, Gina was able to “stalk” her business role model Jeb Blount and convince him to hire her … and sponsor this podcast! More About Susanna After graduating from Cambridge University in Music and Education, Susanna took her first sales role selling advertising space on websites. She's always been intrigued by the unfair negative stigma associated with sales and the way that after their initial excitement to work in sales, people will do everything they can to avoid actual prospecting. With 14 years of experience in recruitment, Susanna challenges this mindset through her successful business sourcing sales professionals into recruitment roles. Susanna decided to become a Sales Gravy Master Trainer because Sales Gravy's vision matches her own beliefs and values. She is committed to providing excellence and dedication to all of her trainees so that they can achieve their goals and succeed in sales.

Dubious
World's Most Dubious Painting: Is Leonardo's Salvator Mundi a Fake?

Dubious

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 52:44


The Saudi Crown Prince might have bought a fake Leonardo.Salvator Mundi, the most expensive painting in the world, has a fascinating yet murky history: is it worth $450 million? Its initial price tag was 49 British pounds and we are debating whether it is an original Leonardo or one of many similar but less valuable paintings created in the 16th century. If you like our content please become a patron to receive our premium episodes, and all of our public episodes ad-free as well. One of many renaissance era portraits of Christ holding a celestial bauble while making the sign of the cross surfaced in a New Orleans auction house in 2005, only to be sold later for almost half a billion dollars. If its chain of ownership is true, it began in the private collection of Louis XII of France, saw the execution of Charles I, and was centuries later sold from the estate of Sir Francis Cook to Warren and Minnie Kuntz, furniture dealers from New Orleans, for 49 British pounds in 1958. Three dealers from New York bought it on a hunch from the auction of the Kuntz estate for $1175, and turned it over to Diane and Mario Modestini, experts in painting restoration. 1 Diane decided after extensive work on the painting that it was from the hand of Leonardo himself. From there the painting took on a life of its own, and each step along its journey involved the exchange of tens to hundreds of millions of dollars. 2 Sketchy Swiss shipping magnate Yves Bouvier bought it for $83 million, and immediately sold it to Russian oligarch Dmitry Rybolovlev for $127 million. When Dmitry found out about Yves' markup (and when his ex wife hit him with a 4.8 billion dollar divorce judgment...), in a rage he put the painting up for auction at Christie's, and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman paid $450 million for it. When MBS tried to get the Louvre in Paris to assist in the painting's perception of authenticity by exhibiting it next to the Mona Lisa the French curators refused, so it now reportedly lives on his yacht. 3 The painting propelled British National Gallery curator Luke Syson to a glamorous career at the Met in New York and the Cambridge University museum, whose previous director is now the director of the royal family's private art collection. It also embroiled Yves Bouvier into a string of lawsuits against Rybolovlev spanning major cities around the globe, and according to the French tabloids also brought Bouvier into an arrangement with a group of escorts who were previously involved in a scandal involving French football stars, who solicited them when they were underage. 4 All of this is a deep look into the shady underworld of the high end art market, and how billionaires and their handlers carry rare antiquities on their yachts and jets to hide from banks, governments, ex-wives with divorce settlements, and tax collectors. 1. Report: How a Louisiana Family Unknowingly Owned $450M da Vinci Painting for Nearly 50 Years. The Advocate. September 2018. ⇤2. Sarah Cascone and Eileen Kinsella. 7 Unbelievable and Contentious Takeaways From a New Documentary About ‘Salvator Mundi,' the $450 Million ‘Lost Leonardo'. Artnet. August 2021. ⇤3. Sam Knight. The Bouvier Affair. The New Yorker. January 2016. ⇤4. Danielle Granger. What is the Real Story Behind Yves Bouvier's Ties to Zahia Dehar?. The Frisky. March 2020. ⇤

The Great Trials Podcast
GTP CLASSIC: Shanin Specter │Michael Goretzka v. West Penn Power Company │ $109 million verdict

The Great Trials Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 79:33


This week we're replaying a classic episode where your hosts Steve Lowry and Yvonne Godfrey interview Shanin Specter of www.klinespecter.com   Remember to rate and review GTP in iTunes: Click Here To Rate and Review   Episode Details: Inner Circle of Advocates member Shanin Specter of Kline & Specter, PC shares how he obtained the largest contested liability personal injury verdict in Pennsylvania history after 39-year-old Carrie Goretzka was fatally electrocuted by a 7200 volt power line. West Penn Power linemen failed to properly clean the wires with a wire brush before installing them, per the manufacturer's instructions, resulting in the line overheating and falling to the ground as a live wire in her yard.  The result of this premises liability case led to the re-training of Pennsylvania linemen, infra-red inspections of power lines and the creation of an Electric Safety Division by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission to investigate reported electrical injuries. An Allegheny County jury returned a $109 million verdict, including $48 million in compensatory damages and $61 million in punitive damages.   Click Here to Read/Download Trial Documents   Guest Bio: Shanin Specter Shanin Specter is a preeminent American trial lawyer. He is a founding partner of Kline & Specter, one of the leading catastrophic injury firms in the United States. Specter has obtained more than 200 verdicts and settlements in excess of $1 million, including jury verdicts of $153 million against a major automaker and $109 million against a Pennsylvania power company. In all, he has achieved 16 eight- or nine-figure verdicts, among them news-making cases involving medical malpractice, defective products, medical devices, premises liability, auto accidents, and general negligence. He is a member of the Inner Circle of Advocates, whose membership is limited to the top 100 plaintiffs' trial attorneys in the United States. Beyond winning substantial monetary compensation for his clients, many of Specter's cases have prompted changes that provide a societal benefit, including improvements to vehicle safety, nursing and hospital procedures, the safe operation of police cars, training for the use of CPR at public institutions, and inspections, installation and maintenance of utility power lines. One case spurred the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission to create a new Electric Safety Division to investigate reported electrical injuries. Most recently, Specter's lawsuit on behalf of the victims of a fire escape collapse helped move the City of Philadelphia in 2016 to enact an ordinance requiring all fire escapes to be regularly inspected. Specter earned his undergraduate degree with honors from Haverford College, his law degree from the University of Pennsylvania and an LL.M. with First Honors from Cambridge University. Read Full Bio   Show Sponsors: Legal Technology Services - LegalTechService.com Digital Law Marketing - DigitalLawMarketing.com Harris Lowry Manton LLP - hlmlawfirm.com   Free Resources: Stages Of A Jury Trial - Part 1 Stages Of A Jury Trial - Part 2