Podcasts about genes

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Sequence of DNA or RNA that codes for an RNA or protein product

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Best podcasts about genes

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Latest podcast episodes about genes

RedHanded
257: Episode 257 - Genes & Justice: Kathleen Folbigg & Patricia Stallings

RedHanded

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 60:04


“1 sudden infant death is a tragedy, 2 is suspicious and 3 is murder”; this theory has pervaded criminal investigations for decades. And so when Kathleen Folbigg's daughter, Laura, became her fourth child to die mysteriously - Kathleen found herself on death row labeled “Australia's Worst Female Serial Killer”. Today the girls delve into 2 unbelievable cases which highlight the immense challenges of the intersection between science and justice in the courtroom. And discover how a series of bizarre circumstances and medical anomalies could have led to the deaths of 5 babies and the imprisonment of two women. Become a patron: Patreon Order a copy of the book here (US & Canada): Order on Wellesley Books Order on Amazon.com Order a copy of the book here (UK, Ireland, Europe, NZ, Aus): Order on Amazon.co.uk Order on Foyles Follow us on social media: Instagram Twitter Visit our website: Website

Radio Fitness Revolucionario
323: En Búsqueda de la Felicidad, con Álvaro Sánchez

Radio Fitness Revolucionario

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 61:27


Hoy hablo con Álvaro Sánchez sobre ideas para ser más felices. ¿Cómo podemos definir la felicidad? Ideas filosóficas ligadas a la felicidad: Duḥkha, hedonismo inteligente, equilibrio epicúreo, adaptación hedónica. eudaimonia... Imaginación, subconsciente y felicidad. Dinero y felicidad: ¿Cuál es la relación? Cómo gastar dinero para ser más felices. Redes sociales e infelicidad. ¿Son más infelices los millennials? Genes y felicidad. Escotes, BMWs y mucho más. Álvaro se ha quitado las redes sociales (en la entrevista explica por qué), pero puedes conocer más sobre él en su web. Como siempre, puedes escuchar también el episodio en iVoox, Spotify  y Apple Podcast.

Filled with His Love
(Bonus) Genes, Ancestors, Faith, and PCEs

Filled with His Love

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 11:19


A listener asked: "I wonder how much of the opposite is also true. We talk a lot about the legacy of faith and other virtues and attributes passed down to us from our parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, etc. What does the science say about what gets passed on to following generations (for good or bad) before childhood events can have an impact?  In the episode, I try to answer this question. Please feel free to email me with any questions you might have. My email: rtosguthorpe@gmail.com

Primal Blueprint Podcast
38: The Link Between Dairy Intolerance and Dairy Genes with Alexandre Family Farm Founders Blake & Stephanie

Primal Blueprint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 45:18 Very Popular


Dairy Intolerance or Mutated Gene Intolerance?  Blake and Stephanie were both born and raised as dairy farmers and bought their current farm in 1992. In 2002, they became certified organic farmers and began studying soil and nutrient density on their farm as well as milk proteins. A2 is the digestible casein protein found in all mammalian milk, but about one thousand years ago it mutated to the A1 form which causes lactose to ferment and potentially why we've seen a rise in dairy intolerances over the last couple of decades. Through their studies Blake and Stephanie learned the difference between A1 and A2 beta casein proteins in milk and they began to breed A1 out of their herd. Today, they have a large herd of 100% A2/A2 genetics cows, and sell only A2 organic milk and yogurt nationwide.  Alexandre Family Farm is the first Certified Regenerative dairy and egg ranch in the U.S.  They are also certified organic and certified humane. Listen in as they share their journey with Morgan with the difficulties of raising organic calves and venturing away from antibiotic usage, their thoughts on what regenerative agriculture means to them and how they want to bring people back to dairy. 

Abbey Normal
78. Rebel Genes (Rerelease!)

Abbey Normal

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 23:08


Do you have a juicy story that's been whispered about during family gatherings? One of Abbey's family legends is the story of a boy embarking upon a cross-country journey to meet a girl, despite his parents wishes. Today we bring the legend into the light- hearing what happened from the perspective of all involved. And reflecting on what the legend says about the family- that rebellion is in the genes. Original air date March 16, 2020.

The Agribusiness Update
Strawberry Genes Fight Deadly Disease and Next Gen Fuels Act

The Agribusiness Update

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022


UC Davis researchers find a gene in strawberries that may ward off deadly Fusarium wilt, and legislation introduced called the Next Generation Fuels Act in both House and Senate.

La Mano Peluda Investigación en Radio Fórmula
Los orígenes de la leyenda de la Viuda Negra

La Mano Peluda Investigación en Radio Fórmula

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 94:20 Very Popular


La leyenda de la Viuda Negra tiene varios orígenes, pero todos conocen el peligro en el que puedes verte involucrado si te la encuentras en la calle de noche.

Escuchando Documentales
Las Formas de la Vida: 1- Orígenes #ciencia #biologia #documental #podcast

Escuchando Documentales

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 50:51


Por primera vez en la historia, los científicos creen que han reunido evidencia sustancial que apunta a un solo grupo animal de criaturas que dieron origen a todos los animales, incluidos los humanos. Investigadores como Cristina Diaz y Mitch Sogin piensan que el candidato más probable para esta "Eva Animal" es un grupo de criaturas que aún existen: las esponjas. Las esponjas, miembros del phylum Porifera, se consideran el phylum de animales vivos más antiguo. El nombre Porifera significa "portador de poros" en latín. Las esponjas son los únicos animales que, si se descomponen hasta el nivel de sus células, pueden volver a ensamblarse y resucitar milagrosamente. Estas criaturas aparentemente inanimadas también son bombas fantásticas que filtran toneladas de agua para recolectar unas pocas onzas de comida microscópica. ¿Cómo sabemos que las esponjas fueron nuestros antepasados? Resulta que todos los organismos en sus genes llevan pistas sobre su historia evolutiva: un conjunto único de cambios genéticos adquiridos transmitidos a través de innumerables generaciones. Este hecho permitió a Mitch Sogin comparar y contrastar conjuntos específicos de diferencias genéticas entre esponjas, moscas, peces, ranas, humanos y otros organismos. Descubrió que las esponjas, de hecho, fueron el comienzo del reino animal y sentaron las bases para que todos los animales las siguieran.

Genetics Unzipped
S5.15 Does size matter when it comes to your genes?

Genetics Unzipped

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 24:35 Very Popular


In this episode we're discovering whether size really does matter - when it comes to your genes and genome, that is. Dr Kat Arney gets to grips with why the human genome has so few genes, why some species have more junk DNA than others, and whether you should avoid eating anything with more genes than you.Full show notes, transcript, music credits and references online at GeneticsUnzipped.com Follow us on Twitter @GeneticsUnzipThis episode of Genetics Unzipped was written and presented by Kat Arney with audio production by Sally Le Page.This podcast is produced by First Create the Media for the Genetics Society - one of the oldest learned societies in the world dedicated to supporting and promoting the research, teaching and application of genetics.

Born to Win Podcast - with Ronald L. Dart

It is always refreshing when science catches up with common sense. For a long time, specialists of one stripe or another argued that what makes us who we are happened as a result of heredity. Or they argued that it is all a matter of environment, of learned behavior. At the same time, I think most of us intuitively believed that it was a matter of heredity, environment and experience that shaped our character. Now, with the human genome project making enormous progress, we are learning that common sense evaluation was pretty much on the mark.Matt Ridley, writing in Time magazine summarizes the emerging story and it is a fascinating tale indeed.This is a new understanding of the fundamental building blocks of life based on the discovery that genes are not immutable things handed down from our parents like Moses' stone tablets, but are active participants in our lives, designed to take their cues from everything that happens to us from the moment of our conception.Time Magazine - What Makes You Who You AreI can almost hear someone saying, So? And I understand the reaction. But what this can mean to parents, educators, and healthcare workers may turn out to be as profound as Matt Ridley thinks it is.

Commune
How Genes Listen to Your Beliefs with Dr. Bruce Lipton

Commune

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 101:22


Contrary to an outdated understanding of genetics, your genes aren't actually “on” or “off.” Different chemicals cause different responses in your genes, and since it is your brain that decides what chemical signals to send to the cells, your consciousness is actually your chief architect. In this episode, Dr. Lipton and Jeff discuss the interconnected relationship between belief and biology, and how you can use Dr. Lipton's pioneering understanding of epigenetics to create health. Learn about Commune and check out all our health, nutrition, and functional medicine courses free for 14 days at onecommune.com/trial. Follow us on Instagram at @onecommune and @jeffkrasno. Commune with Jeff Krasno is letting you try Blinkist Premium free for 7 days! See for yourself why Commune with Jeff Krasno recommends Blinkist to help you learn and grow every day. Go to Blinkist.com/Commune to start your free 7 day trial and get 25% off of a Blinkist Premium membership.This podcast is supported by BetterHelp. COMMUNE listeners get 15% off their first month at BetterHelp.com/Commune.

My Ag Life Daily News Report
Episode 385 | July 27, 2022 | Walnut Wednesday; Ethophon Application Protocols, New Fusarium Wilt Resistant Genes

My Ag Life Daily News Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 32:44


On this week's Walnut Wednesday episode, UCCE Farm Advisor Emeritus Janine Hasey explains ethephon application protocols pre-harvest. Additionally, Kylie Harlan reports on new resistant genes discovered for strawberry fusarium wilt.   Supporting the People who Support Agriculture Thank you to our sponsors who make it possible to get you your daily news. Please feel free to visit their websites. The California Walnut Board – https://walnuts.org/ PhycoTerra®  –https://phycoterra.com/ Verdesian - https://vlsci.com/

INGRID Y TAMARA EN MVS 102.5
Alejandra Ponce: Aliméntate según tus genes, Humanos de otro planeta: Marley Dias y más.

INGRID Y TAMARA EN MVS 102.5

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 79:12


27 jul 22: Alejandra Ponce, nutrióloga funcional, habla de cómo los genes influyen en la alimentación; Tamara Vargas comparte la historia de la activista Marley Dias, Valeria Jasso presenta su sencillo Miel, Cristina Zubieta con el libro Apariencias.

Así las cosas
Las más reciéntes imágenes del telescopio James Webb. Los avances, la importancia, lo que se ha logrado y lo que podría venir.

Así las cosas

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 5:52


Luis Felipe Rodríguez Jorge, astrónomo y miembro de El Colegio Nacional

Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology

"Good Genes," by Kaitlin Demarest: a resident searches for answers after genetic testing.   TRANSCRIPT Good Genes, by Kaitlin Demarest, MD1 (10.1200/JCO.22.00871) My mother was diagnosed with breast cancer when I was 5. I accompanied her to a handful of chemotherapy sessions and filled the time with MadLibs and word searches. The drive to the hospital became familiar; the diner where I celebrated my fifth birthday was on the way, as was the dairy bar and the Chi Chi's that shut down. I grew accustomed to her wearing wigs and remember vividly the time one almost flew off her head on a windy day at Rockefeller Center. I learned that vomit could be green and what a computed tomography (CT) scan was. This is not to say that I knew what was going on or what all of it meant. When she was first diagnosed, my dad explained that there was something scary growing inside my mom and her doctors needed to take it out. He drew an arrow coming out of a finger instead of breast tissue to help my young mind better grasp the concept. I was not sure why the cancer picked her breast to start growing in but that mattered little to me as my kindergarten logic figured it would be simple enough to take out. However, after “trying to get the cancer out” with surgery and chemo, she only seemed to get sicker. She would spend days on the couch after treatments, nauseous but not wanting the Coke syrup she would give me when I was sick. Eventually, she returned to work, her new head of hair much curlier than before, and things seemed normal again for a brief time. I can recall multiple times, almost yearly, that I believed she was cancer-free, but then I would overhear her telling someone over the phone that she needed to start treatment again. I clung to the belief that everything would be okay without a second thought, but then one day the summer after fourth grade, she told me and my brother that she would not be getting better. Soon she was in hospice care, and then she was gone. Losing her at 10 years old, there was so much I did not understand. I decided I wanted to become a doctor and tried to start my medical education as soon as possible to fill in these gaps. I wrote research papers on cancer topics in middle school, took as many science classes as possible in high school, and majored in molecular biology as an undergrad. I even spent a summer shadowing oncologists, including one of my mom's. He called me by her name a few times, which mostly warmed my heart that he still thought of her and reminded me that he had known her too. He was very kind, clearly doing the best for his patients. Watching him, I began to appreciate the rocky road of disclosing setbacks and poor prognoses as a provider. Despite a week of shadowing my mother's oncologist and countless visits with my aunt and uncle, both doctors, who had helped her navigate the treatment process and even took care of her when she was home on hospice, I refrained from asking about the genetics of my mother's cancer. Perhaps due to wishful thinking, I was under the impression that my mom had been tested for hereditary breast cancer syndromes while she was alive and that she was negative for BRCA mutations. But finally, at the end of my first year of medical school, over the karaoke music at a bar after my cousin's college graduation, my aunt told me that she had never been tested; I would need to be tested soon. I had been scared to receive the results of my genetic testing. I had faced mortality but avoided thinking about my own. I remember my heart pounding as I listened to my genetic counselor, trying to discern any doom or gloom in her tone. After she carefully explained that I carried no mutations known to be associated with cancer, I caught my breath and relief did wash over me. Then it was all over. Years of questioning, asking what if, bargaining, avoiding, wondering, hoping all tied up. “Take care of yourself, Kaitlin,” she said, “Don't study too hard tonight.” It was almost as if she knew. The sudden silence, the finality, and the lack of solace in my solitude; I felt panicked and empty. There would be no sticky little mutation to act as scapegoat for all my pain, no genetic alteration on which to pin her loss. I would not have to think so much about prophylactic mastectomies, only early screening. But I was devastated. I thought knowledge would mean power, but it turned out that ignorance was almost bliss. I secretly hoped for an answer, written in our DNA, a molecule I had come to understand so well, that would explain why I had lost my mom so prematurely. As a kid, I felt helpless against my mother's illness and these results only exacerbated that feeling. Studying molecular biology and human physiology granted me some sense of control, but my heart ached not knowing what happened inside of her organs, tissues, and cells. I knew a lot about cancer but virtually nothing about hers. I could not let cancer have any secrets. There are a lot of things I know and remember about her. Her love of grocery store–related game shows. Her frustration over untangling my hair each morning before school. Her Armenian way of dancing; her arms twirling along to Santana on the radio at a traffic stop. But it made me feel so far away from her to learn about the histology, diagnostic workup, and treatment of breast cancer and not know anything about her experience. Our time was cut short, so many stories left untold. Any morsel of information I could remember of her was proof of our time together and that our relationship was special, despite how young we both were when we were separated by her death. If I could not ask her about her hobbies growing up, her social life in college, or what it was like being pregnant with me, I was going to learn about what made that impossible. I remember hearing that my aunt and uncle still had her medical records and, after asking them, they arrived in the mail along with old Mother's Day cards and letters to Santa. The woman kept everything. It took me a few nights, locked in my room, chasing the grief with episodes of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, but I made it through every page. She had a modified radical mastectomy and a transverse rectus abdominus muscle flap reconstruction, an echocardiogram prior to doxorubicin, and required Neupogen to keep her white count up. Other things I had already known: menarche was at age 11 years, she wore a sleeve to improve the lymphedema in her left arm after her lymph node dissection, she had two c-sections, and she smoked cigarettes for a brief period. Also documented was my parents' divorce and the fact that they had me and my brother, our ages swapped. Everyone always thinks he is the older one. It was satisfying and heartbreaking. Now I knew the type of cancer and its stage and size at diagnosis. I knew that she had surgery followed by many cycles of chemotherapy then radiation and tamoxifen. After all of this, according to an office note, she was “basically doing extremely well.” But I read on and on as her tumor markers kept rising. 52. 94. 178. 145. 375. Scan after scan showed no evidence of metastatic disease, until they finally did. One year, three CT scans, three bone scans, and a positron emission tomography CT later, she was found to have bilateral pleural effusions, liver metastases, and omental caking. She had been on estrogen deprivation therapy with Zoladex which was not working, so it was decided to perform a laparoscopic oophorectomy. The oophorectomy converted to an open procedure due to adhesions, bilateral Krukenberg tumors, and extensive carcinomatosis. Mostly lab sheets remained after that, with platelet counts and international normalized ratio checks after she was placed on warfarin for a blood clot. The very last page was a list of information requested by the cancer center at which she was to start another round of chemotherapy to control her progressive disease. On it, she wrote a note to remind herself to have the office reach out to my physician aunt with questions. Even at this stage, she had hope chemotherapy would prolong her life. As painful as it was, I got my answers, which showed me just how powerful and therapeutic it can be to feel informed. I had harbored so much grief for so long because not understanding my mother's cancer made her feel that much farther away. Many would expect the relief but not the heartbreak from hearing my negative results. The truth is, good news is good but it is also new. It does not erase the pain, worry, and loss that may have preceded it, and it does not necessarily indicate a clear path forward. New information can anchor us, quench our anxieties, or it can be an unpleasant surprise. My experience has taught me that you cannot predict how news will land on the ears and hearts of someone else. This makes it so important to leave one's own expectations behind and to give patients the time and space that they need to process. As healthcare providers, we always want to be the bearers of good news, but we must remember that every patient has an undocumented history and any conversation can be a delicate one. As I write, my internal medicine residency training quickly approaches. I am still shaking down cancer's secrets but feeling closer to my mother than before. As a physician, I will meet patients and their families on some of the scariest days of their lives. I cannot take away all of their fear, but I can walk with them through all of the knowing and not knowing and make space for relief and grief alike. I hope I will always remember that my every day could be the longtime culmination of loss, worry, and anticipation for someone else. I am grateful for the good genes, good memories, and good purpose in life my mom gave me, and I will do my best to make her proud. Dr: Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCOs Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by ASCO podcasts, which offer a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows, including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Schapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Kaitlin Demarest resident at the University of Pennsylvania. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, 'Good Genes'. Our guest has no disclosures. Kaitlin, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Kaitlin Demarest: Thank you so much for having me. Dr: Lidia Schapira: It is a pleasure. I just like to start the conversation by asking authors to tell us what they're currently reading or what they recently enjoyed and would recommend to a colleague, what could I find on your night table? Dr: Kaitlin Demarest: I recently finished a book called Middlesex. It's not a very recent book, but it's actually one of the books that I remember my mom reading when I was a kid, and I've wanted to read it since then. It's incredibly beautifully written and it has a medical thread through it as well, I would absolutely recommend it. Definitely one of my favorites. Dr: Lidia Schapira: I really enjoyed that book. It's one of my favorites, too. So, you're currently a medical resident, correct? At Penn? Dr: Kaitlin Demarest: Yes, this is my second week. Dr: Lidia Schapira: And how's it going? Dr: Kaitlin Demarest: It's been so great. I started in the outpatient setting. So it's been nice to step into that PCP role. Dr: Lidia Schapira: Fantastic! Well, maybe we can even interest you in pursuing a career in cancer medicine. Dr: Kaitlin Demarest: Absolutely. Dr: Lidia Schapira: But let's turn to your essay, 'Good Genes'. You share with us that your mom was diagnosed with breast cancer when you were 5, and that you lost your mom when you were 10. Tell us a little bit about what motivated you to write the essay and then send it to us at JCO. Dr: Kaitlin Demarest: Sure! It actually was when I was writing my personal statement for residency applications. My mom's experience with cancer is very much linked to why I want to be a doctor. And so, I think that's why it came up when I was writing that personal statement. I think I just had a lot to put down on paper after I'd gone through her medical records. And it was really therapeutic actually, to write it all down. And a friend encouraged me to send it in. Dr: Lidia Schapira: There's an interesting comment there and one that I want to unpack a little bit. Writing to process an important emotional experience is therapeutic, but then the decision to share it, and in this case, perhaps share it with your future colleagues and attendings in medicine, requires sort of an additional step. What made you want to share the story with a broader community of cancer clinicians? Dr: Kaitlin Demarest: I think I was really comforted by my genetic counselor who probably hasn't read something like this, but she just seemed to be so in tune with the range of responses that someone can have when they get genetic testing results. And I wasn't even expecting the reaction that I had and I thought that maybe it could be helpful both to people who undergo genetic testing, but also to any provider who's delivering those results. Dr: Lidia Schapira: So, let's talk a little bit about the theme of your essay, sharing important medical news, in this particular case, the results of a genetic test. Tell our listeners a little bit about what made you want to be tested? And then how did you receive the news of the genetic test? Dr: Kaitlin Demarest: I knew I was going to need to be tested for a while because my mom was so young when she was diagnosed. So, it was indicated for me. And I understand how it can be a daunting decision for a lot of people. But I hold fast to the notion that knowledge is power. I'm very grateful that I underwent the testing and it really set me up with a great plan to get screening done very regularly. It's sort of a setup for that process. It honestly has brought me a lot of resolve knowing that I'm doing what I need to do in order to best protect myself for the future. Dr: Lidia Schapira: I'm very happy to know that you feel this resolve and you feel good about it. But you write in the essay and share with us that initially, it was devastating to hear that you did not have an inherited susceptibility that we could name. My interpretation of that statement and I want you to react to that was that in a way it made your mother's cancer more mysterious, not knowing the cause, not knowing what the danger was made the threat of the potential genetic susceptibility more vague and diffuse. Tell us a little bit about what it was for you. Dr: Kaitlin Demarest: Exactly. When I found out that I didn't inherit susceptibility, it did make it seem a bit mysterious, both for my mom and for myself. She didn't have genetic testing done, which makes it a little bit more confusing as well. But I think I was really hoping for an answer to explain why she was diagnosed so young, although that would have been difficult news to receive as well knowing that I had inherited something that could lead to cancer. Dr: Lidia Schapira: I found your insights incredibly powerful about the idea that news is just news, and the lens through which somebody receives the news may be different from that of the person who's sharing the news. You make this reflection that you hope that as a physician, you will sort of listen to what's happening with your patients. Tell us a little bit about this idea that even good news that you had good genes wasn't necessarily experienced by you in the moment as good? Dr: Kaitlin Demarest: Definitely news is new and it takes time to process that, even if it's expected to be good. And like you said before, I feel like it is good news now, but when I originally heard that information, I really needed to process what that meant, for me, but also, it just made me realize that there was more processing of my mom's death that I needed to do. Every time we deliver news to a patient, we have no idea what brought them to that space and what is going to come up when they receive that information. Dr: Lidia Schapira: I admire the genetic counselors. Their training is specific to their discipline, but they're also trained in communication skills. I think that is so incredible because, as you say, they can't anticipate how the news is going to land. They have that moment, that sort of teachable moment, to help people begin to process what they've just heard. So, let's talk a little bit about the other piece of the essay, which is that you sought to connect to your mother or you needed to understand the details of your mom's history. And so, you found her records when you were in medical school and sort of able to read through them. I have this image of you locking yourself up in your room instead of listening to Fabulous Mrs. Maisel and even getting some snacks and just pouring your heart and soul into reading this. Can you tell us a little bit about that experience? Dr: Kaitlin Demarest: I think, I would have loved to have processed this a lot sooner, but I think going through the medical records in medical school was a good time to do it because I had a better understanding of what I was reading. It took me probably three nights. I don't think they were three consecutive nights because it was definitely heavy. It was really difficult to read how things progressed and to understand the weight of it all. And not only to read what was happening in her records but to think back and remember those times and being able to look back at those memories with new knowledge filled in a lot of gaps for me, but it was definitely difficult. I feel like I have more to say but I'm struggling to find the words. Dr: Lidia Schapira: Reading your essay, I have the impression that there were many adults who tried to help you as you were developing your own ideas about what had happened to your mom - your aunt, your uncle, your mom's oncologist who allowed you to shadow him in the clinic, which I found very endearing. Can you tell us a little bit about what was helpful, and which ones of these experiences actually were helpful to you? Dr: Kaitlin Demarest: I remember when I received the results, and I was very upset. I called my dad and my stepmom. I think it was my dad who told me that my aunt would probably have her medical records. She sent them right away. Just knowing that my aunt and uncle who are both physicians helped her so much through this process has been incredibly helpful and just very touching. They've been so helpful to me and inspiring to me as I move forward through my medical career. They are the ones who helped me set up a time to shadow my mom's oncologist. And he taught me a lot about breaking news to patients. It was really amazing to get to work with him because I could see how much he cared for his patients and knowing that he was one of the people caring for my mom felt really good. Everyone in my family has been so encouraging of me since I said I wanted to be a doctor when I was 8 years old and they've never made me feel pressured to pursue anything in particular, but they never made me second guess this purpose. Dr: Lidia Schapira: As oncologists, we often tell our patients who are not going to be able to see their kids grow up that their kids are going to be alright and I hope your mom had that feeling that you were going to be alright. Listening to you now I can only imagine how proud she would be of the doctor that you've become and planned to be. What message would you like the readers of your essay and listeners of this podcast to take away from the story? Dr: Kaitlin Demarest: I hope that readers will not shy away from daunting news, whether that means they're the ones hoping to pursue testing or screening, or whether they are providers who are nervous about these kinds of conversations because while they can be very uncomfortable and they can be emotional, they're so, so worth having because they can really protect the health of a lot of people and it's a really great opportunity to form a very trusting relationship that can have a really positive impact for the long term. Dr: Lidia Schapira: And it gives meaning to our work as well. Dr: Kaitlin Demarest: Of course. Dr: Lidia Schapira: It's one of the reasons that many of us get up and go to the clinic every day or every week. It's been lovely to hear your story, Kaitlin. You're a terrific writer. Your insights are very powerful. I thank you for sharing your story with us and I sincerely hope that you consider a career in medical oncology. Dr: Kaitlin Demarest: I'm very much considering it. Thank you so much for having me. Dr: Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCOs Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget to give us a rating or review on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen. While you're there, Be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode of JCOs Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. This is just one of many of ASCO's podcasts, you can find all of the shows at podcast.asco.org.   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.    

SBS Spanish - SBS en español
La tecnología española detrás de las espectaculares imágenes del telescopio James Webb

SBS Spanish - SBS en español

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 23:33


El telescopio espacial James Webb, el más potente puesto en órbita hasta el momento, ha revelado sus primeras imágenes que han fascinado a la comunidad científica en todo el mundo por su extraordinaria calidad. Un grupo de científicos españoles ha participado en la construcción del telescopio. Su coordinador, el director de Óptica Espacial del Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial de España, Tomás Belenguer, explica a SBS Spanish en qué consistió su aportación y nos introduce en algunos de los misterios por descubrir gracias al James Webb, como el origen del universo y la posible vida en otros planetas.

Babes and Babies
Ep 227: How MTHFR Genetic Defect Effects Infertility and How Folic Acid Plays a Role with Troy Duell

Babes and Babies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 65:51


Troy Duell has been in the pharmaceutical industry for over 20 years. He realized pharmaceutical companies were prioritizing profits over health and products that were expensive, ineffective, and often harmful.  He felt the pull to develop a company that put people and their health over profits.  Through his personal story and passion for helping others, he started to dive into what was really in our vitamins and how it affects our health.  In this episode he addresses folic acid verses folate, the MTHFR gene defect and vital nutrition for fertility and pregnancy.  Check out Bump DHA https://centurionlabs.com/about-bump/  Code Mama for discount off first bottle. Connect: https://www.instagram.com/bumpdha/ https://centurionlabs.com/ Connect with Elizabeth: https://www.elizabethjoy.co/ IG: https://www.instagram.com/miraculousmamas/   https://www.truebill.com/mamas https://www.functionofbeauty.com/mamas for 25% off first order https://www.coterie.com/  Promo code Mamas for 20% off and free shipping   Resources: 1.  American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. (2018). Folic Acid Exposure in Utero is Associated with Development of Food Allergy.  The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 141(2). (Presented at the 2018 AAAAI/ WAO Joint Congress, Orlando, FL.).   2.  Servy, Edouard, et.al., MTHFR isoform carriers. 5-MTHF (5-methyl tetrahydrofolate) vs. folic acid: a key to pregnancy outcome: a case series.  Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10815-018-1225-2  

CutOff Genes Podcast
CutOff Genes: Ep 604: Celebrities-They're Just Like Us

CutOff Genes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 49:02 Very Popular


- When relatable things happen to public figures - CeCe Moore's novel approach to difficult IGG cases - Is something happening in the JonBenet Ramsey case? - Book Nook 2.0 - Epic Odyssey: Part 2 with @emmastevensgatheringplace Subscribe, Rate and Review! For help on your own case contact Julie Dixon Jackson at cutoffgenes.com

Noticentro
NASA publicó imágenes que muestran la sequía en Nuevo León

Noticentro

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 1:30


•Proceso legar del refugio Black Jaguar -White Tiger•Incendios forestales en la Unión Europea•Más información en nuestro podcast

Primal Blueprint Podcast
37: Decoding Your Genes for Data-Driven Health with Joe Cohen

Primal Blueprint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 72:08 Very Popular


Biohacking For Personalized Healthcare  This week, Morgan chats with author and entrepreneur, Joe Cohen. Joe suffered from a variety of health issues going up: inflammation, brain fog, fatigue, digestive problems, anxiety–to name a few. His symptoms and experiences were not well understood by conventional and even alternative medicine, and after years of suffering, that he embarked on a self-experimentation journey to improve his health through biohacking.  Joe went on to found SelfDecode, a biotech software platform for DNA and lab-based health recommendations established by your own genes so that you can take charge of your own healthcare with data-driven health decisions. SelfDecode is revolutionizing the healthcare industry by providing personalized health recommendations based on a combination of your DNA, labs, and environmental factors.  In this chat, Cohen describes to Morgan his thoughts on how the world needs more personalized healthcare, his biohacking system for his food sensitivities and his journey from New York to Israel. 

UC San Diego (Audio)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Large-scale Human Modification of the Planetary Microbiome with Rob Knight

UC San Diego (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 23:36


Through the Earth Microbiome Program and complementary efforts, we have sampled a broad range of microbiomes from across the planet. All microbiomes that have been studied are impacted by human activity — the effects of industrialization on the human microbiome are best characterized, but capture of animals in zoos, domestication, modification of soils through agricultural practices, and modification of freshwater and marine microbiomes have also all been well characterized. Indeed, the pervasive role of environmental microbiomes in biogeochemical cycles necessary to sustain life led to a position paper entitled "Scientists' warning to humanity: microorganisms and climate change”, the title of which speaks for itself. However, there is hope. Efforts such as the Microbiota Vault will be especially important in this respect, but also new monitoring and modeling approaches will help us understand where to look globally for the best specimens and microbes to preserve. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37909]

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Large-scale Human Modification of the Planetary Microbiome with Rob Knight

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 23:36


Through the Earth Microbiome Program and complementary efforts, we have sampled a broad range of microbiomes from across the planet. All microbiomes that have been studied are impacted by human activity — the effects of industrialization on the human microbiome are best characterized, but capture of animals in zoos, domestication, modification of soils through agricultural practices, and modification of freshwater and marine microbiomes have also all been well characterized. Indeed, the pervasive role of environmental microbiomes in biogeochemical cycles necessary to sustain life led to a position paper entitled "Scientists' warning to humanity: microorganisms and climate change”, the title of which speaks for itself. However, there is hope. Efforts such as the Microbiota Vault will be especially important in this respect, but also new monitoring and modeling approaches will help us understand where to look globally for the best specimens and microbes to preserve. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37909]

Science (Audio)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Large-scale Human Modification of the Planetary Microbiome with Rob Knight

Science (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 23:36


Through the Earth Microbiome Program and complementary efforts, we have sampled a broad range of microbiomes from across the planet. All microbiomes that have been studied are impacted by human activity — the effects of industrialization on the human microbiome are best characterized, but capture of animals in zoos, domestication, modification of soils through agricultural practices, and modification of freshwater and marine microbiomes have also all been well characterized. Indeed, the pervasive role of environmental microbiomes in biogeochemical cycles necessary to sustain life led to a position paper entitled "Scientists' warning to humanity: microorganisms and climate change”, the title of which speaks for itself. However, there is hope. Efforts such as the Microbiota Vault will be especially important in this respect, but also new monitoring and modeling approaches will help us understand where to look globally for the best specimens and microbes to preserve. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37909]

Evolution (Video)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Large-scale Human Modification of the Planetary Microbiome with Rob Knight

Evolution (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 23:36


Through the Earth Microbiome Program and complementary efforts, we have sampled a broad range of microbiomes from across the planet. All microbiomes that have been studied are impacted by human activity — the effects of industrialization on the human microbiome are best characterized, but capture of animals in zoos, domestication, modification of soils through agricultural practices, and modification of freshwater and marine microbiomes have also all been well characterized. Indeed, the pervasive role of environmental microbiomes in biogeochemical cycles necessary to sustain life led to a position paper entitled "Scientists' warning to humanity: microorganisms and climate change”, the title of which speaks for itself. However, there is hope. Efforts such as the Microbiota Vault will be especially important in this respect, but also new monitoring and modeling approaches will help us understand where to look globally for the best specimens and microbes to preserve. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37909]

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Andrew Klavan Show: Do Our Genes or Environment Influence Our Intelligence?

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022


I sit down with Charles Murray to discuss his new book “Facing Reality: Two Truths about Race in America.” We dive into whether education disparities are caused by our environment or by our genetic structures. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Large-scale Human Modification of the Planetary Microbiome with Rob Knight

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 23:36


Through the Earth Microbiome Program and complementary efforts, we have sampled a broad range of microbiomes from across the planet. All microbiomes that have been studied are impacted by human activity — the effects of industrialization on the human microbiome are best characterized, but capture of animals in zoos, domestication, modification of soils through agricultural practices, and modification of freshwater and marine microbiomes have also all been well characterized. Indeed, the pervasive role of environmental microbiomes in biogeochemical cycles necessary to sustain life led to a position paper entitled "Scientists' warning to humanity: microorganisms and climate change”, the title of which speaks for itself. However, there is hope. Efforts such as the Microbiota Vault will be especially important in this respect, but also new monitoring and modeling approaches will help us understand where to look globally for the best specimens and microbes to preserve. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37909]

Science (Video)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Large-scale Human Modification of the Planetary Microbiome with Rob Knight

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 23:36


Through the Earth Microbiome Program and complementary efforts, we have sampled a broad range of microbiomes from across the planet. All microbiomes that have been studied are impacted by human activity — the effects of industrialization on the human microbiome are best characterized, but capture of animals in zoos, domestication, modification of soils through agricultural practices, and modification of freshwater and marine microbiomes have also all been well characterized. Indeed, the pervasive role of environmental microbiomes in biogeochemical cycles necessary to sustain life led to a position paper entitled "Scientists' warning to humanity: microorganisms and climate change”, the title of which speaks for itself. However, there is hope. Efforts such as the Microbiota Vault will be especially important in this respect, but also new monitoring and modeling approaches will help us understand where to look globally for the best specimens and microbes to preserve. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37909]

Climate Change (Video)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Large-scale Human Modification of the Planetary Microbiome with Rob Knight

Climate Change (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 23:36


Through the Earth Microbiome Program and complementary efforts, we have sampled a broad range of microbiomes from across the planet. All microbiomes that have been studied are impacted by human activity — the effects of industrialization on the human microbiome are best characterized, but capture of animals in zoos, domestication, modification of soils through agricultural practices, and modification of freshwater and marine microbiomes have also all been well characterized. Indeed, the pervasive role of environmental microbiomes in biogeochemical cycles necessary to sustain life led to a position paper entitled "Scientists' warning to humanity: microorganisms and climate change”, the title of which speaks for itself. However, there is hope. Efforts such as the Microbiota Vault will be especially important in this respect, but also new monitoring and modeling approaches will help us understand where to look globally for the best specimens and microbes to preserve. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37909]

Podcast Pensando Críticamente
Escepticismo y Genes - Lluís Montoliu

Podcast Pensando Críticamente

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 25:07


Comenzamos una breve temporada postpandémica con Lluís Montoliu, quien nos habla de la relevancia o irrelevancia de los factores genéticos que predeterminan nuestra apariencia a la hora de establecer diferencias entre humanos. Abordará la importancia del conocimiento básico en genética para desmantelar conceptos como las razas en humanos.

Microbiome (Video)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Large-scale Human Modification of the Planetary Microbiome with Rob Knight

Microbiome (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 23:36


Through the Earth Microbiome Program and complementary efforts, we have sampled a broad range of microbiomes from across the planet. All microbiomes that have been studied are impacted by human activity — the effects of industrialization on the human microbiome are best characterized, but capture of animals in zoos, domestication, modification of soils through agricultural practices, and modification of freshwater and marine microbiomes have also all been well characterized. Indeed, the pervasive role of environmental microbiomes in biogeochemical cycles necessary to sustain life led to a position paper entitled "Scientists' warning to humanity: microorganisms and climate change”, the title of which speaks for itself. However, there is hope. Efforts such as the Microbiota Vault will be especially important in this respect, but also new monitoring and modeling approaches will help us understand where to look globally for the best specimens and microbes to preserve. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37909]

Humanities (Audio)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Large-scale Human Modification of the Planetary Microbiome with Rob Knight

Humanities (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 23:36


Through the Earth Microbiome Program and complementary efforts, we have sampled a broad range of microbiomes from across the planet. All microbiomes that have been studied are impacted by human activity — the effects of industrialization on the human microbiome are best characterized, but capture of animals in zoos, domestication, modification of soils through agricultural practices, and modification of freshwater and marine microbiomes have also all been well characterized. Indeed, the pervasive role of environmental microbiomes in biogeochemical cycles necessary to sustain life led to a position paper entitled "Scientists' warning to humanity: microorganisms and climate change”, the title of which speaks for itself. However, there is hope. Efforts such as the Microbiota Vault will be especially important in this respect, but also new monitoring and modeling approaches will help us understand where to look globally for the best specimens and microbes to preserve. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37909]

Autism Parenting Secrets
Genes are CLUES, Not Destiny

Autism Parenting Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 62:18


Welcome to Episode 109 of the Autism Parenting Secrets. This week we have an amazing guest who provides a compelling, cutting-edge approach that you likely have not heard of.  We're talking about genetic-specific nutrition.Our guest is Bob Miller. In 1993, he opened the Tree of Life practice and he has served as a traditional naturopath for 27 years. In 2016, he created an online certification course on genetic nutrition for health professionals now training over 900 health professionals in the program.Bob is the founder and president of Functional Genomic Analysis, an online software program that organizes and analyzes genetic SNPS for functional health professionals across the world.Getting more informed so you can take better actions to support your child and yourself is the opportunity.  And the secret this week is…Genes are CLUES, Not Destiny You'll Discover:What is Functional Genomics? (5:00)What The Science Says (7:39)How Mold Wreaks Havoc (14:42)Why You Need To Be Careful With Omega 3s and Fish Oil (18:22)Even More Reasons To Avoid High Fructose Corn Syrup (21:02)The Link Between Inflamation, Histamine and Mast Cell Activation (30:07)What You Need To Know About MTHFR (34:03)The Miracle Molecule (38:54)Minimizing Exposure To Glyphosate Is Essential (41:51)How Glutamine and Glutamate Play A Role (53:58)The 3D Chess Game Played Underwater (58:34)About Our GuestFor the past several years, Bob Miller has been engaged exclusively with functional nutritional genetic variants and related research, specializing in nutritional support for those with chronic Lyme disease.Bob lectures nationally and internationally at seminars to educate health care practitioners about genetic variants and nutritional supplementation for achieving optimal health, and holds live webinars every other Thursday evening for health professionals. In 2016, he created an online certification course on genetic nutrition for health professionals now training over 900 health professionals in the program.Bob is a frequent guest on many podcasts such as Dr. Jill Carnahan, Better Health Guy, Dr. Joseph Mercola, and many others.To support his growing genetic research efforts, in 2015, Bob founded and personally funds, the NutriGenetic Research Institute to research the relationship between genetic variants and presenting symptoms.His first research project on genetic variants in those with chronic Lyme disease, was one of two winners for research by the ILADS international meeting held in Helsinki, Finland. His Phase II study of Lyme disease was presented at the American ILADS conference in November 2016, Phase III was presented at the International ILADS conference in Paris, France in May 2017 and his Phase IV study on mTOR and Autophagy in Lyme disease was presented in Boston, November 2017. Phase V was presented in Warsaw, Poland in June 2018 and his Phase VI was another winner presented in Chicago, Illinois in November of 2018 which showed increased variants in the Heme pathway and Mast Cell genes. Phase VII presented in Madrid, Spain in June of 2019 research showed how genetic variants in genes related to the production of and utilization of NAD+ and NADPH are creating what is now referred to as the ‘NADPH Steal'. In 2020, he presented his research at the online ILADS conference on genetic mutations in the synthesis and utilization of bile.Bob has created 72 nutritional supplement products exclusively for health professionals for Professional Health Products and Functional Genomic Nutrition through Compounded Nutrients.  The products he formulated are based upon his genetic research and are designed to support function that may be impaired by genetic weakness.Bob is the founder and president of Functional Genomic Analysis, an online software program that organizes and analyzes genetic SNPS for functional health professionals across the world.Memberships:National Association of Certified Natural Health ProfessionalsAmerican Association of Nutritional ConsultantsBoard Certified Naturopath - American Naturopathic Certification & Accreditation BoardBob MillerTree of LifeReferences in This Episode:Rantes Overview PDF - use this to follow along with the discussionWatch the video version of this presentation hereOmegaQuantDr. Jill CarnahanAdditional Resources:Free Resource: 33 Mistakes Most Autism Parents Make and How To Avoid ThemGot a Picky Eater? - this can helpTo learn more about Cass & Len, visit us at www.autismparentingsecrets.comBe sure to follow Cass & Len on InstagramIf you enjoyed this episode, share it with your friends.Don't forget to subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts to get automatic episode updates for our "Autism Parenting Secrets!"And, finally, please take a minute to leave us an honest review and rating on Apple Podcasts. They really help us out when it comes to the ranking of the show, and we read every single one of the reviews we get. Thanks for listening!

StoryBonding: Human Marketing A.I. Can't Beat
E175 Onur Genes: Founder @ Nureply

StoryBonding: Human Marketing A.I. Can't Beat

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 27:46


Onur Genes is the founder of Nureply, a SaaS helping users send personalized first lines for their cold email outreach using AI in seconds to get more replies and booked calls. Twitter: @onurgenes Website: NuReply.com

Descargas predicanet
Episode 776: SANTOS PADRES: Orígenes (Cantar de los cantares (Libro 2 (2) (O bien se dice))

Descargas predicanet

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 10:35


  Alejandría?, h. 185-Tiro, actual Líbano, h. 254) Teólogo y Padre de la Iglesia griega. Nacido en el seno de una familia cristiana (su padre murió martirizado en el 202), sucedió a Clemente de Alejandría al frente de la escuela cristiana de Alejandría, que convirtió en un prestigioso centro de teología. Su rivalidad con el obispo Demetrio, que le reprochó haberse hecho ordenar sacerdote sin su consentimiento, lo llevó a exiliarse en Palestina (231). Es autor de numerosos tratados ascéticos, dogmáticos (De principiis), polémicos (Contra Celso) e importantes obras exegéticas, cuyo comentario de las Escrituras se desarrolla en tres direcciones: literal, moral y mística. Exponente privilegiado de la gnosis ortodoxa, fue el primero en concebir un sistema completo del cristianismo, integrando las teorías neoplatónicas. Sus ideas, recuperadas y sistematizadas en los siglos siguientes por una corriente de pensamiento llamada origenismo, suscitaron vivas controversias y fueron finalmente condenadas en el concilio de Constantinopla (553).         

The Andrew Klavan Show
Do Our Genes or Environment Influence Our Intelligence?

The Andrew Klavan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 22:40 Very Popular


I sit down with Charles Murray to discuss his new book "Facing Reality: Two Truths about Race in America." We dive into whether education disparities are caused by our environment or by our genetic structures. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Historia de Aragón
Análisis de las primeras imágenes del telescopio James Webb

Historia de Aragón

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 30:10


El Telescopio Espacial James Webb se estrena por todo lo alto con unas imágenes que ya son parte de la historia de la ciencia. Los astrofísicos José Caballero y Pablo Pérez, científicos del Instituto de Astrobiología (INTA/CSIC), que colabora con la NASA, analizan en Ágora las primeras imágenes captadas por este proyecto americano, europeo y canadiense. Galaxias lejanas que abren el camino al espacio profundo, nebulosas, la atmósfera de exoplanetas, estrellas agonizantes… Una maravilla.

HistoCast
HistoCast 255 - Imágenes de la Guerra Civil Española

HistoCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 188:32


Esto es HistoCast. No es Esparta pero casi. En la efeméride del comienzo tan horrible acontecimiento, hablamos de la Guerra Civil. Lo hacemos con motivo de la publicación de libro Sangre en la frente junto a los autores con @jordibrufotos y Jesús Jiménez, preguntados por @tamtamveramendi, @HugoACanete y @goyix_salduero. - Imagen Vicente Rojo artífice de la defensa - Imagen La desbandá - Imagen Margaritas en OrduñaSecciones Historia: - Preguntas biográficas - 12:02- Sección Dinosaurios en Asturias - 1:13:19- El libro - 1:56:12- Tres imágenes - 2:07:28 - Coloreado - 2:47:06- Bibliografía - 3:03:25

Legendary Life Podcast: Fitness I HealthI Nutrition I Healthy Lifestyle For People Over 30+, 40+
513: Nutrition Made Simple: How To Make Better Food Choices, Outsmart "Bad Genes" & Finally End Your Nutrition Confusion with Dr. Gil Carvalho

Legendary Life Podcast: Fitness I HealthI Nutrition I Healthy Lifestyle For People Over 30+, 40+

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 59:24


Despite the massive amount of information available on health and nutrition, there is still a lot of confusion and misunderstanding around it. Why is that, and how can we know who to trust? In this episode, the prominent physician, research scientist, and science communicator Dr. Gil Carvalho reveals why there is a gap between the public and science. And how we can end the nutrition confusion, so we can finally make better choices and live a healthier and longer life. Listen now! 

Hablando Claro Podcast
Nuevas Imágenes del Universo

Hablando Claro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 50:49


Nuevas Imágenes del Universo

Genetics Unzipped
S5.14 Genes, brains and the mind: How much of your personality is encoded in your DNA?

Genetics Unzipped

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 34:21 Very Popular


In this episode we're exploring genes, brains and the mind, as we ask how much of our personality is innate, and whether anything we do as adults can change who we fundamentally are. Presenter, Dr Sally Le Page, sits down with Kevin Mitchell, an Associate Professor of Genetics and Neuroscience at Trinity College Dublin and author of the book Innate: How the wiring of our brains shapes who we are.Full show notes, transcript, music credits and references online at GeneticsUnzipped.com Follow us on Twitter @GeneticsUnzipThis episode of Genetics Unzipped was written and presented by Kat Arney with audio production by Sally Le Page.This podcast is produced by First Create the Media for the Genetics Society - one of the oldest learned societies in the world dedicated to supporting and promoting the research, teaching and application of genetics.

Cienciaes.com
Primeras Imágenes obtenidas por el telescopio espacial James Webb. Hablamos con Santiago Arribas Mocoroa. - Hablando con Científicos

Cienciaes.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022


El momento ha llegado y marca, como estaba previsto, el comienzo de una nueva era de investigación astronómica. El Telescopio Espacial James Webb (JWST), que describía para nosotros en el programa anterior el investigador Santiago Arribas, ha demostrado su razón de ser con unas imágenes espectaculares del Universo en el infrarrojo. Hace unos días, uno de vosotros nos preguntaba si íbamos a hacer un programa dedicado a las primeras imágenes del telescopio y eso hacemos hoy. Santiago Arribas se mostró encantado de participar de nuevo en Hablando con Científicos para comentar la primera imagen del telescopio espacial. Es una imagen espectacular que muestra miles de galaxias de diferentes formas, tamaños, colores y brillo existentes en un reducidísimo espacio de cielo observado.

Coffee Break: Señal y Ruido
Ep376: Especial Primeras Imágenes del JWST

Coffee Break: Señal y Ruido

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 182:19


La tertulia semanal en la que repasamos las últimas noticias de la actualidad científica. En el episodio de hoy: Especial: Primeras imágenes del James Webb Space Telescope (min 5:00); Señales de los oyentes (2:32:00). Contertulios: Gastón Giribet, Héctor Vives, Jose Edelstein, Francis Villatoro, Héctor Socas. Portada gentileza de Manu Pombrol. Todos los comentarios vertidos durante la tertulia representan únicamente la opinión de quien los hace... y a veces ni eso. CB:SyR es una actividad del Museo de la Ciencia y el Cosmos de Tenerife. Museos de Tenerife apoya el valor científico y divulgativo de CB:SyR sin asumir como propios los comentarios de los participantes.

Jack Westin MCAT Podcast
Everything You Need to Know About Cancer and the MCAT

Jack Westin MCAT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 61:42


In this episode of the Jack Westin MCAT Podcast, Phil Hawkins, Lead Instructor and Director of MCAT Prep and Harvard Medical Student Azaii Calderón Muñiz discuss cell replication. More specifically, Azaii and Phil discuss cancer. In this episode you will learn how cells replicate, how cancer bypasses normal genetic barriers, and what you need to know for the MCAT. 0:00 Intro 5:43 Cell Cycle 13:51 The MCAT and Cancer 16:00 Replicating DNA 20:45 Genes in Cancer 38:15 What Cancer Cells Actually Do 1:00:48 Outro About Jack Westin - The team at Jack Westin is dedicated to a single goal: giving students the highest quality learning resources. Jack Westin understands that students can't crush the MCAT without the perfect blend of critical thinking and fundamental science knowledge. To this end, Jack Westin is dedicated to providing students with cutting edge comprehensive tools, courses, and practice materials. The Jack Westin MCAT science and CARS courses, taught by the world's best and most engaging MCAT instructors, are designed to do more than just teach students the MCAT—it supercharges studying and encourages lifelong learning. Want to learn more? Shoot us a text at 415-805-6292 Free Resources: https://jackwestin.com Live Education Sessions: https://jackwestin.com/sessions Courses: https://jackwestin.com/courses Tutoring: https://jackwestin.com/tutoring Follow Us On Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jackwestinmcat

Hablando con Científicos - Cienciaes.com
Primeras Imágenes obtenidas por el telescopio espacial James Webb. Hablamos con Santiago Arribas Mocoroa.

Hablando con Científicos - Cienciaes.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022


El momento ha llegado y marca, como estaba previsto, el comienzo de una nueva era de investigación astronómica. El Telescopio Espacial James Webb (JWST), que describía para nosotros en el programa anterior el investigador Santiago Arribas, ha demostrado su razón de ser con unas imágenes espectaculares del Universo en el infrarrojo. Hace unos días, uno de vosotros nos preguntaba si íbamos a hacer un programa dedicado a las primeras imágenes del telescopio y eso hacemos hoy. Santiago Arribas se mostró encantado de participar de nuevo en Hablando con Científicos para comentar la primera imagen del telescopio espacial. Es una imagen espectacular que muestra miles de galaxias de diferentes formas, tamaños, colores y brillo existentes en un reducidísimo espacio de cielo observado.

The Carnivore Yogi Podcast
All about peptides & Are your genetics causing you to overeat with Nathalie Niddam, Longevity Biohacker

The Carnivore Yogi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 57:07


This episode is sponsored by Optimal Carnivore “CarnivoreY” to receive 10% off all products- Brain Nourish - https://amzn.to/3liaNFN Grassfed Organ Meat Complex https://amzn.to/3Dp1R9e Grassfed Beef liver https://amzn.to/3clgONz This episode is sponsored by Upgraded Formulas - Get your HTMA with Upgraded Formulas - use my code YOGI12 or YOGI for a discount! - https://www.upgradedformulas.com/?rfsn=4637317.2071db5&utm_source=refersion&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=4637317.2071db5 Sign up for my newsletter to get special offers in the future! - https://sarah-kleiner.mykajabi.com/contact Check out all my courses to understand how to improve your mitochondrial health & experience long lasting health! https://sarah-kleiner.mykajabi.com/store Find Nathalie here: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/nathalieniddam/ Website - https://www.natniddam.com Podcast - https://www.natniddam.com/podcast 0:00 Beginning 3:00 Introduction 3:57 How Natalie became interested in nutrition & genetics 6:00 Why we need extra help beyond nutrition & how peptides come in to play 11:30 BPC 157 peptides for the gut & healing chronic injuries 15:00 How peptides are being implemented medically 17:00 Peptides and histamines 19:00 More on histamine issues & troubleshooting 21:00 Immune system modulating peptides 24:20 How peptides can help with anti aging by age group 25:30 Two categories of peptides 29:00 Peptides and melatonin production 31:00 Telomeres and peptides 32:00 Glandulars and histamines 35:19 HRT vs peptides 38:30 Fear with HRT 42:00 How HRT can be helpful 44:26 Genes - the cookie jar gene 48:00 Why our genes don't have to be a final say 51:00 Why interpretations of genetics can be incorrect 54:00 How to find Natalie

El Washington Post
López Obrador en la Casa Blanca. Las imágenes del universo. Constitución y ex presidentes de Chile

El Washington Post

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 19:40


De la reunión AMLO-Biden hablamos con José Díaz Briseño de "Reforma". Del telescopio James Webb, con Juan Diego Soler del Instituto de Astrofísica de Italia. Y de Michelle Bachelet, Eduardo Frei y Ricardo Lagos, con José María del Pino del Grupo Clarín

Martha Debayle
Los genes y el poder de cambiarlos. Martes 12 de julio de 2022.

Martha Debayle

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 34:29


El Director del Laboratorio de Glicobiología Humana y Diagnóstico Molecular de la Universidad Estatal del Estado de Morelos nos explica con peras y manzanas todo sobre el ADN y su posible modificación.

A Moment of Science
How losing a tail can save your genes

A Moment of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 2:00


Some animals are able to lose a limb to save themselves in a process called autotomy.

CutOff Genes Podcast
CutOff Genes: Episode 603: Drastic Measures

CutOff Genes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 48:24 Very Popular


- How is DNA being used to ID Stolen Babies - DNA testing for babies born in a post Roe V Wade era? - Renewed Book Nook - Epic Odyssey with @emmastevensgatheringplace author of The Gathering Place: An Adoptee's Story Subscribe, Rate and REVIEW For help with your search contact Julie Dixon Jackson at cutoffgenes.com

Curiosity Daily
Blood Pressures, Mercury's Crusty Diamonds, Dad or Mom Genes

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 13:34


Today, you'll learn about how high blood pressure can reduce the gray matter in your brain, why scientists think the surface of Mercury is covered in diamonds, and how while we have gene pairs from both parents, our bodies will use one parent's gene over the other's depending on the circumstances.50 Shades of Gray Matter“Study: An Early Spike in Blood Pressure Can Pummel Your Brain” by Nick Kepplerhttps://www.inverse.com/mind-body/high-blood-pressure-brain-health“10 Ways to Control High Blood Pressure Without Medication” by Mayo Clinic Staffhttps://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/in-depth/high-blood-pressure/art-20046974 Diamonds a Plenty“Diamonds may stud Mercury's crust” by Nikk Ogasahttps://www.sciencenews.org/article/mercury-diamond-surface-crust-meteorite-impact-graphite“Mercury Could Be Littered With Diamonds” by Ramin Skibbahttps://www.wired.com/story/mercury-could-be-littered-with-diamonds/“Diamonds Unearthed” by Cate Lineberryhttps://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/diamonds-unearthed-141629226/Mom and dad genes aren't just at the mall.“Parental Control: How Genes From Mom Or Dad Shape Behavior” by Jennifer Michalowskihttps://healthcare.utah.edu/publicaffairs/news/2022/03/genes-behavior.php“Researchers uncover how parent's genes shape behavior, parental controls”https://theprint.in/features/researchers-uncover-how-parents-genes-shape-behavior-parental-controls/941227/“Brain Basics: Genes At Work In The Brain” by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Strokehttps://www.ninds.nih.gov/health-information/patient-caregiver-education/brain-basics-genes-work-brainFollow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to get smarter with Calli and Nate — for free! Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers.Find episode transcripts here: