Podcasts about mphil

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 356PODCASTS
  • 505EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 11, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about mphil

Latest podcast episodes about mphil

The Thomistic Institute
Off-Campus Conversations, Ep. 002: Dr. George Corbett on Music in the Catholic Tradition

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 39:52


Join Fr. Gregory Pine, O.P. of Aquinas 101, Godsplaining, and Pints with Aquinas for an off-campus conversation with Dr. George Corbett about his latest Thomistic Institute lecture, "Music in the Catholic Tradition." The Thomistic Institute Podcast - Off-Campus Conversations with Fr. Gregory Pine, Ep. 002: Dr. George Corbett on Music in the Catholic Tradition You can listen to the original lecture here: https://soundcloud.com/thomisticinstitute/music-in-the-catholic-tradition-dr-george-corbett For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org About the speaker: Dr George Corbett joined the School of Divinity in 2015. Previously, he held positions as Junior Research Fellow in Philosophy, Trinity College, and affiliated lecturer in Italian, University of Cambridge, where he also taught English literature and theology. He received his BA (double first), MPhil (distinction), and PhD (AHRC-funded) from the University of Cambridge. He has also studied in Pisa (as an Erasmus-Socrates exchange scholar at La Scuola Normale Superiore), Rome (Institutum Pontificium Alterioris Latinitatis), and Montella (Vivarium Novum) Dr Corbett directs CEPHAS (a Thomistic Centre for Philosophy and Scholastic Theology), TheoArtistry (a project linking up theologians and artists), and is leading on a new collaborative MLitt in Sacred Music.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Elliot Ackerman and Dr Christina Greer Episode 662

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 89:54


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day.  Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls. We hang out virtually on Thursday Nights at 8pm EST and anytime all of the time on Discord Elliot Ackerman joins me to talk about his new book The Fifth Act: America's End in Afghanistan. He is also the author of several novels, Red Dress In Black and White. His books have been nominated for the National Book Award, the Andrew Carnegie Medal in both fiction and non-fiction, and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize among others. His writing often appears in Esquire, The New Yorker, and The New York Times where he is a contributing opinion writer, and his stories have been included inThe Best American Short Stories and The Best American Travel Writing. He is both a former White House Fellow and Marine, and served five tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star for Valor, and the Purple Heart. He divides his time between New York City and Washington, D.C. Website: www. ElliotAckerman.com; Twitter: @elliotackerman  Dr Christina Greer is hosting a new podcast called The Blackest Questions She is also an Associate Professor of Political Science at Fordham University - Lincoln Center (Manhattan) campus. Her research and teaching focus on American politics, black ethnic politics, urban politics, quantitative methods, Congress, New York City and New York State politics, campaigns and elections, and public opinion. Prof. Greer's book Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream (Oxford University Press) investigates the increasingly ethnically diverse black populations in the US from Africa and the Caribbean. She finds that both ethnicity and a shared racial identity matter and also affect the policy choices and preferences for black groups. Professor Greer is currently writing her second manuscript and conducting research on the history of all African Americans who have run for the executive office in the U.S. Her research interests also include mayors and public policy in urban centers. Her previous work has compared criminal activity and political responses in Boston and Baltimore. She is the host and producer of The Aftermath with Christina Greer on Ozy.com http://www.ozy.com/topic/the-aftermath. Prof. Greer received her BA from Tufts University and her MA, MPhil, and PhD in Political Science from Columbia University.   Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

JAMA Cardiology Author Interviews: Covering research in cardiovascular medicine, science, & clinical practice. For physicians
Alerting Clinicians to 1-Year Mortality Risk in Patients Hospitalized With Heart Failure

JAMA Cardiology Author Interviews: Covering research in cardiovascular medicine, science, & clinical practice. For physicians

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 17:12


Interview with Tariq Ahmad, MD, MPH, author of Alerting Clinicians to 1-Year Mortality Risk in Patients Hospitalized With Heart Failure: The REVEAL-HF Randomized Clinical Trial, and Rishi K. Wadhera, MD, MPP, MPhil, author of Improving Quality Improvement—From Aspiration Toward Empiricism. Hosted by Gregg C. Fonarow, MD. Related Content: Alerting Clinicians to 1-Year Mortality Risk in Patients Hospitalized With Heart Failure Improving Quality Improvement—From Aspiration Toward Empiricism

The Thomistic Institute
Music in the Catholic Tradition | Dr. George Corbett

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 74:25


This lecture was given on April 21, 2022 at The Christian Heritage Centre at Stonyhurst as part of "Catholicism and the Arts: An Intellectual Retreat." For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Dr George Corbett joined the School of Divinity in 2015. Previously, he held positions as Junior Research Fellow in Philosophy, Trinity College, and affiliated lecturer in Italian, University of Cambridge, where he also taught English literature and theology. He received his BA (double first), MPhil (distinction), and PhD (AHRC-funded) from the University of Cambridge. He has also studied in Pisa (as an Erasmus-Socrates exchange scholar at La Scuola Normale Superiore), Rome (Institutum Pontificium Alterioris Latinitatis), and Montella (Vivarium Novum). Dr Corbett directs CEPHAS (a Thomistic Centre for Philosophy and Scholastic Theology), TheoArtistry (a project linking up theologians and artists), and is leading on a new collaborative MLitt in Sacred Music.

JAMA Network
JAMA Cardiology : Alerting Clinicians to 1-Year Mortality Risk in Patients Hospitalized With Heart Failure

JAMA Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 17:12


Interview with Tariq Ahmad, MD, MPH, author of Alerting Clinicians to 1-Year Mortality Risk in Patients Hospitalized With Heart Failure: The REVEAL-HF Randomized Clinical Trial, and Rishi K. Wadhera, MD, MPP, MPhil, author of Improving Quality Improvement—From Aspiration Toward Empiricism. Hosted by Gregg C. Fonarow, MD. Related Content: Alerting Clinicians to 1-Year Mortality Risk in Patients Hospitalized With Heart Failure Improving Quality Improvement—From Aspiration Toward Empiricism

Scrubbed In
E107: Building a Passport Career in Medicine - Jessica O'Logbon (Med Student + Progress with Jess Founder)

Scrubbed In

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 48:05


In this week's episode Jess shares her journey into medical school despite being rejected the first time, her passion for leveling the playing field and her love for side hustles. We delve into her pursuit for building a passport career within medicine, her incredible e-books which are helping doctors with the process of re-locating and med students get funding including why she still wants to be a doctor!    We discuss her life as a medical student sharing insights on social media and more recently her MPhil at Cambridge University. Jess shares her advice for other medics who wish to follow a similar pursuit. Jessica O'Logbon is a Medical Student at King's College London, currently doing an MPhil at Cambridge University. She is the founder of Progress with Jess, a platform where she explores the diverse routes available within a career in healthcare. She has been involved in healthcare leadership, innovation and research, and continuously strive to make a change in my local and global communities.  Check out her blog posts and e-books helping you fulfill your potential at medical school and beyond! https://www.progresswithjess.co.uk/ Instagram: @jess.olo ------------------------------------- Episode Sponsor: Locum's Nest The Locum's Nest app has been revolutionising the way NHS doctors are supported by technology since 2015 and is now wired across all NHS professions. On a mission to remove barriers to workforce mobility across the NHS, Locum's Nest has pioneered the formation of digital collaborative workforce banks across the country, enabling cross-covering of shifts across an ever-growing number of NHS Trusts. Currently the best-rated app for flexible working in the NHS, Locum's Nest is transforming shift work in the NHS into a more inclusive and fulfilling experience by giving healthcare professionals ownership and control of their work life balance. Download the app Now: Apple App Store & Google Play Store Manage your shifts, your rosters and your pay all from one secure place! https://locumsnest.co.uk/healthcare-professionals ------------------------------------- Check out our latest platform Peerr Where healthcare professionals learn from the best educators - your peers! ✍️ Make your own quizzes for revision - An invaluable learning tool

Looking Up
Looking up - 05 Aug 22

Looking Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 4:52


Five minutes at the end of each week explores the big and the small questions in astronomy, cosmology, and space science. Hosted by Kechil Kirkham, no subject is too big or too small, and experts are regularly brought on board to illuminate and excite. Cape Town is the place to be for astronomy, with some of the largest telescopes in the world housed or being built not too far away. Looking Up takes advantage of the shoals of scientists and engineers working on the planet's most advanced astronomy projects, who live and work right here in the Mother City. Kechil has recently acquired an MPhil in Space Studies at the University of Cape Town, and works in South Africa's space industry on the Square Kilometre Array radio telescope.

The Thomistic Institute
Dante's Beatrice and the Beauty of the Christian Faith | Dr. George Corbett

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 56:57


This lecture was given on April 20, 2022 at The Christian Heritage Centre at Stonyhurst as part of "Catholicism and the Arts: An Intellectual Retreat." For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Dr. George Corbett is a Senior Lecturer in Theology and the Arts at the University of St Andrews. Previously, he held positions as Junior Research Fellow in Philosophy, Trinity College, and affiliated lecturer in Italian, University of Cambridge, where he also taught English literature and theology. He received his BA (double first), MPhil (distinction), and PhD (AHRC-funded) from the University of Cambridge. He has also studied in Pisa (as an Erasmus-Socrates exchange scholar at La Scuola Normale Superiore), Rome (Institutum Pontificium Alterioris Latinitatis), and Montella (Vivarium Novum). Dr. Corbett directs CEPHAS (a Thomistic Centre for Philosophy and Scholastic Theology), TheoArtistry (a project linking up theologians and artists), and is leading on a new collaborative MLitt in Sacred Music.

The Chinese History Podcast
The Ming in the Southwest: Conquest, Rule, and Legacy

The Chinese History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 39:23


In 1381, Ming armies marched into Yunnan and Guizhou and within a year had deposed the Mongol Yuan's Prince of Liang, who had been enfeoffed there by the Yuan court. The Hongwu's emperor's decision to annex Yunnan and Guizhou and establish Ming administration there was unusual, for before the Mongols conquered it in the mid-1250s, the area had never been under the control of a China-based empire. It was more Southeast Asian in character than it was Chinese in character. Yet for decades, the scholarly community has neglected the study of the southwest. In this episode, Sean Cronan will discuss the Ming's rule in the region, how the early Ming court reshaped the interstate environment of Southwest China and Upper Mainland Southeast Asia, as well as some of the legacies that the early Ming left on the region. Contributors Sean Cronan Sean Cronan is a Ph.D. student at the University of California, Berkeley. His work focuses on East and Southeast Asian diplomatic encounters from the thirteenth to eighteenth centuries, tracing the development of new shared diplomatic norms following the Mongol conquests of Eurasia, as well as how rulers and scholar-officials in the Ming (1368- 1644) and Qing Dynasties (1644-1911) institutionalized and challenged these new norms. He explores how ideas of multipolarity, regime legitimacy, and the makeup of the interstate order came under debate throughout the Mongol Empire, Ming China, the Qing Empire, Chosŏn Korea, Dai Viet (Northern Vietnam), Japan, the Ayutthaya Kingdom of Thailand, the Pagan Kingdom of Burma, and beyond. He works with sources in Chinese (literary Sinitic), Japanese, Thai, Burmese, Manchu, and Dutch. Yiming Ha Yiming Ha is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. His current research is on military mobilization and state-building in China between the thirteenth and seventeenth centuries, focusing on how military institutions changed over time, how the state responded to these changes, the disconnect between the center and localities, and the broader implications that the military had on the state. His project highlights in particular the role of the Mongol Yuan in introducing an alternative form of military mobilization that radically transformed the Chinese state. He is also interested in military history, nomadic history, comparative Eurasian state-building, and the history of maritime interactions in early modern East Asia. He received his BA from UCLA and his MPhil from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Credits Episode No. 13 Release date: July 31, 2022 Recording location: Los Angeles/Berkeley, CA Transcript Bibliography courtesy of Sean Cronan Images Cover Image: A Buddhist monastery in Xishuangbanna (Sipsongpanna), located in Yunnan at the border with Laos and Myanmar. Note the distinct Southeast Asian style architecture. In Ming times this area was called Cheli 車里 and a native official ruled here on behalf of the Ming court. Today it is classified as an autonomous region for the Dai/Tai ethnic group. (Image Source) https://i.imgur.com/tn3BrKI.jpg A 1636 Ming map of Yunnan, from the Zhifang dayitong zhi 職方大一統志. Due to the large file size, it cannot be uploaded here. Please click on the link above to view it. The yellow rectangle denotes the location of Kunming, the prefectural seat of Yunnan. Red squares represent major settlements. Map of the Möeng Maaw Empire at its greatest extent in 1398. . Areas in red were either governed by a Sa clan appointee or had long been conquered and integrated into the Maaw administrative structure. Areas in yellow were seized by more recent conquest or held only loosely. Map courtesy of Sean Cronan. Please do not cite or circulate. A Yuan seal granted to the native official of Cheli. (Image Source) References Daniels, Christian. “The Mongol-Yuan in Yunnan and ProtoTai/Tai Polities during the 13th-14th Centuries.” Journal of the Siam Society, 106 (2018), 201-243. Daniels, Christian and Jianxiong Ma, eds. The Transformation of Yunnan in Ming China: from the Dali Kingdom to Imperial Province. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2020. Fernquest, Jon. “Crucible of War: Burma and the Ming in the Tai Frontier Zone (1382-1454).” SOAS Bulletin of Burma Research, 4:2 (2006), 27-90. Giersch, Charles Patterson. Asian Borderlands: The Transformation of Qing China's Yunnan Frontier. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2006. Herman, John E. Amid the Clouds and Mist China's Colonization of Guizhou, 1200–1700. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2007. Robinson, David M. In the Shadow of the Mongol Empire: Ming China and Eurasia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020. Yang, Bin. Between Winds and Clouds: The Making of Yunnan (Second Century BCE to Twentieth Century CE). New York: Columbia University Press, 2009.

Network Capital
Debates that define India with Cambridge Academic Tripurdaman Singh

Network Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 69:04


Tripurdaman Singh is a historian of South Asia and currently a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London. Born in Agra, India, Tripurdaman read politics and international studies at the University of Warwick, and subsequently earned an MPhil in modern South Asian studies and a PhD in history from the University of Cambridge. He has been a Visiting Fellow at the International Institute of Asian Studies, Universiteit Leiden and an Indian Council of Historical Research Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Agra. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society, and the author of three books: Imperial Sovereignty and Local Politics (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Sixteen Stormy Days (Penguin, 2020) and Nehru (William Collins, 2021). He lives in Cambridge, UK and Agra, India.

Near FM – Listen Again
Asian Talents Podcast Ep 11 – Fangzhe Qui

Near FM – Listen Again

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 22:50


今集的嘉賓是來自廣州的語言學家邱方哲博士,現職都柏林大學愛爾蘭凱爾特研究學院的助理教授。 他畢業於北京大學,持法學和哲學學士學位。 他亦持有牛津大學凱爾特研究碩士學位及科克大學早期和中世紀愛爾蘭文博士。亦曾並於荷蘭阿姆斯特丹大學和烏得勒支大學作交換生。 他致力於將愛爾蘭文化帶給華人。 另外,作為愛爾蘭語專家,以及邊緣語言(粵語和撒拉語)的使用者,他亦熱心捍衛語言權利。 Fangzhe Qui is an assistant professor (Ad Astra Fellow) in the School of Irish, Celtic Studies and Folklore in University College Dublin, Ireland. He has a PhD in Early and Medieval Irish by UCC, a MPhil degree in Celtic Studies from University of Oxford and a bachelor in Law and Philosophy from Peking University, China. […]

Network Capital
Deconstructing food, sustainable development and agricultural trends with Cambridge Professor Shailaja Fennell

Network Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 49:52


Director of Research, Cambridge Central Asia Forum; Lecturer in Development Studies, and Fellow of Jesus College at University of Cambridge Dr. Shailaja Fennell is Director of Research at Cambridge Central Asia Forum and a University Lecturer in Development Studies. She is also a Fellow of Jesus College at the University of Cambridge. Since 2004, Dr. Fennell has been researching the linkages between rural development, environmental and educational strategies in India, China and Central Asia. She has specialised in the sub-fields of institutional reform, rural development, gender and household dynamics, kinship and ethnicity, and educational provision. Her recent publications include The Handbook of BRICS (with P. Anand, F. Comim, and J Weiss) forthcoming (2018), Oxford University Press, Rules Rubrics and Riches: The Interrelations between Legal Reform and International Development (Routledge 2010), Gender Education and Development: Conceptual Frameworks, Engagements and Agendas (Routledge 2008) edited with M. Arnot. She is currently completing a book titled Grains and Gains: The Political Economy of Agriculture in China and India(Sage 2012), and working on a manuscript currently titled Development in Transition: Lessons from Central Asia. Dr. Fennell pursued her bachelors, masters, and MPhil in Economics degrees from the University of Delhi, after which she went on to read for her MPhil and PhD at the Faculty of Economics and Politics, University of Cambridge. Her doctoral research was on long-term agricultural trends in India and China.

New Books Network
Opposing Power: Building Opposition Alliances in Electoral Autocracies

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 23:02


On 9 May 2018, an ideologically diverse opposition alliance called Pakatan Harapan (PH) defeated the long-ruling Barisan Nasional (BN) coalition which had dominated politics in Malaysia since the 1980s. This was the first regime change in Malaysia's history. This outstanding development was shortly followed by a series of defections culminating in the collapse of the Pakatan Harapan government in February 2020, after just 22 months in power. A new government was sworn in in March 2020, led by Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin, but only lasted until August 2021, when another new government led by Prime Minister Ismail Sabri Yakoob was formed. As Malaysia gears up for its 15th general elections to be held in the second half of 2022, Professor Elvin Ong joins Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories to discuss the tumultuous state of Malaysian politics. Drawing on his book Opposing Power: Building Opposition Alliances in Electoral Autocracies (University of Michigan Press, 2022), Professor Ong reflects on the numerous challenges—structural, perceptual, and strategic—that can often undermine the opposition, and offers insights into what may happen at the upcoming ballot in Malaysia. About Elvin Ong: Elvin Ong is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the National University of Singapore. He is also Chair Elect of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei (MSB) Studies Group. Previously, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Centre for Southeast Asia Research (CSEAR) in the Institute of Asian Research (IAR) at the University of British Columbia. His research has been published in various political science disciplinary journals such as Party Politics and the American Journal of Political Science, as well as various regional journals such as Contemporary Southeast Asia and the Journal of East Asian Studies. His book Opposing Power is published by the University of Michigan Press, under the Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies book series. His PhD is from Emory University, and his MPhil is from the University of Oxford. For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies
Opposing Power: Building Opposition Alliances in Electoral Autocracies

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 23:02


On 9 May 2018, an ideologically diverse opposition alliance called Pakatan Harapan (PH) defeated the long-ruling Barisan Nasional (BN) coalition which had dominated politics in Malaysia since the 1980s. This was the first regime change in Malaysia's history. This outstanding development was shortly followed by a series of defections culminating in the collapse of the Pakatan Harapan government in February 2020, after just 22 months in power. A new government was sworn in in March 2020, led by Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin, but only lasted until August 2021, when another new government led by Prime Minister Ismail Sabri Yakoob was formed. As Malaysia gears up for its 15th general elections to be held in the second half of 2022, Professor Elvin Ong joins Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories to discuss the tumultuous state of Malaysian politics. Drawing on his book Opposing Power: Building Opposition Alliances in Electoral Autocracies (University of Michigan Press, 2022), Professor Ong reflects on the numerous challenges—structural, perceptual, and strategic—that can often undermine the opposition, and offers insights into what may happen at the upcoming ballot in Malaysia. About Elvin Ong: Elvin Ong is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the National University of Singapore. He is also Chair Elect of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei (MSB) Studies Group. Previously, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Centre for Southeast Asia Research (CSEAR) in the Institute of Asian Research (IAR) at the University of British Columbia. His research has been published in various political science disciplinary journals such as Party Politics and the American Journal of Political Science, as well as various regional journals such as Contemporary Southeast Asia and the Journal of East Asian Studies. His book Opposing Power is published by the University of Michigan Press, under the Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies book series. His PhD is from Emory University, and his MPhil is from the University of Oxford. For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/southeast-asian-studies

SSEAC Stories
Opposing Power: Building Opposition Alliances in Electoral Autocracies

SSEAC Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 23:02


On 9 May 2018, an ideologically diverse opposition alliance called Pakatan Harapan (PH) defeated the long-ruling Barisan Nasional (BN) coalition which had dominated politics in Malaysia since the 1980s. This was the first regime change in Malaysia's history. This outstanding development was shortly followed by a series of defections culminating in the collapse of the Pakatan Harapan government in February 2020, after just 22 months in power. A new government was sworn in in March 2020, led by Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin, but only lasted until August 2021, when another new government led by Prime Minister Ismail Sabri Yakoob was formed. As Malaysia gears up for its 15th general elections to be held in the second half of 2022, Professor Elvin Ong joins Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories to discuss the tumultuous state of Malaysian politics. Drawing on his book Opposing Power: Building Opposition Alliances in Electoral Autocracies (University of Michigan Press, 2022), Professor Ong reflects on the numerous challenges—structural, perceptual, and strategic—that can often undermine the opposition, and offers insights into what may happen at the upcoming ballot in Malaysia. About Elvin Ong: Elvin Ong is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the National University of Singapore. He is also Chair Elect of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei (MSB) Studies Group. Previously, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Centre for Southeast Asia Research (CSEAR) in the Institute of Asian Research (IAR) at the University of British Columbia. His research has been published in various political science disciplinary journals such as Party Politics and the American Journal of Political Science, as well as various regional journals such as Contemporary Southeast Asia and the Journal of East Asian Studies. His book Opposing Power is published by the University of Michigan Press, under the Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies book series. His PhD is from Emory University, and his MPhil is from the University of Oxford. For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac.

New Books in Political Science
Opposing Power: Building Opposition Alliances in Electoral Autocracies

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 23:02


On 9 May 2018, an ideologically diverse opposition alliance called Pakatan Harapan (PH) defeated the long-ruling Barisan Nasional (BN) coalition which had dominated politics in Malaysia since the 1980s. This was the first regime change in Malaysia's history. This outstanding development was shortly followed by a series of defections culminating in the collapse of the Pakatan Harapan government in February 2020, after just 22 months in power. A new government was sworn in in March 2020, led by Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin, but only lasted until August 2021, when another new government led by Prime Minister Ismail Sabri Yakoob was formed. As Malaysia gears up for its 15th general elections to be held in the second half of 2022, Professor Elvin Ong joins Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories to discuss the tumultuous state of Malaysian politics. Drawing on his book Opposing Power: Building Opposition Alliances in Electoral Autocracies (University of Michigan Press, 2022), Professor Ong reflects on the numerous challenges—structural, perceptual, and strategic—that can often undermine the opposition, and offers insights into what may happen at the upcoming ballot in Malaysia. About Elvin Ong: Elvin Ong is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the National University of Singapore. He is also Chair Elect of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei (MSB) Studies Group. Previously, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Centre for Southeast Asia Research (CSEAR) in the Institute of Asian Research (IAR) at the University of British Columbia. His research has been published in various political science disciplinary journals such as Party Politics and the American Journal of Political Science, as well as various regional journals such as Contemporary Southeast Asia and the Journal of East Asian Studies. His book Opposing Power is published by the University of Michigan Press, under the Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies book series. His PhD is from Emory University, and his MPhil is from the University of Oxford. For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

Radio LUZ
Architektura na głos: Wojciech Mazan i emanacje marzeń, czyli dlaczego śnimy o ogródkach działkowych.

Radio LUZ

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 35:08


Nasze miasta skrywają zielone oazy, które przyciągają mieszkańców szczególnie w czasach letnich upałów. Dla jednych wydają sie nieosiągalnym pragnieniem, dla drugich terenem realizacji marzeń o fantazyjnych altanach czy zaczarowanych ogrodach. Razem z Wojciechem Mazanem przyglądamy się terenom ogródków działkowych, nie bojąc się otworzyć bramę RODu. Rozmawiamy o ich historii, problematyce własności, zmianach na przestrzeni lat, przyszłość tych terenów, a przede wszystkim o nieformalnych strukturach, które powstają w tych ogrodach osobliwości. Dyskusję przeprowadziły Małgorzata Rybak i Dominika Jezierska. Wojciech Mazan - architekt, badacz, redaktor. Jego czułe obserwacje architektury prezentuje m.in. “Atlas Altan”. Ukończył studia w ramach programu MPhil in Architecture and Urban Design: Projective Cities na Architectural Association School of Architecture w Londynie. Studiował również na Wydziale Architektury Politechniki Wrocławskiej oraz na Rotterdamse Academie van Bouwkunst. Obecnie pracuje jako badacz na Royal College of Art w Londynie i jest członkiem redakcji kwartalnika „RZUT”. Od 2017 roku współtworzy studio PROLOG. Podcast jest wspólnym projektem Muzeum Architektury we Wrocławiu oraz Akademickiego Radia Luz 91.6 FM. fot. Wojciech Mazan “Atlas Altan”

JAMA Health Forum Editors' Summary
Does Rewarding Better Patient Care Experience Punish Safety-net Hospitals?

JAMA Health Forum Editors' Summary

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 12:40


Rishi K. Wadhera, MD, MPP, MPhil, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, discusses his article investigating the association of the Medicare Hospital Value-Based Purchasing program with changes in patient care experience at safety-net vs non–safety-net hospitals with JAMA Health Forum editors John Z. Ayanian, MD, MPP, and Melinda B. Buntin, PhD. Related Content: Association of the Medicare Value-Based Purchasing Program With Changes in Patient Care Experience at Safety-net vs Non–Safety-net Hospitals

New Books in British Studies
Nick Sharman, "Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power| (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in British Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 61:46


Based on five years of archival research, Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power offers a radical reinterpretation of Britain and Spain's relationship during the growth, apogee and decline of the British Empire. It shows that from the early nineteenth century Britain turned Spain into an ‘informal' colony, using its economic and military dominance to achieve its strategic and economic ends. Britain's free trade campaign, which aimed to tear down the legal barriers to its explosive trade and investment expansion, undermined Spain's attempts to achieve industrial take-off, demonstrating that the relationship between the two countries was imperial in nature, and not simply one of unequal national power. Exploring five key moments of crisis in their relations, from the First Carlist War in the 1830s to the Second World War, the author analyses Britain's use of military force in achieving its goals, and the consequences that this had for economic and political policy-making in Spain. Ultimately, the Anglo-Spanish relationship was an early example of the interaction between industrial power and colonies, formal and informal, that characterised the post-World War Two period. An insightful read for anyone researching the British Empire and its colonies, this book offers an innovative perspective by closely examining the volatile relationship between two European powers. Dr Nick Sharman is a Research Fellow at the University of Nottingham, Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. His subject is the economic and political relationship between Britain and Spain in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He has had a career in business and local and regional government and is currently a Councillor in the London Borough of Hackney, where he chairs the Audit Committee. Nick has a PhD from the University of Nottingham, an honours degree in economics and politics from Trinity College, Dublin, an MPhil in town planning from University College London, an MBA from Henley Management College and an MA in history from Royal Holloway University of London. He has written widely on strategic and regeneration issues in local and regional Government and, more recently, on the history of the Anglo-Spanish relationship. His book, Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power, was published by Palgrave Macmillan in late 2021. Luka Haeberle is an enthusiastic student of Latin American and economic history. His main areas of interest are political economy, labor history and political theory. You can find him on Twitter: @ChepoteLuka Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

New Books in History
Nick Sharman, "Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power| (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 61:46


Based on five years of archival research, Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power offers a radical reinterpretation of Britain and Spain's relationship during the growth, apogee and decline of the British Empire. It shows that from the early nineteenth century Britain turned Spain into an ‘informal' colony, using its economic and military dominance to achieve its strategic and economic ends. Britain's free trade campaign, which aimed to tear down the legal barriers to its explosive trade and investment expansion, undermined Spain's attempts to achieve industrial take-off, demonstrating that the relationship between the two countries was imperial in nature, and not simply one of unequal national power. Exploring five key moments of crisis in their relations, from the First Carlist War in the 1830s to the Second World War, the author analyses Britain's use of military force in achieving its goals, and the consequences that this had for economic and political policy-making in Spain. Ultimately, the Anglo-Spanish relationship was an early example of the interaction between industrial power and colonies, formal and informal, that characterised the post-World War Two period. An insightful read for anyone researching the British Empire and its colonies, this book offers an innovative perspective by closely examining the volatile relationship between two European powers. Dr Nick Sharman is a Research Fellow at the University of Nottingham, Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. His subject is the economic and political relationship between Britain and Spain in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He has had a career in business and local and regional government and is currently a Councillor in the London Borough of Hackney, where he chairs the Audit Committee. Nick has a PhD from the University of Nottingham, an honours degree in economics and politics from Trinity College, Dublin, an MPhil in town planning from University College London, an MBA from Henley Management College and an MA in history from Royal Holloway University of London. He has written widely on strategic and regeneration issues in local and regional Government and, more recently, on the history of the Anglo-Spanish relationship. His book, Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power, was published by Palgrave Macmillan in late 2021. Luka Haeberle is an enthusiastic student of Latin American and economic history. His main areas of interest are political economy, labor history and political theory. You can find him on Twitter: @ChepoteLuka Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Military History
Nick Sharman, "Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power| (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 61:46


Based on five years of archival research, Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power offers a radical reinterpretation of Britain and Spain's relationship during the growth, apogee and decline of the British Empire. It shows that from the early nineteenth century Britain turned Spain into an ‘informal' colony, using its economic and military dominance to achieve its strategic and economic ends. Britain's free trade campaign, which aimed to tear down the legal barriers to its explosive trade and investment expansion, undermined Spain's attempts to achieve industrial take-off, demonstrating that the relationship between the two countries was imperial in nature, and not simply one of unequal national power. Exploring five key moments of crisis in their relations, from the First Carlist War in the 1830s to the Second World War, the author analyses Britain's use of military force in achieving its goals, and the consequences that this had for economic and political policy-making in Spain. Ultimately, the Anglo-Spanish relationship was an early example of the interaction between industrial power and colonies, formal and informal, that characterised the post-World War Two period. An insightful read for anyone researching the British Empire and its colonies, this book offers an innovative perspective by closely examining the volatile relationship between two European powers. Dr Nick Sharman is a Research Fellow at the University of Nottingham, Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. His subject is the economic and political relationship between Britain and Spain in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He has had a career in business and local and regional government and is currently a Councillor in the London Borough of Hackney, where he chairs the Audit Committee. Nick has a PhD from the University of Nottingham, an honours degree in economics and politics from Trinity College, Dublin, an MPhil in town planning from University College London, an MBA from Henley Management College and an MA in history from Royal Holloway University of London. He has written widely on strategic and regeneration issues in local and regional Government and, more recently, on the history of the Anglo-Spanish relationship. His book, Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power, was published by Palgrave Macmillan in late 2021. Luka Haeberle is an enthusiastic student of Latin American and economic history. His main areas of interest are political economy, labor history and political theory. You can find him on Twitter: @ChepoteLuka Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books Network
Nick Sharman, "Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power| (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 61:46


Based on five years of archival research, Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power offers a radical reinterpretation of Britain and Spain's relationship during the growth, apogee and decline of the British Empire. It shows that from the early nineteenth century Britain turned Spain into an ‘informal' colony, using its economic and military dominance to achieve its strategic and economic ends. Britain's free trade campaign, which aimed to tear down the legal barriers to its explosive trade and investment expansion, undermined Spain's attempts to achieve industrial take-off, demonstrating that the relationship between the two countries was imperial in nature, and not simply one of unequal national power. Exploring five key moments of crisis in their relations, from the First Carlist War in the 1830s to the Second World War, the author analyses Britain's use of military force in achieving its goals, and the consequences that this had for economic and political policy-making in Spain. Ultimately, the Anglo-Spanish relationship was an early example of the interaction between industrial power and colonies, formal and informal, that characterised the post-World War Two period. An insightful read for anyone researching the British Empire and its colonies, this book offers an innovative perspective by closely examining the volatile relationship between two European powers. Dr Nick Sharman is a Research Fellow at the University of Nottingham, Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. His subject is the economic and political relationship between Britain and Spain in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He has had a career in business and local and regional government and is currently a Councillor in the London Borough of Hackney, where he chairs the Audit Committee. Nick has a PhD from the University of Nottingham, an honours degree in economics and politics from Trinity College, Dublin, an MPhil in town planning from University College London, an MBA from Henley Management College and an MA in history from Royal Holloway University of London. He has written widely on strategic and regeneration issues in local and regional Government and, more recently, on the history of the Anglo-Spanish relationship. His book, Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power, was published by Palgrave Macmillan in late 2021. Luka Haeberle is an enthusiastic student of Latin American and economic history. His main areas of interest are political economy, labor history and political theory. You can find him on Twitter: @ChepoteLuka Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in European Studies
Nick Sharman, "Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power| (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 61:46


Based on five years of archival research, Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power offers a radical reinterpretation of Britain and Spain's relationship during the growth, apogee and decline of the British Empire. It shows that from the early nineteenth century Britain turned Spain into an ‘informal' colony, using its economic and military dominance to achieve its strategic and economic ends. Britain's free trade campaign, which aimed to tear down the legal barriers to its explosive trade and investment expansion, undermined Spain's attempts to achieve industrial take-off, demonstrating that the relationship between the two countries was imperial in nature, and not simply one of unequal national power. Exploring five key moments of crisis in their relations, from the First Carlist War in the 1830s to the Second World War, the author analyses Britain's use of military force in achieving its goals, and the consequences that this had for economic and political policy-making in Spain. Ultimately, the Anglo-Spanish relationship was an early example of the interaction between industrial power and colonies, formal and informal, that characterised the post-World War Two period. An insightful read for anyone researching the British Empire and its colonies, this book offers an innovative perspective by closely examining the volatile relationship between two European powers. Dr Nick Sharman is a Research Fellow at the University of Nottingham, Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. His subject is the economic and political relationship between Britain and Spain in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He has had a career in business and local and regional government and is currently a Councillor in the London Borough of Hackney, where he chairs the Audit Committee. Nick has a PhD from the University of Nottingham, an honours degree in economics and politics from Trinity College, Dublin, an MPhil in town planning from University College London, an MBA from Henley Management College and an MA in history from Royal Holloway University of London. He has written widely on strategic and regeneration issues in local and regional Government and, more recently, on the history of the Anglo-Spanish relationship. His book, Britain's Informal Empire in Spain, 1830-1950: Free Trade, Protectionism and Military Power, was published by Palgrave Macmillan in late 2021. Luka Haeberle is an enthusiastic student of Latin American and economic history. His main areas of interest are political economy, labor history and political theory. You can find him on Twitter: @ChepoteLuka Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

FriendsLikeUs
Amanda Seales and Christina Greer Visit Friends

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 76:24


Amanda Seales With an uncanny knack for taking serious topics (racism, rape culture, sexism, police brutality, etc.) and with humor, making them relatable and interesting, she combines intellectual wit, silliness, and a pop culture obsession to create her unique style of smart funny content for the stage and screens. Amanda Seales is a comedian and creative visionary with a Master's in African American studies from Columbia University. Seamlessly blending humor and intellect her unique style of smart funny content spans various genres across the entertainment and multi-media landscape. She is best known for her iconic role as, “Tiffany DuBois” of HBO's Insecure, her debut stand up comedy special, “I Be Knowin”, as a former cohost on daytime talk show, “The Real”, host of NBCs “Bring the Funny,” and the host/writer of the groundbreaking 2020 BET Awards. She speaks truth to change via her wildly popular instagram @AmandaSeales, weekly podcast, “Small Doses”, and book by the same name. Centering community building in her comedy, she is also the creator/host of the touring variety game show, “Smart Funny & Black” and of “Smart Funny & Black Radio” on Kevin Hart's LOL Network on SiriusXM. Always an advocate for Black voices, she founded Smart Funny & Black Productions to produce and create art as edu-tainment across the media landscape by any joke necessary. A Jedi Khaleesi with a patronus that's a Black Panther with wings, Amanda Seales continues to keep audiences laughing, thinking, and living in their truth! And you can now get more from her at  Amandaverse.com and you can see her live on her new tour: “Black Outside". Christina Greer is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Fordham University - Lincoln Center (Manhattan) campus. Her research and teaching focus on American politics, Black ethnic politics, campaigns and elections, and public opinion. Prof. Greer's book Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream (Oxford University Press) investigates the increasingly ethnically diverse black populations in the US from Africa and the Caribbean. She finds that both ethnicity and a shared racial identity matter and also affect the policy choices and preferences for black groups. Professor Greer is currently working on a manuscript detailing the political contributions of Barbara Jordan, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Stacey Abrams. She recently co-edited Black Politics in Transition, which explores gentrification, suburbanization, and immigration of Blacks in America. She is a member of the board of The Tenement Museum in NYC,  The Mark Twain House in Hartford, CT, Community Change in Washington, DC, and serves on the Advisory Board at Tufts University. She is a frequent political commentator on several media outlets, primarily MSNBC, WNYC, and NY1, and is often quoted in media outlets such as the NYTimes, Wall Street Journal, and the AP. She is the co-host of the New York centered podcast FAQ-NYC, is a political analyst at thegrio.com, is a frequent author and narrator for the TedEd educational series, and also writes a weekly column for The Amsterdam News, one of the oldest black newspapers in the U.S. Prof. Greer received her BA from Tufts University and her MA, MPhil, and PhD in Political Science from Columbia University. Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), TBS's The Last O.G, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf

The Chinese History Podcast
Professor Joanna Waley-Cohen on New Qing History

The Chinese History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 38:28


Since the 1990s, the New Qing History school has loomed large in the study of the Qing dynasty. It has greatly informed not only the study of the Qing but study of other dynasties as well. Yet what exactly is New Qing History? What is "new" about it? How did it come into being? How was it received in China and the West? To answer these questions, we talked to Professor Joanna Waley-Cohen of NYU, one of the leading scholars of the Qing dynasty. Contributors Joanna Waley-Cohen Professor Joanna Waley-Cohen is the Provost for NYU Shanghai and Julius Silver Professor of History at New York University. Her research interests include early modern Chinese history, especially the Qing dynasty; China and the West; and Chinese imperial culture, particularly in the Qianlong era; warfare in China and Inner Asia; and Chinese culinary history, and she has authored several books and articles on these topics. In addition, Professor Waley-Cohen has received many honors, including archival and postdoctoral fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, Goddard and Presidential Fellowships from NYU, and an Olin Fellowship in Military and Strategic History from Yale.  Yiming Ha Yiming Ha is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. His current research is on military mobilization and state-building in China between the thirteenth and seventeenth centuries, focusing on how military institutions changed over time, how the state responded to these changes, the disconnect between the center and localities, and the broader implications that the military had on the state. His project highlights in particular the role of the Mongol Yuan in introducing an alternative form of military mobilization that radically transformed the Chinese state. He is also interested in military history, nomadic history, comparative Eurasian state-building, and the history of maritime interactions in early modern East Asia. He received his BA from UCLA and his MPhil from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Credits Episode no. 12 Release date: June 25, 2022 Recording location: Los Angeles, CA/New York, NY Transcript Bibliography courtesy of Professor Waley-Cohen Images Cover Image: The Qianlong Emperor, who reigned from 1735 to 1796. After he abdicated, he continued to retain power as retired emperor until his death in 1799. He is the longest-reigning monarch in Chinese history and one of the longest in the world (Image Source). The headquarters of the First Historical Archives in Beijing, which houses documents from the Qing. The opening of this archive and access to the Manchu-language documents held within helped give birth to New Qing History. (Image Source) A copy of a Qing-era civil service examination answer sheet. Note the Manchu script on the seal. Currently held in UCLA Library Special Collections (Photo by Yiming). The Putuo Zongcheng Temple, a Buddhist temple in the Qing's Rehe Summer Resort (in today's Chengde, Hebei province). The temple was built between 1767 and 1771 by the Qianlong Emperor and was a replica of the Potala Palace in Lhasa. It is a fusion of Tibetan and Chinese architectural styles and is one of the most famous landmarks in the Chengde Summer Resort. (Image Source) A painting of a European-style palace constructed by the Jesuits for the Qing emperors in the Old Summer Palace (Yuanmingyuan). Note the fusion of Chinese and European styles. The Old Summer Palace was looted and burned by Anglo-French forces in 1860. The twelve bronze head statutes in front of the building have mostly been repatriated back to China, although some are in the hands of private collectors. (Image Source) The Qianlong Emperor commissioned a series of artwork commemorating the "Ten Great Campaigns" of his reign. This particular piece of artwork depicts the Battle of Thọ Xương River in 1788, when the Qing invaded Vietnam. These artworks were collaborative pieces between Chinese and Jesuit painters. (Image Source) References Patricia Berger, Empire of Emptiness: Buddhist Art and Political Authority in Qing China. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003. Pamela K. Crossley, A Translucent Mirror:  History and Identity in Qing Imperial Ideology.  Berkeley:  University of California Press, 1999. Mark C. Elliott, The Manchu Way:  The Eight Banners and Ethnic Identity in Late Imperial China.  Stanford, CA:  Stanford University Press, 2001. Johan Elverskog, Our Great Qing: The Mongols, Buddhists, and the State in Late Imperial China. Honolulu: University of  Hawaii Press, 2006. Philippe Foret, Mapping Chengde:  The Qing Landscape Enterprise.  Honolulu:  University of Hawaii Press, 2000. Jonathan S. Hay, Shitao:  Painting and Modernity in Early Qing China.  Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press, 2001. Ho Ping-ti, “The Significance of the Ch'ing Period in Chinese History,” Journal of Asian Studies 26.2 (1967):  189-95 Ho Ping-ti, “In Defense of Sinicization: A Rebuttal of Evelyn Rawski's `Reenvisioning the Qing,'” Journal of Asian Studies 57.1 (1998):  123-55. Laura Hostetler, Qing Colonial Enterprise:  Ethnography and Cartography in Early Modern China.  Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 2001. Susan Mann, Precious Records:  Women in China's Long Eighteenth Century.  Stanford, CA:  Stanford University Press, 1997. James P. Millward, Beyond the Pass:  Economy, Ethnicity, and Empire in Qing Central Asia, 1759-1864.  Stanford, CA:  Stanford University Press, 1998. Ronald C. Po, The Blue Frontier: Maritime Vision and Power in the Qing Empire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. Evelyn S. Rawski, The Last Emperors:  A Social History of Qing Imperial Institutions.  Berkeley:  University of California Press, 1998. Evelyn S. Rawski, “Presidential Address: Reenvisioning the Qing: The Significance of the Qing Period in Chinese History,” Journal of Asian Studies 55.4 (1996):  829-50.

Palisade Radio
Twitter Spaces – Nuclear Energy Industry Discussion – Featuring Mark Nelson – June 22, 2022

Palisade Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 143:31


Tom welcomes a exciting guest who introduced himself in the last Twitter Spaces, Mark Nelson. Mark has a very interesting perspective on the nuclear energy industry and is an advocate for the it's benefits. He explains why the cost of uranium has a minimal impact on the cost of operating a reactor. We take a deep dive into why nuclear energy has not been fully embraced in the west in recent years. The political, social, and economic reasons why building nuclear plants has become increasingly difficult. We take several listener questions. Guest Links:Twitter: https://twitter.com/energybantsWebsite: https://radiantenergyfund.org Mark Nelson is Managing Director at Radiant Energy Fund. He has discussed nuclear safety in Ukraine in television appearances with CNBC and Bloomberg, among others, and has contributed to articles on the same topic from Bloomberg and the BBC. His analytical work on clean energy and nuclear power has been cited in Reuters, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, and other papers of record internationally. He holds an MPhil in Nuclear Engineering from Cambridge University, and BS degrees in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and a BA in Russian Language and Literature from Oklahoma State University. Previously he worked as Senior Analyst at Environmental Progress in Berkeley, California, with previous stops at the Breakthrough Institute in Oakland, California and Los Alamos National Laboratories in New Mexico.

Investing For Good
Making A Difference Through Excellent Parenting And A Passion For Education with John Palfrey

Investing For Good

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 40:46


How fulfilling an academic-centered careerInsights about the younger generations who lived during the digital eraAn excellent perspective on upbringing and raising your own childrenOverview of growing the financial endowment of a charitable foundationThe importance of balancing career and family  The Life & Money Show Spotlight:Your Life & Money: What is one thing you're doing to live a meaningful and intentional life by design?Other's Life and Money: What is one life or money hack that you can share that will make an impact in others' lives right now? Life & Money in the World: What's the one thing you're doing right now to make the world a better place? RESOURCES/LINKS MENTIONEDBorn Digital by John Palfrey and Urs Gasser | Paperback & HardcoverThe Connected Parent by John Palfrey and Urs Gasser | Hardcover & Audiobook ABOUT JOHN PALFREYJohn is the President of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation which is one of America's biggest philanthropies with assets accumulating to over $7 billion. He is an author of the award-winning books Safe Spaces, Brave Spaces: Diversity and Free Expression in Education, and Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives. He is a seasoned educator, innovator, and legal scholar with well-respected expertise in how learning, education, and other institutions have changed because of new media. Additionally, he is committed to rigorous thinking, disruption, and creative solutions often made possible by technology, accessibility of information, and diversity and inclusion. John served as Head of School at Philips Academy, Andover, and oversaw the creation of the Tang Institute. He was the Henry N. Ess III Professor of Law and Vice Dean for Library and Information Resources at Harvard Law School. From 2002 to 2008, Palfrey served as Executive Director of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, founding board chair of the Digital Public Library of America, and is the former board chair of LRNG, a nonprofit launched and supported by MacArthur. He holds a JD from Harvard Law School, an MPhil from the University of Cambridge, and an AB from Harvard College. CONNECT WITH JOHNLinkedIn: John PalfreyWebsite: MacArthur Foundation CONNECT WITH USTo connect with Annie and Julie, as well as with other Investing For Good listeners, and to get the latest scoop on new and upcoming episodes, join Life and Money Show Podcast Community on Facebook.To learn more about real estate syndication investment opportunities, join the Goodegg Investor Club.Be sure to also grab your free copy of the Investing For Good book (just pay S&H)--Thanks for listening, and until next time, keep investing for good!

Caribbean Cricket Podcast
Caribbean identity in the West Indian cricket context

Caribbean Cricket Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 66:40 Very Popular


Episode 67 is here! If you know anything about the Caribbean Cricket Podcast you'll know we love to talk about the history and culture of our region as much as the cricket itself. With that in mind it was always an intention of ours to record an episode looking at Caribbean identity and what that actually means in the West Indies cricket context. For this episode Machel was joined by his father Professor Roderick Hewitt, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), MPhil focused in Theology/Theological Studies, to analyse whether the West Indies is a failed construct? Is there any such thing as a true Caribbean identity? The recording was done with a live You Tube audience so it does include many of their comments as part of the conversation. If you'd like to support the Caribbean Cricket Podcast you can become a patron for as little as £2 a month here - https://www.patreon.com/Caribcricket?... You can also find out more about Caribbean Cricket Podcast on our website at - https://www.caribbeancricketpodcast.com/ If you would prefer to watch the episode on You Tube. You can watch it here - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2eNlLz4mcI  

Death and Dying (Audio)
Last Gift: Ethical Considerations for HIV Cure Research at the End of Life - Exploring Ethics

Death and Dying (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 41:12


UC San Diego's Last Gift study aims to identify where HIV hides in the body of individuals who are terminally ill from a disease other than HIV, like cancer, ALS, or heart disease. Karine Dubé, DrPH, MPhil, Sarah Gianella Weibel, MD, Andy Kaytes, and Susanna Concha-Garcia discuss the ethical implications of the study, the experiences of the participants, the study components, and what can be learned. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37319]

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)
Last Gift: Ethical Considerations for HIV Cure Research at the End of Life - Exploring Ethics

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 41:12


UC San Diego's Last Gift study aims to identify where HIV hides in the body of individuals who are terminally ill from a disease other than HIV, like cancer, ALS, or heart disease. Karine Dubé, DrPH, MPhil, Sarah Gianella Weibel, MD, Andy Kaytes, and Susanna Concha-Garcia discuss the ethical implications of the study, the experiences of the participants, the study components, and what can be learned. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37319]

Health and Medicine (Audio)
Last Gift: Ethical Considerations for HIV Cure Research at the End of Life - Exploring Ethics

Health and Medicine (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 41:12


UC San Diego's Last Gift study aims to identify where HIV hides in the body of individuals who are terminally ill from a disease other than HIV, like cancer, ALS, or heart disease. Karine Dubé, DrPH, MPhil, Sarah Gianella Weibel, MD, Andy Kaytes, and Susanna Concha-Garcia discuss the ethical implications of the study, the experiences of the participants, the study components, and what can be learned. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37319]

UC San Diego (Audio)
Last Gift: Ethical Considerations for HIV Cure Research at the End of Life - Exploring Ethics

UC San Diego (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 41:12


UC San Diego's Last Gift study aims to identify where HIV hides in the body of individuals who are terminally ill from a disease other than HIV, like cancer, ALS, or heart disease. Karine Dubé, DrPH, MPhil, Sarah Gianella Weibel, MD, Andy Kaytes, and Susanna Concha-Garcia discuss the ethical implications of the study, the experiences of the participants, the study components, and what can be learned. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37319]

Health and Medicine (Video)
Last Gift: Ethical Considerations for HIV Cure Research at the End of Life - Exploring Ethics

Health and Medicine (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 41:12


UC San Diego's Last Gift study aims to identify where HIV hides in the body of individuals who are terminally ill from a disease other than HIV, like cancer, ALS, or heart disease. Karine Dubé, DrPH, MPhil, Sarah Gianella Weibel, MD, Andy Kaytes,and Susanna Concha-Garcia discuss the ethical implications of the study, the experiences of the participants, the study components, and what can be learned. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37319]

AIDS/HIV: Past, Present, and Future (Audio)
Last Gift: Ethical Considerations for HIV Cure Research at the End of Life - Exploring Ethics

AIDS/HIV: Past, Present, and Future (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 41:12


UC San Diego's Last Gift study aims to identify where HIV hides in the body of individuals who are terminally ill from a disease other than HIV, like cancer, ALS, or heart disease. Karine Dubé, DrPH, MPhil, Sarah Gianella Weibel, MD, Andy Kaytes, and Susanna Concha-Garcia discuss the ethical implications of the study, the experiences of the participants, the study components, and what can be learned. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37319]

The Tim Ferriss Show
#598: Primatologist Isabel Behncke — What We Can Learn from Bonobos and Chimpanzees, Lessons from Sex and Play, Walking 3,000 Kilometers Through The Heart of Darkness, The Ape and The Sushi Master, and More

The Tim Ferriss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 134:50 Very Popular


Primatologist Isabel Behncke — What We Can Learn from Bonobos and Chimpanzees, Lessons from Sex and Play, Walking 3,000 Kilometers Through The Heart of Darkness, The Ape and The Sushi Master, and More | Brought to you by LMNT electrolyte supplement, Athletic Greens all-in-one nutritional supplement, and Headspace easy-to-use app with guided meditations. More on all three below.Isabel Behncke (@IsabelBehncke) is a field primatologist and applied evolutionary ethologist who studies social behavior in animals (including humans) to understand our urgent challenges with each other and the planet.Isabel grew up at the foothills of the Andes mountains in Chile, where she developed a life-long love for nature and wildness as well as culture and the arts. An explorer-scientist, she is the first South American to follow great apes in the wild in Africa. She walked more than 3,000 km (~1864 miles) in the jungles of Congo for her field research observing the social lives of wild bonobo apes, who, together with chimpanzees, are our closest living relatives. Isabel documented how bonobos play freely in nature and has extended this research to study how human apes play — at Burning Man, other festivals, and in everyday life. Isabel has observed how play is at the root of creativity, social bonding, and healthy development, findings that have relevance in education, innovation, complex risk assessments, and freedom.Isabel holds a BSc in Zoology and an MSc in Nature Conservation, both from University College London, an MPhil in Human Evolution from Cambridge University, and a PhD in Evolutionary Anthropology from Oxford University. She has won several distinctions for her public communication and knowledge integration, which ranges in formats from TED, WIRED, the UN, BBC, and Nat Geo, to rural schools in Patagonia and traveling buses of schoolchildren in Congo. She is a senior fellow of the Gruter Institute, a TED fellow, and currently advises the Chilean government, working on long-term strategies in science, technology, innovation, and knowledge for Chile's President. She can be found in Chile and New York City.Please enjoy!This episode is brought to you by LMNT! What is LMNT? It's a delicious, sugar-free electrolyte drink mix. I've stocked up on boxes and boxes of this and usually use it 1–2 times per day. LMNT is formulated to help anyone wi