Podcasts about poe

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19th-century American author, poet, editor and literary critic

  • 1,707PODCASTS
  • 3,381EPISODES
  • 55mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 6, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about poe

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Latest podcast episodes about poe

Hate Read Podcast
The Demon's in the Details by Meghan Maslow

Hate Read Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 72:37


Welcome back, Literary Slummers, to another episode of Shelf Aware! This week, we're continuing our unit on M/M Paranormal Romance with the book The Demon's in the Details. We've got a raven shifter named Poe who lives in Baltimore (get it?!), and a demon named Tommy who owns a salon called Rumpled Still: Skin, Hair, and Scalp (can you guess what his REAL name is?!) who fall in love and fight a slumlord basilisk. Join us next week for another Morph Monday! Recommended Reading: Better Off Red by Rebekah Witherspoon Maybe play Digimon Cyber Sleuth? Twitter: @shelfawarecast, @amdeebee, @emnoteliza Instagram: @shelfawarecast Email: shelfawarecast @ gmail

WhoDatJedi Podcast
Rey, Finn and Poe: Can we (really) expect them to make a return?

WhoDatJedi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 67:30


On this, the 97th episode of the WhoDatJedi podcast, your hosts -- Aaron Svoboda (@Aaron_Svoboda), Alfredo Narvaez (@NOLA_Fredo) and David Gladow (@davegladow) -- take a closer look at all the latest in Star Wars news, including some juicy nuggets dropped by Kathleen Kennedy. The biggest one of all might have been her suggestion that Lucasfilm is thinking about the return of sequel trilogy characters Rey, Finn and Poe. Can fans expect that to actually happen? Is Kennedy just being savvy? Is it both? Beyond those questions, the crew addresses the latest casting news for "Ahsoka," talks a little about repurposing old material for new properties and once again offers a critical eye toward "Star Wars prison," aka Galactic Starcruiser. Listen on Podbean, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Pandora, Tune In + Alexa, Amazon Music/Audible, iHeartRadio, and follow us on Twitter & Facebook!  If you like what you hear, be sure to click that follow button and leave us a positive review!  Read more of Fredo's musings here. Read more of Dave's musings here. Song credit: Far, Far Away (Star Wars Jazz), by the Swamp Donkeys Visit their website for more of their music! ---  Related: Kennedy on Sequel characters' return Related: 'Rangers' storylines to be folded into other shows Related: Natasha Liu Bordizzo to play Sabine

The HorrorBabble Podcast
”The Black Cat” by Edgar Allan Poe

The HorrorBabble Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 25:52


"The Black Cat" is a short story by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. It was first published in the August 19, 1843, edition of The Saturday Evening Post. It is a study of the psychology of guilt, often paired in analysis with Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart".

Northview Church Audio Podcast
Bumping Into Jesus: Week 5 | Bumping into Jesus

Northview Church Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


Star Wars Lads
Sabine Casting, Rangers of the New Republic Canceled, Rey, Finn, & Poe Returning!

Star Wars Lads

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 29:10


In Episode 54 of Star Wars Lads, Liam and Sanak discuss the latest in Star Wars news: Natasha Liu Bordizzo has been cast as Sabine Wren in the Ahsoka Disney+ Series, Rey, Finn, Poe, & Kylo Ren might be returning for more Star Wars projects according to Kathleen Kennedy, Rangers of the New Republic is canceled and will be absorbed into future episodes of The Mandalorian, The Book of Boba Fett's Empire Magazine Article, and Battlefront 3 currently not in development!

Baffling Combustions
61. Proverbs of Hell IX ("I contain multitudes")

Baffling Combustions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 62:32


In this session we swerve from the text of William Blake's PROVERBS OF HELL to what news we may find of its shape in Bob Dylan's "I Contain Multitudes," the title and refrain of which is lifted from a line in Walt Whitman's "Song of Myself." We touch on these two guys, as well as Anne Frank, Emily Dickinson, Mr. Poe and Dr. Indiana Jones, as we seek to fathom as always the heart of the heart of the eternal dilemma.

Ik Ken Iemand Die
Mag een kind rouwen om de punt van een potlood? - ONENIGHEID!

Ik Ken Iemand Die

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 51:31


Poe, waar moeten we beginnen? De vonken vlogen ervanaf. Eén voor één werden we de maat genomen door een ander, al dan niet terecht. Er vlogen een hoop boomerangen rond in ieder geval. Conclusie: Alex heeft geen recht meer om dit te doen voorlopig!Dan de opsomming van de kernpunten: Slimme Sint-strategieën (chapeau Hanneke), Kees (kind) slaat Nynke veel te hard, Anne is door een kind letterlijk voor lul gezet, Alex is een vogelsplainer. ALS ANNE EEN TOVA ZIET, DAN ZIET HIJ EEN TOVA!Oh ja, eindelijk leidt Annes geflirt met de fluisterende Amerikaanse therapeute tot ergernis bij Hanneke. Dat duurde nog lang :)Dank aan Auto.nl voor de Gezinswagen van de Show. En veel dank aan al onze Vrienden van de Show! Zie www.vriendvandeshow.nl/ikkeniemanddie. Volgende week zijn we er weer!Sponsor: Onze vrinden van Kinderboeken.nl!Post? Stuur het naar ik@dagennacht.nl.XOXO Team IKIDZie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Atoz: A Speculative Fiction Book Club Podcast
Ep. 32: Doomsday Book by Connie Willis

Atoz: A Speculative Fiction Book Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 44:00


Time travel for Christmas. Just try not to get the plague. Join the conversation on the Atoz forum. Support the network and gain access to over fifty bonus episodes by become a patron on Patreon. Want more science fiction in your life? Check out The Gene Wolfe Literary Podcast. Love Neil Gaiman? Join us on Hanging Out With the Dream King: A Neil Gaiman Podcast. Lovecraft? Poe? Check out Elder Sign: A Weird Fiction Podcast. Trekker? Join us on Lower Decks: A Star Trek Podcast. Want to know more about the Middle Ages? Subscribe to Agnus: The Late Antique, Medieval, and Byzantine Podcast. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

All Over The Place
Episode 107: Grateful for Forks

All Over The Place

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 56:00


Our Brimley Black Wednesday special has only 3 swear words. One for Edgar ALLAN & Poe. Find out how Jim ends up back in high school on his birthday & see if Pat knows what time it is. Stay Scorpio persistent to keep up with this cornucopia of Thanksgiving data. Gobble gobble y'all.

How I Got My Wife To Read Comics - SFPPN
How I Got My Wife to Read Comics #580

How I Got My Wife To Read Comics - SFPPN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 14:11


The League goes Universal, It's Blue and Gold Rashomon, Roddy McDowall--supervillain, this is Mandroid Ron reporting, Unteens Unite, taking a weird angle on Poe, and industry news.

One on One with Kristian Harloff
REWATCH: Star Wars Episode IX The Rise of Skywalker

One on One with Kristian Harloff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 63:29


Star Wars The Rise of Skywalker was released in Dec of 2019 and was the last film in the new trilogy since Disney bought Lucasfilm in 2012. Rey, Poe, Finn and Kylo Ren all return and JJ Abrams directs. The movie is one of the lowest rated Star Wars films on Rotten Tomatoes. Does it hold up? What do the crew of Sith Council think? Kristian, Steph and Mike discuss. Follow the crew on Twitter! Kristian Harloff https://bit.ly/31PePMD Steph Sabraw https://bit.ly/3m0ud0z Mike Kalinowski https://bit.ly/39wu8N5 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Southern Haunts
Bedtime Haunting: The Oval Portrait

Southern Haunts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 12:02


Written in 1845, Edgar Allan Poe's The Oval Portrait is often compared to The Picture of Dorian Gray because that is the only other old timey story folks can think of. Honestly, I can't name another one. But the Oval Portrait clings to the creepy aesthetic that readers of the Victorian author have come to love and one that surrounds a pretty spooky quote from Poe himself. In his book  “Philosophy of Composition,” Poe talks about how “poetry as art is the rhythmical creation of beauty, and that the most poetical topic in the world is the death of a beautiful woman” So, cuddle up, dim the lights, and let me read to you. --Listen to my guest episode on The Silver Linings Playlist.--Want ad free episodes? Listen HEREShop Southern Haunts Merch HERE--IG: @SouthernhauntpodcastFB: Southern Haunts PodcastTwitter: @s_hauntspodcast--Subscribe to Oh! That's A Scary Movie--Music in this episode:https://uppbeat.io/t/kisnou/name-of-the-nighthttps://uppbeat.io/t/ak/midnight-stroll License code: WNT8HKI1FBYUZJMGhttps://uppbeat.io/t/danijel-zambo/friendly-ghost License code: HXQWQMBPM7FB232F"The Haunting Of Lake" originally composed and produced by "VivekSupport the show (http://www.patreon.com/southernhauntspodcast)

Literaticast
51: The Art of Graphic Novel Adaptation, with guest Gareth Hinds

Literaticast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 31:11


My guest this month is graphic novelist Gareth Hinds. He's famous for doing amazing Graphic Novel reinterpretations of classics like the Odyssey, the Iliad, Shakespeare, Poe and more... and we'll talk about how he chooses projects, and how he adapts them for modern readers and a graphic format, tips for aspiring graphic novelists, and so much more. We'll also get into his NEWEST project -- a modern classic -- GRACELING, THE GRAPHIC NOVEL, adapted from the YA fantasy by Kristin Cashore, which is on shelves now. For links to all the books we chatted about, go to the show notes: https://www.jenniferlaughran.com/literaticast

Scoundrels and Spaceports
Episode 06: It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Life Day

Scoundrels and Spaceports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 68:29


Welcome to Scoundrels and Spaceports, a corner of the galaxy for your favorite hives of scum and villainy. In Episode 06, Amanda and Han reminisce over the unforgettable original Holiday Special and Lego Star Wars: The Holiday Special. The duo break down everything from Chef Gormaanda's stir-whip-whip-whip-stir concoctions, Bea Arthur's perfect role, awkward caricature animation, Rey's adventures across space and time, Poe as the official Star Wars holiday representative, and more. So grab a plate of porg chops and wroshyrr tree cake to kick off celebrating the most wonderful time of the year, across the galaxy! Follow Scoundrels and Spaceports on social media at @s_spodcast on Twitter and @scoundrelsnspaceports on Instagram. Our theme music is provided by Closed on Sunday. Be sure to follow and support on Instagram: @closedonsundayy. Find more music by Closed on Sunday on Spotify, Apple Music, and more. Our logo was designed by @tatimilkyway, who you can follow on Twitter.

Write The Book
Jonah Lehrer - 11/15/21

Write The Book

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 48:09


Author and Journalist Jonah Lehrer, whose new book is Mystery: A Seduction, A Strategy, A Solution (Avid Reader Press). This week's Write the Book Prompt was suggested by my guest, Jonah Lehrer: Read a detective story and look for the false clues planted in the first five pages, or in Act I, depending on the work. In a Poe story or a Conan Doyle, there are so many missed leads, and you forget about them once you know the ending. But to create the surprise, a lot of work needs to be done. There are many mechanics involved in setting up that surprising twist. And studying the stories or novels of others can help us learn about those mechanics. Good luck with your work in the coming week, and tune in next week for another prompt or suggestion. Music Credit: Aaron Shapiro 706

Northview Church Audio Podcast
Bumping Into Jesus: Week 3 | What In The World

Northview Church Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021


Best of the Web: the MetaFilter Podcast
178: Leisure Suit Larry's, Uh, Pixels

Best of the Web: the MetaFilter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021


We got a rootin' tootin' podcast here. Darn tootin'. Can you both rootin'- and darn'- something that's tootin' in the same paragraph like this? I don't know. I really don't know. I might be going to podcast jail. Before that happens, though, here's me and jessamyn chattering about MetaFilter, the nature of daylight, representation vs. allusion in crappy old Sierra erotic comedy adventures, MetaFilter, the concept of (for some reason) No Nut November, "Meta", and who knows what else because we're both still getting used to the time change. It runs exactly, precisely, to the second 90 minutes.Helpful LinksPodcast FeedSubscribe with iTunesDirect mp3 downloadMisc - Jessamyn is a bee - I got a tattoo and literally everyone guessed right - remember, remember, the No Nut November, the Poe's Law'd Sienfeldian plot - Jess recently enjoyed reading Finna - I recently enjoyed rereading Dune, I don't have a link or anything, I just did is all - also Sierpinski Triangles - okay, on review I totally recognize that yodel breakdown in Focus' Hocus Pocus Jobs - Property project management and maintenance by Barbara Spitzer - Drop off a document at the PA Secretary of State in Harrisburg by Sheydem-tants Projects - The Worst House On The Internet by missjenny (MeFi Post) - Are You a Clickbait Genius? by malevolent - Saturday Afternoon Ikea Trip Simulator by dng (MeFi Post) - Mini-Project: Convert exported Metafilter comments to HTML, JSON, or MBOX by Kadin2048 - Mystic Paths - A new word board game! by meinvt MetaFilter - anyone who enjoys wild birds is a birder! birding is for everyone! by jessamyn - Aspirational rhetorical loquaciousness by simmering octagon - The United States Postal Service: "Non oficialis motto!" by not_on_display - Uh oh by Cookiebastard - Fractal vise by clawsoon - Welp, there goes my evening ... by dancestoblue - Off, dud, over, under, upon, hot, ono, oof, hi, lo, etc. by tss Ask MetaFilter - help me find more podcasts by jessamyn - HBTY HBTY HBD* HBTY by QuakerMel - How fast/reliable is TSA's lost and found? by LSK - What's a good name for an office can crusher? by box - Programming/computer science/IT terms that refer to obsolete tech? by potrzebie - Burying ethernet cable (or wireless??) by wenestvedt - I want to learn art by Brittanie - Donated to take a campaign over its goal. Goal changed afterwards. wtf? by scruss - Have Jazz Hands, Will Jazzercize by meese MetaTalk - MeFi Mall 2021 by hippybear - MetaFilter Gift Swap 2021 Signups by curious nu - MeFi Holiday Card Exchange by needlegrrl - NaNoWriMo 2021 by womb of things to be and tomb of things that were - Roll, Truck, Roll by lauranesson

DIY MFA Radio
383: The Mashup as a Model: Lessons for Your Writing Career from Edgar Allan Poe - Interview with Catherine Baab-Muguira

DIY MFA Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 52:12


Today, I have the pleasure of interviewing Catherine Baab-Muguira. Catherine is a writer and journalist who has contributed to many media outlets, including Slate, Quartz, CNBC and NBC News. She is a frequent podcast and radio guest, with appearances on NPR and Lifehacker's Upgrade. Catherine currently lives in Richmond, Virginia with her husband and baby son. Today we'll be discussing her first book, Poe for Your Problems: Uncommon Advice from History's Least Likely Self-Help Guru, which came out this past September.   In this episode Catherine Baab-Muguira and I discuss: How Edgar Allan Poe unexpectedly inspired her to write a book about mental health. Why she keeps her day job and how it helps her avoid literary snobbery. The value of learning to write good copy and the art of marketing your book. Plus, her #1 tip for writers. For more info and show notes: diymfa.com/383

Atoz: A Speculative Fiction Book Club Podcast
Ep. 31: Unquenchable Fire by Rachel Pollack

Atoz: A Speculative Fiction Book Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 39:48


Magical realism in upstate New York. Thanks to the listener who commissioned this bonus series! Join the conversation on the Atoz forum. Support the network and gain access to over fifty bonus episodes by becoming a patron on Patreon. Want more science fiction in your life? Check out The Gene Wolfe Literary Podcast. Love Neil Gaiman? Join us on Hanging Out With the Dream King: A Neil Gaiman Podcast. Lovecraft? Poe? Check out Elder Sign: A Weird Fiction Podcast. Trekker? Join us on Lower Decks: A Star Trek Podcast. Want to know more about the Middle Ages? Subscribe to Agnus: The Late Antique, Medieval, and Byzantine Podcast. Follow Valerie's Plants in Star Trek page on Instagram. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Classic Ghost Stories
S02E56 The Beast of Blanchland by Rowan Bowman

Classic Ghost Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 80:50


A man driving home on a winter's night thinks he sees a big cat stalking the moor. He crashes his car and then the weirdness really begins. An original story by Northumberland author Rowan Bowman. #audiobook #horror #northumberland #blanchland Further notes sent me by Rowan after our discussion: Influences in my writing:Raymond Chandler. He writes as a film director, intent on the reader seeing the view clearly in front of them. Daphne du Maurier. Partly because of her sense of place, but also because of the subtlety of the ghosts in some of her stories, Rebecca in particular, the writing is haunted by the melancholy of the nameless narrator, and the actual haunting, the influence that Rebecca has from beyond the grave, is superbly handled. Mandalay was based on du Maurier's own house. I often set books in or around houses I have known intimately. Shirley Jackson. The best writer of mad protagonists and unreliable witnesses in my opinion. Favourite authorsThe first proper ghost story I ever read was A Christmas Carol, I think that's where a lot of people start. As a teenager I suffered from terrible nightmares and took solace in Poe and Lovecraft and progressed to Ray Bradbury (Something Wicked This Way Comes still gives me the shudders). Then I went on to James Herbert, Shirley Jackson and lots of crime stories and thrillers, anything that confirmed it's normal to be scared and okay not to be okay.  Life sorted itself out and I was busy raising my children. The nightmares eased and I read anything I could reach while doing something else. Danielewski's The House of Leaves was the first book in years to actually scare me. I still enjoy Robert Harris thrillers and the Cormoran Strike novels, but I'm back in this stage of my life to seeking out the weird and scary. Dan Simmons is always a good read, I recommend Drood. The atmosphere is intense and like most of his stories the landscapes suck you in. I enjoyed Michelle Paver's Thin Air, but prefer Dark Matter as a supernatural horror, again the landscape is one of the characters, the real horror in Thin Air comes from mundane self-interested cruelty which rather overshadows the supernatural element for me. The landscape in The Loney is brilliantly evoked. There have been several novels since set around the area, but none capture it in the same way. My favourite China Meiville novel is The City and The City, its fantastical landscape is so well drawn that it seems more real than room you are sitting in. The best book I've read since the start of Lockdown has been Piranesi. I loved Johnathon Strange and Mr Norrell; this is very different, but equally good. The reader understands what is going on just before it is revealed, set in a fantasy world that is so well drawn that it's utterly convincing.  If you've ever been asked, 'What is wrong with you?' when admitting to a love of the macabre or frightening, then I recommend Noel Carroll's accessible The Philosophy of Horror (1990) and Lovecraft's collection of essays Supernatural Horror in Literature.  Hope this may be of some interest. Thank you for reading The Beast of Blanchland.  All the best, Rowan Support this podcast

One on One with Kristian Harloff
REWATCH: Star Wars Episode VIII The Last Jedi

One on One with Kristian Harloff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 82:46


Star Wars The Last Jedi was released in Dec of 2017 and was the sequel to The Force Awakens. Rey, Poe, Finn and Kylo Ren all return as well as Luke Skywalker. It is easily the most controversial movie in the Star Wars franchise. Where do you stand? Like it? Love it? Hate it? Mark Reilly joins Steph Sabraw and Kristian Harloff to discuss this Rian Johnson Star Wars film. Join the Sith Council crew as we discuss how we felt the film holds up today and if it can connect to the upcoming TV series on Disney +. We also discuss the Boba Fett series trailer. Follow the crew on Twitter! Kristian Harloff https://bit.ly/31PePMD Steph Sabraw https://bit.ly/3m0ud0z Mike Kalinowski https://bit.ly/39wu8N5 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Palaver: Unraveling Weird Lit
Episode 68: Poe Shit

Palaver: Unraveling Weird Lit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 49:05


We are taking it back to the 1840's with the one and only Edgar Allan Poe! Jess decided to break from his poems and instead tackle some dark and twisted short stories. We lovingly titled this episode “Poe Shit” because we are throwing down with a major horror baddie that has inspired many of our favorite authors! So with love, let's get weird.Be warned, there will be SPOILERS ahead in this episode. If you would like a spoiler free experience, check out some Poe Shit of your own….seriously any book store should have something of his. Don't forget to come back and join our weird book club podcast once you've finished the stories!Check out our social media and send us some feedback! We can't wait to hear from you constant listeners!Twitter: @palaverweirdlitInstagram: @palaverpodcastGmail: palaverweirdlit@gmail.comWe are looking for MORE listener suggestions to expand our bookshelves and use in upcoming episodes! If you are interested in sharing a book you love with us or our weird book club, share your listener suggestions through our gmail (palaverweirdlit@gmail.com). Share with us the title of your book, a spoiler free summary of the book/series, and why you love the book. If you would not like your name shared with your suggestion please let us know in the email. We look forward to hearing from you!Intro & Outro MusicWaltz Of The Skeleton Keys by WombatNoisesAudio | https://soundcloud.com/user-734462061Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.comCreative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_USI Saw A Ghost Last Night... by Leonell Cassio | https://soundcloud.com/leonellcassioMusic promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.comCreative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unportedhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en_US

Humble Hauntings
Barnaby Bonus: The Masque of the Red Death

Humble Hauntings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 22:34


MJ and the gang celebrate Halloween with a classic Poe tale. Promo by Octoberpod FX by free sound.org

Lurk
2021 Halloween Bonus Edgar Allan Poe's The Telltale Heart

Lurk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 14:57


Listen to Jamie read Poe's chilling story The Telltale HeartHappy Halloween Lurkers!To see photos we discussed in this episode, please follow us on our Social Media platforms:Lurk on FacebookLurk on TwitterLurk on InstagramWe have a new Facebook Group join in the discussion! Lurk Podcast Facebook GroupWe are also now found on YouTube- Lurk on YouTubeWe've got Merch!Get Lurk MerchResourcesEdgar Allan Poe National Historic Site- PhiladelphiaEdgar Allan Poe House and Museum BaltimoreThe Poe Museum- RichmondWestminster Hall and Burying Ground Baltimore

Northview Church Audio Podcast
Bumping Into Jesus: Week 1 | Stuck in Life – The Pool of Bethesda

Northview Church Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021


Have you ever felt stuck in life? Then this message is for you! Pastor CJ shares what scripture says on becoming unstuck and moving towards all God has in store for us. Speaker: CJ Johnson

The Good News Podcast
Edgar Allen Poe's The Tell-Tale Heart, Repeat

The Good News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 13:20


In honor of the spooooOOOOkiest time of year, from the archives, a rendition of Poe's Tell-Tale Heart. Happy Halloween!

Truth Be Told
How To Communicate with the Other Side and Loved One's who are Passed On!!

Truth Be Told

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 45:53


Vince Wilson joins the show at the peak of the Halloween season to talk about seances and other paranormal communication. ​Vince is one of leading authorities on spirit communication. He is also a Master Hypnotist, skilled mentalist and illusionist with over two decades of experience and a lifetime of interest in magic, myth and history. Additionally, he is the owner and manager of Poe's Magic Theatre in Baltimore Maryland.https://linktr.ee/vincewilsonmagiPlease Subscribe and Share This Show! Show your support for Truth Be Told by shopping our website for official merchandise! www.truthbetoldworldwide.com

One on One with Kristian Harloff
REWATCH: Star Wars Episode VII The Force Awakens

One on One with Kristian Harloff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 68:45


Star Wars The Force Awakens was the highly anticipated episode in the franchise and was released in 2015. Rey, Poe, Finn and Kylo Ren all made their debuts. JJ Abrams directed the film and it . How will this film tie into the upcoming series? Join the Sith Council crew as we discuss how we felt the film holds up today. Leave Comment! Follow the crew on Twitter! Kristian Harloff https://bit.ly/31PePMD Steph Sabraw https://bit.ly/3m0ud0z Mike Kalinowski https://bit.ly/39wu8N5 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jollyville Radio
Bonus Episode - The Raven

Jollyville Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 9:08


Happy Halloween! Michael Crosa reads The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe. This recording originally appeared in an episode of Poe works published October 10, 2021 by Lunatics Radio Hour podcast. Give them a follow!

Fandom Podcast Network
What A Piece of Junk! (A FPNet Star Wars Podcast) Episode 70: Star Wars LEGO Terrifying Tales

Fandom Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 69:32


What A Piece of Junk! (A FPNet Star Wars Podcast) Episode 70: Star Wars LEGO Terrifying Tales   What A Piece of Junk is THE podcast on the Fandom Podcast Network dedicated to covering everything Star Wars. From the original Star Wars trilogy movies, to the prequels, to Legends canon, Disney's acquisition of Star Wars and its products, and all the fan favorite content out there, we have you covered. So please make sure to stop on over at your local cantina, grab a drink, cozy on up to your favorite alien (or droid), and get ready to talk Star Wars!   Something wicked-ly funny this way comes as the gang takes a look at the first official Star Wars Halloween mashup in the Disney+ special - Star Wars LEGO Terrifying Tales! Poe Dameron and BB8 Find themselves stranded on Mustafar at the site of Darth Vader's Castle. And if THAT wasn't terrifying enough for you, it's been taken over by Grabala the Hutt and turned into...a hotel? The hijinks and Halloween scares ensue as Poe and BB8 deal with some crazy Sith Shenanigans by Darth Vader's former Major Domo Vanee! Was it worth the watch? Join our discussion and find out. Here is how you can get a hold of us on the Fandom Podcast Network and the What A Piece Of Junk Star Wars Podcast: - fpnet.podbean.com - The FPNet is on Podbean app - Fandom Podcast Network is on: Apple Podcasts / Stitcher / Podbean / Google Play / Spotify / iHeartRadio - Facebook: Fandom Podcast Network: https://www.facebook.com/Fandompodcastnetwork/ - What A Piece Of Junk a Star Wars Podcast Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/WhatAPieceOfJunk/ - Email: whatapieceofjunkpod@gmail.com - Twitter: @WhatWars - Instagram: FandomPodcastNetwork  - Scott Baughman on Twitter: @ScotticusMax / Instagram: @darik_grey - Nathan Miracle on Twitter: @gooeychewie - Derrick Marsh on Twitter: @hoodiedm83 GEEKY POCKET TEES: https://geekypockettees.com/ There are two ways you can support the Fandom Podcast Network and the What A Piece Of Junk Star Wars Podcast. Fandom Podcast Network Tee Public Store: Please also visit our TeePublic store where you can help support the Fandom Podcast Network while wearing your favorite show logos with pride! Tee Public Store: https://www.teepublic.com/user/fandompodcastnetwork Apple Podcasts / iTunes Reviews:  Please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts /  iTunes so new fans can find us easier. We LOVE 5 star reviews of course, but we love feedback in general! Please listen to our other awesome podcasts on the Fandom Podcast Network: Master Feed: https://fpnet.podbean.com/

Atoz: A Speculative Fiction Book Club Podcast
Ep. 30: The Hour of the Dragon by Robert E. Howard

Atoz: A Speculative Fiction Book Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 46:30


CROM!!!! It's Robert E. Howard's only Conan novel! Join the conversation on the Atoz forum. Support the network and gain access to over fifty bonus episodes by become a patron on Patreon. Want more science fiction in your life? Check out The Gene Wolfe Literary Podcast. Love Neil Gaiman? Join us on Hanging Out With the Dream King: A Neil Gaiman Podcast. Lovecraft? Poe? Check out Elder Sign: A Weird Fiction Podcast. Trekker? Join us on Lower Decks: A Star Trek Podcast. Want to know more about the Middle Ages? Subscribe to Agnus: The Late Antique, Medieval, and Byzantine Podcast. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Imaginary Worlds
Stage Fright

Imaginary Worlds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 29:45


Many elements of modern horror movies and TV shows came from an unlikely source, a theater in Paris called The Grand Guignol. Beginning in the late 19th century, The Grand Guignol was inventing staples of the horror genre as they discovered how to scare audiences, and why people want to be scared. I talk with University of East Anglia professor and author Richard Hand and Wagner College professor Felicia Ruff about how we can trace the lineage of Psycho, American Horror Story and Sweeney Todd back to The Grand Guignol. Plus, Alex Zavistovich of the Molotov Theatre Group describes what it's like to recreate Grand Guignol plays for a modern American audience. Alex also founded Poe Theatre on The Air which produces Edgar Allen Poe audio dramas like, “The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether,” which is adapted from a short story by Poe that The Grand Guignol originally staged in 1908. This episode is sponsored by Realm and BetterHelp. Our ad partner is Multitude. If you're interested in advertising on Imaginary Worlds, you can contact them here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep
Ligeia | Edgar Allan Poe

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 45:15


Tonight, for the final episode of our third annual Classic Horror Sleep Story Series this October, we will read the Edgar Allan Poe tale “Ligeia”.The story follows an unnamed narrator and his wife Ligeia, a beautiful and intelligent raven-haired woman. She falls ill and dies- but not for long. ​​It may or may not have all been a hallucination of the narrator, and the story may or may not have been a satire by Poe of the Gothic genre itself. — read by 'N' — See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Well Told Tale
The Pit and the Pendulum

The Well Told Tale

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 42:39


We return, this Halloween week, to the twisted imagination of one of our favourite writers here at The Well Told Tale, Edgar Allan Poe.  Unlike many of his other gothic Tales, his focus in this short story is not on the fantastic, or the phantasmagorical, but the terrifying reality with which the protagonist is presented.  Published at the end of 1842, 'The Pit and the Pendulum' is a re-imagining of the horrors that faced those persecuted by the Spanish Inquisition.  What it lacks in historical fact, it makes up for in spine-tingling terror...If you'd like to support The Well Told Tale, please visit us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thewelltoldtaleBooks - (buying anything on Amazon through this link helps support the podcast):The Pit and the Pendulum - https://amzn.to/3jFwgIxEdgar Allan Poe: The Ultimate Collection - https://amzn.to/3baXKASThe Complete Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe - https://amzn.to/3jXvjvpFilmsThe Pit and the Pendulum (1961) - https://amzn.to/3nAWZaqThe Pit and the Pendulum (1991) - https://amzn.to/3bcQ15wI would like to thank my patrons: Toni A, Joshua Clark, Maura Lee, Jane, John Bowles, Glen Thrasher, Ruairi, Chris and Britt.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/thewelltoldtale)

LINUX Unplugged
429: Starlink's Linux Secrets

LINUX Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 59:54


LitReading - Classic Short Stories
The Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe

LitReading - Classic Short Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 17:14


While Halloween is the season for scary stories, their popularity is timeless. That is why this dark tale of revenge still send chills down listeners spines after almost two centuries.The Cask of Amontillado was first published in the November 1946 issue “Godey's Lady's Book” which demonstrates the universal fascination with scary stories. Poe understood humanity's greatest fears and exploited them masterfully, making him the all-time master of the horror genre.

Something Scary
Scared to Death

Something Scary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 35:48


If you're listening, then you are one of those people who loves a good scare. And that means Halloween is your tie of year. It's ours, too. We get a thrill from losing our breath as our blood pumps extra fast through our veins. We delight in stories of witchcraft, fairies, and other mythical folklore. Knowing, praying deep down that the tales we hear may be real. But the reality is when we're faced with these things in real life, that good scare, may scare us to death. First, fairytale wishes haunt your days Followed by Dante's hellfire Then, it's the little things that can kill you Finally in our featured story, no matter where you hide, horror will find you Tap into the magic of your team with monday.com Work OS, sign up for your free two-week trial at monday.com today. Poe is out now. Listen exclusively on Stitcher Premium. For a FREE month, go to stitcherpremium.com/poe and use the code POE. Urban Legends with The Ghost Brothers is out now. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts Start building toward a better year and get $100 off your first month at talkspace.com with code SOMETHINGSCARY Start streaming your next obsession. Try Sundance Now for free for 30 days at sundancenow.com with code SCARY Worry less and feel happier. Sign up for your trial at noom.com/SCARY Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

NOCTURNAL TRANSMISSIONS : short horror story podcast
NOCTRANS Ep 115 - The Black Cat [HALLOWEEN EPISODE]

NOCTURNAL TRANSMISSIONS : short horror story podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 41:28


It's HALLOWEEN and to mark the occasion, we're going back to the main man of macabre manuscription. That sinister scribe, that poet of the perverse, that most eldritch of Edgars - Edgar Allan Poe.   And what Poe story could possibly be better suited to All Hallow's eve than ‘The Black Cat'?     (Thanks go out to our dear friend 'Nellie' who was kind enough to pose for our artwork this episode)   ————   NOCTURNAL TRANSMISSIONS is a fortnightly podcast featuring inspired performances of short horror stories, both old and new, by voice artist Kristin Holland.   https://www.nocturnaltransmissions.com.au   You can support us (and access lots of exclusive content) by becoming a patron at Patreon.com: https://www.patreon.com/nocturnaltransmissions  

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 110: “The Masque of the Red Death” by Edgar Allan Poe

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 97:14


On this special Halloween episode of The Literary Life, Angelina (Harriet Vane), Cindy (Professor MacGonagall), and Thomas (Lord Peter Wimsey), talk about Edgar Allan Poe's tale, “The Masque of the Red Death.” If you are a Patron, you can watch this episode and see our hosts in their costumes as they discuss the story! Angelina begins the chat with a little background on Edgar Allan Poe and his thoughts on the imagination and why he wrote the way he did, as well as connections with Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Thomas points out the connection between this story and Boccaccio's Decameron. Highlights of the discussion include Poe's use of medieval motifs, the imagery and symbolism in Poe's writing, the modern person's avoidance of considering death, and Poe's idea of life as a play within a play. Get in on the Western Films and Fiction webinar on November 22nd with Thomas and James Banks! Register here to join in! Next week we will continue our series on Mansfield Park. To view the schedule for the episodes in the series, see our Upcoming Events page. Also, if you want to join our members-only forum off Facebook, check out our Patreon page to learn more! Commonplace Quotes: I am more concerned by what “the Bomb” is doing already. One meets young people who make the threat of it a reason for poisoning every pleasure and evading every duty in the present. Didn't they know that, bomb or no bomb, all men die, many in horrible ways? There is no good moping and sulking about it. C. S. Lewis There are certain evil men who would be less dangerous if there were not some scrap of virtue in them. La Rochefoucauld This handmaiden (poesy) is not forbidden to moralize in her own fashion. She is not forbidden to depict but to reason and preach of virtue. Edgar Allan Poe, from his review of Longfellow's Ballads Sonnet – To Science by Edgar Allan Poe Science! true daughter of Old Time thou art!    Who alterest all things with thy peering eyes. Why preyest thou thus upon the poet's heart,    Vulture, whose wings are dull realities? How should he love thee? or how deem thee wise,    Who wouldst not leave him in his wandering To seek for treasure in the jewelled skies,    Albeit he soared with an undaunted wing? Hast thou not dragged Diana from her car,    And driven the Hamadryad from the wood To seek a shelter in some happier star?    Hast thou not torn the Naiad from her flood, The Elfin from the green grass, and from me The summer dream beneath the tamarind tree? Source: The Complete Poems and Stories of Edgar Allan Poe (1946) Book List: Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe God in the Dock by C. S. Lewis Maxims and Reflections by François de La Rochefoucauld “The Philosophy of Composition” by Edgar Allan Poe The Murders in the Rue Morge by Edgar Allan Poe The Decameron by Giovanni Boccacio Comus by John Milton The Tempest by William Shakespeare The Castle of Utronto by Horace Walpole Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen Oxford Book of English Verse ed. by Arthur Quiller-Couch Hamlet by William Shakespeare Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

Unpleasant Dreams
The Strange Death of Edgar Allan Poe - Unpleasant Dreams 9

Unpleasant Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 16:13


For our Halloween episode, we explore the strange death of the master of the macabre himself, Edgar Allan Poe. --- Cassandra Harold is your host. EM Hilker is our principal writer and researcher with additional writing by Cassandra Harold. Jim Harold is our Executive Producer. Unpleasant Dreams is a production of Jim Harold Media. You can find EM Hilker's original article HERE PODCAST TRANSCRIPT There is much that can be said about Edgar Allan Poe, but in terms of his literary habits, little that needs to be. Much more famous in death than he was in life, he was nevertheless a literary critic of some renown in his own time. His true love, however, was lurid, ghastly fiction. Poe unknowingly fathered the genre of detective fiction, through his tales of C. Auguste Dupin. The most well-known Dupin story was The Murders in the Rue Morgue, which served to set the stage for Sherlock Holmes and his ilk. He is best known now for his gothic fiction, morbid tales filled with crumbling stone castles and candle-lit catacombs, of demonic foes and bitter sweet revenge. He brought us The Raven, Hop-Frog, The Fall of the House of Usher. The creative mind of Poe was deep and dark and mysterious as a night ocean.  … but little is so mysterious as Poe's own death.... FIND THE REMAINDER OF THE TRANSCRIPT HERE SOURCES – FURTHER READING Anon. “Poe's Death Theories.” Poe's Death | Edgar Allan Poe Museum | Richmond, VA, www.poemuseum.org/poes-death. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Birch, Doug. “The Passing of Poe: What Really Happened to the Master of the Macabre in the Days Leading up to His Death Here 145 Years Ago?” Baltimoresun.com, 24 Oct. 2018, www.baltimoresun.com/news/bs-xpm-1994-10-02-1994275208-story.html. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Edgar Allan Poe: A Life from Beginning to End. Hourly History, 2018. Kindle ed. Eschner, Kat. “Who Was the Poe Toaster? We Still Have No Idea.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 19 Jan. 2017, www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/who-was-poe-toaster-we-still-have-no-idea-180961820/. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021  Geiling, Natasha. “The (Still) Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 7 Oct. 2014, www.smithsonianmag.com/history/still-mysterious-death-edgar-allan-poe-180952936. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Kay, Liz F. “Poe Toaster Tribute Is ‘Nevermore'.” Baltimoresun.com, 9 Dec. 2018, www.baltimoresun.com/entertainment/bs-xpm-2010-01-19-bal-poe0119-story.html. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021. Lovejoy, Bess. Rest in Pieces. Simon and Schuster, 2013. Miller, John C. ‘The Exhumations and Reburials of Edgar and Virginia Poe and Mrs. Clemm,” Poe Studies, Dec. 1974, Vol. Vii, No. 27: 46-4, www.eapoe.org/pstudies/ps1970/p1974204.htm. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allen Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 2000. Pruitt, Sarah. “The Riddle of Edgar Allan Poe's Death.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 26 Oct. 2015, www.history.com/news/how-did-edgar-allan-poe-die. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021. Semtner, Christopher P. “13 Haunting Facts About Edgar Allan Poe's Death.” Biography.com, A&E Networks Television, 13 Jan. 2021, www.biography.com/news/edgar-allan-poe-death-facts. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021. Walsh, John Evangelist. Midnight Dreary: The Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe. St. Martin's Griffin, 2000. 

Curiosity Daily
Early Warning Birds, Ancient Fairy Tales, Breaks vs. Sprains

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 13:37


Learn about how birds could help us predict natural disasters; fairy tales' old origins; and how breaks and sprains heal. Kivi Kuaka: how birds could be the key to an early warning system for natural disasters by Briana Brownell  Hakai Magazine. (2021). Can Birds Help Us Avoid Natural Disasters? | Hakai Magazine. Hakai Magazine; Hakai Magazine. https://www.hakaimagazine.com/news/can-birds-help-us-avoid-natural-disasters/  ‌The project - Kivi Kuaka. (2021, May 3). Kivi Kuaka. https://kivikuaka.fr/theproject/?lang=en  Your Favorite Fairy Tales Are Way Older Than You Think by Ashley Hamer  Folk tales are older than you think - Durham University. (2021). Dur.ac.uk. https://www.dur.ac.uk/news/research/?itemno=27041 ‌ Comparative phylogenetic analyses uncover the ancient roots of Indo-European folktales | Royal Society Open Science. (2016). Royal Society Open Science. https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rsos.150645 ‌ No fairy tale: Origins of some famous stories go back thousands of years. (2016, January 20). Science News. https://www.sciencenews.org/article/no-fairy-tale-origins-some-famous-stories-go-back-thousands-years  ‌Keats, J. (2017). The Origins of an Ancient Fairy Tale. Discover Magazine; Discover Magazine. https://www.discovermagazine.com/planet-earth/the-origins-of-an-ancient-fairy-tale  Fairy Tales: September 2021 podcast playlist | Podcast Brunch Club. (2021, August 31). Podcast Brunch Club. https://podcastbrunchclub.com/fairytales/  Why do breaks heal faster than sprains? by Cameron Duke  Clemence Lim. (2021, June 14). Better to break a bone than to tear a ligament or tendon? Ask your Physio. Core Concepts Physiotherapy; Core Concepts Pte Ltd. https://www.coreconcepts.com.sg/article/better-to-break-a-bone/  Healing Expectations for Different Tissue Types - Symmetry Physical Therapy. (2017, July 25). Symmetry Physical Therapy. https://symmetryptaustin.com/healing-expectations-for-different-tissue-types/  J Gordon Betts, Desaix, P., Johnson, E., Johnson, J. E., Korol, O., Kruse, D., Poe, B., Wise, J., Womble, M. D., Young, K. A., & College, O. (2013). Anatomy & physiology. Openstax College, Rice University. Ligament. (2020). Physiopedia. https://www.physio-pedia.com/Ligament  ligament | Definition, Function, Types, & Facts | Britannica. (2021). In Encyclopædia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/science/ligament  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How To Love Lit Podcast
Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 1 - MeetThe Author And The Personal Issues That Created One Of The Best Horror Genre Books Of All Time!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 48:20


Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 1 - MeetThe Author And The Personal Issues That Created One Of The Best Horror Genre Books Of All Time!   `Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  If you are listening to this in real time, we are well into the month of October and in the United States, the month of October means Halloween.  Halloween, as we've discussed before, is not Christy's favorite holiday.  Christy, why is that?    Because it's horrifying.  It's about death.  It's about being scared.  It's about demons.  I don't understand why we're celebrating these things.      And yet, I have seen you dress up as Wilma Flintstone; answer a door bell to a slew of terrifyingly dressed children, hand out candy and enjoy every minute of it.  For those of you who live in other parts of the world- that is what we do here in the United States on October 31st.  My son, Ben, and his wife Rachel live in a part of Memphis which is particularly serious about Halloween, so we, if we can, love to go down there on Halloween and get in on the party.      That's true- and it is wild. They have a neighbor whose yard literally looks like the set of a horror movie with graves, and ghosts and witches and everything.  It spooks me, but on the other hand,  I do love dressing up, and I love seeing all the kids dress up.  That part I'm cool with.    And yet, here we are reading a classic work described as Female Gothic or horror fiction- the work of the celebrated Shirley Jackson, perhaps her most famous novel The Haunting of Hill House.      True.  But I will say that Literary Horror is slightly different than Nightmare on Elm street.  Here's a little story about myself, so I had never watched a horror movie growing up.  My mother didn't allow it in our home, and back then these movies were rated R and the people at movie theaters really policed that sort of thing- so if you were a young child, obviously you could watch a rated R movie, but they didn't make it easy for you.  Well, anyway, when I was a sophomore in high school, this little school that I attended at the time took an overnight trip out of town to hike up this mountain, Pico da Bandeira.   After the hike, somebody pulled out the VHS of this move and we were going to watch it (I'm pretty sure it was a bootleg).  Anyway, I was so excited- most everyone in Brazil loves horror movies and Nightmare on Elmstreet was one of the most populat at the time.       Well, how did that go for you?    Not well, I'm not sure I got through 15 minutes.  I spent the rest of the night under the covers and with my hands in my ears.  I didn't even want to hear it.      HA!!  Well, what I find fascinating about Literary fiction is that it's scary for all kinds of different reasons, not the idea of someone jumping out and stabbing an unsuspecting girl.      Exactly. It's not some obvious caricature of a gore covered mummy walking around with a hatchet that defines it.  It's metaphorical; it's about the cost of seduction; it's about psychological disorders and it's very much about anxiety.      Well, you know I love it when we get psychological.  One thing I found interesting, and this is coming from the perspective that we just did an entire series kind of around women's issue with A Doll's House, but I expected Shirley Jackson's work to be more feminist than it is.  Also, the book has all this mother/daughter stuff in it.  I wasn't expecting that.    Yes- it very much has everything to do with mother/daughter relationships.  That motif starts on the first page and never lets up.  I got tired of counting mother references, and I never found an article that did the math, but there are reference to mothers endlessly- and something that drew my immediate attention- especially the first time Eleanor wakes up terrified in the middle the night yelling for her mother.  But that is just one way of looking at the book- although that's a great place to start and where we will start our discussion today as we attempt to make it all the way through chapter 1 of the book.    But in a more general sense, what Jackson was looking at was this imbalance of power that can exist in relationships between any two people.  She wants to express the seduction and betrayal of the powerless by the powerful. She expresses how one person uses the power in the relationship basically to crush another person.  And unfortunately, she understood this problem so well because it was her entire life story.  She had that experience with her mother, and then she turned around and had it again with her husband, and really she had it within the community at large of the 1950s.      And, of course, being written in the 1950s, many women of her generation quickly related to it.  In fact, in some ways, it reminds me a little bit of that very famous work by Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique, that became so important in American history but wasn't even going to be written for another ten years.    Yeah, I've heard of that book, but honestly, I don't know much about it.  What is the premise and why does it connect, in your mind to Shirley Jackson.    Well, I'll be upfront and tell you I have never read the book, so I'm speaking from second hand knowledge.  But, what I know about it from teaching and studying history is the impact it had on American culture because of the power of the argument Friedan makes in the book.     First of all I would like to point out she's interviewing women that attended Smith College, which is a very well to do private school in Massachusetts.  survey sample was not very scientific     Friedan, at her 15th college reunion, took a survey from her fellow colleagues, about how they felt about their lives.  The basic premise of her book is that society had created a myth that women were most fulfilled if they were taking care of children, staying at home,  supporting their husbands, and staying away from politics and business.  In the book, she claims that entire worldview for women is a myth- at least for many women.  I will never assume to speak for women and I certainly won't speak for all women.  But Friedan will, and she went after the 1950s stereotypical Leave it To Beaver kind of mom that had been the socially accepted lifestyle.  She said many women were absolutely miserable.  She claimed that society's pressure on women for women to succumb to what amounted to in many cases mindnumbing non-stimulating existences was causing depression.  She famously said it was a “problem that has no name”.   And whether you want to challenge her or agree with her, you have to respect that her idea absolutely resonated across America and really the entire world.  Her book was a best seller, selling over 3 million in her lifetime and has been translated into at least a dozen major languages around the world.  Many textbooks credit Friedan for sparking the second wave of feminism that was a key feature of the 60s, the kind of thing we see portrayed in movies like Forrest Gump in the character of Jenny.  This women's rights movement was not interested in voting rights; it was moving forward to the next level.  It was pushing for workplace equality, birth control, abortion rights, breaking the glass ceiling in academia and business.  Where I see it aligning with Jackson, who came much earlier, is that this book, The Haunting of Hill House is a metaphorical expression of everything Friedan wanted to say about women in the 1960s- the house is haunted, so to speak.  The house was crushing women.  It was making women crazy.     Well, you're starting to steal a little bit of my thunder –next week we are going to spend almost the entire episode discussing the house itself, but you are dead on about what Jackson is doing in her work…pardon the pun.  But, I want to say before all the men moan and groan and say, I'm turning this off if this is going to be another one of those feminist books- the book really is much more than a political commentary- in fact that's just one way of relating to it.  The metaphor most definitely can be read exactly as you have connected to the femininist movement of the 1960s, and many many people have read it just that way, but I'm not sure Jackson herself really did, although there's no doubt she was an advocate for many of the things you just enumerated. She, like Ibsen, would say her work is art and not a piece of political propaganda.  She would also likely claim, and I know I'm being presumptuous to speak for her, but I do think she would claim, that would be a very small way to understand her body of work, if that's all you thought it was. She was writing the emotions and then the reader found themselves in them.     I was also interested to see that Jackson, very much like Elizabeth Barrett Browning struggled fighting critics over the years.  Stanley Hyman, her husband and literary critic during their lives, in the preface for a book he published of her yet unpublished work after her death famously wrote, “For all her popularity, Shirley Jackson won surprisingly little recognition.  She received no awards or prizes, grants or fellowships; her name was often omitted from lists on which it clearly belonged, or which it should have led.  She saw these honors go to inferior writers.”    True, and Hyman, although I have trouble giving him credit for anything because of his and Shirley's relationship which we'll talk about in a different episode, but he predicted that Jackson's “powerful visions of suffering and inhumanity” and would be found “increasingly significant and meaningful.”  He truly always understood that her long form or serious work was more than pop fiction, or gory horror, and yet that was not the majority view of that time.    And part of that is somewhat understandable.  One thing I didn't know about her until we started reading up on her for this podcast series was that her acclaim during her day really came from two places- one was for the short story, “The Lottery”, but the other and this is what I didn't know- was her best-selling essay collection on domestic life titled Life Among the Savages.  I haven't read much of that, to be honest, but what I did read is really truly funny stuff stuff.  She was Erma Bombeck before Erma Bombeck.    Yes- and she was funny, and she was writing about her kids, house cleaning, being a mom, a member of a local community and all the craziness of middle-class life.  It was the stuff that people were living in their world, and she made it funny.  People didn't take seriously the psychological insights into issues of emotional isolation, rage, paranoia, and the fragmentation of the human mind- from a person who was a regular contributor to magazines like Good Housekeeping, Mademoiselle, McCall's and Ladies Home Journal.    No, it was just too different, and of course, you can't discount the condescension from the serious art community- I mean here was a woman writing in a genre that nobody took seriously about female protagonists- which was often not taken seriously- and was famous for cute anecdotes about the comedy of errors which is life as a house-mom raising four children in a small town.We must remember also, as a general rule, the 1950s are not that far removed from the time period where women didn't read literature at all- there was a thing called “ladies reading material” That's what women read.  Men read literature, but women writing for women was not elevated enough to actually be called “literature”- it was simply reading material for women.       Oh- well – I guess we shall make that distinction- although I will say, as a woman writing “ladies reading material” for money she did fairly well for herself.  Shirley Jackson made serious cash off of these stories- in fact, she outearned her husband- and it was the essays that were funding their lifestyles, not her novels. Her biographer Ruth Franklin, commented in an interview that she could make  over $2000 per essay which at the time was enough to fun to fund her Morris Minor collection.    Nice- well British Sports cars are always a fun thing to keep around the house.     I'll say.  But back to her legacy for a second, Jackson is like Elizabeth Barrett Browning in that her work, well after her death, found it's way into the canon and today is very much taken seriously.  In fact, we're teaching her right now to all the 11th graders at Bartlett High School, and almost all American students will at some point read  her short story “The Lottery”, the  famous short story that triggered more public outrage  in 1948 than anything published before or since by the magazine the New Yorker.  Hundreds of people cancelled their subscriptions and even more wrote the magazine totally exasperated.      Well, it's political and psychological and really even religious as well.  But back to the 11th graders at Bartlett, do you think your kids will be able to appreciate or enjoy the depth of the psychological analysis in her novel that today is the central hallmark of her work?    Yeah, I think many of them will get it.  I look forward to how they understand what she's talking about.  You know, students today live in such a different world and the ghosts and houses that haunt them look so differently than the ghosts and houses that haunted our generation or much less Shirley Jackson's.     I look forward to discussing some of these issues with them and see what fascinates them the most.      One of the things that fascinates me the most and I'm expecting to come out is Jackson's multiple direct and indirect references to the relationship between mothers and daughters.  It's clear in this book that whatever is going wrong in Eleanor's mind has something to do with her dead mother.  I have two daughters, and I really pray, I am not the kind of mother Shirley Jackson had or that my daughters ever express any of the feelings she expresses about mother/daughter relationships- nothing that would haunt and torment my children after I'm dead.      No, I'm sure none of us want to have that kind of legacy with our children.      And yet, there are women like Geraldine Jackson, Shirley's mother.  Geraldine was truly relentless in her cruelty towards her daughter.  She was cruel to her as a child and her passive aggressive disapproval was something she perpetuated all throughout Shirley's life right to her untimely death at age 48.      Yes and I think understanding Geraldine' cruelty really helps me see some of the things in Jackson's writing that I may have overlooked before.  And I know that an author's life cannot be used uncritically to explain an artist's work; obviously art speaks for itself, but maybe more than any other writer we've read together, Jackson uses her writings to express pain in artistic ways that were personal to her, but universal to many of us.  Geraldine's ruthless subtle and sometimes not so subtle demoralizing was something Jackson could not get out of her mind.  .  Geraldine's own personality disorder took a heavy toll on Shirley.    And it was always expressed with all the best of intentions- she was always so concerned.    Let's tell a little about their story and then people will know what you're talking about.     Okay, well the story starts when  Jackson was born in 1916 (although she lied about her age and claimed to have been born in 1919- which I think is funny), but anyway, she was born into an affluent family and up until she was 16 they lived in Burlingame, California.     Let me interrupt, just for context, Burlingame, to this day is one of the most expensive cities in the United States.  The median house in Burlingame costs over 2 million dollars- and I'm not talking mansions- this is the price range for what would be an average home that would cost a tenth of that in other parts of the US.  Every review on bestplaces.com talks about how unaffordable it is for most people to live in this Burlingame.     Yep, and Geraldine, Shirley's mom and her father Leslie, cultivated that cliché'd vision of the upper class  country club lifestyle.  They were into the production of this very sophisticated appearance of success and wealth, what was important was the appearance of things.   They were into competitive living, and that,  of course, still includes having perfect children.  Shirley's brother, I might add, was beautiful and competitive and made them proud, but unfortunately for Shirley, she was not- and this was just a huge disappointment for Geraldine.  She could not nor did she want to fit the mold.  Shirley was heavier than the other girls.  She didn't enjoy the same kinds of things as the other girls.  She didn't have that “All-American” barbie doll look like the other girls.  She wasn't into the deputante thing, and if she had been wasn't cute enough.    Yes, I read a couple of articles that called Jackson morbidly obese, so I googled images of her, it was true that she was heavier , but, in my mind, she falls way short of the criteria for morbidly obese by today's definition, especially in her youth. And I want to say something else about this 1950's lifestyle we've been discussing. After WW 2 there was a huge economic boom that doubled family incomes in the decade. It was the first decade of widespread middle class wealth. And one sign of that new middle class wealth was the ability to live on one income. Wives staying at home were a sign of wealth and prestige.     Maybe not, but she certainly wasn't the daughter Geraldine wanted nor could be proud of at a deputant ball.  In fact, truth be told, Geraldine was actually disappointed when she found out she was pregnant because she didn't want a child at that time.  But Geraldine's largest problem and obsession was with Shirley's weight- and her obsession with Shirley's weight never ended.  She made comments about her weight- all of the time.  They were gratuitous, just dropped in to remind her that she was fat.   Here are some quotes from a couple of Geraldine's letters to her daughter just to show you what I'm talking about. “Glad you're dieting.” “Excess weight is hard on the heart.” “You should get down to normal weight. Try non-fat milk.”  Even after the publication of what would be Jackson's final novel, Geraldine could be relied on to bring up her weight, “Why oh why do you allow the magazines to print such awful pictures of you?...I have been so sad all morning about what you have allowed yourself to look like.”      Yes, let me read the full quote for context.     If you don't care what you look like or care about your appearance why don't you do something about it for your children's sake— and your husband's. . . . I have been so sad all morning about what you have allowed yourself to look like. . . . You were and I guess still are a very wilful child and one who insisted on her own way in everything— good or bad.    This is a straight up narcissistic rant.     There was always the subtext that was no matter what Shirley did with her life, she could never live up to her mother's expectations- even if she was famous- Jackson wanted acceptance of who she was- but she wanted it on her terms, and she and wanted to prove to her mom that the way she was was a good way, and she could be good at life just by being herself- but that was never going to happen.  In fact, at one low moment, Geraldine actually told her daughter that she was a failed abortion.      Wow.  That is just hateful.  Geraldine wanted a girl in the image of what she wanted, and she was never going to compromise.  This is classically what people call today a “toxic mother”,  And this plays a terrible toll on girls who have toxic mothers.  These behaviors can destroy women's images of themselves.   And this is what seems to have happened with Jackson and her mother.        Let me just back  up and say, it's absolutely natural and healthy for a girl to look up to her mother; a mom is the original ideal of what a woman should be.  That's how we all learn to navigate in this world, and likely a mom and a daughter will have a lot in common for obvious reasons.  There is a lot of joy in that.  There is a special bond in that.  Over the years, though, as a little girl develops into a teenager, although at first she wants to be exactly like her mom, that desire kind of separates out.  In a normal relationship, as a girl transitions into a woman, she individuates.   She becomes her own person.  Some things of her mother she will keep; others she'll discard.  And healthy moms respect and encourage their daughters individuality.  A normal mom will do whatever she can to equip her daughter, make her bolder and stronger.  But as painful as it may be from a mom's perspective, healthy mom's accept daughter's choices- even the ones they think are mistakes.  That's just what they do, and if they end up being mistakes, it's okay.  We all get to live our own lives.  But in Geraldine's life, what Shirley did was a reflection on her, so she couldn't let the fact that her daughter was overweight go.      Well, how do you think she took it when Shirley told her mom she was marrying a Jew in 1940- or I should say that she had already married a Jew, she didn't even tell them she got married until several months later because they were anti-Semitic people,  I can imagine that didn't go well?        No, I'd say it probably didn't, but I really don't know.   I do want to say one other thing, Christy, don't get me wrong, I think it's pretty well-established that motherhood is by definition a lose/lose proposition- moms just can't win.  It's impossible to raise a perfect child, just like it's impossible to be a perfect person, so of course we can't raise a person in the most perfect of emotional environments.      Mom's will unrealistically be blamed for things that may or may not be their fault- the reality is no one can be perfect, we will hurt each other and there will insecurities that spring up because of the way we are raised, and that's kind of normal too- it's normal for dads; it's normal for moms.  But, that is not the same as being a toxic mom.  Geraldine was toxic.  Nothing was ever going to be good enough for Geraldine.  She was perpetually disapproving, and Shirley was never going to meet her standards.  Geraldine was also always very controlling- I read somewhere she made Shirley wear garters and high heels as a little girl.  She was constantly guilt-tripping Shirley.  She constantly made negative comments; she manipulated her emotions, and most of the time she did it passive-aggressively.  She did it under the guise of love.      And that seems to be in one sense what Jackson expresses in her writing- it's at least what lots of people have identified with in Hill House.   There is this sense that Shirley could never get her mom out of her head, and of course, she's not the only one who struggles with these kinds of things.  In Hill House,  the main character is a 32 year old young woman named Eleanor Vance. I want to add that 32 is not a young age.  She's not telling the story of a child and the abuses of a mother on a small child.  Eleanor is a fully grown adult who should be living her own independent life for quite some time.  But she hasn't.  She hasn't even had an opportunity to do so.  Eleanor has no friends and is alone. That's what we're told at the beginning and we will see all the way through to the end of the book when she tells Theo she has never been wanted, it's been how she's felt always.  We're also told Eleanor's mother is dead right here at the beginning, and that Eleanor has been taking care of her relentlessly since she was twenty years old.   Eleanor's mom is a constant presence in Eleanor's psyche, even beyond the grave.  She even buys clothes that she knows her mother hates- pants- just because her mom is dead and can't do anything about it.   Eleanor is being haunted before she ever gets to Hill House.    True, and this lack of self-esteem and then loneliness is what has resonated with so many women and men who read Jackson's stories.  It also is what directly led to a lot of the suffering Jackson experienced in her marriage to Stanley.      Stanley Hyman, there's a character.  Before I smear him, I guess I will say right off that bat that he, in many ways, was very supportive of Shirley professionally and admired her intellectually.  My problem with him is that he degraded her sexually- and that is the cruelest and most intimate and demeaning forms of degradation that there is.    For one thing he absolutely did not respect the sexual boundaries Shirley wanted in their marriage.  Besides having so many affairs with students at the school he taught but also really just anyone—he seemed to enjoy telling Jackson all about these trysts.  I've read a few of the letters he wrote about women he was sleeping with on various business trips, and I got the feeling it's almost like he was bragging a little bit.  I'd read a few quotes, but they're vulgar.  He talked about groping girls- giving details about what he had done. It's gross never mind hurtful.  And Shirley would get upset.  Although she was a free spirit and Bohemian in some ways, this was not okay with her.  She didn't want a open marriage where everyone just slept with whoever they wanted.  There are letters where she writes him and expresses how this behavior made her feel, but she never mailed these letters.  I don't even know why.  Maybe she didn't have the nerve.  Maybe she knew it made no difference.  Maybe she wanted her family and that was a price she was willing to pay.  I'm speculating.  We only know that  she just took it.  She wouldn't confront him, at least that there isa record of.  She just forced herself to accept it and moved on with her life.      And that is an indication of low self-esteem, obviously.  Jackson wouldn't have put up with that sort of thing like she did, if she didn't think, at some level, it was her fault or that she didn't deserve to be treated any better than that.  This is the legacy of a toxic parent.  Allowing people to treat you in a way that is lesser and that is not how you treat them is a direct result of low self-esteem, but I want to add that future abusive relationships is not the only symptom of low self-esteem and it isn't the only symptom of low-esteem we see in Jackson's life.   Behaviors that provoke self-harm  like over-eating, over-drinking, and pill-popping- all things Jackson did- are also a result of low esteem and indicate high levels of anxiety.  Feelings of sadness, depression, anxiety, anger, shame and guilt- are also things we see in Jackson's life.  She seems to have truly struggled emotionally.     True, but before we get too dark, Shirley was all of that, but she wasn't ONLY that.  She had a happy side too- an apparently tremendously happy side.  I say that from interviews I read that people did with her children.  When her kids write or talk about their homelife, the reports are glowing.  Her home was a happy place.  It was chaotic and topsy turvey at times, the kind of crazy that people love.  They didn't even see any tension between their parents.  For one thing, Stanley didn't have a whole lot to do with the family- lots of men didn't in the 50s, that was the mother's domain, but from the perspective of her children, her marriage to Stanley was a happy one, as was their home.  So, we see all of that going on.  Back to her biographer, Ruth Franklin, Franklin titled her biography about Jackson, “A Rather Haunted Life” kind of to reflect that idea- that she was haunted, but not entirely, just rather haunted.      Yes, and it was that dichotomy that leads to all kinds of cognitive dissonance.  I read in another article by a different biographer that Shirley, as a mother was deeply involved but also emotionally erratic.  “Her moods and anxieties colored her children's days.  No one could be more loving; no one could be meaner.”      Which brings me back to her as a writer.  One critic observed that out of over 110 different stories that Jackson wrote in her lifetime, most of them are about imperiled, divided or anxious women- and that is including both her scary and her funny stories.  And when we get to her final three novels- they are gothic completely about anxiety, entrapment and in the case of Hill House, a deeply troubled female with an inability to differentiate well between illusion and reality.      Understanding that really makes the famous first paragraph of The Haunting of Hill House  meaningful in a deeper way, at least it does to me. And I do want to emphasize this first paragraph is one of the most famous paragraphs in all of Jackson's writings:    No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream.  Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it had stood so for 80 years and might stand for eighty more.  Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.”    And what do you always say, when we start these books, that great writers will give their story away in the first sentence or two.    They almost always do.  This one in particular invites us to think about so much.  First of all, it starts with a negation- “no” but there are a lot of negative words here.  It's hard to understand, but something is telling us no- and when we get to the end of the book, that prophecy is fulfilled, although I won't spoil that just yet and tell you how.  But there's so much more.      Listen to the ideas she introduces-  there is the idea of being alive- of being sane- or not sane- another negative word- of standing in the darkness-in the silence- of being alone.  Of being in a house, but yet…being alone.   The alliteration highlights and brings together her key ideas- within walls- drawing attention to the idea of claustrophobia- sensibly shut; silence lay steadily I might add brings the silence and the claustrophobia together.  Then of course- whatever walked- walked alone- the w sound kind of swoshes in her head and haunts the end of that sentence.      All of her personal demons in one sentence.    Yes- and all of her personal demons getting ready to flesh themselves out metaphorically for all of us to understand and experience with her.      This assertion that she makes about absolute reality, of course is a religious or philosophical statement.  This idea that we absolutely just cannot know what is real, and if we did know what is real we would go crazy.  She's going to say that even little bird or crickets (a katydid is a cricket if you haven't heard that word yet, it's not very common)- Not even the simpliest organisms can handle a world without illusions.  We need them to protect our own sanity.    Yes- and the subtext here suggests because reality is dark; and the reality is you are alone in this world.  You can live – but perhaps you must accept a dream, perhaps an illusion that people have your back, people love you and will support you, but in reality- you are alone.  Perhaps you have to even create an entire fairyland- something to give you an escape from what you know to be true- the betrayal which is coming.  I'm speculating, obviously because I'm fleshing out what is implied with the subtext, at least implied to me-  but there is a sense that that is the direction she's leading us, and it certainly seems to be something we find in her personal story.     It's also kind of a religious statement because it speaks to the nature of reality and that is the essence of faith and walking through life not-alone.  Christy, what was her religious background.      Well, that's a very interesting question.  She was raised by members of the the Christian Science church, but later on she developed a real fascination with the occult and was even accused of being a witch.  Garry, what makes Christian scientists different from main stream Christianity?    Christian scientists, for those who are not familiar with Christianity, adopt many tenents of traditional Christianity but they break from it in a couple of ways that are obvious.  For one,  they do not accept the diety of Jesus Christ in the way traditional versions of Christianity do.  But the second is What most people know and that is the tension is the between The teachings of the Christian science church and their complicated relationship with the medical community.  They  encourage their members to pray for divine healings often perhaps instead of going to doctors.  And this has been controversial in some cases especially for family members outside of the faith.     That was certainly true for Jackson.  One time she and her brother were horsing around and her brother broke his arm, instead of going to the doctor Geraldine and her mother stayed up all night and prayed for his broken arm.  Her grandmother was a faith healer in the church and Jackson did not approve of this. So, she had this side of her, that would seem more secular- but then Jackson had her own sense of the spiritual.  She carried around tarot cards, tried to communicate with spirits later in her life, and flirted with all kinds of spiritual practices, like I said before, many accusing her of actually practicing witchcraft, ahtough I never found anything that really verified how serious she was about that.      So I can see why she might say something about absolute reality being somewhat unknowable or even a dark and lonely thing.      True, and at least in this book what we see in the the relationships that populate the lives  of the characters is that they are contrived.  In chapter 1 of The Haunting of Hill House, Dr. Montague, a title that is somewhat meant to mislead since he's really a ghost hunter, assembles a very select group of people to live with him for three months in a house that he thinks is probably haunted.  There are only four people that will be in this house- Dr. Montague himself, Luke, who is a member of the family who will own the house, Theodora who is selected because she may have extra-sensesory perspection abilities and Eleanor who as a child appeared to bring down a shower of rocks.      We will follow what happens to them from the point of view of Eleanor.  This story is written in the third person omniscient style, but it's way more akin to the free indirect discourse we saw Jane Austen create in Emma.  Laura Miller in the introduction to the book put it this way, readers "experience the novel from within Eleanor's consciousness, and however unreliable we know her to be, we are wedded to her".  And of course the farther into the novel you get, the more you understand how true this statement really is.  Most of the first chapter is really kind of a way to introduce us to Eleanor, and what we find out about her first is that she is 32, she genuinely and for good reason hated her mother until she died and now genuinely hates her sister.  Let's read this part…    Page 3    She's clearly alone and exploited by people who are supposed to be protect her.  This is further developed through the anecdote about her sister and their car.  Apparently they bought a car together but her sister never lets her drive it.  So, when Dr. Montague invites her to come to Hill House, she just takes the car and goes.  And while she's driving to Hill House, she imagines all sorts of things.  She imagines things that could never be real, like the road being an intimate friend or living in a house with a pair of stone lions and people bowing to her on the street because of these lions.  It's gives you kind of this crazy feeling- like how you would feel if you finally had escaped.    Yes, and that crazy feeling is going to intensify as the book progresses.  She's escaped her mother only to land sleeping on a cot in the nursery of a terrible sister.  She's not escaped her sister, but to go where.  At one point on her drive to Hill House she stops to admire a quarter of a mile of Oleanders.  Oleanders are beautiful flowers but they are also poisonous flowers.  She fantasizes about them about a castle with oleanders …then she gets back in her car and drives to a diner where she's going to watch a mother try to coax her daughter into drinking a cup of milk- and let me tell you know- these very same images that she sees on her drive in come back towards the end of the book as we, as readers, feel we are losing our grasp of reality.      But here in chapter 1, when she finally gets to the mansion, the care taker, Mr. Dudley flat out tells her, “You won't like it.  You'll be sorry I ever opened that gate.”    She looks at him and asks him to get away from her car…then she proceeds forward.  At the end of the chapter, we see her looking at this house and this is what she says, “The house was vile.  She shivered and thought, the words coming freely into her mind, Hill House is vile, it is diseases, get away from here at once.”      But of course she doesn't.    No, she doesn't.  That's the thing about haunting houses- they are dangerously tantalizing.  She was invited here by Mr. Montague and for better or for worse, she wants to be here.   I don't know if the Haunting of Hill House is the best example of this, but Jackson was absolutely fascinated with this- Jackson was fascinated with man's obsession with what Poe called the “imp of the perverse.”    Oh yes,  the urge to do something awful to someone and have pleasure in it.  I've seen this in kids, a kid just trips a stranger in the hall just because he can.  Paul Salkovskis, a psychology professor, suggests that it's evolutionary to have these kinds of intrusive thoughts as part of our way of problem solving for future problems.  But this idea that people have impulses to do mean things  or at least things we know we shouldn't and get joy from them.  Jackson was very interested in this idea.  So, are you saying that Dr. Montague is deliberately doing something mean.  Or that Dudley is?  Or Eleanor is?    Not really, in other stories she really demonstrates this much more poignantly, but the reason it comes to mind, besides the fact that I've been told to look for it in her writings, is that we are setting up relationships where we really can't trust each other to be there for each other.  Hill House looks like a place where you are really going to feel alone and exposed and that's where the terror comes from, but we will also see that it's soft and motherly and the people here at the beginning seem kind of exciting- it's seductive.      And I guess it does and has for many readers.  Let me just add one thing I didn't know until we started studying this book.  Horrornovelreviews.com claims that The Haunting of Hill House is the 8th scariest novel of all time.  And Paste magazine puts it into the unsorted top 30.      And so we open the gates to this terrifying place- Hill House- next episode we will look at the house itself, we'll look at the places where biographers think she got her inspiration for the house, we'll meet the other residents, explore the history of the house and begin to experience the ghosts- if that's what they are- as they manifest themselves to us through the eyes of Eleanor.                        

The Blume Saloon: A Judy Blume Book Podcast

"Superfudge," chapters 5-6. The Hatcher family settles down in Princeton and keeps their local Baskin Robbins in business. Peter and new bestie Alex Santo go into the worm business and scam Mrs. Muldour (she's definitely eating them, right?). Fudge creates a most legendary ruckus on the first day of school. Join Jody, Alison, AND four-year-old voice actor prodigy Poe for dramatic readings and hilarious commentary on this Judy Blume classic. Thank you to Blume Heads Geniene, Lisa, and Julie for their letters! It's a Judy Blume book club. Join us every week!

Something Scary
Hazardous Hauntings

Something Scary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 32:45


Follow today's guest Celina Spookyboo: https://www.instagram.com/celinaspookyboo/?hl=en Listen to The Haunted Estate: https://bit.ly/TheHauntedEstatePodcast There are two kinds of people: those who avoid being scared and those who are drawn to terror. These people won't be afraid to venture into an abandoned house, or head deep into the woods. But when you go looking for trouble, you might just find yourself amongst hazardous hauntings. First, the favorite child holds mommy's love Followed by signs of death that surround you Then, creatures from the lake are coming for you Finally in our featured story, a killer memory for Halloween Tap into the magic of your team with monday.com Work OS, sign up for your free two-week trial at monday.com today. Poe is out now. Listen exclusively on Stitcher Premium. For a FREE month, go to stitcherpremium.com/poe and use the code POE. Discover your inner-Tom Boy and get an extra 20% off at tomboyX.com with code SOMETHINGSCARY Rock with pride and score 15% your Blenders purchase at blenderseyewear.com and use code SCARYVIP Listen to Season 3 of Over My Dead Body on Apple Podcasts or listen early and ad-free by subscribing to Wondery+ in the Wondery App Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Boo Crew
Ep#266 - Kate Siegel & Mike Flanagan (MIDNIGHT MASS)

The Boo Crew

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 101:42


Your Boo Crew is back for a SECOND all new episode this week with a new release every day until Friday! So far you've spent time with Don Mancini, the creator of the CHILD'S PLAY franchise. Still to come the talented storytellers behind the new series DAY OF THE DEAD and I KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST SUMMER! This time around we invite you to share in a very special conversation with the absolutely brilliant, Kate Siegel and Mike Flanagan. Their latest experience, MIDNIGHT MASS is truly a gift to behold and has been igniting some of the most deeply ruminative reviews, praise and prose we have ever seen, turning critics and fans into poets. We explore it's terrifying elegance in an abundance of detail. Relive some of the most impactful moments from the series from an all new perspective with a focus on the exceptional cast. Go inside The heart wrenching scene shared by Robert Longstreet and Annarah Cymone, crafting the poignant Episode 5 and the indelible impact Kate's portrayal of Erin has left with her. Unravel the magic of the Newton Brothers and the path to this incredibly unique score and so much more, including a look ahead to new projects like Mike's take on Poe with THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER! Mike and Kate are hilarious, thoughtful and absolutely touching. You are officially invited to attend Mass, for episode 266! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Chilling Tales for Dark Nights
Introducing: "Poe" from Stitcher

Chilling Tales for Dark Nights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 7:46


Introducing the new podcast "Poe", from Stitcher Premium. Edgar Allen Poe is known as the original king of spook. And his 19th century stories can still evoke just as much fear 200 years later. In this 20-part series, podcast network audiochuck, has hand picked some of the most chilling Poe stories and will take you through these modern tales in a whole new way Listen exclusively on Stitcher Premium. For a free month, go to stitcherpremium.com/poe, click start free trial, select a monthly plan, and enter promo code POE. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

True Crime & Cocktails: Unsolved Mysteries Edition

Lauren and Christy deep dive the life and tragic death of American author Edgar Allan Poe. Christy's research reveals an unfortunate family coincidence, and the real true crime inspiration behind one of Poe's most popular works! So, grab a drink, put on some pjs, and join this duo for a true crime slumber party!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.