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Latest podcast episodes about Yup

A Phil Svitek Podcast - A Series From Your 360 Creative Coach
Always Make Sure To Get Your Source Files from Freelancers/Companies

A Phil Svitek Podcast - A Series From Your 360 Creative Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 3:49


If we need something done that we can't do ourselves, we hire someone to do it for us, right? Yup. But too often, the people I know who hire someone never request or get the source files. They only end up with the final PDF, video, graphics, etc. This most likely will be an issue for them because if they need to make alterations to it in the future, they'll have to do it from scratch. That's costly and takes time. Don't let that be you. Always make sure to request your source files. After listening, kindly feel free to ask questions or offer opinions of your own, whether down in the comment section or by hitting me up on social media @PhilSvitek. Lastly, for more free resources from your 360 creative coach, check out my website at http://philsvitek.com. RESOURCES/LINKS: -Coach or Consultant Services: https://philsvitek.com/lets-work-together/ -Podcast Services: http://philsvitek.com/podcastservices -Love Market Film (available now): https://www.amazon.com/Love-Market-Amy-Cassandra-Martinez/dp/B09DFS3FTZ/ref=sr_1_14 -Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/philsvitek -Merchandise: https://shop.spreadshirt.com/phil-svitek---360-creative-coach/ -Instagram: http://instagram.com/philsvitek -Facebook: http://facebook.com/philippsvitek -Twitter: http://twitter.com/philsvitek -Financially Fit Foundation: http://financiallyfitfoundation.org -Master Mental Fortitude Book: http://mastermentalfortitude.com -Elan, Elan Book: http://philsvitek.com/elan-elan -In Search of Sunrise Film: http://philsvitek.com/in-search-of-sunrise

Dope Dealers
Ep 146: NBA Season Preview

Dope Dealers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 78:32


Yup, it's that time of the year. A new NBA season is upon us so the #dopedealers give you our yearly season preview episode. We breakdown each NBA team from serious contenders, to “they close but not this year, to “they need more pieces, to “develop and pray for a good draft pick”. Nobody knows the NBA like Tobe & Jamal. Listen on all #podcast outlets! The Worlds Most Dangerous Podcast! @tobehixx@jamaldoman@dopedealerspodcast@nba

The Chad & Cheese Podcast
LinkedIn Unplugged

The Chad & Cheese Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 43:21


If you're numb over unicorns, well, get over it. This week, the boys highlight two more newly minted members of the Billion Dollar Valuation Club. Yup, welcome Hibob and Karat to the unicorn party. Also on this episode: Canvas and Luma, er, Pillar are in the news (or suffer growing pains, depending on your point of view). Snagajob says "Everything Must Go!", LinkedIn unplugs from China (kinda), and back by popular demand: Porn! Stop watching The Squid Game and enjoy another riveting episode of HR's most dangerous podcast.

Fanatically Correct
FC-57- Q & A with Aaron Dismuke

Fanatically Correct

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 48:32


Is that Tamaki Amajiki from My Hero Academia? YUP, Fullmetal Alchemist's Alphonse Elric himself. Join FanCor in this Q&A, recorded live at Sunrise City ComicCon 2021; With special guest, actor and writer, Aaron Dismuke! -Listen to Fanatically Correct : PodBean, AnyPod(for Echo/Alexa), and kindly review on iTunes and Google Play. -Website : www.fanaticallycorrect.com -Follow @FanCorrect : Twitter and Instagram -Follow Fanatically Correct : FaceBook and MeWe  -Email : ContactFanCor@gmail.com -Voicemail (Google#) : 786-704-8404

An Arm and a Leg
We spend 12 million hours a week on the phone with health insurance

An Arm and a Leg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 19:39


Yup. A Stanford professor measured it. So… we should probably learn how they actually make money, understand their incentives. Here's one clue: A lot of the time, providing insurance isn't their real job. In this episode, we unpack what that means, and we start exploring how to put that knowledge to work. Here's a transcript for this episode: https://armandalegshow.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/12-Million-Hours-An-Arm-and-a-Leg-Transcript-S6-Ep05-12.pdfSend your stories and questions: https://armandalegshow.com/contact/ or call 724 ARM-N-LEGAnd of course we'd love for you to support this show: https://armandalegshow.com/support/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ten Cent Takes
Issue 17: The Sandman Book Club (part 2)

Ten Cent Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 68:04


It's time to return to The Dreaming! This week, we're discussing the third and fourth volumes of Neil Gaiman's celebrated series. Come for the one-off stories of Dream Country, and give the devil his due when we cheer Lucifer's epic trolling of Dream in Season of the Mists.  ----more---- Episode 17 Transcript Jessika: [00:00:00] I just, I like have had five sets of teeth in my life. They just keep growing bigger and bigger each set I got,   Hello, and welcome to Ten Cent Takes, the podcasts where we morph from delight to delirium one issue at a time. My name is Jessica Frazier and I'm joined by my cohost, the blasphemous baker, Mike Thompson.  Mike: I am full of carbs and caffeine. How are you doing? Jessika: Oh, I am somewhat of both as well. Could use a little more sleep, but I have a day off tomorrow, so I will be doing that,  Mike: I'm jealous.  Jessika: Dude. I work nine hours a day. Don't be too jealous. It's those nine hours that get me that day off.  Mike: Oh man. I've been pulling [00:01:00] like 10 to 12 hour days for a couple of months and I'm just,  Jessika: Oh shit. Nevermind. Goodness. Well, the purpose of this podcast is to study comic books in ways that are both fun and informative. We want to look at their coolest, weirdest and silliest moments, as well as examine how they're woven into the larger fabric of pop culture and history. If you'd like to support us, be sure to download rate and review on Apple podcasts or wherever you live.  Mike: Yeah, that really helps with discoverability. We know that we are not a large podcast, but the support that we've gotten from everybody has meant a lot to us. And we're hoping that we can continue to reach more people. If you like, what you're hearing, do us a favor and invite your friends to like our pages, every little bit helps.  Jessika: Yeah, well, today we're continuing on. with the second episode of our book. As we discuss volumes three and four of the Sandman series. But before we jump into [00:02:00] that, Mike, what is one cool thing that you've read or watched lately?  Mike: Something actually that you mentioned on the last book club episode that we did was that there is a Sandman Audible book right now. As much as I don't like giving Amazon my money, if I don't have to, I've had an Audible membership for like a decade. And that means I have access to their Audible originals, which is what this audio book is. And then one of my friends, hi, Darren, also recommended that I listen to the audio book after I told them that we were doing a Sandman book. So I finally downloaded the audio book and started listening while I walked the dogs. And it's legit incredible, like all-star cast. It feels like an audio play complete with like all these incredible production values. Neil Gaiman is serving as the narrator and then they have all of these incredible actors voicing characters and it actually, you know, Neil [00:03:00] Gaiman rewrote it. And so it feels like what he wanted the Sandman, the first volume Preludes and Nocturnes to be, with the hindsight of 30 plus years. Jessika: Nice.  Mike: Yeah, it's great.  Jessika: And he's such a good orator.  Mike: he is he's done a couple of his other audio books that I've listened to over the years. He did The Graveyard Book, which was The only way I can describe it as a Victorian Gothic version of the Jungle Book. And then he also did Coraline. I think he did Coraline. I'm pretty sure he did, but every time that I've listened to him, narrate stuff, it's always been just fantastic,  But, yeah. Jessika: Great.  Mike: How about you? Jessika: Well, I grabbed another $1 image teaser comic. , this time it was Kill or Be Killed by Ed Brubaker. Sean Phillips and Elizabeth Breittwiser. It was okay.  It didn't grow. It followed the first person account of how a man was driven to be an assassin. He basically attempted to die by suicide by jumping off a roof, ended up not dying, but [00:04:00] being visited by what appears to be a demon who tells him , that he now owes him for the life. He tried to waste or something, a life for a life, kind of a such and the rubric for killing being , someone basically like bad and it's not very well defined. So he goes from this guy who can't fathom killing someone to being ready to kill. So he doesn't die. The whole reason he wanted to die was over a woman that chose his roommate over him, by the way, like his best friend. And it was this whole pining love thing. It was just a little just had, really bad incel vibes. You know what I mean?  Mike: Yeah, Jessika: I don't know. It just felt very strange. Like his whole motive was very, contrived it felt,  Mike: Yeah. Brubaker does a lot of good stuff, but he writes a lot of, kind of the modern equivalent of pulp noire.  Jessika: Mm.  Mike: Everything that you've described sounds very much like a Brewbaker story. You got to find the right thing. He writes some really good stuff. Like he's the guy who actually created the winter soldier for the Captain America Comics. Jessika: [00:05:00] Okay.  Mike: Yeah. He did a couple of other kind of like noire-ish stories for image that they were hit or miss for me, but when he's good, he's really good. And then other times it's just, it's not my vibe. Jessika: Okay. That's fair.  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: So, honestly though, again, it was one of those $1 Image teaser situations.  Mike: I love how they do that.  Jessika: I didn't feel like I really lost anything.  Mike: No, I think that's a really great strategy of theirs where it's just kind of the entry-level pilot. Jessika: Yeah, well, let's mosey on to our main topic.  Mike: Yes. Jessika: So last episode, just to recap, we covered an overview of the history and places you can read, watch and listen to the Sandman series. And if you haven't already listened to episode 15, we highly recommend you check out that episode for that. And our discussion on the first two volumes of the Sandman series, because from here, we are going to be discussing [00:06:00] volumes three and four. I don't really have many tidbits per se for us this episode. Really? We're just going to look at the plot and then talk about what we thought.  Mike: I actually have a couple of tidbits. Believe it or not, not many, but a couple. Jessika: Mike has tidbits everyone. I love it. I didn't even know. Well, awesome.  Mike: All right. So should we kick things off?  Jessika: Let's do it. Volume three is titled Dream Country and it was published in 1990 and only included issues 17 through 20. And what made up a four-story anthology. It was, of course, written by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Kelly Jones, Malcolm Jones III, Charles Vess, and Colleen Duran. We start with the story of Calliope, the youngest Greek muse, who has been imprisoned by Erasmus Fry to be his own personal muse. Super gross. [00:07:00] She'd been captive for closest 60 years. So Erasmus gives Calliope to Richard Maddick, who is a writer who has one successful novel but now has hit a patch of writer's block. And unfortunately for Calliope, he's a greedy motherfucker who only cares about his own success. So he takes Calliope who has been left without clothes in a room alone. And of course, immediately rapes her. This one was really hard for me. You can already tell, as I'm trying to get through this description.  Mike: Yeah, it's an uncomfortable issue to read now. Even now it's, mean, it was really uncomfortable when I first read it when I was, I don't know, 18 or so. And it's just gotten increasingly gross as time goes on, especially now, post me too in the entertainment industry. Jessika: Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. I mean, definite correlations there.  Mike: Oh yeah. Oddly prescient. Jessika: Yes. So Richard of course gets gains from this whole [00:08:00] situation and enjoys a few years of very good success. He writes more hit novels, some award-winning poetry, and even gets into Hollywood with writing and directing. So here we are again with the correlation situation and of course winning awards in that area. And this is all happening while Morpheus is still in prison, by the way, until he isn't any longer. And one thing we need to know about Calliope is that she and Morpheus have history. In fact, they have a child together. So Calliope calls out to him in desperation. After being told by her visiting muse sisters, that they were unable to help her and help Morpheus did. The author wanted ideas, then he was inundated with them. So many that they were causing him to have an actual breakdown seemingly with psychological effects. In the end, Richard sends someone to release her where he only finds Erasmus Fry's book in the room where she should have been.  Mike: And doesn't it [00:09:00] originally start out with Morpheus trying to free Calliope, but Richard doesn't want to, because he needs the ideas she gives him when he rapes her? Jessika: Yeah Mike: Yeah. And that's when Morpheus sits there and basically punishes him with an overflowing chalice of ideas. Jessika: Yeah. It's, definitely a fitting punishment. In my opinion  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: story, number two was super fun. I think you and I can probably agree. And this story was about a cat speaking to a crowd of cats in a graveyard. And this cat told the story of having kittens and having them taken away by the people that owned her. And of course, the guy was super level-headed about the whole thing and took the kittens to a shelter and they were adopted by loving families and, oh wait, never mind. He put them all in a bag, tied the bag to a large rock, and threw it in a body of water. I just can't with people. Like, honestly, I can't,  Mike: It's a safe assumption that people are going to be terrible throughout this series. Jessika: I mean, it's true, [00:10:00] but I would love to have them all adopted. So the cat naturally is super upset but also looking for some sort of vengeance or something. And that night she has a dream where she goes on a long and difficult dream quest to see what is ultimately Meowpheus the cat.  Mike: Meowpheus I like that.  Jessika: So basically a Meowpheus tells her that cats used to rule. They were larger and humans were basically the pets. Instead, cats choosing to hunt humans for food and sport and keeping them to feed and groom them. One day, humans banded together and with participation from only 1000 humans, they were able to dream the same dream together and basically manifest humans being the alpha in the world, instead of the cats. And this went back into time where the power of the collective dream actually rewrote history in favor of humans, making the cat subservient. Instead. [00:11:00] The cat in the graveyard was basically preaching a gospel, asking all the cats in the graveyard to dream the same dream. That she was trying to get 1000 cats to help her so that, they could all pull a Cher and turn back time to be in power once again. I enjoyed the partying quippy remark from one of the listener cats, which was effectively good luck getting multiple cats to do anything at the same time. Mike: Uh, yeah. Accurate. Jessika: And while it was really sad and cruel I like the idea that cats have an attitude for a reason.  Mike: Yeah, I thought it was cute. It was just, it was a very, I mean, we'll get into this later on, but it was, I thought it was very. Jessika: Yeah. The third step. Told us, the creation of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream wherein Morpheus has actually requisitioned the play in specific terms and asks Billy Shakes and his troop to perform in the middle of an empty field. Well, kind of. That field is not empty for a long as [00:12:00] Titania, Oberon, Puck, and all the other characters from the fairy realm have arrived through the portal, which Morpheus opens for them. It's mentioned during the dialogue between Titania and Morpheus, that this is probably the last time the mortal realm would allow them to enter, that they were feeling the hostility from Gaia upon their entry. During the play puck steps in for the actor playing himself and kills of course, and Titania is very strangely fascinated with Billy's 11 year old son Hamnett and is like trying to entice him. And then in the end, everybody, but Puck leaves the realm. And it's mentioned at the end of the issue that Hamnet died later that same year. So like, did Titania finally get Hamlet to go with her?  Mike: You know, it's left a little bit open, but it's playing into that whole idea of the changeling child and, you know, the mortals who go over into the very realm, as children, which I really liked that I thought it was a nice ending that was very bittersweet. Jessika: Yeah. I thought so too. And the fourth and final story [00:13:00] of this volume is called Facade and it is about a woman named Rainey who we learn has been given a gift by the sun, God Ra, which makes her a metamorph. Meaning that she can change her physical appearance, physically change faces, skin, everything. But this also means that she no longer has a normal human appearance. Her skin is scaly and multicolored. Her hair has turned of violent shade of green and her face is withered and her nose is almost completely gone. We find Rainie living a very solitary life, getting a monthly disability check and only interacting with the worker assigned to her, but disability case she's depressed and has suicidal ideations. Probably the scariest part of the story is when an old friend who works for the same company that Rainey was working for, when Ra messed her up, who invites her to lunch, Rainie sucks it up, puts on a face literally and meets [00:14:00] at the restaurant. Where her entire face falls off into a plate of spaghetti. I don't, I don't know about you like that. I thought it was super terrifying. Mike: Yeah. I mean, it goes back to that very human emotion of seeing someone that you haven't seen forever. And you're trying to do as much as you can to make sure that they don't see that you've changed too much.  Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: You and I are at that age now where it's like, people from high school want to get in touch and we're all older. You know, some of us are. And so you see these people and you still want to seem like the person that they knew, because you don't want to, you don't want them to comment on how you've changed. You don't want to acknowledge it. And I read it as she'd been working for like the CIA or an intelligence agency because they call it “The Company.” They don't ever refer to it as anything else. Jessika: I think it was something of that nature kind of checking out sites, et cetera.  Mike: Yeah.[00:15:00] But yeah, and then the whole thing is that because she can change her body into elements. She's, she's a sidekick from the old Moetamorpho series in the sixties. I didn't really know much about her, but I did a little digging cause I couldn't remember a lot. And so Metamorpho is a DC hero who is part of the justice league and his whole thing is that he can't. Basically change his body into any element that he wants. And so that was the whole thing where she's talking about, oh, like it's not hard for me to change the color of my hair. I I just turned it into copper and, and then she basically grows a kind of silica over her face, but she was saying that after roughly a day it gets stiff and, it falls off. And unfortunately, that's what happened with her, at her lunch with her friend. Jessika: Yeah. it was definitely a bummer. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: So of course, Rainey goes home crying where she has to break into her own house by melting the handle because she forgot her purse with her keys and breaks down crying. Death appears having been visiting one of Rainey's neighbors who fell off a stepladder and talks with Rainie, advising that she should [00:16:00] ask rah nicely to take away her gift, or at least giving us an option. She looks into the setting sun and becomes what I'm assuming is a pile of Ash. It looks like death didn't actually take her. So I'm not sure if Rainie is supposed to be just with the world. You know, just one with the world as it kind of seemed like she fear being  Mike: You know, I read it as like she was, she had her immortality taken away from her because she seemed so happy when she turned into, I don't know if it was ash or glass or something. It was kind of hard to tell what the art, and then it cracked and fell apart. And then Death answers the phone and says something along the lines of like, no, she, she can't come she's gone away or something to that effect. And, death isn't this cruel being or anything like that. I think death helped her move on. I'd like to think that she did. Jessika: Okay. Okay. Yeah. it was Fe usually. she like wanders away with the person [00:17:00] she's like low key reaping. Mike: Usually. Yeah. I don't know. I think maybe it was just a little bit, it, it was for the sake of narrative in this case,  Jessika: That's fair. That's fair.  Mike: But yeah. Urania was this, so her full name is Urania She was a side character for a few issues in Metamorpho's sixties series. And then she wound up basically giving herself the same powers that he had, and it was delivered via device called the Orb of RA. So it's really interesting because, Metamorpho is always a science character, because it's all about the elements of what he can turn himself into. But at the same time, there is in his background. is this like, you know, mystical quality to it. And so I liked that they kind of tapped into that mythology a little bit, and really they did a nice job with a character that I think most people had forgotten existed. Jessika: So, Mike, did You have a favorite [00:18:00] character part of the story? What did you dig from this?  Mike: This volume in particular, I really like, because it feels. Like a breather from the main narrative. And honestly, I think that's something that we needed because I mentioned last time, how I always am a little bit surprised at how dark the early stories are. They're very much horror stories with a little bit of fantasy kind of softening the blows a little bit, but there's a couple of moments in those first couple of volumes where I feel like I need to pack a flashlight. it's dark. but yeah, this collection is just, a much-needed change of pace just for a little bit. My least favorite story is the one with the cats. And it's not because I think it's bad. I just don't connect with it that much. Part of it is because we've got a rescue cat, we treat her better than the kids. Let's be honest. I can't fathom throwing kittens into a pond. It was just, it feels a little bit too mustache-twirly. You know, especially in this day and age where like, if people find out [00:19:00] about that you get tracked down on social media and just annihilate it. But it was cute. The whole bit where at the end, it's like, oh, it must be, it's dreaming, you know, it's chasing something and, you're like, oh, okay. Yeah. So it's, it's dreaming of hunting humans. Cool. Jessika: [laughs],  Mike: And it's funny, cause I was actually in a production of Midsummer Night's Dream when I first read this collection. So I loved everything about that specific issue. I loved how it tapped into fairy lore it showed this kind of weird, strange relationship with Titania and Oberon. And how absolutely sinister pock seemed not to mention how there's that dangling plot thread, where he basically gets loosed on earth afterwards  Jessika: mm.  Mike: I don't know. It's just, it's very different than any other portrayal I'd seen up until then. And, , it's interesting because they brought those characters specifically back in a number of different ways across the vertigo comics later on, like to Tanya actually had her origin explained in the Books of Faerie, which was in itself a series that [00:20:00] spun off of another comic that Neil Gaiman wrote called the Books of Magick, where eventually it's revealed that the main character from the Books of Magick, Tim Hunter, who was like the next great magician of the age, he's like our version of Merlin. It is very. They always leave it a little bit up in the air, but Titania''s his mother, because she was a human who was brought into the world of Fairie. And then eventually he got married to Oberon and then she had an affair with a human that was in service to Oberon.  Jessika: Okay.  Mike: She becomes a major part of the lore in her own right. Which I thought was really cool. And Puck shows up again later in the series. I, like I still squirm when I read that story of Calliope, especially where we are like sitting on the other side of me too, and the ongoing flood of stories about successful men in the arts, just being abusive, assholes to those who aren't as powerful as they are. Like when we're recording this, there's a whole flood of stories coming out of Activision [00:21:00] blizzard, if you're not in video games, they make Warcraft and a bunch of other stuff. it turns out that that was a really toxic place for women. And I spent almost a decade working in video games with various companies and yeah, it's not surprising, but it's just, these stories need to be told that at the same time, they're always super uncomfortable to read. Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: Um, yeah. And then, the facade story, I really liked, I really appreciate how gaming does this amazing job spinning out a story that's focused on loneliness and how harmful it is. and then I thought it was kind of neat that it arguably has a happy ending, though the main character dies. Jessika: Yeah. I can see that.  Mike: Same question back at you. What about you? Jessika: So, you know, I really enjoyed the cat story.  Mike: You don't say. Jessika: I did. I mean, I get it though. Like cats are, are super intense and honestly they make [00:22:00] me a little nervous. I heard some horror stories about cats, just going bananas on people and them just like getting super fucked up, like missing part of an ear and shit. Like I've heard some stories. That's just like a regular house cat. Oh, I don't think so  Mike: Well, and then you've met our cat. Jessika: Yeah. Well, yeah. You know that's but I don't, I didn't fear your cat right away. There are some cats I go into someone's house and I'm just like, oh, I got to watch my back.  Mike: We have a dog and a cat's body. Jessika: Yeah. Your cat's sweet.  Mike: No, she... she's fat and lazy and she knows who feeds her. So she's like, I'm good. I don't need to get out. I don't need to be now. Jessika: I'm strictly a dog household, so I just don't really truly get them to be honest with you. And I honestly, I'm kind of glad I have allergies as an excuse, not to have to get one. So did you have a favorite art moment in this volume? Like was there a panel or cover that really stood [00:23:00] out to you or hit you in some kinda way?  Mike: Yeah. That final sequence in the Midsummer issue, so that one was illustrated by Charles Vess and he's this really he's this artist that has this really beautiful illustration style that feels very old school storybook. Sarah loves this British artist named Arthur Rakim and Vess always kind of reminds me of his work, but the closing monologue by Puck is I gotta be at that closing monologue is kind of terrifying, especially with the way that it's illustrated. I also liked how this felt almost like, well, I mean, it was in certain ways, it was a sequel to men of good fortune, that issue that we talked about last time with Hob Gadling and the mortal that keeps on meeting up with Morpheus.  Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: Yeah, you remember during, the last book club episode, how I mentioned that Sandman won the World Fantasy Award. Yeah. So it was for this issue specifically, you know, and then they got all grumpy about it and they [00:24:00] changed it so that you could no longer win a world fantasy award with a comic book. So. The only comic book to ever win a world fantasy award, Jessika: extra salty,  Mike: extra salty. Jessika: Hate to see it.  Mike: what about you? Like, I'm actually curious. What did you think about Vess's illustration style? Because we haven't seen, I don't think we've really seen much of his artwork in the series up until now. Jessika: We haven't, and that's actually this, this was my favorite art volume as well, or art issue as well. I mean, it just, it was beautiful. It used color in a really interesting way that went from playful to dark and serious. I mean, it just with the same type of illustration and the color would just change the whole.  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Which was super cool just by adding shadows, moving the colors. Plus you got to love a good donkey head and you know, okay. I was musing and you have to go with me on this journey. They had to have used a taxidermied donkey's head. Right.  Mike: [00:25:00] No, they, I  Jessika: Please. Come on, come on, go with me on this journey.  Mike: Ugh no. Hmm.  Jessika: Ah,  Mike: Like, like that's a whole element in that American Horror Story series, like where  they make a mandatory by putting a bull's head on a dude. Like, no, no, Jessika: I am going horror with this one. Mike: Well, have fun going down that road. I'm not there with you. Jessika: Okay. Well, that's good. I suppose we are on volume four  Mike: I suppose  Jessika: Volume Four!. Alright.  Mike: What accent is that? Jessika: I don't know, I do a lot, don't I? Mike: A little bit?  Jessika: I think it's my 1920s.  Mike: Okay.  Jessika: I don't know. It's like my newscaster, I used to have an old-timey newscaster kind of an accent that I did.  And I think I'm combining, I'm combining my Virginia [00:26:00] Montgomery Prescott, the third Esquire.  Mike: It's, that so proper American that it's almost English kinda like that very Northeastern accent.  Yeah.  Jessika: Yes. Yeah.  Mike: Yeah. All right.  Jessika: All right. Volume four is titled season of the mists and came out between 1990 and 1991 and included issues 21 through 28. Story as always was written by Neil Gaiman and illustration was done by Kelly Jones, Malcolm Jones, the third Mike Drigenberg, Matt Wagner, Dick Giordano, George Pratt, and P Craig Russell. Volume four begins with our introduction to destiny. Ooh. While wandering his realm is visited by the fates, the three sisters that we have seen previously, the sisters inform him that he needs to call a [00:27:00] reunion of all his siblings of the eternal realm. So off, he goes to the family gallery where he goes up to each portrait of his sibling and they appear out of the portrait. When summoned the siblings are a mix of characters we have seen. And one that is new to this issue. Death who is told to change her outfit, even though no one else was, I thought that was kind of rude.  Mike: Yeah, Destiny's a stickler for formality. Jessika: Yeah. Well, the other one's got to wear nimble to CWA. They got to wear whatever  Mike: Hmm. Jessika: I, whatever. I don't know. It makes me angry. So don't tell women they have to change. They are not a distraction. Death has followed by Dream and then the twins, Desire and Despair, and lastly Delirium who we come to find out, used to be Delight. So during their reunion, desire calls out Dream's treatment of lovers who have spurned [00:28:00] him, leading him to ask for validation of his actions from Death. And Death instead agrees with. Prompting dream to plan, to travel to hell in order to remove queen nada from her torturous captivity, who was, that was the subject of their whole conversation.  Mike: Yeah. And we actually saw that whole story in the previous volume to  Jessika: Yes,  Mike: saw what happened to. Jessika: exactly. so destiny closes out the reunion basically stating that the actions that needed to be put into motion had been accomplished by dream deciding to go back to. hell.  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: The next issue gives us a taste of what hell looks and feels like. So back in the dream realm, Dream is saying his goodbyes and makes a big announcement to those living in his realm. He tells them about Nada, how he had been unjust and how he had to rectify his actions and that he may not return as he is not on good terms with Lucifer. So [00:29:00] he sends Cain to Hell as a messenger to let loose for know that dream will be visiting whether he approves or not basically. So that was fun.  Mike: Well, he knows that he can't kill Cain because Cain is protected by the mark of Cain from, the Cain and Abel story. He knows about that.  Jessika: oh yeah. Yeah, for sure.  Mike: That's why dream sent Cain it's because he knows that Cain can't be killed. Jessika: Exactly. Exactly. Lucifer clearly is still really salty about being embarrassed. The last time dream was there and he makes an announcement to his, his demonic minions reminding them that he is the oldest and strongest bad-ass lets them know that dream will be returning and implies very strongly. That the day that Dream returns will be very memorable. Kane delivers the response to Dream. And on the last stop of his farewell tour, Dream also visits Hippolyta whose husband [00:30:00] was the pho dream king superhero thingy from one of the other stories while he was enslaved or, you know, captive.  Mike: Yeah. she and Hector the previous Doctor Fate were being used by Brute and Glob to basically create kind of like an island for them to operate outside of the dreaming the dreams of a kid who was being abused.  Jessika: Exactly.  Mike: And then, Dream is on her shit list because he sent her ghost of a husband on to wherever he got sent onto, but she was pregnant at the time. And so there's a connection between Dream and the baby because she carried the baby to term mostly in dreams, Jessika: Well, the baby was in gestation for like that, like 30, 30, 40 years or something more than that. I mean, it was like 60 years? I don't  remember how many it was like however long or  Mike: I,  Jessika: or was it just the kid timeframe? Mike: I think it was just the kid timeframe. So I think it was only for a couple of years, but still it was in gestation injuries for a long time compared to. Jessika: Oh, I can't even imagine [00:31:00] being pregnant once, let alone for like two years straight. Holy crap. And she was like really pregnant. That's not comfortable.  So Morpheus advises Hippolyta to take good care of the kid that had been gestating in the dream realm, because he will take it someday. So. Cool. Thanks, Dream. That's awesome.  Mike: Really endearing us to you, buddy. Jessika: Yeah. serious. Oh, he also gives her the name Daniels because she had kind of been struggling with a name for him.  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: So that's the kid's name now? I guess. So Dream makes his way to hell anticipating a fight with Lucifer, but what He finds is an eerily empty hell with Lucifer in the process of locking all the gates. And when asked about this loose advises that he's, he's done, he's quitting and he is no longer the ruler of hell. He's freed everyone and everything that was locked up. And he's not really sure what happened to them or where they all went, whether it was to earth or other realms or what, but he just [00:32:00] knows they're no longer in hell Mike: Yeah. He likes straight up. Does not care.  Jessika: Oh, zero fucks. None.  Mike: They're his favorite kind of problem. Not his. Jessika: Then he goes, Yeah. think I'm bluffing. Hey, here's a knife. Why don't you cut off my wings? Just see, just, just go ahead and see. And, and Dream does. And then as a parting gift, he hands the key to hell Dream stating basically Like Hey, this is your problem now. Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: that's some high-level trolling.  Mike: Dream was prepared for just about every outcome except that one. It is. Jessika: Exactly. We are then introduced to Oden who travels to the cavern where Loki is being held captive and has been enduring an eternity of torture until Ragnarok, the end times in which the Asgardian realms would be destroyed. Odin [00:33:00] frees low-key from his situation and asks him to help him as he wants to take over the Hell situation since Lucifer abdicated and Loki agrees to help, then we cut back to dream because he's not really sure what to do. So he calls on his sister death for advice. And she has like, no time. First of all, she has no time for him in that issue. She's like, what do you need? I'm super busy. She pretty much says, this is your problem. Also, he knows things are going to go down and he hides, frustrated his castle basically. And then he just starts getting visited by all these different parties, all wanting the keys to hell. So you have the Asgardians, Azazzle and a demon Envoy who're like “That's my house. I just want to live in my house again.” Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: Yeah. Anubis and Bastet who are like, yo, [00:34:00] you know, who does a good job with death with underworlds let me show you.  Mike: it's a really eclectic mix of mythological figures because you also have. The Lords of chaos and order send their envoys, Shivering Jemmy from the Lords of chaos who... I really like her. I think she's a great,  Jessika: did too.  Mike: and then the Lords of order send their representative and it's a cardboard box that basically spits out ticker tape  and  Jessika: Which  Mike: And, then you get the elves, a ferry at one point. And they have, a really unique proposition, which is that the lands of Faerie had a tie to hell where every seven years they had to send over a certain number of , their best and brightest as a sacrifice. And they wanted, basically begging dream, not to let hell reopen. Jessika: And we did. We establish that That was still a thing when all the other shit went down.  Mike: That specific deal? Jessika: yeah.  Mike: Oh yeah. It's still a deal. And actually, that was a whole thing in the books of [00:35:00] magic. They have a whole thing with ferry and hell going into conflict with each other, because I think it has been almost 20 years since I read this last. But if I remember right, it was, I think Faerie refused to pay the tithe anymore anymore. And as a result, they basically straight up, went to war with hell. and it was, oh man, it was cool. I remember liking that storyline. I don't remember it enough to really talk about it a lot though, because it's  been so long.  But it's, it's good. It's in one of the collected volumes of the Books of Magick that they did, they only collected the first 50 issues, 50 through 75 aren't collected anywhere. Jessika: Hmm.  Hmm. So we also had Suzan O No Mikto  Mike: Yes.  Jessika: Oh, and a couple of angels who were there just to be voyeurs to the situation  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: and Dream finally lets them into the castle. [00:36:00] After he stopped sulking and he advises that he'll be hosting a banquet and having accommodation set up and they could discuss the key to the realm the next day, basically. And we start seeing the consequences of hell's release through a boys boarding school where one solitary boy is staying over during the holidays while his father, as a prisoner of war in Kuwait  and all hell returns. When boys and staff who used to attend the school, start to show back up  Mike: yeah. Jessika: Along with the headmasters previously deceased mother.  Mike: Yes. It's... that issue. It's really interesting because I really didn't like it originally. And I've come to appreciate it more because it feels like a very Gothic or story kind of like the Hunting of Hill House from Netflix.  Jessika: I can see that. Yeah.  Mike: yeah.  Jessika:  It was wild.  Like all of them had reasons that they were in hell.  Mike: Yeah. That [00:37:00] issue is really interesting and it's really weird because it's drawn by Matt Wagner, who has a very interesting style. All of his own Wagner himself is famous for creating a couple of different characters on his own. Like he created a character called the Grendel, who is this assassin and wound up becoming a cult property, had a long run with Dark Horse, if I remember right. But this story in season at the mist is really creepy because the whole thing is that the dead are coming back to earth and all sorts of unexpected ways. And then there were a bunch of boys who were really awful, Who come back and they start tormenting Charles, because he's the only living soul there. And he's also, you know, he's a sweet, sensitive little kid, like who is just an easy target for people like that. And the thing is, is like, that was me when I was at that age was I was that sensitive kid who was just an easy target for bullies. And so it was really hard to read it when I was younger. And, I've got a little different perspective now, [00:38:00] but it's, still tough. Anyway, go on. Jessika: Oh, that's okay. So yeah, Charles, unfortunately, he got tortured by that trio of boys. And apparently those boys had murdered another school boy as an offering to Lucifer. So joke's on them, the offering didn't save them from the torture of damnation,  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: so Charles ends up being physically tortured and then starves to death. And his only companion was that other boy who had been killed on the premises that boy, that, those,  that trio allegedly sacrificed. Edwin. Yeah. So death rolls up to pick them up and Charles says “Yeah, no thanks. I'm gonna hang out with, uh, Edwin and deaths. Like you don't, I don't, I don't have time for this. Like literally every one is coming back. Like I literally don't have time. I will come back for you.  Mike: I loved that she was in early nineties, jogging paraphernalia, like  Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: I thought it was fantastic. Jessika: was ready for it.  Mike: [00:39:00] I may be misremembering this, but I thought it was really funny how it was like, I think it was like pink and purple too. Like it was very colored. Jessika: I think it did have some color to it.  Yeah. Oh, funny. So back in the dream realm, two more guests from the theory realm, those two that we had talked about, they arrive and the banquet in. And each of the guests eats and drinks, their desire delicacies, cause , poof we're in dreamland and shenanigans ensued due to the differences of the attendees. And one by one, they basically corner Morpheus requesting a private conversation and he provides each of them with a signal stadium that he'll meet with them after the banquet and entertainment have concluded Cain and Abel show up as the entertainment we're able dies,by being cut in half and then being made into sausage in a magic act  Mike: which. That is a, that is a recurring theme with Cain and Abel in, in the Sandman comics.  Jessika: Yeah, I've noticed.  Mike: But, [00:40:00] Cain was the host of another horror series called the house of misery. And he always had this kind of macabre sort of sense of humor. I know Abel eventually showed up in the house mystery series. I don't know if Cain murdered him every time. I wouldn't be surprised. Jessika: Fair enough. So this is this tracks apparently, each of the guests go off to their respective quarters to wait to be summoned. And they each go to Morpheus, either offering something they think he would want or threatening him in order to turn over control the key to hell. And he advises each one of them that he will announce his decision in the morning. And once in the privacy of his own quarters, he ruminates on the pressure of the weight of his responsibility that was dropped on him.  Mike: Yeah. What was your favorite bargaining tactic? I've got mine. I'm curious about yours. Jessika: I didn't like the whole trading people thing. I don't know. Cause they were all so good in different ways. Like order and chaos were both really interesting to me. I think chaos just being like, [00:41:00] we will find you  Mike: Chaos was my favorite Jessika:  I was going to say like, but Shivering Jemmy was just so funny to begin with.  Mike: Well,  Jessika: was just such an interesting.  Mike: you know, they play, they play with this a lot because, Dr. Fait is one of the Lords of order, DC comic books. And so there's always been this presentation that, order is, the right way to go. And what I kind of enjoyed is that this very much embodies, no order is a dull little box in chaos is chaos. It's not what you expect. And so they send this, hobo girl with a red balloon and  Jessika: like, uh, like a clown face.  Mike: yeah, and she's like, speeding. Almost like toddler English, like it's much younger phrasing than you would expect from a kid who looks like they're 10 or 11. And then, turns into this monstrous thing, delivering ungodly threats to the Lord of dreams. And then, you know, it turns back into the little kid again, after when it was like,[00:42:00] byeeeee. Yeah, I can get behind this. Jessika: So good. She just ate ice cream for dinner too, which I loved.  Mike: Oh yeah. It was so good. I, again, I think she shows up in the books of magic later on, but I can't remember for that one. Jessika: That's amazing. So I really did like her as a character.  Mike: it was good. Jessika: So the next morning. As Morpheus, still struggles to decide to whom he will grant the key. He is visited by the voyeur angels who tell him they have a message for him from the creator who dictates that the two angels will now run hell and guess what guys, you're not allowed back to the silver city Remiel. Oh, Remiel was not happy about this situation. He did not take this well.  Mike: No, he did not it was very much implied that he was about to rebel, like Lucifer. Jessika: Yup. He's like fuck the shit. [00:43:00] Why do I have to go down there? And he had that. He was like, this is your fault. I was like, whoa, damn, you need to go calm down. Your silent homie is not the enemy. there was some salt. This issue.  So Morpheus hands over the key after Remiel takes a chill pill and Morpheus still has the task of telling the other as the outcome of his decision and lets them know the decision was really made for him that if the creator of hell wanted angels to run it, who was he to decide differently from what the creator of that thing wanted to do with it. And most of his guests took this. Okay. I liked orders response of this? This is logical.  Mike: Yeah. And then chaos is like, man, it's fine. We just didn't want order to get it. It's fine. Whatever. Jessika: Exactly.  Mike: And then  Jessika: was even better.  Mike: doesn't she give Morpheus her balloon afterwards?  Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: Yeah, I thought that was great Jessika: She's like, oh, well,  I didn't really want this anyway. [00:44:00] but Azazel was especially upset about this whole situation  Mike: Embodiment of bitter party of one. Jessika: Yes. yes. Table for one. Absolutely. And he pretty much said that he was going to consume the souls of Nada as well as his companions from hell, because he had actually kidnapped her.  Mike: Yeah, and we should note that one of his companions from hell was actually, the demon who had Morpheus's helm before. it was a honied offer of him sitting there and saying, well, I will give you the woman that you're searching for, but then I'll also let you enact punishment of this guy who challenged you and to make you look bad in front of all of hell. Jessika: That makes sense. I was kind of wondering why he was like, why would he care about this one, dude? But that makes way more sense. I forgot about that, dude.  Mike: Yep.  Jessika: There's a lot. There's a lot to remember in this.  Mike: You know, I can't remember everything and I've read this series multiple times. It's a dense story. And I always feel like. I probably caught things before, but, I always [00:45:00] find things that I feel like I'm discovering for the first time with each reread. Jessika: Oh, that's so cool. I'm so glad I picked up the trade paperbacks.  Mike: Yeah. I'm glad that you, I'm glad you're spearheading this. This is a really fun series to talk about. Jessika: Thank you. So Azazel tells Morpheus, basically, I'm going to consume the souls of Nada and my other companion, unless Morpheus could jump into the abyss of space of teeth,  the abyss of his Azazel's teeth, which he's just like space with teeth. Like that's what he is.  Mike: And eyes.. Jessika: And eyes. Yeah, that's right. He does have eyes too, but he's just like a bunch of Maltz mostly. Yeah. So Morpheus does it. He does the thing and jumps in, finds them, captures his Azazel  after he tries to go back on his word of letting them go. If he'd have found his company. And then asks his Raven friend, Matthew, to tell Nada that he needs to talk with her because he has some apologizing to do,  Mike: Mm Jessika: The inhabitants of hell [00:46:00] begun to return as the new angel leaders look on and dream meets with nada and makes a pitiful attempt at half-apology and Nada slaps him and in doing so extracts an actual apology, which it shouldn't take that much. But Dream seems to realize how he's in the wrong.  Although he almost immediately negates that understanding by once again, asking her to be the queen of the dream realm.  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: Bro. She was, and she was like, bro, we've done this already. I don't want to do this. I already said no to you once. And  I meant it.  Mike: I really appreciate that gaming does not make dream this infallible being, he very much shows like, no, he is. A flawed dude  Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: and he doesn't always get things immediately. Jessika: Yeah, That was really interesting. [00:47:00] That piece of it, I mean, dream has to concede, but he he basically says, let's go discuss your future.  Mike: yeah,  Jessika: Which is really neat, cause he's taken her whole life away and, and then some, and he's in a, he's a negative said this blank she's for thousands of years been tortured in hell. Like how do you even make that up?  Mike: Exactly. And that was actually something that I was curious about the first time I read it, I'm like, how do you make this right? cause that's, that is so much red in the ledger. Jessika: That's What I was thinking too. It's like, oh, okay, well, what are you going to do now, dude, aspire flowers and be like, well, babe,  Mike: What about you chocolates? I only ate half of them. Jessika: right? It's Valentine's day it's. This is what we do. Right. So, so Loki who was supposed to have been taken back to his cave of acid dripping wonder  Mike: His torture cave, Jessika: his torture cave with a snake and a woman. And torture.  Mike: where he is [00:48:00] bound in the entrails of his own son and his wife catches venom dripped from a snake's fang. And then occasionally when she empties the cup, that's catching the phenom. It causes him to shake the earth and agony. And that's why we get earthquakes. Norse mythology is a thing.  Jessika: Yes. And so Loki though has switched places, the little trickster he is with Suzano No-Ol-Mikoto who was sent back to the cavern to be forever tortured, which is rough. He didn't do anything. And then he tries to cut a deal with dream, to not get them sent back.  Mike: he, he does like, he actually cuts a deal with him. Jessika: I mean, he does cut a deal He does, which. Guy, are you at least get a, go get the other homie from the blade? He doesn't, he doesn't even go other homes. Mike: yeah, he does  Jessika: like he does.  Mike: Yeah, he does. He says what I'll do is, as I will, I will basically create , an illusion of you in that tormented space.  Jessika: Okay. I must have missed that part because I  was just like guy. [00:49:00]  Mike: it's a throwaway line. It's he basically sits there and he says like, but if I do that, you owe me a favor.  Jessika: Okay. I mean, I got that part of it. I was like, you're getting out of this, but like, whoa,  Mike: I have a lot of favorite moments in this, in this volume, but that was one of my favorites where dream asks him and he's like, why did you choose Susano No O Mikoto, but Loki basically just says, yeah, I just really don't like thunder gods. And I was like,  Jessika: Which all  Mike: also I love how much of just a turd Thor is throughout the entire time that he appears he's such a gross dude.  Like there's  Jessika: gross.  Mike: the bit where he's trying to hit on bass and he's like, do you want to touch my hammer? It gets bigger when you play with it. I'm like, blech Jessika: it was so bad. And that he's just trashed. He's just like,Ugh.  Mike: Well, I think bast actually scratches up his face too, which I thought was great.  Jessika: Yup. Yup. Mike: but it's funny because I read this in the nineties, give or take my only exposure to Thor in comic [00:50:00] books before that had been Thor, the superhero, and this was such a wildly different take on him. I was like, this is amazing cause Thor was awful and mythology. Jessika: Yeah. Oh Yeah. there were definitely some, questionable stories that I have read. Yes.  Mike: Anyway, I really enjoyed that.  Jessika: yeah. So we also find out that Nuala that was one of the two ferries is being left in the dream realm, even though the ferry deal was not the one that panned out her bros, just like, see ya. I, I wasn't ever supposed to bring you back. You're staying regardless.  Mike: Yeah. You're, a gift from the court to dream.  Jessika: Which, and he's just like, okay. And he's like, oh, by the way, I don't dig glamour here. So you can just drop the glitz. You're glimmering right now. And then she's just this little petite, mousy hair, smaller elf looking, which, you know what I did not, I didn't like the whole idea that, she had to be, [00:51:00] that,  That she felt like she had to glamour to begin with. And that, that was a whole thing.  Mike: I don't know what part of mythology it is, but, but one of the European pieces of mythology is that the elves have an ability to wrap themselves in illusion. in that they're actually these kinds of weird, gross little things. So that, that was tying into kind of the European folklore. But yeah, it's a thing. I don't remember if she shows up in later issues. I think she does, but I don't remember. Jessika: I mean, that would suck to just be like, by the way you live in the dream realm now oh and we're never featuring you again. Double rough.  Mike: yeah,  Jessika: Yeah. So after dream is like, nah, you gotta be you, boo. He goes and puts not a soul into a newborn child basically. So it's assumed that she will get to live the life that dream took from her so many centuries ago.  Mike: Yeah. He basically, he, he gives her the opportunity to live life again, kind of wiping the slate clean, which is, mean, let's be honest. That's probably the best offer that [00:52:00] he can give her. Jessika: He also puts her in a male body, which like, talk about like leveling up,  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: Come on. You're already doing better. Mike: Yeah. And then he has that really nice moment where he says something along the lines of I will remember you and love you matter what body wear. And you will always be welcome in the dream realm. I have my quibbles with, with Dream, especially with this whole storyline. But I feel like that was arguably the best solution he could have come up with. Jessika: Oh I agree. Yeah, when I did see that, that was the solution. I mean, you can't provide somebody with multiple lifetimes, but you can take away the pain of knowing that that happened and provide them with a new life that you don't interfere with. I thought it was a good, a good deal. I guess. All things considered.  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: We then cut to Lucifer, wingless, chilling on a beach, looking at the sunset where he is approached by an older man who walks [00:53:00] over and make small, talk about the sunset with him and stay till, see him tomorrow. If he's still there and Lucifer admitting that the sunset is actually really beautiful, goddammit and giving some credit to the creator. And we end the volume with the two new leaders of hell going around and making quote unquote changes  Mike: yeah. Jessika: the way things are. Basically, they're still going to be torture, but it's supposed to be phrased differently as a rehabilitation, but the angels don't quite understand the meaning of the tortures of hell, which makes it even worse.  Mike: Yeah. It's so uncomfortably abusive where they're like, no, we're doing this because we love you. And one day you'll thank us for it. Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: you're just like, woo.  Jessika: It's it was a gross abuser situation.  Mike: Yeah. And then there's that bit where one of the souls is like, no, you don't understand that makes it worse. Jessika: Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Oh Yeah. And unfortunately the angels start to embrace their [00:54:00] roles in the endless pain and suffering.  Mike: Yeah. And that's actually, that's something that is, brought back to the forefront in Lucifer, the series that Mike Carey wrote in the late nineties to early odds, which I've talked about this before, but like that series is also, I think just as good as Sandman. It's really great, we also see a lot of pantheons of different gods getting pulled into Lucifer's machinations and there's a whole thing where he makes things difficult for the angels running hell. Jessika: Oh, I'm excited to see it  Mike: It's very good. Jessika: Well what were your overall impressions of the story and who were your favorite or least favorite characters or events of this?  Mike: It's actually hard to sit there and talk about just a couple of favorite moments because I really love this collection. I loved it when I first read it. I still love it. I love the strange sadness of the overall story and the original takes on the gods. And also, I really love the twist that heaven takes over [00:55:00] the running of hell. We talked about how I really enjoyed Dream kind of, spoiling the plot twist about Loki, having switched places with Susano. And, I really soured on Dream as a character in these early issues over time. I dunno it, like, when I read this as a kid, I was like, oh, okay. He feels bad about his actions. And is going to rescue this woman that he loves from hell and now I'm like, motherfucker, you put her in hell. And she details how awful her time there was like, come on, dude, you condemned her there for millennia just because she wouldn't marry you?Like, get fucked. Jessika: And then you said, I guess I did something bad if that's how you feel.  Mike: it wasn't even, you didn't even come to this realization  on your own. You had to be told by multiple people that you fucked up. Like a mediocre white guy in his thirties, you sat there and dug your heels and went no, no. Well,  maybe Jessika: “I don't think that's right.”  Mike: maybe. All right, fine. [00:56:00] It's like, whatever, Jessika: Oh, no.  Mike: like that. I'm coming down harsher on dream than you are. Jessika: No, but that's how I felt about it too. I mean, you're just doing all the work. I'm just going to sit back and ride this ride because I'm like, I'm there with you, but I'm like passenger seat. I'm chilling. Like I don't need to be the navigator. We have maps now we have Google maps. It's fine.  Mike: I'm sitting there swinging my arms and getting all mad and getting the cardio. Jessika: Oh yeah. And I'm doing the pumping our movement of the trucks next to me. You know, I'm just along for this ride. No, I agree. He's a shit heel and a lot of these, and I'm like, I have had more than a few moments where I think to myself, how am I supposed to feel about this character? But then I think to myself, no, that's a good character. But then I think to myself, no: That's a good character. That's a good character, because that means it's complex. It's more realistic because that's what people.  Mike: Yeah. To be honest, he is that privileged male character who has never had to really stop and think about his [00:57:00] actions really not have things go his way.  And we are now at the part of tonight's program where we are finding out after having fucked around for a while. Jessika: Fucked around so hard. So Well, I really enjoyed the banquet and I really liked the different interactions between the different mythologies and how they behaved and what they ate. And it was really funny, but I also thought it was very thoughtful. In the way that it was done. And similarly with the way that each party had a different way and signal to meet with dream, it just really showed his understanding and empathy by adapting to each of his guests needs.  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: Or perhaps he's just used to doing this for each individual's dreams.  Mike: Well, it's a little bit open to interpretation because in other episodes you see his appearance changed. Like there was, you know, he was Meowpheus. Jessika: Yep.  Mike: So my take on him is that his appearance. Doesn't change. It's just, we [00:58:00] perceive them in different ways. And because we are, you know, people reading the story, we are seeing him in his siblings manifest as people.  Jessika: That's very astute, sir.  Mike: But yeah, I mean, like you looked at like the different art styles that came into play when he was meeting with the different gods. And I mean, I, I still think about how doesn' het have like a tea ceremony with Suzano when they're, when they're talking. And then I feel like it's much darker and moodier when he meets with Odin. And then again, the art style changes again when he meets with Bast.  Jessika: Yeah. Well, speaking of art, did you, did you have a favorite art moment in this volume?  Mike: Yeah. okay. So you remember how last time we talked about how I have this, one defining moment where in Men of Good Fortune hob has these three panels where his face changes?  Yeah. There's a couple of different images throughout the series that I always just kind of have pop up in my head when I think about it. And one of them is from this volume and it's the bit where he's inside a Zazzle and [00:59:00] he's like prying open the mouse and the empty space and he's floating around it feels kind of more traditionally action comic booky, and the way that it's drawn, that's not a bad thing. It's just, for some reason it feels that way. And I, I think it's really good. and I also really liked how at the end of it, he reveals that he is trapped. Azazel in a jar. It's very in keeping with how Gaiman would resolve conflict in ways that could be a giant battle, but instead they're very clever. , it was like when they had the battle between him and Dr.Destiny, and then afterwards you get the field of white and then it turns out he's just sitting in the Palm of dream's hand. Jessika: Yes. Yeah.  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: So good.  Mike: I'm curious, you're approaching this with fresh eyes because this is the first time you've read through this. So I'm wondering, do you have the same moments or are they different? Jessika: I actually thought Morpheus had a lot of really good billowing robe moments.  Mike: Yes. Jessika: Like, I mean, they didn't have, I think they may have had like one semi-full page of like a billowy robes situation. But there were quite a few shots of him, like floating into [01:00:00] hell and he was just making an entrance  Mike: yeah. I was just thinking that Jessika: here for it. Yeah.  Mike: he's got his helm  Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: the bit where  Jessika: dressed up. This is the met gala. He is here.  Mike: Yes. And then what I really liked about that was there's that moment where Lucifer is like, are you afraid of me? And more visas? Like, yes. And I'm like, all right. Not, your difficult comic book. All right. Cool. Jessika: Just being real between you and I. Absolutely.  Mike: That was great. Jessika: Yeah. So I really like, again, to your point about what you really enjoyed was the kind of feeling of movement of probably him floating through space and having that action feeling. That's what I really liked about the billowy ropes. Was it just, I could almost see them moving,  and I could feel the movement of him floating down, which was so neat. Yeah. Well, let's move along to our brain wrinkles. [01:01:00]  Mike: All right. Jessika: So this is the one thing comics or comic-related. That has just been sticking in our noggin since the last time we spoke. So, what is it for you?  Mike: Well, Sarah and I had our anniversary this week, and she got me this really cool book called American Comic Book Chronicles, the 1990s by Jason Sachs and Keith Dallas. Do you remember those American century books from time life? They were those prestige format  photo history books, and they would document major moments in America and world history from across the 20th. Jessika: I do. Yup.  Mike: I feel like every school library had a complete volume.  Jessika: Exactly.  Mike: So this is like that except for Comics. And so it's really cool. And nobody should be surprised at this point to hear that I particularly love comics from the eighties and nineties. And as I'm reading through this book, it's reminding me about how absolutely insane the early nineties were when it came to the comic book industry and [01:02:00] also just comic collecting in general. So I think we're going to have to do an episode where we talk about something related to that topic sooner or later, probably sooner. it has been rattling around my head for the past couple of days where I just reread I've read the stuff that some of it, I knew some of it I didn't and all of it's insane. Jessika: well, let's definitely talk sooner rather than later, because let's go back to childhood.  Mike: All right. You talked me into it. We're going to do a nineties episode at some point. It's fine. FINE! Jessika: Twisted his arm. There's no violence on this podcast. I'm a pacifist. God dammit.  Mike: Uh, but yeah, that's me. What about you? Jessika: Well, Mike, you told me about the podcast Bitches on Comics, which, okay. I'm not going to lie to you. I've binged the first 45 episodes since you told me about it less than a week ago, you haven't, it hasn't been a week.  Mike: I can't remember. I know it's been about a week. [01:03:00] I really like that show. Jessika: It's been about a week. Okay. It's so good. And they have their, I mean, they're very queer, which are, you know, a hundred percent I'm here for, and I got to tell you, they,  Mike: Like more queer fans of comic books. Oh, no. Jessika: Oh, no. Well, and they have this thing in there where they're. There aren't a lot of queer podcasts about comic books and I'm like, wait, we're here now, here we are. Pick us.  Mike: Yeah, exactly. I'm like, oh, can we come talk to, you want to have us on, or do you want to come on our show? Like, whatever you want to talk about, it's fine.  Jessika: I, will awkwardly approach them with my bag lunch and ask if I can sit with them.  Mike: Oh, a hundred percent. Yeah. They're great. their Mojo episode, I thought was really interesting and I wound up tweeting with them for a little while because they pointed out that there really aren't many characters like mojo. And I think I made a good point with him. I mentioned how Superman's bill and Mr. Mxyzptlk might be another equivalent character[01:04:00] where he's all about throwing shit up in the air and, disrupting everything but no, they, they were great. Jessika: So good. Well, they, in episode three, they introduced me to the novel, the refrigerator monologues, which delves into the, the idea of women in comics being fridged or killed just for entertainment sake, or to drive a plot narrative, or to make the, the main hero sad, or, basically as a plot tool and the refrigerator monologues delves into it as first-person accounts of female superheroes and how they had been used. And I went and listened to it because you can find it. I kept it on hooplah actually. So I listened to it for free and it was an audiobook.  It was very, very good. And he talked about them not having autonomy or storylines of their own. it got me thinking about the way that we write characters and who we are allowed to succeed in [01:05:00] any given situation. I don't know, I just, I highly recommend this book and I highly recommend listening to Bitches on Comics because they have got me just like thinking about shit.  Mike: Yeah, you and I should talk about a Hawk and Dove from DC in the 1980s and how they just did the most egregious fringing of Dove in a 1991 crossover in a way that was really bad. it's one of those things where I still talk about it. I've been talking about it for 20 years because it's so wild. Jessika: Man. Well.I guess we'll have a really uplifting conversation about that later. I'm sure I'm going to have no zero opinions about that.  Mike: No. Jessika: I tell you, I commit now. No opinions. I can't commit to that. Everyone knows I'm

Raw Data By P3
Imke Feldmann

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 75:37


Imke Feldmann is among the first few to have recognized the incredible value and potential of this thing called Power Pivot in Excel (which was the precursor to Power BI).  And did she ever run with it, launching quite the successful solo consultancy and training service!  She exemplifies the helpful nature of the data community through her blog, The BIccountant, where she shares her amazing Microsoft BI tool knowledge. Her background is in Finance and Accounting, but you'll quickly realize she knows a great deal more than just Finance and Accounting! Contact Imke: The BIccountant Imke's Twitter References in this Episode: Imke's Github MS Power BI Idea - Customizable Ribbon - Please Upvote :) MS Power BI Idea - Speed Up PQ By Breaking Refresh Chain - Please Upvote :) Episode Timeline: 3:00 - The value of outsourcing certain business functions, Imke's path to Power BI starts with Rob's blog, a multi-dimensional cube discussion breaks out! 19:45 - One of Power BI's strengths is collaboration, Imke LOVES her some Power Query and M and loves DAX not so much 33:45 - Imke has a BRILLIANT idea about how to improve Power Query and some other improvements that we'd like to see in PQ 52:30 -  Rob's VS code experience, how COVID has affected the consulting business, Staying solo vs growing a company and how Imke determines which clients she takes on Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello friends. Today's guest is Imke Feldmann. We've been working for a long time, nearly a year to arrange the schedules to get her on the show, and I'm so glad that we finally managed to do it. For a moment, imagine that it's 2010, 2011, that era. During that timeframe, I felt not quite alone, but a member of a very slowly growing and small community of people who had glimpsed what Power Pivot could do. And for those of you who don't know what Power Pivot is, and that was the version of Power BI, the first version that was embedded only in Excel. And at the time, the way the community grew, we'll use a metaphor for this. Imagine that the community was a map of the world and the map is all dark, but slowly, you'd see these little dim lights lighting up like one over here in the UK, one in the Southwest corner of the United States, very faintly. Rob Collie (00:00:51): And these would be people who were just becoming aware of this thing, this Power Pivot thing, and you'd watch them. They'd sort of show up on the radar, very tentatively at first kind of dipping their toe, and then that light would get brighter, and brighter, and brighter over time, as they really leaned in, and they learned more and more, and they became more adept at it. And this was the way things went for a long time. And then in 2011, out of nowhere in Germany on the map, this light comes on at full intensity, brightly declaring itself as super talented and powerful. And that was what it felt like to come across Imke Feldmann. Rob Collie (00:01:27): Like all of our guests, there's a little bit of that accidental path in her career, but also a tremendous sense of being deliberate. When this stuff crossed her radar, she appreciated it immediately. And I didn't know this until this conversation, but she quit her corporate job in 2013, the same year that I founded P3 as a real company, and became a freelancer. So for eight plus years, she has been a full time Power BI professional. There truly aren't that many people who can say that in the world. Our conversation predictably wandered. At one point, we got pretty deep into the notion of M and Power Query and it's screaming need for more buttons on its ribbon. And Imke has some fantastic ideas on how they should be addressing that. Rob Collie (00:02:14): We also, of course, naturally talked about the differences between remaining a solo freelancer as she has, in contrast to the path that I chose, which is scaling up a consulting practice business. Along the way we reprised the old and completely pointless debate of DAX versus M, I even try to get Tom hooked on M as his new obsession. We'll see how well that goes. Most importantly though, it was just a tremendous pleasure to finally get to talk to Imke at length for the first time after all these years, we literally crossed paths 10 years ago. So it was a conversation 10 years in the making compress down to an hour and change. I hope you enjoy it as much as we did, so let's get into it. Announcer (00:02:56): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention, please? Announcer (00:03:00): This is The Raw Data by P3 Adaptive podcast, with your host Rod Collie, and your cohost Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to P3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:03:24): Welcome to the show Imke Feldmann. How are you today? Imke Feldmann (00:03:27): Thank you, Rob. Great. It's a great day here over in Germany. Rob Collie (00:03:30): We have been talking about doing this for the better part of a year. So I'm glad that we're landing the guest, Imke is here. I really appreciate you doing this. So why don't we start with the basics. What are you up to these days? What do you do for a living? Imke Feldmann (00:03:48): I have people building great Power BI solutions these days. Rob Collie (00:03:55): Ah, yes. Imke Feldmann (00:03:55): That's how I fill my days. Rob Collie (00:03:58): I hear that that's a good business. Imke Feldmann (00:03:58): Yeah, it is. Rob Collie (00:04:03): So, and your website is? Imke Feldmann (00:04:06): Thebiaccountant.com. Rob Collie (00:04:07): Is that what you are on Twitter as well? Imke Feldmann (00:04:08): Yes. That's also my Twitter handle theBIccountant without an A in the middle. I just replaced the A from accountant with a BI. Rob Collie (00:04:17): There you go. Imke Feldmann (00:04:18): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:04:18): That's right. So that means that I'm going to make a tremendous leap here, wait till you see these powers of observation and deduction. You must have an accounting background? Imke Feldmann (00:04:29): I do, yes. Rob Collie (00:04:30): See you look at that. That's why I make the money. Okay, let's start there, was accounting your first career out of school? Imke Feldmann (00:04:39): Yes. I went to university and studied some economics or business stuff there, they'll know it's translated into English. And then I worked as a business controller. After that, I took over a job to lead a bookkeeping departments or to work with an area where the numbers came from basically. And then after that, I worked as the finance director, where I was responsible for a whole bunch of areas, controlling bookkeeping, IT, HR, and production. So that was quite a job with a broad range of responsibilities. Rob Collie (00:05:18): So you mentioned, kind of slipped IT into that list, right? Imke Feldmann (00:05:23): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:05:23): There's all these things in that list of responsibilities that all seemed they belong together, right? Bookkeeping, accounting, control or finance, IT. We've run into this before, with actually a number of people, that a lot of times the accounting or finance function in a company kind of wins the job of IT by default. Imke Feldmann (00:05:45): Yeah. It seems quite common in Germany, at least I would say. Rob Collie (00:05:48): I get multiple examples, but one that I can absolutely point to is Trevor Hardy from the Canadian Football League, he is in accounting, accounting and finance. And just by default, well, that's close to computers. Imke Feldmann (00:06:00): Yes. Rob Collie (00:06:01): And so it just kind of pulls the IT function in. Now is that true at really large organizations in Germany or is it a mid market thing? Imke Feldmann (00:06:09): No I would say a mid market thing. Rob Collie (00:06:12): That's true here too. So when there isn't an IT org yet it ends up being, oftentimes it falls to the finance and accounting function. Hey, that's familiar. It's kind of funny when you think about it, but it's familiar. And isn't finance itself pretty different from accounting? How much of a leap is that? What was that transition like for you taking over the finance function as well? We tend to talk about these things, at least in the US, is like almost like completely separate functions at times. Imke Feldmann (00:06:43): It depends, but at least it had something to do with my former education, which wasn't the case with IT. So, I mean, of course on a certain management level, you are responsible for things that you're not necessarily familiar with in detail. You just have to manage the people that know the details and do the jobs for you. So that was not too big an issue I must admit. Rob Collie (00:07:10): My first job out of school was Microsoft, an organization of that size, I was hyper specialized in terms of what I did. At this company at P, we are nowhere near that scale, and there's a lot more of that multiple hat wearing. I've definitely been getting used to that over the last decade, the first decade plus of my career, not so much. Imke Feldmann (00:07:31): Yeah. That's interesting because I basically went completely the other way around. I see myself now as working as a technical specialist and as a freelancer, I don't have to manage any employees anymore. Rob Collie (00:07:47): Well, so now you wear all the hats? Imke Feldmann (00:07:49): Yes. In a certain way, yes. Rob Collie (00:07:51): Okay. There's no HR department necessarily, right, so it's just you. But marketing, sales, delivery, everything. Imke Feldmann (00:08:01): Yep, that's true. Yep. And when I first started, I tried to do everything by myself, but the test changed as well. So in the past I started to outsource more things, but to external companies, not internal staff. Rob Collie (00:08:17): So you're talking about outsourcing certain functions in your current business, is that correct? Imke Feldmann (00:08:22): Yes, yes. Rob Collie (00:08:22): So it's interesting, right? Even that comes with tremendous risk when you delegate a certain function to an outside party whose incentives and interests they are never going to be 100% aligned with yours. Even we have been taken for a ride multiple times by third-party consulting firms that we've hired to perform certain functions for us. Imke Feldmann (00:08:46): Oh, no I don't outsource and your services that I directly provide to my clients. Rob Collie (00:08:49): Oh, no, no. Imke Feldmann (00:08:50): No. Rob Collie (00:08:50): No, we don't either. But I'm saying for example, our Salesforce implementation for instance- Imke Feldmann (00:08:56): Okay, mm-hmm (affirmative). Rob Collie (00:08:57): ... Has been a tremendous money sink for us over the years. Where we're at is good, but the ROI on that spend has been pretty poor. It's really easy to throw a bunch of money at that and it just grinds and grinds and grinds. And so this contrast that I'm getting around to is really important because that's not what it's like to be a good Power BI consultant, right? You're not that kind of risk for your clients. But if you go out and hire out some sort of IT related services for example, like Salesforce development, we're exposed to that same sort of drag you out into the deep water and drown you business model, that's not how we operate. I'm pretty sure that's not how you operate either. And so anyway, when you start talking about outsourcing, I just thought, oh, we should probably talk about that. Have you outsourced anything for your own sort of back office? Imke Feldmann (00:09:52): Back office stuff, yeah. My blog, WordPress stuff, or computer stuff in the background. So security [inaudible 00:09:59] the stuff and things like that, things that are not my core, I hire consultants to help me out with things that I would formally Google, spend hours Googling with. Rob Collie (00:10:09): Yes. Imke Feldmann (00:10:10): Now I just hire consultants to do that. Or for example, for Power Automate, this is something that I wanted to learn and I saw the big potential for clients. And there I also did private training basically, or coaching, or how you called it, hire specialists. Rob Collie (00:10:27): To kind of getting you going? Imke Feldmann (00:10:29): Exactly, exactly. Rob Collie (00:10:30): And those things that you've outsourced for your back office, have there been any that felt like what I described you end up deep in the spend and deepen the project going, "What's going on here?" Imke Feldmann (00:10:41): I'm usually looking for freelancers on that. And I made quiet good experiences with it, I must say. Rob Collie (00:10:49): Well done. Well done. All right. So let's rewind a bit, we'll get to the point where you're in charge of the finance department, which of course includes IT. Imke Feldmann (00:10:58): Not necessarily so. I felt quite sad for the guys who I had to manage because I said, "Well, I'm really sorry, but you will hear a lot of questions from me, especially at the beginning of our journey," because I had to learn so much in order to be a good manager for them. So that was quite different situation compared to the management roles in finance that I had before, because there I had the impression that I knew something, but IT was basically blank. Rob Collie (00:11:30): I would imagine that that experience turned out to be very important, the good cross pollination, the exposure to the IT function and sort of like seeing it from their side of the table, how valuable is that turned out to be for your career? Imke Feldmann (00:11:45): I think it was a good learning and really interesting experience for me just to feel comfortable with saying that I have no clue and ask the people how things work and just feel relaxed about not being the expert in a certain area and just be open to ask, to get a general understanding of things. Rob Collie (00:12:09): That's definitely the way to do it, is to be honest and transparent and ask all the questions you need to do. It's easier said than done. I think a lot of people feel the need to bluff in those sorts of situations. And that usually comes back to haunt them, not always. Imke Feldmann (00:12:25): No, that's true. Rob Collie (00:12:27): Some people do get away with it, which is a little sad. So at what point did you discover Power BI? Imke Feldmann (00:12:35): I didn't discover Power BI, I discovered Power Pivot, for your blog of course. Rob Collie (00:12:41): Oh, really? Imke Feldmann (00:12:43): Yes, yes, yes, yes. I think it was in, must be 2011, something like that. Rob Collie (00:12:50): Early, yeah. Imke Feldmann (00:12:51): Yeah. Quite early. When I was building a multidimensional cube with a freelancer for our finance department, then I was just searching a bit what is possible, how we should approach this and things like that. So we started with multi-dimensional cube because that was something where I could find literature about and also find experts who could have me building that. But when doing so, I really liked the whole experience and it was a really excellent project that I liked very much. And so I just searched around in the internet and tried to find out what's going on in that area. And this is where I discovered your blog. Rob Collie (00:13:35): I have no idea. First of all, I had no idea that my old blog was where you first crossed paths with this. Imke Feldmann (00:13:42): I think [inaudible 00:13:43]. Rob Collie (00:13:44): And secondly, I had no idea that it was that early. I mean, I remember when you showed up on the radar, Scott [inaudible 00:13:51] had discovered your blog and said, "Hey, Rob, have you seen this? Have you seen what she is doing? She is amazing." That wasn't 2011, that was a little bit later. I don't remember when but... Imke Feldmann (00:14:06): No, I think we've met first. I think we met on the Mr. XR Forum on some crazy stuff I did there. I cannot even remember what that was, but I started blogging in 2015 and we definitely met before. Rob Collie (00:14:21): That's what it was. It was the forums. And Scott was the one that had stumbled upon what you were doing there and brought my attention to it. I was like, whoa. It was like... Imke Feldmann (00:14:34): That last really some crazy stuff. I think I was moving data models from one Excel file to another or something like that. Some crazy stuff with [inaudible 00:14:43] and so on. Rob Collie (00:14:44): You obviously remember a better than I do. But I just remember being jaw dropped, blown away, impressed, by what you were doing. And the thing is the world of Power Pivot interest at that point in time still seems so small. The community still seems so small that for you to emerge on our radar fully formed, already blowing our minds, that was the first thing we ever heard from you. That was a real outlier because usually the way the curve of awareness went with other members of the community is that like, you'd see something modest from them. And you'd sorta like witnessed their upward trajectory as they developed. Of course, you've continued to improve and learn and all of that since then. But as far as our experience of it, it was you just showed up already at the graduate level, just like where did she come from? So cool. So you said that you enjoyed the multi-dimensional cube project? Imke Feldmann (00:15:43): Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yes. I don't know MDX, but I totally enjoyed the project. So being able to build a reporting solution for my own company, basically then for the company I worked for, and doing it live with a consultant with a freelancer on my hand, discussing how things should look like and just seeing the thing form before my eyes and grow. And this was just such an enjoyable experience for me. Rob Collie (00:16:11): So the thing that's striking about that for me is, there's no doubt that the multi-dimensional product from Microsoft was a valuable product. It did good things. But I never have heard someone say that they really enjoyed the implementation process as a client, right? Imke Feldmann (00:16:31): Okay. Rob Collie (00:16:31): You had a freelancer doing the work. So something you said there really jumped out at me, it was, sort of like doing the project live. So the way that this worked traditionally, at least in the US, is the consultant would interview you about your requirements and write a big long requirements document and then disappear and go build a whole bunch of stuff and come back and show it to you, and it's completely not what anyone expected. It's almost like you're on completely different planets. Obviously, if you'd had that experience, you would not be saying that you enjoyed it. So there had to be something different about the way that you and that freelancer interacted. Do you remember what the workflow was like? Imke Feldmann (00:17:16): What we did is that we often met together and just looked at where we're at and what the next steps should be. And we definitely had specific targets in mind. So there were some reports that I had defined as a target, and around these reports I was aware that we needed something that a proper data model, because I also knew that I wanted to have some sort of a general set up that could be carried from Excel as well. So I knew about cube functions, and I knew that on one hand I needed these reports that had formerly been within our ERP system. Also, I wanted them to be in a separate solution that was under my control and independent from the ERP system. And on the other hand, I wanted some more. So I wanted the flexibility to be able to vary this data and for certain other purposes in the controlling department as well. So basically being able to do ad hoc analysis on it. Imke Feldmann (00:18:23): And we met often and I showed a certain interest in how the table logic was created. So I knew that the MDX was over my head at the time, but I showed a very strong interest in which table are created, how they relate to each other, and that was quite unusual. At least this is what the [inaudible 00:18:47] the freelancer told me. Rob Collie (00:18:49): I bet. Imke Feldmann (00:18:50): He said that he doesn't see that very often that clients showed this sort of interest. Rob Collie (00:18:56): Did he say, "Yeah. You really seem to be having fun with this. Most of my clients don't enjoy this." You said that you met very often, so were there times where he was writing MDX while you were in the room? Imke Feldmann (00:19:10): Sometimes yes, because I said, "Well, can we switch this a bit or make some changes?" And sometimes he said, "Well, I can try adjust now." Because he came over for one day or half a day, and then we spoke things through and defined further things. And if we were finishing early, he would just stay and do some coding there. But apart from that, he would work from home and do the big stuff. Rob Collie (00:19:37): OLAP originally it stands for online analytical processing, where online meant not batch, right? It meant you could ask a question and get the answer while you were still sitting there. Imke Feldmann (00:19:51): Okay. Oh, really? Rob Collie (00:19:53): That's what online meant. Imke Feldmann (00:19:54): It's interesting. Rob Collie (00:19:56): It basically meant almost like real time. It's a cousin of real time, that's what online meant at that point, as opposed to offline where you write a query and submit it and come back next week right? So that's what the online and OLAP comes from. Imke Feldmann (00:20:12): Oh, interesting. Rob Collie (00:20:13): We would pick a different terminology of OLAP were it invented today. So something interesting about, it sounds like your experience, and I did not anticipate drilling into your experience with multi-dimensional on this conversation, but I think it's really important is that at least some portion of that project that you sponsored and implemented with the freelancer, at least some portion of the work was similarly performed online. Meaning the two of you were sort of in real time communication as things evolved. And the old model and the vast majority of multidimensional solutions that have ever been built in the world, the MDX powered solutions, were built and an offline model, where the majority of the communication supposedly takes place in the form of a requirements document. Rob Collie (00:21:05): And that was a deeply, deeply, deeply flawed approach to the problem, that just doesn't actually work. So I guess it's not surprising to me that the one time I've ever heard someone say they really enjoyed that multi-dimensional project, that at least a portion of that multidimensional project was sort of almost like real-time collaboratively performed rather than completely asynchronous, right? I guess we want to be really geeky, we could say it was a synchronous model of communication as opposed to an asynchronous one. And Power BI really facilitates that kind of interaction. Imke Feldmann (00:21:41): Absolutely. Rob Collie (00:21:42): The reason why the MDX multi-dimensional model worked the way it did, or there was two reasons, one is a legitimate one on one of them is more cynical. So the legitimate reason is, is that it required reprocessing of the cube for every change, it's just too slow, right? The stakeholder, the business stakeholder doesn't typically have the time or the patience to sit there while the code's being written, because it's so long between even just implementing a formula change sometimes would be, well, we need to wait an hour. And so the attention span of the business person can't be held for good reason there, right? And so that sort of drove it into an asynchronous model. Rob Collie (00:22:23): The other reason is, is that that is asynchronous model turned out to be a really good business model for the consultants, because the fact that it didn't work meant that every project lasted forever. And so that's the cynical reason. But Power BI is not long delays. You change the measure formula, or you add an extra relationship, or heck even bringing in a new table, just a brand new table, bring it in, it wasn't even in the model, now it's in the model. End to end that can sometimes be measured in minutes or even seconds. And so you can retain engaged collaborative interest. Now it's not like you're always doing that, right? There's still room for offline asynchronous work in our business, but really critical portions of it can be performed the other way. And I think that makes a huge difference. Imke Feldmann (00:23:13): Yep. And that's what I like about it. So it's so great to be able to have, as a consultant, to perform really relatively large tasks without any further involvement of other people. Which, I mean, honestly, I don't call myself a team worker, not because I don't love other people also, but teamwork means you have to communicate with other people, make sure that they know what you're working on. So there are so many interfaces that have to be maintained if you're working with other people. And so I really laugh the way I work currently being able to deliver full solutions as a one woman show consultant. That is really a pleasure for me. That's really my preferred way of work, I must say. Because I can really focus on the things that have to be done and I'm able to deliver value in a relatively short time for the clients. Rob Collie (00:24:14): That's a really interesting concept. There are certain kinds of problems in which collaboration, a team collaboration is absolutely necessary. The magic of collaboration sometimes can beat problems that no individual could ever beat. At the same time though, there's this other dynamic, right, where having a team working on a problem is actually a real liability because the communication complexity between the people becomes the majority of the work. Here's a really hyper simplified example. There used to be sort of a three-person committee, if you will, that was running our company P3, me and two other people. Imke Feldmann (00:24:57): Mm-hmm (affirmative). Rob Collie (00:24:58): And so all leadership decisions were essentially handled at that level. Well, things change, people move on, right? And so we went from a three person committee to a two person committee. We didn't anticipate the two of us who stayed, right? We did not anticipate how much simpler that was going to make things. We thought, just do the math, right, it's going to be like, well, it's one less person to get on the same page. So it's going to be a one-third reduction in complexity. It was actually double that because we went from having three pairs of communication, right, the triangle has three sides, to a line that only has one side, right? So there was only one linkage that needed to be maintained as opposed to three geometrically, combinatorially, whatever we're going to say, right? It just became- Imke Feldmann (00:25:45): Exponential. Rob Collie (00:25:45): ... Exponetially simpler. And so for problems that can be soloed, you have this amazing savings in efficiency, in clarity, even, right? Imke Feldmann (00:25:59): Yup. Rob Collie (00:25:59): There's just so many advantages when you can execute as one person, then there's the other examples like our company at our size now, even ignoring the number of consultants that we need to do our business, just the back office alone, we need the difference in skills. We need the difference in talents and interests and everything. We simply could not exist without that kind of collaboration. However, when our consultants were working with a client, usually it's essentially a one-on-one type of thing, right? We don't typically put teams of consultants on the same project. We might have multiple consultants working for the same client and they might be building something that's somehow integrated, but it's still very similar, I think to your model, when you actually watch sort of the work being done, there's this amazing savings and complexities. Imke Feldmann (00:26:50): Yup, that's true. Of course I have a network in the background. So when big problems arise where I need brain input, of course, I have a network, but it's not a former company. Rob Collie (00:27:02): And that's how we work too, right? We have all kinds of internal Slack channels. For some reason we adopted Slack years ago before Teams was really a thing. So Slack is sort of like our internal social network. There's a lot of discussion of problems, and solutions, and a lot of knowledge sharing, and people helping each other out behind the scenes in that same way. Again, we do bring multiple consultants into particularly large projects, but it's not like there's three people working together on the same formula. In Power BI, the things that you do in ETL, the things that you do in power query are intimately interrelated with the data model and the decks that you need to create. And imagine parceling that out to three different people. You have one formula writer, one data modeler, one ETL specialist, you would never ever get anywhere in that kind of approach. Imke Feldmann (00:28:00): Not necessarily. I mean, the tax people are the person responsible for the data model. He could write down his requirements. He could define the tables basically. And then someone could try to get the data from the sources. But of course, then you get some feedback that the data isn't there or that the model has to be shaped in a different way. So it has two sides to it. But that's interesting to see that you have the same experience, that Power BI models or solutions of a certain size that can very well be handled by one person alone. And that really brings speed, and flexibility, and agility to the whole development process I think. Rob Collie (00:28:41): You communicate with yourself at what's above giga? Peta, petabit? you communicate with yourself at petabit speed and you communicate with others through a noisy 2,400 baud modem that's constantly breaking up. It's amazing what that can do for you sometimes. So there comes a point in your journey where you decide to go freelance. Imke Feldmann (00:29:07): Yup. Rob Collie (00:29:08): That's a courageous leap. When did that happen and what led you to that conclusion? Imke Feldmann (00:29:13): I made the decision in 2012 already to do that. Rob Collie (00:29:19): Wow. Imke Feldmann (00:29:20): And I just saw the light. I just saw the light in Power Pivot and then Power Query came along and I saw what Microsoft was after. And as I said, I enjoyed the building of the cube, getting my hands dirty, reading about the technologies behind it and so on. And this was what I felt passionate about. And I also had the idea that I needed some break from company politics. And so I just thought, well, I give it a try. And if it doesn't work, I can find a job after that or find a company where I work for at any time after that. So I just tried it and it worked. Rob Collie (00:30:05): So you decided in 2012, did you make the break in 2012 as well? Imke Feldmann (00:30:12): I prepared it, and then I just in 2013, I started solo. Rob Collie (00:30:18): Okay. 2013 is also when we formally formed our company. For 2010-2013, it was a blog. I had other jobs. I had other clients essentially, but I wasn't really hanging out the shingle so to speak, as you know, we're not an actual business really until 2013. And I guess it's not much accident that we both kind of did the same thing about the same time, it's that demand was finally sufficient I think in 2013 to support going solo. In 2012, there weren't enough clients to even support one consultant. And so, oh, that's great. And I think you really liked Power Query too, does M speak to you? Imke Feldmann (00:31:02): Yes. Yes. Yeah. Rob Collie (00:31:03): It does, doesn't it? Imke Feldmann (00:31:04): I really prefer Power Query or M over DAX, I must admit. It has been much more liable to me than DAX. Rob Collie (00:31:15): Oh, and I liked you so much before you said that. I'm team DAX all the way. Imke Feldmann (00:31:23): I know. I know. I know. I mean, of course I love to use DAX as well, but I really feel very, very strong about Power Query. And I mean, I had such a great journey with it. I mean, it was really [inaudible 00:31:35] work for me personally, that I did with it. And it was just a great journey to understand how things work. I mean, this has been the first coding language for me that I really learned. And it was just a great journey to learn all the things and starting to blog about it. And of course, I started basically helping people in the forum, that's where I basically built my knowledge about it, solving other people's problems. And this was just a great journey. And Polar Query has always been good to me than DAX. Rob Collie (00:32:14): This is really cool, right? So you fell in love with Power Pivot, so DAX and data model, right? There was no Power Query. Imke Feldmann (00:32:21): Mm-hmm (affirmative)-, that's true. Rob Collie (00:32:23): Okay. And because we had no Power Query, there were many, many, many things you couldn't do in Power Pivot unless your data source was a database. Imke Feldmann (00:32:30): Yup. Rob Collie (00:32:31): Because you needed views created that gave you the right shape tables, right? If your original data source didn't have a lookup table, a dimension table, you had to make one. And how are you going to make one without Power Query? It gets crazy, right? At least unbelievable. So try to mentally travel back for a moment to the point in time where you're willing to, and not just, it doesn't sound like you were just willing to, you were eager to go solo to become a freelancer, right, with just DAX and data modeling. And then after that, this thing comes along that you light up when you talk about. You didn't have this thing that you love, but you were already in, that doesn't happen very often. Imke Feldmann (00:33:18): It could be that loved DAX at the beginning, but it just started to disappoint me at sometimes. Rob Collie (00:33:29): Oh, okay. Thomas LaRock (00:33:29): It disappoints everyone. Rob Collie (00:33:29): I'm just devastated. Imke Feldmann (00:33:35): No, I mean, it's amazing what DAX can do, but I mean, we all know it looks easy at the beginning, but then you can really get trapped in certain situations. Rob Collie (00:33:46): Yeah. I described these two things is like the length and width of a rectangle, Power Query and DAX. Take your pick, which one's the width, which one's the length? I don't care. And then we ask which one is more responsible for the area of the rectangle, right? Neither. You can double the length of either of them and it doubles the area of the rectangle. So it's really ironic that I'm so sort of firmly on team DAX for a number of reasons. Number one, is that I'm really not actually that good at it compared to the people who've come along since. Like my book, for instance, I think, I look at it as this is the 100 and maybe the 200 level course at university, maybe the first in the second course, maybe, but it's definitely not the third course. The thing that you take in your third or fourth year of university, that's not covered in my book in terms of DAX. Rob Collie (00:34:44): And basically every one of the consultants at our company is better at DAX than I am. And that's great. That's really good. And the other thing that's ironic about my love of DAX over M, is if these two were in conflict, which they aren't. Imke Feldmann (00:35:00): No they are. Rob Collie (00:35:02): Is that I actually was trying for years to get a Power Query like project started on the Excel team. I knew how much time was being chewed up in the world just transforming data, not analyzing it even, just getting things ready for analysis. It's just ungodly amounts of time. And so I was obsessed with end-user ETL. When I was on the Excel team, it was like a running joke, someone would mention in a meeting, "Well, that's kind of like ETL," and other people would go, "Oh no, no, don't say that in front of Rob, he's going to get started and he won't shut up about it for the next 30 minutes." On the podcast with the Power Query team, I told them I'm really glad that no one ever agreed to fund my project on the Excel team because now that I see what Power Query is like I grossly underestimated how much work needed to go into something like that. And I'm glad that Microsoft isn't saddled with some old and completely inadequate solution to the Power Query space, because now that I've seen what the real thing looks like, I'm like, "Oh my gosh, we would've never been able to pull that off." Rob Collie (00:36:14): So the thing that I was most obsessed with is the thing that now that it's actually been built, for some reason, I just find M to be, I don't know, there's like a reverse gravity there that pushes me away. Imke Feldmann (00:36:26): What I actually would like to see is that there's less need to use M in the Power Query product. So first, the only thing I was dreaming about was finally to have a function library that can easily be shipped from then, or that you can download from internet or wherever, where you can use additional functions in your M code. So this was the first thing that I was really passionate about and thought that we should have such a thing in Power Query to be able to make more cool things, or group steps together. But now what I really think we should actually have and see in Power Query is the ability to build our own ribbons and to the query editor. Rob Collie (00:37:13): Yes. Imke Feldmann (00:37:13): Like we have in an Excel. So this is something that in my eyes would really bring a big push to the product and actually would make so much sense for the people who start using these products. I mean the whole Power platform can have so many benefits for finance department, all departments, but I mean, I'm passionate about finance departments. But have you counted how many low-code languages are in there, if you include Power Apps and Power Automate and all these things? Rob Collie (00:37:50): Low-code. Imke Feldmann (00:37:50): And honestly, in order to come up with any solution that makes sense in a business environment, I would say in all of these solutions, there is no way around the code at the end. I mean, you get quite far with clicky, clicky, but I haven't seen solutions where you get around the languages. And now imagine the typical finance people who really they know the Excel formulas and some of them might know VBA as well. And now their server uses new low-code, no-code word, and just get your head around about five or six new languages that you all have to know and learn in order to get something useful and so on. So I think that's just not feasible for people who have real jobs in the business to learn all that. Rob Collie (00:38:42): Well, that's what you're here for, right? That's what your business is for and that's what P3 is for. Imke Feldmann (00:38:48): We get them started and the products are great. And if there are people in the companies who have a drive to learn things and take the time they get their heads around it, but it could be easier. It could be easier with things like that, where we could provide additional user interfaces and just make it even easier for people to build great solutions for them or adapt solutions that consultants had build initially, but to maintain them by themselves and make adjustments to them if needed. Rob Collie (00:39:19): So [inaudible 00:39:20] has an old joke where he says, when he's doing a presentation or something, he says, "That's a good question. And I define good question as a question I know the answer to, right." And then he says, "But then a great question is a question that is covered by the very next slide." So there's a similar parallel joke to make here, which is that, that idea you just talked about with the ribbons and everything, right? So if I said, it's a smart idea, what I would mean is, again, this is a joke, right? I would mean that that's an idea that I agree with and have kind of already had. But if I say it's a brilliant idea- Imke Feldmann (00:39:55): Okay. Rob Collie (00:39:56): ... Then it's an even better version of an idea that I've already had that has never occurred to me. Your idea is a brilliant idea. Imke Feldmann (00:40:02): Okay. Rob Collie (00:40:06): It goes beyond. So I have been advocating privately behind the scenes with the Power Query team forever telling them that they need about three or four more ribbon tabs. There's just way too many commonly encountered problems for which you can imagine there being a button for, and there's no button. Imke Feldmann (00:40:28): Exactly. Rob Collie (00:40:29): And it's like, I don't understand. I used to be on teams like that, but I don't understand why they haven't gotten to this. Because it seems so low hanging fruit. They've already built the engine, they've built the language, right? The language can already handle this, but you actually had two brilliant ideas in there that had never occurred to me. First of all, I'm used to the idea that the community can't contribute libraries of functions, they can't do that for DAX. Imke Feldmann (00:40:57): Mm-hmm (affirmative). Rob Collie (00:40:58): That's not even like engineering possible for DAX. And the reason for it is, is that the DAX engine is so heavily optimized in so many ways that there'd be no way to plug in some new function that's unpredictable in terms of what it needs to do. All of these things, they're all inherently interrelated and they make changes in the storage and the query engine to make this function work better and vice versa, because it has to take advantage of the index compression scheme and all of that kind of stuff. It's actually not possible, is the wrong word, but it's actually orders of magnitude more difficult, if not impossible to allow DAX to have UDF, user-defined function type of feature. Rob Collie (00:41:42): I don't think Power Query is like that though. Maybe naively, because again, I'm not on the internals team on the Power Query side. But it does seem like a UDF capability is at least much more feasible- Imke Feldmann (00:41:53): Absolutely. Rob Collie (00:41:54): ... For Power Query, which does execute row by row essentially. Other languages have this, right? One of the reasons that R is so popular is not that R is so awesome, is that R has tremendous libraries of commonly solved problems that you can just go grab off the internet or off the shelf and plug into your solution. Imke Feldmann (00:42:14): I have my own library I've created. You can go to my GitHub and you'll see 50, 60 custom M functions. You can package them in a record and [inaudible 00:42:24] them as a library and your M code, or you could even connect live to them and run them with an execute statement. But this is too difficult, although it's just a couple of clicks, but it's too difficult or at least intimidating for the beginners, who really Power Query beginners who start with the products, I think there's so much potential to make their life easier. And that's not through some coding stuff, or I know this function, I know that function, that's really can only come in my eyes through user interface with buttons. Rob Collie (00:42:59): Yeah, I agree. And just as importantly for me, is that I might actually come around and be like, just as much team Power Query as team DAX. Honestly, my frustration is just the M language and just my total lack of desire to learn it. [crosstalk 00:43:16]. It is what it really comes down to. It's not about M, it's not about Power Query, it's about me. Whereas again, I know the need that it fills is massively important. So it's not that I think it's a bad mission, I think it's like the mission in a lot of ways. I was obsessed with it long before I ever crossed paths with business intelligence, I was obsessed with data transformation, end user data transformation. It's just a problem that's about as ubiquitous as it gets. So let's make it happen. We agree, the two of us, that's it, right? It's like we need to go provide a unified front. Imke Feldmann (00:43:52): I think that that's an idea in the idea forum, I might send the link that you can maybe post. Rob Collie (00:43:56): We want that thing up, voted to the moon. I'll even go figure out what my sign in is on the ideas side. Imke Feldmann (00:44:08): Oh, good luck with it. Rob Collie (00:44:09): Which is absolutely impossible. I have no idea which of the 14 counts. And then I'll try to create a new one and it'll go, "Nah, you're not allowed to. We know it's you, but we won't tell you who it is, what your email address is." So I completely agree. So there's so many problems. I always struggle to produce the list. It's like I need to be writing down the list of things that are crucial, but here's an example. Remove duplicates, but control which duplicate you keep. That's a problem that can't be solved in the GUI today. Imke Feldmann (00:44:48): And you need the intimidating type of buffer that you have to write by hand around it, which is just pain. Rob Collie (00:44:56): Remove dups and don't care which one you keep. Okay, fine. That's a great simple button. There should be an advanced section that allows you to specify, oh, but before you keep the dups, sort by this column or sort in the following manner. Imke Feldmann (00:45:10): Exactly. Rob Collie (00:45:10): And then keep the first one of each group. It's easy for us to say outside the team, but apparently that is a, we just make a joke, right? That's apparently a Manhattan project level of software to add that extra button. Anyway, we'll get that. Thomas LaRock (00:45:27): That doesn't make sense to me though. I'm fascinated by all of your conversation and you guys are a hundred miles away from me in a lot of this stuff, but I could listen to it all day. But no, the fact that Excel can't do the remove duplicates, except for like the first of each one of something, that's a simple group by. In my head, I sit there and go that's easily solvable because Excel and DAX does such great stuff that I would never want to do in TSQL, how the hell do we stumble across a thing that's been solved by straight up SQL language that somehow can't get into an Excel? Rob Collie (00:46:01): Well, let's explain the problem very clearly and see if we're on the same page as to what the problem is, but either way it'll be valuable. So let's say you have a whole bunch of orders, a table full of orders. That is a really wide Franken table. It's got things like customer ID, customer address, customer phone number, but also what product they ordered, and how much of it, and how much it cost. Okay, and a date, a date of the order. All right. And you've been given this table because the people that are responsible for this system, they think that what you want is a report and not a data source. And this is incredibly common. Okay. So you need to extract a customer's dimension or lookup table out of this. You need to create a customer's table so that you can build a good star schema model. Okay. And Power Query is right there to help you. Power Query will help you invent a customer's look up table where one wasn't provided, and that's awesome. Rob Collie (00:46:58): Okay. So you say, okay, see customer ID this column. I want to remove duplicates based on that column. Okay, great. But now it's just that the order that the data came in from the report file or the database or whatever that will determine which duplicate is kept. What you really want to do of course is take the most recent customer order of each customer ID because they've probably moved. They may have changed phone numbers, whatever, right? You want their most recent contact information. You don't want their contact information for 15 years ago. And the M language allows you to solve this problem essentially sort by date, and then keep the most recent, but only if you get into the code manually, and as Imke points out, it's not even if you go into the code, the things that you would want to do, if you do a sort, you can add a sort step to the Power Query with the buttons, with the GUI, and then you do the remove duplicates and it ignores the source. Imke Feldmann (00:47:59): Yes. Rob Collie (00:48:02): The GUI almost tries to tell you that it's impossible, but if you know about table dot buffer. Imke Feldmann (00:48:07): So the question is why do we have a sort command in Power Query when it doesn't give the sort order? I mean, that is the question to ask. But that's how it is. Rob Collie (00:48:16): It sorts the results. It sorts the results, it just doesn't sort for the intermediate steps. Imke Feldmann (00:48:20): Why? No, that's quite technical. But would just be great if such a common task could be done with buttons that is reliable at the end. I fully agree. Rob Collie (00:48:35): So Tom, I think this one's really just an example of, again, I truly think that M and Power Query, just like DAX and data modeling, the Power BI data modeling, both of these things belong in the software hall of fame of all time. It is amazing, Power Query, M, is just ridiculously amazing. It's one of the best things ever invented. Remember this is someone who's associated with being a critic of it. Imke Feldmann (00:49:04): Yeah, you're making progress, it's great to see. Rob Collie (00:49:07): And yet I'm telling you that it's one of the top five things ever invented probably. And I think there's a certain tendency when you've done something that amazing to lose track of the last mile. I think it's more of a human thing. Imke Feldmann (00:49:19): Maybe, but I mean, what I see is that they are investing quite a lot in data flows, which makes a lot of sense as well in my eyes. Rob Collie (00:49:27): All that really does though, as far as you and I are concerned, Imke, is it makes it even more important that they solve this problem. Because it's now exposed in two different usage scenarios. Imke Feldmann (00:49:37): Yeah, you're right. Rob Collie (00:49:39): And I want my data flow to be able to control which duplicates are kept too. So that's what I'm saying. There's all these big sort of infrastructural technical challenges that do tend to draw resources. And it's not a neglect thing. Imke Feldmann (00:49:54): No, no. Rob Collie (00:49:54): It isn't like a willful failure or anything like that, I don't want to paint that kind of negative of a picture. Imke Feldmann (00:49:59): No. Rob Collie (00:50:00): It's just that out here in reality, the inability to do, even if we just identified the top 10 things like this, addressing those top 10 things with GUI, with buttons, what have I think in the world, maybe even a bigger impact than the entire data flows project, right? Because you would expand the footprint of human beings that are advocates of this stuff and then you go build data flows. You don't have to think of it as either or, right? They should do both. It's just that I think it's hard to appreciate the impact of those 10 buttons when you're on the software team. It's easier to appreciate the impact of data flows, which is massive. I don't mean to denigrate that. I think it's crazy good. It's just that this other thing is of a similar magnitude in terms of benefit, but it's harder to appreciate when you're on the software team. It's easier to appreciate when you're out here in the trenches, living it every single day. And every time I run into a problem like this, I have to put my hand up and say to my own team, I have to say, " Help." Thomas LaRock (00:51:02): So a casual observation I have is that you wish for there to exist one tool that will handle all of your data janitorial needs. And that tool doesn't necessarily exist because life is dirty, so is your data and you're never going to anticipate everything possible. Now, should that sorting functionality exist in that duplicates, the scenario gave me? Yeah, probably. But there's always going to be something next. And that's why I go to you and I say, the thing that you've described to me is you need your data to be tidy so that it can be consumed and used by a lot of these features that we've talked about today. And in order to get to tidy data, there's no necessarily one tool. Thomas LaRock (00:51:48): You're a big fan of the ETL, Rob. You know that, hey, maybe I need to take the source data and run it through some Python scripts, or some M, or something first before it goes to this next thing. And that's the reality that we really have. What you're wishing for is the one tool, the one button to rule it all. And that's going to take a while before that ever comes around. Rob Collie (00:52:09): The thing is though, is that M is ridiculously complete. Imke Feldmann (00:52:14): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:52:15): You can do anything with it. And it's a language that's optimized for data transformation. So I know you can do anything with C++ too, right? But this is a data crunching, data transformation, specialized language that is really complete. And its UI is woefully under serving the capabilities of the engine. And so I suppose we could imagine and deliberately design a data transformation scenario that maybe M couldn't do it. Imke Feldmann (00:52:45): No. Rob Collie (00:52:46): I think that'd be a very difficult challenge considering how good M is. Imke Feldmann (00:52:49): I think in terms of logic, M can do anything, but in terms of performance, there is some room for improvements. So because there's a streaming semantic running in the background, and as long as the stream runs through all the steps, if you have complex queries, this can really slow things down. And currently there is no button or command in the M language to cut the stream and say, well, stop it here and buffer what you have calculated until here, and then continue from there. So if you have really complex stuff that would benefit from an intermediate buffer, then you can store that in an Azure blob or CSV, or whatever. Specifically if you're working with data flows, you can create some automatic processes that would enable this kind of buffering. Imke Feldmann (00:53:45): And then you will see that the speed of the whole process that can really increase dramatically because in some situations, the speed in M drops exponentially. And these are occasions where a buffer would really helped things, but we don't have it yet in the engine of Power Query. So this was what really be something else that would be fairly beneficial if we wouldn't have to make these work-arounds through things. Rob Collie (00:54:14): Tom, that just occurred to me, I can't believe this is the first time that this thought has crossed my mind. But I think that you might fall into an abyss of love with M. Thomas LaRock (00:54:28): Well, I'm a huge James Bond fan, but... Rob Collie (00:54:30): Oh, no. I think you would really, really just dig it. Thomas LaRock (00:54:38): I don't think I have time to take on a new relationship at this point. I'm still with Python and R, so I mean, I don't know. I'm not going to disagree, I'm just, please don't start a new addiction for me. Rob Collie (00:54:51): Think of the content though, that you could produce over time. The M versus SQL versus Python treatises. Thomas LaRock (00:54:59): Cookbook. Rob Collie (00:55:00): You were made for this mission Tom. Thomas LaRock (00:55:03): Okay. So we'll have to talk later about it. You can sweet talk me. You know I've let you sweet talk me into any [inaudible 00:55:08]. Rob Collie (00:55:08): That's right, that's right. Come on, Tom. Get into M, you know that thing that I have nothing but praise for, that I just love to death, you need to do that. Thomas LaRock (00:55:18): For you. That's what you want to do, is you want to learn it but [inaudible 00:55:21] through me. Rob Collie (00:55:22): Oh, that wouldn't work. I would be, "Oh yeah, well this is still M." Thomas LaRock (00:55:29): You're going to be like, "Tom, where's your latest blog post on M so I can read it and hate upon it even more?" Rob Collie (00:55:37): No, I would not read. Just as the first step. Thomas LaRock (00:55:42): I'm going to read it, but not leave a comment about how much I hate it. Rob Collie (00:55:45): Let's go back to talking about how we did a bunch of big fat Fisher-Price buttons for me to mash my thumbs in the UI. That's what I need. Thomas LaRock (00:55:54): You know what? I'll do that. I'll open up VS code and I'll just build this one big button, it's Rob's button. Rob Collie (00:56:00): Hey, you won't believe this, but I recently installed VS code. Thomas LaRock (00:56:03): I don't believe it, why? Rob Collie (00:56:05): Well, because I needed to edit, not even write, because I'm not capable of it. I needed to edit an interface, add on customization for World of Warcraft. And the only purpose of this World of Warcraft add on interface modification was to allow me to drop snarky comments into a particular channel of the conversation based on the button that I press. I needed a menu of snarky comments to drop at particular points in time. It's hard to type them out all the time, right? So it's just like, now here we go. I dropped one of those. I dropped one of those. Thomas LaRock (00:56:37): We got to get you a real job or something. You got way too much time on your hands. Rob Collie (00:56:42): That was my number one contribution to the World of Warcraft Guild. For a couple of months, there was the snarky rogue chat. Thomas LaRock (00:56:48): You know that is on brand. Rob Collie (00:56:56): It prefixed every comment in the chat with a prefix, you came from rogue chat 9,000. So that people who aren't on the joke were like, "Why is this guy, he's usually very quiet, become so obnoxious. Look at the things he's saying." Anyway. So VS code. And that also involved GitHub. Because my friend who wrote the stub, the shell of this add on for me is a vice president at GitHub. So of course he puts the code in GitHub and points me to it and then points me to VS code, and I'm like, "Oh, you're making me work now? Okay. But you wrote the shell for me, so okay. All right. I'll play ball." So it doesn't sound like you regret your decision to go solo. Imke Feldmann (00:57:40): Absolutely. Rob Collie (00:57:41): You're not looking to go back to corporate life. Imke Feldmann (00:57:43): Absolutely not. Rob Collie (00:57:44): Not missing that. So what can you tell us about the last year or two? What impact, if any, did COVID have on your business? Imke Feldmann (00:57:52): Business has grown especially the last year. So people needed more reports than ever and solutions. So it really, I don't know whether it was COVID effect or just the fact that Power BI is growing and growing. Rob Collie (00:58:07): I'm sure it's both. So the dynamic we saw during 2020. So 2020 would be the, if you're going to have a year that was negatively impacted by COVID, it would have been 2020. And what we saw in 2020 was that we were definitely not acquiring new clients. We weren't making new relationships at nearly the rate we had been people weren't taking risks on meeting a new BI firm. That wasn't something that there was as much appetite for as there had been. However, amongst the clients where we already had a good relationship, we'd already been working with them for a while, their needs for data work expanded as a result of COVID because it did, it created all kinds of new problems and it invalidated so many existing blueprints of tribal knowledge of how we run the business. When reality changes, you need new maps, you need new campuses. Rob Collie (00:59:04): And so on net, we ended up our overall business still grew modestly over the course of 2020, year over year compared to 2019. But then when the new clients started to become viable again, people started looking, we're interested in making new relationships, 2021 has been a very, very strong year of growth, not moderate, really kind of crazy. How do you keep up with increased demand as a one person shop? Imke Feldmann (00:59:35): Saying no. Rob Collie (00:59:36): You have to make your peace with saying no. At one point in my history, I faced sort of the same thing and I decided not to say no, and instead decided to grow the company. That brought an enormous amount of risk and stress- Imke Feldmann (00:59:55): I can imagine. Rob Collie (00:59:55): ... Into my life that I did not anticipate its magnitude. I'm sure I anticipated it, but I didn't anticipate the magnitude of it. I'm very grateful that I'd made that decision though, because where we are today is incredible. That's a rocky transition. So today everything runs like clockwork basically. We have a lot of growth ahead of us that seems almost like it's just going to happen, we're just going to keep growing for a long time. But we had to set the table we had to build our organism as a company into a very different form than what it had been when it was just me. And that molting process it was very painful. I don't pretend that the scaling decision is the right decision, it's very much a personal one. I've certainly lived that. If the version of me that made the decision to scale the company knew everything that was coming, it would have been a much harder decision to make. You kind of have to have a little bit of naive optimism even to make that leap. Imke Feldmann (01:00:57): I can imagine that once you get these things figured out and with the dynamic that the product has, that has a good chance to get it going into a very successful business, I believe. Rob Collie (01:01:10): Well, with your profile and with the growing demand for these sorts of services, the percentage of no that you have to say is just going to keep going up. Imke Feldmann (01:01:20): Yeah. But I made my decision and that's just fine. Rob Collie (01:01:25): I'm very supportive of that decision. I don't have any criticism of it, again, especially knowing what I know now. But if there's going to be come a point where you're going to be saying yes 1% of the time, and the answer to that is ultimately, well, you just raise your rates, which is also very difficult to do. In the end, it's almost like an auction for your services. You need to run yourself like Google. There's a 40 hour block of Imke time coming up for availability. We'll just put it on eBay. Imke Feldmann (01:01:59): I mean, it's just nice to be able to choose with whom you work with. That's just nice. And I earned enough money, so that's fine. So I'm happy with that. Rob Collie (01:02:12): How do you choose who you work with? Is it mostly based on industry? Is it mostly based on job function that you're helping? Or is it more about the specific people? There's all kinds of things that could... Let's say if I came to your website today, I filled out your contact form, what are the things that I could say in that contact for a message that would lead you to say no, versus leads you to say maybe? Imke Feldmann (01:02:37): What I really like to do is to work with finance directors. So basically not people exactly like me, but I like to see that the managers approached me and they have an interest in the product itself and also therefore an interest to push it into their departments. So this is for me, a very, very good starting point because it's an area I'm familiar with. I know that there's enough critical support to get the decisions that have to be made and maybe also push IT to help with certain things. This is really one of my favorite set ups, I would say. Rob Collie (01:03:19): Yeah, we do a lot of work with finance departments as well. How long does sort of your average relationship run with a client? How long do you end up working with the same organization on average? Imke Feldmann (01:03:31): That's hard to say, that's really completely different. It can be the initial five days kickoff where we set up a PNL statement connect all the finance data and they go along with that. And basically, never hear again, or just occasionally hear again, "Can you help me with this problem or that problem?" And it could also be going on for years, basically with breaks in between of course, but some customers, they come every now and then when they want to expand things. Now I have a customer that I'm working on some hours or even days ever week since over a year by now. Rob Collie (01:04:15): That sounds similar to my experience as a freelancer, when it was just me, less similar to our business today, a little bit less. I mean, I think it's still more similar than not. It's just that the dial has moved a little bit. Imke Feldmann (01:04:32): So how long are your engagements then, usually? Rob Collie (01:04:35): Most of our engagements are, if we start out doing kind of that kickoff you're talking about, we started like a project with people, that tends to not be the end. We don't typically have people just immediately vanish after that because that's usually the point at which, I mean, they've got something working already, very often after the first week or so of working with a client, they've usually got some really amazing things built already at that point. But at the same time, that's really just at the beginning of the appetite. Usually there are things that are

Call Me By Your Game
Ep.88 – Soulcalibur II with Victoria Longwell

Call Me By Your Game

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 77:22


Shwing shwing! That's the sounds that swords make, right? YUP! On today's episode we're joined by comedian, co-host of Friends Talk Frasier and Feelings podcast, and the world's greatest St. […]

The Adam Jones Show
The Mysterious Case of Westbrook, Maine....Kinda

The Adam Jones Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 11:20


Jones & Arcand start wrapping up the show discussing the story of Westbrook, Maine, where everyone in the town believes there is some exterrestrial-type things going on. YUP!

Oh F*ck Yeah with Ruan Willow
Ep 81: Primal Forest Sex Male and Female The Sexual Bucket List Episode 2 NSFW

Oh F*ck Yeah with Ruan Willow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 20:42


Ep 81: Primal Forest Sex Male and Female The Sexual Bucket List Episode 2 NSFW...DEFINTELY NSFW! This is the 2nd episode in my ad-lib, off-the-cuff, impromptu improv style erotica series where I take a topic and create the erotic story on the spot without having written it out. This story is very sexy to me. It contains spontaneous sex, exhibitionism, and voyeurism. Come along with me as I spin a sexy steamy tale of a couple who take a walk and find a spot in the forest to fuck, to delve into their mutual passion, and to satisfy each other. And...there might just be a surprise that is delectably delicious!Did you miss my first episode in this Sexual Bucket List series? Go check out episode 78 to listen to the Dressing Room Rendezvous. I will just sit down and record what's on my brain for this series, I won't be writing/typing it out ... it's off the top of my head! I will take ideas if you would like to send me an idea for this series, contact me via Social Media or at ruanwillow@gmail.comThis particular episode is narrated as if it's happening live and I am with YOU! Yup! It's first-person and you can place yourself in the place of my partner because, throughout the story, I will be using the word "you". Sometimes it will be a heterosexual story, sometimes it will be two women, and sometimes it will be multiple partners.Find all my links here: https://linktr.ee/RuanWillowTry Amazon Audible Amazon (affiliate link): https://amzn.to/3zCtUPFCheck out Ruan's Audiobook Inside of Ruan Willow: https://tinyurl.com/ezcjdekHello, I'm Ruan! :)Welcome to my podcast!Listen to this reading to rage up your sexuality, entertain your brain, and enjoy!On my podcast, you will find romance, topics on relationships, romance and love, self-care,  intimacy for adults only,  and it is intended for the purposes of entertainment, your fantasy life, and the arts. Sexual health and fitness are important parts for a healthy sex life.Thank you for listening!Have a fabulously sexy day!love ya,RuanWould you like a copy of my latest audiobook for free? I have free codes while they last.  Contact me on social media or at ruanwillow at gmail dot comRuan's Books:Ruan's Cabin Getaway: An Explicit Age Gap Romance: https://books2read.com/u/mB2A7DAffiliate link: https://amzn.to/3trZVshThe Mardi Gras Unmasking by Ruan Willow book link: https://books2read.com/u/mZeWpEAffiliate link: https://amzn.to/3eAtUsgInside Ruan Willow written with BD Hamptonhttps://amzn.to/3uPHjlJSupport my podcast by joining my membership on Patreon that will give you extra content and early access to certain works.https://www.patreon.com/ruanwillowWant to start a podcast yourself? Check out Buzzsprout! Following this link lets Buzzsprout know I sent you, gets you a $20 Amazon gift card if you sign up for a paid plan, and helps my show too! https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1573090More info at the end of this episode for those interested.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/ruanwillow)

Cliff and Puck
10-12 H1: Welcome To The Show Jim Moore & Is Rolo Going To Be In or Out

Cliff and Puck

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 38:39


Puck and Jim Moore! Yup, Jim Moore joins Puck as the new host for the midday show 10 am - 1 pm! Puck takes the time to thank Jim for making the commitment and he's excited to have him on the KJR team! Also, what does the future hold for coach Rolovich, will he be granted the religious exemption...

SpyCast
*15th ANNIVERSARY/500th EPISODE SPECIAL* - “The CIA and the 9/11 Commission Report” – A Conversation with Alexis Albion

SpyCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 78:23


This is a big one, a very big one: our 500th episode & 15th anniversary We have come a long way since we began back in 2006 – it's quite fitting then, that in this week's episode I speak to our very first historian and curator, Alexis Albion, who is currently the Curator for Special Projects here at the Spy Museum Alexis actually left us way back when to be on the 9/11 Commission Report, where she was the central researcher on the CIA and US counterterrorism policy before 9/11. Hang on, did you just say what I think you said, she was the central researcher on the CIA…? Yup. I know, what the hell, right, we've been sitting on this story all this time! Episode 500 is a good time to thank two of the behind-the-scenes unsung technical heroes – Mike and Memphis who have been involved with more SpyCast's than anyone else. They are awesome. They are great guys, and they rock. Other people who have been involved in the content side of SpyCast have included Peter Earnest and Chris Costa, our former and current Exec Director, as well as my other predecessors in the Historian & Curator role: Thomas Bogart, Mark Stout and Vince Houghton. The show would of course be nothing without our guests, who have contributed their time, expertise and experience to help educate, inform and occasionally entertain the public on the vitally important matters of intelligence and espionage. Sometimes this past year I have felt like Churchill, in that he got the job he had always coveted: but under the least auspicious circumstances. It has been emotional people, but, we are getting there. Here's to the next 500. Sláinthe.

Shows & Tell
Outer Banks

Shows & Tell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 65:33


We're the hosts and our mission this podcast is to have a good time, all the time.

The Cabin
Iconically Wisconsin: Kwik Trip Edition

The Cabin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 37:12


The Cabin is presented by the Wisconsin Counties Association and this week we're featuring Sheboygan County; https://bit.ly/3EXlM09Campfire Conversation: We're back with another “Iconically Wisconsin” episode and we're talking about Glazers, clean bathrooms, delicious hot food, milk in a bag, and a savage social media feed. Yup – we're talking all things Kwik Trip with their Social Media Specialist, Paige Forde! Any true Wisconsinite knows that Kwik Trip is more than a gas station; it's a way of life. And this episode is ready to give you an extra dose of KT appreciation. This is an iconic episode of The Cabin Podcast that you can't miss! And make sure you're subscribed, so we can see you next time; https://bit.ly/3AeagJWUW-Platteville: Affordable education with a heart for Wisconsin sustainability; https://bit.ly/3nz1XpEGroup Health Trust: Distracted Driving; the dangers of eating and driving; https://bit.ly/3wlvsMoMarshfield Clinic; All of Us Research Program; https://bit.ly/3klM56EKnow Your Wisconsin: Cancer Care & Research 

Whatever Talk
Whatever Talk 145 I Am Better Than You

Whatever Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 32:58


YUP! I'm better than you and you. Lil Nas X can't turn your kids gay nor can anyone else. Cops still being niggas. By-the-way gay is ok now go with your day. Oh!!! Fuck them kids!

Backyard Gardens - Gardening for everyone
Minisode: You should Grow Kale

Backyard Gardens - Gardening for everyone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 16:54


Yup that's right KALE!! Isn't it everyone's favorite? Well, you should be growing it in your garden. Learn to Grow. Grow for Change.   Help support the podcast Become a Patron to grow our community garden- https://www.patreon.com/backyardgardens One time donation- Donate Here Products we recommend for your garden- https://www.amazon.com/shop/thebackyardgardner Check out our new tshirt line- https://teespring.com/stores/backyard-gardens-tv   More Gardening stuff for you Youtube-          www.youtube.com/backyardgardens Instagram-       www.instagram.com/backyardgardenstv Website-          www.backyardgardenstv.com

Redefining Strength Fitness Hacks
FHP 340 - Do The Minimum

Redefining Strength Fitness Hacks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 9:30


So we're entering the time of year that well…we often slack a bit on those healthy habits. We get busy. There are tons of work things and family events…Let's face it…often the holidays are when our motivation fades and often our healthy habits fall by the wayside.But I think part of the reason why we ultimately lose progress so we feel we have to start over in the new year is because we're holding ourselves to too high of standards.Say whaaaat?!Ok don't get me wrong. I believe 100% in hard work.But I also think we hide behind having to be all in or the “go hard or go home” attitude so much so that we end up doing NOTHING when we can't do everything and be perfect with our implementation.It's why I want to prepare you for this time of year by giving you permission to do the minimum.Yup. The minimum.Because sometimes by simply doing as little as we can to MAINTAIN our current results we move ourselves forward.I mean think about it this way even…If you started the New Year even where you are NOW over, say 5lbs heavier from all of the holiday eating, wouldn't that be better?And on top of that, by often doing the minimum and being slightly better than we were the year before, we ultimately enter the New Year BETTER OFF than where we are currently. Because consistency adds up. It may not happen as fast as we'd like, but those results do snowball.So I wanted to really highlight how you can do the minimum and still see results with these tips…

The Tri Hard Girls
Episode 45: Sit & Sip | Crooked Pinkies, Prank Phone Calls, and Cheatin' Husbands

The Tri Hard Girls

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 42:36


We may have taken some time off, but don't you worry we made sure to come back and DELIVER. This weeks podcast is *insert drumroll* a recap of our 10 YEAR HIGH SCHOOL REUNION. Yup, long awaited and finally here. Grab that popcorn because one thing that ALWAYS happens when you're back with your home town classmates... THE SECRETS come out... and we are going to SPILL THEM ALL ;) Make sure you follow us everywhere @thetrihardgirls and on our personals: @kasskardash @mcfarbek @acaroline19 and with that.. The Tri Hards are OUT! Music by Elysium Audio Labs Track: “Ocean Park” License: https://bit.ly/3k14iEk www.elysiumaudiolabs.com https://youtu.be/C5--uy0atHk Spotify: http://spoti.fi/3as7DLr

Fret Talk
Fret Talk Episode 217 - "Satisfied Four Times"

Fret Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 70:01


Y'all want a free Orange amp!? Get listening to the podcast, I'll hook you up. Budget Pedal Chap is joined by Lee Pedabadadoo and Mr Matt Quine for some guitar goodness. We talk about some lovely news from Epiphone, whatcha think they released this week? Yup, you're probably right. Harley Benton do some absolute work on one of their most fabulous lines and there is a pedal with a dinosaur on it, so gear of the year? Mahooosive shout out to our patreon backers, who are awesome and for as little as two dollars a month, you can be one of those cool kids. Visit www.patreon.com/frettalk to find out more Don't forget to have your online on the Fret Talk Podcast group on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/690366661155328/?ref=bookmarkssay and join in with the live streams at the PBOD Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/64533347864/ Find your host at: BudgetPedalChap www.Facebook.com/budgetpedalchap www.Instagram.com/budgetpedalchap https://www.youtube.com/budgetpedalchap or search ‘budget pedal chap' on YouTube Matt www.Facebook.com/SwitchIOM www.twitch.tv/heel_mattq www.twitter.com/heel_mattq www.instagram.com/heel_mattq Lee https://www.facebook.com/groups/64533347864/ www.pbodoom.com www.youtube.com/pedalboardsofdoom Will http://www.arocketcomplex.com/ www.youtube.com/user/ARocketComplex www.instagram.com/arcwillpowell/ Ollie www.Facebook.com/OllieMilesMusic Paul M www.Dontpanic.com www.Dontpanic.co.uk www.Facebook.com/dontpanicblackpool www.Instagram.com/showmaster87 Paul F www.Twitter.com/VitaminnP Chris www.Facebook.com/demolabstudio Moog www.Facebook.com/Rapscallionmusic Andrew ‘The Guitar Geek' Ferris https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCI5i6aBbINMIEkYW3b6olHg www.Instagram.com/theguitargeekyt Ayrton https://www.facebook.com/TheSinCircus/ Sean youtube.com/SeanPierceJohnson @stompboxsaturday on IG @seanpiercejohnson on IG Band stuff: CockeyedOptimist.net facebook.com/CockeyedOptimistRock @cockeyedoptimist on IG Music available on iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/cockeyed-optimist/441835940 and Spotify https://open.spotify.com/artist/7a0bFlRv1D2WFz4uAy5exL Eric https://www.facebook.com/ThePedalboardJedi/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/fret-talk/message

The DoomBots Podcast
Episode 33: Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol Makes Superheroes Weird AF (In The Best Way!)

The DoomBots Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021


Yup! We're talking about another groundbreaking series from Grant Morrison this week -- only this time it was for DC, and Zach is the one breaking everything down for Searnold! Meet Robotman! Meet Crazy Jane! Meet Rebis! Meet Danny the Street!

Ditch Diggers
[DD] What Does John Milton Have To Do With YA?

Ditch Diggers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 66:39


Yup, we're talking, a little late, about the YA Ratings debacle, but through the lens of dead white guy John Milton. Yeah, he was a cranky old man, writer of super long Bible fanfic, and helped with regicide a little bit, but he also was a strong anti-censorship advocate. Which, considering you could lose your head for writing something offensive, was pretty damn brave. My Milton professor made anything sound good. He was so excited about Milton that he made us excited. And Aeropagitica has stuck with me, even if the attention span to re-read it has not.

Ditch Diggers
[DD] What Does John Milton Have To Do With YA?

Ditch Diggers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 66:39


Yup, we're talking, a little late, about the YA Ratings debacle, but through the lens of dead white guy John Milton. Yeah, he was a cranky old man, writer of super long Bible fanfic, and helped with regicide a little bit, but he also was a strong anti-censorship advocate. Which, considering you could lose your head for writing something offensive, was pretty damn brave. My Milton professor made anything sound good. He was so excited about Milton that he made us excited. And Aeropagitica has stuck with me, even if the attention span to re-read it has not.

Born to be a STAR
Picking a new sent

Born to be a STAR

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 31:43


How do you pick a new sent? Video games with Amazon. The idea of a smart fridge sounds fun. Apple or hp? Push yourself to smile even if it's difficult. What's new this weekend. There's so much available horror or mystery both lol. Are we ready for a new show there's so many. Looks like Titans is on hbo max. Yup doom patrol back there's only 3 episodes. Dc is the essence of comics. Hope you find something good to watch too. Who doesn't want breakfast for dinner? The Halloween Oreos are so good Halloween cereal too. I spy pumpkin pie Rice and beans any night of the week. How to make normal delicious. Happy Friday

Paradise Pod
Nashville Stew Club

Paradise Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 118:43


A long one to tide you over during the international break. Jonathan Slape and Ben Wright hop in the booth for the collab that's gonna set the streets on fire. The haters said it could never happen. The dawgs recap a late collapse at home against Orlando City, and a fiesty draw in New Jersey against NYCFC. Then we get into some HEATED debate about the yanks.Topics hit include: Watching matches from the press box, and how your gameday experience affects your viewingDefinitive Nashville pizza POWER RANKINGSThe XI against Orlando - our strongest at this point in the season?PK dramaThe difference Leal makesThe second penalty call in the Orlando match - soft?!Yup, set piece defendingStrange rotation for the NYCFC matchRivalry brewing between Nashville and NYCFC?Castellanos on Joe WillisGrowing concern over Ake Loba's limited minutesFour ChalupasUSMNT roster choicesExpectations for this round of World Cup qualifyingA big beautiful batch of listener Qs take us out on this one. Many thanks to Slape for coming back on, and shouts out to the young savage Ben for getting in the mix. COYBIG.

The Justin Aguirre Podcast
Transformed People transform people

The Justin Aguirre Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 8:27


Yup, that's the way it goes, that's the way it flow. Have a good one!

Neue Encounter
Venom: Our Return

Neue Encounter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 64:58


Yup, we're back. Our long awaited return with new equipment and from a new location. We catch you up on life and have a lightning round of movies we watched during our hiatus as well as discuss the ridiculousness that is Venom: Let There Be Carnage. It's good to be back. Want more Neue Encounter? Join the pea brain club by becoming a patron and get early access to episodes and even more content! www.patreon.com/neueencounter You can find us as @neueencounter on Instagram and Twitter! Business inquiries: hello@neueencounter.com

Dental A Team w/ Kiera Dent and Dr. Mark Costes
#429: It's OKAY to ____ Your Job

Dental A Team w/ Kiera Dent and Dr. Mark Costes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 16:47


Kiera is giving you permission not to enjoy being a business owner or a team member all the time. Yup, you're dealing with the ebbs and flows of being a working human — the entrepreneurial pattern! But Kiera also has a solution to your bad situation which will help you love your job longer before getting to those downward swings: Look for patterns Identify them Take massive action Have a brain dump Find someone to look outside your situation It's important to give yourself space when these emotions arise, and know that it's normal. Kiera just had her own challenging week to endure, but she's back on top! You can be, too. Episode resources: Reach out to Kiera Subscribe to The Dental A-Team podcast Become Dental A-Team Platinum! Review the podcast on iTunes

Realistic Sustainability
S2E78 (Short) The Stigma of Reuse

Realistic Sustainability

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 9:30


A stigma? Yup somehow over the last two generations we went from using everything up to turning our noses up at those who do the same. Lets take a look at the stigma of reusing single-use items. We hope you enjoy the show and if you do, please consider sharing it with your friends and family or leave a review on your favorite podcast platform. The more people that we can expose to sustainability, the better. Thank you! Please consider supporting the podcast: Here Greeningyourlife.org Get the book: Here --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/realistic-sustainability/support

Horror Vomit
Malignant ft. Kristina Hoople

Horror Vomit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 54:26


This week we're joined by the legendary Kristina Hoople to discuss the brand spankin new 2021 release, Malignant. Yup, it's a Wan. You can dress it up however you like, but at the end of the day, it's another Wan.   If you like what we've done here today, please go give us a 5 star review wherever possible. If not, well, keep it to yourself.

Immigration Tech & Marketing - The GMI Rocket Show
Michael Guirguis, CEO, Seso: H-2A visa immigration tech and building the “Gusto for Agriculture”

Immigration Tech & Marketing - The GMI Rocket Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 74:09


Join my discussion with Michael Guirguis, the CEO of Seso, and he's tackling agricultural immigration and the H-2A visa. Michal and his team come from consulting & farming rather than immigration, and I think this is SUPER important because innovation within an industry is often inspired by an outside perspective. As for Michael, he graduated from Stanford with a degree in Economics, had a stint at the White House, and then joined McKinsey, where he worked around the world. After leaving McKinsey, Michael worked for an EduTech startup for a handful of years before finally launching Seso in 2019. So, here's what we'll be talking about: Michael's early years and his time at Stanford Michael's early entrepreneurial experiences, and his time at the White House Michael's experience at McKinsey and Yup.com and how that shaped him How Michael came upon the idea for Seso, and the first steps he took His experience at Stanford's CodeX program and where Seso is today Michael's vision for Seso as the “Gusto for Agriculture” and the future of immigration tech And more! For More Information On Seso: https://www.sesolabor.com/

VO BOSS Podcast
Voice and AI: Descript

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 35:22


If you can dream it, it can happen! Jay Leboeuf from Descript joins Anne to discuss the benefits of having a voice clone and how Descript can improve work-from-home potential for talent. Remove filler words with one click, adjust your audio via transcript, fix errors using an Overdub voice clone, and so much more. Use your voice beyond its in-person potential with tools that bring the power of AI editing directly to talent. More at https://voboss.com/voice-and-ai-descript-jay-leboeuf/ Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. AI Voices: Welcome to the podcast. The VO BOSS podcast blends solid, actionable business advice with a dose of inspiration for today's voiceover talent. Each week host Anne Ganguzza focuses in on a specific topic to help you grow your voiceover business. Anne: All right. Hey everyone, who was that? That was some other people introducing the podcast today. So welcome again, everyone to the VO BOSS podcast. This is the AI and Voice series, and I am your host Anne Ganguzza, Anne Ganguzza. Today, I'm excited to bring you special guest Jay LeBoeuf, head of business development at Descript, a company that creates tools for new media creators. Now, Jay is also a lecturer on media technology and business at Stanford University, Carnegie Mellon, and University of Michigan, and sits on the board of advisors of numerous AI media and ed tech startups. He previously worked at some little known companies, probably to you guys out there and in the voiceover world, Avid Pro Tools and Izotope. Jay, thank you so much for joining me today. Jay: Thanks for having me, Anne. It's, uh, it's wonderful to be here with some of my AI-driven voice friends. Anne: Yeah, that was fantastic. So what we heard in the beginning was a couple of your voices on your platform, right? Jay: Indeed. One of which is my own and we were using Descript's Overdub technology. Anne: Awesome. Well, I want to definitely talk to you about that, but before we get into your role at Descript and what the company offers, first of all, let me just say, okay. Avid Pro Tools and Izotope, known to just everybody probably that listens to this podcast, and your resume is so incredibly impressive. Back in 2008, you were founder and CEO of Imagine Research where you created the first sound object recognition platform. And somehow that, I believe that that led into a patent as well as some small business research awards to you. And then somehow that became Izotope in 2012. Now, does that mean that my mouse clicks are being detected by an AI engine? Jay: So there's so many ways that AI is now integrated into the creative products that we use on a daily basis. And so the short answer is yes. So Imagine Research was based on some of what I was seeing. So I was at the, on the Pro Tools team, like you mentioned for about eight, eight and a half years before that. And I was seeing all these struggles that recording engineers, mixing engineers, voiceover talent, uh, ADR, we were seeing all these, these problems in the process that AI could solve. So we attempted to create the first set of tools where we could teach a computer how to recognize basic sounds and musical instruments, and even robustly differentiate is this a male speaker versus a female voice, and, you know, try to choose presets automatically for it. So Izotope acquired that company and that technology. I was at Izotope for about two years or so, helping to integrate all that work. And you know, you now see that Izotope products include a number of assistants -- Anne: Oh yeah. Jay: -- and things that will listen to your content and it's going to help it -- Anne: Absolutely. Jay: -- get it to the next stage. And that's the goal with all of this. Anne: And I have to say that there's a lot of people in the voiceover industry that just absolutely, that is their go-to, that is their go-to product to get rid of excess noise in their recording. So I thought that that was so fascinating. So, and now you are at Descript, and I've heard of Descript from the podcast world, and I'd heard about it a few years back where a lot of people were starting to use Descript for transcripts for their podcasts. And then wow, you guys just seem to have like catapulted with your product offerings since then. Tell us a little bit about Descript and the products that you offer, because I'm genuinely impressed with everything that you guys have going on over there. Jay: Great. Uh, thanks for using it, being familiar with it. For those that don't know De-script or Descript, we have no official pronunciations. So the choice is yours. Anne: Okay. Jay: Our team is kind of split on it. I go with De-script myself. So -- Anne: De-script. 4:30 Jay: Descript allows creators to create and edit audio and video as simply as typing. And this is this paradigm where you can drag in content that you've recorded externally, or you can record natively in the app. A transcript appears in seconds to minutes. You know, this time transcript will appear. If you have multiple people on a track, will automatically detect who they are, split them into different speaker labels. So you have this like really rich transcription going on. And a lot of people might stop right there and say, yeah, I've seen transcription tools before. Then I, you know, do a paper edit in Google docs, and then we bring it into Pro Tools and then just start cutting. But with Descript, we have all this alignment technology where the transcript is automagically aligned to the underlying audio and video. So as you are editing the text, as you are doing things like cutting out all of your ums, ahs, likes, you knows, all of that, just snips them out. And we use some AI to kind of stitch it all together. So that way you make a few cuts. And I have plenty of examples I can play of like befores and afters, where we can take a lot of great material and just make it sound so much better. So that's all you have to do, just edit text. Anne: Now I remember when I looked at it a couple of years ago, one of the things that I have today is when I record through ipDTL, because it's a high quality audio connection, people can talk over one another. And whenever I tried transcript technologies in the past, it couldn't deal with people talking at the same time, and then basically separating out who they were. But I feel like your technology has now surpassed those issues. And it's really something that I think is incredible, that it can even overlay the words on the wave form. Is that what you had mentioned? Jay: Absolutely, so you have, you have two ways of editing. You have the script view where you can actually just see the transcript. And if you just, all you want to do is select words and phrases and hit, delete, or strike through, you can edit through that. But if you are more comfortable with the wave form, we actually will overlay the words on top of each part of the wave form. Anne: Wow. Jay: And then you can make your manipulations there. So if you want to add a crossfade to a certain place, you know that, okay, yeah. Just put a crossfade between the words, voiceover and business, and no more needing to audition thousands and thousands of times to get them right. Anne: Wow. Well, that's fantastic. All right. So that's for podcasting. And now you have some other products that you offer as well that are quite powerful. Jay: Exactly. So, you know, we're most known for podcasting, I'd say. You know, the, the people in that community have probably heard of us, have probably tried it out. If you haven't, by all means, now's a great time to at least try. Drag some tape in, start cutting it up, and of course if there's anything I can help you with, let me know. But you know, we added video support in 20 -- what year are we in now -- 2020. Anne: Yep. I saw that. Jay: It's been a year. Anne: It's been a year. Jay: It's been a year. So about halfway through 2020, we -- you were always able to kind of edit the video because it was always linked to the audio, but we really doubled down. So, uh, what we ended up doing was built in all of the basic features that you would have in a typical non-linear editor, like an, an iMovie or a Final Cut or a Premiere. We built in all the basics, all the bread and butter things that you need, on top of all of the word and text editing capabilities we had. So you can now do all of your cross fades, all of your titling, arrows and annotations, and you know, very basic multicam support. All these things work great, 4k, 60 frames-a-second video. It's all synced to the cloud, so that's something that's also really wonderful about the tool, and you, and I could record something. I can invite you just like a Google Doc, and then you and I can start collaborating on this material simultaneously. We see the same doc. We have the same footage. Anne: So, wow, a video word processor. So we have the audio word processor -- Jay: Video word processor. Anne: -- and now a video word processor. That's, wow. Also, in addition to that, I think you can do screen recording as well with Descript? Jay: Exactly. So for all of us that are fully embracing the remote collaboration -- Anne: Yeah. Jay: -- asynchronous video communication life, we're sending each other a lot of quick updates or quick tutorials. So rather than have to type out those "here's all the instructions on how to connect to ipDTL for the first time," you can actually just do a quick screen recording using your own voice. And what differentiates the Descript screen recorder is again, as soon as you finish recording your screen recording, either, you know, your webcam or the screen itself, you see an instant transcript of what you said. And with one click, if you want to remove all of your filler words -- Anne: Right. Jay: -- I am a prolific ummer and ahher when I'm making stuff up. Anne: We all -- yeah, I think we all. We all are. Jay: So when -- you get to this little dialogue that pops up that says you have 35 filler words -- Anne: Wow. Jay: -- click to remove, and then you'll see the sentence where I start explaining it. And then I say, "yeah, let me try that again." I can just whack that sentence out and then send the video along. You can ask my team. I do tons of those every day,. Anne: Now does it record the screen, and also use the video cam? So it can do multiple cameras or multiple recordings at the same time? Jay: Exactly, exactly. So, so right now you can have your webcam as a bubble that you can position anywhere you want on the screen. Also, you have separate audio tracks for your mic. You have computer audio. So that's something that I use a lot where I'm demoing something and maybe sharing the output of Descript to the app or a different tool. So you can capture audio from computer audio and also your high input. Anne: Fantastic. Jay: Very nice microphones. Anne: Now I happen to read a press release the other day about a new product called Studio Sound, which allows you to remove noise [laughs] in your recording. Jay: Okay. Anne: That's pretty powerful. [laughs] Jay: So I have incredible admiration for companies that make professional noise reduction, de-reverberation restoration tools. I have a ton of friends that work at Izotope. Having worked there myself, I love the company. So -- Anne: I was going to say, you have quite a background in it. So that would make sense. [laughs] Jay: So I will say what we wanted to build was as close to a one checkbox solution where you know what, you have this audio, you either don't have the time, you don't have the skill -- Anne: Right, exactly. Jay: -- you don't have the knowledge to use the professionals. So like we're not talking about saving location recording from the deadliest catch and removing like -- Anne: Right. Jay: -- some of those conditions. We're talking about -- let me play an example. So I'm going to play you some material, and this, this is maybe what got recorded with some, you know, room tone on a not great mic. So let me just hit play. Anne: Okay. [room noise] Jay: Hey, there's the room tone. Voice: The appearance of the island when I came on deck next morning was altogether changed. Although the breeze had now utterly ceased, we'd made a great deal of way during the night and were now lying becalmed about half a mile to the southeast of the low eastern coast. Jay: Okay. So now let me click a checkbox that's called Studio Sound in Descript. Anne: And that's not uncommon for people with podcasts who have guests that are not necessarily -- Jay: Right. Anne: -- having the right recording studio. Jay: Right. No, definitely. Anne: Yeah. Jay: So now, now let me hit the space bar and now I'm playing. Voice: The appearance of the island when I came on deck next morning was altogether changed. Although the breeze had now utterly ceased, we'd made a great deal of way during the night and were now lying -- Jay: Let me turn it off. Voice: -- becalmed about half a mile to the southeast of the low eastern coast. Anne: Wow. Jay: And back on. Voice: Green colored woods covered a large part of the surface. Anne: Wow, wow! Jay: That's one checkbox. Anne: This is a product that's actually out now? Jay: This is out now. We -- Anne: Wow, that's incredible. Jay: -- have a beta tag applied to it because we're still experimenting with it -- Anne: Sure. Jay: -- but it's actually on every plans. Anne: Okay. Jay: We have a free Descript plan. So people listening to this, they're like, I want to try this out. You can try this out. It's totally free. Try it on your files, download your files when you're done with them. Anne: Right. Jay: We're really excited about this. And this is just one of these other suites of tools that we're trying to do to allow people to create professional sounding and looking content faster than ever before. Anne: Sure. Jay: You shouldn't have to spend hundreds and hundreds of extra dollars to download and learn tools when you have problems with your content. And so that's, that's some of the stuff we're trying to solve. Anne: Yeah, and that really serves a need. You know, I cannot tell you how many people -- I mean, I'm a full-time voice talent. And so for me, you know, this is part of my daily thing. I had to learn how to, or I'd had tools that helped me to remove noise, but there's so many people out and in the podcast world, or just in general, that are creating content and yeah. Stuff like this is it can be immensely helpful. So, wow. So that's an incredible suite of tools, and you also now have, well, you've had it for a couple of years now, Overdub, right, which is your -- this is how you can create an AI voice, your voice cloning technology. Talk to me a little bit about that. Jay: Absolutely. So Overdub allows anyone to create their own voice clone, and importantly, only with their own voice. And you can do that with only a few minutes of training data. And once you have this voice clone, this voice model, you can generate new sentences or correct your verbal typos. So a few ways that we see it being used, being -- really resonate with your listeners. Let's say you made a mistake in a, in an audio book or, you know, in a podcast, you mispronounced the key character's name. Anne: Right. Jay: You stated a date wrong, something like that. So you need to go back to the studio, or if you're at home, you need to kind of set up your equipment again, get it exactly how it was before. Anne: Punch and roll. [laughs] Jay: Rerecord everything, punch and roll, or even better, I have much more experience on the editor side. So as an editor, I would spend hours trying to find that word or phrase and then splice it in from elsewhere in the archives. Anne: Absolutely. Jay: It just never sounds right. Anne: Yeah, that actually makes me think of a lot of medical recordings that I do, for medical narration. If you find that you've mispronounced the word once, it's usually in the script quite a few times, if it's a product name. Jay: Right. So with Overdub, you would have created your own voice model. And so if you have the script and you knew -- you're using Descript, you can actually go in, find that one word that needs fixing or that phrase that needs fixing, or the sentence you actually forgot to say, and just type it in. And what we actually do behind the scenes -- this part is fascinating -- we don't just generate in the word in isolation. We take the text that you type in. We take basically the audio recording before your contextual edit and the audio after. And then we send that all to the cloud, and using those three inputs along with, you know, your voice model, we're able to generate the missing word or phrase to make it fit in in context. So, you know, if I was trying to resynthesize the word Overdub, sometimes it will sound like Overdub. Sometimes it'll sound Overdub, and it's just gonna depend on where it's going to fit in within the phrasing of what you were saying. Anne: Wow. So tell me again, what does it take to create your Overdub again? How long does it take? Jay: As little as 10 minutes -- Anne: Wow! Jay: -- of training data. Anne: So does that mean you have a model that's already there, that's being used for these voices? Jay: So let's go even deeper with the super behind the scenes. The way that we're able to make it so easy where all you need to do is create, you know, you basically read a training script. Anne: Okay. Jay: And you read this training scripts to us, and, you know, we have it on our website and there's, there's nothing special about it. Technically any source material would work, but we just provide this like David Attenborough voiceover stuff. It's really fun to read. Anne: Okay. Jay: So you read that, and we need as little as 10 minutes. The more you add, the better it's going to get. There's no point in going over an hour at that point. Our research has shown it's not going to sound any better. Anne: Okay. Jay: So, you know, between 10 minutes and an hour that you're willing to sit and read this script. The other thing we need of course is your voice consent statement. So this is a 30-second long blurb we also have available on our website, which you grant consent to Descript to create your own voice model. And you're just stating that, like, I and I alone have access to this voice model. If I choose to grant it with somebody else, then I'm giving people the option to use my voice. But you know, this voice is just mine. And we use that to compare against the training data to make sure that this is really you. Anne: Got it. So then let me just back up just a second. Jay: Yeah, please. Anne: So if you're using any of the material that people upload, let's say, for podcast editing or any of the, any of the products that you offer, is any of that being used for training data from Descript? Jay: No. So all of your material, all your voice data is yours and yours alone. Anne: Got it. Previous to releasing Overdub, we had actually learned from this the general speech patterns from thousands and thousands of speakers. Uh, Descript acquired a company called Lyrebird in 2019. Anne: Yes, I'm familiar with that. Jay: And they're real pioneers in this space. And they had actually learned from thousands of existing speakers. Anne: I heard the viral thing they did with politicians, so back a few years back. Absolutely. And so you've had the model for a while that's been developed with thousands and thousands of voices. Jay: Exactly. Anne: Got it. Jay: What, what the secret sauce is, is the ability to, with just a few minutes of a different person's speech, be able to identify what makes Jay or what makes Anne sound the way they do with the mic they have in the room that they do with the cadence that they're speaking? And we kind of can make this like lighter weight model to generate your speech. Anne: Okay. So what, in your opinion, or what, in your knowledge, what makes a better AI voice? Is it the person that records being, I don't know, more conversational or what makes some voices sound a little more robotic than others? Jay: The short answer is it's really going to depend on the underlying technology that's being used. So that's why Descript's Overdub technology sounds different than Alexa, than Google Wavenet, than Thimble, than, you know, than other solutions. For our approach, some of the things that we think makes it sound so good, so one thing is that we are one of the only solutions that actually we generate already 44,100 samples every second of your voice. And your listeners know what that means. If, if people don't it's, you know, CD quality sound -- you don't even know what CDs are anymore. Anne: I know! Jay: It's really good, super high resolution. And so that's one of the things that people often notice, like Alexa is nowhere even close to -- Anne: Right. Jay: 44.1 K. And so that's why she'll always sound that little bit muffled, that little bit like flat. And so by generating in, you know, what the researchers called super resolution, that's one thing that really makes a very big difference with what we're doing. From a training material standpoint, when we, you know, when we work with artists and celebrities, sometimes we'll actually coach them on, you know, the training material that they should put into the system should be read as naturally -- Anne: As possible. Jay: -- as they want the output to be. So, yeah. So, you know, we have the David Attenborough scripts, but if you're never going to be doing that in the wild and then read it in a way that's more representative -- Anne: In the wild! [laughs] Right, right, absolutely. Jay: Literally in the wild. Anne: Yup. Yup. Okay. All right. That makes sense. Now, do you have tools that allow you to change the sound of it once you've, you know, once you've typed in a script, and you change -- can you add emotion? Can you change speed? Those sorts of things? Jay: Change style is what we have. Rather than exposing 10, 15, you know, sliders, controls, checkbox, the Descript way of doing it is to allow you to actually select some source material that sounds representative of the style you want to recreate. So I would go in there, I would highlight a sentence or part of a paragraph that sounds like what I want to create. I would then right click on it, say overdub voice style, and I would say "create new voice style," and then call it whatever you want. So maybe it's happy or enthusiastic. Anne: Okay. Jay: You give it a name and then that name can be applied for Overdub generation in the future to steer the material. Anne: Are you recording that happy? Or are you recording that? Like, where are they getting that from? Where are you getting the happy from? Or the emotion from? Jay: Yeah. Anne: The style. Jay: We leave it to users. Anne: Oh, okay. Jay: That's one of the things people say like -- Anne: I got it. Jay: -- "hey, you know, I just created my voice model. Why don't you provide some templates?" I'm like, because I don't know what you sound like when you're happy. Anne: Okay, okay. Jay: So you get one default style -- Anne: Okay. Jay: -- that the system thinks is neutral Anne. This is what neutral Anne sounds like. And then it's up to you to go through, and in your training data, start finding examples of here's me being contemplative, here's me being excitable, and then give them the names -- Anne: Okay. Jay: -- that you you feel comfortable with. Anne: Do you resell these voices? Jay: No. So your voice is only your voice. You can assign it to other people that you work with on your team -- Anne: Okay. Jay: -- but you can also revoke that at any time. That's, uh, you know, it's functionality that we, we treat seriously. Now that -- the one thing we do provide to get people started out of the box, when we were playing the welcome to the VO BOSS intro, for example, we provide some stock voices. So we have eight right now, just a very limited palette, but still eight stock voices, which are pre-trained voice models of voice actors that we have an agreement with to get people get up and running. Anne: Got it. So then if I wanted to resell my voice, is that possible? Like if I create, let's say I get a script, I mean, you can hire human Anne or you can hire AI Anne. And so somebody says, well, I'm going to hire AI Anne, and I'm going to pay a certain amount. You know, probably not as much as human Anne. Could I then on Descript generate that voice and sell that? Jay: Yeah, we, you know, we don't have a marketplace or anything like that to facilitate that, but -- Anne: Interesting. Jay: -- the voice is yours. So you would come to an arrangement. You would be responsible for sharing your voice with another Descript user and overseeing how they're using it. And you know, the nice part of the voice ownership, you can turn it off at any time, so you can revoke access. Anne: So I guess my question would be, let's say I have a client, and they say, you know what? I have a bunch of material that I need to have recorded, but my budget is so much. And I say, okay, well, I can do that for you with my AI voice. 'Cause I don't have enough time to go in my studio and record that, but I could go to Descript, throw in the scripts, generate that, and then sell that to my client. I guess that's my question. Um, and that would be in agreement -- Jay: Oh, totally. Anne: -- that would be in agreement. How interesting, because I think one thing that a lot of people in the voiceover industry have been fearful of is, you know, who owns that voice, and how do I know where it's being used, and how do I, you know, is there an agreement, a contract that's been drawn up? So what that would do is it would allow us control over our own voice in selling the voice. So we would like, we normally do, we have contracts where we specify usage. So if it happens to be, let's say, in the commercial realm, and it's a commercial for McDonald's, if that's, you know, what they were looking for, we could then, you know, put in usage that would be appropriate for the job. And it would be something that we would negotiate with the company. Jay: Right. Anne: And that would be fine. You're not even a middle guy in that. That's basically we own our own voice. Jay: No. Anne: We can do whatever we want with it. Right? We can download it, right, I assume. Jay: Absolutely. This is the workflow I heard you say, Anne, is maybe we can flip it. You hire me, I'm voice talent. You give me the script. Anne: Yup, yup. Jay: But then like, oh, this is not within my budget. And you're like, how about this? I'm going to give you AI Jay. Anne: Yup. Jay: You're only interested in the final files. Maybe I can also give you the Descript file so that way, if you need to make -- Anne: Changes. Jay: -- changes and tweaks, you can, but you can't make, you can't generate new material. Anne: Well, then they'd have -- Jay: So here's AI Jay. This is Jay. I'm reading a sentence for Anne. She paid me to read this. Here you go. Anne: Oh, yup, yup. Jay: There's my material. You provide the audio files. These things are getting a lot of traction. So we actually have the ability to batch export material. And also we have API access for -- Anne: Wow. Jay: -- Overdub for if you want to programmatically do things. Anne: Sure. Jay: So a real example, there's a -- Anne: Wow. Jay: -- creative agency, and they work with one of their voice actors to do a mixture of things that are read real, but then they have a contract with Sunglass Hut. And they want to personalize it to go to your local Sunglass Hut. Anne: Right, exactly. Jay: And they get the address or the town. Anne: Sure. Jay: And so what they actually do, and Descript is not involved in this -- Anne: Right. Jay: -- but they use the tools to programmatically then create all the addresses sp this voice talent doesn't have to read 10,000 different Sunglass Hut locations. And so the voice actor consents to using their voice for that. And often they're the ones like generating on their system -- Anne: Sure. Jay: -- because they want to make sure it sounds right, and it's -- Anne: Well, yeah, exactly. So the client isn't necessarily going in -- they don't have a Descript account, and they're going in and typing it -- in addresses. It would be the talent probably, 'cause you're right. They would tweak it speed-wise or, you know, just so it sounds good. Jay: Right. And it's as super flexible. So I would encourage -- Anne: Right. Jay: -- because you know, the voice that you create, you can only create a voice with your own voice. You -- Anne: Right. Jay: We have people that try to upload a Barack Obama voice, you know, try to fake the consent statement, and AI built this. AI is kind of smarter than that. So it can detect that you're trying to fake the system. Anne: Right. Jay: We also have a human in the loop that listens to these consent statements. Make sure everything's legit. Anne: Oh, got it, got it. Jay: So we do everything we can to keep this as secure as possible. Anne: Wow. Talk to us a little bit about ethics, because I know you're one of the early adopters of putting a terms of service and an ethics statement on your website. Tell me about your policies on that. Jay: Yeah. I love that when I joined -- I joined the company at the beginning of 2020. There was already an ethics statement in place -- Anne: Mm-hmm, yup. Jay: -- which, which I was really inspired by. So you own, and you control your use of your digital voice. And this is something we strongly believe in that users can, you know, create a model that's authorized by you and controlled by you. So that's something that we unwaveringly do not budge from, and it's all based on this recorded verbal consent state, that kind of grants consent, and also helps us verify that you are a real, live, consenting person. So we will not clone voices of the deceased. Anne: Okay, okay. Jay: It's just, it's just a slippery slope. Anne: Yeah. Jay: That's an unapproved voice cloning. So unless we have a consent statement,. Anne: Oh, okay, that makes sense then why you have a verbal consent statement, yeah. Jay: We have a verbal consent statement, and, you know, uh, and again, people will try to stitch it together with -- Anne: Sure. Jay: -- with words, but it's just the system's designed to, to try to not allow that. And you know, we personally view that unapproved voice cloning -- like if we start making exceptions to this rule, then we're going to get into a world where we're making subjective judgment calls -- Anne: Yeah. Jay: -- about what's ethical and what's not ethical -- Anne: Absolutely. Jay: -- or what's a creative use case. And that's a very slippery slope. So we just want to be very clear and transparent. You have to own your voice. You have to be able to provide a consent statement. Um, we do not clone voices of children or minors. That's also against our terms of service. So if you're under 13, you can't use Descript. Our terms of service prohibit that. Anne: Okay. Jay: And we really want to stay up on what are the, the latest ethical standards? How are other companies using this? So we're talking to a lot of companies, participating in different membership organizations to try to figure out, you know, how do we ensure that content is authentic and -- Anne: Right. Jay: -- we're, we're as responsible as possible? Anne: Are you in the process of improving your model? So the AI voices will become even better and better and better with even maybe less data or, you know, even more human-like? Or is there a point where you kind of say, this is the level of -- like, how human do you want it to be? Because I think there's a level there of, if it becomes too human, then maybe there's that one note that somebody says, "wait a minute, am I being duped? Is this, you know, is this a human talking to me? Or is it an AI voice?" Do you have a level of, I guess, humanness for your AI model? Jay: We're going to keep improving it until it is indistinguishable from reality. And there's a lot of podcasts right now where you know, the sweet spot right now, Anne, is for this contextual edits where a word or a phrase has been fixed in the context of a longer recording. So we're at the point now where hosts are using that on a regular basis, and you can't tell. Like, no one's writing in and saying -- Anne: Right. Jay: -- that it sounds fake. And that's something that even a few years ago, it sounded like -- Anne: Sure. Jay: -- like voicemail phone tree systems, it would stick out. Those are just smooth. They sound great. Where we're going to be going, and what I think is going to sound better and better in the coming years is this like longer form text-to-speech. Anne: Yeah, right. Jay: So let me give you an example. So this is, this is how Malcolm Gladwell and his team at Pushkin Industries use Descript, and they use this for podcasts and audio books. So, you know, they're using Descripts, the desktop app, to transcribe dozens of interviews and, you know, archive material, and then starting to pull tape, pull selects, and getting the show in like a good rough cut. And then Malcolm Gladwell created his Overdub voice, and he assigned access to his voice to some of his editors. So they can create a draft narration for what the show would sound like with him doing the intro and kind of transitioning between different pieces. And so they can actually do a table read, and everybody can just kind of get on a call, listen to the table read with digital Malcolm, so they can hear how it sounds before anybody entered the -- Anne: Sure. Jay: Now that -- nothing's going to replace Malcolm in the zone saying and introducing his stories as himself. Anne: Right. Jay: And he's going to be like that for a while. Anne: Yeah. Jay: But there's always going to be applications, and it could be for really short commercials. Anne: Yeah. Jay: It could be for no budget audio books where, you know what, I'm just going to throw the AI voice at it. And we're gonna certainly know it's fake, but it's not going to be like listening to Alexa reading audio. Anne: Right, right, exactly. Jay: Because it's going to, it's going to actually have some, have some level of dynamics. Anne: Well, I think as long as the listener, I mean, then it becomes like the consumer, right? And you know, as long as they're aware. You know, I don't have a problem listening to Alexa 'cause I know it's Alexa, and I don't feel like Alexa is trying to dupe me into thinking she's human. And so I feel that same way. If I'm aware, I don't have a problem in certain cases, listening to it as long as know. Jay: That's it. And that's also why we want to, if anything, empower creators to have control of their voice. And if they wanna use it for editorial corrections, fantastic. If they want to use it for some longer form projects that they don't actually have the time to do or the budget -- their clients might not have the budget to do it -- Anne: Right. Jay: That that's their choice. Anne: Wow. Well, this has just been so enlightening. Woo, thank you so much for talking to me and talking to our listeners and talking about this, this amazing product that just seems to keep going. You guys keep coming up with these really wonderful things. So congratulations on that. Where do you see AI going in five years or even ten years? Jay: I'm super excited about this. Like media production is now actually entering a phase where if you can dream it, it can happen. And we don't necessarily need the expensive studio or the years and years and years of audio or video production training. We just need our laptops. So you and I both seen this in our careers with, with the move, from editing on tape -- Anne: Yup. Jay: -- to digital and then with PCs becoming so powerful with tools like iMovie and Garage Band that, you know, truly anybody can be a creator, and professionals can work from home. Well, the thing is there were a lot of advances during this time on other parts of the production process, like filming on smart phones and being able to broadcast and publish on social media, YouTube and podcast hosts, but all that stuff in between, all the editorial, all the correcting out mistakes -- Anne: Yeah. Jay: -- uh, generating small replacements, re-records, cutting, all that has been painstakingly difficult. Anne: Yeah. Jay: So this is where AI is really stepping in. And this next wave is, is huge because everybody is going to have access to these tools that make life even simpler, and the next generation of storytellers have never had it so good. Anne: Yeah. Well, that's fantastic. Oh, my goodness. Thank you so, so very much again, for spending time with us today. I'm going to give a big shout-out to our sponsor, ipDTL. You too can connect like a BOSS and find out more at ipdtl.com. You guys, BOSSes, have an amazing week, and we will see you next week. Thanks again. Bye-bye. Jay: Bye, everybody. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voboss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to Coast connectivity via ipDTL.

Magic Minds Podcast
yup the flats- Tony May - Episode 6

Magic Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 83:36


Hello What's the craic. Welcome back to the magic minds podcast" Stories that have the power to inspire". We are liberties number one podcast. The best podcast in Dublin 8 I'm proud to say. Today is our final episode of our Yup the flats series. on the show is Tony May. Tony chats us about a life of crime, drug addiction and prison to now turning his life around. He now uses his past to help others that are struggling with addiction and mental health. Have a listen and let us know what you think and we would love to hear your feedback. EXCITING NEWS- Matt's Mindfulness and gratitude activity journal "My Head to My Heart" is now available to purchase. https://magicmindsfoundation.company.site/fbclid=IwAR1zp1r4CdFU2tOxmohGNLuCLAj247w91kFxHo90Xn2L2ugis5fLoeUt37o If you enjoy our work and would love to support us with the Publication of Matt's book then please subscribe to our Patreon Page. If you can afford to buy us a coffee or a pint once a month we would be delighted but if you cant that's ok too, you can listen for free. https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42505663. LOVE & KINDNESS TO YOU XXX Huge thank you to our Sponsors and Charities. I want to thank Niall Reilly and the team at Rooney media graphics. Also we have Liberty photos who is owned by Andy who is Matt's trusty side kick on the podcast. So if you need any photographs for weddings or birthday parties then Liberties Media Hub is the place to go. Shannon's helpline, Don't forget check out our website for more information on our previous interviews http://magicminds.ie/ Special thanks to our: Sponsors: Niall Reilly- www.rooneymedia.com Andrew O'Connell- www.libertiesphoto.ie Supports: Shannon's Hopeline - www.shannonshopeline.ie Magic Minds Podcast Team Matt Burke- Host Andrew O'Connell- Video Production & social Media Hannah Burke - Social Media --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/magic-minds/message

A Phil Svitek Podcast - A Series From Your 360 Creative Coach
One Month To Go Before Colombia! - 10/04/2021: A Phil Svitek Vlog

A Phil Svitek Podcast - A Series From Your 360 Creative Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 22:11


"We're in the endgame now," as the Marvel quote goes. Yup, my team and I are a month away from flying to Colombia to film my 2nd movie. It's exciting for sure, though there's still lots to prepare. In this edition of my vlog, I discuss editing the green screen footage we shot a week ago, the VFX process, the administrative side of things, plus how I'm getting prepared mentally and physically. I reference a few things throughout this episode, so here's all the links to those if you want to dig deeper: Team Deakins episode (https://teamdeakins.libsyn.com/darius-wolski-cinematographer), No Hurry No Pause philosophy (https://philsvitek.com/no-hurry-no-pause/), Playtest short film (https://youtu.be/qGbw1So77yg) & the Playtest Q&A (https://youtu.be/mVhgNV8H-kY). There's lots of nuggets in there for you to utilize, so enjoy. Thanks for tuning in. Also, feel free to ask questions or offer opinions of your own, whether down in the comment section or by hitting me up on social media @PhilSvitek. Lastly, for more free resources from your 360 creative coach, check out my website at http://philsvitek.com. RESOURCES/LINKS: -Coach or Consultant Services: https://philsvitek.com/lets-work-together/ -Podcast Services: http://philsvitek.com/podcastservices -Love Market Film (available now): https://www.amazon.com/Love-Market-Amy-Cassandra-Martinez/dp/B09DFS3FTZ/ref=sr_1_14 -Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/philsvitek -Merchandise: https://shop.spreadshirt.com/phil-svitek---360-creative-coach/ -Instagram: http://instagram.com/philsvitek -Facebook: http://facebook.com/philippsvitek -Twitter: http://twitter.com/philsvitek -Financially Fit Foundation: http://financiallyfitfoundation.org -Master Mental Fortitude Book: http://mastermentalfortitude.com -Elan, Elan Book: http://philsvitek.com/elan-elan -In Search of Sunrise Film: http://philsvitek.com/in-search-of-sunrise

Per Our Last Email
That's Just The Grind, Boy! ft. Jesse Nyberg

Per Our Last Email

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 71:58


If we had a penny for every time someone described the freelance life as "the grind," well... we probably wouldn't be here making this podcast.Kidding. Maybe... In today's episode, we got a chance to sit down with none other than Jesse Nyberg, or "glue," if you're cool like that...

WhatCulture Gaming
Halo Infinite Has The Best Multiplayer Since Halo 3

WhatCulture Gaming

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 36:51


Yup, 343 have gotten it THAT right. Scott and Josh also dive into Konami secretly reviving Castlevania, Metal Gear Solid AND Silent Hill. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Artfully Told
Episode 071 - Ashey Taylor

Artfully Told

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 46:11


In this week's episode, I again welcome Ashley Taylor! Ashley was our very first podcast guest and we're delighted she came back to share about her manifesto to artists about the importance of intentionality in every choice when creating and sharing their work. She offers blunt yet insightful advice about how artists can be meaningful in their works' presentation. (Fun fact: the cover image of this episode is of Ashley & Lindsey when they were promoting the 2019 premiere of "Cracked! A Reimagined Kansas City Nutcracker.")   Get in touch with Ashley Taylor: https://www.ashleyrebeccataylor.wordpress.com  Enroll in Lindsey's dance and wellness courses: www.elevateart.thinkific.com  Support Artfully Told: www.paypal.me/elevateart Artfully Told links: www.facebook.com/artfullytold | www.artfullytold.podbean.com | elevateartskc@gmail.com Get a free audiobook through Audible!  http://www.audibletrial.com/ArtfullyTold Schedule your own interview as a featured guest with Artfully Told! https://calendly.com/artfullytold/podcast-interview   Episode 71 - Ashley Taylor [00:00:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hello, and welcome to Artfully Told, where we share true stories about meaningful encounters with art. [00:00:06] Krista: I think artists help people have different perspectives on every aspect of life. [00:00:12] Roman: All I can do is put my part in to the world. [00:00:15] Elizabeth: It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. It doesn't have to be perfect ever really. I mean, as long as you, and you're enjoying doing it and you're trying your best, that can be good enough. [00:00:23] Elna: Art is something that you can experience with your senses and that you just experiences as so beautiful. [00:00:31] Lindsey Dinneen: Hi friends, whether you are just getting started or you're a seasoned professional looking to up your game, I have an exciting opportunity for you. Did you know that I am actually the creator of 10 different courses online that range from ballet, jazz, tap. They also include a mindset detox course and two Stretch and Tone courses. So if you're looking to start a new hobby or get a little bit fitter, or you're looking to do a deep dive into your mindset, really perform a true detox, I have the course for you, and I would love to help you out with that. So if you go to elevateart.thinkific.com, you will see all of the different courses I've created. [00:01:26] You don't have to step in a classroom to take your first dance class. I teach a signature 20 Moves in 20 Days course that allows you to learn 20 steps in just 20 days. It's a lot of fun. We have a great time together. And I think you're going to absolutely love the different courses. And Artfully Told listeners get a little something from me. So if you go, you'll sign up and use the promo code "artfullytold," all one word, and when you do so you'll get 15% off the purchase of any and all your favorite courses. All right, listeners, enjoy that. Again, it's elevateart.thinkific.com. See you there. [00:02:11] Hello, and welcome back to another episode of Artfully Told. I'm your host Lindsey and I am extremely delighted to have as my guest today a returnee. She actually had the very, very first episode that I ever released with a guest was with Ashley Taylor. So thank you, Ashley, for being back. I'm just beyond excited. Ashley is a dancer. She is a choreographer, teacher. She is also a writer. In fact, maybe sneak peak. Can I say that you're working on a novel? [00:02:47] Ashley Taylor: Of course you can! [00:02:49] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. Yeah. And then also, goodness gracious. I think your artistic list goes on and on. You can paint, draw, what can't you do? Maybe we should start there. [00:03:02] Ashley Taylor: Well, I'm going to answer that question later. [00:03:04] Lindsey Dinneen: Okay. Fair. That's true. Anyway, artist extraordinaire, very creative and very good at what she does. So, Ashley, thank you for being back. [00:03:17] Ashley Taylor: Thank you for having me. I'm super excited to chat with you again about artsy things. [00:03:22] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Well, first I'm really curious to know sort of what what you've been up to lately, especially considering, you know, when we did our recording last year, of course it was COVID central and it kind of still is, but things have changed and opened back up. So I'm curious how you've been able to navigate sort of getting back into more artsy things? [00:03:50] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. So I would not say I'm fully back in, in the way that I would like to be, but that's fine. I've had the time to explore a lot of writing and editing and found a community of creative writing people, which is great. So we meet virtually once a week and read each other what we're working on and give feedback, which has been wonderful, highly recommend creative community as a side note. So yeah, I, as you said, I have been working on a novel. I, I am editing it. I think this is my third draft right now. I've got some feedback recently from some readers, so I'm editing it. And the goal is to get it sent to some agents and see what the possibilities are there in the next couple of months. [00:04:44] So that'll be, that'll be an adventure for sure. In addition to that, I am starting to gather ideas for another writing project, which would be my own and other people's stories about being in the professional dance world and the good, the bad and the ugly of that. But focusing on the good hopefully. And so, yeah, writing, lots of writing. As far as dance goes, that's my other main thing. And I am starting to do some auditions and have a performance with you coming up, which I'm super excited about. And yeah, I that's pretty much it for now. I will see if any other opportunities arise, but I am trying to go with the flow. [00:05:33] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Well, and by going with the flow, obviously you are also very involved in lots of things. So that seems like quite a bit to keep you busy, not to mention, you know, you're a wife and mother and, you know, details. Well, congratulations on finishing or working on draft three of the novel. I mean, first of all, that's a huge undertaking to finish, let alone to get to this next point. So congratulations on that. And obviously I'm wishing you the best in your publishing journey and I'm sure our listeners are as well. And once that happens, you'll have to be on again and talk all about your book. [00:06:15] Ashley Taylor: I would be glad to do that. [00:06:17] Lindsey Dinneen: All right. And then so you mentioned getting back into various forms of art. And then I'm also curious because when we talked last time, you were essentially a brand new mom. And now you-- I mean, I guess you'd maybe consider yourself still kind of a brand new mom, I don't know-- but... [00:06:44] Ashley Taylor: It changes every day pretty much, a little bit. [00:06:49] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. And I'm curious how that has impacted your either expression of art or I mean, obviously ability to do art changes a little bit I'm sure. Or a lot, but I'm just curious if it, if you feel that also being a mom or having a little one has, has impacted just the way that you express yourself through art. [00:07:13] Ashley Taylor: Hmm. That's a great question. I think, I think I have two answers to that. So the first thing is now that I'm a mom, I obviously have additional demands on my time and energy. So that's, it can be a difficult thing, but it's also a good thing in the sense that I am a lot pickier now about what artistic endeavors I spend time on. So early on in any artistic person's career or foray into artistic things, just kind of taking whatever opportunities come your way, because you want to get out there and get recognized and build experience. And I've done that. And I've spent a lot of time doing that in the past. And I-- it's not that I have every experience I'd ever want under my belt and you know, I'm an expert now-- certainly not, but I think I am a little less willing to just kind of do whatever at this point. I'm interested in spending time on projects that I find really meaningful, which means I weed things out very quickly if I see audition listings or whatever it may be, and I think that's good. [00:08:25] I think, I think it's good to have that perspective now. Like I'm not, I'm not desperate enough to just do whatever. So that's good. And then as far as how it affects the expression of art, I do think it's not like I'm thinking about my son all the time while I'm making art, but I, I do think you, there's less pressure to throw your entire identity onto your art, because you know that you have other more important things waiting for you at home. Just gives you a different perspective and you realize you are more than, you're more than being a mother. You're also more than being an artist. You are all of those things at once. And you get to use the wholeness of that. You bring the wholeness of that into whatever you're doing at the moment, if that makes sense. [00:09:15] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, it absolutely does make sense. And I think that's really an amazing perspective to have, because it is so easy to get caught up in, you know, I'm, I'm a dancer. I've always been a dancer. I, you know, struggled with that myself quite a bit last year with COVID and not dancing for a year. I mean, not performing for a year and feeling like I've always identified myself, you know. When people meet me and I tell them that I'm a dancer. They're like, "Oh yeah, that makes sense." You know, it's just part of my DNA. And, and so there were many times last year I sort of had these like identity crisis moments of, "Well, who am I without this?" And, you know, and what, what do I need for my soul to, to feel like I can still identify as a dancer? Yeah. So I definitely relate to that, but I love the perspective that you have of sort of there's, there's more to you. Like you have, you have a myriad of sides to you and they're, they're important and they're all valuable, I guess. So, yeah, like that. [00:10:30] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. And I think we, we do ourselves a disservice by identifying as only one thing, honestly. Because we're all so much more than that. [00:10:39] Lindsey Dinneen: Absolutely. So earlier you had alluded to the fact that you're writing more about dance and people's experiences and things like that. And I know recently you wrote a really intriguing blog post that I kind of wanted to dive into a little bit. It was a manifesto of sorts, if that's fair, about some trends that you've been noticing in, I suppose, the dance world in particular, but in general in the arts world. And I'm curious if you don't mind sharing what you wrote about and sort of your thought process behind all that? [00:11:19] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. So I think the idea for this stemmed from, you know, I haven't performed in a while either, and, but I have seen over the past year or two, I've seen a few companies' virtual performances. And even that prompted me to think back to performances I've been involved in in the past. And I mean, I'll just be blunt. I'm pretty blunt in the blog post. There are times when I'm watching dance and I'm a dancer and I am actually bored. And I was trying to figure out why is that? Because it's not that it's not at all that the dancers aren't talented, they're very talented. And I came to realize it's because the choreography is rather mediocre. And I, you know, I have to couch this by saying everybody sees something different in a piece of art. And some people will find a piece of art meaningful that another person will not, right?. We all know it's, it's very subjective. [00:12:24] However, what I think, what I think people get caught up in sometimes is, you know, somebody who is not familiar with dance, might watch a dance and think, "Wow, they're so talented." Or, "Wow, that looks so hard," or, "Wow, that was beautiful." And those are all good reactions, right? But as a dancer, myself, I might have similar reactions, but I also might ask, "Okay, well, what are you trying to say through this dance?" I'm like, "What's the point of this? Why are we doing this?" And what I kind of argue for in the, in the post is like, I, I'm not always sure that artists are actually asking that question, 'cause especially dancers, we love dancing. We love doing our art. We love it. So we do it because that's what we do and we've trained, we've spent years studying it and we think, well, we have to dance. That's what we worked all this time for. And so then we end up putting out these dances that might be fun to do as performers, they might be meaningful personally as performers, and the audience might be wowed by our talent. [00:13:35] But did they actually get something meaningful out of it? Like, did you communicate through that dance? And I don't know. I guess I've been, I've been thinking lately that we really need to do a better job of being clear about what we're trying to say and what our intent is. So like, if the intent is, I just want to entertain people. So it's like, I don't know if the Radio City Rockettes say, or a fun movie. That's like a goofy chick flick. Okay. Entertainment. Great. No problem with that. But I think what we do is forget that there is a difference in some regard between entertainment, and art or between just like pure creative expression and art. So entertainment is, you know, you walk away and you're like, "Wow, I feel relaxed. I got out of my head for a minute." So it was great. They were talented. That was fun. Creative expression is like, any, anything that you do that's, that's creative, artistic, which is always great. [00:14:32] And it's like, I baked some cookies. I painted a sunset. I, I made a dance, right? That's all great, but I, I feel that a primary-- what's the word-- a primary purpose of art is to communicate something, to express something. And it has to be something from which the viewer can glean meaning, and it doesn't have to be the exact meaning that the artist intended, but there should be something like you should react to a piece of art in my opinion. So I questioned the approach of artists who don't, who are not clear about what they're trying to communicate. And therefore are not even editing it appropriately in order to communicate that more. So an example that I use in the, in the post is just because you know how to write words down and you find some interesting words and then you put them on a page that does not mean that you've actually written a story, right? [00:15:37] There's a lot that goes into writing a story with characters and plot and you know, development and all of this, right? So you can't just put words on a page and say, "I made art now. You know, enjoy it, pay for it." It's like, well, why, why would anybody do that? They could have written the page, the words on the page. So in, in dance, similarly, I feel like we pick some music and we're like, well, we have to dance because we have a show coming up and we gotta make money. So we'll make a dance about something random and put it up, put it on stage. And like here's talented dancers and here's like a couple of interesting moves. And we put it on stage and we call it art and then people don't come and we lament the fact that people just don't get it. It's like, well, was there anything there for them to get? Like, that's really my question. It's like, I don't think with the amount of content there is these days, like I just don't think it's realistic to assume that people will want to come watch you just because you're talented. Like there, the world is full of, the world is full of art and entertainment and all these things. So what makes yours different? Like, why are people gonna want to come and then come back? Are you giving them something transformative or something meaningful? Beyond just a spectacle. Does that make sense? [00:16:57] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. No, I resonate with everything that you're saying so much. Good gravy. Yeah. I, yes, that definitely makes sense. And I think, you know, gosh, a lot of thoughts were forming in my head as you were talking about it, but working kind of backwards. One thing that I just thought about too, is that with COVID one of the lovely things to come out of it, I suppose, is the fact that the world opened up even more. And so art that may have only been accessible to a certain geographic region is now being live-streamed across the world, you know, or, or it's been recorded and made into a film that's then, you know, again, available literally anywhere. So I think you touched on a really good point. That's even more relevant today. And that is that there's a lot, there's a lot of art. So what makes you different? [00:17:57] Ashley Taylor: Yeah, exactly. Yeah, I think artists sometimes sort of have this sense of entitlement, of like, well, I have years of training and I spent money and time and energy to do this. So you should come watch me because of that. And it's like, that's not fair. I mean, I don't know. I think that's unrealistic and I would love, I would love it if people came just to watch us because we're talented, but it's unrealistic. And so we need to give them something more than that. Okay. [00:18:28] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. No, absolutely. And I think sort of to that point, I mean, you would hold any other profession to that too, right? So just because a doctor has trained for years and years, super highly educated, if he constantly misdiagnosis and, you know, or treats people terribly, you're not coming back. There's plenty of doctors in the world, or, you know, if a plumber doesn't, you know, again, highly educated probably, you know, years of experience, but if they can't fix the problem, you don't go back. [00:19:03] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. [00:19:04] Lindsey Dinneen: So I think, you know, there's a lot of, I agree that, that there is some entitlement of sort of like, well, I have devoted my life to this, so then you should devote your life to me, you know, or whatever. [00:19:18] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. [00:19:19] Lindsey Dinneen: Well, and I think it's, it's actually something I've thought about before. You also have to be really careful as, as an artist. And as, let's say, you know, a show director, a company director, or whatever that you just recognize the fact that it will always matter more to you than to anyone else. So if you're going to be effective at what you do, you, like you said, you have to have a message that you can, that can be translated that that's not. [00:19:48] Ashley Taylor: And I think in order to do that, you really have to, you have to have an editing eye, and/or you need outside perspectives telling you "I'm not getting it" before it goes out to a wider audience. And like, think of the book publishing industry, you know, your book goes through multiple rounds of edits and proofreads and suggestions before it ever hits the shelves of a bookstore, unless you're self publishing, but you still should go through those steps if you're self publishing. So there have been many outside eyes looking at this project and saying, "I'm not quite getting it" or like "that character needs something more," but with the average dance company, in my personal experience, that doesn't happen. So there's no accountability to make sure that what you're trying to say is coming across. And again, you don't always have to have a message, but, but there needs to be, you need to be clear about the fact that you don't have a message, then you can't try half heartedly to put some kind of message in there. And it just doesn't go anywhere. If that makes sense. [00:20:57] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. So I'm, I'm gathering you're not a fan of the whole Untitled Number One concept. [00:21:03] Ashley Taylor: Oh my gosh. [00:21:04] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh. Oh man. I think that should be banned in the art world, man. You have to come up with something. [00:21:12] Ashley Taylor: Yeah, good grief. Yeah, that just seems, it seems lazy to me and I, yeah, again, I said this would be blunt. [00:21:20] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, no, no, for sure. And, but I think that's, that's actually really interesting. I actually, I think you touched on something that's important and it is blunt, but I think that essentially part of what you're getting at is if you don't do this self editing or outside editing, it is lazy, right? Like you aren't doing your due diligence, you aren't kind of respecting the art form in a way. [00:21:46] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. Yeah. I agree. Or you're assuming that the art form is so sacred or something that people will come anyway. I'm trying to think of an example that's not dance, but I don't know. I mean, even, you know, modern art, a lot of people don't get modern art, visual art. So I, and I feel like sometimes modern artists are like, "Well, I painted this, so you should look at it because it's painting and because I'm talented and I'm an artist and here it is. It's art." And, to which I would respond "Fine, but don't expect anybody to feel the same way about it than you do." I mean, I don't know. I think you have to communicate something, even if you're communicating everything is meaningless. Like, okay. That's, that's a message. But anyway. [00:22:40] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes. That's a choice. Yeah. It's interesting that you put it kind of like that, because that is something that-- yeah-- so our friends over at Kansas City Aerial Arts, apparently in their rehearsal process when they're actively choreographing and then sort of doing the edits like you're talking about, their sort of funny catchphrase is, "Well, that's a choice." And, and I love it because it's true. You, you have lots of choices along the process of creating art and editing art. And you know, you can make a choice that ends up needing to be changed in the future. I mean, that's, that's what happens a lot too. I mean, goodness, actually a real world example is in going back and looking at some of the choreography that I've previously done, or right now that I'm resetting on our dancers, is looking back and going, "What was that, you know, you know?" [00:23:39] Ashley Taylor: We all do it. [00:23:40] Lindsey Dinneen: Right, and perspective. And you go, "That doesn't make sense. Why would I have that person come on from that side of the..." You know, just it's so funny, but it is so important to go back and, and improve every time I think too. [00:23:54] Ashley Taylor: I was going to go off on another little rant-- not a ranch-- just a tangent. Yeah, I, yeah. So back when you were saying, talking about choices, "Well, that's a choice," so I don't have a problem with choices and I, and again, I don't think every piece of art is meant to be loved necessarily. So if you're choosing to communicate everything is meaningless and it's this very dark piece of art about that. You know, I don't have a problem with that as long as everything you do has a reason behind it and it supports your message. And I think a lot of times people miss that part. So I feel like, I think that we should start with the why and then go to the how and the what, and, and I'll explain that in a second, but I think a lot of people start with the what. They're like, "Well, we have to make a ballet." [00:24:42] And then they go into the why sort of, if they even get there, but more or less, it's just, well, we had to make a ballet. So here's a fun little piece of music. And, you know, we'll put people on stage versus, to say, to go back and say why first? Why am I even doing this? Why am I here today? What am I trying to say? And, and once you know that, then you can say, "Okay, now how best do I say that?" So, personal example really quick. I have started writing things before and I thought it would be in prose form. And like, as soon as I started, I thought, "You know what? This wants to be a poem." And I can't explain it other than that, it was like this wants to be poetry, not prose. And I think, you know, in that case, it worked out better to express the idea that way or, you know, I know we're a ballet company. I know we normally dance on pointe, but this piece really needs to be danced barefoot, and that will enhance the vision of what I'm trying to say. So again, it's like your why is informing your what ,or your how versus the other way around, if that makes sense. [00:25:48] So again, it's just, it's just about like every, every choice you make artistically needs to have a reason behind it and you need to be evaluating how that fits into your broader vision for this piece. Everything should support it. I remember in college my professors saying every, every person on stage needs to have a reason to be there. And if they're doing the exact same thing as everybody else, you need to question why they're there. So again, just having a reason. I'll stop there. [00:26:18] Lindsey Dinneen: No, no, that's great advice. I love that. Actually I remember in choreography classes in college, them talking about if you're going to use the prop, you have to use the prep. You can't just have a random bench on stage that you don't interact with except for the beginning, or maybe the end. Like there don't do that. Or, you know, 'cause again, and what I've been trying to actually communicate to my choreography students is intentionality is everything, right? So you have everything has to have intentionality because I agree with you once you start being like, "Oh, whatever," you run into all the issues that emerged from that of, okay, but so there's no thought put into that. And you, I think you do need to constantly be asking yourself and or what you're editing, "well, why?" Like, as a, as an artist, you should be able to answer that very clearly. [00:27:16] Ashley Taylor: Right. And if the answer is, " well, I just wanted to have them dance on a chair or, well, I just needed to use four couples instead of one." It's like, that's not a really good answer, frankly. So basically what you're saying is you had to adjust or water down the art in order to accommodate some limitation. And like, there are times to do that, but if you don't have to then, for heaven's sake, don't like, anyway, that's my thoughts. Or like, or people will say, "well, the music I want to use is 12 minutes. So this is going to be a 12 minute piece." And it's like three minutes in you've said everything you needed to say. I get it. And now I have to sit here and watch the repetition for another nine minutes. And like, I'm bored out of my mind. It's like, again, not that the dancers aren't good, but I don't need to, I didn't need to see that for 12 minutes. So cut the music, you know, make your, make your art or make your artistic choices work for the art. [00:28:17] Lindsey Dinneen: What a brilliant little way to sum that up. [00:28:21] Ashley Taylor: Thanks. [00:28:22] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yup. I like that. So I am curious when, okay, so we've talked about, you know, obviously you need to be communicating something, you need to be doing it well, which means a lot of editing and evaluation and re-editing again or whatever, but how do you feel about someone who's like, especially in the dance world, somebody who might produce a piece and their whole thing is, " I just want to make this as abstract as possible." Do you still feel that they need to communicate that that is the intention behind it? Or do you just not care for that style? [00:29:07] Ashley Taylor: I-- this is my personal preference-- if you're going to do that and say this has no story, this has no message, it's just movement on stage, personally, if I'm going to watch a piece that has no meaning, I want it to be still moving. And what I mean by that is, I want the music to be interesting. I don't want some soundscape, you know? You know what I mean? It's like the sort of tuneless music during massage. Exactly. Yeah. It's like, yeah, I don't want that because that's, that doesn't do anything for me. And then, and then, so I want some interesting music and I want the movement to respond to the music or enhance it and I want it to be memorable movement. So if some, so that if a piece is so beautiful or so dynamic or so in your face, whatever it is that I stopped caring if there's a meaning behind it, I think you've still made art because you've, you've managed to say, to use a metaphor, the earlier metaphor-- you've managed to make really amazing sentences, just beautiful sentences with beautiful words. And I don't care what you're saying, if that makes sense, but so, but that's a challenge. Like that's really challenging to make a dance so interesting that like everybody's just mesmerized, right? [00:30:37] So, and what I, so what I feel often happens is people will say, "Well, I'm going to make this abstract dance and then it's like nothing. Not only is it not communicating, but it's not interesting or unique or dynamic enough to, to move somebody." Like I could probably count on one hand the number of abstract, totally abstract dances. I've seen that I didn't care that there was no meeting. So, and like, I'm not even sure that I could make one. So like it's a challenge, but that's kind of how I would respond to that. Like if you're going to make that choice, fine. But then the art has to be like really different or just really moving. I keep using that word "moving." [00:31:19] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Dynamic moving. Yeah. I agree. I actually think it's probably a harder artistic challenge to go that route well than it is to be communicating a specific message or story and, and that kind of touches back into what we were talking about with intentionality of, I absolutely agree. So I always say that I love tap dancing because you can't do a sad tap dance. And, and that's, that's the thing about tap is it just would be so absurd and ridiculous. Like you wouldn't be communicating well, if you tried to do that, I suppose trying to do a comedically tragic piece, right? But you know, which I think that could be fun. But my point is that, you know, if, if my goal is to communicate happy, then, you know, tap is a good choice. If my goal is to communicate sadness and loneliness, probably tap's not the best choice. So what would best communicate that? So I, I agree with you. I really liked the idea of starting with the why, and then working backwards. It's like Event Planning 101, right? You know, you, what's the, what's the date of the event and what are you trying to do with that event? Why are you hiring you and then you work back, right? [00:32:38] Ashley Taylor: How do you want people to feel when they walk away from this event? [00:32:41] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah, exactly. What do you want them to have gained or learned or, yeah. Yeah. I love that. Right. Very cool. Well the manifesto is very well written and really worth the time to read as are Ashley's other musings. Do you mind sharing a link to your blog? [00:33:01] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. So I'm at ashleyrebeccataylor.wordpress.com. And that's Ashley with a Y, Rebecca with two C's, ashleyrebeccataylor.wordpress.com. And if anybody is interested, on the contact page on my blog, I also have links to my YouTube channel, which is for dancing and also my Facebook page, which is for basically all the arts that I do. [00:33:29] Lindsey Dinneen: All of the things. [00:33:30] Ashley Taylor: All the things. Yes. [00:33:32] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes. Awesome. I love it. Yeah, cool. Well, thank you for sharing about that, that particular post and kind of your, your musings and your feelings about, about, you know, an artist process and, and I really, I, you know, like you said, it's blunt, but I think it is a good gut check for any time that you do sort of want to just make a quick decision rather than a intentional decision or, you know, so I do think there's a lot of value to that. So thank you for kind of also bringing that back to awareness. I think especially maybe during COVID there were many of us who were like, I just need to create something, but you know, and that there's, there can be a lot of value in that and there can be a lot of value in doing so for you, but if you're going to be doing it for an audience of some kind, then, you know, let's, let's put that intentionality in it. Yeah. I really liked that. Exactly. All right. Well, I have three questions that I would love to ask you if you don't mind answering them. [00:34:45] Ashley Taylor: All right. [00:34:46] Lindsey Dinneen: So, first of all, what change would you like to see in the world of creating art or displaying art? Or making it available to people. So it essentially, what's, what's one big change you'd like to see in the art world? [00:35:03] Ashley Taylor: Well, I think I've spent most of our time talking about it. But actually I, so I have a different answer which is more about the artists themselves in a way. So I don't know about other forms of art so much, but in the ones that I'm involved in, I feel like the message that we get as we get more serious about pursuing them is there's kind of one right way to pursue a career in this field, or, you know, even a serious hobby or whatever. So, you know, if you're a dancer, you kind of get the impression-- it's like, well, if you don't dance in a company or you're not appearing in commercial music videos or whatever it may be, then you're not, you haven't really made it, right? And I think so, you know, this is something I've been wrestling with a lot over the past few years because I don't have a regular dancing gig at the moment. [00:36:00] And I feel like that message is harmful because it kind of makes you feel like you've failed if you either can't do that or don't want to do. And not wanting to go that route is totally valid. So how can we find more creative ways to make the art that we that we're passionate about, which may not be that traditional career route, right? So what I would like to see change is more people feeling the freedom if they don't see what they're looking for, the opportunity they're looking for, go make it right. I mean, create what isn't there yet. And give opportunities to other people who might feel the same way as you do about the career path that you've chosen or are up to not to choose. [00:36:52] Lindsey Dinneen: Amen to that. Yeah, no good answer. But I really, obviously, I personally resonate with that because, you know, I had gotten to a point in my career where the opportunities to be apart of a full-time company here locally, we're just not the right fit anymore. And so that's exactly what I did. I, I didn't see something that could continue to work well, so I created a company. And thankfully there were enough people who were like, "Yes, we agree. We, we like this. Let's go that route." And we, we don't dance all the time. We, we do, you know, two big shows a year and then little gigs here and there throughout. But yeah. And I think that's, I think that's great. [00:37:38] Ashley Taylor: Yeah, and it's, it's great because you don't, you know, there isn't one definition of what a dance company is or there shouldn't be so just because yours doesn't look like someone else's doesn't mean it's not a valid way to make art. Maybe might be an even a better atmosphere for making art. So why not try it, you know? [00:37:58] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. And I, yes, exactly. Well, and I, I try to especially tell my students this. But I just think in general, so true what you said. I think that there are many avenues to a dream and if you can remain open to it, to them, to the other options, then you're going to be a lot happier and a lot more fulfilled, you know, in the long run, because there are a lot of ways to do it. Yeah. [00:38:34] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. And you might even be more impactful. I mean, you never know. [00:38:37] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. So, absolutely. Yes. Well, great answer. And then my second question is, is there something art related that stands out to you as something that you would love to do that is completely outside of your wheelhouse and maybe you've so far felt intimidated to try it and maybe that kind of held you back from trying it? So essentially, is there something that you artistically would like to venture into, but maybe haven't for whatever reason? [00:39:10] Ashley Taylor: Yeah, there are many things. I mean, if I had my way, I would be good at everything, but I'm not. So I feel like the primary one is I would love to play the violin. I'm not really that musical. I mean, I am as a dancer, but not in the sense of playing an instrument. And I've, I have tried with, with disastrous results to play a few notes on other friend's stringed instruments before, so I would need some training, but yeah, but I would, I would love to try that, that instrument. And I think that'd be really fun. I, so that's very outside of my wheelhouse. The other one that comes to mind is musical theater which is more related to dancing and what I have experienced doing, but it's, it also feels very intimidating to be that well-rounded and sort of that showy in a way, but it sounds like a lot of fun. It always looks like they're having fun. So I'd love to try that too. [00:40:07] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, that's, that's really cool. I totally relate to the musical theater thing. I just love watching it so much that I always thought it'd be really fun, but I am so intimidated by the idea of having to be a triple threat and like, yeah, well, maybe we should audition for something together at some point, just, you know, at least for the experience of it. [00:40:31] Ashley Taylor: What? Abject failure? [00:40:34] Lindsey Dinneen: We can pick each other off the floor. It'll be fine. That'll be fine. Awesome. And then my final question is, at the end of your life, what's the one art-related experience you would want to experience again for the last time? [00:40:52] Ashley Taylor: So this is such a hard question because there are so many. So my answer is kind of funny because there's a, there's a piece of music that I have choreographed to. And I think it's probably the most beautiful piece I've ever heard, although that's hard to say, but it just moves me every time I hear it. And so I started telling people, I want this played at my funeral, which sounds like super morbid, and people would always sort of laugh awkwardly and be like, "Okay." Well, I think what I'm trying to get at with that statement is it's, it's so transcendent to me that that's kind of how I want to go on like thinking of, I'm thinking of a higher plane, I suppose, and something bigger than me and like kind of what lies ahead of death or what lies beyond death. So anyway, that's my little manifesto about it, but the piece of music is "Nearer My God to Thee," by The Piano Guys. So it's an arrangement of a hymn done on cello, multiple cellos, harmonizing with each other, and it is gorgeous, highly recommend listening to it. [00:42:03] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. That is a gorgeous, gorgeous piece of music. I, I agree with you. It's, it's amazing. There are, I mean, there's a lot of beautiful music out in the world, but there are certain ones that stand out as just every time I hear them, I'm like transported, or you said transcended, are you feeling like that? But yeah, that's yeah, you know, in fact it's really interesting. There was, there was somebody recently who was suggesting to do-- so, so I think there's probably a lot of us that find it difficult to just sit still and meditate. You know, come back to your breath, come back to your breath or whatever, you know, it's, it's hard to do that. [00:42:47] But one suggestion that I heard recently was to put on a piece of music like that. And it's, that's just that you just listen to it and you don't do anything else. You close your eyes, you know, let that experience sort of envelop you and that's what you kind of not like necessarily meditate on, but the idea of like clearing your head and not being distracted by other things and things like that. And yeah, I did it once and it was really amazing because it's just, you know, you get sort of distracted if you're alone, even if you love the piece of music, if you're not like solely focused on that, it's easy to sort of let it not wash over you, right? [00:43:29] Ashley Taylor: Oh yeah. But to bring your full focus to it. Yeah, I can, yeah, I can attest to that as meditative. [00:43:35] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes, indeed. Yeah. Awesome. Well, Ashley, this has been amazing as I fully expected. So thank you so much for being here. And I know we have the information for your website and that's probably a good way for people to connect with you or to at least follow your work. [00:44:03] Ashley Taylor: And I have an email on there too, so I'm always happy to chat about artistic things if that's desired. [00:44:10] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. Perfect. Well, again, I really appreciate you. Thank you for sharing your heart and thank you for being blunt, and, and for challenging us to, to be our best and, and do our best. I think that's really important and I am very excited to follow the path of this novel and can't wait to purchase it when it's available for purchase. [00:44:39] Ashley Taylor: And you'll be the first to know. [00:44:42] Lindsey Dinneen: Excellent. All right. And thank you so much to everyone who has listened to this episode, and if you're feeling as inspired as I am right now, I'd love if you'd share this with a friend or two and we will catch you next time. [00:44:57] If you have a story to share with us, we would love that so much. And I hope your day has been Artfully Told. [00:45:07] Hi friends. I wanted to share with you another podcast that I think you're going to fall in love with just as I have. It's called Harlem with a View, and it is hosted by Harlem Lennox, who was a previous guest of mine on Artfully Told and a dear friend. Just because it looks easy doesn't mean it is. There is so much that goes into the work of your creative. She wants to know how the artists got into their line of work, what inspires them, but most importantly, what keeps them going? She'd asked them about how they make it through the blood, sweat, and tears. She wants to know what it's like to live this creative life: the good, the bad, the ugly, and even the magical. So she goes behind the scenes with creatives, from different genres and she explores their history, their take on life and talks about the business of art and the dedication of making art. She has a brilliant, brilliant platform. I think you will fall in love. I highly recommend that you search for Harlem with a View. Thanks!

Hearts & Stripes
EP091 Faith & Marriage Prayer

Hearts & Stripes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 22:59


We are on the final week of our Faith & Marriage Series here on Hearts & Stripes podcast.  In this episode I share how prayer can impact you thriving personally, in your marriage and with your legacy.  I even get transparent with sharing my prayer for marriages as it aligns with the God's picture of marriage that is outlined in the Word.  Yup, I was super nervous about sharing a prayer on the podcast, but if it blesses just one person then it was totally worth the knot in my stomach and momentary discomfort. Top Takeaways: Establish a prayer practice and faith relationship for yourself Pray together as a couple to grow closer to God as you grow closer to one another Start a legacy of faith through prayer with your family and friends Prayer For Marriage: My prayer for marriage is that we would each see marriage as another gift. An opportunity to draw nearer to God in His mission to be glorified and point others toward Himself. That we would embrace the chance to be sanctified, becoming more like Christ, because of the differences and challenges with our spouse. Growing our dependence on and likeness  of Jesus every day. I pray our marriages would be so bizarrely unified (not perfect), fresh, and partnered with both our eyes on Christ that the world is drawn to ask "what are you looking at?" So that we, as 2 made 1, can reply with honor regarding the good news that brought us peace and core reason for our hope and ability to truly love one another. Scripture Reference: 1 Peter 3:15 and 1 John 4:19 Thank you Crystal for submitting this prayer!  Be sure to connect with her. IG:  @crystalcnvrstnsllc  FB:  Crystal McFadden, LPC - Resiliency Communicator  Full name:  Crystal McFadden, LPC   Bree's Prayer Scripture References: Ephesians 4:2-3 Colossians 3:14 Ecclesiastes 4:9 Ephesians 5:25-33   Access a full list of Military Marriage resources  visit https://www.militarymarriageday.com/resources For more on Military Marriage Day, survey information and the Military Marriage Resource Hub visit: https://www.militarymarriageday.com IG https://www.instagram.com/militarymarriageday/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/militarymarriageday   Today's Heart Track Great Are You Lord by All Sons & Daughters Listen to our Heart Tracks II playlist on Spotify https://open.spotify.com/playlist/6ymOG8ArepaBYgIqCe4vmisi=7cbbfc02b0484f67   Let's Connect: Join us in the Hearts & Stripes Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/heartsstripes To get even more on Hearts & Stripes podcast, resources, coaching and more head to https://www.breecarroll.com Connects with Bree on IG https://www.instagram.com/itsbreecarroll Connect with Bree on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/itsbreecarroll

Day Zero
Day 8 - October 3, 2021

Day Zero

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 98:01


Yup, still cloudy with a chance of propaganda. Charlie, Xcubed, Chris and Cory tackle the ridiculous stories of the week. Special guest Ryder Lee of the Raised By Giants Podcast.

Oh F*ck Yeah with Ruan Willow
Ep 78: NSFW The Dressing Room Rendezvous The Sexual Bucket List Number 1

Oh F*ck Yeah with Ruan Willow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 17:03


Ep 78: NSFW The Dressing Room Rendezvous The Sexual Bucket List Number 1. Hey all! I'm so excited you are here! I love love love love love that you are here and I love sharing with you! I'm starting a new series that I will publish sporadically for as long as I have ideas, for as long as I want and that series is called The Sexual Bucket List! This is episode 1 of this series. In each of the episodes of this series, I will be doing an ad lib narration of a sexual story. Yep! Totally off the top of my head! I do a tiny bit of editing because I do stumble here and there but for the most part, this is exactly as I said it off the cuff! I will just sit down and record what's on my brain for this series, I won't be writing/typing it out ... it's off the top of my head! I will take ideas if you would like to send me an idea for this series, contact me via Social Media or at ruanwillow@gmail.com This particular episode is narrated as if it's happening live and I am with YOU! Yup! It's first person and you can place yourself in the place of my partner because throughout the story, I will be using the word "you". Sometimes it will be a heterosexual story, sometimes it will be two women, and sometimes it will be multiple partner. So hang on for the ride and let's go ... to the dressing room! Oh Fuck Yeah!Find all my links here: https://linktr.ee/RuanWillowWant to start a podcast yourself? Check out Buzzsprout! Following this link lets Buzzsprout know I sent you, gets you a $20 Amazon gift card if you sign up for a paid plan, and helps my show too! https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1573090Try Amazon Audible Amazon (affiliate link): https://amzn.to/3zCtUPFCheck out Ruan's Audiobook Inside of Ruan Willow: https://tinyurl.com/ezcjdekHello, I'm Ruan! :)Welcome to my podcast!Listen to this reading to rage up your sexuality, entertain your brain, and enjoy!On my podcast, you will find romance, topics on relationships, romance and love, self-care,  intimacy for adults only,  and it is intended for the purposes of entertainment, your fantasy life, and the arts. Sexual health and fitness are important parts for a healthy sex life.Thank you for listening!Have a fabulously sexy day!love ya,RuanP. S.  I have a sexy part in an audiobook...it's a Western comedy and it's full of adventure, comedy, fights, and sex. It's a fabulous book!  Very entertaining!  You will laugh a lot! It's called How the West Wasn't Won Part 2, Whiskey for my men, shrooms for my horses. Check it out here: https://amzn.to/3htixCKWould you like a copy of my latest audiobook for free? I have free codes while they last.  Contact me on social media or at ruanwillow at gmail dot comRuan's Books:Ruan's Cabin Getaway: An Explicit Age Gap Romance: https://books2read.com/u/mB2A7DAffiliate link: https://amzn.to/3trZVshThe Mardi Gras Unmasking by Ruan Willow book link: https://books2read.com/u/mZeWpEAffiliate link: https://amzn.to/3eAtUsgSupport my podcast by joining my membership on Patreon that will give you extra content and early access to certain works.https://www.patreon.com/ruanwillowInside Ruan Willow written with BD Hamptonhttps://amzn.to/3uPHjlJSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/ruanwillow)

Shotgun Saturday Nights - An Unofficial King Falls AM AND Improv on Tape NSFW Fancast!

Greetings all! Sorry for the break we had to take. I had a lil' bit of a health scare that has been (for the most part) taken care of, but it was pretty emotionally draining. -Dawn ANYWHOOZLES... In this episode, we discuss...! *Mission to Zyxx Live show (tomorrow!) and the Premiere of 90 Degrees South by our boy Brian! Good luck man!! *Politics (we can't stay away, and it's more of a rant than anything else) *The episode itself! * Discussions about Patreon, writing, and mental health (as it relates to this episode) Yup, that's about it, you know how we roll by now. Peace out, be awesome to one another, and wash your hands, ok? ;) -Dawn and Dana --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/shotgunsammy/message

Be With Me: 7 Minutes of Biblical Wonder
From WOE IS ME to GO WITH HE Mt12:21 s4e116

Be With Me: 7 Minutes of Biblical Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 7:51


600 years before Jesus, Isaiah perfectly reveals Him.  It is enough to single-handedly believe and follow Jesus forever.  Isaiah notes four things we now see more clearly:That God takes great pleasure in Himself.  The three Persons of the Trinity think the other Persons of the Trinity are pretty special. Do do otherwise would be blasphemy.The people of God are a bunch of losers, unchosen, poor, foreign, unpowerful people.  Knuckleheads.  God looks at us and says, "Yup, those are EXACTLY my people..."Jesus has a wonderful personality: not quarrelsome, not loud, not advertising, and gentle UNTIL...the moment when He brings JUSTICE TO VICTORY.  If you have ever seen a person carrying a sign that says, "I want JUSTICE", you can be sure they haven't considered it very carefully.  In the end, NOBODY will want just for themselves.   We'd all be doomed...UNLESS we have HOPED in His name.  That is the rescue from pure justice.  Give me some of that!Today is a kind message to all who may feel like they are "bruised reeds" and "smoldering wicks."  The call is to move from "woe is me" to "go with HE".  Subscribe on Apple Podcasts.  It is the purple button on your new phone.  Androids MOST welcome here too!

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE
SONJA (MORGAN) In Your City - (a Caberlesque Review)

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 10:37


Sonja In Your City!! It is official. The one, the only, Ms. Sonja Morgan will soon be appearing in your city. That is right, Ms. Morgan is bringing her very special brand of Caburlesque to a city near you. We were thrilled and honored to be in attendance at Sonja's One Night Only “Friends and Family” Preview Show the other week. The comedy, the improv, the singing, the guest list, the opening acts, the thrill of it all. Where do we begin? As our official plus one for the night, the gals from the Access Hollywood “Housewives Nightcap” Digital Series are here to help us review the entire night, Sonja Sangria and all. Yup, available in white and red. Of course, our full review includes a play by play of the show, the Leah McSweeney Cameo and hangin' with Sonja Morgan in all her glory afterwards. Oh yea, like we said, where or where do we begin? @emilyorozcotv @laurenaherbert @behindvelvetrope @davidyontef Full Episode At: https://www.patreon.com/posts/55382295/edit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Woody and Jim - 1075 The River Nashville
Why doesn't anyone listen to what Jim says?

Woody and Jim - 1075 The River Nashville

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 35:11


People found some weird isht inside the walls of their home. Ricki and Zac have found the angriest anger-balls in Nashville.... playing kickball. Yup, kickball. Nashville is losing 2 concert venues.

Parenting After Trauma with Robyn Gobbel
The parts of The Club that are Hard to Describe

Parenting After Trauma with Robyn Gobbel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 17:35


You've probably heard- The Club is open for registration from now until October 5, 2021!There are parts of The Club that are super easy to describe and there are parts of The Club that feel almost impossible to describe.If you're thinking about joining The Club, here's my best attempt at showing you what The Club is all about. In this episode I mention how there are basically no rules for membership- except that all members agree to The Club manifesto.  Yup, we have a manifesto.  It's not creepy, promise.  In fact, it might be the most important thing that has made The Club work the way it does.I have an episode about the Manifesto that you find here: The Club has a ManifestoDefinitely if you have questions- email me! robyn@robyngobbel.com**********There are so many benefits (and no drawbacks!) to teaching kids and teens about the brain. I'll give you simple, fun ways to Teach Kids about their Awesome Brain. This 1.5 hour webinar airs live on Wed Oct 20. Everyone who registers will receive the recording so you don't have to attend live! CLICK HERE.

MSUM Dragons Podcasts
Homecoming Podcasts Crossover with Wade Youngblom

MSUM Dragons Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021


It is homecoming week here in Dragonland…a time to come back to this place many once called home, engage with alumni, and the community. Our show does just that today…connects with an alum who is connecting with fellow alums to promote Dragons Football on THE DRAGON WAY Podcast. Yup, crossover episode time as we welcome former athlete, former coach, and current host of THE DRAGON WAY Podcast…the man whose loves are simply his family and BDubs…please welcome Wade Youngblom!!!  

Spill the D - Disney World, Disneyland, Movies, and more
Ep. 36: 50 Reasons to Visit Disney as an Adult

Spill the D - Disney World, Disneyland, Movies, and more

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 69:35


50 REASONS?! Yup, 50 reasons! Sab and Gina sat down and came up with their top 50 reasons why you should visit the Disney Parks as an adult. From the food to the booze they cover it all! This episode also features discussion of Disney news such as an exciting new scavenger hunt and some holiday merch already being sold on ShopDisney. Make sure to listen for a tip save you time, money, and space in your suitcase! Enjoy episode 36 of Spill the D! Gina and Sab ★ Disney Podcast (@spillthedpod) • Instagram photos and videos Sab & Gina - Disney Podcast (@spillthedpod) TikTok | Watch Sab & Gina - Disney Podcast's Newest TikTok Videos --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/spillthed/message

The Fearless and Successful Podcast by Dijana Llugolli
Vince Warnock: Your Superpower - Vulnerability

The Fearless and Successful Podcast by Dijana Llugolli

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 56:33


I have to start this caption by saying: BUSINESS IS FUN you guys and my guest Vince Warnock knows how to entertain, educate and encourage people. I've known Vince for a year and he hosted me on his podcast Chasing the Insight in December 2020. Definitely go and listen to the episode: https://chasingtheinsights.com/ep47-dijana-llugolli-success/⁣ ⁣ What I like about Vince is that he is so smart and fun and he loves to serve. This LIEV TALK show was one of my favourites because it represents all my values: Freedom to be yourself, Fearlessness, Fun and Flow! Yup, your coach D love good F words! ⁣ ⁣

The Pixelated Paranormal Podcast
The Pixelated Paranormal Podcast #209: Oh Fudge, Preston Goes to a Psychic

The Pixelated Paranormal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


Hot off his return flight from Vegas, Shawn joins Preston to discuss what it’s like to sit in the crowd of an auditorium-sized psychic reading, from the Jersey Shore Medium herself, Theresa Caputo. Then they jump into some bizarre fudge-related news! Yup… that’s right, we said fudge. So grab your favorite candy bar, put your feet up and enjoy the show! Voicemail: 913.662.3144 - Email: pixelatedparanormal[at]gmail[dot]com

Light After Trauma
Episode 62: Wondering If There Is More To Life? There Is! with Donna Bond

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 51:24


We were not meant to live our lives by simply going through the motions. Unfortunately, far too many people go through their days feeling unsettled and unhappy with their circumstances. Donna Bond is no stranger to this feeling. Transforming herself from a marketing executive to now a life and spiritual coach, Donna shares her powerful story of her refusal to accept anything less than the best that life has to give.  Support the Podcast Light After Trauma website Donna's website Denise's website Transcript   Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: Hey. What's up everybody? How's it going? Welcome back to another episode. I'm really excited about the next couple months as we really dive into this fall season because I've got some awesome content lined up. I am so excited. As a quick little reminder, I just want to ask, if you haven't done so already and you are enjoying what you are hearing on the podcast, please head on over to wherever you like to listen and leave a review and rating for the podcast. That does wonders in terms of trying to spread awareness for the podcast and to garner more support for the podcast. I love doing this. I want to continue doing it us. And one of the big ways in which I will be able to continue to do this is through your help and your support. So please leave a review. We also have a Patreon, if you are able to support that, that would be incredible so that we can have even more content. And you can find that Patreon either in the show notes or you can go to the website, which is lightaftertrauma.com and you will have everything you need there. So with that said, I will dive right into who our guest speaker is today. We have got the lovely Donna Bond and Donna is a spiritual advisor, a business and life coach and the author of Original Wisdom: Harness The Power of the Authentic You. Donna is supporting individual transformation of consciousness and she assists clients across the globe and she helps them to evolve to new heights of meaningful success, personal growth and fulfillment and spiritual aliveness using the principles and practices of spiritual psychology. And I think it's really important to note that Donna has a master's degree in spiritual psychology, which truthfully, I'm not very familiar with at all. So I'm really looking forward to diving in and finding out what that is all about because I didn't even know getting a master's degree in spiritual psych was an option. So we are going to find out all the answers to those questions Tuesday with Donna. So hi Donna. Welcome to the podcast. Donna Bond [02:46]: Hi Alyssa. Thank you for having me. So glad to be here. Alyssa Scolari [02:50]: So glad to be here too. I am just for the listeners. I am looking at such a dreamy background. We've got Donna's book in the background and then are those pink roses? Donna Bond [03:04]: Those are pink roses. Alyssa Scolari [03:06]: Are they real? Donna Bond [03:07]: Yes, they are real. I get roses every week as a gift to myself and as a gift to my clients and I just love the energy that they hold and the fragrance that they emit and they remind me to be soft and go with the flow and yeah, I love them. I love them. Alyssa Scolari [03:31]: Yes, I'm loving them as I'm seeing in the background. And they really do radiate just serenity. My eye keeps drifting over to them and I'm like oh, they're so dreamy. Okay. So that was our rose corner. If you don't have roses, get some in your home. I apparently need to go out after this and buy some roses. So welcome. And I wanted to start out by asking you one of the things that I was saying right off the bat in the introduction is you have a master's degree in spiritual psychology? Donna Bond [04:06]: Yeah. With an emphasis in consciousness, health and healing from the University of Santa Monica. Alyssa Scolari [04:15]: So I actually did... I wasn't even aware that you could get a master's degree in spiritual psychology. Are those programs few and far between or is that something I've just completely missed the mark on? Donna Bond [04:30]: Well, the University of Santa Monica was delivering this master's for about 35 years. Believe it or not. Alyssa Scolari [04:40]: Wow. Donna Bond [04:40]: Yeah. And they actually are no longer delivering the actual master's program, but they have re-imagined their offering into something called soul centered living, which is terrific because it really makes the program available to a wider audience. You don't have to have any prerequisites or credentials to participate in the program. And the study of the program is you, right? You're the topic, you're the homework. It's a journey into yourself. And a lot of the people who attend the program don't go on to work in the field. Many of the graduates do. I have found my way into transformational coaching as a result of the program, but more often than not, people who participate in that program, they just show up in their life in a really different way. Alyssa Scolari [05:49]: Yeah. I love hearing you say that because that's everything that I would imagine that master's degree would be, is a deep dive into you essentially. Donna Bond [06:00]: Yeah. Yes. Alyssa Scolari [06:02]: Oh, man. I might be going back for another master's degree. That sounds phenomenal. Donna Bond [06:08]: Well, the beauty, I know you're in the Northeastern part of the world, the beauty of what they're doing now is they've taken the entire thing online, which it's certainly been amazing to sit in a room with nearly 200 people and have the depth of the experiences that we've all shared together. And being online is really cool because doctors who want to marry whole neck are incredible teachers. They are a spiritual masters of our time and being able to be face-to-face with them on Zoom all up close and personal is pretty magical and pretty special. So yeah, it's a miracle really that anyone around the globe now can do this, but truthfully, when I was there, people would come from Dubai for the weekend. Alyssa Scolari [07:12]: Wow. Donna Bond [07:14]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [07:15]: That is, oh, that's incredible. Now can you tell me how... So, can you give me a little bit of backstory on how you made that decision to go for your master's in spiritual psychology? Because as I understand it, you were doing something completely... You were on a completely different track in your life when things seemingly took a complete 180 for you. Donna Bond [07:39]: Yes. So I was in the world of hospitality for 28 years. I was a marketing executive working for the Ritz-Carlton at the time. And it all looked really good on the surface, Alyssa. It all looked really good on the surface, but deep down, I was really unhappy and I didn't know it at the time, but I was developing a frozen shoulder, which was like this gorgeous, outward manifestation where I was in my life because I knew I wasn't happy deep down, but I wasn't doing anything about it. Right? So this outward manifestation of stuckness showed up in a really big and prominent way. And I have always been a spiritual seeker. If you saw my office, you'd see hundreds of books here. I've read it all. I love it all. And so I had gone to see a psychic and literally crying to this psychic like I've got to find my purpose in life and the whole sob story. And she said to me, Donna, they're spelling it out for me. Spiritual psychology. And I said what in the hell is spiritual psychology? Alyssa Scolari [07:39]: What? Donna Bond [09:01]: Yes, literally. So she says, "Oh, there's three universities that teach a program in this." And one of them is the Center for Integral Studies, which is up in Northern California. She said there's also Sophia University, which is also, I think, based in Northern California. Now I think they have a campus in Costa Mesa. And she never got to tell me the name of the third university. So I went home, of course, and consulted the real Oracle. I Googled it. Alyssa Scolari [09:37]: Of course. Donna Bond [09:40]: And very quickly, right? And very quickly found my way to the University of Santa Monica. And I worked with this amazing admissions counselor. And it's so funny to think back, and it's not funny, but it's just incredible to think back at where my mindset was at that time in my life, how I saw the world at that time in my life, which was very practical and logical and really through a completely different lens. And I have this very long exchange with this admissions counselor trying to get every question answered and taking on what I was perceiving as being a burden of a master's program while I'm working a 60-hour a week job in this really intense high pressure corporate environment. And she finally said to me, "Hey Donna, why don't we do this, just for one week and see." And those were such magical words, right? It's like that, when I think about it, time stopped in that moment as I was being invited into making such an important decision in my life. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [11:06]: Yeah. Right? That one weekend. And it's that feeling and I know so well and I can see all of the emotion in your face, but I know the listeners can't see this, but I can see it and I resonate so deeply with that feeling of like it's almost like it hits you and you're like oh, this is it. Is that like along the lines of what you were feeling? Donna Bond [11:35]: Yes and no. Truthfully at that time in my life, there was not one bone in this body. There is not one cell in this membrane that had a belief system, that there was anything else that could be possible for me in my life other than what I had. And where I had already achieved the status and the success that I had grown over nearly almost 30 years. It was like oh, I was earning a certain level of income and I had a certain level of status and a certain level of respect and prestige that I had earned coming up through the ranks in my career. And there was nothing in this body that thought that that would be possible to recreate a whole another career in my life at the age of 45, which was when this all started. So there was a whole, there was this call to do this, but truthfully I did not know why. I did not know. I did not know why there was nothing logical about it. Alyssa Scolari [12:49]: So it's almost like for the first 45 years of your life, you were walking around with a very myopic view on what your world was and nothing, you couldn't see beyond. You had essentially blinders to other possibilities in your world. And I really appreciate the fact that you are sharing this happened when I was 45 years old because I think that there are so many people out there. And I know that there are people who are listening that get to a point in their lives, I think much like you're describing where they're like well, here I am. This is my life. I can't see any other possibilities. Right? I've been working as a nurse for the last 20 years and this is what it is. And deep down, right, they're burying feelings of but there's more. There has to be more than this. And of course it comes out in physical ways. Right? And a lot of times what we do is we go oh, I'm getting old. I got a frozen shoulder. Yup. That's me. Right? I'm getting old. Instead of saying, right, what is my body telling me? So I love that. Thank you so much for sharing that. And I didn't mean to interrupt, so continue. You can go on but I loved so much in what you just said that I'm like yes, it's so important for you to be sharing this because it's never too late. Donna Bond [14:22]: It's never too late. And I'm 53 now and my new career is taking off. Right? It's launching. I am having more fun than I have ever had in my life. And it's been a journey. So I enrolled myself in this program and ignored my frozen shoulder for the better part of a year until I quite literally couldn't lift my arm. And when I finally reconciled with what was going on with my shoulder and decided to actually address it, I had an experience where I was, I have to call it divine intervention because there's really no other way to call it. But I was on my way to the Ritz-Carlton Global Leadership Conference. I was on an airplane. My shoulder was stuck. I mean, it was in so much pain, visibly swollen from the neglect. And I'm going to a conference where I'm going to drink too much and I'm not going to sleep and I'm going to abuse my body even further. Alyssa Scolari [15:31]: Right. Donna Bond [15:31]: And I was reading a book called Finding Your Element by Ken Robinson. And I was really excited about this book because I've been looking for my element my whole life. Alyssa Scolari [15:46]: Yeah. That's the very thing you've been searching for, right? Donna Bond [15:52]: And I'm reading and he's talking about how we play it safe. And he's using all these metaphors and these analogies and he uses Mark Twain's metaphor, "20 years from now, you're going to be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than you by the things that you did do." So sail away from the safe harbor, throw off the battle lines, explore, dream, discover. I think I just twisted that around, but you get my drift. And so as I'm reading this, all of a sudden, I feel like there's this emotion that is bubbling up inside of me. And then there's another line that says "What lies behind us and what lie before us are tiny matters compared to what lie within us." And that's a Ralph Waldo Emerson. Alyssa Scolari [16:40]: One of my favorites. Donna Bond [16:41]: But now, I feel like this emotion has moved its way up into my chest. And then I get to the clincher, this little eight liner that is by the poet Elizabeth Appell called Risk. That poem is often attributed to Anais Nin, but she didn't actually write it. And then the day came when the risk to remain tight in the bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. And when I read that, Alyssa, my shoulder was the bud. My shoulder was that bud. And I just had this out of body experience as I was on this airplane suddenly having complete and utter clarity that I needed to leave my job. At this point still, there's not one bone in my body that thinks I'm going to be a coach, that even... This is not anywhere in my spirit, it's not in my radar, it's not in my consciousness. But I'm going to quit my job. And I just get this dose of clarity around this. And even though I don't have a clue or a plan, I am clear that this is what needs to happen. And so I go to this conference and an important part of the story that I didn't mention earlier was that as I'm evolving in this program, in spiritual psychology, I'm doing a lot of exploring of my consciousness and sort of testing out the laws of the universe. And I was doing an experiment where I was asking the universe to bring me an apple. And right before I left on this trip, I had sort of demanded the universe bring me an apple. Very random, no attachment to this whatsoever. I couldn't care less whether this happens or it doesn't happen. Alyssa Scolari [18:45]: Almost like you were testing the waters a little bit? Donna Bond [18:47]: Yes. Yes. So I had thrown this out there, right? So I had this experience on the plane, go through this conference. It's the very last night of this conference. And my name was called to the stage where I am the recipient of the Western Regional Marketing Achievement Award for the third consecutive year in a row. And as I'm walking back to my table with this award in my hand, I'm even more grounded in my knowing that I'm out. I'm done. I've had an amazing career. I'm so proud of all that I've done and all of the gifts that this has given me and even though I have no idea what's next, I know I'm done. I'm done here. Well, I sit down at my place setting and served before me is dessert. And it is this incredibly elaborate apple dessert with apple confit and green apple sorbet. And apple this and apple that. And because it was with the Ritz-Carlton, they don't miss a beat, there was a menu card. So there was no mistaking what this was that had just been set before me because the menu card is now describing in great detail this apple dessert. And so I sat there at that table and just let the tears roll down my face as I became aware in that moment of the part of me that is so much greater than anything that I have given myself credit for. Right? Than any of my belief systems or upbringing or conditioning or patterning that there is this other part of me that is absolutely indefinitely connected to the infinite universe and the intelligence that is everywhere. And it was like I collided with that. And it was fantastic. Alyssa Scolari [21:07]: I'm sure- Donna Bond [21:09]: And it changed everything. Alyssa Scolari [21:09]: ... that in itself felt like an outer body experience. Donna Bond [21:12]: Without question. Without question. Alyssa Scolari [21:14]: I mean, I have head to toe chills. When we're recording this, it's like the hottest day that we've had so far in summer over here in Pennsylvania. But I am covered in goosebumps from head to toe because that, it's beautiful. I don't have any other words that can do it justice. It's just, you sought out the universe and the universe said hey, I'm opening my arms to you. And I love that. So did you end up quitting your job? Donna Bond [21:47]: I ended up quitting my job. Yes. That happened in March. I actually resigned. Well, I actually ended up going out on a medical leave of absence and having shoulder surgery and through my healing journey with my shoulder, I got clear about well, what am I going to do next? Because I needed to earn an income, right? That was a piece of it for me. So I decided to become a marketing consultant. And I thought I would pitch the Ritz-Carlton on hiring me to train my replacement to take my role as the director of sales and marketing there. So I ended up resigning in October of 2014 and I worked as a marketing consultant for about a year and a half. And still there was nothing in me that really believed that I was going to be sitting in these sacred, intimate conversations one on one with people being given a sacred opportunity to help them solve problems in their life and live into their next level of potential. But the universe kind of tricked me into it. And that's true. Alyssa Scolari [23:16]: Yeah. So it's almost... Right. So it's almost like you had no idea where all of this was taking you. You just knew it was time to change, but you were going with it, right? You were surrendering to wherever it was that you were being led to. Donna Bond [23:34]: Yes. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [23:36]: Which is a hard thing to do. Let's not gloss over that because just being able to surrender itself, it's very hard to do. Donna Bond [23:46]: It's really hard. And then, I think first of all, I guess I have to say that I could not have done this without the support that I had through this master's program at the University of Santa Monica. And really being wrapped in this container of not only loving, but this belief in me when I couldn't believe in myself. Right? There was like this template that was being held for what was possible. And that's why I love coaching so much. Right? Is because we get that partnership and you've got a partner who is believing in you when all else fails. Alyssa Scolari [24:40]: Yes, yes. Donna Bond [24:43]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [24:43]: I mean, I actually have a coach that I work with and that's exactly what it is. It's at the end of the day knowing there's somebody there who's still going to wrap you in safety and comfort and support along this journey. Donna Bond [25:01]: Yeah. [crosstalk 00:25:02] so there's a lot of surrender They are. They are. And I definitely went through an undoing because my whole life was about my job and who I was at my job and who I was was my job. So there was a lot of identity crisis. There was a lot of ego death, right? Of just unraveling all of that. And this all happened within the context of my marriage and, which is still alive and healthy and beautiful and supportive and all of those amazing things, which is whole other story and a whole other interview. Truly because that's a whole other book. Alyssa Scolari [25:53]: Yes. Donna Bond [25:55]: I said yes to one thing at a time. And I guess for the people who are listening, that's a really helpful way when we're being asked to surrender. It's like you don't have to surrender to everything all at once, you just have to surrender what's in front of you right now. And that is basically what I did. It's like I took one little step out of my comfort zone. I took one little step in the direction of kind of where I wanted to go and then I let the universe fill in the blanks. And once I took that one little step, then the next step got revealed. The next step didn't get revealed till I was willing to take that first step. Right? So there's this give and take with the universe that I think is so important that we can't opt out. Right? We got to stay in the game. We have to participate in our own forward motion. We can make a move and then the universe is going to meet us there and we can make another move and the universe is going to meet us there. But the universe isn't going to meet us until make the first. Alyssa Scolari [27:15]: Yes. It's almost a mutual respect. Right? It's a mutual trust that's forming. I think the way you're describing it, it's very, very beautiful and more accurate than what I've seen it described. Or as I think a lot of people think that it's like well, if I ask for it, it's all mine. Right? And that's where I think things like manifestation sort of get taken... They take off, right? People take them to unrealistic heights because it doesn't work like that. Right? You don't sit down and write on a piece of paper I want a Mercedes Benz and a $6 million home and a $58 million yacht. Donna Bond [27:57]: And then you go sit on the couch. Alyssa Scolari [27:59]: Yes. Yes, exactly. So the way you're describing it as is very, very beautiful. Donna Bond [28:08]: Thank you. Yeah. So that's what I did. It was one step at a time. And I was in the, my master's is in spiritual psychology with an emphasis in consciousness, health and healing. And when I was going through the consciousness, health and healing part of the program, we had to do a service project that was like donating. I can't remember the number exactly. It's like 56 hours of our time in service. And I had come through a mentality where time is money. Right? You don't do anything unless you're getting paid for it. So this was a really big opening for me in what is service? What does service mean and what does it mean to have a service consciousness? Right? And I think people sometimes mix up the difference between service and servitude, right? We are making ourselves available to something and we're doing that from a place of wholeness, from a place of giving, but not from a place of depleting ourselves or betraying ourselves. Even that word comes word forward fo me. Alyssa Scolari [29:31]: Yes. Donna Bond [29:32]: So my service project that I had birthed in my mind was that I was going to assist women who had small businesses. Actually a lot of coaches and healers and facilitators, I was going to assist them with growing their business and teaching them a little bit about marketing and giving them some more self-confidence. And this was the idea that I had. And one afternoon sitting around a pool at the Ohio Valley and Spa, I was with one of my girlfriends who was also in this program with me. And she said, well, can I be your first person? Right? Can I be the first person that you give these service hours to? And I said absolutely. It would be my honor to support you. I would love that. Well, when I turned in this project to the University of Santa Monica, it got denied that my service project was not going to fulfill the requirement or what I needed to do for my master's. However, I had already made this commitment, right, to this woman that I would assist her. And so I'm a woman of my word, right? I really operate with a good amount of integrity. So I basically said to myself, well, even though I had to now still find something else to meet this 56-hour requirement, I'm going to help her. I'm going to still help this woman. And that's where the magic happens. Because when I sat down with her and got myself out of the way, it opened myself to be a channel for the divine and the universe was working through me in a way that was extraordinary and magical and beautiful and loving and compassionate and accepting and extraordinary on all of these incredible levels. And that is how I was invited into gifts that I had that really were laying dormant within me. And I had to put myself into a position that maybe I wouldn't have normally put myself in to be able to discover those gifts. Alyssa Scolari [32:12]: Yeah. As you're sharing your story, I can't help but think to myself what a magical transformation. It's been eight years, right? Donna Bond [32:22]: Eight years. Alyssa Scolari [32:23]: What a magical transformation. Eight years, even though it may seem like a long time, it's so quick, especially for such a drastic change in essentially the way you view the world around you. It's like a rebirth. It's like being reborn and it's powerful. Eight years. Eight years. Donna Bond [32:49]: Well, it's so funny that you're saying this because yesterday I was speaking with somebody and we were talking about the significance of a seven-year cycle. And so I had hung out a shingle, right, as a marketing consultant initially upon resigning my position. And I did that for a year. And on June 30th, a year into that, I made the decision to become a full time professional coach. And that meant saying no to any marketing gigs that might be coming my way. And so I have just completed that seven year cycle of being a full-time professional coach. And just as a side note, because we love the universe and it's always inviting us to learn and grow, right after I made this commitment. Right? Like I'm a full time professional coach now. It's my one and only. That's what I'm doing. Didn't I get a call for a big fat job. Alyssa Scolari [34:01]: Oh, of course. Of course. Donna Bond [34:01]: In marketing. Big fat job. Alyssa Scolari [34:04]: Because you were universe being, if it weren't testing you. Of course. Donna Bond [34:11]: Yeah. So I said no and it was so ama... And listen, make no mistake, I needed the money. Let's be clear. But I said no and that was fuel for the universe to help me align with where I was. And it all started there. Alyssa Scolari [34:40]: It's incredible. I love hearing these things because it's like it gives me life because there's so much power to this. There's so much strength and right. Touching on, even just saying like make no mistake, I needed the money, right? And I also think that's something so many of us say. In fact, I found myself saying that last night, right? I am feeling at a place in my life where I feel very called to slow down and I'm getting signs like the universe was just hitting me over the head with signs that I need to slow down. And of course, I'm so good at finding all reasons to not slow down. And I also don't want to gloss over how difficult that is for so many people to go, yes, I need the money. Yes, I have a family to provide for. Yes, I need X. Yes, I can't do this because of X, Y, Z, whatever. To stop, to turn all that off and to just say no, no, because this doesn't feel right for me. That is incredible. I just give you all of the accolades for being able to do that. Donna Bond [35:57]: Ca I share something about what you're saying? Alyssa Scolari [35:59]: Please. Donna Bond [36:00]: Coming from somebody who had a regular direct deposit paycheck every two weeks, right, for 28 years, there was a lot of mindset shifts that really needed to take place as I became an entrepreneur and became responsible for generating my own income. I live in Southern California, right? It's not cheap here. Alyssa Scolari [36:23]: Right. Exactly. Donna Bond [36:24]: So one of the things that I became aware of and one of the things that is really in my teachings, in my book, Original Wisdom: Harness The Power of The Authentic You is about energy and that energy of doing, the energy of pushing and the striving and the going and the foreseen and the doing, that is an energy of contraction. It's an energy of compression. It's an energy to heavier denser energy. And when we're in that energy, it's harder to let things come into our experience. So it became very present in my consciousness that when I am feeling the energy of lightness and freedom and joy, that is an energy that is more open and more expansive. That is an energy of allowing, that is energy of receiving. And so I began to do this experiment with myself where I would take a Tuesday, right? In the middle of the week, in the middle of the month, I would take a Tuesday and I would just go play. It didn't matter. Let's be clear. I have 101,000 things at my desk that could and should be done, but I would take a Tuesday and I'd find a girlfriend and I would go goof off. And I would do this intentionally because I wanted to shift the energy. And in so doing invariably, I would get a call on my way home from somebody who's looking to start a six month coaching journey or somebody who was inviting me onto their podcast or somebody who needs me to come into their corporation and consult. It never fails. Alyssa Scolari [38:29]: Never fails. You're so right. Donna Bond [38:33]: So I just, I love to break ourselves out of the monotony of physical world reality and how we get trapped in our own BS. Right? There is always a different way and we have the power and the choice to invite ourselves into that. Alyssa Scolari [38:58]: Yes we do. And it's not easy, but it's so worth it. I think the other question that I wanted to ask you and I'll ask you this before I also ask where folks can find you and things like that, but is it safe to say that this process can also be a bit, not cyclical, but I don't find, at least for me, and maybe it's different for you that it's as easy as once you enter into the path of letting the universe guide you and saying no and saying yes and doing what feels right and creating more space for more play, more positive energy, you still can get stuck. Because you've spent so many years of your life doing things one way and then sometimes it can be tough. Right? Is that the case for you where you do have moments where you're like, oh, I can sense there's some bad energy. I need to kind of get things right again. It's not just sort of like, well, everything's rainbows and puppies and butterflies now that I've made this decision, right? Donna Bond [40:14]: Alyssa, are you talking about being human? Alyssa Scolari [40:19]: I might be. I might be. Donna Bond [40:21]: Yeah. Well, I think that's what we're talking about. And yes, right? So here's how I see it. We want everything to be linear because that's how we think the world works in our logical left brain- Alyssa Scolari [40:38]: Right. That's what makes sense in our brains. Donna Bond [40:39]: ... and our [crosstalk 00:40:39] Right? Alyssa Scolari [40:38]: Yes. Donna Bond [40:38]: We want everything to have a clear beginning and a clear end. We want us to go in a straight line. We want to know all the steps and the return on the investment and how long it's going to take. But the truth is we live in an ever expanding universe and I believe that all growth and transformation and all of the forward motion of this ever expanding universe happens in a spiral. So every time we make a lap around the spiral, we go out a little bit more and we go up a little bit more. Right? So then we take another lap and we go out and we go up. Then we make another lap and we go out and we go up. And what happens, where I see it, is there's like little sticky patches along the spiral. Right? And then you just made another lap. And you've been here before, you might have a little bit of a different perspective and there's still something for you to learn. Alyssa Scolari [41:47]: Yes. Donna Bond [41:48]: So it's like you have a choice right there to open yourself and to be able to see what is your [inaudible 00:41:58] What can I learn from this? How might I grow from this experience, person, circumstance, trauma, right? Whatever it is. Or are we going to shut ourselves down, lock in, close up. Right? And we hop into that story as well. So I think what you're saying is very, very real. I know that as long as we are in these human bodies, on this human adventure, we will continue to have those sticky places along the spiral. And transformation is about changing our relationship to something. And so if we can begin to change our relationship to how we relate to ourselves and how we relate to the world when we're going through a difficult period, that right there can bestow many gifts. Alyssa Scolari [43:08]: Yeah. You're absolutely right. And I also have to say as somebody who's a very visual person, I am deeply appreciative of that visual that you provided because that is exactly what I was trying to say and that is exactly how it feels. And I also think that it's very, very important to point that out because it really is a lifelong process. Donna Bond [43:33]: It is a lifelong process. Alyssa Scolari [43:37]: So now, what we heard from you today, is that just a snippet of all the things that can be found in your book because your book, it's a memoir, correct? Donna Bond [43:49]: Yes. It's a teaching memoir. Alyssa Scolari [43:51]: Well, yes. And because it also has a lot of nuggets of wisdom in there about ways to move through this process and for people to be able to start their own journey. Donna Bond [44:05]: It is definitely my journey and I did not set out to write a book. I actually set out to create a workshop, which I did. And over time, I wanted more stories that could support the teaching point that I was trying to make in my workshop. And before I realized it, I had so many stories that what I was describing literally was all of my experiences on my own transformational journey. And a little bit of rearranging with how the workshop went and it was suddenly like, oh, this is like my whole journey from beginning to end and how it all happened. And so in each chapter, there's all sorts of fun, synchronistic serendipity. I don't really believe in coincidence. I believe that everything happens for a reason. And that, of course there is a lot of deeper meaning to our life and our existence. And so I've got all of those fun nuggets in there. And I offer an opportunity for transformation at the end of every chapter. So this is really inviting the reader to have their own experience with whatever the teaching point is. And so I give you the chance to engage with life, right? To take what you've learned and really apply it in your life in some way because that's really the only way that we learn. And that's the beauty of the University of Santa Monica and the programs that they deliver there is they are experiential learning. And this masters is not just something that wound up in my head, right? It's in my body. I embody this work because I lived it, because I took all of what they were teaching and I applied it to my real life in a very, very real way. And I got the feedback from life, from the universe. So I offer these opportunities for transformation, as well as something that I call a sacred truth activation. And these sacred truth activations are a series of affirmations designed to invigorate your spirit, to really call upon that authentic power that you have inside of you that is your original wisdom, right? My definition of original wisdom is the inherent intelligence in all beings that is rooted in unconditional love. Alyssa Scolari [46:59]: I love that. That definition itself feels like a warm hug to me. Donna Bond [47:04]: Yeah. Thank you. Alyssa Scolari [47:07]: I love it. I love it. So if people would like to work with you, purchase your book, where can people find you and where's the best place to be able to purchase your book? Is it just on Amazon or is it in other bookstores as well? Donna Bond [47:23]: It's everywhere. Alyssa Scolari [47:24]: [crosstalk 00:47:24] supporting small businesses. Donna Bond [47:26]: Yeah, thank you. It's everywhere. And you can go to donnabond.com/podcast and I have a gift for your listeners, four ways to get unstuck, which actually talks about the spiral and sort of what happens at each of the stages on the spiral. So if that is of interest and if they would like a signed copy of my book, they can get it there. And of course, it's available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble and all of the book places in the world. Alyssa Scolari [48:01]: Oh, that was fantastic. Thank you so much. So to the listeners, all of this will be included in the show notes. And I think the last thing I want to say is I know that you have just said that there are no coin... Right? You don't believe in coincidences and I do not either. And I have found that as somebody who... I started this podcast a year ago and this podcast is very much about... It's about interviewing other people and it's about learning about trauma and healing and all of the things that go along with that. But I'm also very, very open and transparent with the listeners and folks about my own journey to recovery from complex PTSD and an eating disorder. And looking at the head space I was in last night, which was not a very good one to say the least, I am always so surprised that when I hop on for an interview, that topic and the conversation always sort of takes me exactly where I need to be for a shift, for a message, for whatever needs to happen within myself. I'm always learning that through conversations exactly like the one that you and I are having. So thank you so much for- Donna Bond [48:01]: Me too. Alyssa Scolari [49:26]: ... teaching. Yeah. Donna Bond [49:27]: Me too. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [49:29]: It's a beautiful thing. It really is. So I'm really, really grateful for your vulnerability, for the realism that you share and what this process and journey is like because it's not all rainbows and puppies and butterflies. It's scary and it's beautiful and terrifying all at the same time. And still even knowing all of that, once you've started the journey, you can never go back and you wouldn't have it any other way. So thank you so much. To the listeners, again, you will find everything you need in the show notes to learn more about Donna, to check her out, to read her book. I really appreciate your time today. Donna Bond [50:21]: Alyssa, thank you. It's really been my honor to be here with you. Thank you. Alyssa Scolari [50:26]: Thanks for listening everyone. For more information, please head over to lightaftertrauma.com or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram, we are @LightAfterTrauma and on Twitter, it is @LightAfterPod. Lastly, please head over to at patreon.com/lightaftertrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. So please head on over. Again, that's patreon.com/lightaftertrauma. Thank you and we appreciate your support. [singing]

Very Amusing with Carlye Wisel
Hello from Disneyland Paris!

Very Amusing with Carlye Wisel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 54:24


YUP!!! Come along on Very Amusing's first (and EXTREMELY safe!!) international journey, where I discuss what it was like to visit a foreign theme park that requires vaccines, masks, and a whole lot more.Relevant Links:https://www.demarches-simplifiees.fr/commencer/passe-sanitaire-etrangers?locale=enhttps://fr.usembassy.gov/covid-19-information/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.