Podcast appearances and mentions of king saul

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 1,146PODCASTS
  • 1,931EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jun 28, 2022LATEST
king saul

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about king saul

Show all podcasts related to king saul

Latest podcast episodes about king saul

The Daily Bite
1 Chronicles 10

The Daily Bite

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 18:42


King Saul is defeated by the Philistines. LSB 444 - No Tramp of Soldiers' Marching Feet · Words: Timothy Dudley-Smith © 1984 Hope Publishing Company, Carol Stream, IL 60188. All rights reserved. Used by permission. · Music is public domain · Church/Singer – St. Mary Cathedral, Lansing, MI, and Ryan Ferrigan – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qL5BFnNInvA --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rev-steve-andrews-jr/message

Repentance on SermonAudio
King Saul's Man-pleasing Repentance

Repentance on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 47:00


A new MP3 sermon from Texarkana Reformed Baptist Church is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: King Saul's Man-pleasing Repentance Subtitle: 1 Samuel Speaker: Noah Saveall Broadcaster: Texarkana Reformed Baptist Church Event: Sunday Service Date: 6/26/2022 Bible: 1 Samuel 15:24-35 Length: 47 min.

X CHURCH with Tim Moore

What are you insecure about? Insecurities. We all have them. We just have to make sure they don't have us. After all, what if insecurity is a bigger deal than we think? What if it keeps us small and hinders us from the big, expansive, joyful life God has in store? What if insecurity is actually linked to something darker than we realize? And what if the solution is something unexpected? God wants us to trade in insecurity for something higher, something better. In this week's Kings and Queens message, Pastor Russ takes us through the journey of King Saul and walks us through how to live a better life. Subscribe to get the latest videos and live worship: https://www.youtube.com/xchurch Connect with X Church Facebook | https://www.facebook.com/theXchurch.oh Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/theX_church/ Twitter | https://twitter.com/theX_church Helping people get on the path to God. This is the vision of X Church, led by Pastor Tim Moore and based in South East Columbus, OH _ Stay Connected Website: www.thex.church #theXchurch

Insight for Living Canada Daily Broadcast
Two Deaths...A Study in Contrast, Part 2

Insight for Living Canada Daily Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022


1 Samuel 31 / June 24-27, 2022 In our study of David, we have come to the crossroads in his pilgrimage from the sheep to the throne…from an Israelite fugitive to the highest office in the land. And it is a death that altered David's direction—the death of King Saul. From the Series: David: A Man of Passion and Destiny read more

Commuter Bible OT
1 Chronicles 24-26, Psalm 105

Commuter Bible OT

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 21:28


1 Chronicles 24 - 1:03 . 1 Chronicles 25 - 5:09 . 1 Chronicles 26 - 10:05 . Psalm 105 - 15:49 . As David prepares to pass the crown to his son Solomon, his heart and mind continue to be fixed on God's glory, particularly through the building of the temple and structuring it properly. David has spent years of his life amassing materials for it's construction, and not only that, he has also drawn up architectural plans, built instruments, and created systems for all who work in and around the temple. For someone who knew scarcity and insecurity for a good portion of his life while running from King Saul, it is notable that David gives so much away and invests in the future of God's worship, rather than holding onto it for himself.:::Christian Standard Bible translation.All music written and produced by John Burgess Ross.Co-produced by the Christian Standard Bible.facebook.com/commuterbibleinstagram.com/commuter_bibletwitter.com/CommuterPodpatreon.com/commuterbibleadmin@commuterbible.org

Church on the Move Podcast
Psalm 51: Do you really want to get better or just feel better?

Church on the Move Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 44:19


Often, we seek to numb our pain, desperate to feel better. But God doesn't want us to just feel better; He wants to transform us. We were not created for a life of sin. When we're in Christ, sin can't separate us from God but it still has the power to destroy.  In the Bible, King Saul and King David both sinned against God, but their responses to their sin were very different. One of them sought temporary relief and distraction from his mistakes and the other cried out to God in humble repentance. So, do you want to feel better, or do you want to truly get better? Let's dive deep into Psalm 51 with Seth Swindall!

Oak Hills Community Church
20220626 - 1 Samuel 17 - David and Goliath - Mark Piland - King Saul

Oak Hills Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 39:45


Speaker: Mark Piland, Senior Pastor, Oak Hills Community Church, Argyle, TX

The Daily Bite
1 Chronicles 8

The Daily Bite

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 16:55


The descendants of Benjamin, including Ehud the judge, and King Saul. LSB 444 - No Tramp of Soldiers' Marching Feet · Words: Timothy Dudley-Smith © 1984 Hope Publishing Company, Carol Stream, IL 60188. All rights reserved. Used by permission. · Music is public domain · Church/Singer – St. Mary Cathedral, Lansing, MI, and Ryan Ferrigan – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qL5BFnNInvA --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rev-steve-andrews-jr/message

Insight for Living Canada Daily Broadcast
Two Deaths...A Study in Contrast, Part 1

Insight for Living Canada Daily Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022


1 Samuel 31 / June 24-27, 2022 In our study of David, we have come to the crossroads in his pilgrimage from the sheep to the throne…from an Israelite fugitive to the highest office in the land. And it is a death that altered David's direction—the death of King Saul. From the Series: David: A Man of Passion and Destiny read more

Insight for Living Canada Daily Broadcast
STS Study: Two Deaths...A Study in Contrast

Insight for Living Canada Daily Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022


1 Samuel 31 / June 24-27, 2022 In our study of David, we have come to the crossroads in his pilgrimage from the sheep to the throne…from an Israelite fugitive to the highest office in the land. And it is a death that altered David's direction—the death of King Saul. From the Series: David: A Man of Passion and Destiny read more

Class in Bible
Shmuel 1 Ch. 14 v.41-51 Why Wasn't King Saul Answered - Solving the Mystery

Class in Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 20:53


Why didn't the Urim and Turim answer King Saul. Why did the lottery fall on Yonatan if he didn't eat intentionally?

Risen Church NC
DAVID: One Destiny - 1 Samuel 16

Risen Church NC

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 52:57


David's rise from shepherd boy to prince of Israel happened suddenly and took the nation by storm. He was beloved like none other in his generation. What once was a secret between the prophet Samuel and his family soon became a forgone conclusion: David was destined to be Israel's next king. Like any rising star, David became enraptured by his assumed destiny. From his musical skills, war trophies, and favor under Saul, it would have been hard for even the most modest person to dismiss the hype. David seemed too blessed and important to fail. However, just as quickly as he rose to fame, he saw it all unravel and taken away. King Saul turned on him and soon after, the whole nation. Within days, David went from prince to pauper, from hero to fugitive. The next chapter of his life would be spent on the run, making a series of selfish decisions as he attempted to cling to his destiny. Yet, it was during this dark episode wherein David realized that God had a greater plan for him. In the aftermath of tragedy, David begins to understand his true destiny and sees God transform him into a man after God's own heart.

East Albertville Church of Christ Podcast
The Monumental Fall of King Saul

East Albertville Church of Christ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 26:32


Series: Sammy Bynum Meeting June 2022Service: Gospel MeetingType: SermonSpeaker: Sammy Bynum

Insight for Living on Oneplace.com
What to Feed an Angry Man, Part 3

Insight for Living on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 27:35


After David passed one character test by letting tyrannical King Saul live, he faced another one. Foolish and wicked Nabal returned David's kindness with hard-hearted rejection and mercilessness. David and his men stood on brink of murder, but wise Abigail intervened! Pastor Chuck Swindoll helps you navigate conflict in this sermon on 1 Samuel 25. Discover how trust in God leads to a cool head in conflict and a soft heart for even the most stubborn people. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/82/29

Gospel of Grace - A Primitive Baptist Radio Broadcast
King Saul’s Errors: Traditions of Men

Gospel of Grace - A Primitive Baptist Radio Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 30:13


King Saul tried to portray his own opinion and his own tradition as the commandment of God. We are prone…

Let's Read the Bible
S4, E24 - Saul vs David

Let's Read the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 71:38


Aaron and Evan take a look at the start of a long conflict between King Saul, and the future king David.

Calvary Church
David: Jonathan Strengthened David's Faith in God / Beau Eckert: 1 Samuel 18-20

Calvary Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 35:58


David killed Goliath and instantly became a national hero. King Saul was angry and envious which led him to relentlessly pursue David in order to take his life. But God used David's friendship with Jonathan to strengthen his faith in God through one of the darkest and most challenging periods of his life. Let's look together at the characteristics of their friendship.

Insight for Living on Oneplace.com
What to Feed an Angry Man, Part 2

Insight for Living on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 27:19


After David passed one character test by letting tyrannical King Saul live, he faced another one. Foolish and wicked Nabal returned David's kindness with hard-hearted rejection and mercilessness. David and his men stood on brink of murder, but wise Abigail intervened! Pastor Chuck Swindoll helps you navigate conflict in this sermon on 1 Samuel 25. Discover how trust in God leads to a cool head in conflict and a soft heart for even the most stubborn people. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/82/29

Walk With Me - Devotionals

The Right WayReader: Jon WatsonDate: 17th June 2022Passage: Psalm 16:11-------------------Psalm 16 is, on the whole, a happy psalm. This is quite remarkable because it is probable that David wrote the psalm when he was in hiding because King Saul was searching for him in order to kill him. He begins the psalm by saying: "Keep me safe, O God, I've run for dear life to you." (Psalm 16:1, The Message) Well, David found true security in God — see the text at the top: "Ever since you took my hand, I'm on the right way." (Psalm 16:11, The Message)Do you ever wonder if you are on the right way in your life? Sometimes we give in to temptations that seem fun at the time but end us up in disappointment and difficulty. Life can be full of choices — who to be friends with, what job should I apply for, is it wrong to take strong drink or drugs when everyone else seems to be doing it? Elvis Presley wrote a song and the end of the first verse had some really good advice : "Put your hand in the hand of the man of Galilee." That's just what David did and he found that God led him in the right and good way. Jesus, 'the man of Galilee', said he had come to give us life — abundant and full life — and to show us the right way by following him.When you wonder what you should or should not do, ask yourself: "What would Jesus do? Can I honestly take Jesus with me into this place or company?" He shows us the right way. PrayerDear Lord, help me to take your hand so I will go in the right way. Amen.

Insight for Living on Oneplace.com
What to Feed an Angry Man, Part 1

Insight for Living on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 27:58


After David passed one character test by letting tyrannical King Saul live, he faced another one. Foolish and wicked Nabal returned David's kindness with hard-hearted rejection and mercilessness. David and his men stood on brink of murder, but wise Abigail intervened! Pastor Chuck Swindoll helps you navigate conflict in this sermon on 1 Samuel 25. Discover how trust in God leads to a cool head in conflict and a soft heart for even the most stubborn people. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/82/29

Insight for Living on Oneplace.com
Life's Most Subtle Temptation, Part 3

Insight for Living on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 27:43


When's the last time you really wanted to get even with an enemy? Remember how you felt? Revenge is life's most subtle temptation, and David had to face it head-on. David was presented with the perfect opportunity to spill Saul's blood after Saul had been in hot pursuit to kill David. Yet, David did not have God's release to execute personal vengeance. Follow the story of David's cave encounter with King Saul in 1 Samuel 24. Pastor Chuck Swindoll challenges you to consider the slights and injustices against you with a biblical perspective. Yield to God and refuse to fight according to your sinful flesh! To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/82/29

Caregiving is a Ministry
Episode 201 Psalm 59

Caregiving is a Ministry

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 9:34


David reflects on running from King Saul as he tried to kill him.

Insight for Living on Oneplace.com
Life's Most Subtle Temptation, Part 2

Insight for Living on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 27:30


When's the last time you really wanted to get even with an enemy? Remember how you felt? Revenge is life's most subtle temptation, and David had to face it head-on. David was presented with the perfect opportunity to spill Saul's blood after Saul had been in hot pursuit to kill David. Yet, David did not have God's release to execute personal vengeance. Follow the story of David's cave encounter with King Saul in 1 Samuel 24. Pastor Chuck Swindoll challenges you to consider the slights and injustices against you with a biblical perspective. Yield to God and refuse to fight according to your sinful flesh! To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/82/29

Thought For Today
Pray for Your Leaders

Thought For Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 3:10


A very good morning to you! It is Tuesday morning, 14th of June 2022, and this is your friend, Angus Buchan, with a thought for today. If we go to the Old Testament, to 1 Samuel 24:10:“I will not stretch out my hand against my lord, for he is the Lord's anointed.”This is the story when King Saul was trying to kill David and David had an opportunity to kill him in the cave but let him leave the cave. He cut off the corner of his robe and when King Saul was down the hill, he shouted out to him, “Look what I have got. I could have killed you but I didn't because I know that I may not touch God's anointed.” Remember the sad story... Eventually, King Saul actually committed suicide, that was all because of jealousy.I want to say to you today that we are not permitted to touch God's anointed. Now, there might be some occasion where you feel it is totally unjust that the person goes unpunished. Obviously, we have got to do what the Lord tells us. If somebody has committed a crime, they need to be reported. We have got to do it according to government procedure but when it comes to touching God's anointed, God Himself will deal with that person, just like He did with King Saul. What we have to do is to pray for those who have fallen. Every time I hear a man or woman of God who has been used mightily by God, falls into sin... Maybe putting their fingers in the till or committing adultery. Maybe getting involved with the whole 'power thing' and they fall, it makes me extremely sad because none of them started that way. They started off meaning well, just like King Saul did. He was a very humble man, he was head and shoulders above any other man in Israel. He didn't even want to be king initially but then he fell.We need to pray for our leaders, I am talking Christian leaders particularly. We need to pray that God will keep them safe and accountable. The danger is when men and women get separated and they have no one to stand with them. I praise God that I have four trustees and these men hold me accountable. I have to tell them exactly what I am doing, where I am going and where I am not going, it gives me a tremendous sense of security. I want to encourage you to do the same. Get men or women around you that can advise you in your day to day living and keep you safe.Jesus bless you and have a wonderful day.Goodbye.

Insight for Living on Oneplace.com
Life's Most Subtle Temptation, Part 1

Insight for Living on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 27:30


When's the last time you really wanted to get even with an enemy? Remember how you felt? Revenge is life's most subtle temptation, and David had to face it head-on. David was presented with the perfect opportunity to spill Saul's blood after Saul had been in hot pursuit to kill David. Yet, David did not have God's release to execute personal vengeance. Follow the story of David's cave encounter with King Saul in 1 Samuel 24. Pastor Chuck Swindoll challenges you to consider the slights and injustices against you with a biblical perspective. Yield to God and refuse to fight according to your sinful flesh! To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/82/29

Douglas Jacoby Podcast
CLEAN – podcast 15, Mother & Daughter

Douglas Jacoby Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 15:28


For additional notes and resources check out Douglas' website.IntroductionSome of those possessed were helpless children, as in this and the next podcast (and possibly the slave girls of Acts 16:16). Today we will zero in on a Canaanite mother & child.Keep in mind the biblical background: in the OT, the Canaanites were the immoral—even criminal—occupants of the Promised Land. Some died in the Conquest (under general Joshua). Far more were driven out of Canaan, or (probably also very common) intermarried with the Israelites. Historically, the Canaanites were trouble!Let's also consider the context. Jesus has just been criticized for not respecting the purity laws of the Jews—not just the levitical laws, but the traditions of the Pharisees.In this account, Jesus doesn't just dismiss the unbiblical traditions of the Pharisees. He associated with an “unclean” person.Scriptural study: Matt 15:21-28Tyre and Sidon (v.21) are in modern Lebanon. They were once powerful city states. Their ruins are accessible today.“Son of David” (v.22) – she recognizes Jesus' kingship. Like Rahab (Joshua 2), this foreigner recognized that only Israel followed the true God.How did the demon oppress her? Did it dwell within her, as in the cases of all the other demoniacs we are examining? Or was it an oppression more like that suffered by King Saul, when an evil spirit tormented him?Whatever the case, the oppression was severe. It's hard to see your children in pain.Chronic illnessPsychological disorderSuffering consequences of poor decisionsThis was clearly an outsider to the Jewish family of faith. She is a foreigner, a Canaanite—and a woman…Why does Jesus ignore her (v.23)? Maybe he just wants her to want it."I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel” (v.24) fits with Jesus' overall strategy.Matt 10:23 – Jesus asked his missionaries to focus on the lost tribes of Israel. Matt 28:19-20 – Gentiles were in the larger plan, though not just yet.Having a missionary focus inevitably means, when we're doing evangelism, that we choose some and don't choose others. This doesn't mean an absence of love, but the presence of strategy. In every congregation, church builders must decide whom they're targeting. Otherwise the church will soon be full of those easiest to reach—with a larger representation of transients, foreigners, persons with psychological issues, and so on.The woman pleads with Jesus a second time (v.25). Notice her posture: kneeling. This is common when people are desperate.Notice also how Jesus interacts with the woman.Playfulness? ("Dogs" may be puppies, or domestic dogs.)Her "great faith" reminds us of the centurions of Matt 8:5-13 and Matt 27:54.Keep in mind that Jesus is outside the land of Israel during this conversation. That is, it's not as though his helping her means less help for the Israelites! (More evidence that he is testing her, not speaking cruelly or even completely literally.)Notice that the oppression is lifted immediately. The demon is gone.Application:God is good. Even though he may not answer our first request / prayer, he hears and responds. We should trust him. (Note: This is not Prosperity Theology or Word-Faith Theology. His purpose isn't to enrich us materially, or to give us mystical psychic powers.)Having an evangelistic strategy doesn't mean there won't be some exceptions, just as involvement in one ministry doesn't mean we never help out in other areas. (Those whose ministry is leadership may still be called upon to help with administration, or to show hospitality.)Let's ask the Lord to help our children—and not just those who are suffering severely. God is truly concerned about our families, just as he cares for us.When Christ gets involved in our friends' or family's lives, radical things happen. People are set free—adults and even children. They start truly living!

Saints In the South
Old Testament, 1 Samuel 8-10; 13; 15-18, The Battle Is The Lords's, Come Follow Me

Saints In the South

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 29:08


Join us this week as we dive into Saul's natural man tendencies and how we can try to avoid them ourselves.  We also discuss one of the most famous biblical stories of all time...David and Goliath.  This is a personal favorite of ours.  So many ways to apply this story to our lives.  Joins us and lets see what we can learn from these men of the scriptures.  From Come Follow Me:Ever since the tribes of Israel had settled in the promised land, the Philistines had been an ongoing threat to their safety. Many times in the past, the Lord had delivered the Israelites from their enemies. But now the elders of Israel demanded, “We will have a king … [to] go out before us, and fight our battles” (1 Samuel 8:19–20). The Lord relented, and Saul was anointed king. And yet when the menacing giant Goliath hurled his challenge to the armies of Israel, Saul—like the rest of his army—was “greatly afraid” (1 Samuel 17:11). On that day, it wasn't King Saul who saved Israel but a humble shepherd boy named David, who was wearing no armor but was clothed with impenetrable faith in the Lord. This battle proved to Israel, and to anyone who has spiritual battles to fight, that “the Lord saveth not with sword and spear” and that “the battle is the Lord's” (1 Samuel 17:47).#oldtestament #davidandgoliath #biblestudy #kingsaul #Davidandgoliath #churchofjesuschrist #churchofjesuschristoflatterdaysaints #mormonsandchristians #mormonpodcast #christianpodcast #ldspodcast #thelordwillfightourbattlesSupport the show

Enduring Words for Troubled Times – Enduring Word
The Sad and Tragic End of King Saul – 1 Samuel 31:3-6 – June 10, 2022

Enduring Words for Troubled Times – Enduring Word

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022


The post The Sad and Tragic End of King Saul – 1 Samuel 31:3-6 – June 10, 2022 appeared first on Enduring Word.

Insight for Living on Oneplace.com
Every Crutch Removed, Part 2

Insight for Living on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 27:26


David went from one win to another. The entire nation celebrated him! Yet, amid his triumphs, King Saul became an envious opponent. Pastor Chuck Swindoll explores 1 Samuel 1821 where God removed five significant crutches in David's life so that he would learn to lean ultimately and completely upon God. Falling is painful! But that's where all earthly crutches eventually lead. Ditch the unstable crutches in your life so you can lean on Christ, your unshakable support! To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/82/29

Commuter Bible OT
2 Samuel 3-4, Psalm 95-96

Commuter Bible OT

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 17:47


2 Samuel 3 - 1:03 . 2 Samuel 4 - 10:34 . Psalm 95 - 13:44 . Psalm 96 - 15:11 . In our last episode, we covered the aftermath of King Saul's death, including a scramble for power and position by Abner, the commander of Israel's army. After losing a battle against David's men, Abner fled on foot and was chased down by Asahel. Abner killed Asahel, but escaped to live another day. Today, Asahel's brother Joab seeks revenge against Abner, but he does so without David's approval. Later, two assassins cut off Ish-bosheth's head and bring it to David. David is grieved by both incidents and he makes his grief and mourning public.:::Christian Standard Bible translation.All music written and produced by John Burgess Ross.Co-produced by the Christian Standard Bible.facebook.com/commuterbibleinstagram.com/commuter_bibletwitter.com/CommuterPodpatreon.com/commuterbibleadmin@commuterbible.org

Gospel of Grace - A Primitive Baptist Radio Broadcast

We find the error of King Saul when he ignored the ordained order of God to take upon himself the…

Terraforma Church
The Pointy End of a Spear

Terraforma Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 35:10


King Saul allowed his insecurities, anxieties, and fears to go unchecked in his life until it cost him dearly. It limited his leadership and ruined his relationships. We also have insecurities, and yet, they don't need to define our stories. We can learn to take ownership, to give grace, and to live for God's approval alone and receive our security in His love.

Thinking on Scripture with Dr. Steven R. Cook
Deuteronomy 25:11-19 - Self defense, just weights and measures, judgment on the Amalekites

Thinking on Scripture with Dr. Steven R. Cook

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 73:25


     In Deuteronomy 25:11-19, Moses addresses the punishment of a woman who damages another man's genitals while defending her husband in a fight (Deut 25:11-12), God's requirement to adhere to standard weights and measures (Deut 25:13-16), and the future command to destroy the Amalekites as divine judgment for their sin of attacking Israel when they were weak and vulnerable (Deut 25:17-19). Justice for Unfair Fighting      In the previous section, Moses addressed the shameful behavior of a brother who would not fulfill his levirate duties (Deut 25:5-10), and here addresses the shameful behavior of a wife toward another man. In this current scenario, Moses said, “If two men, a man and his countryman, are struggling together, and the wife of one comes near to deliver her husband from the hand of the one who is striking him, and puts out her hand and seizes his genitals, 12 then you shall cut off her hand; you shall not show pity” (Deut 25:11-12). Naturally, a wife defending her husband would be considered an honorable act; however, in this context, the end does not justify the means, as her action may do more than merely rescue her husband, as she may permanently prevent the man from being able reproduce children. Furthermore, to grab a Jewish man's genitals might be viewed as a disregard for the sign of the Abrahamic covenant (which was male circumcision), and therefore a disregard for the God of the covenant.[1] Clough states this practice was “a common tactic used by women in the Ancient Near East.”[2] However, though common in pagan cultures, Moses here prohibits this practice. The wife could help defend her husband, but this practice was not permissible, and if implemented, required the woman's hand that was used in defending her husband to be cut off.      Cutting off the woman's hand appears to be an application of lex talionis, or the law of retaliation, which meant the punishment was not to exceed the crime (cf., Ex 21:23-25; Lev 24:19-20). However, because a woman is biologically different than a man, the application of this law served as an example (i.e., a case law) of how to apply lex talionis in odd situations. Peter Craigie states: "It should be noted, finally, that the punishment prescribed for this violation of the law is an extension of the lex talionis; for obvious reasons, given the different sexes of the persons involved in the incident, the lex talionis could not be applied literally. It may be that this very particular piece of casuistic law is intended as an example of how lex talionis was able to be interpreted when it could not be applied literally."[3]      This is the fourth and final time in Deuteronomy that Moses set forth a directive in which an offender was not to be shown pity when punishment was rendered for a particular crime. The previous examples include showing no pity when executing a relative who promoted idolatry (Deut 13:6-9), a murderer (Deut 19:11-13), and a false witness who accused another of murder (Deut 19:16-21). Just Weights and Measures      Moses now moves into economic matters pertaining to the just use of weights and measures. Moses states, “You shall not have in your bag differing weights, a large and a small. 14 You shall not have in your house differing measures, a large and a small. 15 You shall have a full and just weight; you shall have a full and just measure, that your days may be prolonged in the land which the LORD your God gives you” (Deut 25:13-15). Using unjust weights and measures would be a violation of the command not to covet (Deut 5:21) as well as the command not to steal (Deut 5:19). This command assumes a national standard for weights and measures to be used in ancient Israel. Victor Matthews states, “Commerce in a society without coined money is dependent on standard weights and measures. Examples of stone and metal weights, marked with specific symbols designating weight values, have been found in Egyptian tombs as well as at several sites in Israel and Mesopotamia.”[4] Using different weights and measures was a form of thievery, as a businessperson would use a heavier weight or larger measure when purchasing items, thus obtaining more for the businessperson, and then a lighter weight and smaller measure when selling to the purchaser, thus giving less to the customer. Jack Deere states, “The Israelites were to be totally honest in their business dealings. They could well afford to be so since it was ultimately the Lord who would withhold or give prosperity to them. Thus, honesty in business was a way of proclaiming one's faith in the Lord's ability to support him and give him long life.”[5] Here was blessing that came from God to those who abided by His moral standards.      God was personally concerned with all matters in society. His laws provided moral standards pertaining to marriage, raising children, agriculture, caring for the poor, the judiciary, military, and economics. To disregard one aspect of God's law would negatively impact other areas. In this case, unjust weights and measures would unfairly enrich the businessperson while injuring the average citizen by depriving him/her of food resources or other goods. Moses declares, “For everyone who does these things, everyone who acts unjustly is an abomination to the LORD your God” (Deut 25:16). This shows that theology matters, as the Israelite businessperson who walked with God and was obedient to His Word would naturally be honest in economic dealings with others. Unfortunately, at certain times in their history, Israel businessmen failed to adhere to this law, and the prophets spoke out against them for their crimes that hurt others (Amos 8:4-6; Prov 11:1; 16:11; 20:10, 23).   Just Retribution for the Amalekites for their Cruel Hostility      Moses then shifted to address a matter pertaining to an event 40 years earlier when Israel was coming out of Egypt. Moses said, “Remember what Amalek did to you along the way when you came out from Egypt, 18 how he met you along the way and attacked among you all the stragglers at your rear when you were faint and weary; and he did not fear God” (Deut 25:17-18). Eugene Merrill states: "The Amalekites, whom the Old Testament traces back to Eliphaz, son of Esau, and his concubine Timna (Gen 36:12), lived in the Arabian deserts east and south of the Dead Sea (Gen 36:16; Num 13:29; 14:25). They were a fierce nomadic people, hostile to Israel as their flagrant attack on the weak and elderly of the Exodus wanderers makes clear (Ex 17:8–16). Because of this cowardly act, the Lord placed them under his judgment (Ex 17:14), promising to bring them to utter ruin (Num 24:20)."[6]      Apparently, the Amalekites had attacked weak and vulnerable Israelites, the stragglers who had difficulty keeping up, and this when they were “faint and weary.” Here was a cowardly attack on those who were vulnerable. Daniel Block states: "The Amalekites committed barbaric and cowardly atrocities. Fearing to engage the Israelites in a frontal attack, they let the Israelites pass by; then, when they were famished and weary, they attacked powerless stragglers at the rear. These probably involved the weak and the sick, who could not keep up with the main camp and proved easy targets for marauders."[7]      To say that Amalek “did not fear God” meant he had no regard for God's people. Moses then said, “Therefore, it shall come about when the LORD your God has given you rest from all your surrounding enemies, in the land which the LORD your God gives you as an inheritance to possess, you shall blot out the memory of Amalek from under heaven; you must not forget” (Deut 25:19). The two directives in this section were: 1) remember what Amalek did to Israel at a time when they were weak, and 2) execute future judgment upon the Amalekites by destroying them altogether. Biblically, there were times when God Himself executed punishment on others (see Gen 11:1-8; 19:24-25), but at other times He expected His people to serve as His instrument of righteous judgment upon the wicked (Ex 32:19-28; Rom 13:1-4). Jack Deere states: "Two specific battles with the Amalekites were mentioned in the Pentateuch (Ex 17:8–16; Num 14:39–45), but Deuteronomy 25:17–19 seems to indicate a series of hostilities that are not mentioned elsewhere. The unprovoked attacking of the weak, sick, and helpless Israelites lagging behind evidenced the cruelty and cowardice of the Amalekites as well as their lack of fear of Israel's God. Since the Amalekites had shown no mercy to Israel, they were to receive none. Israel was to blot out the memory of Amalek from under heaven. More than 400 years later David defeated the Amalekites (2 Sam. 1:1), but they were not completely wiped out till about another 300 years later in Hezekiah's day (1 Chron. 4:41–43). The strong command Do not forget! is the last of nine such commands in Deuteronomy (cf. comments on Deut. 4:9)."[8]      The Amalekites displayed a longstanding hostility toward Israel and caused them problems for many centuries. Amalekite hostility can be seen during the time of the Judges (Judg 6:3; 10:12), King Saul (1 Sam 15:6-8), and King David (1 Sam 30:1-17). Eventually, they were finally destroyed in the time of Hezekiah (1 Ch 4:41-43). Present Application      Israel was a theocracy, one kingdom under God, who was their Judge, Lawgiver, and King (Isa 33:22). In Deuteronomy 25:13-16, we learn that God directed His people to have integrity and to live honestly in their business dealings with others. God was concerned about metrology, which is the science of measurement, most commonly with weights, volume, and distance. Having an agreed upon universal standard allowed a free market to operate with integrity, as each person could know that what they were buying, or selling, was a true measurement.[9]      Israel being a theocracy, meant that an Israelite could not separate the learning of the law from the practicing of the law within the context of a theological relationship with the Lord of the law. Various aspects of God's law touched on matters familial, agricultural, social, judicial, martial, religious, and financial. In this way, we learn there was no dichotomy between the sacred and the secular. To be walking properly with the Lord meant knowing His directives and conforming one's life to those directives. God's directives form the standard for righteous conduct. Without a fixed standard for values, morals become arbitrary and unstable. Holding to God's moral standards meant one would follow ethical business practices, being honest in buying and selling, adhering to just weights and measures.      In ancient Israel, God cared about the economic practices of His people, saying, “You shall do no wrong in judgment, in measurement of weight, or capacity. 36 You shall have just balances, just weights, a just ephah, and a just hin; I am the LORD your God, who brought you out from the land of Egypt. 37 You shall thus observe all My statutes and all My ordinances and do them; I am the LORD” (Lev 19:35-37). Solomon wrote in Proverbs, “A just balance and scales belong to the LORD; all the weights of the bag are His concern” (Prov 16:11). John Kitchen writes, “God is intimately involved in establishing what justice in the business world looks like. The standard of ethics for business is divinely established! Unethical business practices are not only in defiance of the king, but of God Himself. There is more to be considered in business than mere pragmatics.”[10]      Furthermore, God disapproved of false weights and measures, saying, “A false balance is an abomination to the LORD, but a just weight is His delight” (Prov 11:1), and “Differing weights and differing measures, both of them are abominable to the LORD” (Prov 20:10), and “Differing weights are an abomination to the LORD, and a false scale is not good” (Prov 20:23). Three times in Proverbs it is declared that a false balance or differing weights are an abomination to the Lord. John Kitchen writes: "An abomination is an attitude or action that is repugnant to the Lord and which He cannot endure. Because God loathes these things, they come under His judgment. Other things listed as ‘an abomination' to the Lord include idolatry (Deut 7:25), homosexuality and other sexual perversions (Lev 18:22–30; 20:13), human sacrifice (Deut 12:31), occult activity (Deut 18:9–14), ritual prostitution (1 Kings 14:23f), and sacrificing unclean or defective animals (Deut 14:3–8; 17:1)."[11]      Those who reject God inwardly will be inclined to defraud others outwardly. Unfortunately, Israel later turned away from the Lord and declined morally, and their business practices reflected their spiritual state. Having dethroned God from their lives and rejected His moral standards, they enthroned their own sinful desires which flowed into their business dealings. Later prophets, who served as prosecuting attorneys for the Lord, brought charges against Israelites because of their corrupt business practices (Amos 8:4-6, Mic 6:10-11), which added to the eventual destruction of the nation.      It should be remembered that people may use weights in business dealings, but “the LORD weighs the hearts” of everyone (Prov 21:2; cf., Prov 24:12); and He desires “righteousness and justice” from His people (Prov 21:3). Honesty and generosity should be the hallmark of God's people, especially those who lead in business.   [1] Remember, God's covenant with Abraham came with the sign of circumcision (Gen 17:11), which pictured God's supernatural involvement in producing a promised heir, as Abraham could not produce an heir on his own. This was also true for the virgin Mary, who bore the baby Jesus, the Messiah, by means of supernatural procreation (Luke 1:30-35). [2] Charles Clough, Lecture notes on Deuteronomy 25:11-19 Calibrated Social Standards as a Restraint on Coveting, (2011), p. 2. https://www.bibleframeworkapplied.org/bfmfiles/notes/2009-Deuteronomy-Handout-058.pdf [3] Peter C. Craigie, The Book of Deuteronomy, The New International Commentary on the Old Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1976), 316. [4] Victor Harold Matthews, Mark W. Chavalas, and John H. Walton, The IVP Bible Background Commentary: Old Testament, electronic ed. (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2000), Dt 25:13–16. [5] Jack S. Deere, “Deuteronomy,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 1 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 307. [6] Eugene H. Merrill, Deuteronomy, vol. 4, The New American Commentary (Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1994), 331. [7] Daniel I. Block, The NIV Application Commentary: Deuteronomy, ed. Terry Muck (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2012), 592–593. [8] Jack S. Deere, “Deuteronomy,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary, vol. 1, 307. [9] In the United States, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, is the governmental department responsible for regulating weights and measures in business. For a helpful video, watch the following: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xml6brruFEU [10] John A. Kitchen, Proverbs: A Mentor Commentary, Mentor Commentaries (Fearn, Ross-shire, Great Britain: Mentor, 2006), 357. [11] Ibid., 239.

Commuter Bible OT
1 Samuel 29-31, Psalm 92

Commuter Bible OT

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 14:44


1 Samuel 29 - 1:02 . 1 Samuel 30 - 3:34 . 1 Samuel 31 - 9:35 . Psalm 92 - 12:04 . When we last left King Saul, he had consulted a medium when he didn't hear from the Lord, where he learns that he and sons will die the following day. David almost joins the Philistine forces in the impending war against Saul, but the commanders don't trust David like King Achish does. Returning to their settlement at Ziklag, they find their territory decimated and their families taken captive. After consulting the Lord, they pursue the Amalekites. On the way, David and his men redeem the life of a servant who had been discarded by his Amalekite master, and he returns their kindness by directing them toward the Amalekites. Later, Saul goes to battle against the Philistines along with his sons, where they meet a devastating end.:::Christian Standard Bible translation.All music written and produced by John Burgess Ross.Co-produced by the Christian Standard Bible.facebook.com/commuterbibleinstagram.com/commuter_bibletwitter.com/CommuterPodpatreon.com/commuterbibleadmin@commuterbible.org

Flint City Church
The Jealousy of Saul: Walk Thru OT Part 14

Flint City Church

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022


King Saul was a jealous man, jealousy brings all sorts of evil, the antidote for jealousy is to have the mind of Christ.

Transforming Mission LeaderCast with Tim Bias & Sara Thomas
Episode 232 - The Means of Grace - Hope from Fasting

Transforming Mission LeaderCast with Tim Bias & Sara Thomas

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 20:39


What's the most unfashionable spiritual practice today? If you said fasting, you'd be in good company. It's the means of grace that many people have difficulty practicing.  One of the many reasons we find fasting difficult is the consumeristic culture we live in. We live in a world with short attention spans, and normalized consumption of social media, news, and anything on our mobile devices. Additionally, consumerism shows up in the instant gratification of goods and services. Abundance These examples point to fasting being counter-cultural in a world that is often surrounded by abundance. As a result, it's possible to say, many of us are guilty of gluttony. Biblical Basis for Fasting In the Old Testament, fasting is done for primarily one reason: repentance for unfaithfulness. Sometimes it was individuals that fasted because of God's judgment and at other times it was individuals (2 Sam 12:13-16, Nehemiah 9:1-2) Unfaithfulness isn't the only reason for fasting in the Old Testament. Sometimes leaders would fast to seek God's assistance. (1 Sam 7:3-11, 2 Chronicles 20:3-12 and Ezra 8:21-23) And sometimes fasting was a result of grief. David's fast following the death of King Saul and Jonathan (1 Samuel 11-12)  There's one more type of fast in the Old Testament. Jump over to numbers 6:1-21 for something known as the Nazirite vow. This was fasting as a form of purification. But there were specific behaviors like abstaining from alcohol, cutting their hair, shaving, and….touching a corpse. This was the fasting of self-denial Fasting in the New Testament If I can continue into the New Testament, probably the most known example of fasting is that of Jesus following his baptism (Luke 4:1-2) for 40 days and nights he fasted. But that isn't the only place Jesus talked about fasting. In the sermon on the mount, I love his instructions not to look gloomy like the hypocrites, they disfigure their faces so their fasting can be seen by others (Matt 6:16-18)   Why is Fasting Important? Fasting is about deepening our relationship with God. So for leaders, fasting can be an essential means of grace when you're trying to make decisions, you feel the weight of those decisions and/or you find yourself being the center of attention, instead of Jesus being the center of attention. At the center of fasting are humility and self-control. Like most things, it matters why you are fasting. If it's about humbling yourself before God to seek God's will and God's way. Your motivation for fasting matters. There are many ways you can fast. Whatever you choose, if it is for a specific period of time or a specific type of fast, fast from one of the things that pull for your attention. It might be food, technology, a habit, etc. Hope in fasting comes from drawing closer to God. Hope while fasting comes from drawing closer to the God that we know in Jesus and humbling ourselves to be in God's presence and take God's guidance.

His Hands Church
Comparison vs Contentment

His Hands Church

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 41:46


Message for 05/29/2022 "Comparison vs Contentment" by Justin McTeer. *All verses are NLT unless otherwise noted.* 1 Peter 5:9 - Stand firm against him, and be strong in your faith. Remember that your family of believers all over the world is going through the same kind of suffering you are. Genesis 4:2b-16 - When they grew up, Abel became a shepherd, while Cain cultivated the ground. 3 When it was time for the harvest, Cain presented some of his crops as a gift to the Lord. 4 Abel also brought a gift—the best portions of the firstborn lambs from his flock. The Lord accepted Abel and his gift, 5 but he did not accept Cain and his gift. This made Cain very angry, and he looked dejected. 6 “Why are you so angry?” the Lord asked Cain. “Why do you look so dejected? 7 You will be accepted if you do what is right. But if you refuse to do what is right, then watch out! Sin is crouching at the door, eager to control you. But you must subdue it and be its master.” 8 One day Cain suggested to his brother, “Let's go out into the fields.” And while they were in the field, Cain attacked his brother, Abel, and killed him. 9 Afterward the Lord asked Cain, “Where is your brother? Where is Abel?” “I don't know,” Cain responded. “Am I my brother's guardian?” 10 But the Lord said, “What have you done? Listen! Your brother's blood cries out to me from the ground! 11 Now you are cursed and banished from the ground, which has swallowed your brother's blood. 12 No longer will the ground yield good crops for you, no matter how hard you work! From now on you will be a homeless wanderer on the earth.” 13 Cain replied to the Lord, “My punishment is too great for me to bear! 14 You have banished me from the land and from your presence; you have made me a homeless wanderer. Anyone who finds me will kill me!” 15 The Lord replied, “No, for I will give a sevenfold punishment to anyone who kills you.” Then the Lord put a mark on Cain to warn anyone who might try to kill him. 16 So Cain left the Lord's presence and settled in the land of Nod, east of Eden. Proverbs 27:4 - 4 Anger is cruel, and wrath is like a flood, but jealousy is even more dangerous. 1 Samuel 18:6-9 - When the victorious Israelite army was returning home after David had killed the Philistine, women from all the towns of Israel came out to meet King Saul. They sang and danced for joy with tambourines and cymbals. 7 This was their song: “Saul has killed his thousands, and David his ten thousands!” 8 This made Saul very angry. “What's this?” he said. “They credit David with ten thousands and me with only thousands. Next they'll be making him their king!” 9 So from that time on Saul kept a jealous eye on David. Genesis 37:3-4 - Jacob loved Joseph more than any of his other children because Joseph had been born to him in his old age. So one day Jacob had a special gift made for Joseph—a beautiful robe. 4 But his brothers hated Joseph because their father loved him more than the rest of them. They couldn't say a kind word to him. Luke 22:24-27 - Then they began to argue among themselves about who would be the greatest among them. 25 Jesus told them, “In this world the kings and great men lord it over their people, yet they are called ‘friends of the people.' 26 But among you it will be different. Those who are the greatest among you should take the lowest rank, and the leader should be like a servant. 27 Who is more important, the one who sits at the table or the one who serves? The one who sits at the table, of course. But not here! For I am among you as one who serves. Matthew 6:25-30 - “That is why I tell you not to worry about everyday life—whether you have enough food and drink, or enough clothes to wear. Isn't life more than food, and your body more than clothing? 26 Look at the birds. They don't plant or harvest or store food in barns, for your heavenly Father feeds them. And aren't you far more valuable to him than they are? 27 Can all your worries add a single moment to your life? 28 “And why worry about your clothing? Look at the lilies of the field and how they grow. They don't work or make their clothing, 29 yet Solomon in all his glory was not dressed as beautifully as they are. 30 And if God cares so wonderfully for wildflowers that are here today and thrown into the fire tomorrow, he will certainly care for you. Why do you have so little faith? Psalm 71:19 - Your righteousness, O God, reaches to the highest heavens. You have done such wonderful things. Who can compare with you, O God? Psalm 89:6 - For who in all of heaven can compare with the Lord? What mightiest angel is anything like the Lord? Psalm 113:5 - Who can be compared with the Lord our God, who is enthroned on high?

C3 Church San Diego // AUDIO
Called to the Front - Rick Young

C3 Church San Diego // AUDIO

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 39:07


On this Memorial Day Sunday, we look to honor those who gave and lost by examining the call to carry on and fight for our freedoms, salvations, and step up in our identity in Christ.  As we explore what it means to be called, we will use King Saul, David, and the Giant Goliath to demonstrate the context and complexity of the battle.

Mosaic Boston
The Paradox of Freedom

Mosaic Boston

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 52:02


Audio Transcript: This media has been made available by Mosaic Boston Church. If you'd like to check out more resources, learn about Mosaic Boston and our neighborhood churches, or donate to this ministry, please visit mosaicboston.com. Heavenly father, we thank you for the blessing it is to gather. We thank you for this church. We thank you Holy Spirit for knitting our souls together. And one voice, we have the privilege to worship you to glorify you. And as we glorify you, as we grow in glorifying you, meditating on your glory on how much higher you are than anything in the created order. Our faith and our hope are strengthened and we thank you for that. We thank you for the holy scriptures. You did not leave us without a word from you. You are a God who communicates to us. We thank you for the incredible book of Romans. It's so rich and so deep, and the implications are so transformative. We thank you that despite our sin, Jesus Christ came and he died for us. Jesus, you died for us when we were yet sinners rebelling against you, running from you, blaspheming your holy name. We wanted nothing to do with you. You came, you lived the perfect life of love and worship toward God and cared toward people so much so that you gave yourself as a sacrifice. In obedience to God the father, you gave the ultimate sacrifice, yourself, your life. And you bled on that cross and you suffered. You died and you were entombed. You didn't stay dead and we thank you for that. We thank you that because of your resurrection, you are now just and the justifier, that by grace through faith, when we repent our sins and trust in you, it's as if we had never sinned. I pray today, set our gaze upon the path of sanctification that you call us to each one of us. And I pray that you empower us by the Holy Spirit and encourages from the holy scriptures today. And we pray all this in the beautiful name of Jesus Christ. Amen. We're continuing our sermon series through the incredible Book of Romans. Today in Romans 6:15 through 23. The title of the sermon is The Paradox of Freedom. We've talked about, and this was chapter 5 and then the beginning of chapter 6, St. Paul has been transitioning from talking about justification by grace through faith, to sanctification. Justification by grace through faith is when you repent of your sin and you trust in Jesus Christ. It's just as if you had never sinned. From God's perspective, you are sinless. You are holy. God's gift of righteousness, Christ's righteousness imputed to you, and now begins the process of sanctification. All those freely and instantaneously justified through faith begin the process of sanctification. How through the same act of faith, by continuing to believe, by continuing to repent and believe on a daily basis, that's how we are sanctified. The word means to become more holy, more set apart, more righteous, sanctity. We get the word sanctity from agios in the Greek, holy. Sin for the Christian therefore should be out of character. Sin should be uncharacteristic. When sin happens in your life, you say, "Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. That's not me. That's not who I am. That's not my new identity in Christ." And if you think you're a Christian, but you have never meditated on sanctification, if this isn't even a category for you in your life, then you're probably not a Christian. And today, we're going to help you become a Christian and show you how important it is to follow Christ in this path. Yes, we do battle indwelling sin. We battle with it daily. While we were in Adam, we didn't battle sin. It was just normal. We were on team sin. Now, we are on team Jesus. It's a winning team over sin. That's what it means when scripture says we are more than conquerors. That's what the text is about today. We're in Roman 6:15 through 23. Would you look at the text with me? What then? Are we to sin because we are not under law, but under grace? By no means. Do you not know that if you present yourselves to anyone as obedient slaves, you are slaves of the one whom you obey, either of sin, which leads to death or of obedience, which leads to righteousness. But thanks be to God that you were once slaves of sin have become obedient from the heart to the standard of teaching, to which you were committed. And having been set free from sin have become slaves of righteousness. I'm speaking in human terms because of your natural limitations for just as you once presented your members as slaves to impurity and to lawlessness, leading to more lawlessness, so now present your members as slaves to righteousness, leading to sanctification. For when you were slaves of sin, you were free in regard to righteousness. But what fruit were you getting at that time, from the things of which you are now ashamed? For the end of those things is death. But now that you have been set free from sin and have become slaves of God, the fruit you get leads to sanctification and its end, eternal life. For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus, our Lord. This is the reading of God's holy inherent and fallible authoritative word. May you write these eternal truths upon our hearts. Three points to frame up our time this morning. First, set free from slavery to sin, set free for slavery to God, and set free for sanctification. First, set free from slavery to sin. The context is we are in Christ. Pastor Andy did a tremendous job last Sunday explaining what that means to be in Christ, that we've been crucified with Christ, buried and entombed with Christ and raised from the dead with Christ in newness of life. And this is symbolized with baptism. We have baptism today after the second service. It's symbolized with baptism. What is baptism? Baptism is a sign. It's a sign, outward sign of an inward reality that you died with Christ. You died to sin and you were raised with Christ to walk with him in the newness of life. So we've been set free from sins, horrible consequences. That's death. From sins, shameful guilt, that's condemnation. From sins, desperate tyranny, which is slavery to the flesh. Therefore, we must reckon. And you see this phrase over, and over, and over in Romans 18 plus times. He said, "You have to reckon this. You have to count this. You have to consider yourself dead to sin." God considers you righteous, therefore you have to consider yourself righteous and dead to sin. Practically speaking, how does this look? There has to be a vehement, a vehement, vociferous, digging deep into my GRE words. Inside of you, there has to be a militant reaction against sin. When the temptation rears it's ugly head, you have to say to the sin like to a terrible old girlfriend or boyfriend, ex, you broke up. They weren't good to you, cheated on you. That person keeps calling and you have to say, "You are dead to me." Sin, not to the person. "You're dead to me. You're dead to me. You're dead to me. Your number is blocked. I never want to see you sin. You rear its ugly head. You're dead to me. You're dead to me." That has to be the posture of, "We're broken up forever. Sin, you do not entice me. You do not lure me. You do not attract me." The stream of thought begins in Roman 6:12 through 14. And Pastor Andy handled this masterfully last week. But it begins of verse 12. Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body, to make you obey its passions. Do not present your members to sin as instruments for unrighteousness, but present yourselves to God as those who have been brought from death to life, and your members to God is instruments for righteousness. For sin will have no dominion over you since you are not under law, but under grace. He says before we come to Christ, sin does have a dominion over us. It has an authority. It has a power over us. He says, "But that power is broken through Christ." Just a aside here, but it's an important aside, it's about this concept of free will. And I have to set this up because we're going to get to Romans 9 through 11. I cannot wait. I'm excited for Romans 9 through 11. But this idea that we are born with a free will, of free moral will. This idea is not biblical. This idea is actually very pagan. The idea the free will is every time we have a moral option before us to sin or not to sin, to do good or to do evil, that we have the power to say yes or no and the will is basically a state of indifference. Well, this idea isn't biblical at all. It's actually anti-biblical. Indeed we do have a will. What's the will? It's the power of volition. We have the capacity to make choices according to towards our desires. But the problem is our desires want nothing to do with God. Apart from Jesus Christ, we do not want to think about God. We don't want to worship God. We don't want to obey God. We have no affection stored God at all. By nature, we are only wicked continually. By nature, we have no inclination towards things of God. So this idea of I can choose Jesus anytime I want. I can follow Jesus anytime I want. Not unless Jesus Christ saves you. Not unless Jesus Christ regenerates your heart. Before Christ sin does reign in our moral body making you obey. Non-Christians are not walking around thinking how they can be moral obedient to God. They're not thinking about how they can study the scriptures to find out eternal life. You want nothing to do with God. And at best, maybe just lip service. If you haven't studied this concept of free will, I would commend to you Martin Luther's the Bondage Of the Will. Masterful. It's a Christian classic. He responds to Erasmus of Rotterdam in which he explains, "Look, we're born sinners. Scriptures, clearly, Ephesians 2, and you were dead in your sins and trespassers. We have not the capacity to worship God to do his will. And also Jonathan Edwards wrote The Freedom of the Will. Also masterful work. "Unless you're born again," Jesus told Nicodemus, "you can't enter the kingdom of God. But once you are regenerated, sin no longer holds your will in bondage. Once you become a Christian, you can say no to sin. You have that power given to you by the power of the Holy Spirit. That's why in verse 12, he says, "Don't let sin reign in your body. You have the power, Christian to say no. Sin, you are not king. You are not desperate. You are not fewer. You are not in charge of me. I will say no to you." Don't let sin make you obey it's passions. Verse 13, don't present your members to sin. Present yourself to God. Verse 14, don't let sin have dominion over you. Sin is mastered no more. Sin no longer owns you. Sin no longer has authority over you. Stop taking orders from sin. Don't go where sin might be attractive to you. Literally block sin out. That's what he's saying. As Christians obviously, we still sin, but we don't have to. I was never taught this. I was never taught this. I was taught Jesus is always there for you when you sin. Come to him for forgiveness. Oh, clean slate. Now, okay, go and attempt not to sin. But when you sin, we all know you're going to sin. Come back. There wasn't... Which is actually a very defeated spirit. If you wake up and you're like, "Yeah, I'm a sinner, so I'm going to sin today," you're going to live categorically different than if you wake up and you say, "I am a saint, I am a saint. I am saint and I will reign over sin. I will not let sin reign over me." Today, as Christians, we still sin. But hypothetically, Christians, the moment you get saved, the moment you get justified, the moment you trust in Jesus Christ, you were repent of your sin. Hypothetically, from that moment, you could live a life of absolute holiness. Sit with that for a little bit that from... Oh, wait. You've already sinned from the moment that you got justified. Let's start from today. Starting today, dear Christian, you can live a life of absolute holiness, righteousness, perfection, hypothetically. Obviously, we sin, but you could. So every time you're faced with this temptation, God gives you the power of the Holy Spirit if we simply cooperate. Okay, a couple terms I got to give you if you haven't heard these. Monergism and synergism, monergistic and synergistic, our regeneration, our justification is monergistic meaning it's the work of one person. Our justification, our regeneration, it's the work of God, only of God. You did nothing to justify yourself. You did nothing to be born again in the same way that you did nothing to be born physically. You did nothing to be born spiritually, it's monergistic. God elects before the foundation of the world. God predestines. God draws. God writes your name in the book of life before you were even born. Justification is monergistic. But from the moment that you are reborn, the Christian life becomes synergistic. It's a joint effort. It's you and God. Now, you are paddling together. You're in the rowboat of life. And unless you're pulling your side, you're just going to be going around in circles. Or if you think it's only up to you, you'll also be going around in circles. Philippians 2:12 through 13. Therefore, my beloved, as you have always obeyed, so now, not only as in my presence, but much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling for it is God who works in you, both to will and to work for his good pleasure. Do you see that tension? Do you see that cooperation? You are to work out your salvation. I'm to work out my salvation. It's my responsibility to work out my salvation. It's your responsibility to work out your salvation. But then he said, "But it's God who works in you. You work out what God works in both to will and to work for his good pleasure. So God is the one that actually activates the will. And the word for work here is he gives energy for the work for his good pleasure." So work out what God works, and you diligently use the means of grace. The means of grace of holy scripture, studying the scriptures. Feed your soul, dear Christian, in the form of studying a scripture every day, praying to God. Corporate worship. When the saints gather together, there is more Holy Spirit in the room. I have the Holy Spirit. You have the Holy Spirit. When we get together, the Holy Spirit is moving. That's a means of grace. Community groups. That's another means of grace. During the week, you meet brothers and sisters and you share life together. You share your burdens. You pray for one another. That's a means of grace. As diligently as you care for your body, and many of you do, and that's tremendous. The body is a temple of the Holy Spirit. We are to care for our bodies. I had so much spinach last night. I had extra spinach. Whenever my girls don't finish much spinach, whatever's left over, that's what I have for dinner. That's when you know your dad, whatever's left over, that's what you got. You care for your body. You want the vitamins. You want the nutrients. You want to care for your heart. You do a little cardio. You work out. You care for yourself. In the same way that you care for your body, you have to care for your soul, if not more important. Feed the new man. Feed that new soul. Starve the old man. Starve the flesh. You can't reign in life if sin is reigning in you. So this is what he talked about in chapter 5. He says, "We are called by grace, by God's grace. We're called to reign in life." So in a sense where, we're children of God, but we're also kings and queens. We are to take authority, dominion over the kingdoms of our lives in submission to Jesus Christ. So in a sense, we're slaves to God, but when we're slaves to God, we're also kings reigning over sin. He says, "If sin is reigning in you, it's because you let it reign." Every part of your body, all your members are personified here. It's instruments as tools, either for righteousness or unrighteousness. A lot of people think Christianity is just spiritual. That has nothing to do with life. Like, "Oh, your faith. All right, all right. That's what you believe. It's out there. It's very personalized." Nothing to do with the way that you physically live. And we push back at that. That's a false idea. It has everything to do with how we live. Romans 12:1 through 2, "I appeal to you therefore, brothers, by the mercies of God to present your bodies, not just your souls, your bodies as live as a living sacrifice, wholly and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship." Every day you wake up and you say, "God, I am yours. Jesus, I'm yours. I am on the altar. My body is on the altar as a sacrifice." That's through worship. "Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind. That by testing, you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect." Full body. Holistic submission, your mind. Lord, my mind is yours. Help me take captive every single thought that is a virus against my walk with you. Submission of the mind, submission of the mouth, of the voice, tongue, legs, arms, hands, fingertips, everything in submission to God. Roman 6:14, he continues, "For sin will have no dominion over you, since you are not under the law but under grace." And this is what you need to understand in context. He's not saying that this is license to sin. "Oh, we're under grace." I heard this so many times. You meet with someone and you're like, "Hey, man or sister, you're living in sin. Here's the scriptures. We should repent." And he says, "We're not under the law. We're under grace." No, no, no. Hold on. You can't just rip a verse out of context. What's he talking about? Paul has already explained the law condemns us. So before Christ, we are all under the dreadful burden of the law. The law reveals our disobedience that we can't be saved by obedience to law. We're all debtors to law. But once in Christ, we are no longer in the condition of being crushed by the weight of the law. Now, we're under grace and the law operates differently depending on which realm you're in. We talk about that in chapter 5. And Adam, the law condemns us and reveals our sin. It has no power to affect change. In Christ, you're saved by grace. Now the law is transformed by this whacking stick of burden, condemnation, repent, repent, repent. Once you do repent, the law becomes this path that God gives us as a rule for life. God says, "Here's the guardrails for the fullness of life, a life in which you are going to flourish. Not just temporarily, but for all of eternity shows us the way of life is freedom from sin. So no grace doesn't nullify the law. It transforms what the purpose of the law in our lives. So Romans 3:31, he says, "Do we then overthrow the law by this faith?" By no means. On the contrary, we uphold the law." Romans 7:12, that next chapter. "So the law is holy and the commandment is holy and righteous and good." Romans 7:14. "For we know that the law is spiritual, but I am over the flesh sold under sin." So we're not under the principle of law as a means of salvation. We don't look at the 10 commandments and say, "Fulfill the 10 commandments and then God will allow you to go to heaven." That's not how Christianity works. God gives us 10 commandments and he says, "Try doing it." And as soon as you try doing it, you're like, "Yep, I can't do it." And he's like, "Good. Now, you get the point. Repent of your sin. You need Jesus Christ. Once you're in Christ, you get the power of the Holy Spirit to now live according to God's will." Which is the law. We're justified by grace through faith. We're under grace, which doesn't mean we're free to sin. It actually means now we're free to obey. We have the ability to obey God, and its obedience from the heart. And it's all by grace. Our justification is by grace. And so is our sanctification. Roman 6:15. What then? Are we to sin because we are not under the law, but under grace. By no means. So Paul has been a pastor long enough. He knows. He knows this is always the objection. Whenever you tell people, you can't earn your salvation. There's nothing you can do to merit your way into heaven, it's only by grace. And they're like, "But that doesn't work." You can't just tell people that you can repent of your sins anytime and all of your sins are forgiven. Now, there's no motivation to live a righteous life. No, no, no, that can't be how it works. This is what Paul continues to say, he says, "But if that's how you think, you don't understand grace." He says, "By no means. May it never be. God forbid." Verse 16. "Do you not know that if you present yourselves to anyone as obedient slaves, you are slaves of the one whom you obey either of sin, which leads to death or of obedience, which leads to righteousness?" So to fully understand this verse, you need to understand the culture of that time and indentured servitude. When modern readers hear the word slave or slavery, we think of the slave trade in the west and recent centuries, which was essentially kidnapping, stealing people, bringing them across the ocean, then selling them at the auction block to other people. In the ancient world, slavery was primarily voluntary servitude. So if someone couldn't pay their debts or couldn't provide for their family, didn't have a place to live, did not have work to provide. This person would offer their services to fulfill the debt and they would live in the master's house and they would fulfill the will of the master indentured servitude. And it was estimated that Rome at that time, when Paul was writing, that one third, at least one third of the population of Rome were in this kind of indentured servitude as slaves. And initially they were made to wear this distinctive style of clothing, so people could say, "Okay. You're a slave. You're not a slave." And then the Romans figured out, "Oh, that's actually a bad move because it's communicating to the slaves just how powerful they could be if they united and worked together of their numerical strength." So then they said, "No, no, no. You have to address like everyone else." And many free men had once been slaves and likely more than half of the Roman church at that time had been enslaved. So they intuitively understood this metaphor that when your master tells you something to do, you are to obey your master and you can't serve to masters. So Paul here is saying in, "Adam, we were slaves to sin, which leads to death, but in Christ we're slaves to a master who redeems us, who loves us, who turns aside God's wrath from us by his own obedience. We worship a master who himself enslaved himself, took on the form of a servant. This is the greatest master that has ever lived. This is a master that did everything to serve us, Christ." God becomes a doulos, becomes the slave to take on the penalty that we deserve. He fulfills the will of God completely. And Paul is saying by repentance, by obeying in him, we're liberated from sin and from death, which formally held us in bondage. Do you ever feel like you are enslaved to sin? Are there sins now in your life that you're like, "I can't even imagine having freedom from the sin"? I can't even imagine what freedom would feel like, what it would taste like. Well, today I'm calling you to believe that you can have victory over that particular sin. Whatever sin the Lord is bringing to mind now. And in your Christian walk... One of the things I like doing my free time is watching fights. I like fights. I like boxing. I like MMA. I told my wife second career, if this doesn't work out, I think I'm going to be an MMA fighter just in case. So one of the things I like to see is the records of these guys. Because some of the guys in the boxing world, they're like, "I am undefeated. I'm 99 and 0." And then you look at their opponents and you're like, "They were all trumps. They were all trumps." I've been to matches like this and I've seen how these guys pad their numbers. It's basically like a professional gets in there and they're like, "Okay, who wants to fight him?" But in the Christian life, we should have a column of wins over sin. You should be able to look back at your life and you say, "You know what? Two years ago, I struggled with envy. I struggled with insatiable desire for social media. I struggled with..." whatever the sin is. "I struggled with pride." And pride is the last enemy. We'll get to pride. Because actually as you grow in the Christian faith, you should be able to look at your resume of wins and be like, "That was pretty good." And then the Holy Spirit comes in and you're like, "Sinner, you wicked sinner, now here's your thorn in the flesh, so you don't get proud." But that should be our goal is to like to graduate away from lesser sins to greater sins. How do you do it? You do it by coming to Jesus saying, "Jesus, set me free. Jesus give me the power to remain free." John 8:31 through 36. So Jesus said to the Jews who had believed, "If you abide in my word, you are truly my disciples, and you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free." And they answered him, "We are offspring of Abraham and have never been enslaved to anyone. How is it that you say you will become free?" Jesus answered them, "Truly, truly, I say to you, everyone who practices sin is a slave to sin. The slave does not remain in the house forever, the son remains forever. So if the son sets you free, you will be free indeed." So obeying sin leads to death. Obeying God leads to righteousness. And the master we obey shows whose slave we really are. Point two is set free from slavery to God. Verse 17. But thanks be to God that you who are once slaves of sin have become obedient from the heart to the standard of teaching to which you are committed and having been set free from sin have become slaves of righteousness. Remember the monergistic, synergistic thing I said? Here it's synergistic, but who gets all the glory? God, of course. He says thanks be to whom? To God that you who were on slaves have become obedient. So you are doing the obedience, but you give glory to God because it's God who gives you the power. He gives you the desire to do it. Thanks be to God. Paul pours forth a burst of Thanksgiving having considered the greatness of what God has done for him. Our goal should be to become slaves of righteousness. And what kind of slaves of righteousness? How are we to obey? He says from the heart, from the heart. And this is the paradox of freedom that you are enslaved to Jesus Christ. And by the way, sometimes it does feel like slavery. I'm not going to stand up here and say, once you follow Jesus Christ, it's just hunky-dory. It's easy. It is smooth sailing. It's not. It's work. It's a lot of hard work, but it's transformative work. He says, "But this is from the heart. From the heart you want to obey." You want to fulfill everything that God has called you to do. You want to do God's will. This is the difference between religion and a relationship. Religion, you're like, "I got to do this thing, so I don't go to hell. I got to do this thing so that I get blessed. I go do this thing because God said so." And he says obedience is from heart. Oh, it's not I have to do this, I get to by the power of the Holy Spirit serve this God that loves me and he's given me a new heart that's free to obey God. Galatians 5:1. For freedom Christ has set us free; stand firm therefore, and do not submit again to a yolk of slavery. So the freedom Christ offers isn't autonomous self-direction. But if deliverance from the enslaving powers of sin that prevent us from becoming everything God intended us to be. This is why our children's ministry and our youth ministry is so important. It's so important. I don't know why things work this way, but they do. It's like when you're a teenager, when you're in high school, when you're in college, you basically set up your spiritual trajectory. In the ministry here at Mosaic, I've been in the city 13 years. Mosaic is 11. Very few people have come to faith in their 80s, 90s. We've had a few and it's like, "Oh, praise God." Because once you get on this path of, this is what I believe, this is my worldview, and then you just get really busy in life in your job and your career. And then you don't really study, so you don't really... It's when you're a teenager, the spiritual formation is so important. When you're a child, when you're a teenager, when you're in high school, when you're in college spiritual formation... Because you're figuring out how am I to live? What are the decisions I should be making? What should I be addicting myself to? Good things or bad things? Things that will make me prosper and flourish or things that will be destructive for me. The sooner you get on this path of like, "Oh, this is the way I am to go. This is how I can become the best version of myself." And then you just go. And there's also hope for everyone who at any time you come to the Lord, you can sin, sin, sin, and then the Lord saves you, regenerates you, justifies you, gives you the Holy Spirit. And then transformation all of a sudden. But he says, "This is the path for our flourishing. It's following God's law." Every other religion is a religion of law and human merit. Christianity and stark contrast is a religion of freedom. That's why we mistakenly think that freedom is the absence of all restrictions. Like, "Freedom, yeah." I remember when I got my license, my first car was an Audi 80. It was tremendous. It was a stick shift. I didn't know how to drive stick shifts. I learned that day when I bought it to drive it home and I thought, "It's freedom, freedom. I have freedom." I finally have freedom. I had overbearing immigrant parents and I'm like, "Finally, got my own car." I thought I was free until I got pulled over and I got my first speeding ticket and I realized, "Oh, hold on. Oh, no, no, no, no. There's restrictions to the freedom. And if you do not drive within those restrictions, you are actually going to lose your freedom." Freedom isn't the absence of restrictions. Freedom is the presence of restrictions that we were designed for. This is why we shouldn't get mad and we should be like, "Oh, the law of God." The Psalmist says, I delight in the law of God. I love the law of God because he knows that it's the law of God that brings blessing in life. When a Christian is like, "This is too hard. I can't follow the Lord. This is too hard. It's too restricting. I need freedom. I need freedom. I need freedom away from God, away from his commandments, away from the church. I just need a breather. I need freedom." That's like a fish saying, "You know what? I am restricted by this water. This water is not for me anymore. I'm tired of swimming in water. I'm going to walk." I've got five fish in my house and I've been studying fish for a while. That would be ludicrous of the fish to jump out and say, "I want freedom from this tank." And that's what a lot of people do when they want freedom from God. It's freedom from the environment in which you flourish. It's like a train. A train is most free when it's restricted to rails and humans are most free when we're running on oxygen, so our souls are most free when we're restricted to and by God. We are most free when we are in submission of God's authority, when we humbly submit to God who submitted himself to the law and the punishment for our law breaking. True freedom is found in submission to the God who submitted himself in order to free us. So for us, for Christians, we're set free from sin for sanctification, for obedience to God, and we should be happy with the fact that we are enslaved to God, because this is where we flourish. Matthew 6:33. Seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things shall be added onto you. He said, "These are the priorities for the Christians. Seek God's kingdom and righteousness and God will take care of the rest of our needs. This is that priority. Matthew 5:20. "For I tell, unless your righteousness," Jesus said, "exceeds that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven." So he says Christians are to have a righteousness that exceeds that of the Pharisees. If we don't, we're not going to enter the kingdom of heaven. So he's not saying we enter the kingdom of heaven through our righteousness, but he says, if you have entered the kingdom of heaven, you will pursue righteousness. So if faith is real, the fruit of faith is righteousness. It's obedience from the heart. I've always found that verse. Very interesting. What does it mean that our righteousness needs to exceed that of the Pharisees? Because if you follow the Pharisees in many ways, they were very righteous. They weren't righteous from the heart, but they did a lot of things that were very righteous that we could learn from them. Let's look at them. Let's look at the Pharisees real quick. Who were the Pharisees? They rose up against the secularism of the Jews of that day. They're like, "You're not Jewish enough. You're not obedient to God's law enough." So they start their own movement of conservatives and they sought to restore covenant purity in Israel. They were called the set apart ones and they consider themselves set apart for the singular pursuit of righteousness. But they did it hypocritically. They didn't do it from the heart. But we can still learn from their righteousness. Matthew 23:23 through 24. "Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites. For you tithe mint and dill and cumin, have neglected the weightier matters of the law, justice, and mercy, and faithfulness. These you ought to have done without neglecting the others. You blind guides, straining out a gnat and swallowing a camel." So the problem with them, Jesus is like, "You did the lesser parts of the law, tithing, but you missed the more important parts of the law, justice, mercy faithfulness." You should have done the other stuff. It's good. You should be tithing. Don't forget the weightier matters of the law. Here, I just want to emphasize that this was part of their righteousness. They understood that 10% of their income that the Lord gives them, they are to give back to the Lord for kingdom building purposes. So in terms of our righteousness, Christians, does your righteousness exceed that of the Pharisees in terms of tithing? And I say that because statistically less than 3% of Christians in the United States, tithe give 10% of their income to the Lord. The rest rob God of what he calls us to give for the building of his kingdom. So this is a tremendous opportunity for me to plug our building campaign because we still are praying for the Lord to provide us with resources, to build or purchase a ministry center. We've located a tremendous property. And if the Lord would lead you to give, you can go to our website and there's the Mosaic Build and give to build the kingdom of Lord here. So our right to succeed, including with our finances. Luke 18:11 through 22, another example we can learn from the Pharisees. The Pharisee, standing by himself, prayed thus, "God, I thank you that I am not like other men extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week and I give tithes of all that I get." Obviously, he's a hypocrite and self-righteous for thinking that he's better than this other guy, and that other guy, the tax collector, repented of his sins and he walked away justified. And when this guy didn't, so they had a heart issue, the Pharisees did, but they still had a righteousness in that. This guy tithes. He's said, "I tithe." And he says, "I fast twice a week. I fast twice a week." And the expectation for Christians, Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount. He's not saying if you fast, he says, when you fast. That's an expectation. We are to discipline our bodies even from food, for the purpose of drawing near to the Lord and spending more time in prayer. Something to learn from the Pharisees. John 5:39 through 40 that Jesus says to the Pharisees, "You search the scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life, and it is day that bear witness about me, yet you refuse to come to me that you may have life." Their problem here in the text, they didn't come to the Lord. The scriptures were clear that the Messiah is Jesus Christ and Jesus proved it to them. But here we can learn, at least they did study the holy scriptures. They searched the scriptures. And we can learn from that. Matthew 23:15, "Woe to you, scribe and Pharisees, hypocrites. For you travel across sea and land to make a single proselyte, and when he becomes a proselyte, you make him twice as much a child of hell as yourselves." So he calls him children of hell. He calls them hypocrites. But here, I just want to emphasize, they shouldn't have converted people to hypocrisy that they were doing, but at least they cared about evangelism. That's what the word proselyte means. A proselyte is a convert. They travel across sea and land. That's how important evangelism was to them. We can learn from that. That's part of the righteousness that the Lord calls us to. The great commission is given to all of us to go and make disciples of all nations. So Jesus said, "Unless our righteous succeeds that of the Pharisees, we won't enter the kingdom of heaven. Obedience is an expectation for every Christian. It's not a popular word today in many circles. It's never even used this word. But if you study church history, you see that when the church thrived, when there was revival in the church, when people were quickened by the Holy Spirit drawn near to the Lord, they cared about obedience. Dietrich Bonhoeffer has a tremendous word called The Cost of Discipleship in which he talks about cheap grace. And he says, "Cheap grace is the grace which amounts to the justification of sin without the justification of the repentant sinner who departs from sin and from whom it departs. Cheap grace is not the kind of forgiveness of sin, which frees us from the toils of sin. Cheap grace is the grace we bestow on ourselves. Cheap grace is the preaching of forgiveness without requiring repentance. Baptism without church discipline, communion without confession, absolution without personal confession. Cheap grace is grace without discipleship, grace without the cross, grace without Jesus Christ living and incarnate. Such grace is costly because it cause us to follow, and it is grace because it cause us to follow Jesus Christ. It is costly because it cost a man his life. And it is grace because it gives a man the only true life. True grace sets us free from sin and sets us free for God. And we're set free for sanctification, which is growing in proximity to God, growing in closeness to the Lord. The holier you become, the closer you get to the Lord. Roman 6:19 through 20. I'm speaking human terms because of your natural limitations. For just as you once presented your members as slaves to impurity and to lawlessness leading to more lawlessness. So now present your members as slaves to righteousness, leading to sanctification for when you were slaves of sin, you were free in regard to righteousness. Since some people don't easily grasp spiritual things, Paul used the graphic metaphor of making his point to slavery that we are to be just as wholehearted and obeying God as we used to be to sin. Think about your life before meeting Christ, dear Christian. Think about how your life revolved around sin. And you look at young people around the city and it's like their lives revolve around sin. The sin of pursuing wealth. Just to pursue wealth because of greed, because you're in love with money. The sin of pursuing pleasure, despite any kind of... Without even thinking about morality. Seeking freedom to sin you and then all of your finances and time, and the way that you orchestrate where you live and who your friends are, it's all based around sin. And for the Christian, once you become a Christian that needs to shift. Now, the sin of your life is Jesus Christ and you should have a singular pursuit of righteousness and center your whole life around that. Prior to regeneration, people give themselves wholeheartedly to sin. Now, we are to equally wholeheartedly give ourselves to righteousness. When we are under slavery to the dominion of sin, we're completely free from righteousness. And to be free from righteousness is the same thing as being given over to sin. This is the paradox of freedom. Satan promises us freedom, but gives us only slavery to sin. Jesus Christ promises us a yolk. He promises us slavery, but gives us incredible freedom over the soul. It's like your heart just opens up. Your soul opens up. There's no guilt. There's no shame. There's no regret. You're just focused on the Lord, focused on love, the ultimate paradox of the Christian life to be free from sin is to be a slave to righteousness. Now, we are free to pursue righteousness, to present our members as slaves, to righteousness leading to sanctification. Roman 6:21. "But what fruit were you getting at that time, from the things in which you were not ashamed? For the end of those things is death." What benefit did you reap at that time from the things you are now ashamed of? I was speaking with a college student. I won't say when. I was speaking with a college student and the college student said, "You know what? I live for the weekend. That's all I live for. Nothing else in my life gives me pleasure. I hate Monday through Friday until 4:00 PM." I said, "Why 4:00 PM?" He said, "It's happy hour somewhere." Just living for the weekend. He said, "But then the rest of the week, I am just miserable. I hate my life. I hate my work. There's just no satisfaction, no joy, nothing." And then you look back and you're like, "What did I reap from living like that, from living for myself, from living for sin? What did I reap? What do I have now from all of that? But when you have the Holy Spirit and your vision is clear and you look back at your life and you think of the sins you committed. It's incredibly shameful." That's what he says. He said in verse 1 and 2, "But now that you've been set free from sin and have become slaves of God, the fruit you get leads to sanctification and its end, eternal life." Said enslave to God. Not only do you get satisfaction and joy and you get the presence of God, but you get the satisfaction that your life is actually incredibly meaningful. What you do is fruit that you're producing fruit, that leads to sanctification, to sanctify you. But in the end also eternal life for you and then building of the kingdom. Roman 6:23 for the wage of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus, our Lord. Wages of sin is death. So if you are not yet a Christian, if you are here today and you're just not sure. You're not sure. I'll just ask you. Do you care about holiness? Because that's really the test. If you have been justified, then you care about sanctification. You care about obedience to God. If you don't care about obedience to God, you're probably not a Christian. So I call you today to do the following. When we pray, when we worship appeal to God in your heart, in your heart and the depth of your heart appeal to God and say, "God, forgive me for my sins. Forgive me for living for myself, living as if you don't matter as if you don't exist for living as if I were dead to you and you were dead to me." I repent of that sin. Lord, I repent of that sin. I trust in Jesus Christ that Jesus Christ died on the cross, that Jesus Christ on the cross, he says, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" Meaning God the father in some sense says to God the son, "You're dead to me. You're dead to me. Son, you're dead to me." Because Jesus Christ took our sin upon himself to save us. So repent of your sin, trust in Jesus Christ. And from that moment on, you will see the Holy Spirit is going to grow a desire for sanctification in you. The wage of sin is death. It's eternal death in a place called hell, a place of eternal damnation, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Jesus Christ. One of my favorite things to do is to go to the reservoir, the Cleveland Circle Reservoir in the evening to watch the sunset. I like that. There's lots of benches. There's always at least one bench I can find to sit there. I like to stare into the sun. I was told that that's not healthy. So in the vicinity of the sun, I stare and I pray and I pray. I was kind of bummed out this week that one day, and I drove to the reservoir. I just sat down. I'm praying. I'm like, "Lord, I don't know." There was a spiritual sadness of him battling. I met with a pastor friend of mine and he said, "Welcome." He said, "It's an occupational hazard." That's what he told me and he laughed and that made me feel better. So I'm sitting there and I'm like, "Lord, just send me some good news." I need some good news. I even left my phone up because I'm like, "Whenever I pray, sometimes the Lord specifically sends me a phone call or text like someone is going to encourage me." And I'm like, "Lord, Lord, Lord." And nothing, just nothing. Just nobody. I'm like, "Lord." And then out of nowhere I hear a voice and the voice says, "Jesus Christ died for your sins." And I was like, "Who's that?" And I realized it was me. I was just talking to me. It was my voice because I learned from the Psalmist that you were to encourage yourself. The Psalmist says, "Why are you downcast, O my soul?" Why are you downcast? This is the greatest news in the history of the universe. What other news do we need other than Jesus Christ died on the cross for my sins because of his great love for me, he washes away my shame, my sin, my regret, all of that. Honestly, I just started laughing. I'm like, "Oh, I just Pastor Jan'd myself. It worked. It worked. I got a big smile on my face and I went home and it was tremendous." And the essence of Christian theology is grace and the essence of Christian ethics is gratitude." We get power for sanctification from justification. We are saved by grace through faith. That's how we get justified. But then sanctification happens when we just think and we meditate on the sufferings of Jesus Christ in our behalf. That's what it took to justify us. And as you do, your faith increases and your sanctification increases as well. A close to this, 1 Samuel 15:22, Samuel says to King Saul, he says, "Has the Lord has great delight and burnt offerings and sacrifices as in obeying the voice of the Lord. Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice and to listen than the fat of rams. So obedience, God cares more about obedience than the sacrifices that we bring to him. But we can't even obey God unless we meditate the sacrifice of Jesus Christ. And Jesus Christ sacrificed himself because he was in total obedience to God the father. In Gethsemane, he said, "Lord, if there's any other way, let this cup pass for me, but not my will but yours be done." So as we meditate on Christ obedience, as we meditate on his sacrifice, the Lord strengthens our own resolve to be obedient to the Lord. If God is speaking to you about any area of your life, dear Christian, where you are in disobedience, today is the day of repentance and today is the day of resolve. To say to sin, "You are dead to me, because I am alive to Christ." Let's pray. Heavenly father, we thank you for this time in the holy scriptures. We thank you for the meditation on the gospel. And we thank you, Lord, that we can live a life of righteousness, a life of sanctification. And even when we don't do it perfectly, we can always come to you and repent and find grace and pray for anyone who doesn't yet know you today, draw them to yourself, regenerate their hearts, save them and give each one of us an extra dose of the Holy Spirit to work out our salvation, to do it with fear and trembling. We pray all this in Christ's name. Amen.

Insight for Living Canada Daily Broadcast
Soft Music for a Hard Heart, Part 2

Insight for Living Canada Daily Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022


1 Samuel 16:14-23 / May 26-27, 2022 The therapeutic value of music is nothing new. So it was with David, the youthful king-elect, who was more than a faithful shepherd and a man of valour. He was first known as a skilful musician, a talent that brought him face-to-face with his predecessor, King Saul. From the Series: David: A Man of Passion and Destiny read more

Insight for Living Canada Daily Broadcast
STS Study: Soft Music for a Hard Heart

Insight for Living Canada Daily Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022


1 Samuel 16:14-23 / May 26-27, 2022 The therapeutic value of music is nothing new. So it was with David, the youthful king-elect, who was more than a faithful shepherd and a man of valour. He was first known as a skilful musician, a talent that brought him face-to-face with his predecessor, King Saul. From the Series: David: A Man of Passion and Destiny read more

Insight for Living Canada Daily Broadcast
Soft Music for a Hard Heart, Part 1

Insight for Living Canada Daily Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022


1 Samuel 16:14-23 / May 26-27, 2022 The therapeutic value of music is nothing new. So it was with David, the youthful king-elect, who was more than a faithful shepherd and a man of valour. He was first known as a skilful musician, a talent that brought him face-to-face with his predecessor, King Saul. From the Series: David: A Man of Passion and Destiny read more

Knowing Faith
#150 – The One Q&A To Rule Them All

Knowing Faith

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 39:38


Jen Wilkin, JT English, and Kyle Worley celebrate episode 150 of Knowing Faith by answering questions submitted by listeners! Questions Covered in This Episode:How do we reconcile judgment day with the knowledge that when we repent God forgets or casts away our sins?Will we see King Saul in heaven?Are false stories the same thing as worldviews?How can brothers in Christ best supportz sisters in Christ who are pursuing some form of ministry in the US context?Is the soul inherently gendered as male and female? If yes or no, what are the implications for complementarianism?Do you consider women's bible study and women's ministry the same thing?Can you help me understand the difference between the ontological and economic Trinity? Why does it matter?What are your thoughts on Paul saying to not pay attention to genealogies in 1 Timothy?Why is the Father referred to as God the Father but Christ is referred to as the Son of God, not God the Son? Does this language confuse the equality of the Trinity in any way?Who is your favorite of the minor prophets and why?How do we pray Trinitarianly?Does Kenosis deny the deity of Christ?I want to develop my own curriculum for our study to use, where should I start?Romans 7:4 says we have died to the law in Christ Jesus but in Matthew 5:17 Jesus says he didn't come to abolish the law but to fulfill it. So if we are in Christ it means that we have died to the law, but also we have fulfilled the law in Christ. How can both be true at the same time? Did we die to the law or did we fulfill the law in Christ?I reckon after these tough questions you and your families need a holiday to NZ! What say you all?Helpful Definitions:Anthropomorphic: Ways of talking about God in human terms so we can understand a concept.“Narrative is our culture's currency, he who tells the best story wins.” Bobette BusterAnthropology: The doctrine of humanity.Dichotomy: We are made up of two parts, body and soul.Trichotomy: We are made up of three parts, body, soul, and spirit.Ontological (Imminent) Trinity: The view that centers on the Trinity in and of Himself, or the internal relations between the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit as present (immanent) only to Himself (c.f. Jn 1:1-2,18); this perspective is distinguished from that of the economic Trinity. Economic Trinity: A view of the Trinity focused on God in the history of redemption, or the functional acts (economies) of the Godhead in the creation and salvation of the world; this perspective is distinguished from that of the immanent Trinity.How to pray: To the Father through the Son by the Spirit.Kenosis: Jesus gives over his divine rights (Philippians 2:7).Resources Mentioned in This Episode:1 Timothy 1:4, Amos, Nehemiah, Philippians 2:7, Romans 7:4, Matthew 5:17“Jesus & Gender” by Elyse M. Fitzpatrick and Eric SchumacherAmazon affiliate links are used where appropriate. As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases, thank you for supporting Knowing Faith.Sponsors:Explore the Southern Seminary degree programs designed to equip you to be more effective in full-time ministry or as a lay leader: SBTS.EDU/EXPLOREFollow Us:Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | WebsiteSupport Knowing Faith and Become a Patron:patreon.com/knowingfaith

Daf Yomi for Women - Hadran
Yevamot 79 - May 25, 24 Iyar

Daf Yomi for Women - Hadran

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 44:34


Presentation in PDF format Today's daf is sponsored by Caroline and Victor Ofstein in honor of their son Shalom's wedding to Yocheved Davidowitz today. "May their home be filled with Torah, learning and mitzvot, and bracha and simcha always". Today's daf is sponsored by Ruth Leah Kahan, Jessica Shklar, and Emily Michelson in loving memory of their mother Kadimah Michelson, Kadima bat HaRav Avraham Zvi Ben-Tzion v'Chaya, on her fourth yahrzeit. Today's daf is dedicated to the memory of all those young children murdered in the shooting yesterday in an elementary school in Texas.  The end story of the Netinim is explained and why King David forbid them to marry Jews even though they had converted. As an act of revenge against King Saul, they insist on murdering seven of his descendants. How were those seven people chosen? After they were killed, their bodies were left to hang for half a year as a kiddush Hashem - to show everyone what is done even to sons of kings who don't treat converts properly, even those who have converted for ulterior motives. Ritzpa bat Aya, the concubine of King Saul, two of whose kids were among those murdered, protected the bodies from the birds and animals. Only after the rains began did King David allow them to be buried. As a result of this incident, 150,000 people converted to Judaism. From where is this derived? Was it really David who forbade them? Wasn't it already alluded to by Moshe in the Torah or by Joshua in the book of Joshua? In the time of Rebbe, they wanted to repeal this decree against the Netinim, but they were unsuccessful - why? Two different answers are given. There were two traditions regarding a man incapable of having children, a saris,  regarding chalitza - one that he does perform chalitza and that chalitza is performed on his wife, and one that says the opposite. There are different tannatic opinions about which one refers to a man who was born like this and which one refers to a man who became this way later in life. An aylonit does not do chalitza or yibum. Rabbi Akiva holds that a man who became a saris does chalitza - but if Rabbi Akiva also holds that all negative commandments (which would include marriage to a saris - patzua daka) are like ones liable for karet, how could one possibly be obligated in chalitza or yibum? Rabbi Ami limits it to a case where the yevama was a convert and according to those who hold that a convert can also marry those who are forbidden to marry. Two questions are raised against Rabbi Ami's position. Raba brings a different answer - that he does chalitza only if he was not yet a saris when his brother died but became a saris before yibum was performed. A difficulty is raised against this position as well. A third answer is brought by Rav Yosef who rejects the question as he brings a different understanding of Rabbi Akiva's position regarding negative commandments - only those that are ones forbidden due to a close relation are like those liable for karet. Why is he even part of the mitzva of chalitza and yibum if the whole point of the mitzva is to carry on the name and he is not capable of that?

Commuter Bible
1 Samuel 19-22, Proverbs 29:15-27

Commuter Bible

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 27:31


1 Samuel 19 - 1:10 . 1 Samuel 20 - 5:50 . 1 Samuel 21 - 15:10 . 1 Samuel 22 - 18:18 . Proverbs 29:15 - 24:43 . In our last episode, King Saul's jealousy and hatred for David began to grow as David successfully conquered the Philistines in battle time after time. Saul began plotting David's demise, but his plans to see him killed were all foiled. Today, Saul's rage becomes clear to everyone, and David flees from the king's presence. As he takes shelter in a distant cave, his family catches word and they join him, along with other men who seek escape from Saul's reign. Later, Saul starts to crack under pressure and he begins to imagine that David could strike at any moment. In a rage, he puts a city of priests and their family to the sword.:::Christian Standard Bible translation.All music written and produced by John Burgess Ross.Co-produced by Bobby Brown, Katelyn Rahn, Eric Williamson, and the Christian Standard Biblefacebook.com/commuterbibleinstagram.com/commuter_bibletwitter.com/CommuterPodpatreon.com/commuterbibleadmin@commuterbible.org 

Daf Yomi for Women - Hadran
Yevamot 77 - March 23, 22 Iyar

Daf Yomi for Women - Hadran

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 45:22


Today's daf is sponsored by Aviva Adler in loving memory of her father, Professor Joseph Kahane's 6th yahrzeit, Yosef ben Rachel v'Tzvi HaKohen.  When Doeg the Edomite recommended to King Saul to look into David's lineage to disqualify him on account of his great grandmother Ruth, in the end, Yeter, the father of Amasa brought down a tradition he had learned from Shmuel that Moabite and Amonite women are permitted. There are two different tannaitic opinions explaining on what basis are the women excluded from the prohibition. Three different verses in Tehillim are explained to be connected to this incident as David is thanking God for saving him from those trying to attack his lineage and that of his grandson, Rechavam whose mother was Naama the Amonite. Ulla quotes Rabbi Yochanan as ruling that the daughter of a male convert from Amon is permitted to marry a kohen. According to who is this statement made? If it was said according to Rabbi Yehuda, he rules that the child of a convert is like the child of a chalal and is disqualified from marrying a kohen. If it was said according to Rabbi Yosi, he permitted the daughters of converts so it is obvious! In the end, they explain the case: if the child of a convert from Amon with a Jewish woman, which is a forbidden relationship and even according to Rabbi Yosi, one may have thought here that since the child was born from a forbidden union, perhaps she would be disqualified from marrying a kohen. Reish Lakish in fact holds that she is disqualified, but Rabbi Yochanan permits it. On what basis does Rabbi Yochanan permit it? He disagrees with Rabbi Zakkai on how to explain the words in the verse in Vayikra 21:14 that a kohen gadol can marry a virgin from his own people. What does "from his own people" refer to? Two different versions of Rabbi Yochanan's drasha are brought. There is an alternate version of his discussion and disagreement with Rabbi Zakkai. According to the second version, why would the child of an Egyptian convert with an Israelite be permitted to marry a kohen? What is the retort that the rabbis could have made to Rabbi Shimon's kal vachomer in the Mishna regarding the female Edomite and Egyptian converts? 

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 119: David's Wisdom (2022)

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 21:10


In the last chapters of 1 Samuel, Fr. Mike focuses on David's wisdom in battle through his prayer and ability to unite the people of Israel. He also touches on Psalm 18 and how wonderful things can happen once we allow ourselves to be loved by God. Today's readings are 1 Samuel 29-31 and Psalm 18. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 118: King Saul Despairs (2022)

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 20:15


Fr. Mike reflects on King Saul's despair in the face of trial, and how he seeks other means of comfort when he feels like God has abandoned him. God never abandons us, especially in the midst of danger. Fr. Mike invites us to place our trust in God's promise, instead of resorting to sinful acts. Today's readings are 1 Samuel 27-28 and Psalm 34. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 115: King Saul is Spared (2022)

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 13:07


Fr. Mike uses King Saul as an example that God does not un-choose those he has chosen, and never loses faith in us. Even if we feel someone is in power unjustly, it's God who decides who holds power, not us. Today's readings are 1 Samuel 24 and Psalm 57. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.