Podcasts about athenian

Capital of Greece

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Latest podcast episodes about athenian

The Daily Stoic
All That Matters Is How We Respond | No Pain No Gain

The Daily Stoic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 8:44


It was the great Athenian leader, Pericles, who said that there was nothing wrong with poverty. It could be caused by so many things—a business failure, the sudden loss of a family's breadwinner, theft, even just plain old back luck. Like the Stoics, he knew that Fortune could swoop in, and, in the blink of an eye, undo years of hard work and careful planning.

Developing Leadership
Episode 28 | An Engineering Leader's Search for Meaning with Chad Fowler

Developing Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 40:33


Join Chad Fowler, Jason Warner, and Eiso Kant in a heartfelt existential episode on what it means to be an engineering leader that will have you question if the manager path is the right one for you. An essential listen for anyone trying to find meaning in their role. Deep dive into the topics discussed in this episode at go.developingleadership.co/ep28 Join the discussion and follow us on twitter @ devleadership_ Developing Leadership is a podcast presented by Athenian. We are introducing the world of engineering to metrics and data that improve processes and help teams. If you want to learn more about data-enabled engineering, go to athenian.com

New Books Network
On Plato's "Apology"

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 34:10


In 399 BC, the Greek philosopher Socrates was on trial. He believed in free-thought and sought truth by questioning everything, including society. And the Athenian government decided he was dangerous. Plato's Apology is a first-person account of Socrates' trial written in the form of a “dialogue,” an exploration of philosophical ideas through real and imagined conversations. Steven Smith is a professor of Political Science and Political Philosophy at Yale University. His research focuses on the problem of the ancients and moderns, and he is the author of books such as Modernity and Its Discontents and Reading Leo Strauss. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Intellectual History
On Plato's "Apology"

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 34:10


In 399 BC, the Greek philosopher Socrates was on trial. He believed in free-thought and sought truth by questioning everything, including society. And the Athenian government decided he was dangerous. Plato's Apology is a first-person account of Socrates' trial written in the form of a “dialogue,” an exploration of philosophical ideas through real and imagined conversations. Steven Smith is a professor of Political Science and Political Philosophy at Yale University. His research focuses on the problem of the ancients and moderns, and he is the author of books such as Modernity and Its Discontents and Reading Leo Strauss. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Ancient History
On Plato's "Apology"

New Books in Ancient History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 34:10


In 399 BC, the Greek philosopher Socrates was on trial. He believed in free-thought and sought truth by questioning everything, including society. And the Athenian government decided he was dangerous. Plato's Apology is a first-person account of Socrates' trial written in the form of a “dialogue,” an exploration of philosophical ideas through real and imagined conversations. Steven Smith is a professor of Political Science and Political Philosophy at Yale University. His research focuses on the problem of the ancients and moderns, and he is the author of books such as Modernity and Its Discontents and Reading Leo Strauss. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

History Extra podcast
15 minutes of fame: Kleisthenes, father of Athenian democracy

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 23:55 Very Popular


It's the HistoryExtra podcast's 15th birthday, and to celebrate, we've asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame'. In this episode, Professor Michael Scott nominates Kleisthenes. He tells Kev Lochun about how this sixth-century BC aristocrat came to be regarded as the father of Athenian democracy. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Casting Through Ancient Greece
58: Shifting Sands in Athens

Casting Through Ancient Greece

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 40:58


Events during the 460's would see the political sands in Athens begin to shift, with opposition to Cimon's influence increasing in the sources. This would first come through charges of corruption at the conclusion of the Thasos campaign. While a more successful attempt would take place with Sparta's rejection of Athenian assistance during the helot revolt, assistance Cimon had supported sending.This would see the emergence on the pages of Athenian history, two new influential political figures. Ephialtes and Pericles would mount a similar opposition to Cimon's policies as Themistocles some ten years earlier. Ephialtes would appear to head this opposition while Pericles, the son of Xanthippus would be his junior.They would be successful in shifting public support away from Cimon, while also managing to have him ostracized. This would see Cimon removed from Athenian politics for the next 10 years, allowing the policies of Ephialtes, Pericles and their supporters to now dominate the political institutions within Athens.The changes that would develop in Athens would open the way for a more direct form of democracy to develop. This would see the aristocratic institution of the Areopagus attacked and its powers severally reduced in favour of the council of 500 and the assembly. This would give more say over affairs in Athens to a broader range of classes. However not all would be pleased with these developments as Ephialtes would become a victim of political violence.     Support the show

Hellas Footy Pod
Hellas Footy Podcast S3 Episode 7

Hellas Footy Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 67:35


Round 4 of SLGR is over with PAO sitting pretty on top of the table after getting maximum points in the Athenian derby. PAOK are hard to read but are winning Olympiakos indifferent start to the season continues with a draw at home. Should AEK fans worry? Greek club owners unite in slamming EPO president in refereeing saga. Ethniki Omada to be named this week. Karelis a smokey? All that and much more. #HellasFootyPod

The Rational Reminder Podcast
Understanding Crypto 15: Prof. Vili Lehdonvirta: Cryptocracy: The Obfuscation of Power

The Rational Reminder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 66:47


Today, we speak to Vili Lehdonvirta, Professor of Economics, Sociology, and Digital Social Research at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford. Professor Lehdonvirta is a social scientist whose research focuses on ways digital technologies are reshaping the organization of economies, including their associated social effects. He is also the author of two books, Cloud Empires and Virtual Economies, which provide readers with an in-depth look into the power that crypto platforms hold and a well-rounded characterization of digital markets. In this episode, we talk about the ideological underpinnings of crypto and the role of governance in making cryptocurrencies possible. We discuss the role of states in scaling markets, how states and platform companies differ, the impacts of smart contracts on governance issues, and how control and power are centralized within crypto markets, as well as the social implications of blockchain technology. Listeners will also learn about past controversies within the crypto space, why people are still needed within crypto, and the blockchain paradox, plus more!   Key Points From This Episode:   We start by learning about John Perry Barlow's vision for cyberspace. [0:05:06] Find out about the role that states play in markets. [0:07:03] How markets function at scale if the state is not involved. [0:07:55] Professor Lehdonvirta's view on whether governance may precede markets. [0:08:59] The role massive platform companies play in today's economy. [0:09:44] Ways in which states and platform companies differ. [0:10:42] Why he thinks public blockchain technology has garnered so much attention. [0:11:27] An explanation of the influence John Perry Barlow's vision had on cryptocurrencies. [0:13:04] Learn what a Kleroterion is and the role it played in Athenian democracy. [0:14:01] Professor Lehdonvirta shares what it means to ‘trust in the code.' [0:17:05] An outline of the new properties smart contracts created. [0:18:59] Social and economic implications of unstoppable censorship-resistant contracts. [0:21:08] A brief rundown of how impactful smart contracts have been. [0:22:27] How the trustless and unstoppable claims of cryptocurrencies and DAOs were affected by the DAO story. [0:24:20] Whether the Bitcoin block-size conflict affected the perception of crypto as a trustless system. [0:28:17] We find out the current size of the Bitcoin development team. [0:31:05] Other examples of human discretion affecting the direction of Bitcoin. [0:31:46] Professor Lehdonvirta explains the strategies used to preserve trustlessness after the human interventions took place. [0:35:16] Details about an important strategy: the appeal to technical expertise. [0:38:53] Find out if the ability to fork blockchain networks restores trustless claims of crypto. [0:39:42] Whether users of a blockchain network, who are not miners, can influence crypto markets. [0:45:02] Professor Lehdonvirta's opinion on who has the most control over cryptocurrency networks. [0:49:35] Hear what aspect of Athenian democracy Nakamoto failed to replicate. [0:54:26] We learn what the blockchain paradox is (also known as the governance paradox). [0:56:50] Find out if Professor Lehdonvirta thinks technology changes the fundamental aspects which shape how societies are organized. [01:00:11] Find out if blockchain has eliminated the need for nation-states. [01:02:11] What cryptocurrencies have accomplished since their inception. [01:03:40]

History Made Beautiful
80: How to Win an Election: Lessons from an Ancient Roman Rebel

History Made Beautiful

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 10:23


The ancient Greek historian Thucydides once wrote, “Human nature is constant”. An election is a messy process and something that we have tried to get right for thousands of years. In some ancient Greek city-states, election by lot was a method of choosing public officials. It was used especially in the Athenian democracy, from which most information about the practice is derived. This practice provided the regular turnover of officeholders. As a result, for better or worse, the operations of government were not in the hands of experts, but in the hands of the people. This episode is also available as a blog post: http://martinifisher.com/2020/09/25/how-to-win-an-election-lessons-from-an-ancient-roman-rebel/

Unlimited Opinions - Philosophy & Mythology

The failures of radical democracy! In this episode, we look at Chapter 1 of Alan Ryan's On Politics, beginning with the emergence and rule of Athenian radical democracy. We look at the origins of the Greek city-state, the functioning of the Athenian Assembly, the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, the Trial of Socrates, and more! We also break down why the Athenian democracy ultimately failed and why it might not be the best idea to praise radical democracy as a great political system. We're also planning a future giveaway, so be sure to follow us on Twitter @UlmtdOpinions for more upcoming details!

Developing Leadership
Episode 27 | The Power & Peril of Software Engineering Metrics with César Lugo from Typeform

Developing Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 43:08


Cesar Lugo, Software Engineer and founding member of the Engineering Intelligence team at Typeform, joins us to talk about the power of engineering metrics and how data can help influence how organizations behave. Learn about continuous improvement frameworks that work and why industry benchmarks fall short of their goal to help engineering organizations thrive. Deep dive into the topics discussed in this episode at go.developingleadership.co/ep27  Join the discussion and follow us on twitter @ devleadership_ Developing Leadership is a podcast presented by Athenian. We are introducing the world of engineering to metrics and data that improve processes and help teams. If you want to learn more about data-enabled engineering, go to athenian.com

Daybreak
Daybreak for September 1, 2022

Daybreak

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 51:22


Thursday of the 22nd Week in Ordinary Time Saint of the Day: St. Giles, 650-724; Athenian of noble birth; sailed for France, seeking solitude; conversed only with God for many years; admitted several disciples, and founded a monastery Office of Readings and Morning Prayer for 9/1/22 Gospel: Luke 5:1-11

Unlimited Opinions - Philosophy & Mythology
S4 E1: Introduction: Thinking About Politics

Unlimited Opinions - Philosophy & Mythology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 61:36


This is the start to potentially the most rant-filled season of all time! For Season 4, we are reading Alan Ryan's On Politics, a book discussing the history of political theory from Herodotus to the modern day. In this episode, we discuss the introduction as well as give an introduction for this season as a whole. We discuss the Athenian and Roman degrees of citizenship, how to think about politics, why it's not a good idea to have direct democracy, and much more! We also have the first of many long rants about the direct election of U.S. senators!  Follow us on Twitter! @UlmtdOpinions

Classic Audiobook Collection
The History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides ~ Full Audiobook

Classic Audiobook Collection

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 1693:06


The History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides audiobook. The History of the Peloponnesian War is an account of the Peloponnesian War in Ancient Greece, fought between the Peloponnesian League (led by Sparta) and the Delian League (led by Athens) in the 5th Century BC. It was written by Thucydides, an Athenian general who served in the war. It is widely considered a classic and regarded as one of the earliest scholarly works of history. The History is divided into eight books. These book divisions are the work of editors in later antiquity.

TMC Publishing
In Conversation with Apostolos Sideris - TMC Publishing Podcasts

TMC Publishing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 46:43


Full interview of jazz bassist, composer and vocalizer Apostolos Sideris on the release of his new album HANE. Presented by Vika Stankovic. "A scorching August midday. I stand on my balcony, looking out at the sea, well, trying to discern it in the muggy haze on the horizon. Apostolos is on his way to sit down in conversation with me. I'm pondering my decision to start this podcast. Feelings of worry, excitement, anxiety are all intertwined and I try to give each of the emotions space. To recognise them and let them be. You see, I've been ‘in conversation' with people all my life and greatly enjoyed discussions on all sorts of topics, but this has always been either within my profession (I'm an English teacher) or personal encounters with friends and family members. I've even been talking with artists, musicians, painters, composers, poets all my adult life. So, this is nothing new for me. Why was I then so nervous about this podcast, which by the way, was my idea to begin with? I glance down from the first floor and see a yellow Athenian taxi halting right in front of the gate. This instantly brings me back to reality. Apostolos emerges from within and waves up in my direction, a cotton tote bag on his shoulder, a smile on his face. He immediately apologizes for being late (only 10 minutes) and tells me laughingly that he had a hilarious time with friends the night before and that he was coming straight from his friend's place with next to no sleep at all. I laugh along. I'm not worried in the least. Musicians, the world over, have always been night owls. He does accept some coffee, though. The first thing I notice is Apostolos's childlike gaze as he, coffee in hand, looked around and started asking questions about the artwork on the walls with genuine inquisitiveness. I was right, I thought. Playfulness is one one of the key qualities of most musicians I've encountered so far and Apostolos was no exception. What followed was a serious of spontaneous questions on my part through a couple of games, which Apostolos accepted with due innocence. After all, his recent album release ‘Hane' was largely based on improvisation, that is, playing around with whatever ideas and means he had at hand during the period of physical enclosure we've all been through. The mind, though, was free to roam and create, as Apostolos puts it himself."

Developing Leadership
Episode 26 | Consensus Driven Cultures, Dev Influencers & Capacity Planning

Developing Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 36:00


Jason and Eiso ad lib on a variety of topics. From consensus-driver cultures, the trouble with software engineering endorsements and capacity planning best practices. Warning: Eiso recorded this episode from a boat out at sea (ahoy!), so that's why you can sometimes hear background noises coming from his side. We apologize for this and will try to keep all recording sessions on land from now on. Deep dive into the topics discussed in this episode at go.developingleadership.co/ep26 Join the discussion and follow us on twitter @ devleadership_ Developing Leadership is a podcast presented by Athenian. We are introducing the world of engineering to metrics and data that improve processes and help teams. If you want to learn more about data-enabled engineering, go to athenian.co

Stories Podcast - A Free Children's Story Podcast for Bedtime, Car Rides, and Kids of All Ages!

Today's episode is an adaptation of a Greek myth. When Athens is under attack by the Persian army Callimachus and Miltiades take the entire Athenian army out to meet them. Follow along as the swift Philippides saves the day.Draw us a picture of what you think any of the characters in this story look like, and then tag us in it on instagram @storiespodcast! We'd love to see your artwork and share it on our feed!!If you would like to support Stories Podcast, you can subscribe and give us a five star review on iTunes, check out our merch at storiespodcast.com/shop, follow us on Instagram @storiespodcast, or just tell your friends about us!Check out our new YouTube channel at youtube.com/storiespodcast. If you've ever wanted to read along with our stories, now you can! These read-along versions of our stories are great for early readers trying to improve their skills or even adults learning English for the first time. Check it out.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Casting Through Ancient Greece
56: Thasos, Path to Conflict

Casting Through Ancient Greece

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 37:15


After the Delian Leagues victory over the Persian forces at the Eurymedon River, campaigning would continue with it appearing other areas closer to the Greek mainland being the focus. Though, the Island of Thasos, an original Delian league member would now also revolt from the league, seeing Athens and the leagues attention being refocused to deal with this developing threat.We are told that the revolt would come about due to economic reasons, with Athenian influence now also extending into areas Thasos had control in. This would see the full force of Athens navy and by extension the Delian league directed at the island in the Northern Aegean. Thasos would be laid siege to and would now attempt to seek assistance from outside of the Delian league.Here we can perhaps see the path to conflict between Athens and Sparta, since Sparta would be the city Thasos would turn to. Sparta, with it seeming the war party had now gained more influence within Spartan politics, in turn would secretly agree to attack Athenian territory to try and relive the siege directed at the island. This being the first overtly hostile action we hear of being contemplated.Though, Poseidon, the earth shaker would see to it that the attack would not take place. A great and terrible earthquake would rock the Peloponnese seeing many cities including Sparta devastated. This would create further issues for Sparta to deal with, while the path to conflict between Athens and Sparta would be further laid as the consequences from this event unfolded.   Support the show

Developing Leadership
Episode 25 | Reviving Engineering Teams & Overcoming the Fear of Shipping with Craig Kerstiens

Developing Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 42:09


Craig Kerstiens joins us for a chat on decalcifying engineering teams, why you need to get your teams to ship more, and finding A-Players. Craig runs product and engineering at Crunchy Data and has been incredibly influential in the Postgres community. Deep dive into the topics discussed in this episode at go.developingleadership.co/ep25 Join the discussion and follow us on twitter @ devleadership_ Developing Leadership is a podcast presented by Athenian. We are introducing the world of engineering to metrics and data that improve processes and help teams. If you want to learn more about data-enabled engineering, go to athenian.com

The Final Straw Radio
Fighting Back Against Displacement In Greece

The Final Straw Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 75:59


This week, we spoke with Alex, an anarchist squatter in the Athenian neighborhood of Exarchia. They talk about repression by the New Democracy party, struggles against green washing wind turbines around rural Greece, the fires raging through the country, resistance to rape culture, fighting against the building of a metro station in Exarchia and the privatization of public spaces like Strefi Hill, police presence at Universities, anarcho-tourism and the hunger strike of anarchist prisoner Giannis Michialidas. Links: Learn more on the struggle for Strefi by visiting LofosStrefi.Noblogs.Org or finding them on Twitter (@LofosStrefi) or Facebook Protest from 2021 at Strefi Hill video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xoikItwwFn4 From the attack in the feminist demo against attempt of rape. Very strong moment for us oppressed from patriarchy: https://youtu.be/kXKfV69_lGo Self organized carnival from strefi assembly, no metro in exarchia square assembly and self organized Navarinou park https://youtu.be/Q1XpyBttDdc 25th june International call for defending exarchia https://youtu.be/xYl6eNlfHLU New mural for Alexis Grigoropoulos https://youtu.be/9vr6uHgO-7g Announcements Week of Solidarity August 23-30th is the International Week of Solidarity with Anarchist Prisoners. The site https://Solidarity.International has suggestions of ways to get involved, a poster for this year, and place to contact to announce or share your action or event. Reject Raytheon, WNC On Earth Day 2022, affiliates of Reject Raytheon AVL performed a rally, march and direct action at the Bent Creek River Park to block traffic and protest the building of a factory by Pratt & Whitney, a subsidiary of aerospace war drone and fighter plan component manufacturer, Raytheon. You can support folks as they attend court at 9am on August 31st the Buncombe County courthouse, room 1A for trespassing charges. And you can learn more about the struggle to push back the murder machine manufacturer Raytheon locally at RejectRaytheonAVL.com Firestorm Fundraiser If you haven't heard, our friends and sponsor Firestorm Books has purchased a building and will be moving down at 1022 Haywood Rd to the former site of Dr. Dave's Automotive, near the Odditorium over the next year. They plan to donate the land to the Asheville Community Land Trust to be held in protection for perpetuity, but are fundraising now to pay for remediation and renovation of the space. You can support their efforts and help make this new space a reality by visiting their GiveButter page linked in our show notes for this episode. TFSR Patreon I'll keep this short and sweet. A big shout out to the folks who've donated or joined our patreon recently. We're still not at the level where our recurring donations will cover the monthly cost of our printing, mailing, web hosting and transcriptions (about $600 per month would do that) let alone saving up to help us cover future travels to gather interviews, but we're moving that direction. To entice you, we've changed up our patreon to feature a new $3/mo level, and are offering occasional online patreon content to that and other levels including early releases, behind the scenes chats, updates and other things. If you can throw us some dough, we'd be much obliged. You can find more about the patreon at patreon.com/tfsr and learn other ways to support us at tfsr.wtf/support ! . ... . .. Featured Track: Αυτό Το Σύστημα [Διάβρωση Cover] by Γεμάτος Αράχνες, ρε Φίλε! from their 2021 split with Βελζεβούλ Τα μη χειρότερα

What’s My Thesis?
142. The Athenian Marketplace - Robert Ramirez

What’s My Thesis?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 65:08


Developing Leadership
Episode 24 | Leaders vs Managers & The Power of Sponsorship with Meri Williams

Developing Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 40:21


Meri Williams, one of the most inspiring engineering leaders in the world, joins us for a discussion on managers vs. leaders, coaching vs. mentoring, how leaders can advise team members from different backgrounds, and the power of sponsorship. Deep dive into the topics discussed in this episode at go.developingleadership.co/ep24 Join the discussion and follow us on twitter @ devleadership_ Developing Leadership is a podcast presented by Athenian. We are introducing the world of engineering to metrics and data that improve processes and help teams. If you want to learn more about data-enabled engineering, go to athenian.com

New Books in European Studies
Othon Alexandrakis, "Radical Resilience: Athenian Topographies of Precarity and Possibility" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 59:29


Radical Resilience: Athenian Topographies of Precarity and Possibility (Cornell UP, 2022) relates narratives of Athenians struggling to survive the impoverishment of relentless austerity measures, compounding emergencies, and human disasters of successive national crises in Greece since 2010.  Drawing on eight years of fieldwork, Othon Alexandrakis examines the effects of injury, erosion, and upheaval on individuals already pushed beyond their limits but holding on against all odds. Through analysis of everyday scenes across different social locations in the city, he documents the often slow, difficult work of picking up the pieces of one's life and moving them around—and the worlds that fade and the ones that become visible in the process. He shares the stories of a disillusioned anarchist organizer, an exhausted nurse helping a father search for his lost daughter, a misunderstood Romani man rejected by his friends and family, and an undocumented migrant who discovers hope in the trash—stories of individuals finding solace and possibility within, with, and against the tragedies of their lives. Alexandrakis shows how these stories lead to a potentially transformative coming to resilience. In Radical Resilience, Alexandrakis traces the bare edges of radical possibility from within the efforts of those continuing on beyond their limits. Othon Alexandrakis is Associate Professor of Anthropology at York University. He is the editor of Impulse to Act. Alize Arıcan is an anthropologist whose research focuses on urban renewal, futurity, care, and migration in Istanbul, Turkey. Her work has been featured in Current Anthropology, City & Society, JOTSA, Radical Housing Journal, and entanglements. You can find her on Twitter @alizearican Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in Sociology
Othon Alexandrakis, "Radical Resilience: Athenian Topographies of Precarity and Possibility" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 59:29


Radical Resilience: Athenian Topographies of Precarity and Possibility (Cornell UP, 2022) relates narratives of Athenians struggling to survive the impoverishment of relentless austerity measures, compounding emergencies, and human disasters of successive national crises in Greece since 2010.  Drawing on eight years of fieldwork, Othon Alexandrakis examines the effects of injury, erosion, and upheaval on individuals already pushed beyond their limits but holding on against all odds. Through analysis of everyday scenes across different social locations in the city, he documents the often slow, difficult work of picking up the pieces of one's life and moving them around—and the worlds that fade and the ones that become visible in the process. He shares the stories of a disillusioned anarchist organizer, an exhausted nurse helping a father search for his lost daughter, a misunderstood Romani man rejected by his friends and family, and an undocumented migrant who discovers hope in the trash—stories of individuals finding solace and possibility within, with, and against the tragedies of their lives. Alexandrakis shows how these stories lead to a potentially transformative coming to resilience. In Radical Resilience, Alexandrakis traces the bare edges of radical possibility from within the efforts of those continuing on beyond their limits. Othon Alexandrakis is Associate Professor of Anthropology at York University. He is the editor of Impulse to Act. Alize Arıcan is an anthropologist whose research focuses on urban renewal, futurity, care, and migration in Istanbul, Turkey. Her work has been featured in Current Anthropology, City & Society, JOTSA, Radical Housing Journal, and entanglements. You can find her on Twitter @alizearican Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Urban Studies
Othon Alexandrakis, "Radical Resilience: Athenian Topographies of Precarity and Possibility" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in Urban Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 59:29


Radical Resilience: Athenian Topographies of Precarity and Possibility (Cornell UP, 2022) relates narratives of Athenians struggling to survive the impoverishment of relentless austerity measures, compounding emergencies, and human disasters of successive national crises in Greece since 2010.  Drawing on eight years of fieldwork, Othon Alexandrakis examines the effects of injury, erosion, and upheaval on individuals already pushed beyond their limits but holding on against all odds. Through analysis of everyday scenes across different social locations in the city, he documents the often slow, difficult work of picking up the pieces of one's life and moving them around—and the worlds that fade and the ones that become visible in the process. He shares the stories of a disillusioned anarchist organizer, an exhausted nurse helping a father search for his lost daughter, a misunderstood Romani man rejected by his friends and family, and an undocumented migrant who discovers hope in the trash—stories of individuals finding solace and possibility within, with, and against the tragedies of their lives. Alexandrakis shows how these stories lead to a potentially transformative coming to resilience. In Radical Resilience, Alexandrakis traces the bare edges of radical possibility from within the efforts of those continuing on beyond their limits. Othon Alexandrakis is Associate Professor of Anthropology at York University. He is the editor of Impulse to Act. Alize Arıcan is an anthropologist whose research focuses on urban renewal, futurity, care, and migration in Istanbul, Turkey. Her work has been featured in Current Anthropology, City & Society, JOTSA, Radical Housing Journal, and entanglements. You can find her on Twitter @alizearican Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Anthropology
Othon Alexandrakis, "Radical Resilience: Athenian Topographies of Precarity and Possibility" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 59:29


Radical Resilience: Athenian Topographies of Precarity and Possibility (Cornell UP, 2022) relates narratives of Athenians struggling to survive the impoverishment of relentless austerity measures, compounding emergencies, and human disasters of successive national crises in Greece since 2010.  Drawing on eight years of fieldwork, Othon Alexandrakis examines the effects of injury, erosion, and upheaval on individuals already pushed beyond their limits but holding on against all odds. Through analysis of everyday scenes across different social locations in the city, he documents the often slow, difficult work of picking up the pieces of one's life and moving them around—and the worlds that fade and the ones that become visible in the process. He shares the stories of a disillusioned anarchist organizer, an exhausted nurse helping a father search for his lost daughter, a misunderstood Romani man rejected by his friends and family, and an undocumented migrant who discovers hope in the trash—stories of individuals finding solace and possibility within, with, and against the tragedies of their lives. Alexandrakis shows how these stories lead to a potentially transformative coming to resilience. In Radical Resilience, Alexandrakis traces the bare edges of radical possibility from within the efforts of those continuing on beyond their limits. Othon Alexandrakis is Associate Professor of Anthropology at York University. He is the editor of Impulse to Act. Alize Arıcan is an anthropologist whose research focuses on urban renewal, futurity, care, and migration in Istanbul, Turkey. Her work has been featured in Current Anthropology, City & Society, JOTSA, Radical Housing Journal, and entanglements. You can find her on Twitter @alizearican Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

New Books Network
Othon Alexandrakis, "Radical Resilience: Athenian Topographies of Precarity and Possibility" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 59:29


Radical Resilience: Athenian Topographies of Precarity and Possibility (Cornell UP, 2022) relates narratives of Athenians struggling to survive the impoverishment of relentless austerity measures, compounding emergencies, and human disasters of successive national crises in Greece since 2010.  Drawing on eight years of fieldwork, Othon Alexandrakis examines the effects of injury, erosion, and upheaval on individuals already pushed beyond their limits but holding on against all odds. Through analysis of everyday scenes across different social locations in the city, he documents the often slow, difficult work of picking up the pieces of one's life and moving them around—and the worlds that fade and the ones that become visible in the process. He shares the stories of a disillusioned anarchist organizer, an exhausted nurse helping a father search for his lost daughter, a misunderstood Romani man rejected by his friends and family, and an undocumented migrant who discovers hope in the trash—stories of individuals finding solace and possibility within, with, and against the tragedies of their lives. Alexandrakis shows how these stories lead to a potentially transformative coming to resilience. In Radical Resilience, Alexandrakis traces the bare edges of radical possibility from within the efforts of those continuing on beyond their limits. Othon Alexandrakis is Associate Professor of Anthropology at York University. He is the editor of Impulse to Act. Alize Arıcan is an anthropologist whose research focuses on urban renewal, futurity, care, and migration in Istanbul, Turkey. Her work has been featured in Current Anthropology, City & Society, JOTSA, Radical Housing Journal, and entanglements. You can find her on Twitter @alizearican Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Casting Through Ancient Greece
Interview: The Athenian Experience of War with Dr Owen Rees

Casting Through Ancient Greece

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 107:15


Dr Owen Rees is Associate Lecturer in Ancient History at Manchester Metropolitan University, where he specialises in the transition of soldiers from civilian life to the battlefield and back again. His books on the topic of ancient Greek warfare include Great Battles of the Classical Greek World (Pen & Sword, 2016); Great Naval Battles of the Ancient Greek World (Pen & Sword, 2018); and Military Departures, Homecomings, and Death in Classical Athens: Hoplite Transitions (Bloomsbury Academic, 2022).He is also the founder and lead editor of the website BadAncient.com, which brings together a growing network of specialists to fact-check common claims made about the ancient world and expose the prevalent pseudohistory in the modern day.In this episode I sit down with Dr Owen Rees to focus on his newest scholarly work, Military Departures, Homecomings and death in Classical Athens. Although we are looking at the Athenian experience of war in the Classical Age, the unfolding events of particular battles will not be our focus here. Rather we will be looking at the often overlooked elements surrounding the campaigns that would embarked on. We will be more concerned with the experiences around preparing to leave for war in what would form departure scenes, this looking different to the various parts of society. This will also see us turning to the aftermath of a war or campaign in how the homecoming was also experienced by these elements of society. With wars also comes death and Dr Rees will also take us through how the Athenian War dead were treated where they would receive their own form of homecoming. We also look to how the individual hoplites experience of war may affect them through trauma or more commonly known to us today as PTSD. We view this topic through the competing theories that ask whether ancient soldiers also suffered this disorder as spoilers to today. Though, to begin our talk today I spend a little time getting to know Dr Rees, his background and motivations before we then engage in a little general historical conversation. After this we then draw our focus to the main subject for our talk and spend well over an hour looking at the research behind Military Departures, Homecomings and death in Classical Athens.Links for Dr Owen Rees:Owen Rees Website Bad Ancient Twitter Books:Great Naval Battles of the Ancient Greek World Great Battles of the Classical Greek World Military Departures, Homecomings and Death in Classical Athens Support the show

Montessori Education with Jesse McCarthy
The Scientist, The Mountaineer, The Athenian (and La Casa)

Montessori Education with Jesse McCarthy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 22:46


Two examples of when things didn't go so well with children, and one when they did. (And a secret.)

The 50/50 Podcast
Ep. 49, Leland Hammonds: Technical Director, San Antonio Athenians Soccer Club

The 50/50 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 78:38


"The Professor," Leland Hammonds, Technical Director of San Antonio Athenians SC joins Founder & Host, Hector Cano for this special episode. A semi-pro organization that competes in the United Women's Soccer (UWS) League, we discuss the Athenian's preparation for a return to trip to the National Championship tournament and their upcoming semifinal match versus the Chicago Mustangs. Regarded as a highly respected and consistent national power, we take an inside look into the Athenian's development program and the contributing factors to their success. We also examine their newly created Athenians Next program and their future plans for player development, as well as their focus on being a champion for women's soccer and community support. An episode loaded with tons of great information...Don't miss this exciting episode!    [Originally Recorded 7-19-2022]

Ironside Podcast
Ep. 56 - Redemption with the Athenian Stranger

Ironside Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 85:13


My friend and returning guest Athenian Stranger joins us again to discuss how to get the most out of the gym, combating weakness, and going through hard times. We discuss Samson, passive aggression, and many of the problems plaguing society. We open with an excerpt from the Sagas of the Icelanders and talk about scripture and strength. Follow him on Twitter @athens_stranger for much more wisdom and inspiration.

Listen, Organize, Act! Organizing & Democratic Politics
S2.E1: Thucydides and the Athenian-Melian Dialog

Listen, Organize, Act! Organizing & Democratic Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 75:12


With Jed Atkins, I discuss Thucydides understanding of politics, how he has shaped the history of political thought, and the context for him writing "The History of the Peloponnesian War." We then focus on a passage from "The History" known as the Athenian-Melian dialog, reflecting together on the ways this dialogue frames the relationship between power and politics. In the second part, I discuss with Anna Eng why the dialogue is drawn on by community organizers to teach democratic politics and how she uses the dialog in trainings.Guests:Jed Atkins is the E. Blake Byrne Associate Professor of Classical Studies and Associate Professor of Political Science and Philosophy at Duke University. He is chair of the Classical Studies Department and Faculty Director of Transformative Ideas and the Civil Discourse Project in the Kenan Institute of Ethics. A scholar of Greek, Roman, and early Christian political theory, he is the author of “Cicero on Politics” and the “Limits of Reason; Roman Political Thought;” and (with Thomas Bénatouïl) editor of “The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy.”Anna Eng is the lead organizer of Nevadans for the Common Good, an affiliate of the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF). Originally from Portland, Oregon, she has organized for over 20 years in California, Texas and Nevada. 

History with Cy
The Peloponnesian War - PART III: Revolt of Mytilene, Fate of Plataea, Civil War in Corcyra and more

History with Cy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 26:37


In this third installment of the Peloponnesian War podcast, we take a look at life after Pericles and the years 428 and 427 BC.  Leaders of Mytilene's oligarchy have decided that now is the time to leave the Athenian-led alliance.  The conflict in Plataea also finally comes to an end while another bloody civil conflict between factions in Corcyra gets out of hand and shocks the Greek world.  At the end of it, the Athenians head west to see if they can exert their influence in southern Italy and Sicily.  The war is really heading up and who knows where the fires will spread to next! In this third installment of the Peloponnesian War podcast, we take a look at life after Pericles and the years 428 and 427 BC.  Leaders of Mytilene's oligarchy have decided that now is the time to leave the Athenian-led alliance.  The conflict in Plataea also finally comes to an end while another bloody civil conflict between factions in Corcyra gets out of hand and shocks the Greek world.  At the end of it, the Athenians head west to see if they can exert their influence in southern Italy and Sicily.  The war is really heading up and who knows where the fires will spread to next! Contents:00:00 Introduction01:10 Revolt of Mytilene06:25 Judgement of Mytilene: Cleon vs. Diodotus 13:41 The Fate of Plataea16:07 Civil War in Corcyra22:05 Sicily and Syracuse25:43 Thank You and PatronsSupport the show

Developing Leadership
Episode 23 | What Motivates Engineering Leaders?

Developing Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 32:49


Jason and Eiso explore what motivates engineering leaders. They chat about how engineering value creation differs from other functions, what role ego plays as a motivating factor, engineering leadership role models, and more. Deep dive into the topics discussed in this episode at go.developingleadership.co/ep23 Join the discussion and follow us on twitter @ devleadership_ Developing Leadership is a podcast presented by Athenian. We are introducing the world of engineering to metrics and data that improve processes and help teams. If you want to learn more about data-enabled engineering, go to athenian.com

Let's Talk About Myths, Baby! A Greek & Roman Mythology Podcast
CLXXI: Mythology Meets History, Theseus as an Athenian Politician & Generally Awful Guy

Let's Talk About Myths, Baby! A Greek & Roman Mythology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 40:53


That's right, we're returning to the story of Theseus because there is still more to that oh-so-problematic man! The myths of Theseus are uniquely Athenian, means of tying mythological heroes with Athenian might and the larger mythological history of Homeric tradition. (Begs the question, why did they have stories of him being quite so messy?!)CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing.Sources: Plutarch's Life of Theseus; Early Greek Myths by Timothy Gantz.Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Quotomania
Quotomania 282: Philostratus, the Athenian

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Flavius Philostratus, (born AD 170—died c.245) was a Greek writer of Roman imperial times who studied at Athens and some time after AD 202 entered the circle of the philosophical Syrian empress of Rome, Julia Domna. On her death he settled in Tyre.Philostratus's works include Gymnastikos, a treatise dealing with athletic training; Ērōïkos(“Hero”), a dialogue on the significance of various heroes of the Trojan War; Epistolai erōtikai(“Erotic Epistles”), one of which was the inspiration for the English poet Ben Jonson's To Celia(“Drink to me only with thine eyes”); and two sets of descriptions (ekphraseis) of paintings of mythological scenes, attributed to two men named Philostratus, possibly the well-known figure and his grandson. Flavius Philostratus's Bioi sophistōn (Lives of the Sophists) treats both the Sophists of the 5th century BC and the later philosophers and rhetoricians of the Second Sophistic, a name coined by Philostratus to describe the art of declamation in Greek as practiced in the Roman Empire from the time of Nero (AD 54–68) to Philostratus's own day.Philostratus's work on the life of the Pythagorean philosopher Apollonius of Tyana (1st century AD), which was commissioned by Julia Domna, is revealing of religious attitudes in a transitional period. His idealized portrait of Apollonius as an ascetic miracle worker was taken up with enthusiasm by the pagan elites of the next centuries—when Christianity had become of political significance—as a counter figure to the Christian Jesus. In Philostratus's moderately Atticizing prose (i.e., aspiring to the Classical style of 5th-century-BC Athens and opposed to the florid and bombastic style of Greek associated especially with Asia Minor), formal elegance was a way to give new significance and validity to the traditional cultural heritage of the pagan Greek world.From https://www.britannica.com/biography/Flavius-Philostratus. For more information about Philostratus, the Athenian:“The Life of Apollonius of Tyana”: https://www.loebclassics.com/view/LCL017/2005/volume.xml“Life of Apollonius 8”: https://www.livius.org/sources/content/philostratus-life-of-apollonius/philostratus-life-of-apollonius-8.7.vi-x/Lives of the Sophists: https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674991491

Let's Talk About Myths, Baby! A Greek & Roman Mythology Podcast
Conversations: Textual Ghosts, The Intersection of Athenian Autochthony and Disability, w/ Justin Lorenzo Biggi

Let's Talk About Myths, Baby! A Greek & Roman Mythology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 71:07


Liv speaks with Justin Lorenzo Biggi who studies Athenian citizenship, autochthony, and how both intersect with disability in ancient Athens. It turns out Autochthony isn't just about being born of the snakey-legged early peoples of Athenian mythology...CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing.Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Syrtos
Meet us on the dance floor: Getting to know Rania and Mike

Syrtos

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 112:30


Rania Samartzis- born in NYC, moved to Athens, Greece until I was 8 yo, then moved to Port Richey, FL and currently living in Palm Harbor,FL. My mom is from Kastoria (Macedonia) and my dad is Athenian (his mom from Smyrna & his dad from Thiva). 
I started dancing when i was in school in Greece as part of the school curriculum, then when we moved to Florida with my family, i joined the local church dance group with my brother. As my brother went into college, the group did not have a college dance group so he ventured out to the next local dance group - in tarpon Springs.. Levendia! I joined him shortly after. I have been a part of Levendia (of the St. Nicholas Dance Ministry) for about 15 years now. This year teach the middle/high school group along with Mike. I've taught the High School/College groups for several years and this year I also help with the adult group with Maria Kouskoutis as the main instructor. Nomikos “Mike” Kambourakis 
Born in Kalymnos, Greece - raised in Tarpon Springs, FL! Greek folklore has been a part of my life since I was a baby. My great grandfather Nikitas Tsimouris played the Tsampouna and would play all the time accompanied by his wife (my great yiayia) Nomiki and his 4 sisters singing at the house. I started dancing with Levendia in the first grade and was hooked since as it “ran through my veins” and ive been dancing since. This year I am teaching the middle/high school group of the St. Nicholas Dance ministry. Music courtesy of Panayotis League

The Partial Historians
Special Episode – Ancient Athenian Women with Associate Professor Rebecca Futo Kennedy

The Partial Historians

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 69:09


What was life like for women in ancient Athens? In this episode we explore the lives of women with Associate Professor Rebecca Futo Kennedy!

Developing Leadership
Episode 22 | Untangling & Optimizing Your Software Engineering Cycles, with Charity Majors

Developing Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 36:05


Charity Majors, co-founder, and CTO of honeycomb.io, joins us to talk about everything that's wrong with engineering cycles, how throwing money at the problem by hiring more people is making it worse, and what we can do about it. Find out: How to create systems that increase software engineering productivity, Which toolsets can enable shorter feedback loops, How elite teams have figured it out, How infrastructure engineering is key to all of this and more! Deep dive into the topics discussed in this episode at go.developingleadership.co/ep22 Join the discussion and follow us on twitter @ devleadership_ Developing Leadership is a podcast presented by Athenian. We are introducing the world of engineering to metrics and data that improve processes and help teams. If you want to learn more about data-enabled engineering, go to athenian.com

Casting Through Ancient Greece
54: Clash at the Eurymedon

Casting Through Ancient Greece

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 38:42


The Delian League had been campaigning in and around the Aegean for the best part of ten years. Thucydides had given us the picture of Athenian growth in power during this period with the league focusing less and less on the Persian threat and looking to police Greeks in the region before then having to turn to their own members looking to leave the league.During this period the Persian Empire was also continuing with their policies within their lands, though mostly out of the view of the Greeks. For this reason, we have no narrative accounts of what was taking place, just small pieces of evidence suggesting likely activities. These would range from further campaigning on their boarders, expanding their lands; put down possible revolts and engaging in great construction projects at their capitols.Although, it had appeared that the Persian threat in the Aegean had died down as the 470's progressed, just over ten years after the battles of Mycale and Plataea, there would be a renewed effort. The Persian had begun assembling naval and land forces in southern Anatolia to prepare for what appeared to be another campaign directed at the Greeks.Cimon would receive word of the Persian build up and direct the leagues attention towards southern Anatolia as the campaigning season came on. A naval battle would take place at the opening of the Eurymedon River, then the Greeks would fight a land battle to follow up their victory at sea. There is also the possibility that a second naval engagement followed these two battles against a reinforcing force. The battle of the Eurymedon would effectively end any future Persian attempts at launching an offensive directed at Greek lands.Support the show

Young Heretics
Ep. 110: The Cave

Young Heretics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 70:03


Plato's cave is one of the most famous metaphors ever. But what does it really mean? At long last, this Young Heretics series on the Republic has gotten us far enough to understand what Plato is saying about Athenian society—and our own—in book 7. Plus: how do you find your purpose in life? BIG ANNOUNCEMENT: Pre-order your copy of Spencer Klavan's new book, "How to Save the West: Ancient Wisdom for 5 Modern Crises" today: https://www.amazon.com/How-Save-West-Ancient-Wisdom/dp/1684513456 -- Public Goods is the one stop shop for sustainable, high quality everyday essentials made from clean ingredients. Receive $15 off your first Public Goods order at https://publicgoods.com/HERETICS. -- Truebill is the new app that helps you identify and stop paying for subscriptions you don't need, want, or simply forgot about. Save thousands of dollars a year: https://truebill.com/heretics. -- Bambee is an HR platform built for small businesses. Automate the most important HR practices and get your own dedicated HR Manager. Get your FREE HR audit right now at https://bambee.com/heretics. -- Diversify your savings and get up to $1,500 of free silver today with American Hartford Gold: text HERETICS to 6-5-5-3-2. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Greek Gods and Human Mythtakes
Aristophanes: Bird Eye Blind

Greek Gods and Human Mythtakes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 46:49


Dustin continue our retelling of the comedic genius Aristophanes', by retelling the comedy  "The Birds", which centers around an Athenian's hairbrained scheme to use birds to destroy the Olympians. This play was so good it was deemed ILL EAGLE. 

The Plutarch Podcast

Check out what I'm up to this summer and fall and see if you can learn some Greek and Latin with me.Full show notes available at https://plutarch.life/dionSeason 4 is brought to you by Hackett Publishing. Use coupon code PLUTARCH for 20% and free shipping in the US and Canada. Important PeopleDionysius I (the elder) - Tyrant of Syracuse taking power shortly after the Peloponnesian War and reigning until 367 BC. For some authors, he's the textbook tyrant in the way he held on to power, the fear that prevented him from trusting almost anyone (except his nephew Dion), and his cruelty. Though Plutarch doesn't mention it, this is the tyrant who shows up in stories like Damon and Pythias or The Sword of Damocles. Dionysius is called D-Prime in this podcast so that we don't confused him with his son or nephew. Dionysius II (the younger) - Less accomplished and intelligent than his father, Dionysius does manage to rule Syracuse not once, but twice. We'll see his comeback in Timoleon's story...Dion - The main character of our tale and one of Plato's best and brightest students. When he fails to convert either the elder or younger tyrant to philosophy, he finds himself exiled, stripped of most of his wealth, and finally discovers his wife has been ordered by the tyrant to marry another man. This means war and Dion takes it to Syracuse. Can he become the next philosopher-king? Will he instead train up a virtuous democracy to overthrow fifty years of tyranny? Tune in to find out!Plato - Yep. Plato was a real person who had a real life outside of his dialogues (in which he never makes himself a character). You'll want to check out Plato's Seventh Letter for another perspective on the events in this Life. If you haven't read this life, though, Plato's Seventh Letter will be a great deal more obscure. Philistus - An accomplished military mind banished by D-Prime but recalled by D-2, Philistus had taken up his pen in exile and written as a historian. As a political enemy and counterweight to Plato's influence on D-2, Plutarch has a lot of reason to hate this man. Heracleides - The perfidious but fun-loving rival as Dion tries to tame the tyrannical democracy. Heracleides would rather feed the beast and the tensions certainly mount as Dion fights not one tyrant, but two. Callippus - This perfidious Athenian doesn't seem important until the end... and then he's fatally important. Important PlacesCorinth - Mother city (metropolis, μητρόπολις) of Syracuse and prosperous city on the Peloponnesus. Syracuse - 5 major neighborhoodsOrtygia - The original island settled by the Corinthians who founded Syracuse. It still contained Achradina - The heights of the mainland settlement overlooking the ocean and the Neapolis region, famous for the stone quarries in which the Athenians died during the Peloponnesian Wars and after which Dionysius would use for political prisoners. Neapolis - the most recent addition to the city, North and West of Achradina and Ortygia, but enclosed by the fortifications D-Prime builtTyche - district of NeapolisEpipolae - high plateau in the Neapolis, included in the walls D-Prime builtKey Virtues + VicesCourage (ἀνδρεία - manliness, courage) - Dionysius I and Plato have a fight about what virtue consists in. Plato concedes that andreia is important but then proves publicly that tyrants are the least manly men. Aloofness - Dion struggles to win friends and influence people. Support the show

The Cost of Glory
Lysander 1: Death of Democracy

The Cost of Glory

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 70:29


A Spartan; first Greek honored as a god during his lifetime; destroyer of Athenian naval supremacy. In this episode: his rise to power, how he pulled off the greatest naval upset in Greek history, and WHY he did it. Characters:LysanderSocratesXenophonAlcibiadesPrince Cyrus the YoungerAgesilausKing AgisKallikratidasThe Mob Key Virtues:PatienceFlexibilityObedience Key Places:AthensSpartaEphesusDardanelles / Hellespont

Casting Through Ancient Greece
53: Debut of the Delian League

Casting Through Ancient Greece

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 37:34


The Delian league had now been established with the majority of its members coming from regions throughout the Aegean. In its inception they had all turned to a Greek city state on the mainland, that of Athens who headed the league. In 477 BC the league would now find itself in a position to begin campaigning for the first time, they would set out under the leadership of a relative new comer to the scene of Athenian politics, Cimon.Thucydides would give us a picture of how the league would evolve over its first decade in operation, as well as highlighting how Athens's power would grow. The league would first direct itself against Persian controlled regions on the Thracian coast, aligned with the objectives it had been created under. Though, it wouldn't be only the Persians that the Delian league would focus its attentions against. Other Greeks would find themselves becoming the target of the league's activities in the Aegean. These actions would be justified for a number of reasons, from eliminating piracy in the Aegean, to protecting the common strategic security through cohesion.As the years passed new challenges within the league would arise. With very little Persian activity in the Aegean league members would have been starting to wonder if the finical costs of supporting the league were in their interests anymore. One member Naxos would act on this and attempt to leave, but this risked seeing the league fall apart. Athens would see that they would remain a member through force. This was an ominous sign of the direction the league was heading in, though the Persian threat had not disappeared just yet. Support the show

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Father Serapion the Sindonite (5th c.)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 2:01


" 'Sindon' means 'linen cloth,' and this saint was called 'the Sindonite' because he covered his naked body only with a linen cloth. He carried the Gospels in his hand. Serapion lived like the birds, with no roof and no cares, moving from one place to another. He gave his linen cloth to a poor wretch who was shivering with cold, and himself remained completely naked. When someone asked him: 'Serapion, who made you naked?', he indicated the Gospels and said: 'This!' But, after that, he gave away the Gospels also for the money needed by a man who was being hounded to prison by a creditor in debt. [note: Gospel books were all hand-written, and were uncommon and valuable.] At one time in Athens, he did not eat for four days, having nothing, and began to cry out with hunger. When the Athenian philosophers asked him what he was shouting about, he replied: 'There were three to whom I was in debt: two have quietened down, but the third is still tormenting me. The first creditor is carnal lust, who has tormented me from my youth; the second is love of money, and the third is the stomach. The first two have left me alone, but the third one still torments me.' The philosophers gave him some gold to buy bread. He went to a baker, bought a single loaf, put down all the gold and went out. He went peacefully to the Lord in old age, in the 5th century." (Prologue)

History of Persia
72: The Ionian War

History of Persia

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 34:00


Despite their defeat in Sicily, the tales of Athenian demise in 413 BCE were greatly exaggerated. In 411, Athens and Sparta began to clash again and protracted tug-of-war in the Aegean even as Athens itself was seized by political upheavals. Intelligent Speech Conference 2022! Buy tickets with promo code Persia Sign Up For The History Buffs at TheHistoryBuffs.com/HistoryOfPersia Patreon | Support Page Twitter | Facebook | Instagram --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/history-of-perisa/support

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 84: Defending Tammy Faye, The First Space Hotel & A Very Bad Vegan

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 81:45


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Black Raven Pilsner from Black Raven Brewing in Redmond, WA that was left for her backstage in Seattle by some Washington Termites. She talks about her weekend in Portland OR and Seattle WA, excited to have hung out with her cousin Tom and had some time to drink beer at Kell's Irish Pub and eat her favorite clam chowder at Athenian in Pike Place Market. Kathleen then shares the details of her day at the Masters with her friend Ron White, applauding the egg salad recipe and Tiger's return to Augusta. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Masters branded barbeque potato chips, which she loves because they taste like Lays. She finishes her tasting with Cotton Candy Twinkies, which she will send directly to her mom since they taste like sweet fluorescent “pink.”QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen is thrilled to report that she will be going to Red Rocks to see Queen Stevie Nicks, and she's also seeing Tanya Tucker's concert at The Ryman in Nashville, which will celebrate the 50th year of the release of “Delta Dawn.” Kathleen is also excited to announce that Queen Dolly's Duncan Hines baking line has been released for purchase.DEFENDING TAMMY FAYE BAKKER: Kathleen tells the Termites about watching “The Eyes of Tammy Faye” which is about the 1970's rise of Tammy Faye and her husband Jim Bakker to create the world's largest religious broadcasting network and theme park. Kathleen defends Tammy Faye when discussing the scandals that Jim eventually served prison time for, stating that she truly believes that Tammy Faye wasn't aware of the details involved in the corruption.UPDATES: Kathleen gives updates on Mattress Mack's NCAA Basketball Final Four bet, and the firing of the Applebee's franchisee. BAD VEGAN: Kathleen reads an article outlining the story behind the Netflix docuseries “Bad Vegan,” which details the activities of Sarma Melngailis, the former owner of the NYC vegan restaurant Pure Food and Wine, and her relationship with fraudster Anthony Strangis that lead to the defrauding numerous investors and the restaurant's staff over the course of a few years.“HOLY SHIT THEY FOUND IT”: Kathleen is amazed to read about an extremely rare wooden Roman figure that was found in a Buckinghamshire ditch, and the discovery of a lost sun temple in Egypt that could be 4,500 years old. THE “CHILDREN” PROTEST RETURN TO THE OFFICE: Kathleen laughs out loud reading an article outlining the fight that Zoomer-aged Apple employees are having with CEO Tim Cook, refusing to return to the office after the pandemic, and are threatening to quit the company rather than comply with Cook's RTO plans. WELL-TRAVELLED FLAMINGOS: Kathleen reads an article about a pink Tanzanian flamingo that escaped from a zoo in Kansas in 2005 and was spotted again in Texas earlier this month. “Flamingo No.492 has been seen in various locations over the past 17 years.PARALYZED MAN WANTS A BEER: Kathleen laughs that she's found her spirit animal when reading an articleabout a totally-paralyzed man who was able to speak again thanks to a brain implant, a controversial study claims. The study claims that the man's first words were to ask for a beer and tell his son that he loved him. LAPSYS$ HACKING GROUP ARRESTED: Kathleen reads a release announcing that seven teens have been arrested for Lapsus$ hacks of global tech companies. SPACE HOTEL TO OPEN: Kathleen is excited to read that the World's first space hotel will open in 2027 with activities that you can't do on Earth. WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEK: Kathleen recommends watching “The Eyes of Tammy Faye” on Hulu, and “Trust No One: The Hunt For The Crypto King” on Netflix. SEE KATHLEEN LIVE: See Kathleen live on her “Do You Have Any Ranch?” Tour. Tickets available at kathleenmadigan.com/tour See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.