Podcasts about Friedrich Nietzsche

German philosopher

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Latest podcast episodes about Friedrich Nietzsche

Intelligent Design the Future
An Interview with I, Charles Darwin author Nickell John Romjue

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 10:28


On this ID the Future, host Joshua Youngkin interviews the author of I, Charles Darwin, Nickell John Romjue, about his unique book in which a time-traveling Charles Darwin returns to the modern day. What would happen if Charles Darwin were to come back today? I, Charles Darwin examines that issue scientifically and culturally. In this conversation, Romjue describes what drew him to the subject and some of the things he did to prepare for writing the novella. ID the Future ran his audio book as a five-part series. Part 1 is here. Part 2 is here. Part 3 is here. Part 4 is here. And Part 5 is here. To learn more and to purchase the book, visit www.icharlesdarwin.com. Source

Arts & Ideas
John Cowper Powys

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 54:04


With their casts of outsiders, deviants and miscreants, the novels of John Cowper Powys explore where meaning can be found in a world without God. Very often, the answer is in semi-mystical communion with nature and landscape. Heir of both Thomas Hardy and Friedrich Nietzsche, Powys was admired by contemporaries like Iris Murdoch, and anticipated lots of the concerns of ecocritical writers and thinkers of today. But few of his books are currently in print. To mark the 150th anniversary of his birth, Matthew Sweet discusses his life and writing with Margaret Drabble, John Gray, Iain Sinclair and Kevan Manwaring. Producer: Luke Mulhall

The Warrior Priest Podcast
0127: Midweek Debrief - Fortifying Mind & Body During Crises

The Warrior Priest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 76:29


“No longer to accept anything at all, no longer to take anything, no longer to absorb anything—to cease reacting altogether. This fatalism…can preserve life under the most perilous conditions by reducing the metabolism, slowing it down, as a kind of will to hibernate.” Friedrich Nietzsche, Ecce Homo --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/donavon-riley/support

Women at Halftime Podcast
178.Roundabout Purpose-Definition and Benefits

Women at Halftime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 20:07


The word purpose is used frequently, especially in self-help content. It is often used interchangeably with mission but there are distinctions between the two. Your mission is the overlying arc of what you do; the business. Your purpose is the unifying principle and answers the question, why? When you take the time to reflect upon your purpose (even if you aren't actively pursuing a business), you make an invaluable investment in yourself and in those who you can impact by executing your mission. While we've been taught that having a purpose is a good thing, what exactly is it? Purpose is the engine behind the decisive exit of your roundabout. Having a compelling purpose encapsulates what matters deeply to you. This purpose connects you with something greater than yourself. Here, we cover the definiton and benefits. Full article here: https://goalsforyourlife.com/blog/purpose-definition-benefits

Into the Absurd
#67: Royce Johnson (Twilight of the Idols - Education)

Into the Absurd

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 62:20


Mr. Royce Johnson returns to the ITA podcast to discuss Nietzsche's Twilight of the Idols, "What the Germans Lack", aphorisms 6 and 7 on education. Royce is an English teacher at Coeur d'Alene high school, and I attended his class in my senior year. His English class served as my formal introduction to higher level philosophy, which is interesting being that Friedrich Nietzsche started off as a philologist--someone who studies language. Prior to recording the podcast, Royce suggested that I read "On Language" by George Orwell, which is an interesting essay regarding doublespeak, euphemisms, etc. Sources: "Twilight of the Idols" by Friedrich Nietzsche, translated by R.J. Hollingdale

The BreakPoint Podcast
Losing Our Religion: Blue Laws Decline While Deaths of Despair Do Not

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 5:12 Very Popular


A mortal affliction affects much of America's heartland. Known as “deaths of despair,” both the Rust Belt and Appalachia have seen incredible spikes in rates of addiction, overdoses, violence, and suicide. In addition to the thousands who die each year by various forms of self-harm, thousands more live Gollum-like, trapped by their chemical chains and in loneliness.  It is a complex situation. While we must not diminish anyone's moral agency, the downward paths we are on are paved, lined, and greased by a number of contributing factors. For example, Beth Macy, the author of the book Dope Sick, has documented the lethal partnership of doctors and drug companies, not to mention the co-option of government oversight agencies, which inflicted a plague of highly addictive opioids on some of America's poorest areas of the country.   A new recent study, however, points to an additional complexity, an oft-ignored element of this cultural disease: the decline of religion. According to the study's authors, there is some correlation between the end of so-called “Blue Laws” and the opioid epidemic. In certain parts of the country, Blue Laws have long limited the range of activities allowed on Sundays. Certain businesses were not allowed to be open, and certain things (especially alcohol) could not be sold. Though these laws continue in certain areas, particularly in Europe, they began to disappear in parts of the United States as the 20th century wore on, to the point that now they are few and far between.  Of course, a significant, culture-wide phenomenon like the opioid crisis cannot be reduced to something as simplistic as whether or not people can shop on Sunday. To do that would be to mistake correlation for causation, kind of like saying murders go up with ice cream sales. And this is something the study's authors readily admit.   Rather than claiming that the end of Blue Laws created the opioid crisis, they use the end of Blue Laws as a marker to track the decline in American religiosity. The diminishing connections to faith in communities across the country, especially in those areas where they were once so strong, are among the factors that contributed to our nation's chemical plague. In other words, Blue Laws are a kind of canary in the coal mine, marking when we've crossed a dangerous line.  In light of these diminishing religious commitments, reinstating Blue Laws likely will not lead to a reversal in rates of addictions or other deaths of despair. Even if they were an important part of our cultural life of faith at one time, too much has changed for such an easy fix. However, what these laws represented and what has been lost as they disappear points to the underlying causes, not only of the opioid crisis but of many of our parallel pains as well.  What we need to ask is, in a mix of Friedrich Nietzsche and REM, what is the cost of losing our religion?  As much as we prize our individualism, particularly here in America, human beings aren't just dust motes of consciousness, floating on the air currents of life. We're connected, not just to one another, but to a host of other elements through relationships that give us meaning, identity, direction, and hope. To be healthy, as individuals and as communities, these relationships (upward, inward, outward, and downward) must be strong.  Human beings need a connection to something beyond ourselves, something higher and transcendent in order to find ourselves, to know who and what we are, to be sure of our identity. We need connections with one another, especially the links of family and friendship, in order to be accountable, supported, and complete. And, we need proper connection to the physical world around us, so to be tethered to reality through things like meaningful labor, a place to call home, and some part of the world to call “mine.”  Marx got it wrong. Religion isn't the opiate of the masses, but instead a part of life most needed, irreplaceable by technological convenience or scientific mastery. The loss of religion has been a bad idea wherever it has been tried, and those suffering across Appalachia and the Rust Belt are some of its most obvious victims. By abandoning religion, specifically the Christianity which once provided meaning to these now missing relationships, the essential connection between individuals and communities and a higher purpose has been lost.   As Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn said all the way back in 1983, “Men have forgotten God; that's why all this has happened.” Blue Laws didn't hold off the effects of substance abuse, but the religious impulse that such laws represented were part of a way of seeing life and the world, one in which we weren't just reduced to being cogs or animals or sexual expressions. The Christianity that the world has rejected offers the hope that the world so desperately needs. 

ERIC KIM
VIDEO PODCAST: LIVE BETA.

ERIC KIM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 5:28


Beta is better: AUDIO Think Beta What does it mean to 'live beta'? It means to prefer a life of instability and radical newness, even though it may be 'worse' and 'instable'. What this means The reason why this is such a radical notion: In modern day times, we all seek 'stability' for ourselves, our 'families', etc. Much of buying a home-- the notion of building 'stability' for your 'growing family'. But ... what if IN-STABILITY were in fact the superior route? That in order to extract the maximum out of life and existence that you MUST seek MAXIMAL instability and dynamism in your life? What would this mean? Beta Art Also the fun idea-- Then, your art is never final or perfect. Rather, the ongoing 'beta testing' of your artwork is in fact the goal. Beta lifestyle Also as a life thing: Seek the life of maximal change and instability. A 'digital nomad' lifestyle. Or a semi-nomadic one. A life full of travel, unexpectedness, foreign-ness, and learning new things, languages, peoples, cultures, etc. Don't seek final or the best Beta is often inferior to the more 'stable' release, or the public release. Yet, Beta is sexier, more interesting, more bleeding-edge. This is what we love as technologists. To always be on the bleeding-edge of things. Everything is beta-testing Also if we think about this as a lifestyle approach, it is fun: Every day is a new fun exciting chance and opportunity for you to test out something new! A new approach, a new thought, a new concept, etc/ No boundaries or barriers One thing I also like about the beta mindset is this: there is no right or wrong, everything is just testing. For example, when I observe Seneca engage with the world, he is just beta testing physics. He sees certain things and objects and interacts with it, and what he is trying to discover is how it reacts as response to him. There's no right or wrong here; he is simply testing physics, action and reaction, Action and effect. Anti-finality The problem with a lot of philosophers and thinkers is this: they seek a supreme final, immutable answer to everything. Even Stephen Hawking and his pursuit for “a theory of everything.” However, seeking an ultimate system, or being a systematizer is bad. Even our best friend Friedrich Nietzsche said “I distrust all systemizers.” Even one of his unfinished books, “The Will to Power”, he ultimately scrapped it at the end because he realized he was making an ultimate system. Why everyone loves waiting for the new iPhone In some ways, Apple and technology is the ultimate optimistic system; there will always be something new and fresh. Even a funny thought: One of the best reasons to keep living, is to simply be able to be alive and witness new innovations given birth. Also, one of the great reasons to be a photographer is that we are the ultimate synthesis and hybrid of technology and art. Consider, the camera is one of the most technological apparatus for creating art. And yes, us as photographers are artists. Therefore, as time goes on, new innovations will continue to be given birth which will make our lives as photographers happier, more productive, more creative, more artistic, more efficient, and lighter. Even the other day when I was shooting some street photography at the mall here in Phnom Penh, I was thinking to myself; “Wow, I wish I had a Ricoh GR 3 or Ricoh GR

MINDRAMP PODCAST - THE QUEST FOR QUALONGEVITY
MIND OVER MUDDLE - The Empress & Her Deputy

MINDRAMP PODCAST - THE QUEST FOR QUALONGEVITY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 13:55


We continue to explore how the two hemispheres of our brain influence us in different ways. In this episode I borrow a story from Iain McGilchrist who, in turn, borrowed it from Friedrich Nietzsche. McGilchrist uses his story - The Master and His Emissary - as the title for his book that first introduces his "hemisphere hypothesis." The two main characters in the story represent the Right Hemisphere (The Master) and the Left Hemisphere (The Emissary). It tells of their relationship and of the destruction of their realm that follow the Emissary's usurpation of leadership from the Master. I have taken the liberty to change the gender of the leader to a woman and to add some embellishments that I believe help illustrate McGilchrist's full thesis. The essence of his idea is that the two hemispheres have different ways of relating to the world. When they cooperate, under the guidance of the Right Hemisphere, things go well. But when the Left Hemisphere dominates - as it does in modern culture - our minds get muddled and the culture starts to unravel.  

Crónicas Lunares
Friedrich Nietzsche - Así habló Zaratustra. La sanguijuela

Crónicas Lunares

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 8:30


MARTIS DIES. En esta sección hablaremos de distintos temas que suelen ser existenciales y polémicos, así como podemos hablar de Enseñanzas Secretas, Tanatología, Sectas Coercitivas, Filosofía, Conspiraciones Mundiales, Religión y quizás algo de secciones sobre espiritualidad, de la forma como a nosotros nos ha enseñado las ciencias antiguas y que en la actualidad tienden a ser ocultas. Friedrich Nietzsche - Así habló Zaratustra. La sanguijuela --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/irving-sun/message

Ideology
The Abolition of the Telos - Rise & Triumph Part 2

Ideology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 45:19


In Episode 6 of Season 2, Mick and guest host Dr. Christina Crenshaw continue a review of Carl Trueman's Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self, exploring the ideas of the past three centuries that have been influential in shaping the cultural landscape of today, and specifically the contributions of Friedrich Nietzsche, Karl Marx, Charles Darwin, and Sigmund Freud - how their combined thoughts went a long way toward abolishing traditional notions of human essence and purpose. Connect with us at ideologypc@gmail.com // feel free to share, subscribe, rate, and/or comment Episode notes: (see notes from last episode)

Grace Anglican Formation
Scripture, the Self, and Society (Part 4)

Grace Anglican Formation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 43:30


Continuing his class on Scripture, the Self, and Society, Dr. Michael Nicholson looks at the work and legacy of Karl Marx and Friedrich Nietzsche, as well as the example of Oscar Wilde. When God is thought to be irrelevant, moral codes are deemed oppressive and a moral order becomes impossible to sustain. For Dr. Nicholson's slides, click HERE.

The 260 Journey
The Greatest Truth I Know

The 260 Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 5:10


Day 183 Today's Reading: 1 Thessalonians 1 Some time ago I was flying on a 10 p.m. flight. Earlier that day I'd preached four messages. I was exhausted. I noticed the man sitting next to me was reading Heaven Is for Real. This is good. He is a Christian, I thought. I can go to sleep because we are both going to heaven. He saw my Bible, which I'd pulled out to read, and began talking to me—a lot. Come to find out, he was part of a cult. I prayed the strangest prayer that flight: “God, I am so tired. Please don't use me. Find someone else. But I do ask that You don't let this kid die and go to hell.” I felt terrible praying that way, but I simply didn't have the energy to engage him in conversation. As disappointing as I know I must have been to God, the amazing thing is that I was still secure in God's love for me. His love did not decrease one ounce because of my poor tired attitude. He loved me exactly the same when I prayed that lame prayer as when I preached for Him. One of the saddest things that happens in Christianity is that we overemphasize what we do for God rather than what God has done for us. I used to think God loved me only when I was doing good. But 1 Thessalonians reminds me of the truth. Paul starts chapter 1 with a thunderbolt. In fact, I consider it the greatest truth I know, and it's all in verse 4: “My dear friends, God loves you” (CEV). God loves you! Those words change everything and cost everything. I came from a background in Christianity where the emphasis was on how much we love God and not on how much God loves us. In fact, I thought my actions determined how much God loves me. But there is not one thing you and I can do to make God love us any more than He does right now. We believe this in theory but we don't live this way. We think God loves us more when we are at our spiritual best. Here is good news: God loves us the same when we are at our worst on planes praying Don't use me prayers. William Coffin reminds us: “God's love doesn't seek value, it creates value. It is not because we have value that we are loved, but because we are loved that we have value.” Every religion in the world is based on what we do. The stars in those other religions is anyone who dies a martyr, carries a briefcase, rides a bike, or gives up years on the mission field. In Christianity, however, it's all about what God has done. One of my favorite authors, Brennan Manning, said: “My deepest awareness of myself is that I am deeply loved by Jesus Christ and I have done nothing to earn it or deserve it.” That's the scandal and that's the deal of the century. So if those words, God loves you, are difficult to accept, let me help you today. There is no greater place to deal with doubts of God's love than at the only place that settles the question—and that's at the cross. In the man Jesus, the invisible God became visible and audible. God can't not love us. The cross is the proof of His love—love that He demonstrated at Calvary. The well-known saying goes like this: I asked God how much He loves me, and He said this much. And He held His hands wide to his side and died for me. When you look at the cross, you see what price you are worth to God. God loves you just as you are and not as you should be. He died for you at your worst. He did not wait for you to change in order to die for you. Isn't it staggering to think you are worth the death of someone and most of all, God? That is what puts a large gulf between Christianity and other religions, such as Islam. Islam asks you to die for Allah, but Christianity has God dying for you. Brennan Manning tells an amazing story in Souvenirs of Solitude: More than a hundred years ago the atheist philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche reproached a group of Christians: “Yuck, you make me sick!” When their spokesman asked why, he answered, “Because you Redeemed don't look like you're redeemed. You're as fearful, guilt-ridden, anxious, confused, and adrift in an alien environment as I am. I'm allowed. I don't believe. I have nothing to hope for. But you people claim you have a Savior. Why don't you look like you are saved?” In Matthew 22 Jesus described the kingdom of God as a wedding feast. Do you really trust that you are going to a wedding feast that has already begun? Do you really believe that God loves you unconditionally and as you are? Are you committed to the idea that the nature of the world is to be a celebration? If you are, then in the words of Father John Powell, S. J., “Please notify your face.” You have something to be happy about: God loves you for who you are. Christianity is not a moral code but a love affair.

Audio Drama
THE MALTESER

Audio Drama

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 27:07


If your partner starts wearing black leather and reading Mein Kampt or  Le Marquis De Sade order yourself a stab proof vest before she finally reads Friedrich Nietzsche then tries to kill you. written for that chain smoking dipsomaniac girl who I will love till I die even though she nearly killed me to a bisexual bulimic catastrophe love always XXX --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/steven-richardson41/message

Crónicas Lunares
Friedrich Nietzsche - Así habló Zaratustra. Coloquio con los reyes

Crónicas Lunares

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 10:22


MARTIS DIES. En esta sección hablaremos de distintos temas que suelen ser existenciales y polémicos, así como podemos hablar de Enseñanzas Secretas, Tanatología, Sectas Coercitivas, Filosofía, Conspiraciones Mundiales, Religión y quizás algo de secciones sobre espiritualidad, de la forma como a nosotros nos ha enseñado las ciencias antiguas y que en la actualidad tienden a ser ocultas. Friedrich Nietzsche - Así habló Zaratustra. Coloquio con los reyes --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/irving-sun/message

Here to Help
Best of: A Conversation with Science Writer Annie Murphy Paul

Here to Help

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 49:21


Join us for a best of episode where Chris sits down with Annie Murphy Paul. Annie is an acclaimed science writer whose work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Scientific American, and The Best American Science Writing, among many other publications.Chris speaks with Paul about her latest book “The Extended Mind”, which tells the stories of scientists and artists, authors and inventors, leaders and entrepreneurs—Jackson Pollock, Charles Darwin, Jonas Salk, Friedrich Nietzsche, Watson and Crick, among others—who have mastered the art of thinking outside the brain. It also explains how every one of us can do the same, tapping the intelligence that exists beyond our heads—in our bodies, our surroundings, and our relationships.Hyams and Paul dive into how ‘experts' are people who have mastered the art of thinking outside the brain and what the “naked brain” is and how it is severely limited in what it can do. 

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma
Ep 294: Dance Dance For the Halva Waala

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 290:43


You can lose yourself in cinema -- and you can find yourself in it. Jai Arjun Singh and Subrat Mohanty join Amit Varma in episode 294 of The Seen and the Unseen to talk about the films in their lives, why we should watch old films, why we should watch new films, why Bollywood and Hollywood and other woods are all great, and why we live in a wonderful technicolor world. This episode is a celebration of cinema! (For full linked show notes, go to SeenUnseen.in.) Also check out: 1. Jai Arjun Singh on Twitter and Instagram. 2. Haal-Chaal Theek Thaak Hai -- Subrat Mohanty and Pavan Jha's podcast. 3. Jai Arjun Singh Lost It at the Movies -- Episode 230 of The Seen and the Unseen. 4. Jabberwock — Jai Arjun Singh's blog. 5. Jaane Bhi Do Yaaron: Seriously Funny Since 1983 — Jai Arjun Singh. 6. The World of Hrishikesh Mukherjee -- Jai Arjun Singh. 7. Popcorn Essayists: What Movies do to Writers -- Edited by Jai Arjun Singh. 8. The Golden Era -- Subrat Mohanty's YouTube playlist of 100 lesser-known songs from the golden era of Hindi film music (mostly 1935-65). 9. The Unseen Lata -- Subrat Mohanty's YouTube playlist of 54 lesser-heard songs from Lata Mangeshkar, from 1948 to 1976. 10. Old posts by Subrat Mohanty from the Passion For Cinema web archives. 11. Some Spotify playlists, courtesy Nishant Shah, from Haal-Chaal Theek Thaak Hai episodes: 1, 2, 3, 4. 12. Pavan Jha's YouTube channel. 13. The only 1980s Maltova Mum commercial I could locate from the 1980s. (Couldn't find Singer.) 14. Kashmir Ki Kali -- Shakti Samanta. 15. Mughal-E-Azam -- K Asif. 16. Khuda Nigehbaan Ho -- Song from Mughal-E-Azam, sung by Lata Mangeshkar, music by Naushad, lyrics by Shakeel Badayuni. 17. Cinema Paradiso -- Giuseppe Tornatore. 18. Phool Khile Hain Gulshan Gulshan -- talk show by Tabassum.  19. Old episodes of Phool Khile Hain Gulshan Gulshan with RD Burman, Deepti Naval, Anand Bakshi and Bhupinder. 20. The Indiana Jones and Superman franchises. 21. The Evil Dead -- Sam Raimi. 22. Sam Raimi, Wes Craven and John Carpenter. 23. The Fugitive and The Bodyguard. 24. The Unbearable Lightness of Being -- Milan Kundera. 25. The Antichrist -- Friedrich Nietzsche. 26. The 400 Blows -- Francois Truffaut. 27. Salò, or The 120 Days of Sodom -- Pier Paolo Pasolini. 28. Łódź Film School and Andrzej Wajda. 29. Do the Right Thing -- Spike Lee. 30. On Exactitude in Science (Wikipedia) -- Jorge Luis Borges. 31. Titus Andronicus -- William Shakespeare. 32. A Chess Story (previously published as The Royal Game) -- Stefan Zweig. 33. The World of Yesterday -- Stefan Zweig. 34. The Friday the 13th franchise. 35. Tracy and Hepburn -- Garson Kanin. 36. Bhimsen Joshi, Mallikarjun Mansur, Kumar Gandharva and Lata Mangeshkar on Spotify. 37. Vijay Anand, Guru Dutt, Raj Kapoor, Bimal Roy and Hrishikesh Mukherjee. 38. Guide -- Vijay Anand. 39. Kaagaz Ke Phool -- Guru Dutt. 40. Jean-Luc Godard and Federico Fellini. 41. Shankar–Jaikishan, Hasrat Jaipuri, Shailendra, Mukesh, KA Abbas, Ramanand Sagar and Kidar Sharma. 42. Aag, Satyam Shivam Sundaram, Awaara, Barsaat and Shree 420.43. Nargis and Nadira. 44. Mud Mud Ke Na Dekh -- Song from Shree 420, sung by Asha Bhosle and Manna Dey, music by Shankar-Jaikishan, lyrics by Shailendra. 45. Orson Welles. 46. Squid Game on Netflix. 47. The Immediate Experience -- Robert Warshow. 48. Dil Dhadakne Do, Luck by Chance and Gully Boy -- Zoya Akhtar. 49. Casablanca -- Michael Curtiz. 50. Yudh and Tridev -- Rajiv Rai. 51. Amit Varma's Twitter threads on the MAMI festival from 2018 and 2019. 52. The Art of Translation -- Episode 168 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Arunava Sinha). 53. Dead Poet's Society -- Peter Weir. 54. The desire to help, and the desire not to be helped — Roger Ebert's review of Goodbye Solo. 55. Pauline Kael on Amazon. 56. Dekalog — Krzysztof Kieślowski. (And Roger Ebert's essay on it.) 57. The Dead — John Huston. 58. In the Bedroom -- Todd Field. 59. Devdas (Sanjay Leela Bhansali) and Parineeta (Pradeep Sarkar). 60. Salman Rushdie, Arundhati Roy and Vikram Seth. 61. Raag Darbari (Hindi) (English) — Shrilal Shukla. 62. PG Wodehouse on Amazon and Wikipedia. 63. Films, Feminism, Paromita — Episode 155 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Paromita Vohra). 64. Dharmyug and Dharamvir Bharati. 65. Andha Yug (Hindi) (English) -- Dharamvir Bharati. 66. Suraj ka Satvaan Ghoda -- Dharamvir Bharati. 67. Gunahon Ka Devta — Dharamvir Bharati. 68. Sara Rai Inhales Literature — Episode 255 of The Seen and the Unseen. 69. The Life and Times of Mrinal Pande — Episode 263 of The Seen and the Unseen. 70. Anil Biswas, SD Burman, Chitragupt, Roshan, C Ramchandra and Madan Mohan. 71. Naushad and Aan. 72. Maan Mera Ehsan -- Song from Aan, sung by Mohammad Rafi, music by Naushad, lyrics by Shakeel Badayuni. 73. Sebastian D'Souza, Anthony Gonsalves, Ghulam Mohammed and Mohammed Shafi. 74. Khayyam and RD Burman. 75. The Long Tail -- Chris Anderson. 76. The Sound of Music -- Robert Wise. 77. Do-Re-Mi -- Song from The Sound of Music. 78. Giacomo Puccini and Giuseppe Verdi on Spotify. 79. Tosca -- Giacomo Puccini -- performed at Arena di Verona. 80. Dua Lipa, Olivia Rodrigo, Lizzo and Billie Eilish on Spotify. 81. About That Time -- Lizzo. 82. Renaissance -- Beyoncé. 83. Ae Dil Hai Mushkil -- Karan Johar. 84. Aar Paar, Geeta Dutt and Eminem. 85. Pet Shop Boys, Guns N' Roses, U2, REM and Stone Temple Pilots on Spotify. 86. Bob Dylan and Leonard Cohen. 87. How This Nobel Has Redefined Literature -- Amit Varma. 88. Mera Joota Hai Japani -- Song from Shree 420, sung by Mukesh, music by Shankar-Jaikishen, lyrics by Shailendra. 89. Sahir Ludhianvi and Majrooh Sultanpuri. 90. Do Bigha Zamin -- Bimal Roy. 91. Dharti Kahe Pukaar Ke -- Song from Do Bigha Zamin, sung by Manna Dey and Lata Mangeshkar, music by Salil Chowdhury, lyrics by Shailendra. 92. Varun Grover Is in the House -- Episode 292 of The Seen and the Unseen. 93. Mondegreen. 94. Tragedy -- Bee Gees. 95. Aap Jaisa Koi -- Song from Qurbani, sung by Nazia Hassan, music by Biddu Appaiah, lyrics by Masth Ali & Shashi Pritam. 96. Ek Akela Is Shaher Mein -- Song from Gharaonda, sung by Bhupinder Singh, music by Jaidev, lyrics by Gulzar. 97. Jonathan Haidt on Amazon. 98. Amar Akbar Anthony and Andrei Tarkovsky. 99. 2001: A Space Odyssey -- Stanley Kubrick. 100. Mirza Ghalib (and the show on him by Gulzar). 101. Roy Lichtenstein, Drowning Girl, Jackson Pollock, René Magritte, Pablo Picasso and the Pre-Raphaelites. 102. The Wire, Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul. 103. Christopher Nolan, Martin Scorcese, Quentin Tarantino, Coen Brothers and Preston Sturges. 104. Ball of Fire -- Howard Hawks. 105. The Lady Eve -- Preston Sturges. 106. Barbara Stanwyck and Lawrence Olivier. 107. Francis Ford Coppola, Brian De Palma and Alfred Hitchcock. 108. How to Read and Why -- Harold Bloom. 109. Malayankunju -- Sajimon Prabhakar. 110. Muqaddar Ka Sikandar -- Prakash Mehra. 111. Agatha Christie on Amazon and Wikipedia. 112. Nayak -- Satyajit Ray. 113. Prakash Mehra and Kader Khan. 114. Laawaris -- Prakash Mehra. 115. Don and Majboor. 116. Sample SSR conspiracy theory: He's alive! 117. David Cronenberg. 118. Masaan — Directed by Neeraj Ghaywan and written by Varun Grover. 119. Moonlight — Barry Jenkins. 120. Chacha Bhatija, Parvarish, Amar Akbar Anthony and Dharam Veer -- Manmohan Desai. 121. Man, Woman and Child -- Erich Segal. 122. Man, Woman and Child (1983 film) -- Dick Richards. 123. Masoom -- Shekhar Kapoor. 124. Shyam Benegal, Govind Nihalani, Mani Kaul, Kumar Shahani, Mrinal Sen and Robert Bresson. 125. Au Hasard Balthazar -- Robert Bresson. 126. Uski Roti -- Mani Kaul. 127. Narendra Shenoy and Mr Narendra Shenoy — Episode 250 of The Seen and the Unseen. 128. Calcutta 71 -- Mrinal Sen. 129. Ivan's Childhood, Solaris and Andrei Rublev -- Andrei Tarkovsky. 130. Stanislaw Lem on Amazon and Wikipedia. 131. Cahiers du Cinéma and Mayapuri. 132. Black Friday and Paanch -- Anurag Kashyap. 133. Navdeep Singh, Sudhir Mishra, Neeraj Ghaywan, Raj Kumar Gupta and Rajkumar Kohli. 134. Nagin and Nagina. 135. Jaani Dushman -- Rajkumar Kohli. 136. Three Colors: Blue -- Krzysztof Kieślowski. 137. Three Colors: Red -- Krzysztof Kieślowski. 138. Three Colors: White -- Krzysztof Kieślowski. 139. The Double Life of Veronique -- Krzysztof Kieślowski. 140. The legendary Babbar Subhash. 141. Dance Dance -- Babbar Subhash. 142. Aagaya Aagaya Halwa Wala -- Song from Dance Dance. 143. Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro -- Kundan Shah. 144. Leke Pehla Pehla Pyar -- Song from CID, sung by Shamshad Begum, Asha Bhosle and Mohammad Rafi., music by OP Nayyar, lyrics by Majrooh Sultanpuri. 145. Rote Hue Aate Hain Sab -- Song from Muqaddar Ka Sikandar, sung by Kishore Kumar, music by Kalyani-Anandji, lyrics by Anjaan. 146. Kai Baar Yun Bhi Dekha Hai -- Song from Rajnigandha, sung by Mukesh, music by Salil Chowdhury, lyrics by Yogesh. 147. Rim Jhim Gire Saawan -- Song from Manzil, sung by Lata Mangeshkar, music by RD Burman, lyrics by Yogesh. 148. Andrew Sarris and André Bazin. 149. Sergei Eisenstein and the Odessa Steps sequence. 150. Court — Chaitanya Tamhane. 151. Khosla Ka Ghosla, Oye Lucky! Lucky Oye!, Love Sex Aur Dhokha, Shanghai and Detective Byomkesh Bakshy! -- Dibakar Banerjee. 152. Jean Renoir. 153. Akira Kurosawa and Yasujirō Ozu. 154. Tokyo Story -- Yasujirō Ozu. 155. Rashomon -- Akira Kurosawa. 156. The 2012 Sight and Sound poll of the 100 Greatest Films of All Time. 157. Early Summer -- Yasujirō Ozu. 158. Make Way for Tomorrow -- Leo McCarey. 159. Citizen Kane -- Orson Welles. 160. Vertigo -- Alfred Hitchcock. 161. Setsuko Hara. 162. Sara Akash -- Basu Chatterjee. 163. Bhuvan Shome -- Mrinal Sen. 164. KK Mahajan. 165. One Cut of the Dead -- Shin'ichirō Ueda. 166. Unsane -- Steven Soderbergh. 167. Promising Young Woman -- Emerald Fennell. 168. Psycho -- Alfred Hitchcock. 169. Hitchcock's Films Revisited -- Robin Wood. 170. Picnic at Hanging Rock, Gallipoli, Witness, Dead Poet's Society and The Truman Show -- Peter Weir. 171. Buster Keaton and Charlie Chaplin. 172. John Ford and Girish Shahane. 173. Everything is Cinema -- Don Palathara. 174. Hi Mom! -- Brian De Palma. 175. Taxi Driver -- Martin Scorcese. 176. Joyful Mystery -- Don Palathara. 177. The Postman Always Rings Twice -- Tay Garnett. 178. Treasure of the Sierra Madre -- John Huston. 179. Noir's arc - notes on an excellent anthology -- Jai Arjun Singh. 180. Key Largo -- John Huston. 181. Gun Crazy -- Joseph H Lewis. 182. Sullivan's Travels -- Preston Sturges. 183. O Brother, Where Art Thou? -- Coen Brothers. 184. Winchester '73 and Bend of the River -- Anthony Mann. 185. Shaheed (1948) -- Ramesh Saigal, starring Dilip Kumar. 186. Andaz -- Mehboob Khan. 187. Duniya Na Mane -- V Shantaram. 188. Some Like it Hot and Ace in the Hole -- Billy Wilder. 189. Ernst Lubitsch and James Wong Howe. 190. Sweet Smell of Success -- Alexander Mackendrick. 191. Mere Apne -- Gulzar. 192. Haal Chaal Thik Thak Hai -- Song from Mere Apne, sung by Kishore Kumar and Mukesh, music by Salil Chowdhury, lyrics by Gulzar. 193. Mr Sampat -- SS Vasan. 194. Miss Malini -- Kothamangalam Subbu. 195. Mr. Sampath: The Printer Of Malgudi -- RK Narayan. 196. Achhe Din Aa Rahe Hain -- Song from Mr Sampat, sung by Shamshad Begum and ML Vasantakumari, music by Balkrishna Kalla, lyrics by Pandit Indra Chander. 197. Parakh -- Bimal Roy. 198. O Sajna Barkha Bahaar Aayee -- Song from Parakh, sung by Lata Mangeshkar, music by Salil Chowdhury, lyrics by Shailendra. 199. Oonche Log -- Phani Majumdar. 200. Major Chandrakanth -- K Balachander. 201. Jaag Dil-E-Deewana -- Song from Oonche Log, sung by Mohammad Rafi, music by Chitragupt, lyrics by Majrooh Sultanpuri. 202. Birendranath Sircar, RC Boral and Timir Baran. 203. PC Barua, Bimal Roy and KL Saigal. 204. Devdas (1936) -- PC Barua. 205. President -- Nitin Bose. 206. Ek Bangla Bane Nyara -- Song from President, sung by KL Saigal, music by RC Boral, lyrcs by Kidar Sharma. 207. Street Singer -- Phani Majumdar. 208. Babul Mora Naihar Chhooto Hi Jaye -- Song from Street Singer, sung by KL Saigal, music by RC Boral, lyrics by Nawab Wajid Ali Shah. 209. Wajid Ali Shah. 210. Shatranj Ke Khilari -- Satyajit Ray. 211. Duniya, Yeh Duniya, Toofan Mail-- Song from Jawab, sung by Kanan Devi, music by Kamal Dasgupta, lyrics by Pandit Madhur. 212. Rajnigandha -- Basu Chatterjee. 213. Rajnigandha/राजनीगंधा -- Mannu Bhandari. 214. The Conversation -- Francis Ford Coppola. 215. Deer Hunter -- Michael Cimino. 216. The Godfather -- Francis Ford Coppola. 217. The Godfather: Part 2 -- Francis Ford Coppola. 218. Sisters -- Brian De Palma. 219. Blow Out -- Brian De Palma. 220. Blowup -- Michelangelo Antonioni. 221. The Long Goodbye and Nashville -- Robert Altman. 222. The Missouri Breaks -- Arthur Penn. 223. The Last Picture Show, Paper Moon, What's Up, Doc? and Targets -- Peter Bogdanovich. 224. This is Orson Welles -- Orson Welles and Peter Bogdanovich. 225. Hitchcock -- Francois Truffaut. 226. Bringing Up Baby, His Girl Friday, The Big Sleep and To Have and Have Not  -- Howard Hawks. 227. The Big Sleep -- Raymond Chandler. 228. William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway on Amazon. 229. Johny Mera Naam and Jewel Thief -- Vijay Anand. 230. Sholay -- Ramesh Sippy. 231. Back to the Future -- Robert Zemeckis. 232. Mr India -- Shekhar Kapoor. 233. Rahul Rawail, JP Dutta, Mukul Anand and Rajiv Rai. 234. Hathyar and Ghulami -- JP Dutta. 235. Raat Bhat Jaam Se Jaam Takrayega -- Song from Tridev with galaxy of villains. 236. Naseeb -- Manmohan Desai. 237. Dan Dhanoa, Mahesh Anand, Dalip Tahil and Tej Sapru. 238. The Ramsay Brothers! 239. Don't Disturb the Dead: The Story of the Ramsay Brothers -- Shamya Dasgupta. 240. Do Gaz Zameen Ke Neeche -- Tulsi and Shyam Ramsay. 241. Veerana -- Ramsay Brothers. 242. Purana Mandir -- Ramsay Brothers. 243. Govinda! 244. Ilzaam -- Shibu Mitra. 245. I am a Street Dancer and Main Aaya Tere Liye from Ilzaam. 246. Jackie Brown and Pulp Fiction -- Quentin Tarantino. 247. Halloween -- John Carpenter. 248. A Nightmare on Elm Street -- Wes Craven. 249. Scream -- Wes Craven. 250. Terminator 2: Judgment Day -- James Cameron. 251. Mad Max: Fury Road -- George Miller. 252. Nicholas Cage and Keanu Reeves. 253. Wild at Heart -- David Lynch. 254. Red Rock West -- John Dahl. 255. The Last Seduction -- John Dahl. 256. Edward Norton in American History X and Rounders. 257. New Delhi Times -- Ramesh Sharma. 258. Drohkaal -- Govind Niahalani. 259. Gupt and Mohra by Rajiv Rai. 260. Sonam! 261. Wild -- Nicolette Krebitz. 262. Waves -- Trey Edward Shults. 263. Climax -- Gaspar Noé. 264. Mother! -- Darren Aronofsky. 265 Eho — Dren Zherka. 266. The Magic Mountain -- Thomas Mann. 267. Invisible Cities -- Italo Calvino. 268. Cosmicomics -- Itali Calvino. 269. If on a Winter's Night a Traveller -- Italo Calvino. 270. A House For Mr Biswas -- VS Naipaul. 271. A Bend in the River -- VS Naipaul. 272. Middlemarch -- George Eliot. 273. Mrs Dalloway -- Virginia Woolf. 274. To the Lighthouse -- Virginia Woolf. 275. Decline and Fall -- Evelyn Waugh. 276. Scoop -- Evelyn Waugh. 277. Brighton Rock -- Graham Greene. 278. Brighton Rock (1948 film) -- John Boulting. 279. Kingsley Amis and Martin Amis. 280. Lucky Jim -- Kingsley Amis. 281. The Siege Of Krishnapur -- JG Farrell. 282. Alfie -- Lewis Gilbert. 283. Get Carter -- Mike Hodges. 284. Blame it on Rio -- Stanley Donen. 285. Gangs of Wasseypur -- Anurag Kashyap. 286. Tamas -- Govind Nihalani. This episode is sponsored by Capital Mind. Check out their offerings here. Check out Amit's online course, The Art of Clear Writing. And subscribe to The India Uncut Newsletter. It's free! Episode art by Simahina, in a homage to Jackson Pollock.

music amazon netflix spotify movies success hollywood science house woman fall child song travel sound society fire heart night dead childhood singer cinema rio hole feminism quentin tarantino sight roses writers doc directed lighthouses lizzo edited john carpenter spike lee translation unseen right thing james cameron david lynch bedroom bollywood stanley kubrick sodom sam raimi alfred hitchcock hindi william shakespeare wes craven blows agatha christie orson welles travellers francis ford coppola bee gees judgment day amit verona cin coen brothers virginia woolf space odyssey steven soderbergh robert zemeckis roger ebert brian de palma george miller friedrich nietzsche mami akira kurosawa barry jenkins film school chris anderson disturb tulsi thomas mann john huston hepburn raymond chandler peter bogdanovich peter weir martin scorcese italo calvino graham greene howard hawks where art thou robert wise sierra madre george eliot stefan zweig andrei tarkovsky hanging rock michael cimino michael curtiz dance dance evelyn waugh stanley donen halva satyajit ray lata mangeshkar yogesh harold bloom mukesh karan johar ueda arthur penn greatest films have not robert bresson preston sturges gulzar pg wodehouse anurag kashyap john dahl dilip kumar mike hodges robin wood kishore kumar sanjay leela bhansali krzysztof kie zoya akhtar kingsley amis qurbani lewis gilbert asha bhosle wasseypur todd field rd burman vs naipaul amit varma joseph h lewis guru dutt vijay anand paromita paromita vohra varun grover garson kanin hrishikesh mukherjee ramesh sippy manmohan desai kundan shah
UndenEYEable Perception
UndenEYEable Perception Ep.89

UndenEYEable Perception

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 45:53


The Lomeli Brothers fresh off their fantasy draft drop their Steve Smith episode. From Renato's birth year; to a bee sting to a scorpion sting. Is vulnerability oversharing? Why do we hurt the people we live? Probe my Quote, "He who has a why to live, can bear with almost any how." - Friedrich Nietzsche 

Festival della Mente
Matteo Nucci - Movimento nel tempo: Platone e Nietzsche - Festival della Mente 2022

Festival della Mente

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 57:17


Secondo Platone, il tempo appartiene alla dimensione del divenire, mentre in quella dell'essere domina l'eternità. Solo nella dimensione del tempo è possibile il movimento. Ma come ci muoviamo nel tempo noi umani che abitiamo il divenire? Siamo abituati a immaginare il nostro percorso su una linea retta, dal passato al presente al futuro. Per gli antichi invece questo movimento era ciclico. Proprio come credeva un filosofo moderno: Friedrich Nietzsche. La formula famosa è «eterno ritorno dell'identico». Perché non esiste progresso e non ci avviamo, come vuole la visione cristiana, dalla creazione al giudizio finale, né come vuole la visione illuminista, verso il trionfo della ragione. D'altronde, solo vivendo ogni nostro attimo, con la consapevolezza dell'alternanza continua di vita e morte, ci è concesso di realizzare la nostra umanità.

Salud por la historia
El filósofo que aseguró que “Dios ha muerto”

Salud por la historia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 11:03


A sus 24 años, ya era un destacado profesor en una de las universidades más prestigiosas de Europa. Desarrolló premisas filosóficas como la idea del “superhombre” o la afirmación de que “Dios ha muerto”. Apolíneos y Dionisiacos, Andrés Kalawski y Paula Molina traen la historia de Friedrich Nietzsche, a 122 años de su muerte.

Thales' Well
On Nietzsche's Socialism with Robert Miner

Thales' Well

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 69:33


Friedrich Nietzsche is usually considered a staunch critic of socialism. My guest on this episode thinks this picture is a lot more complicated than we suspect. Professor Robert Miner suggests Nietzsche offers a very complex picture of what socialism entails, and we should consider Nietzsche as a critic and proponent of socialism. Robert Miner is a Professor of Philosophy at Baylor University. You can find a link to his university website here. Robert's article, which we based this discussion on, is called ‘‘ Nietzsche as Critic and Proponent of Socialism: A Reappraisal Based on Human, All Too Human'' and you can find it here. Robert has published a number of books on Nietzsche and other philosopher. You can buy his book on Nietzsche's The Gay Science here, and his book on Nietzsche and Montaigne here. If you would like to study with me you can find more information about our online education MAs in Philosophy here at Staffordshire University. You can find out more information on our MA in Continental Philosophy via this link. Or, join our MA in Philosophy of Nature, Information and Technology via this link. Find out more about me here.  September intakes F/T or January intakes P/T. You can listen to more free back content from the Thales' Well podcast on TuneIn Radio, Player Fm, Stitcher and Podbean. You can also download their apps to your smart phone and listen via there. You can also subscribe for free on iTunes. Please leave a nice review.

Encyclopedia Womannica
Muses: Lou Andreas-Salomé

Encyclopedia Womannica

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 5:01


Lou Andreas-Salomé (1861-1937) was an inspiration to some of Germany's most famous thinkers – including Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud. But she was also an intellectual, whose writings on sexual liberation and women's rights paved the way for generations of feminists.This month, we're talking about muses–women who were drivers of creativity and inspiration. Once again, we're proud to partner with Mercedes-Benz (whose famous namesake was inspired by a young muse named Mercedes). Tune in daily for stories of women whose lives inspired work that has shaped our culture.History classes can get a bad rap, and sometimes for good reason. When we were students, we couldn't help wondering... where were all the ladies at? Why were so many incredible stories missing from the typical curriculum? Enter, Womanica. On this Wonder Media Network podcast we explore the lives of inspiring women in history you may not know about, but definitely should.Every weekday, listeners explore the trials, tragedies, and triumphs of groundbreaking women throughout history who have dramatically shaped the world around us. In each 5 minute episode, we'll dive into the story behind one woman listeners may or may not know–but definitely should. These diverse women from across space and time are grouped into easily accessible and engaging monthly themes like Educators, Villains, Indigenous Storytellers, Activists, and many more.  Womanica is hosted by WMN co-founder and award-winning journalist Jenny Kaplan. The bite-sized episodes pack painstakingly researched content into fun, entertaining, and addictive daily adventures. Womanica was created by Liz Kaplan and Jenny Kaplan, executive produced by Jenny Kaplan, and produced by Liz Smith, Grace Lynch, Maddy Foley, Brittany Martinez, Edie Allard, Lindsey Kratochwill, Adesuwa Agbonile, Carmen Borca-Carrillo, Taylor Williamson, Ale Tejeda, Sara Schleede, and Alex Jhamb Burns. Special thanks to Shira Atkins. Original theme music composed by Miles Moran.We are offering free ad space on Wonder Media Network shows to organizations working towards social justice. For more information, please email Jenny at pod@wondermedianetwork.com.Follow Wonder Media Network:WebsiteInstagramTwitter

Let's THINK about it
The Path of Opposition (Failure as Transcendence)

Let's THINK about it

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 23:25


PART 1: the path for the 2 to become 1the 2 is 1, linked through exclusionin the last season of “peaky blinders” Tommy Shelby is a socialist forced into plotting with the fascists… In one scene he says people think of opposing sides as two end-points as if they are on separate tracks. But Tommy says he finds it to be a circle, where the two sides start diverging. As they escalate and become more extreme, separating distance, they begin to arch back toward each other, sweeping around the central axis, as if in an orbit. As they extend further they gravitate back to a shared commonality: the goal of revolution and change unites them, making them uneasy allies. It is as if, after fighting for so long the only people you understand or respect are the other extremists. One way to think about it is that you “bind yourself” to your opposition as tightly as your cause… In the process of rejection, you tie yourself to that thing. As Anthony DeMello says, the priests who come to talk to him can only talk about what they have given up: sex. And the prostitutes that talk to him only speak of God. So, whatever you forego is what you bind yourself to. Your choices of exclusion, the distance you feel from the thing, relate you even more closely to it. Today, if we look at the most extreme fringe on each side of the political spectrum, let's take the ultra-woke and the anti-woke, they appear to want opposite outcomes, yet on closer inspection, perhaps they are fighting for the same thing: According to David French, they both want an end to liberalism and pluralism. Which means they need dominance over the center. Not only do they share a battlefield, but the battle is to dictate behavioral norms.Upon closer inspection, we can see that both extremes stem from a contradictory ideology of the individual's rights. “I want this, or this is my right,” to which the other side responds, “no, that infringes on my rights.” To fight for your rights, you dictate the rights of others. French says both sides have legitimate grievances against the other, which they are unwilling to forego or forgive. And in this way, in this very basic dialectic, by mapping out the antagonism and tactics, and considering the meta-motivation, the two begin to appear as one bound together in a deadlocked dance: hurt and enraged opposites react to the moves and cues of the other, mimicry to maintain a stalemate, leading not to victory but to a perpetual divisive communion.  PART 2: The circle into the mobius strip 3 antagonistic motions: convergance, rotation, flipping sidesWhat we have looked at is a stalemate, where an impasse determines opposition or sets up and compounds antagonisms. Let's return to thinking about this dynamic in terms of geometry, or shapes: To start, let's look at the circle of the Ouroboros, the snake eating its tail. The snake's movement goes in one direction, with the swallowing creating an eternal movement. This is like an eternal cycle or wheel of time. But we have talked of oppositional sides, so the one point of intersection where the mouth gulps the tail only represents one point… we need another snake. We need the danger doubled to represent two antagonists. Tommy Shelby, once again from Peaky Blinders, suggests the opposing points move in opposite directions, starting in the south, branching apart from each other, only for their goals to align at the North pole despite their mutual disgust. But, that is not our deadlocked dance… that is relatively easy 2 becomes 1.How about if our savvy antagonists are both reacting to each other, rotating clockwise, always maintaining distance? In this movement, a type of reactivity maintains their separation and thus their identity: they can never bridge their difference because there is no intersection. What if each argument can be flipped so it becomes its mirror opposite? Not jumping across the circle, but somehow the point itself inverts to its opposite?  Can we use the circle, the topology of the argument, the battlefield if you will, to alter the antagonists? What if we take our two-dimensional repetitive, boring, deadlock dance on the circular path, and by twisting the path we flip each side into its opposite? The [[The Möbius Strip]] does this: It is a mathematical object, a one-sided surface that twists in space, a non-orientable topology. If you have ever looked at [[M.C. Escher]]'s art, you have likely seen one. The most popular image is a bunch of ants on what looks like a 3D infinity sign, some are walking clockwise yet not never encountering the ants walking counterclockwise even though it seems like they should.  What is unique is that in a purely flat 2D realm an object traveling on the outside of a Mobius Strip will move through this mathematical twist appearing on the inside: it will be flipped to become a mirror of itself. If it is right-handed, all of a sudden it will become left-handed. Right becomes left. And even in a 3D realm, the points would move from interior to exterior, creating dynamism instead of a boring, repetitive state. To bring this into context, Remember Herbert Marcuse's the one-dimensional man? This person is caught up in a totalizing system that reduces them, and any real rebellion or complexity is co-opted back into the system until the person has no substance left. They are essentially flattened, even their rebellions are reduced to slogans turned into cheap t-shirts or bumper stickers. In consideration of this, the points of antagonism in our society are likely reduced as well, making them easier to flip. In the last episode, step 64, Piccone would say they are “artificial negativity,” not real, and only staged simulations. As well, Marcuse's “repressive tolerance” points out the contradiction in forcing people to be tolerant. When the good is bad and the rebellion strengthens the hegemony, what do we do? Well, let's talk about these opposites, these antagonistic extremes that fundamentally can never agree… Individually, they are trying desperately to manifest their goals, to fully realize themselves. Just as you and I are. (or I assume we are.) On their path, they sweep outward to the furthermost point of differentiation to break free.  But, unfortunately, they are ultimately incapable of fully becoming. Don't worry, this isn't as sad as it seems: nothing can ever fully be itself. When you consider it, as many philosophers have, this transcendent self fully becoming has lots of problems before we even get into the foibles of subjectivity. First, everything is made up of subsets, and subparts with their own wills and prerogatives, so no definition could ever be complete. That is, no definition of fullness could take into account the sum of the parts to explain the complete self. (Lacan would even say that to be whole, you must include the “exception to the rule,” otherwise, it is not a complete definition, it is non-total, or non-all encompassing. )There is another reason no one can ever fully become: Zizek says everything has within it a fundamental failure that denies the harmonious nature of its parts. It's not only the broader system thwarting you while comprising you, but more importantly, your constitutive parts have been created to be in a fundamental contradictory deadlock. Take as a non-human example the state, as in the nation-state: it functions and still exists despite its deadlock… in fact, it seems to only exist because of the inherent contradictions in itself combat itself. Its becoming is precisely its embrace of its contradictions, its incompleteness: its totality is always caveated, contingent, and deferred, and yet always an immanent process of becoming without ever reaching it. Simply because it cannot be fully itself is not a reason to scrap it, we would never want it to become fully itself: total state domination, which is total stagnation. So, back to it: we have a Mobius strip, with two points racing around, reaching for extremes of difference, yet inevitably pulled back to the center, flipping over, changing polarity, and collapsing into each other: they fail to achieve their full becoming because of an inherent contradictory failure.We can say the path they are on is made to thwart them, that is the path of the Mobius Strip where the oppositions cross without ever coming into contact.Zizek calls this a crack, gap, or void because it is an insurmountable, unbridgeable opposition within us, and within the universe, that does not let us cross the horizon into transcendence. But he says this constitutive gap motivates our motion. That's right, our failure to become -our inherent flaw- drives us.  PART 3: Going Down to Get Through mining the ground, going through, donutsWith these Hegelian antagonisms or even Kantian antinomies, we are mapping the oppositions and the shape of their movement. This is brutally simplified, but here we go: For Kant, the idea was to point out how we could never perceive the really real world, the thing-in-itself, as it really was. But the goal for Hegel is to recognize these seemingly insurmountable polarities and in so doing sublate them to ascend up a spiral staircase of overcoming. This two-sided oppositional struggle is somehow considered ONE thing, one problem or category, to be overcome. But Zizek says not to think of this challenge as a “smooth becoming,” not as dialectics that you overcome, but rather we should think of them as “blocks and stoppages” that keep you from fully becoming. It is a never-ending battle, finding the two and sublating them to one, and in doing this repeatedly you may feel despair. A sort of [[sysiphean]] exhaustion. Last episode I brought up that if Hegel used donuts as a metaphor more people would consume his philosophy, so maybe it's my turn to take us back to donuts, but this time specifically the donut hole: this is the void through which we must pass… enough of this circular orbiting: let's go through.  What if, instead of Overcoming, which is pictured as upward motion tackling bigger and bigger antinomies, this kind of existential Donkey Kong where the levels get harder and harder, what if we consider becoming as mining? More like Dig-Dug with a pinch of Fight Club. This would be a more [[Friedrich Nietzsche]] downgoing. But, sure, we can throw in Hegel's notion of the ground as well, it's just going beyond the ground. In our down-going we encounter the ground, where each blockage stops us, requiring us to chip away. Once the two sides are far enough apart we have created new unity, a hole or void, that is an absence ringed by a circle. Perhaps we have allowed the problem to expand. Given what we know of antinomies, they are fighting to stay apart, to differentiate each other, and are spending vast amounts of energy in this attempt… as they widen from each other, the sides of our hole will expand, opening up. We know that gravity or entropy will inevitably lead to the circle collapsing because nature abhors a vacuum or void, but for the moment, the energies of the extremes have opened a way through. And as we go down, we move from shallow to deep, further isolating ourselves in the darkness of the unknown. This would take bravery, not the group think conformity of choosing sides; this expansion into the beyond breaks foundational blockages, it goes through the metaphysical ground, like a prison break. PART 4: The Knot (tying it up, 2 is not 2, failure as the path)José Ortega y Gasset and Heidegger sort of say, this is life: it is not actually a binary, and your battle of contradictions is to battle the artificial binary, the game. To do this is to live, and it is a heroic undertaking. We are constantly enticed back into the black-and-white game, but remember, this is a process that cannot be separated from the context and circumstances you are in. “I am I and my circumstance; and, if I do not save it, I do not save myself.” José Ortega y GassetLife and Reality are not things you can have for yourself unless you accord them to all others”Alan WattsNow, considering this, it is not the individual, upward overcoming we should be focused on. That is just another binary. We have a failure within us, we are built with contradictions inherent to us: that is the exception inside us that -in a bracketed sense, sort of odd way- makes us dynamically whole and offers us the path. Slavoj Žižek says that failure is the path through: the uniquely human trait is not our addition of language or intelligence, but our ability to embody the very failure of the universe: we are inscribed with the impossibility of transcendence, and in embracing the failure as satisfaction we move outside or, beyond, the subject/object relation Zizek brings up here the example of the difference between humans and apes, where an ape is presented with an object Beyond reach we'll give up and move on to something accessible, say a less attractive sexual partner, while I human will remain persistent and transfixed on the impossible object. He says this is why a person is hysterical: they pose ultimate happiness, delight, and ecstasy (jouissance) as an absolute, true goal. They make ultimate delight into unsatisfied desire. The very unsatisfaction with the goal is their joy. He says “such a subject is capable of relating to a term that is outside the limits of the game,” they support themself through their relationship to that which is “out-of-play”. By installing a point of impossibility as ultimate joy, you are hysterical, you are utterly human: our flaw is to find delight in the impossible, which is also our means to move beyond the binary oppositions that plague us. 

The Word on Fire Show - Catholic Faith and Culture
WOF 349: Understanding the Present Moment #4 (Michel Foucault)

The Word on Fire Show - Catholic Faith and Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 33:23 Very Popular


Friends, today on the “Word on Fire Show,” we conclude our series of discussions called “Understanding the Present Moment.” Brandon Vogt and I have examined four massively influential figures who together help explain our present moment, how we arrived at where we are today. The ideologies undergirding much of the unrest in our culture stem from these four thinkers: Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Michel Foucault. Once we understand these figures and their key ideas, we will recognize them everywhere and be prepared to engage today's challenges. In today's fourth and final discussion, we focus on Michel Foucault, perhaps the least known of the four but maybe the one with the greatest direct impact on the way many in our culture think today. A listener asks, how do we understand God as bring if he's both Father and Son? Links Two new Thomas Aquinas books! – Thomas Aquinas: Spiritual Master by Bishop Barron and Thomas Aquinas: Selected Commentaries on the New Testament edited by Jason Paone Bishop Barron discussion with Lex Fridman (Youtube) The Holy Hour: Meditations for Eucharistic Adoration edited by Matthew Becklo NOTE: Do you like this podcast? Become a patron and get some great perks for helping, like free books, bonus content, and more. Word on Fire is a non-profit ministry that depends on the support of our listeners…like you! So be part of this mission, and join us today!

Desde el jardín
Martín Hopenhayn y los 122 años sin Friedrich Nietzsche

Desde el jardín

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 33:01


Junto a Cristián Warnken, el filósofo, ensayista y aforista chileno hizo un breve repaso por la vida y obra de pensador alemán.

Sadler's Lectures
Martin Heidegger, Plato's Doctrine Of Truth - The History Of Metaphysics - Sadler's Lectures

Sadler's Lectures

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 15:17


This lecture discusses the 20th century philosopher, Martin Heidegger, and focuses on his essay "Plato's Doctrine of Truth" found in the book, Pathmarks Heidegger views Plato's shift in the understanding of the essence of truth - from unhiddenness to correctness - as setting western thought on the path of metaphysics and humanism. He also briefly discusses how Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Rene Descartes, and Friedrich Nietzsche figure into this history of western metaphysics, further developing additional conceptions of truth that remain within the trajectory originally established by Plato. To support my ongoing work, go to my Patreon site - www.patreon.com/sadler If you'd like to make a direct contribution, you can do so here - www.paypal.me/ReasonIO - or at BuyMeACoffee - www.buymeacoffee.com/A4quYdWoM You can find over 2000 philosophy videos in my main YouTube channel - www.youtube.com/user/gbisadler You can find the copy of the text I am using for this sequence on Heidegger's essay "Plato's Doctrine of Truth" in Martin Heidegger Pathmarks, available here - http://amzn.to/2AH5z0p

Leadership Lessons From The Great Books
Leadership Lessons From The Great Books #31 - Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for Everyone and No One by Friedrich Nietzsche

Leadership Lessons From The Great Books

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 66:08


Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for Everyone and No One by Friedrich Nietzsche (translated by Walter Kaufmann)--- Welcome and Introduction- 01:30 God is Dead! - 05:32 My First Thought Was, He Lied in Every Word - 10:30 The Last Man - 15:30 The Tragedy of the Last Man - 22:00 Creating a Theology of Morals Without God - 30:00 A Critique of the State - 44:57 Toward an Anti-Nietzschean Ideal - 56:00 Staying on the Path - 1:03:00  ---Music: Wagner - The Grand Seasons Vol II - Gotterdammerung - Starke scherte - Parts 1,2,3. Courtesy of MuseOpen.org.--- Pick up your copy of 12 Rules for Leaders: The Foundation of Intentional Leadership NOW on AMAZON! Check out the Leadership Lessons From the Great Books podcast reading list! --- Check out HSCT Publishing at: https://www.hsctpublishing.com/. Check out LeadingKeys at: https://www.leadingkeys.com/ Check out Leadership ToolBox at: https://leadershiptoolbox.us/ Contact HSCT for more information at 1-833-216-8296 to schedule a full DEMO of LeadingKeys with one of our team members. --- HSCT Publishing: https://www.hsctpublishing.com/. HSCT LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hsct/. HSCT YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJvVbIU_bSEflwYpd9lWXuA/. HSCT Twitter: https://twitter.com/hsctpublishing/. HSCT IG: https://www.instagram.com/hsctpublishing/. HSCT FB: https://www.facebook.com/HSCTPublishing/.

El ojo crítico
El ojo crítico - 'La consagración de la primavera' de Fernando Franco

El ojo crítico

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 54:21


Empezamos charlando con Fernando Franco sobre 'La consagración de la primavera', su nueva película, y con Valeria Sorolla que es una de sus protagonistas. Dejamos la primavera atrás para entrar al invierno de Friedrich Nietzsche con Use Lahoz y pasamos por los libros de la Biblioteca Nacional, que ahora pueden leerse en gran parte de forma gratuita. Terminamos sobre las tablas en la Feria de Teatro de Castilla y León con su director, Manuel González. Escuchar audio

PRay TeLL, Dr. Hash
1190 Other Nietzsche Quotes

PRay TeLL, Dr. Hash

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 2:52


il posto delle parole
Matteo Nucci "Festival della Mente"

il posto delle parole

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 22:19


Matteo Nucci"Festival della Mente"https://www.festivaldellamente.it/it/Venerdì 2 settembre 2022Movimento nello spazio: Omero e HemingwayNei più antichi esempi della nostra letteratura, i poemi omerici, la descrizione del movimento umano è dettagliata, minuziosa, riempie ogni pagina: Era che seduce Zeus; Achille che scopre la morte di Patroclo; Elena che siede accanto al marito ritrovato. Tutto è movimento nello spazio. Mentre il centro di questo movimento – l'anima dei protagonisti – è velato da un silenzio pieno di promessa. Identico è l'atteggiamento dello scrittore americano più imitato del Novecento: Ernest Hemingway. Nella sua rivoluzione stilistica, dai racconti più brevi fino al capolavoro Il vecchio e il mare, il movimento dei protagonisti domina, mentre il cuore del racconto è omesso. Proprio come Omero, Hemingway sa che solo così noi lettori potremo scoprire la forza che è nascosta nei gesti che ogni giorno, senza accorgercene, ripetiamo.https://www.vivaticket.com/it/ticket/5-matteo-nucci/186330Sabato 3 settembre 2022Movimento nel tempo: Platone e NietzscheSecondo Platone, il tempo appartiene alla dimensione del divenire, mentre in quella dell'essere domina l'eternità. Solo nella dimensione del tempo è possibile il movimento. Ma come ci muoviamo nel tempo noi umani che abitiamo il divenire? Siamo abituati a immaginare il nostro percorso su una linea retta, dal passato al presente al futuro. Per gli antichi invece questo movimento era ciclico. Proprio come credeva un filosofo moderno: Friedrich Nietzsche. La formula famosa è «eterno ritorno dell'identico». Perché non esiste progresso e non ci avviamo, come vuole la visione cristiana, dalla creazione al giudizio finale, né come vuole la visione illuminista, verso il trionfo della ragione. D'altronde, solo vivendo ogni nostro attimo, con la consapevolezza dell'alternanza continua di vita e morte, ci è concesso di realizzare la nostra umanità.https://www.vivaticket.com/it/Ticket/13-matteo-nucci/186333Domenica 4 settembre 2022Movimento nell'anima: Saffo e Kavafis«I confini dell'anima non li potrai mai trovare, per quanto tu percorra le sue vie, tanto profondo è il suo logos» scriveva Eraclito. Tuttavia, di quel logos – quella parola che misura e scava – forse solo i poeti possono sondare il mistero. L'esempio perfetto, nell'antichità, è quello di una donna dalla vita tormentata il cui nome brilla al di là dei tempi: Saffo. I versi dedicati agli amori vissuti o perduti gettano luce sui movimenti che attraversano la nostra anima come un respiro. Psychè del resto significa "soffio". È quello stesso soffio a percorrere i versi del più grande poeta in lingua greca del Novecento: Costantino Kavafis. Nelle sue liriche erotiche come in quelle storiche il viaggio ai confini dell'anima è costante. E il luogo in cui esso si arresta è una dimensione al di là dello spazio e del tempo. Perché solo nell'anima noi esseri umani mortali possiamo riscoprirci eterni.https://www.vivaticket.com/it/Ticket/23-matteo-nucci/186337Matteo Nucci è autore di romanzi, racconti, reportage e saggi. Con Ponte alle Grazie ha pubblicato i romanzi Sono comuni le cose degli amici (2009), e È giusto obbedire alla notte (2017), entrambi cinquina finalista del Premio Strega, oltre a Il toro non sbaglia mai (2011) e L'abisso di Eros (2018). Con Einaudi ha pubblicato la traduzione e cura del Simposio platonico (2009), e i due saggi narrativi Le lacrime degli eroi (2013) e Achille e Odisseo. La ferocia e l'inganno (2020). I racconti sono usciti in raccolte e riviste, mentre i reportage appaiono su il Venerdì di Repubblica e L'Espresso e vengono ripubblicati online da minima et moralia. Cura un sito di cultura taurina: www.uominietori.it. Per HarperCollins esce a settembre Sono difficili le cose belle. Matteo Nucci"Sono difficili le cose belle"Harper Collinshttps://www.harpercollins.it/Arianna ha dieci anni e da poco ha perso la nonna. Un dolore inspiegabile, inimmaginabile, che non riesce a capire e che non sa raccontare, ma la tiene sveglia di notte. In un pomeriggio come tanti, però, lungo la strada che la sta portando verso il Gianicolo, appare una macchina rossa. E dal finestrino, ecco il sorriso che Arianna conosce benissimo, assieme alla voce che credeva di aver dimenticato. Sua nonna è lì. È tornata per lei. Ha inizio un incredibile viaggio: nonna e nipote varcano la soglia di un parco familiare, che presto diventa un luogo incantato, capace di portarle in dimensioni lontane, fatte di memoria, immaginazione, sogno, amore. Ogni regola sembra sovvertita mentre, fra entusiasmi e paure, si apre un percorso che è diretto verso il passato, composto da ricordi familiari e personali, verso il presente miracoloso in cui nonna e nipote sono riunite come per magia, e verso il futuro, tutto da scrivere, di Arianna.Dopo avere raccontato con straordinaria bravura la filosofia e la mitologia greca, Matteo Nucci, al suo quarto romanzo, stupisce i lettori con questa meravigliosa novella fiabesca, nata come dono per le sue nipoti colpite dal lutto, e impreziosita da L'astuccio, un racconto contenuto nel libro come una “bonus track” in fondo a un album o un “pendant” accanto a un quadro, che, con forma e contenuto totalmente diversi, parla della stessa storia. Sono difficili le cose belle è un romanzo commovente, profondo, che ricorda certi classici “filosofici” amati dai lettori di ogni età, da Il Piccolo Principe a Storia di una gabbianella e del gatto che le insegnò a volare, e che fa pensare e sa sciogliere il dolore del cuore grazie all'amore che non muore mai per i nostri cari.IL POSTO DELLE PAROLEascoltare fa pensarehttps://ilpostodelleparole.it/

The Word on Fire Show - Catholic Faith and Culture
WOF 347: Understanding the Present Moment #3 (Jean-Paul Sartre)

The Word on Fire Show - Catholic Faith and Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 28:28 Very Popular


Friends, today on the “Word on Fire Show,” we continue our series of discussions called “Understanding the Present Moment.” Brandon Vogt and I are examining four massively influential figures who together help explain our present moment, how we arrived at where we are today. The ideologies undergirding much of the unrest in our culture stem from these four thinkers: Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Michel Foucault. Once we understand these figures and their key ideas, we will recognize them everywhere and be prepared to engage today's challenges. In today's second discussion, we focus on Jean-Paul Sartre. A listener asks, how does someone be selfless and yet love himself? Links The Installation of Bishop Robert Barron Wonder Conference – WonderConference.com NOTE: Do you like this podcast? Become a patron and get some great perks for helping, like free books, bonus content, and more. Word on Fire is a non-profit ministry that depends on the support of our listeners…like you! So be part of this mission, and join us today!

The Carey Nieuwhof Leadership Podcast: Lead Like Never Before
CNLP 512 | Brian Zahnd on Understanding Deconstruction, Nietzsche, Nihilism and the Alternative to Christianity, and the Oddity of Post-Christian America

The Carey Nieuwhof Leadership Podcast: Lead Like Never Before

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 78:00 Very Popular


Author and pastor, Brian Zahnd, gives an in-depth explanation of the deconstruction that's happening in Christianity today, a brief history of existentialism, Friedrich Nietzsche and the alternative to Christianity, and the oddity of post-Christian America. Get more on this episode by going to https://careynieuwhof.com/episode512.

Conocimiento Experto
293 - El Arte de la Sabiduría del Mundo - Lecturas Recomendadas Conocimiento Experto

Conocimiento Experto

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 45:53


¿Qué hay para mi dentro del libro de lecturas recomendadas del programa conocimiento experto El Arte de la Sabiduria Mundial de Baltasar Gracián y Morales? Descubre Los Patrones de Comportamiento que te ayudarán a construir tu Reputacion Personal, evitar ser Manipulado y alcanzar Poder.Adquiere el Libro: https://amzn.to/3Oys7DcAccede a nuestro grupo privado en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/conocimientoexpertoMonetiza tus Redes Sociales: https://impactoexperto.com/Participa del Reto 60/100 para ser una Mejor Versión: https://conocimientoexperto.com/reto60100Accede a mi sito oficial y desarrolla tu modelo de negocio:https://www.salvadormingo.com/Accede al Programa Principios Experto: https://conocimientoexperto.com/principiosObtén mi libro: https://amzn.to/2KmHMXaMis programas:* Programa Principios Experto: https://conocimientoexperto.com/principios* Libro Conocimiento: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org/unavidaconproposito* Programa Posicionamiento de Expertos en Internet: https://conocimientoexperto.com/programaexperto* Más contenidos gratuitos: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org* Aplicación Móvil Conocimiento Experto: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org/apps/* Programa Conocimiento Experto Elite: https://conocimientoexperto.com/eliteMis redes:* Sígueme En Instagram en: https://www.instagram.com/salvadormingo/* Sígueme en Facebook en: https://www.facebook.com/Conocimientoexperto* Sígueme en Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/SalvadorMingoConocimientoExperto* Sígueme en Twitter en: https://twitter.com/s_mingoEl Arte de la Sabiduría Mundial (1647) es un clásico que permanece en el tiempo sobre los Patrones del Comportamiento Humano. Compuesto por 300 máximas breves pero brillantes, arroja luz sobre cómo vivir la vida, alcanzar el éxito y ganarse el respeto. Ha mantenido su vigencia a lo largo de sus casi 400 años de publicación, inspirando a personajes como Arthur Schopenhauer y Friedrich Nietzsche.A lo largo de la historia hay ciertos principios que se repiten una y otra vez, a veces estos pueden resultar incomodos, sin embargo no dejan de formar parte de nuestra realidad, y más vale ser consciente de los mismos, si es que queremos aumentar nuestras probabilidades de éxito en la vida, tanto para la ejecución como para nuestra protección. Por lo que si quieres saber algunos de estos principios que te ayuden asimilar parte de la sabiduría del mundo en los ámbitos del éxito y el poder, te invito a que te quedes.Edicion: Diciembre 1991Baltasar Gracián y MoralesFue un jesuita, escritor español del Siglo de Oro que cultivó la prosa didáctica y filosófica. Entre sus obras destaca El Criticón —alegoría de la vida humana—, que constituye una de las novelas más importantes de la literatura española, comparable por su calidad al Quijote o La Celestina. Es considerado un precursor del existencialismo y de la postmodernidad. Influyó enn la filosofía de Schopenhauer y Nietzsche. Sin embargo, su pensamiento vital es inseparable de la conciencia de una España en decadencia, como se advierte en su máxima «floreció en el siglo de oro la llaneza, en este de yerro la malicia».3Enfoque La Psicologia del PoderSe FirmeSalvador MingoConocimiento Experto#SerManipulado#las48leyesdelpoder#BaltasarGracian

Salvador Mingo -Conocimiento Experto-
293 - El Arte de la Sabiduría del Mundo - Lecturas Recomendadas Conocimiento Experto

Salvador Mingo -Conocimiento Experto-

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 45:52


¿Qué hay para mi dentro del libro de lecturas recomendadas del programa conocimiento experto El Arte de la Sabiduria Mundial de Baltasar Gracián y Morales? Descubre Los Patrones de Comportamiento que te ayudarán a construir tu Reputacion Personal, evitar ser Manipulado y alcanzar Poder. Adquiere el Libro: https://amzn.to/3Oys7Dc Accede a nuestro grupo privado en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/conocimientoexperto Monetiza tus Redes Sociales: https://impactoexperto.com/ Participa del Reto 60/100 para ser una Mejor Versión: https://conocimientoexperto.com/reto60100 Accede a mi sito oficial y desarrolla tu modelo de negocio: https://www.salvadormingo.com/ Accede al Programa Principios Experto: https://conocimientoexperto.com/principios Obtén mi libro: https://amzn.to/2KmHMXa Mis programas: * Programa Principios Experto: https://conocimientoexperto.com/principios * Libro Conocimiento: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org/unavidaconproposito * Programa Posicionamiento de Expertos en Internet: https://conocimientoexperto.com/programaexperto * Más contenidos gratuitos: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org * Aplicación Móvil Conocimiento Experto: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org/apps/ * Programa Conocimiento Experto Elite: https://conocimientoexperto.com/elite Mis redes: * Sígueme En Instagram en: https://www.instagram.com/salvadormingo/ * Sígueme en Facebook en: https://www.facebook.com/Conocimientoexperto * Sígueme en Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/SalvadorMingoConocimientoExperto * Sígueme en Twitter en: https://twitter.com/s_mingo El Arte de la Sabiduría Mundial (1647) es un clásico que permanece en el tiempo sobre los Patrones del Comportamiento Humano. Compuesto por 300 máximas breves pero brillantes, arroja luz sobre cómo vivir la vida, alcanzar el éxito y ganarse el respeto. Ha mantenido su vigencia a lo largo de sus casi 400 años de publicación, inspirando a personajes como Arthur Schopenhauer y Friedrich Nietzsche. A lo largo de la historia hay ciertos principios que se repiten una y otra vez, a veces estos pueden resultar incomodos, sin embargo no dejan de formar parte de nuestra realidad, y más vale ser consciente de los mismos, si es que queremos aumentar nuestras probabilidades de éxito en la vida, tanto para la ejecución como para nuestra protección. Por lo que si quieres saber algunos de estos principios que te ayuden asimilar parte de la sabiduría del mundo en los ámbitos del éxito y el poder, te invito a que te quedes. Edicion: Diciembre 1991 Baltasar Gracián y Morales Fue un jesuita, escritor español del Siglo de Oro que cultivó la prosa didáctica y filosófica. Entre sus obras destaca El Criticón —alegoría de la vida humana—, que constituye una de las novelas más importantes de la literatura española, comparable por su calidad al Quijote o La Celestina. Es considerado un precursor del existencialismo y de la postmodernidad. Influyó enn la filosofía de Schopenhauer y Nietzsche. Sin embargo, su pensamiento vital es inseparable de la conciencia de una España en decadencia, como se advierte en su máxima «floreció en el siglo de oro la llaneza, en este de yerro la malicia».3 Enfoque La Psicologia del Poder Se Firme Salvador Mingo Conocimiento Experto #SerManipulado #las48leyesdelpoder #BaltasarGracian

Bibliotequeando
16 - Los Simpsons y La Filosofía - William Irwin

Bibliotequeando

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 37:12


Un libro en el cual más de 20 filósofos analizan distintos capítulos y personajes de la serie de TV más popular del mundo. En el resumen comparamos a Homero con las creencias de Aristóteles, a Bart con Friedrich Nietzsche, y la moral del vecino Flanders con Emmanuel Kant. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Daily Podcast with Jonathan Doyle
The One Person Who Can Change Your Life.

The Daily Podcast with Jonathan Doyle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 12:06 Transcription Available


In a world of victim culture and blame it becomes a revolutionary act to let go of bitterness and resentment and take radical responsibility for you life. In today's message we explore a very challenging insight from the 19th century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche that I came across in Douglas Murray's new book, The War On The West. If you are ready to find a way to a deeper experience of life and its possibilities then this is the episode for you. Grab a free copy of my book Bridging the Gap here: https://go.jonathandoyle.co/btg-pdf (https://go.jonathandoyle.co/btg-pdf) Enquire about booking Jonathan to speak: https://go.jonathandoyle.co/jd-speak-opt-in (https://go.jonathandoyle.co/jd-speak-opt-in) Find out about coaching with Jonathan here: https://go.jonathandoyle.co/coaching (https://go.jonathandoyle.co/coaching)

The Word on Fire Show - Catholic Faith and Culture
WOF 345: Understanding the Present Moment #2 (Friedrich Nietzsche)

The Word on Fire Show - Catholic Faith and Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 28:48 Very Popular


Friends, today on the “Word on Fire Show,” we continue our series of discussions called “Understanding the Present Moment.” Brandon Vogt and I are examining four massively influential figures who together help explain our present moment, how we arrived at where we are today. The ideologies undergirding much of the unrest in our culture stem from these four thinkers: Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Michel Foucault. Once we understand these figures and their key ideas, we will recognize them everywhere and be prepared to engage today's challenges. In today's second discussion, we focus on Friedrich Nietzsche. A listener asks, what's the difference between the theological virtues of faith and hope? Links Wonder Conference – WonderConference.com NOTE: Do you like this podcast? Become a patron and get some great perks for helping, like free books, bonus content, and more. Word on Fire is a non-profit ministry that depends on the support of our listeners…like you! So be part of this mission, and join us today!

Tähenduse teejuhid
Tähenduse teejuhid: "Süvapsühholoogia ristiisa"

Tähenduse teejuhid

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022


Friedrich Nietzschest oleme sel hooajal rääkinud varem koguni kolmel korral. Vahetu tõuke selleks andis [Richard Tarnase](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhpEK-_b7mfHcnieHphuIr0G_cPk4ssFG) külalisloeng James Hillmanile pühendatud kursusel "[Hinge kood](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kxSJPnjOPHI&list=PLhpEK-_b7mfFuWpVtjdjSR6EO5kMBu3F4&index=9&t=0s)". "Süvapsühholoogia – mille poole ma nüüd pöördun – kerkis esile 19. sajandi viimastel aastakümnetel, pisut hiljem kui eelpool kirjeldatud eksperimentaalne kartesiaanlik psühholoogia. See kasvab mõnes mõttes välja kunstnike ja sisemaailma vastu huvi tundvate filosoofide loomingust. Kõige olulisem on siin Friedrich Nietzsche, keda võib pidada süvapsühholoogia ristiisaks. Ta sukeldus sügavale oma sisemusse ja naasis sealt paljude väärtuslike taipamiste ja äratundmistega," ütles Tarnas oma külalisloengus. Kolmes eelnevas saates on mu stuudiokülalised olnud Mihkel Kunnus ja Jaanus Sooväli. 131. vestlusringis "[Apolloni ja Dionysose vahel](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srqNyJbQb-c&list=PLhpEK-_b7mfHDxAx9Oncmkc556IRanB9n&index=132)" rääkisime nendega Nietzsche esimesest raamatust "Tragöödia sünd". 148. saates "[Friedrich, Jordan ja moirad](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDf2kBGvCT0&list=PLhpEK-_b7mfHDxAx9Oncmkc556IRanB9n&index=148&t=0s)" võtsime jututks Nietzsche mõju Jordan Petersonile. 152. jutuajamises "[Ihade hämar keldrisopp](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrrpWBFPhFc&list=PLhpEK-_b7mfHDxAx9Oncmkc556IRanB9n&index=152&t=0s)" oli fookus pigem süvapsühholoogial kui Nietzschel endal, aga sellisena oli see saade oluline ettevalmistus vestlusele "Süvapsühholoogia ristiisa", kus Jaanusele ja Mihklile lisandus Siim Lill. Head uudistamist! H.

Ron  Johnson Discipleship Podcast

Today on the Ron Johnson Discipleship Podcast: On today's episode we examine the ideas of another madman, Friedrich Nietzsche. As one who boldly declared, "God is dead," Nietzsche was bold enough to connect the dots between God's passing and the powerful implications of that idea. If we have no Creator, we are free to create ourselves. We are our own masters. Morality is a myth. The self-expressive, free spirited rebel is the new superman of the cosmos. We can be whoever we want to be and answer to no one. The spirit of Nietzsche is everywhere in America today. Find out more at https://ron-johnson-discipleship-podca.pinecast.co

KPCW Cool Science Radio
Cool Science Radio | July 28, 2022

KPCW Cool Science Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 52:57


On this week's edition of Cool Science Radio, John Wells and Lynn Ware Peek's guests include: (01:14) Technology journalist Nate Anderson who advocates for a life of goal-oriented, creative exertion as being more meaningful, he says, than what our technological devices provide us. Anderson shares what 19th-century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche can teach us about joyful living in a tech-saturated world. (25:29) Then, Dr. Saurabh Gombar, founder and chief medical officer at Atropos Health and Adjunct Professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine joins the show. His work surrounds making health care more targeted and precise by aggregating millions of anonymized electronic records to instantly inform patient care.

Infinite Loops
Johnathan Bi — Girard, Desire, and Modernity (EP.116)

Infinite Loops

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 71:39


Johnathan Bi started out getting trained in Mathematics, and then eventually went on to study Philosophy and Computer Science at Columbia. He hosts a lecture series on René Girard's Mimetic Theory and is also a founding member of Lonsdale Investment Technology. Important Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnathanBi Lecture series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Qu6vBebwwg Website: https://johnathanbi.com/ Lonsdale Investment Technology: https://www.longterm.com/ Show Notes: Becoming pessimistic with age Humiliation always comes back to bite you How Jonathan got introduced to Buddhism and Girard Why Jonathan left academia The driving human emotion Has modernity ignored the “spirit”? Girard's apocalyptic predictions Wild, wild west of capitalism The mystery with the discovery of the skull What does eugenics say about science? Science becoming dictatorial Buddhism figuring out the inner telescope Physical vs. metaphysical desires Mimesis in asset valuation Price to magic ratio Nietzsche's will of power Is delusion bad? Can internet lead to greater violence? “The Buddhist Solution” Girard—A rescuer of spirit And MUCH more! Books Mentioned: The Status Game; by Will Storr The Struggle for Recognition; by Axel Honneth Sapiens; by Yuval Noah Harari The Science of Storytelling; by Will Storr The Origin of Species; Charles Darwin Untimely Meditations; by Friedrich Nietzsche

Composers Datebook
"Parsifal" in Bayreuth

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 2:00 Very Popular


Synopsis On today's date in 1882, the eminent German conductor Hermann Levi led the first performance of Richard Wagner's new opera, “Parsifal” – a work that would also turn out to be his last, as Wagner would die the following year in Venice. No other Wagner opera would arouse the same level of controversy as “Parsifal.” Some thought it a blasphemous parody of the Catholic Mass, others, like the anti-religious Friedrich Nietzsche, saw it as a sanctimonious sell-out. Wagner helped fuel the controversy by calling the work a “sacred stage festival play.” Despite the notorious anti-Semitism of Wagner and his circle, the bulk of those Bayreuth performances, like the very first, would be conducted by Hermann Levi, who was Jewish. Levi wrote to his father about an unusual occurrence that took place during the final performance of the first run of “Parsifal” at Bayreuth: “Just before the final scene, Wagner appeared in the pit, twisted and turned his way up to my desk, took the baton from my hand and conducted the performance to the end. I remained at his side, because I was afraid he might slip up, by my fears were quite groundless – his conducting was so assured that he might have been nothing but a Kapellmeister all his life. At the end, the audience burst into applause which defies all description.” Music Played in Today's Program Richard Wagner (1813-1883) – Transformation Music, from Parsifal (London Symphony; Sir Adrian Boult, cond.) EMI Classics 62539

OPEN AIR
Friedrich Nietzsche on Perception

OPEN AIR

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 2:18


“They muddy the water, to make it seem deep.” ― Friedrich NietzscheThis episode contains an idea, reflection, and a simple action you can take on your creative project today.The world is noisy and your dreams deserve attention. Use this minute to shift your focus back to what you want to get done today.Want to make progress on your creative projects every day? Sign up for Make Daily -> www.makedaily.co

Shakespeare and Company

There are few people who can write so brilliantly, about so many subjects, all at once, as Geoff Dyer. The Last Days of Roger Federer: And Other Endings could be his most wide ranging to date. It's about tennis—as the title suggests—and specifically about the curtain dropping on the career of one of the most successful, and most technically beautiful players, ever. But it's also about endings of so many other kinds: the significance, or otherwise, of an artist's last work; mental and intellectual decline; finishing and not finishing books; and why, perhaps, deep down, we really just long for everything to come to be over with...*SUBSCRIBE NOW FOR BONUS EPISODESLooking for Friends of Shakespeare and Company read Ulysses? https://podfollow.com/sandcoulyssesIf you want to spend even more time at Shakespeare and Company, you can now subscribe for regular bonus episodes and early access to Friends of Shakespeare and Company read Ulysses.Subscribe on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/sandcoSubscribe on Apple Podcasts here: https://podcasts.apple.com/fr/podcast/shakespeare-and-company-writers-books-and-paris/id1040121937?l=enAll money raised goes to supporting “Friends of Shakespeare and Company” the bookshop's non-profit, created to fund our noncommercial activities—from the upstairs reading library, to the writers-in-residence program, to our charitable collaborations, and our free events.*Geoff Dyer is the author of Jeff in Venice, Death in Varanasi and three previous novels, as well as nine non-fiction books. Dyer has won the Somerset Maugham Prize, the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize for Comic Fiction, a Lannan Literary Award, the International Center of Photography's 2006 Infinity Award for writing on photography and the American Academy of Arts and Letters' E.M. Forster Award. In 2009 he was named GQ's Writer of the Year. He won a National Book Critics Circle Award in 2012 and was a finalist in 1998. In 2015 he received a Windham Campbell Prize for non-fiction. His books have been translated into twenty-four languages. He currently lives in Los Angeles where he is Writer in Residence at the University of Southern California.Adam Biles is Literary Director at Shakespeare and Company. Buy a signed copy of his novel FEEDING TIME here: https://shakespeareandcompany.com/S/9781910296684/feeding-timeListen to Alex Freiman's Play It Gentle here: https://open.spotify.com/album/4gfkDcG32HYlXnBqI0xgQX?si=mf0Vw-kuRS-ai15aL9kLNA&dl_branch=1 Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Inédita Pamonha
#PartiuPensar 19 – Prazeres do cotidiano

Inédita Pamonha

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 34:06


Neste podcast: Clóvis de Barros Filho fala sobre diferentes tipos de prazer e aborda pensadores como José Saramago e Friedrich Nietzsche.

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan
Matthew Continetti On Conservatism

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 86:00 Very Popular


Matthew is a journalist who worked at The Weekly Standard and co-founded The Washington Free Beacon, where he served as editor-in-chief. Currently he’s a contributing editor at National Review, a columnist at Commentary, and a senior fellow and the Patrick and Charlene Neal Chair in American Prosperity at the American Enterprise Institute. We discuss his wonderful book, The Right: The Hundred-Year War for American Conservatism.You can listen to the episode right away in the audio player above (or click the dropdown menu to add the Dishcast to your podcast feed). For two clips of my convo with Matthew — on whether the GOP is destroying the Constitution, and debating how conservative was Obama was — pop over to our YouTube page.A listener looks back to last week’s episode:I enjoyed your discussion of friendship with Jennifer Senior, particularly your observation that a friend is someone we don’t want to change.  It reminded me of one of my favorite quotes by Friedrich Nietzsche: “Love is blind, friendship closes its eyes.”And here’s some insight from Jesus on the subject:Another listener grumbles:Another woman talking about friendship? How novel. How about finding some guys to talk about it? Because it sure is tough for straight men to find new friendships. The old ones fall apart for much the same reason that women's do, but the straight male psyche seems particularly resistant  to making new ones.  The Dishcast, in fact, recently aired an episode with Nicholas Christakis that covered quite a bit about the nature of friendship between straight men. Much of it centers on taking the piss out of each other:Another listener remarks on the part of my convo with Jennifer about the evolving nature of newsrooms — basically that they’re boring now, ensconced in Slack:I agree about the dead quiet in newsrooms these days. I started out in broadcasting in the early ‘80s, with a stint at NPR in the late ‘80s early ‘90s. People would shout and yell and ask questions on spelling, grammar and facts about previous stories, all while rushing to meet the deadlines. Then a few years ago, I worked in a major public radio newsroom and it was dead quiet. The editor sitting behind me would type a question to me via top-line message and I’d just turn around and answer him. It was a major sin! So boring! Thankfully now I work for a small nonprofit newsroom and I’m the head of our tiny audio division. Sadly COVID made our newsroom virtual, but oh how I miss those early, pre-internet newsrooms with people arguing and talking and joking with each other.Here’s what Jennifer and I have to say:After the Continetti convo this week, here are a few requests for more conservative guests:Sometimes I feel like you’re a friend of mine, since I’ve been reading you for so long — God, since the ‘80s. The thing is your intellectual honesty, and changing your mind when facts change. So please, please, get Rod Dreher on to talk with you! We love it when you talk to someone who’s in the same area but looking in another direction. What Dreher is going through is just beyond the pale — embracing a strongman authoritarian regime and calling it conservatism. It’s the same as the left embracing CRT and calling it liberal. Yep. I just need to summon up the emotional energy for him. Another asks:Have you ever considered getting Ben Shapiro on? I think he might be a more fun guest than Ann Coulter (even though I enjoyed listening to your interaction with her), and he’s honestly more capable of learning (i.e. I’m hoping it’d be a educational interaction for him).Always open to your guest recommendations — and your commentary on the episodes: dish@andrewsullivan.com.More dissents. First up, from one of the readers who most frequently criticizes the Dish’s coverage of crime:Last week you highlighted Scott Alexander’s column on the 2020 murder spike, calling it “devastating.” In fact, it’s wildly off-base. I’m sure Scott is a smart guy, but he’s wading into an incredibly complex subject with very little respect for or understanding of the work of others.His argument rests on timing. Murders began spiking around the launch of Black Lives Matter protests —  the “structural break” mentioned in the Council on Criminal Justice’s report he cites — so, he says, it follows that one caused the other. This is a version of the “Ferguson Effect” theory, and it’s fared very poorly in the academic literature — though you wouldn’t know it from Scott’s selective citations. That doesn’t mean protests are irrelevant to crime, but the best research on the subject points out something that Scott, in his rush to judgment, misses: people don’t protest for no reason. Instead, protests tend to be caused by external factors, like police brutality. That’s why Rick Rosenfeld, who serves on the Council on Criminal Justice and did much of the descriptive work that Scott cites, argues that crises in police legitimacy, not protests, are what drive increases in violent crime and murders.The distinction is subtle but important, for methodological reasons that needn’t detain us and theoretical ones that should. Specifically, blaming protesters for rising violence is essentially an elaborate way of “blaming the victim.” If protests cause murders to rise, what else are people to do when police terrorize or kill their neighbors — as happened to George Floyd and so many others? Looking further upstream places the blame for degraded police legitimacy where it belongs: on the police force itself. What really irks me about Scott’s column, though, is its certainty in the face of an unbelievably complex social crisis. There’s a reason criminologists (not the most liberal bunch, trust me) haven’t settled on protests as the sole reason for a 30% nationwide murder spike, felt in rural communities as well as cities. Sometimes things really are complicated, and that’s ok.Scott followed up his post by replying to the best dissents from his readers, including Matt Yglesias, who began his reply, “I agree with almost everything in this post except for the media criticism parts.” You rarely see this kind of debate in the MSM. Check it out.Next up, abortion. First, a dissent from the right:Your wrong characterization of the rejection of Roe v. Wade is another example of your conversion to the Left. No mention of the 63 million babies who were murdered in the last 49 years, but oh how well you stand up for women and their right to have as many one-night stands as they want without consequences, guilt, or their morality even being questioned. Instead you should be praising the Supreme Court for finally beginning to bring our democracy back to the original standard — that only the legislature makes laws — not the president and not the courts. You should be rejoicing over the fact that abortion rights are forced back into the hands of the state legislatures, and ultimately (to some extent) into the hands of the voters. It should have been this way for the last 50 years, but a radical leftist cabal took over our Supreme Court and made decisions with very little legal support or logic. If it really is a fundamental right of women to control their bodies and ignore the consequences of killing the babies they produce, 50 years of debate and voting would have proved it to be so, and abortion would be largely legal throughout the US today. But instead, the Supreme Court dictated the law from out of nowhere, dictatorially legislated the law of the land, and the cost has been the unjust murder of some portion of 63 million babies. You should be sickened by it.So today I leave your blog. You’ve transformed from my favorite writer, defender of liberty and “explainer” of the evils of CRT and the transgender movement, to just another gay leftist parroting the lies of immoral people who have no concept of what makes our country different from all the rest. Your conversion is sad and twisted because you have the ability to reach out to the citizens who have no idea how important liberty is or what is required to safeguard it.I honestly don’t know what you’re talking about. The entire piece was a defense of abortion as a subject for democratic deliberation and not judicial fiat. That’s been my view for years. In this fraught and complex topic, I think a compromise on the European lines is the least worst option. I also believe — and have said so on multiple times — that I share your view that abortion is a moral evil, and the taking of human life. I could never be a party to one. But many disagree with me and you. And we live in a pluralistic society. And the question of when human life becomes a human person is a highly debatable one. Banning all abortion would be a disaster. Limiting and regulating it is a far better option. As for sexual freedom, you’ve got me there. As long as it’s between adults, and consensual, I have no problem with it, and lots of experience with it. I truly don’t think it is intrinsically wrong. Human beings’ sexuality is far more expansive and diverse than most other species’, and if children and marriage are not involved, I see no reason to curtail it, and many reasons to celebrate it.Next, a dissent from the left:You seem to argue from the perspective that Roe was not a compromise. It was. It was a politically failed attempt to pick a middle ground. Culturally, Roe succeeded. If you check Pew Research Center, the majority of Americans favor unrestricted abortion early in pregnancy, allowing a woman to terminate a pregnancy for any reason. Americans favor restrictions later, allowing for life of the mother and viability of the fetus concerns. This is the compromise between no abortions even for pregnancies of non-consensual sex and abortion on demand for any reason.In vitro fertilization remains a corner case. Generally, fertility clinics have legally binding contracts saying what should be done with unused embryos if a couple separates. However, if state laws regard all embryos as human beings, this raises important questions. Can a couple discard viable embryos when their family has reached the size they desire? If there is a dispute, does the party who wishes to bring an embryo to term have a right to do that over the objection of the party who does not? If a couple is conceiving through IVF to avoid a serious genetic anomaly, will it be legal to discard a viable but non-normal embryo, such as one with trisomy 21?What to do about pregnancies conceived through non-consensual sex continues to be the biggest challenge for the right-to-life movement. If the State can compel a woman to carry a pregnancy to term, even if the sex act was non-consensual, what other things can the State compel regarding our bodies? Surely states could compel mandatory vaccination, which is much less invasive and less likely to result in negative outcomes.Following that, what about states that forbid abortion but do not engage in good-faith efforts to catch and convict rapists? The map at End The Backlog does not correlate well with states based on their abortion laws. The map shows Alabama as “unknown.” A quick Internet search of “rape kit backlog Alabama” pulls up articles about backlogs of over 1,000 kits. One article talks about a community that can’t gather evidence anymore because they don’t have any specially-trained nurses. Texas is listed as having over 6,000 backlogged kits. Oklahoma has 4,600. (To be fair, California’s backlog is almost 14,000 and New York’s is unknown.) Ancestry DNA websites have made even very cold cases possible to solve. Yet, our society continues to let rapists repeat.You wrote: “I also believe that the Court could approximate your vision, in defending minority rights. But women are hardly a minority, and many women — at about the same rate as men — want abortion to be illegal.” You also wrote: “Those rights are related to minorities who cannot prevail democratically — not half the human population.”Rights are defensible when they belong to the minority — but if the right belongs to the majority, it doesn’t need to be defended? I know you are a fan of George Orwell, but this is sounding a lot like, “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.” I thought rights were rights regardless of how many or which people have them. Isn’t that the point?I'd love to see you engage with what should be the conservative argument for widespread access to contraception and abortion in the first trimester. If the conservative goal is a society where everyone contributes and rises or falls on merit, then access to reproductive health care should be a conservative priority. We know from developing nations one of the best ways to improve standards of living is to improve family planning. Most women will size their families to match the resources at hand. If conservatives want to reduce the welfare state, affordable and accessible family planning would go a long way toward doing that. Instead, the poorest states and most conservative states in our country are the ones who make it difficult.Conservatives are the ones arguing for limited government. Getting in the middle of one of the most difficult decisions anyone will ever make does not look like limited government.As always, thank you for an engaging read, even when I disagree.I truly don’t think Roe is in line with public opinion, or a compromise. Here’s where Americans stand on the question from a recent Marist/PBS poll:Nearly seven in ten (68%) support some type of restrictions on abortion. This includes 13% who think abortion should be allowed within the first six months of pregnancy, 22% who believe abortion should be allowed during the first three months of pregnancy, 23% who say abortion should be allowed in cases of rape, incest, or to save the life of the pregnant person, and 10% who say abortion should be allowed only to save the life of the pregnant person.Even 52% of Democrats think limits should be put on abortion.Roe mandated the most expansive abortion regime in the West. A democratic adjustment to the Western norm does not seem to me to be an outrage — as the polls suggest. Yes, I do think that rapists should be brought to justice; that a complement to abortion restrictions should be much more accessible healthcare for pregnant mothers before and after birth; more distribution of contraception; greater availability of adoption options; and medical exceptions for late-term abortions where the mother desperately wants the child but deformity or genetic disease makes delivery traumatizing, and the child’s life almost certainly short. Which is to say: in that situation, it should be up to mothers and doctors. Get full access to The Weekly Dish at andrewsullivan.substack.com/subscribe

Hermitix
Friedrich Nietzsche's 'The Antichrist' with Paul Bishop

Hermitix

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 61:58 Very Popular


Professor Paul Bishop is the author of multiple books on the work of Carl Jung, Friedrich Nietzsche, alongside other texts on analytical psychology and German thought. In this episode we discuss Friedrich Nietzsche's The Antichrist, alongside discussions on Rudolf Steiner, Carl Jung, belief, atheism and more... The book: https://edinburghuniversitypress.com/book-nietzsche-s-the-anti-christ.html --- Become part of the Hermitix community: Hermitix Twitter - https://twitter.com/Hermitixpodcast Support Hermitix: Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/hermitix Donations: - https://www.paypal.me/hermitixpod Hermitix Merchandise - http://teespring.com/stores/hermitix-2 Bitcoin Donation Address: 3LAGEKBXEuE2pgc4oubExGTWtrKPuXDDLK Ethereum Donation Address: 0x31e2a4a31B8563B8d238eC086daE9B75a00D9E74

The Word on Fire Show - Catholic Faith and Culture
WOF 341: Understanding the Present Moment #1 (Karl Marx)

The Word on Fire Show - Catholic Faith and Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 29:58 Very Popular


Friends, today on the “Word on Fire Show,” we kick off a new series of discussions called “Understanding the Present Moment.” Brandon Vogt and I will look at four massively influential figures who together help explain our present moment, how we arrived at where we are today. The ideologies undergirding much of the unrest in our culture stem from these four thinkers: Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Michel Foucault. Once we understand these figures and their key ideas, we will recognize them everywhere and be prepared to engage today's challenges. In today's first discussion, we focus on Karl Marx. A listener asks, what advice would you give to a man discerning the permanent diaconate? Links Redeeming the Time: Gospel Perspectives on the Challenges of the Hour by Bishop Robert Barron NOTE: Do you like this podcast? Become a patron and get some great perks for helping, like free books, bonus content, and more. Word on Fire is a non-profit ministry that depends on the support of our listeners…like you! So be part of this mission, and join us today!