Podcasts about archeology

The study of the past through material culture

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Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone

Sarah and Emily continue their reflections on what last year was all about and they discuss their life goals for 2023. Listen to hear about what they want more of in the new year, what has been holding them back from achieving those things, and what their top three priorities for 2023 are going to be. Key Points In Episode: In the last episode of Inner Archeology, Emily and Sarah reflected back on 2022 and talked about making active choices about how you look at the past. Emily opens up about what she wants more of in the new year: safety, stability, and security – a strong foundation altogether. What does stability mean to you? For Sarah, different people have different definitions (she and Ben, for example, have different definitions of stability). For the new year, Sarah wants a great sense of calm because things will get more complex. #NewYearResolutions Sarah admits that she had to relearn that ‘Calm isn't boring.' Do you agree? Emily and Sarah address the questions ‘How can I be more fully me in 2023?' and ‘What has been holding you back?'. Emily wants to bring horseback riding back! It was part of her teenage years but it wasn't there for the last 15 years. She wants to change that. Another thing that she always wanted to do? Take jazz piano lessons. #Goals There are certain things that Emily and Ben have helped Sarah realize – and she wants to focus on those in 2023. Sarah had been thinking about the baby, all the logistics, about Ben's identity as a father but she hadn't thought about her identity as a mother until she saw a necklace (saying ‘Mama') her sister gave her as a gift. Are you about to become a mother? Think about what you want to be as a mom but also what you DON'T want to be. #Motherhood Emily and Sarah share their top three priorities for 2023. Here are some questions for you to reflect on (feel free to go through them with someone you love): What are your intentions for the new year? What do you want to cultivate more of in 2023? What has been holding you back from achieving that? What are your top three priorities for the new year?   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Previous episode - Reflecting on 2022

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone - Video Edition

Sarah and Emily continue their reflections on what last year was all about and they discuss their life goals for 2023. Listen to hear about what they want more of in the new year, what has been holding them back from achieving those things, and what their top three priorities for 2023 are going to be. Key Points In Episode: In the last episode of Inner Archeology, Emily and Sarah reflected back on 2022 and talked about making active choices about how you look at the past. Emily opens up about what she wants more of in the new year: safety, stability, and security – a strong foundation altogether. What does stability mean to you? For Sarah, different people have different definitions (she and Ben, for example, have different definitions of stability). For the new year, Sarah wants a great sense of calm because things will get more complex. #NewYearResolutions Sarah admits that she had to relearn that ‘Calm isn't boring.' Do you agree? Emily and Sarah address the questions ‘How can I be more fully me in 2023?' and ‘What has been holding you back?'. Emily wants to bring horseback riding back! It was part of her teenage years but it wasn't there for the last 15 years. She wants to change that. Another thing that she always wanted to do? Take jazz piano lessons. #Goals There are certain things that Emily and Ben have helped Sarah realize – and she wants to focus on those in 2023. Sarah had been thinking about the baby, all the logistics, about Ben's identity as a father but she hadn't thought about her identity as a mother until she saw a necklace (saying ‘Mama') her sister gave her as a gift. Are you about to become a mother? Think about what you want to be as a mom but also what you DON'T want to be. #Motherhood Emily and Sarah share their top three priorities for 2023. Here are some questions for you to reflect on (feel free to go through them with someone you love): What are your intentions for the new year? What do you want to cultivate more of in 2023? What has been holding you back from achieving that? What are your top three priorities for the new year?   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Previous episode - Reflecting on 2022

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone

Sarah and Emily continue their reflections on what last year was all about and they discuss their life goals for 2023. Listen to hear about what they want more of in the new year, what has been holding them back from achieving those things, and what their top three priorities for 2023 are going to be. Key Points In Episode: In the last episode of Inner Archeology, Emily and Sarah reflected back on 2022 and talked about making active choices about how you look at the past. Emily opens up about what she wants more of in the new year: safety, stability, and security – a strong foundation altogether. What does stability mean to you? For Sarah, different people have different definitions (she and Ben, for example, have different definitions of stability). For the new year, Sarah wants a great sense of calm because things will get more complex. #NewYearResolutions Sarah admits that she had to relearn that ‘Calm isn't boring.' Do you agree? Emily and Sarah address the questions ‘How can I be more fully me in 2023?' and ‘What has been holding you back?'. Emily wants to bring horseback riding back! It was part of her teenage years but it wasn't there for the last 15 years. She wants to change that. Another thing that she always wanted to do? Take jazz piano lessons. #Goals There are certain things that Emily and Ben have helped Sarah realize – and she wants to focus on those in 2023. Sarah had been thinking about the baby, all the logistics, about Ben's identity as a father but she hadn't thought about her identity as a mother until she saw a necklace (saying ‘Mama') her sister gave her as a gift. Are you about to become a mother? Think about what you want to be as a mom but also what you DON'T want to be. #Motherhood Emily and Sarah share their top three priorities for 2023. Here are some questions for you to reflect on (feel free to go through them with someone you love): What are your intentions for the new year? What do you want to cultivate more of in 2023? What has been holding you back from achieving that? What are your top three priorities for the new year?   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Previous episode - Reflecting on 2022

Off-Farm Income
OFI 1602: Never Been Happier To See A Goat's Head Stuck In A Fence

Off-Farm Income

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 24:31


Today is a farm update episode everyone.  We will cover: Beautiful night skies during calving/kidding season The lure of the predator The great relief of remembering that goats are just dumb The archeology of our local area of Idaho The worst roads in America More Places You Can Listen to Off-Farm Income And Matt Brechwald:    

Don't Look Now
206 - King Tut

Don't Look Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 52:12


King Tutankhamun or King Tut is probably the most well known Egyptian pharaoh due to his unspoiled tomb being found and unsealed by Howard Carter in 1923.  Learn a bit about his life, when he reigned, what ailments he suffered from (hint, Royal Incest was def. a thing), and how his tomb was discovered and opened over 3000 years after his death.  Is there really anything to the supposed Curse of Tutankhamun? 

The IndyCast: Indiana Jones News and Commentary

In our first episode for the year, we talk about Ke Huy Quan's latest success, we look at the new Indy toys from Hasbro, Disney Imagineer Chuck Ballew drops by for a chat with the Lost Delta, IJ in the UK talk Indiana Jones and the Tales of Innocence and lots more!

Plastic Plesiosaur Podcast
How Smart was T-Rex, and do Giant Ells Explain Lake Monsters? - Guest Steven Domingues

Plastic Plesiosaur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 105:51


Trey dives into the recent controversy about how smart T-Rex was. A new paper by Suzana Herculano Houzel titled "Theropod Dinosaurs had primate like numbers of telencephalic neurons" has started a debate on how we can tell the cleverness of this ancient creature. Miles looks at the worlds newest - oldest - known sentence.  Found on a ivory comb, it helps give context to the region and the history of writing. The gang also get side tracked talking about historical art of dicks, and the new Indiana Jones move. So, sorry about that. The gang go over Monster Quest S2E15 - Lake Monsters of the North - The MonsterQuest team explore both historic and recent sightings of a mysterious eel-like monster in Lake Crescent, Newfoundland, Canada.Support the show

Foxy Talks | Minecraft & YouTube
Something New Coming Soon to Minecraft?

Foxy Talks | Minecraft & YouTube

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 100:50


Is it Archeology? We hope not! In this episode Foxy and Jessiie talk about Transcribing and Translating YouTube videos into different languages.We also discuss how we'd feel if Archeology was added to Minecraft in 1.20 Join our Discord: https://discord.gg/nNhMQnDfnc Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/theminecraftupdateLeave FeedbackEmail: news@theminecraftupdate.comForm: https://theminecraftupdate.com/feedback NewsMinecraft Java Snapshot 23W03Ahttps://www.minecraft.net/en-us/article/minecraft-snapshot-23w03a Bugdate Unable to download certain content in Marketplacehttps://bugs.mojang.com/browse/MCPE-54531 Sign text disappears, except sometimes to the player who placed the sign.https://bugs.mojang.com/browse/REALMS-9191 Sugar cane on mycelium, rooted dirt and mud doesn't break when the water is removedhttps://bugs.mojang.com/browse/MCPE-162351 Menu navigation position is rest during lag after exiting a worldhttps://bugs.mojang.com/browse/MCPE-165834 Furnace UI is brokenhttps://bugs.mojang.com/browse/MCPE-164589 Touch controls crash while I touch "Modify Control Layout" buttonhttps://bugs.mojang.com/browse/MCPE-163629 Good Ideas BinSpecial item that turns areas of Lava into Nether WaterCan't be bucketed or placed from a bucket.- Suggested by Foxy from wileycoyote13's original suggestion Latent Potionshttps://feedback.minecraft.net/hc/en-us/community/posts/360074315531-Latent-Potion-Vaccine-potions-- Suggested by Tyler Link Minecarts with Leads- Suggested by Nobody2023 Shield Bash ability- Suggested by Nobody2023 Dynamic Lighting- Suggested by LemonAiden Listen Links● Listen Notes: https://lnns.co/zHGebC4hgXV● YouTube: https://bit.ly/3oGsC3V● Apple Music: https://apple.co/3IFc0S0● Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3IFarDw● Google Play: https://bit.ly/3ycjZ4h● iHeart Radio: https://ihr.fm/3dBMY8fbb● Spreaker: https://bit.ly/30gKSrk● Deezer: https://bit.ly/3GAvs0D● TuneIn: http://tun.in/pjb2Y● Podcast Addict: https://bit.ly/3GuxSh9● Stitcher: https://goo.gl/6jYQt8● PocketCasts: https://pca.st/XjA6● Amazon Music: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/1c6cca1a-5b40-4991-8b36-6056d7f2ac82/the-minecraft-update-podcastHostsFoxyNoTailTwitter: https://twitter.com/foxynotailYouTube: https://youtube.com/foxynotailTwitch: https://twitch.tv/foxynotailDiscord: https://discord.gg/foxynotail Jessiie BTwitter: https://twitter.com/Jessiie_BYouTube: https://youtube.com/JessiiebTwitch: https://twitch.tv/jessiie_bDiscord: https://discord.gg/Z7mAYQa #minecraft #podcast #news

Strange Paradigms
ANCIENT PYRAMIDS AROUND THE WORLD - Mysteries with a History

Strange Paradigms

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 97:17


( To see the video of this show, click here: https://youtu.be/O1X3534Ga3o ) WEBSITE with Blogs, Videos, and Podcast direct links: https://strangeparadigms.com/ FREE TRIAL for the Skinwalker Ranch Insider Membership Website: https://tinyurl.com/skinwalkerinsider Cristina's Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and More > https://beacons.ai/cristinagomez Patreon Club for Extras & Behind the Scenes: https://www.patreon.com/paradigm_shifts MYSTERIES WITH A HISTORY PLAYLIST - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLneWjPNXc1RxFVOxYfFaC_u7DM3fvc8gd From young children, to the elderly, everyone is familiar with the pyramids of ancient Egypt, and also those of the Aztec Empire in Mexico, but beyond these examples there is a vast trove of history which many are unaware of, being ancient pyramid structures around the world, with some of them located in very surprising places, and with a murky past that defies the explanation of modern historians. In this episode, Cristina Gomez and Jimmy Church will review and discuss these ancient mysteries with a history.TOPICS COVERED IN EACH EPISODE - Mysteries with a History is a weekly show that looks at specific places, events, and topics that have a significant history, and that challenge our understanding. From UFO sightings, to UFO hotspots, the Paranormal, including sites of ghost hauntings, bizarre supernatural activity, urban legends, lore, myths, and much more.

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone

What happens when you're aware of the pain you create for yourself through mental images? And how do you choose to remember last year? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily look back at their 2022 and share their goals for the new year, including Sarah's willingness to embrace simplicity and Emily's strive to cultivate intentionally – plus, a couple of tips from Jonah Hill's new documentary Stutz. Key Points In Episode: If you're afraid of running out of things to cover as a content creator, don't sweat it! As Sarah says, you won't run out of things to say (trust her, she's been a copywriter for 10+ years). Sarah's mantra for 2023 is ‘I'm not going to unnecessarily mentally torture myself.' Being aware of the fact that we often create pain through the images we create for ourselves is powerful. Keep that in mind the next time it happens. For Emily there are two layers: it's about stopping the pain that comes as a result of the thoughts and stories we create, and the second is about actually cultivating joy, healing, and trust through our way of thinking. What does Sarah think about simplicity? ‘It's booooriiiing!' However, focusing on doing less and simplifying things is what her next few months are going to be about. Emily has been in survival mode for the last two years and she wants to change things in 2023. She wants to raise the baseline of the overall quality of her life, as well as cultivating music and art in her life. #LifeGoals As you're thinking about your goals for the new year, try to be specific. If you're thinking about baselines, try to define that as much as you can. Are you referring to health? To nutrition? To working out? To something else? Btw, specific baselines are covered in Sarah's upcoming book! #ComingSoon Sarah brings up a big lesson from Jonah Hill's documentary Stutz: always work on your life force by starting on your relationship with your body. An unexpected joy for Emily last year? Dancing! For Sarah, there are two: how her relationship with Ben has unfolded (which surprises her all the time), and having a ton of F-U-N doing an event with Emily. For 2022, Sarah chooses to remember it as the year where she stopped being small in business and in life. For Emily, that's TBD. Another golden nugget from Jonah Hill's Stutz: pain, uncertainty, and working on yourself are three constants that are always there. The key is to continue to move forward and even embrace them. Emily said it: ‘It's never all dark. Even when darkness seems everywhere, there's ALWAYS some intrinsic light in it.' #InspiringWords   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Sarah's YouTube channel 30 Rock Daughter Drink This Water: A Book of Sacred Love by Jaiya John Jonah Hill's Stutz

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone - Video Edition

What happens when you're aware of the pain you create for yourself through mental images? And how do you choose to remember last year? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily look back at their 2022 and share their goals for the new year, including Sarah's willingness to embrace simplicity and Emily's strive to cultivate intentionally – plus, a couple of tips from Jonah Hill's new documentary Stutz. Key Points In Episode: If you're afraid of running out of things to cover as a content creator, don't sweat it! As Sarah says, you won't run out of things to say (trust her, she's been a copywriter for 10+ years). Sarah's mantra for 2023 is ‘I'm not going to unnecessarily mentally torture myself.' Being aware of the fact that we often create pain through the images we create for ourselves is powerful. Keep that in mind the next time it happens. For Emily there are two layers: it's about stopping the pain that comes as a result of the thoughts and stories we create, and the second is about actually cultivating joy, healing, and trust through our way of thinking. What does Sarah think about simplicity? ‘It's booooriiiing!' However, focusing on doing less and simplifying things is what her next few months are going to be about. Emily has been in survival mode for the last two years and she wants to change things in 2023. She wants to raise the baseline of the overall quality of her life, as well as cultivating music and art in her life. #LifeGoals As you're thinking about your goals for the new year, try to be specific. If you're thinking about baselines, try to define that as much as you can. Are you referring to health? To nutrition? To working out? To something else? Btw, specific baselines are covered in Sarah's upcoming book! #ComingSoon Sarah brings up a big lesson from Jonah Hill's documentary Stutz: always work on your life force by starting on your relationship with your body. An unexpected joy for Emily last year? Dancing! For Sarah, there are two: how her relationship with Ben has unfolded (which surprises her all the time), and having a ton of F-U-N doing an event with Emily. For 2022, Sarah chooses to remember it as the year where she stopped being small in business and in life. For Emily, that's TBD. Another golden nugget from Jonah Hill's Stutz: pain, uncertainty, and working on yourself are three constants that are always there. The key is to continue to move forward and even embrace them. Emily said it: ‘It's never all dark. Even when darkness seems everywhere, there's ALWAYS some intrinsic light in it.' #InspiringWords   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Sarah's YouTube channel 30 Rock Daughter Drink This Water: A Book of Sacred Love by Jaiya John Jonah Hill's Stutz

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning
Lucy Biven, Co-author of The Archeology of Mind with Jaak Panksepp on ”A Short-Cut to Understanding Affective Neuroscience”

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 66:50


"Jaak Panksepp was the first and only neuroscientist who focused squarely on the emotional brain. There followed a lengthy and instructive series of emails between Jack and Lucy that ultimately resulted in the publication of this book" Jaak Panksepp and Lucy Biven, authors of the famous book that is often required reading for those studying an Introduction to the Field of Neuroscience, The Archeology of Mind. Watch our interview on YouTube here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wH3j5WDXvEk   On today's Episode #270 we will cover ✔  An introduction to Lucy Biven, who co-authored the well-known book, The Archeology of Mind, with Jaak Panksepp. ✔ How Lucy went from being the Head of Psychotherapy at the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service in England, to writing a leading resource in the field of Neuroscience, with Jaak Panksepp. ✔ How neuroscience gave her answers to a court case she was asked to advise, that 19 experts in the field of child development couldn't solve, without an understanding of how our brain works. ✔ How an understanding of our brain can help us to be better parents, teachers, coaches and managers. ✔ Where Jaak Panksepp's work filled in the missing gaps for Lucy, opening doors with this new understanding of our brain, and emotions. ✔ 3 often discussed Theories about Emotions and Affect (Feedback Theory, Brainstem Theory and Conceptual Act Theory, or Theory of Constructed Emotion and which one Lucy believes in today. ✔ Lucy makes a case for Panksepp's Brainstem Theory, as well as Damasio's work. ✔ Lucy and Andrea discuss the hard question of consciousness and why all traditional attempts to answer this complex question, has failed. ✔ Lucy shares how she uses Panksepp's Brainstem Theory to help 2 boys knowing when to take the role of a coach, versus a traditional therapist, to help them to overcome mental blocks that were holding them back from living a successful life.  I'm so grateful to have this opportunity today to speak with Lucy Biven, who co-authored The Archeology of Mind, with the one and only, Jaak Panksepp. Those who study the field of neuroscience will know his name, and if you haven't heard of him, I hope this episode sheds some light on his work, combined with Lucy's as pioneer researchers in the field of Affective Neuroscience. Welcome back to The Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast where we bridge the gap between theory and practice, with strategies, tools and ideas we can all use immediately, applied to the most current brain research to heighten productivity in our schools, sports environments and modern workplaces. I'm Andrea Samadi and launched this podcast almost 4 years ago, to share how important an understanding of our brain is for our everyday life and results. This season (Season 9) we will be focused on Neuroscience: Going Back to the Basics for the next few months, as we welcome some phenomenal pioneers in the field of Neuroscience, paving a pathway for all of us to navigate our lives with more understanding with our brain in mind. My goal with this next season (that will run until the end of June) is that going back to the basics will help us to strengthen our understanding of the brain, and our mind, to our results, and provide us with a springboard to propel us forward in 2023, with this solid backbone of science. With some new and exciting responsibilities on my end, we will be doing one episode a week, going back to the basics each week, that I know will be helpful for all of us. For today's guest and EPISODE #270, we will be speaking with someone who many of you who study in the field of neuroscience will recognize. There are those who I would call “rockstar” researchers, whose work has revolutionized the field. If you take a neuroscience course, or like I did, a Neuroscience Certification Program, you are a clinician, a psychotherapist, you will have come across her first book as required reading. Metapsychology Online Review thinks this book should be “essential reading not only for mind professionals, but for teachers, parents, personal and physical trainers and coaches.” So when I had an email from this next guest, one of the rockstar authors we come across and highlight in our notebooks, letting me know she has recently published a new book, and that her first book she co-authored with Jaak Panksepp, I almost fell off my chair in my office. She could have been Mick Jagger emailing me, as that would be the equivalent in this field of neuroscience research. Her first book The Archaeology of Mind[i] that she co-authored with Jaak Panksepp “describes the new scientific discipline called affective neuroscience, which seeks to illuminate how our most powerful emotional feelings—the primal emotional affects—arise from ancient neural networks situated in brain regions below the neo-cortical thinking cap.” "An exhaustive work, covering a neglected and often misunderstood field . . . . Nowhere else will you really find due diligence done on the non-conscious biases of humans and animals . . . . Essential reading, not only to us as mind professionals, but to teachers, parents, personal and physical trainers and coaches. Emotions are still everything, and vital to understanding why we are what we are, and why we do and have done, everything in the past and now. An amazing buy." ― Metapsychology Online Reviews "Panksepp's perspective on the continuity of animal and human minds has not received the attention it deserves. Here are the collected facts and the reasoning behind that compelling view. An indispensable volume." ― Antonio Damasio, author, Self Comes to Mind; David Dornsife Professor of Neuroscience and Director, Brain and Creativity Institute, University of Southern California "This book has the capacity to integrate affective neuroscience into the consciousness of not only therapists, but also those interested in understanding depth motivation that sustains or pathologizes our every action and thought. It is a truly pioneering effort. Its deep truths about the origins of mind and feeling, and the implications for altering how we see ourselves over evolutionary time, connected to our fellow social mammals and birds, also has implications for how we treat our fellow travelers on this planet." ― Stuart Brown, MD, Founder and President, The National Institute for Play   Our next guest, Lucy Biven, who co-authored The Archeology of Mind with Jaak Panksepp,  is the former Head of the Department of Psychotherapy at the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service, part of the National Health Service in Leicestershire, England.  She became interested in neuroscience about 20 years ago when she was appointed by the Michigan Supreme Court to devise and implement a protocol for the transfer of custody of a 2½ year old girl from the home of a couple whom the child regarded as her parents, to the home of her biological parents. Like most of her colleagues, Lucy worried about the little girl's psychological development, yet the child progressed well and today is an emotionally healthy young woman. Where did it all go right?  She looked towards neuroscience for the answers she was looking for and found that, along with meeting Jaak Panksepp who coined the term “affective neuroscience” (a field that studies the neural mechanisms of emotions and how consciousness emerges from strong emotional stimuli). My goal with this next interview is learn directly from Lucy Biven, how an understanding of our emotions and our brain can help us to be better teachers in the classroom, coaches in the field of sports, or improve our effectiveness in the modern workplace.  Her most recent book A Short-Cut to Understanding Affective Neuroscience was released last summer, and I look forward to learning what this rockstar from the field of psychology and neuroscience can teach us with her work, research and experience. Welcome Lucy, thank you very much for reaching out to me when you did, it was perfect timing for the direction we are going with the podcast, and going back to the basics to start our year. Welcome. INTRO Q: To start off with, I must ask, what type of reaction do you typically get from people when you reach out to them, like you did to me. Have most people read The Archeology of Mind? The reason I ask this, is that Antonio Damasio mentioned that "Panksepp's perspective on the continuity of animal and human minds has not received the attention it deserves” and I had heard that before, so I wonder were you surprised when I knew exactly who you were, with the massive amounts of respect that go along with those who spearhead a field? Q1: I always like to know what brought people to where they are now, and you explain what brought you to this field in the Introduction of your book A Short-Cut to Understanding Affective Neuroscience[ii]. Can you give a snapshot of your career path (so I don't think I was crazy that you were in England)? What did your work entail as Head of the Department of Psychotherapy at the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (in England) and why were you appointed that case by the Michigan Supreme Court? Q1B: The book opens with an incredible example of how neuroscience helped to inform the outcomes of those cases involving children and their caregivers that dated back to 1993. Can you explain how neuroscience explained the outcomes that 19 experts in child development couldn't see without understanding how the brain works? I'm asking from the point of view not of a researcher who has a sound understanding of how our brain works, but for of those of us who have a thirst to understand this information, that we were never taught. Q2: The introduction of your book is interesting as neuroscience proved something that 19 experts in child development couldn't see, even from the point of view of a parent. I always wondered if I had made a mistake when I moved from Canada to the US (only AFTER I had children) but it was with the difference we see with maternity leave in the US where we have about 12 weeks compared to a full year in Canada. I always wondered if I was doing something wrong when I dropped my daughter off at daycare and drove off to work. I was shocked when I learned that “The hippocampus creates enduring personal memories, but it does not begin to function until a child is about four years old (Newcombe et al. 2000; Gleitman et al. 2007). Babies and young children can retain short-term memories, but the neural pathways that encode these memories dissolve after a few weeks or months and the children forget” (Fivush and Hamond 1990). So, for all those parents out there who feel guilty dropping their kids off at daycare, or leaving them for a few hours with a caregiver, this bit of research could really have helped me back then to not stress so much about that, right? How else can you see an understanding of our brain, helping us beyond your Supreme Court Case, or for young parents raising their children? Do you have any other neuroscience tips that surprised you? Q3: What was it about Jaak Panksepp's work that filled in the missing gaps for you, and for lay people like me and others listening who want to understand the important workings of the brain (for improved results in our schools, sports environments or modern workplaces?) Q4: The first 3 chapters discusses different schools of thought about emotion and effect. Can we talk about each one and give an example of how something like a gunshot would be experienced with each theory? Feedback Theory-affects emerge from cognitive parts of the cortex or cortex creates all forms of consciousness (Kawkabani, 2018) We hear a gunshot, and freeze but why according to FBT are we not afraid? Brainstem Theory-maintains that all mammalian brains contain genetically programmed emotional systems). I've seen Panksepp's 7 Emotional Systems written out in many places but didn't realize there was a reason behind the ALL CAPS of each system. What did he want to show with the all caps? Panksepp's 7 core emotions: ALL mammalian brains have these 7 emotions? Why do you think these 7 emotions have been overlooked by psychologists and neuroscientists if they appear in the upper brainstem, indicating they evolved a long time ago? With brainstem theory, we hear a gunshot, what happens? We feel fear that originates from the brainstem?   3. Conceptual Act Theory (CAT)-claims that emotional systems do not exist and that emotions do not emanate from any brain region. Affects depend on concepts we construct largely on the basis of social experience. (Lisa Feldman Barrett-Theory of Constructed Emotion-explains the experience and perception of emotion). Her research shows emotions are invented using our memory and imagination (Waldman). With a gunshot, how would you explain your reaction if emotions don't exist in the brain? Did my brain create a fearful affect based on what I watched on TV, my memory and imagination?   Q5: In chapter 5 and 6 you dive deeper into brainstem theory by looking at 2 different hypothesis—Jaak Pankseep and Antonio Damasio, explaining how affects might be created.  Both are similar, involving the brainstem, but they explain different mechanisms for how this happens. What is Damasio's view involving homeostasis/consciousness? What is Panksepp's major contribution to affective neuroscience? Q6: All the research in the first 7 chapters show how the brain creates conscious affective feelings. In chapter 7, you evaluate Damasio and Panksepp's Hypothesis. You mention that both Damasio and Panksepp maintain that all consciousness includes a conscious unified sense of self (Ramachandran, 2009) who we've come across on this podcast as he inspired the work of Dr. Baland Jalal EPISODE #211.[iii] Ramachandran sites that people with male bodies feel like men, and people with female bodies feel like women. What does neuroscience research say about our sense of self and our consciousness and what was the point with Ramachandran's research? Q7: Chapter 8 we have the hard question of consciousness. On EPISODE #251, I looked at “Exploring Consciousness” and learned that “consciousness is the most astonishing act our big, complex, interconnected brains pull off and scientists are only just beginning to understand it.”[xiv] (National Geographic, The Brain). I learned that “Some scholars reckon the puzzle of consciousness is something the human mind is incapable of solving” (National Geographic) but that Daniel Dennett, Philospher and Cognitive Scientist from Tufts University (MA) says that this line of thinking is “culpably wrong. It isn't impossible at all. It's just that we have to buckle down and do it.”[iv] Why do all traditional attempts to answer the hard questions of consciousness fail? Which brain structures and functions correlate with consciousness? How does the physical brain create nonphysical conscious experiences (like seeing colors, tasting flavors, feeling joy and sorrow, anticipating the future, and remembering the past? What makes us happy, lonely, caring or curious? (no one knows how this happens Greenfield 2000). Q8: In chapter 10, you show how neuroscience helped you to treat 2 boys using the SEEKING system. How did you help each boy differently by knowing when to act like a coach, or like a traditional therapist and identifying the 7 emotional sytems that needed help? NOTE: Lucy wanted to be sure we included a distinction between emotion and affect in the show notes. Neuroscientists see emotion as purely physical reactions that occur inside the body (influx of stress or calming chemicals) and behavior (smiling, grimacing, approaching, running away). Affects, on the other hand, are private conscious experiences that cannot be directly observed - you can only deduce affects from behavior and verbal reports.   How could others use this system to help students, or athletes, who've gone off track somehow, or even managers and supervisors in the corporate world who might be having a challenge with their employees? Lucy, I want to thank you very much for first of all sending me that note before the holidays. For those of us who spend a lot of time learning, someone who can understand these difficult concepts, and explain them in a way that we can all use them, really are rockstars in my eyes. Like Dr. Daniel Siegel[v], who wrote the foreword to The Archeology of Mind and suggested that scientists or researchers would be interested in “the abundance of academic references” but for clinicians, educators or general readers, he suggests to read the pages of that book like a fascinating nonfictional story, and let the words sink in over time. Thank you for joining the rockstar researchers who have come on our podcast, like Dr. Daniel Siegel and those who have helped us to embrace a world where neuroscience can provide us with answers to move us forward, if we can take the time to stop, think, and understand the research that you've gathered, and then see how we can implement your last tip, to impact change in our worlds, backed by science. Thank you for all you have shared today. If people want to reach you, what is the best way?  Email Lucy at LucyBiven@gmail.com  If people want to purchase your books, what is the best way? A Short-Cut to Understanding Affective Neuroscience by Lucy Biven Published July 6, 2022 https://www.amazon.com/Short-Cut-Understanding-Affective-Neuroscience-ebook/dp/B0B69SSNXV/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= RESOURCES: Palaces of Memory by George Johnson https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/in-the-palaces-of-memory-how-we-build-the-worlds-inside-our-heads_george-johnson/572819/item/3589928/?gclid=Cj0KCQiAiJSeBhCCARIsAHnAzT-NyFHlqgUK_OySTM5OHSRM3Ic-W9ocGM_kDYtAqd4dUnj8SIp0kecaAuMREALw_wcB#idiq=3589928&edition=1903120 The Emotional Brain by Joseph LeDoux Published September 22, 201We https://www.amazon.com/Emotional-Brain-Mysterious-Underpinnings-Life-ebook/dp/B00AK78PDC/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=   Who's in Charge by Michael Gazzaniga Published November 15, 2011 https://www.amazon.com/Whos-Charge-Free-Science-Brain-ebook/dp/B005UD1EVG/ref=sr_1_1?gclid=Cj0KCQiAiJSeBhCCARIsAHnAzT_G3h7DHS5KOnaE-oZBRaqInCY5h6x_azxOw6cDettoKFu73XQ2Om0aAvU3EALw_wcB&hvadid=295460754701&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9030091&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=9467293520721770679&hvtargid=kwd-564030166002&hydadcr=22594_10348222&keywords=who%27s+in+charge+michael+gazzaniga&qid=1673931510&sr=8-1     REFERENCES: [i] The Archeology of Mind: Neuroevolutionary Origins of Human Emotion by Jaak Panksepp and Lucy Biven Published September 17, 2012 https://www.amazon.com/Archaeology-Mind-Neuroevolutionary-Interpersonal-Neurobiology/dp/0393705315 [ii] A Short-Cut to Understanding Affective Neuroscience by Lucy Biven Published July 6, 2022 https://www.amazon.com/Short-Cut-Understanding-Affective-Neuroscience-ebook/dp/B0B69SSNXV/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= [iii]Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #211 with Dr. Baland Jalal on “Sleep Paralysis”  https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/harvard-neuroscientist-drbaland-jalalexplainssleepparalysislucid-dreaming-andpremonitionsexpandingour-awareness-into-the-mysteries-ofourbrainduring-sl/ [iv] What is Consciousness Published on YouTube Sept. 10, 2015 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ir8XITVmeY4 TIME STAMP 1:31/12:42 [v] Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #28 with Dr. Daniel J Siegel on “Mindsight: The Basis for Social and Emotional Intelligence” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/clinical-professor-of-psychiatry-at-the-ucla-school-of-medicine-dr-daniel-siegel-on-mindsight-the-basis-for-social-and-emotional-intelligence/  

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone

What happens when you're aware of the pain you create for yourself through mental images? And how do you choose to remember last year? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily look back at their 2022 and share their goals for the new year, including Sarah's willingness to embrace simplicity and Emily's strive to cultivate intentionally – plus, a couple of tips from Jonah Hill's new documentary Stutz. Key Points In Episode: If you're afraid of running out of things to cover as a content creator, don't sweat it! As Sarah says, you won't run out of things to say (trust her, she's been a copywriter for 10+ years). Sarah's mantra for 2023 is ‘I'm not going to unnecessarily mentally torture myself.' Being aware of the fact that we often create pain through the images we create for ourselves is powerful. Keep that in mind the next time it happens. For Emily there are two layers: it's about stopping the pain that comes as a result of the thoughts and stories we create, and the second is about actually cultivating joy, healing, and trust through our way of thinking. What does Sarah think about simplicity? ‘It's booooriiiing!' However, focusing on doing less and simplifying things is what her next few months are going to be about. Emily has been in survival mode for the last two years and she wants to change things in 2023. She wants to raise the baseline of the overall quality of her life, as well as cultivating music and art in her life. #LifeGoals As you're thinking about your goals for the new year, try to be specific. If you're thinking about baselines, try to define that as much as you can. Are you referring to health? To nutrition? To working out? To something else? Btw, specific baselines are covered in Sarah's upcoming book! #ComingSoon Sarah brings up a big lesson from Jonah Hill's documentary Stutz: always work on your life force by starting on your relationship with your body. An unexpected joy for Emily last year? Dancing! For Sarah, there are two: how her relationship with Ben has unfolded (which surprises her all the time), and having a ton of F-U-N doing an event with Emily. For 2022, Sarah chooses to remember it as the year where she stopped being small in business and in life. For Emily, that's TBD. Another golden nugget from Jonah Hill's Stutz: pain, uncertainty, and working on yourself are three constants that are always there. The key is to continue to move forward and even embrace them. Emily said it: ‘It's never all dark. Even when darkness seems everywhere, there's ALWAYS some intrinsic light in it.' #InspiringWords   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Sarah's YouTube channel 30 Rock Daughter Drink This Water: A Book of Sacred Love by Jaiya John Jonah Hill's Stutz

Learn Russian Conversation
240–241 Michel Foucault, the death of author and archeology of knowledge

Learn Russian Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 13:59


Michel Foucault, 1926-1984.  Is he a historian, sociologist, philosopher? He is all this and much more, 

for the thirsty soul
Evidence from Archeology and Science (Bible)

for the thirsty soul

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 14:48


Does modern archeology align with the Bible? Does the Bible predict any current scientific discoveries?

The Drone Trainer Podcast
158. Drone Archeology with Retired Combat Vet, Michael Tucker

The Drone Trainer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 43:11


Michael Tucker is a retired military combat veteran, who is also a member of The Drone Trainer Pro. Listen in as Michael discusses how he started his business, Drone of Arc, as well as detail on his archeology missions. Where to find Michael: Website: Drone of Arc Facebook Instagram Twitter LinkedIn Join our community at TDT Pro! Join a support and strategy-focused community for commercial drone pilots who are ready to make the jump from sporadic revenue to scalable and consistent growth: Join now for free! Please support the show: BTC: bc1qr2nzt7aanyj2j3qrtty7y5gn6l86kdngjp6ejd ETH: 0xBca1860E88A8239F779E553210bD9D21042702D9 XMR: 87Jirm5GHkLEiuXFJVkdrfJo6e4RnAmH87H3PfmXDf3PbLGMJiWRWxy6fhAUbNw37j6RbA11b3BsnBCtxLY9ocNh5pd4Dmn

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone

What's scarcity all about? And how can you make sure that, paradoxically, it isn't something that takes away, but rather, adds and gives? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily talk about the role of scarcity within their personal and professional life, and they share some of their experiences with scarcity. Key Points In Episode: There are some fun “roasting bits” coming soon, so consider subscribing to the show! Plus, there are more hilarious bonus episodes available at Patreon.com/InnerArcheology. Have you ever found yourself in a hotel room dying for some water but debate about taking the one from the minibar (clearly overpriced!) or get it elsewhere? When you're in the car and the AC is on, do you go for windows closed or open? During summer, Emily looooves to drive with her windows down and the AC blasting! Emily opens up about her “fruit scarcity” and “fruit hoarding” issue, and what that led to when she was living in Scotland. Emily and Sarah talk about having scarcity toward things – having them but not really using them… Sarah and Emily share the journal scarcity “episode” they recently had. You know the feeling about something that feels irreplaceable? When you think about it, and you think hard, you may end up noticing a sign of scarcity and then realizing it wasn't irreplaceable. #FoodForThought Sarah and Emily go over embracing the feeling of scarcity, what Sarah's experience with a bad accountant led to, and the question ‘If I lost everything you owned, how would I be?' Stay away from scarcity dating!   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Shanola journals Moleskin journals

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone - Video Edition

What's scarcity all about? And how can you make sure that, paradoxically, it isn't something that takes away, but rather, adds and gives? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily talk about the role of scarcity within their personal and professional life, and they share some of their experiences with scarcity. Key Points In Episode: There are some fun “roasting bits” coming soon, so consider subscribing to the show! Plus, there are more hilarious bonus episodes available at Patreon.com/InnerArcheology. Have you ever found yourself in a hotel room dying for some water but debate about taking the one from the minibar (clearly overpriced!) or get it elsewhere? When you're in the car and the AC is on, do you go for windows closed or open? During summer, Emily looooves to drive with her windows down and the AC blasting! Emily opens up about her “fruit scarcity” and “fruit hoarding” issue, and what that led to when she was living in Scotland. Emily and Sarah talk about having scarcity toward things – having them but not really using them… Sarah and Emily share the journal scarcity “episode” they recently had. You know the feeling about something that feels irreplaceable? When you think about it, and you think hard, you may end up noticing a sign of scarcity and then realizing it wasn't irreplaceable. #FoodForThought Sarah and Emily go over embracing the feeling of scarcity, what Sarah's experience with a bad accountant led to, and the question ‘If I lost everything you owned, how would I be?' Stay away from scarcity dating!   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Shanola journals Moleskin journals

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone

What's scarcity all about? And how can you make sure that, paradoxically, it isn't something that takes away, but rather, adds and gives? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily talk about the role of scarcity within their personal and professional life, and they share some of their experiences with scarcity. Key Points In Episode: There are some fun “roasting bits” coming soon, so consider subscribing to the show! Plus, there are more hilarious bonus episodes available at Patreon.com/InnerArcheology. Have you ever found yourself in a hotel room dying for some water but debate about taking the one from the minibar (clearly overpriced!) or get it elsewhere? When you're in the car and the AC is on, do you go for windows closed or open? During summer, Emily looooves to drive with her windows down and the AC blasting! Emily opens up about her “fruit scarcity” and “fruit hoarding” issue, and what that led to when she was living in Scotland. Emily and Sarah talk about having scarcity toward things – having them but not really using them… Sarah and Emily share the journal scarcity “episode” they recently had. You know the feeling about something that feels irreplaceable? When you think about it, and you think hard, you may end up noticing a sign of scarcity and then realizing it wasn't irreplaceable. #FoodForThought Sarah and Emily go over embracing the feeling of scarcity, what Sarah's experience with a bad accountant led to, and the question ‘If I lost everything you owned, how would I be?' Stay away from scarcity dating!   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Shanola journals Moleskin journals

Is This Real?
The Curse of King Tutankhamun!

Is This Real?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 57:33


On this weeks episode the crew goes back in time and talks about the curse of king Tut! Many people involved in the digging if his tomb have died but in what ways does this make it a curse?Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREESupport the showIf you want to try Dubby products please go to https://www.dubby.gg/ and when you're ready to check out in the code area punch in "ISTHISREALPC" for 10% off your entire order!

Fringe Radio Network
The Mysteries of Egypt (Part 3) - Snake Brothers

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 147:17


We are joined in studio by Laura for more discussion on the 2022 Egypt trip. We talk about what we learned, further observations we made, and plans for the future. Laura asks us about the goals we had for this trip and if we accomplished any of them...which we did....mostly. Kyle talks about mapping the Serapeum and jumping in and out of the boxes, checking the interiors and using resonance to get rough measurements. We also discuss the statues, the differences in skill and style you can see between them, and the possibility that the large object that was being cut out at the Aswan Quarry might have been a rough block for a standing statue.We're getting back into the normal swing of things here at the SnakeBros Institiute, so we finish up with some Space Weather news and a few emails, and a 1Up box present for Laura.

2 Massage Therapists and a Microphone
Talking About Life and Death, with guest Ashley

2 Massage Therapists and a Microphone

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 99:00


Ashley is a Massage Therapist with a Bachelors degree in Anthropology and a Masters degree in Archeology. In recent years she has taken training to become a death doula which is being incorporated into her practice. Ashley tells us her story of a pivotal moment that made her realize that western cultures don't do a great job at making people comfortable with the concepts of death and dying. As a society that believes there's either life OR death, we don't often focus on life AND death. As a death doula, one of Ashley's goals is to allow people who are dying, and their families, the opportunity to get the most out of the rest of their physical life, and to not feel as though their life is over before it is. Ashley is a presenter at the Canadian Massage Conference this coming June in Halifax where she will be teaching Therapists about End of Life Care. 2rmtsandamic.com | conedinstitute.com | massagetherapymedia.com

The Secret Teachings
TST 1/6/23 - Tomb Raiders & Myth Makers

The Secret Teachings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 120:01


Archeologists have recently announced the ‘discovery' of the Tomb of Osiris, god of the Underworld; but despite all the hype, the tomb was actually discovered in 1887 by Philippe Virey, though it wasn't fully excavated. Could it be the real Osiris or simply a place to rest the physical embodiment of the god? Could it also be symbolic and relate to the ancient practice of living resurrection that took place as a drama in the mystery schools? Scientists have also recently suggested that mummies, which few realize are found all over the world, were nothing more than idols, as if this level of cultural sophistication was simply the result of a desire for better interior decoration. Western archeology in particular, largely driven by Judaeo-Christian and Islamic influence, refuses, neglects, or by sheer incompetence, does not allow for certain dates or finds to be incorporated into the orthodox narrative. However, eastern archeology, particularly in Japan, seems more willing to allow investigation and questioning of the official narrative. When local tradition in Akita Prefecture spoke of Kuromata Yama being built by an ancient people, Japanese researchers found with science that this was exactly the case. Where once the Jomon culture were thought to be comprised of simple hunter-gatherers who roamed Japan thousands of years ago, it is now known from sites like Sannai-Muryama in Aomori Prefecture that they planned settlements and even had planned sanitation. Jomon, whom were anything by primitive, made pottery long before anyone else officially in the world, the oldest piece dated to 16,500 years ago from Odayamamaoto No. 1 Iseki. Jomon were also building incredible structures with enormous blocks, and smaller stone circles. The Japanese reizan, or sacred mountains, often said to be inhabited by kami, are one of the central features of their spiritual beliefs and the Shinto religion. Miwa-Yama, for example, is occupied by Omononushi-no Kami, guardian of human life, who taught medicine like the Yellow Emperor of China. His symbol is the serpent, which is found all over the world. These details are critical to understanding the context and influence of something going back into the heart of the Ice Age. In other words, since archeologists tend to dismiss such notions, they amount largely to nothing more tomb raiders and myth makers.

Den of Rich
Dmitry Korobov | Дмитрий Коробов

Den of Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 127:34


Dmitry Korobov is a graduate of the Department of Archeology, Faculty of History, Lomonosov Moscow State University (1993), Doctor of Historical Sciences (2015), Professor of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Head of the Department of Theory and Methods of the Institute of Archeology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Corresponding Member of the German Archaeological Institute. The main scientific interests of D. S. Korobov are the archaeology of the Alanian tribes of the North Caucasus in the early Middle Ages, the funeral rite and the settlement system, the use of geoinformation, and non-destructive methods in archeology. Author of more than 300 publications, including a number of monographs and textbooks. ================================ SUPPORT & CONNECT: Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/denofrich Twitter: https://twitter.com/denofrich Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/denofrich YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/denofrich Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/den_of_rich/ Hashtag: #denofrich © Copyright 2023 Den of Rich. All rights reserved.

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone
Afraid To Call Yourself An Entrepreneur?

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 33:25


How do you approach archetypes? And how do you deal with labels: do you own them or are you afraid of them? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily talk about the role labels play, how they go about them, and how to avoid having your life influenced by other people's archetypes.   Key Points In Episode: Have you ever noticed how when you're in a challenging situation, and you come out on the other side and you've grown, you think to yourself, ‘I did it! I've mastered it!' Then before you know it, you're in that situation again? #That'sCalledLife Assigning new “labels” to ourselves is a process and it takes time. Sarah shares the example of the students in her course. Think about it: you may be a writer but also an entrepreneur, a CEO, or something else. We tend to have these associations and create fantasy scenarios solely based on small snippets of information we've gathered from TV or people in our lives. Emily shares that we often look at the negative aspects of these archetypes and end up having a deep-soul identity crisis. Even though it's other people who assign you a label, you're the one that gets to define what it actually looks like for you! As Sarah puts it, it's the archetypes that you've created in your mind that make you want to associate or distance yourself from a particular label. Is there any label you've been “allergic” to? If so, try to ask where your thoughts about it actually come from. Seeing any difference now? Sarah and Emily touch upon how embracing certain archetypes can impact you, as well as Imposter Syndrome and the complexity and layers an archetype may have. Sarah shares a story about a recent conversation with a friend of Ben's where she ended up playing dumb (and wasn't happy about it!). Emily talks about a very specific way in which we sometimes sabotage our growth curve. How do you feel when people ask you, ‘What do you do?'? Emily and Sarah address that question.   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Previous episode - Holding Space For Each Other's Joy

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone - Video Edition

How do you approach archetypes? And how do you deal with labels: do you own them or are you afraid of them? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily talk about the role labels play, how they go about them, and how to avoid having your life influenced by other people's archetypes.   Key Points In Episode: Have you ever noticed how when you're in a challenging situation, and you come out on the other side and you've grown, you think to yourself, ‘I did it! I've mastered it!' Then before you know it, you're in that situation again? #That'sCalledLife Assigning new “labels” to ourselves is a process and it takes time. Sarah shares the example of the students in her course. Think about it: you may be a writer but also an entrepreneur, a CEO, or something else. We tend to have these associations and create fantasy scenarios solely based on small snippets of information we've gathered from TV or people in our lives. Emily shares that we often look at the negative aspects of these archetypes and end up having a deep-soul identity crisis. Even though it's other people who assign you a label, you're the one that gets to define what it actually looks like for you! As Sarah puts it, it's the archetypes that you've created in your mind that make you want to associate or distance yourself from a particular label. Is there any label you've been “allergic” to? If so, try to ask where your thoughts about it actually come from. Seeing any difference now? Sarah and Emily touch upon how embracing certain archetypes can impact you, as well as Imposter Syndrome and the complexity and layers an archetype may have. Sarah shares a story about a recent conversation with a friend of Ben's where she ended up playing dumb (and wasn't happy about it!). Emily talks about a very specific way in which we sometimes sabotage our growth curve. How do you feel when people ask you, ‘What do you do?'? Emily and Sarah address that question.   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Previous episode - Holding Space For Each Other's Joy

Fringe Radio Network
Ancient Apocalypse Roundtable - Where Did The Road Go?

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 87:05


Seriah is joined by Christopher Ernst, Taylor Bell, Octavian Graves, and Ian Burton to discuss Graham Hancock's Netflix series “Ancient Apocalypse”. Topics include talk radio, podcasting, Randall Carlson, Joe Rogan, racist tropes in alternative history/archeology, the Ethiopian Coptic Church, comet and meteor strikes, the last ice age, recently discovered ancient sites, Graham Hancock's books, marijuana, Ayahuasca, Robert M. Schoch, geology vs archeology, a possible ancient civilization destroyed by cataclysm, the scablands, gradualism vs catastrophe, the Snake Brothers, research rejected by academia, the scientific method, anomalous evidence, plate tectonics, doing accurate research, problems with unsourced internet information, agendas in archeology and Egyptology, social scapegoating in human nature, Immanuel Velikovsky, respecting vs dismissing ancient stories, temples uncovered by a tsunami, David Hatcher Childress, Gobekli Tepe, parallels between artifacts from ancient Latin America and Ancient China, tunnel vision in academia, Jordan Peterson, far-right infiltration of alternative research, the dilemma of choosing media platforms, Terence McKenna, “News Radio”, Bob Lazar, Michael Shermer, the age of the Sphynx, John Keel and bitterness with the establishment, “type A and type B" scientists, the progression of advancement in science by generational change, Bigfoot hunting, Ivan T. Sanderson, vanishing evidence, ancient giants across cultures, Greg Little, Serpent Mound, giants and the Bible, Viracocha and Indigenous Latin American religion, folklore of white-skinned red-haired giants in ancient America, Moon-eyed people, colonialist reinterpretation of Indigenous beliefs, race as a cultural construct, the politics of Egyptology, remnants of an ancient culture distributing information to later peoples, the subjective nature of being a giant, pro wrestling, the societal rebellion against expertise, the “Bosnian Pyramids”, the psychologists who wrote “The Invisible Gorilla”, Egyptian Minister of Antiquities Zahi Hawass, colonialism and anti-colonialism in archaeological research, skeptics vs debunkers, resistance to innovation in science, the negative influence of billionaires, Jacques Vallee and internet search engines, cover-ups of astronomical anomalies, Dr. X, and much more! This is a fascinating round table discussion!

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone
Holding Space For Each Other's Joy

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 32:40


It's easy to say no when you're down or to feel sad, angry, or bitter when thinking about past hardships… but what if you said YES! to more joy? And what if you did that even while you were in a dark place? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily talk about their personal growth: going through divorces, looking at past mistakes, and how to approach life for more happiness and positivity.   Key Points In Episode: Has it ever happened to you to feel like you wouldn't like to share your joy with someone else because you know they're having a hard time? If you're feeling down, don't be bitter toward someone who's feeling happy! Sarah has been impressed by Emily's ability to be able to share some joy and laugh with Sarah despite having a hard time. Think that Emily was able to wedding dress shopping with Sarah while being in the thick of a heartbreak..! The end of the year always causes reflections, and the new year is always an exciting time. What are you excited about for the new year? Emily has often thought of herself as a thought leader and mindset coach but this isn't something that will happen in her future… it's happening right now! Emily and Sarah talk about one of the biggest challenges in both of their lives: going through a divorce – and how they experienced it in different ways. It can be healing for us to see someone succeed and be happy, whether we have a big role, a small role, or no role at all in what they have gone through. Every now and then you may think about your past and may feel different ways: sadness, self-loathe, anger, frustration… but you can also look at it as an opportunity to appreciate how far you've come and how much you've grown. When Sarah went through a divorce, she didn't really have anyone to be there for her and to give her support. Sarah has some advice for anyone going through a divorce right now: ‘Get in touch with your values and behave in a way that when you look back you'll be proud of your behavior because divorce is just an ugly process that often brings out the worst in people.' It's not easy but Emily is so right: ‘Even when things aren't easy, I'll grow through my experiences.' Holding space for other people's joy while you're in a dark place is worth it. #QuoteOfTheDay Sarah believes that she could only do part of her healing by herself. The other part required another person, a partner, to show up for her.   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone - Video Edition

It's easy to say no when you're down or to feel sad, angry, or bitter when thinking about past hardships… but what if you said YES! to more joy? And what if you did that even while you were in a dark place? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily talk about their personal growth: going through divorces, looking at past mistakes, and how to approach life for more happiness and positivity.   Key Points In Episode: Has it ever happened to you to feel like you wouldn't like to share your joy with someone else because you know they're having a hard time? If you're feeling down, don't be bitter toward someone who's feeling happy! Sarah has been impressed by Emily's ability to be able to share some joy and laugh with Sarah despite having a hard time. Think that Emily was able to wedding dress shopping with Sarah while being in the thick of a heartbreak..! The end of the year always causes reflections, and the new year is always an exciting time. What are you excited about for the new year? Emily has often thought of herself as a thought leader and mindset coach but this isn't something that will happen in her future… it's happening right now! Emily and Sarah talk about one of the biggest challenges in both of their lives: going through a divorce – and how they experienced it in different ways. It can be healing for us to see someone succeed and be happy, whether we have a big role, a small role, or no role at all in what they have gone through. Every now and then you may think about your past and may feel different ways: sadness, self-loathe, anger, frustration… but you can also look at it as an opportunity to appreciate how far you've come and how much you've grown. When Sarah went through a divorce, she didn't really have anyone to be there for her and to give her support. Sarah has some advice for anyone going through a divorce right now: ‘Get in touch with your values and behave in a way that when you look back you'll be proud of your behavior because divorce is just an ugly process that often brings out the worst in people.' It's not easy but Emily is so right: ‘Even when things aren't easy, I'll grow through my experiences.' Holding space for other people's joy while you're in a dark place is worth it. #QuoteOfTheDay Sarah believes that she could only do part of her healing by herself. The other part required another person, a partner, to show up for her.   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube

Plastic Plesiosaur Podcast
China Has It's Own Bigfoot.

Plastic Plesiosaur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 90:10


In the 1970's there was a push to find China's own Bigfoot type creature. Is this an ancient legend or folktale in the region? Or maybe it was the Bigfoot hype of America drifting over and effecting other nations.  Miles and Trey dive into Monster Quest's search for the "Wild Man" of China.  They also sing a Christmas song, poorly. Support the show

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone - Video Edition
An Unexpected Reason Why Change Can Feel Scary

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 38:24


Do the maladaptive coping mechanisms you developed in childhood have to define you into adulthood, or can you break free from these patterns and beliefs to achieve personal growth? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily talk about the after-effects of challenging childhood dynamics, generational differences among parents, and how you can foster emotional intelligence and be a bridge between generations. Key Points In Episode: Inner Archeology has been going for almost a year now, woo-hoo! The topic of today's episode has been coming up a lot in conversations Emily has been having lately – and it's something that applies pretty much across the board. And it's that most of us didn't have an emotionally healthy upbringing. At that time, we didn't have the skills nor understanding, while our parents' generation lacked the awareness, skills and tools. Sarah points out that the fact that very few of us were raised in healthy homes means that we're collectively shifting toward strengthening emotional intelligence and awareness. Do you agree? Our generation serves as the bridge because it experienced that childhood and is now focused on creating a different environment for our children. #WeTheHealingBridge Speaking of generations, there's also a resentment toward our generation, an inability to accept the fact that our generation acknowledges that some childhood things weren't healthy. True, the older generation may have 50-60 years of coping with things a certain way, but when they're open to embrace vulnerability and growth to achieve change - talk about personal growth…simply inspiring! Some people may go through an identity crisis because they have attached their identity to manipulative coping mechanisms. #Facts Sarah shares that whenever she's able to identify psychological human behavior and tendencies, it's easier for her to push back on them. Sarah loves seeing Emily coach people and remind them that ‘Change doesn't have to be an all or nothing thing. You can try on beliefs and new ways of doing things.' #QuoteOfTheDay Emily said it best: ‘The ones who are successful are the ones who experienced fear and resistance but they did things anyway.' Confidence comes from taking action, says Sarah…agree or disagree? Emily used to be someone who said ‘byeee!' as soon as she felt as if she outgrew a friend, whereas Sarah feels she has a high tolerance for discomfort and uncomfortable conversations.   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Recent IA episode - Generational Evolution MasterYourFate90.com (Emily's coaching program) Kevin James Thorton Breaking the Habit of Being Yourself: How to Lose Your Mind and Create a New One by Joe Dispenza

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone
An Unexpected Reason Why Change Can Feel Scary

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 38:24


Do the maladaptive coping mechanisms you developed in childhood have to define you into adulthood, or can you break free from these patterns and beliefs to achieve personal growth? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily talk about the after-effects of challenging childhood dynamics, generational differences among parents, and how you can foster emotional intelligence and be a bridge between generations. Key Points In Episode: Inner Archeology has been going for almost a year now, woo-hoo! The topic of today's episode has been coming up a lot in conversations Emily has been having lately – and it's something that applies pretty much across the board. And it's that most of us didn't have an emotionally healthy upbringing. At that time, we didn't have the skills nor understanding, while our parents' generation lacked the awareness, skills and tools. Sarah points out that the fact that very few of us were raised in healthy homes means that we're collectively shifting toward strengthening emotional intelligence and awareness. Do you agree? Our generation serves as the bridge because it experienced that childhood and is now focused on creating a different environment for our children. #WeTheHealingBridge Speaking of generations, there's also a resentment toward our generation, an inability to accept the fact that our generation acknowledges that some childhood things weren't healthy. True, the older generation may have 50-60 years of coping with things a certain way, but when they're open to embrace vulnerability and growth to achieve change - talk about personal growth…simply inspiring! Some people may go through an identity crisis because they have attached their identity to manipulative coping mechanisms. #Facts Sarah shares that whenever she's able to identify psychological human behavior and tendencies, it's easier for her to push back on them. Sarah loves seeing Emily coach people and remind them that ‘Change doesn't have to be an all or nothing thing. You can try on beliefs and new ways of doing things.' #QuoteOfTheDay Emily said it best: ‘The ones who are successful are the ones who experienced fear and resistance but they did things anyway.' Confidence comes from taking action, says Sarah…agree or disagree? Emily used to be someone who said ‘byeee!' as soon as she felt as if she outgrew a friend, whereas Sarah feels she has a high tolerance for discomfort and uncomfortable conversations.   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Recent IA episode - Generational Evolution MasterYourFate90.com (Emily's coaching program) Kevin James Thorton Breaking the Habit of Being Yourself: How to Lose Your Mind and Create a New One by Joe Dispenza

Church News
A historical visit to Bethlehem at the Savior's birth, with BYU Professor Dr. Matthew Grey

Church News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 35:23


Each Christmas season, members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and others across the world, turn their thoughts to the town of Bethlehem and the traditional interpretation of the Nativity. This episode of the Church News podcast features Dr. Matthew Grey, a professor of ancient scripture at Brigham Young University. He shares historical insights and biblical context on the village of Bethlehem, the archaeology and practices of Jewish daily life, and the religious and political atmosphere that existed in this area at the time of the Savior's birth.  The Church News Podcast is a weekly podcast that invites listeners to make a journey of connection with members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints across the globe. Host Sarah Jane Weaver, reporter and editor for The Church News for a quarter-century, shares a unique view of the stories, events, and most important people who form this international faith. With each episode, listeners are asked to embark on a journey to learn from one another and ponder, “What do I know now?” because of the experience. Produced by KellieAnn Halvorsen.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The IndyCast: Indiana Jones News and Commentary

In this blockbuster episode we can finally officially talk about the trailer for the newly titled Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny, along with a new teaser poster, Empire Magazine exclusives and more Indy 6 inch figures! Official IndyCast correspondent Mitch Hallock is back with an Indy Christmas gift guide, we have the return of Old Indy, we get Indy outfit and IJ in the UK updates, Morgan and Rich talk dinosaur Eggs, a Lost Delta interview and more of your great emails!

Love Where You Are with Somer Colbert
What You Didn't Know About the Manger with Amanda Hope Haley

Love Where You Are with Somer Colbert

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 41:59


Welcome to the Love Where You Are podcast!  In today's episode I am welcoming back my friend, THE Red-Haired Archeologist, Amanda Hope Haley.  Amanda Hope Haley has a bachelor of arts in Religious Studies from Rhodes College and a master of theological studies in Hebrew Scripture and Interpretation from Harvard University. She is a lover of the Bible–its God, its words, its people, and its history. She writes and podcasts as the Red-Haired Archaeologist, bringing readers and listeners on her journeys to understand artifacts that can contextualize Scripture. She contributed to The Voice Bible as a translator, writer, and editor; and she has been a content editor and ghost writer for popular Christian authors. Last time she was on the podcast, she shared some things we may have missed from our translations of the Bible.  In this episode, Amanda and I discuss the Christmas story and things you didn't know you didn't know. Amanda shares about the common traditions surrounding Christmas, such as the nativity scene and the Three Wise Men, that give us a historically inaccurate and misrepresented picture of our savior's birth.   Amanda and I discussed:   - The historical timeline surrounding the birth of Jesus - Why Mary and Joseph had to stay in a stable - Where and when our common Christmas traditions began   Thank you for listening today! You can connect with Amanda  through Facebook, Instagram, and her website!   You can also find her books on Amazon or wherever you buy your books! They make excellent Christmas presents.    FAVORITE TAKE-AWAYS: *The iconic nativity scenes we see all around us this time of year and grew up with, are not historically accurate! But we can still love and appreciate them.  *"There was no room in the inn" is a poor translation... there was room, just where the animals were.  *The "Three Wise Men" may not have even been three! We have no idea how many men came or even when they came. All we know is what they brought and how significant that was.  *The B.C. and A.D. dating system is flawed... it's contradicted by Scripture! Jesus was born when Harod was alive, and he died before year 1 A.D.  *We may try to look to science and history to "prove" Scripture, but God used miracles for a reason.    Connect with Somer!  Stay connected to Somer and the Love Where You Are podcast through her Facebook & Instagram! Now, go love where you are and live on mission for Jesus today. 

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone

What could a 10-minute DMT trip do? And what happens when things go wrong with marijuana (aka: cannabis)? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily continue their talk on psychedelic drugs and talk about an eye-opening DMT trip Emily went on, where the fear of certain drugs comes from, and share their cannabis mistake stories.   Key Points In Episode: This episode is part 2 of Emily's and Sarah's conversation about the benefits of psychedelic drugs. If Emily had to pick a psychedelic drug today, it would be DMT… What about your pick? Emily would pick it because a DMT trip lasts for about 10 minutes and there's no comedown and nothing afterwards. With mushrooms, on the other hand, you're “committed” for several hours and there's some tricky time afterwards. Emily did DMT before she did mushrooms, and she did it twice. Did you know that everyone who has taken DMT says to have experienced the same onset? There's a clear difference between psilocybin and DMT. With the first, there are some thematic things – like feeling connected to the earth – but the experience can change from person to person. With psilocybin, on the other hand, there's a sort of structure to it. One major difference Emily experienced with DMT compared to other drugs is that she didn't feel loopy with her thoughts, rather lucid the whole time. It was a lucid, cerebral experience. Have you ever heard of The Dome? That's what someone on a DMT trip goes into (you can even Google Dome to see artistic representations of it). During her DMT trip, Emily saw Thoth (ancient Egypt's god of the moon). Oh, in case you're wondering, she knows this because of doing a Google search later on. #JustSayin' As Thoth approached Emily, who felt a bit uneasy because she didn't have anything to offer, he telepathically said to her and kept repeating, ‘You're enough just as you are.' Emily then felt Thoth pass through her, and she ended up in what she believes was nirvana, a little slice of heaven. Emily's friends, who saw her go on her DMT trip, told her she was sobbing and kept repeating, ‘Ok, ok' to Thoth. Sarah admits that she would be afraid to do DMT because she doesn't like the idea of visuals…what about you? Sarah believes that the time to try ayahuasca, psilocybin or anything else is something that should come to you naturally. You shouldn't feel nervous about it or forced into it. For Sarah and Emily, the fear of trying certain drugs like LSD and acid typically comes from being afraid of losing your mind. Is that something you're thinking too? Did you know that, the first time she did LSD, Sarah got pranked by a friend of hers who knew she was doing it for the first time but pretended not to be himself? #HiDylan Emily also had a psychedelic experience with marijuana – but it happened by mistake because she smoked too much of it. She smoked a 50-milligram joint a friend accidentally gave her (for reference, when smoking weed, Sarah would smoke 2.5 milligrams and Emily around 5!). She got stuck in the bathroom for what felt like half an hour because she didn't have the energy to head back to the living room and, when she did, she stayed in a fetal position while feeling as if she was having a panic attack. #NotFunAtAll Most people who smoke weed do have a mistake story… True? Sarah has given up smoking weed, she's more into edibles nowadays. As for her weed mistake story, it happened during her senior year of high school, toward the end of the year. She ate crumbs out of a bag of weed cookies and…let's just say she wasn't able to walk out of class on her own! Are you a creative person? If so, know that marijuana has helped Emily with her creative process because it has gotten her out of her usual way of thinking (actually, that's how she got to Inner Archeology as the name of this show!).   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Part 1 of Exploring Psychedelics Thoth Andrew Huberman podcast episode - The Effects of Cannabis (Marijuana) on the Brain & Body

Fringe Radio Network
The Mysteries of Egypt (Part 1) - Snake Brothers

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 151:40


We're back from our epic three week trip in Egypt! We learned so many things and explored many new places. We have Ben from UnchartedX on with us to discuss some of the sites we visited and our evolving thoughts on what we learned. There is so much to discuss, expect more Egypt episodes in the coming weeks!

Town Square with Ernie Manouse
The Countess of Carnarvon on Highclere Castle & her new book, THE EARL AND THE PHARAOH

Town Square with Ernie Manouse

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 49:22


Town Square with Ernie Manouse airs at 3 p.m. CT. Tune in on 88.7FM, listen online or subscribe to the podcast. Join the discussion at 888-486-9677, questions@townsquaretalk.org or @townsquaretalk. For the full hour, we talk with The Countess of Carnarvon as she discusses the history of her home Highclere Castle, which was made famous for being the main setting of the critically-acclaimed historical drama series Downton Abbey. She also discusses the history that inspired her latest book, The Earl and the Pharoah which chronicles the life of George Herbert, the 5th Earl of Carnarvon, and his role in funding and taking part in the excavation of King Tutankhamun's tomb. The Earl and the Pharoah is available now wherever books are sold. To watch Ernie Manouse's previous interview with The Countess of Carnarvon on Houston Public Media's InnerVIEWS, click here.   Guest: The Countess of Carnarvon Author, “The Earl and the Pharaoh” Town Square with Ernie Manouse is a gathering space for the community to come together and discuss the day's most important and pressing issues. We also offer a free podcast here, on iTunes, and other apps

Walter Edgar's Journal
Revolutionary revelations: remains of soldiers from the Battle of Camden recovered, studied - to be re-interred with honors

Walter Edgar's Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 52:15


In 1780, Camden was the oldest and largest town in the Carolina backcountry. It was strategic to both the British Army and the Patriots in the Revolutionary War. Following a series of strategic errors before and during the Battle of Camden, the Patriot army under command of Major General Horatio Gates was soundly defeated, ushering in changes in military leadership that altered the war's course. After the battle, Major General Nathanael Greene was promoted to command of the Southern Campaign, and his leadership ultimately led to the evacuation of the British army from Charleston, SC in December 1782.In November of 2022, the South Carolina Battleground Preservation Trust announced a significant, historic discovery at the Revolutionary War Camden Battlefield. The Trust, acting on behalf of Historic Camden Foundation, contracted with the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina, to excavate a number of bodies of Revolutionary War soldiers killed in the August 16, 1780 Battle of Camden.Walter Edgar talks with Dr. Steve Smith of the SC Institute for Archeology and Anthropology at USC; Bill Stevens, forensic anthropologist with the Richland County Coroner's Office; and Doug Bostick, CEO of the South Carolina Battleground Preservation Trust about the excavations, the significance of the discoveries, and about plans for reinterment ceremonies April 20-22, 2023, in Camden.

Big Picture Science
Tomb with a View

Big Picture Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 54:00


A century ago, British archaeologist Howard Carter opened the only surviving intact tomb from ancient Egypt. Inside was the mummy of the boy king Tutankhamun, together with “wonderful things” including a solid gold mask. Treasure from King Tut's crypt has been viewed both in person and virtually by many people since. We ask what about Egyptian civilization so captivates us, thousands of years later. Also, how new technology from modern physics allows researchers to “X-Ray” the pyramids to find hidden chambers. Guests: Emma Bentley – Postgraduate student in Archeology and Ancient Worlds at the University of Edinburgh in the U.K.  Sarah Parcak – Archaeologist and Egyptologist, University of Alabama, and author of “Archaeology From Space: How the Future Shapes Our Past.” Richard Kouzes – Physicist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Salima Ikram – Professor of Egyptology at The American University in Cairo and head of the Animal Mummy Project at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Featuring music by Dewey Dellay and Jun Miyake Big Picture Science is part of the Airwave Media podcast network. Please contact sales@advertisecast.com to inquire about advertising on Big Picture Science. You can get early access to ad-free versions of every episode by joining us on Patreon. Thanks for your support!   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

History of Estonia Podcast
Estonia in the Era of Stalin Part #2

History of Estonia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 51:04


In this episode, we are lucky to have Olaf Mertelsmann who is Professor of Eastern European History at the Institute of History and Archeology, University of Tartu. He holds a doctorate in History from the University of Hamburg (2000). He has taught in Estonia, Germany, and Russia. His main interests are the social and economic history of Eastern Europe, Stalinism, Soviet history, and contemporary Baltic history. He is the author of five monographs, has edited several volumes, and published more than fifty papers in journals. In this episode we get to learn a little about Christmas in Stalin's Estonia.

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone

Psychedelic drugs: a dangerous thing to avoid at all cost or a life-altering resource? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily talk about psychedelic drugs, share their experiences with them and go over how they both went on an exploration journey with mushrooms. Key Points In Episode: This episode is part 1 of Emily's and Sarah's conversation about the benefits of psychedelic drugs. Psychedelics were massively vilified by our parents' generation but they now seem more open to the idea that they could be acceptable. Sarah's mom even jokes about going on ayahuasca retreats! LOL Emily had her first experience with Silybin in her 30s – she hadn't done anything prior to that. She did a massive mushroom trip that ended up being life-altering, in a really good way. When the time is right, Sarah would like to be able to have conversations about drugs with her kids because that's something that wasn't really talked about before. What about you, would you want to leave your children to figure things out on their own or would you open up to them about them? The world is made of many things, including drugs, alcohol, and sex, so why not talk about them? Emily topped the mushrooms up with a small dose of ecstasy, which led to all sorts of good visuals and her feeling very connected to #MotherEarth. Everything – the sky, ground, etc. – felt very alive and communicative. Mushrooms feel very feminine to Emily, whereas marijuana feels very masculine, energy-wise. Do you agree? Did you know that psychedelic drugs tend to highlight end-of-life stuff? There have been studies showing that. Hearing mushroom stories always makes Sarah giggle because they are so similar even when it's different people sharing their experiences. #MushroomThoughts During her mushroom trip, Emily felt as if she was embodying the mother of the universe – feeling all of the joy, sorrow, and loss of a mother that had ever existed. There was a freaky moment where Emily felt that each of her friends was her child and they were pulling parts of her body..! Emily realized that what she was experiencing was the epitome of her potential as a mother, making the greatest sacrifice she could make by giving her body to her children to sustain them. She felt so in alignment and as if she was an eternal floating memory. Emily walked away from that experience feeling really connected to the idea that being a mother was something inherent to her whether or not her mother was still on planet Earth. She also felt as if she faced her own death, and it wasn't scary at all. Though it took her some time to process the whole experience. Sarah has done acid once (#NotHerThing) and mushrooms 4-5 times. Only one mushroom experience was positive while the others weren't negative but more controlled and in a party setting. She once snapped and wondered whether she was going to lose her mind… and also learned that you shouldn't look at yourself in the mirror when tripping (oh, and avoid public bathrooms too!) and that she'd rather be immersed in nature. Her first experience doing mushrooms was at Hangout Fest where she swam in the ocean, while her second was in Bali with someone who really knew what they were doing and with a beach and stars as the setting. Sarah's mushroom trip in Bali was a mile marker that helped her realize that her relationship with her boyfriend at the time needed to come to an end and she felt the universe putting its hands on her cheeks and saying ‘You're doing great, you're trying so hard and doing a great job!'. She was immediately released from that relationship, had a massive empathetic growth toward people in her family, her anxiety levels plummeted, and she felt as if the Milky Way was fire, all while listening to some great music. Sarah feels that, in a really weird way, her Bali trip set her up to have a baby. It has been one of the top 3 most important experiences that ever happened in her life. If you're thinking of going on a psychedelic trip, keep in mind that the people who are around you, the intentions you set, and your surroundings can be the difference between a truly spiritual and revolutionary experience and something uncomfortable.   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube Hangout Music Fest

Flow
Did the Mexihcah Practice Human Sacrifice?

Flow

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 12:39


In this video I examine the validity of the sources that highlight human sacrifice in Mesoamerica, and more specifically, Mexihcah culture. #history #native #chicano #aztec References Anawalt, Patricia R. 1982. “Understanding Aztec Human Sacrifice.” Archeology 35, no. 5 (September): 8. https://www.jstor.org/stable/41727796. Jarus, Owen. 2017. “25 cultures that practiced human sacrifice.” Live Science. https://www.livescience.com/59514-cultures-that-practiced-human-sacrifice.html. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/d-a-f-l-o-w/support

The Metal Detecting Show
Archeology Versus Metal Detecting

The Metal Detecting Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 12:07


This week We chat about Archeology versus Metal Detecting and what the establishment formed from the Citizen Scientific Movement needs to do to reconnect with the Metal Detecting PublicHowever, before we start I want to thank you for listening to the podcast and I hope you enjoy the episode this week  If you want to support the show there are many options available from the links in the episode notes below and if you want to interact with me and the show that information is there too.but most importantly If you like this content please don't hesitate to tell your friends and don't forget to hit that subscribe button.Support the showThanks for listening. You can contact and support the show using the following link.Contact:VoicemailTwitterInstagramDr DetectorCiaranSupport:PatreonBuymeaCoffee

Our Prehistory
12. Aurignacian Technology

Our Prehistory

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 38:54


In the absence of Neanderthals, Homo sapiens developed the Aurignacian culture, which spanned Europe. These people continued the trend toward technological complexity that had begun during the out of Africa migrations.Support the show

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone

Great things and growth happen at the end of your comfort zone… does that apply to relationships too? In this episode of Inner Archeology, Sarah and Emily discuss the connection between trust, risk, uncertainty, and safety in relationships – including the role of expectations, the idea of self-trust, and how to approach failed relationships. Key Points In Episode: Have you heard of Emily's Master Your Fate 90-day program? Learn more about it over at MasterYourFate90.com. Today's episode is inspired by some of the relationship conversations Emily has been having with her cohort plus some inspiration she got from an Instagram profile: the intersection between trust and risk, safety and uncertainty in relationships. The more trust we develop within ourselves, the more safety we create inside of us and the more capacity we have for risk and uncertainty that are needed to experience joy and beautiful things in life, says Emily. Do you agree? For Sarah, healing comes from relationships. It isn't just about having trust in yourself…when it comes to relationships, you eventually need to put trust in someone else – hoping they will treat you with respect. What comes to your mind when thinking about self-trust? Do you think it's about developing trust in yourself by keeping the promises you made? Is it about rooting your identity within yourself instead of on external things? (For Emily, it's the latter). We often think of failed relationships as failures… but, actually, they can be great sources of self-trust, confidence and self-worth. #PersonalDevelopment Do you know how we experience growth at the end of our comfort zone? The same can be said for relationships: if you want meaningful and deep relationships, you need to accept a level of risk and discomfort. Sarah shares a story that brings the role of expectations in a relationship into the picture. Both Sarah and Emily think that the way you see whether someone really cares is how they show up, especially in repair. What's your take? Are you replaying toxic relationships over and over again? Chances are that you have normalized harmful and toxic behavior and have mistaken it for safety. Recognizing this was huge for Sarah.   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram @Inner.Archeology on Instagram InnerArcheology.com InnerArcheology.tv (video version) patreon.com/InnerArcheology Inner Archeology on YouTube MasterYourFate90.com (Emily's 90-day program) @QueerCosmos on Instagram Rachel Botsman

Episodes – Ventchat
Podcast 654: Big Archeology

Episodes – Ventchat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 215:26


How was your Thanksgiving. The story about Michael J. Fox drinking cobra blood that only Woody Harrelson could tell. What do Bigfoot believers have in common? World Cup. Rob reviews Andor season 1. Oatly Emotional Support Hotline. Fotie's new skincare book. Plaid. 50 Cent is suing over claims that he had penis enlargement surgery. Ancient […]

The Secret Teachings
BEST OF 11/24/21 - Robot Turkey: Cornucopia of Silicon

The Secret Teachings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 118:37


BEST OF: From foraging and hunting to domestic agriculture, man has come a long way. Now man sits in his home ordering prepared foods, meals ready to eat, and groceries from the tap of a button. Soon all of these convenient options will be catered with drones and autonomous vehicles rather than humans. In the process of this technological progressive evolution, the soul has been separated from man alongside his relationship to food and soil. This Thanksgiving we serve you the Robot Turkey, a new kind of bird promising cockroach milk mashed potatoes, red#40 cranberry sauce with no cranberries, genetically modified corn, and tofu turkey with 3D printed bones. It's a cornucopia of silicon. Eat up.

The Holy Post
536: Listener Voicemails! Archeology, Abortion, & Avoiding Holiday Family Arguments

The Holy Post

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 70:27


Just in time for the holidays, the Holy Post crew is answering another round of voicemails from our Patreon supporters. On this episode, Phil, Skye, and Kaitlyn respond to listener questions about how much confidence to put in archeological evidence for the Bible, how did Christians interpret Revelation before the recent invention of "Left Behind" theology, when does satire and social media become sinful, what abortion policies could most Americans agree on, and how do you practice the Sabbath with a demanding job and young kids? Plus, they offer practical advice for avoiding arguments with your family about politics and religion during holiday gatherings. Patreon Bonus: Getting Schooled by Kaitlyn Schiess: Creeds 101 - https://www.patreon.com/posts/74991905/ New Holy Post merch - https://www.holypost.com/shop 00:00 - Sponsor: InterVarsity Press Get 30% off “The Thrill of Orthodoxy” by Trevin Wax with code: THRILL30 at: https://ivpress.com/the-thrill-of-orthodoxy 00:44 - Intro 6:08 - Ben: Holiday family conversations 11:55 - Brad and Carrie: Dispensationalism 22:58 - Millie: Mocking 25:51 - Sponsor: Faithful Counseling Get 10% off your first month at faithfulcounseling.com/holypost 27:05 - Cody: Healthy social media use 32:02 - Mark: Sabbath 36:08 - Ali: Archeology and the Bible 46:08 - Peter: How nations treat foreigners 52:03 - Trudie: Political thinking around helping the poor 1:02:31 - Yong: Policies around abortion 1:09:57 - Credits Past episodes and other resources mentioned: Holy Post Episode 244: Cultural Lies, Human Longings & the Gospel with Trevin Wax - https://www.holypost.com/holy-post-podcast/episode/1c5a47cf/episode-244-cultural-lies-human-longings-and-the-gospel-withtrevin-wax Holy Post Episode 410: White Privilege, Cancel Culture, & Reading Revelation with Juan Hernandez - https://www.holypost.com/post/episode-410-white-privilege-cancel-culture-reading-revelation-with-juan-hernandez Holy Post Episode 506: The Pro-Life Case for Paid Family Leave with Rachel Anderson - https://www.holypost.com/post/episode-506-the-pro-life-case-for-paid-family-leave-with-rachel-anderson “The Millennial Maze” by Stanley J. Grenz - https://amzn.to/3tTUljk “The Liturgy of Politics” by Kaitlyn Schiess - https://amzn.to/3GzrGI1 Holy Post website: https://www.holypost.com/ Holy Post Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/holypost The Holy Post is supported by our listeners. We may earn affiliate commissions through links listed here. As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

Into America
Life, Loss, and Libations

Into America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 43:48 Very Popular


When someone in the Black community dies, we honor them with vibrant, spiritual homegoings and repasses as a celebration of their life. That's because honoring someone in death is a reflection of how we loved them in life. This Fall, as the weather gets cooler and calls for introspection, and as some cultures celebrate Day of the Dead and All Souls Day, we're looking to the Black burial and mourning traditions that buoy us year after year. On this episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee speaks with Dr. Karla F.C. Holloway, author of the book “Passed On: African American Mourning Stories, a Memorial,” to discuss the origins of Black burial practices, how these traditions are passed down, and why they matter. Historical archeologist Dr. Brittany L. Brown also joins us to talk about her research into a previously undiscovered African American burial site.For a transcript, please visit msnbc.com/intoamerica. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.For More: The growing movement to save Black cemeteriesKeep the Faith, Baby