Podcast appearances and mentions of David Keith

American actor and director

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David Keith

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Best podcasts about David Keith

Latest podcast episodes about David Keith

Gimmick Infringement
Peelecast Part III: Nope and Black Characters

Gimmick Infringement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 36:57


Part III of the Peelecast revolves around David Keith and family, and particularly around the cloud that hasn't moved. The group discusses why it didn't hit audiences the same way as Peele's previous work. They also go into the black character horror trope.Peelecast is part of the mighty 19 Media Group (@19MGroup on Twitter). You can find Tyler (@TylerJMcDowell), Jabari (JabariDavisNBA), and Brad (@WindDuster) on Twitter. Tyler and Brad host the Gimmick Infringement podcast (@GIPod19). Jabari Davis is the co-host of the NBA Finals File podcast on iHeart Radio. These shows are found wherever you find podcasts.

Best Friend’s Fancast
Udderly Terrific

Best Friend’s Fancast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 119:10


Tryce, Superfan Meghan and special *guest* Lisa discuss the issues of the day!Carb call-outs! Bathroom talk (literal)!  Empty Nest, license plates, and more!  Also!  We confuse Keith David and David Keith for a LONG time and never explain during the show!  All this and more, brought to you by The C-Team (derogatory).

The Uptime Wind Energy Podcast
Wind Turbines Heat the Earth, $50M for Floating Wind, Missiles vs Turbines, Rope Partner Leading Edge Solution

The Uptime Wind Energy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 57:36 Very Popular


We had a great time at WindEnergy Hamburg 2022 last week; more on that later. In this episode we discuss compelling, but conflicting, new research showing how wind turbines heat OR cool the earth. Scottish company Edge Solutions and US-based Rope Partner created a leading edge protection shield that's gotten high marks in European installations and in testing at ORE Catapult. Joel explains why solutions like this shield make sense. We look at potential impacts of the Biden administration's recent $50M investment in floating offshore wind development. $31M is for ATLANTIS. Did you know ATLANTIS Did you know ATLANTIS is an acronym? Rosemary did. And an already-approved wind project in Nebraska could increase the state's wind production by 25%. BUT, it's too close to missile silos, operated by the US Air Force for 50+ years. Is a compromise possible? Visit Pardalote Consulting at https://www.pardaloteconsulting.com Wind Power Lab - https://windpowerlab.com Sign up now for Uptime Tech News, our weekly email update on all things wind technology. This episode is sponsored by Weather Guard Lightning Tech. Learn more about Weather Guard's StrikeTape Wind Turbine LPS retrofit. Follow the show on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Linkedin and visit Weather Guard on the web. And subscribe to Rosemary Barnes' YouTube channel here. Have a question we can answer on the show? Email us!  Uptime 133 Allen Hall: Hello. Hello, Hello everyone. We have a great show for you this week.  Rosemary Barnes: We're gonna talk about some research from a couple of different research groups that shows that wind turbines may either heat or cool the surface of the earth, depending on which study we're looking at. And then we're gonna talk about 50 million that's been set aside by the US government to support floating offshore wind. Rosemary Barnes: And then  Allen Hall: we have a standoff in Western Nebraska between nuclear missiles and wind turbin. Row Partners is now installing custom form Turine Blade Shields from Ed Solutions, a really interesting partnership. I'm Allen Hall, president of Weather Regard Lightning Tech, and I'm here with my good friend and blade expert Rosemary Barnes. Allen Hall: And my good friend put Wind Power Lab, Joel Saxon. And this is the Uptime Wind Energy Podcast. If you're a frequent listener to the podcast, please take a moment and give us a five star rating on your podcast platform and subscribe to our weekly newsletter Uptime Tech News, which can be found by Googling Uptime Tech news. Allen Hall: Do wind turbines heat the earth? My response is based on simple engineering, and when turbines take energy from the wind, which reduces the speed of the wind, and the cooling effect from wind blowing across to prairie should reduce it should be reduced so necessarily temperatures will increased. Allen Hall: So less wind means slightly warmer temperatures. That's my engineering take on it. However, wind farms may warm the earth or they may cool the earth. It depends on the specifics. So there's some really interesting research has just popped out from Harvard University. Harvard researchers Lee Miller and David Keith estimated the effects of wind turbines on local temperatures in the United States. Allen Hall: To do this, they created a computer model, which put roughly 460 gigawatts of wind turbines in the us. The US currently generates about 120 gigawatts, so they basically multiply the wind tur times four and derive the temperature two meters from the ground. So that's like human temperature things we would feel surprisingly millers and key simulated predictions calculated air temperatures will increase by 0.24 degrees Celsius across the us. Allen Hall: And a half a degree Celsius in the Midwest where most of the wind turbines are found. That's an interesting result because I've seen varying numbers and you always think that the temperature would rise a little bit,

Canary Cry News Talk
CRASH VLADS

Canary Cry News Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 173:58


Canary Cry News Talk #535 - 09.16.2022 - Recorded Live to Tape! CRASH VLADS - Car Conspiracy, NIH Bridge2AI, Antarctica Geoengineering Harvard: Index of MSM Ownership (Harvard.edu) SHOW NOTES Podcast = T -  2:48 (D-live)     Timestamps by Jade Bouncerson HELLO 3:13 V / 0:25 P RUSSIA/UKRAINE 6:18 V / 3:30 P Russian President Vladimir Putin survives another brutal assassination attempt (News AU)  →→ Putin's car ‘attacked with bomb' in ‘assassination attempt' over Ukraine invasion (The Sun)    Ukraine President Zelensky has 'no serious injuries' after car accident (CNN)  →→ Ukraine President Zelensky involved in car accident but 'not seriously hurt' (BBC)    DAY JINGLE/PERSONAL/EXEC.  20:49 V / 18:01 P   FLIPPY UPDATE 41:57 V / 39:11 P Nike launches B.I.L.L. ROBOT in London store that can polish and repair your shoes (DailyMail)   SHILLZILLA 47:57 V / 45:11 P Shillzilla mentions Derwin (Twitter)   POLYTICKS 53:57 V / 51:11 P  Clip: Dem Rep. Says “We Gotta KILL” MAGA “Extremists” (Summit News)          MONEY 1:01:23 V / 58:35 P (Basil singing jingle) Clip: FedEx CEO says he expects the economy to enter a ‘worldwide recession' (CNBC)  World Bank sees rising risk of global recession in 2023 (Yahoo / Reuters)    PARTY TIME 1:09:32 V / 1:06:44 P BREAK 1: TREASURE   COVID/WACCINE/BILL GATES 1:24:08 V / 1:21:20 P How Bill Gates and partners used their clout to control the global Covid response (Politico)    BEAST SYSTEM/AI 1:48:25 V / 1:45:37 P NIH launches Bridge2AI program (NIH.gov)   BREAK 3: TALENT 1:58:09 V / 1:55:21 P   ANTARCTICA  2:24:52 V / 2:22:04 P Scientists propose controversial plan to refreeze North and South Poles (Sky News) → 2013: David Keith, “Sulfuric Acid Geoengineering” Stephen Colbert    BREAK 4: TIME 2:39:20 V / 2:36:32 P END   This Episode was Produced By: EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS Chad the Chad**   Producers Hannah G, Jamie K, Malik W, Sir Morv Knight of the Burning Chariots,  Dame Sarah of the Shadows, Runksmash, Sir LX Protocol V2 Knight of the Berrean Protocol, Gail M, Veronica D, Sir Scott Knight of Truth, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, Sir Darrin Knight of the Hungry Panda's   Visual Art Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove Knight of Rusbeltia Sir Darrin Knight of the Hungry Panda's ItsyBitsySkynet   CLIP PRODUCER Emsworth, FaeLivrin, Epsilon   TIMESTAPERS Jackie U, Jade Bouncerson, Christine C, Pocojoyo, Joelle S   SOCIAL MEDIA DOERS Dame MissG of the OV and Deep Rivers   LINKS HELP JAM   MICROFICTION Runksmash - The lizard with the ray gun skulks around the corner, sniffing for the agent. Seeing his opportunity Derwin unrolls himself and slashes the beast's face with his sharp paper fingers. “After this, how about some Nacho Fries at Hardy's?” He asks Stacy. ADDITIONAL LINKS Patagonia founder transfers ownership to environmentally focused entities (Washington Times)  Gas stoves linked to asthma in children, adult cancers, scientist warns (NY Post)  Russia Conducts Military Drills in Arctic Sea Opposite Alaska (US News)  Why One Harvard Astronomer Believes This Asteroid Is an Alien Ship (DailyBeast)  These 3 companies will help NASA build vertical solar arrays for the moon (Space)  Mason company helping to power NASA's return to moon (Yahoo)  Vatican sought Xi-Pope meeting in Kazakhstan, China declined - source (Reuters) (Archive)  Creepy ‘Big Brother' AI can find you in CCTV footage by stalking your Instagram (The Sun) Queensland man who claims to be Charles and Camilla's son drops DNA bombshell (7News AU) Facebook spied on private messages of Americans who questioned 2020 election (NY Post) Alex Jones lawyer appears to tweet and fall asleep during Connecticut trial (Indy UK)

The Lunar Society
Charles C. Mann - Americas Before Columbus & Scientific Wizardry

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 92:03


Charles C. Mann is the author of three of my favorite history books: 1491. 1493, and The Wizard and the Prophet. We discuss:why Native American civilizations collapsed and why they failed to make more technological progresswhy he disagrees with Will MacAskill about longtermismwhy there aren't any successful slave revoltshow geoengineering can help us solve climate changewhy Bitcoin is like the Chinese Silver Tradeand much much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here. Some really cool guests coming up, subscribe to find out about future episodes!Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.If you enjoyed this episode, you may also enjoy my interviews of Will MacAskill (about longtermism), Steve Hsu (about intelligence and embryo selection), and David Deutsch (about AI and the problems with America's constitution).If you end up enjoying this episode, I would be super grateful if you shared it. Post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group-chats, and throw it up on any relevant subreddits & forums you follow. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.Timestamps(0:00:00) -Epidemically Alternate Realities(0:00:25) -Weak Points in Empires(0:03:28) -Slave Revolts(0:08:43) -Slavery Ban(0:12:46) - Contingency & The Pyramids(0:18:13) - Teotihuacan(0:20:02) - New Book Thesis(0:25:20) - Gender Ratios and Silicon Valley(0:31:15) - Technological Stupidity in the New World(0:41:24) - Religious Demoralization(0:44:00) - Critiques of Civilization Collapse Theories(0:49:05) - Virginia Company + Hubris(0:53:30) - China's Silver Trade(1:03:03) - Wizards vs. Prophets(1:07:55) - In Defense of Regulatory Delays(0:12:26) -Geoengineering(0:16:51) -Finding New Wizards(0:18:46) -Agroforestry is Underrated(1:18:46) -Longtermism & Free MarketsTranscriptDwarkesh Patel   Okay! Today I have the pleasure of speaking with Charles Mann, who is the author of three of my favorite books, including 1491: New Revelations of America before Columbus. 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created, and The Wizard and the Prophet: Two Remarkable Scientists and Their Dueling Visions to Shape Tomorrow's World. Charles, welcome to the Lunar Society.Charles C. Mann   It's a pleasure to be here.Epidemically Alternate RealitiesDwarkesh Patel   My first question is: How much of the New World was basically baked into the cake? So at some point, people from Eurasia were going to travel to the New World, bringing their diseases. Considering disparities and where they would survive, if the Acemoglu theory that you cited is correct, then some of these places were bound to have good institutions and some of them were bound to have bad institutions. Plus, because of malaria, there were going to be shortages in labor that people would try to fix with African slaves. So how much of all this was just bound to happen? If Columbus hadn't done it, then maybe 50 years down the line, would someone from Italy have done it? What is the contingency here?Charles C. Mann   Well, I think that some of it was baked into the cake. It was pretty clear that at some point, people from Eurasia and the Western Hemisphere were going to come into contact with each other. I mean, how could that not happen, right? There was a huge epidemiological disparity between the two hemispheres––largely because by a quirk of evolutionary history, there were many more domesticable animals in Eurasia and the Eastern hemisphere. This leads almost inevitably to the creation of zoonotic diseases: diseases that start off in animals and jump the species barrier and become human diseases. Most of the great killers in human history are zoonotic diseases. When people from Eurasia and the Western Hemisphere meet, there are going to be those kinds of diseases. But if you wanted to, it's possible to imagine alternative histories. There's a wonderful book by Laurent Binet called Civilizations that, in fact, does just that. It's a great alternative history book. He imagines that some of the Vikings came and extended further into North America, bringing all these diseases, and by the time of Columbus and so forth, the epidemiological balance was different. So when Columbus and those guys came, these societies killed him, grabbed his boats, and went and conquered Europe. It's far-fetched, but it does say that this encounter would've happened and that the diseases would've happened, but it didn't have to happen in exactly the way that it did. It's also perfectly possible to imagine that Europeans didn't engage in wholesale slavery. There was a huge debate when this began about whether or not slavery was a good idea. There were a lot of reservations, particularly among the Catholic monarchy asking the Pope “Is it okay that we do this?” You could imagine the penny dropping in a slightly different way. So, I think some of it was bound to happen, but how exactly it happened was really up to chance, contingency, and human agency,Weak Points in EmpiresDwarkesh Patel   When the Spanish first arrived in the 15th and 16th centuries, were the Incas and the Aztecs at a particularly weak point or particularly decadent? Or was this just how well you should have expected this civilization to be functioning at any given time period?Charles C. Mann   Well, typically, empires are much more jumbly and fragile entities than we imagine. There's always fighting at the top. What Hernán Cortés was able to do, for instance, with the Aztecs––who are better called The Triple Alliance (the term “Aztec” is an invention from the 19th century). The Triple Alliance was comprised of three groups of people in central Mexico, the largest of which were the Mexica, who had the great city of Tenochtitlan. The other two guys really resented them and so what Cortes was able to do was foment a civil war within the Aztec empire: taking some enemies of the Aztec, some members of the Aztec empire, and creating an entirely new order. There's a fascinating set of history that hasn't really emerged into the popular consciousness. I didn't include it in 1491 or 1493 because it was so new that I didn't know anything about it; everything was largely from Spanish and Mexican scholars about the conquest within the conquest. The allies of the Spaniards actually sent armies out and conquered big swaths of northern and southern Mexico and Central America. So there's a far more complex picture than we realized even 15 or 20 years ago when I first published 1491. However, the conquest wasn't as complete as we think. I talk a bit about this in 1493 but what happens is Cortes moves in and he marries his lieutenants to these indigenous people, creating this hybrid nobility that then extended on to the Incas. The Incas were a very powerful but unstable empire and Pizarro had the luck to walk in right after a civil war. When he did that right after a civil war and massive epidemic, he got them at a very vulnerable point. Without that, it all would have been impossible. Pizarro cleverly allied with the losing side (or the apparently losing side in this in the Civil War), and was able to create a new rallying point and then attack the winning side. So yes, they came in at weak points, but empires typically have these weak points because of fratricidal stuff going on in the leadership.Dwarkesh Patel   It does also remind me of the East India Trading Company.Charles C. Mann   And the Mughal empire, yeah. Some of those guys in Bengal invited Clive and his people in. In fact, I was struck by this. I had just been reading this book, maybe you've heard of it: The Anarchy by William Dalrymple.Dwarkesh Patel   I've started reading it, yeah but I haven't made much progress.Charles C. Mann   It's an amazing book! It's so oddly similar to what happened. There was this fratricidal stuff going on in the Mughal empire, and one side thought, “Oh, we'll get these foreigners to come in, and we'll use them.” That turned out to be a big mistake.Dwarkesh Patel   Yes. What's also interestingly similar is the efficiency of the bureaucracy. Niall Ferguson has a good book on the British Empire and one thing he points out is that in India, the ratio between an actual English civil servant and the Indian population was about 1: 3,000,000 at the peak of the ratio. Which obviously is only possible if you have the cooperation of at least the elites, right? So it sounds similar to what you were saying about Cortes marrying his underlings to the nobility. Charles C. Mann   Something that isn't stressed enough in history is how often the elites recognize each other. They join up in arrangements that increase both of their power and exploit the poor schmucks down below. It's exactly what happened with the East India Company, and it's exactly what happened with Spain. It's not so much that there was this amazing efficiency, but rather, it was a mutually beneficial arrangement for Xcalack, which is now a Mexican state. It had its rights, and the people kept their integrity, but they weren't really a part of the Spanish Empire. They also weren't really wasn't part of Mexico until around 1857. It was a good deal for them. The same thing was true for the Bengalis, especially the elites who made out like bandits from the British Empire.Slave Revolts Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's super interesting. Why was there only one successful slave revolt in the new world in Haiti? In many of these cases, the ratios between slaves and the owners are just huge. So why weren't more of them successful?Charles C. Mann   Well, you would first have to define ‘successful'. Haiti wasn't successful if you meant ‘creating a prosperous state that would last for a long time.' Haiti was and is (to no small extent because of the incredible blockade that was put on it by all the other nations) in terrible shape. Whereas in the case of Paul Maurice, you had people who were self-governing for more than 100 years.. Eventually, they were incorporated into the larger project of Brazil. There's a great Brazilian classic that's equivalent to what Moby Dick or Huck Finn is to us called Os Sertões by a guy named Cunha. And it's good! It's been translated into this amazing translation in English called ​​Rebellion in the Backlands. It's set in the 1880s, and it's about the creation of a hybrid state of runaway slaves, and so forth, and how they had essentially kept their independence and lack of supervision informally, from the time of colonialism. Now the new Brazilian state is trying to take control, and they fight them to the last person. So you have these effectively independent areas in de facto, if not de jure, that existed in the Americas for a very long time. There are some in the US, too, in the great dismal swamp, and you hear about those marooned communities in North Carolina, in Mexico, where everybody just agreed “these places aren't actually under our control, but we're not going to say anything.”  If they don't mess with us too much, we won't mess with them too much. Is that successful or not? I don't know.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, but it seems like these are temporary successes..Charles C. Mann   I mean, how long did nations last? Like Genghis Khan! How long did the Khan age last? But basically, they had overwhelming odds against them. There's an entire colonial system that was threatened by their existence. Similar to the reasons that rebellions in South Asia were suppressed with incredible brutality–– these were seen as so profoundly threatening to this entire colonial order that people exerted a lot more force against them than you would think would be worthwhile.Dwarkesh Patel   Right. It reminds me of James Scott's Against the Grain. He pointed out that if you look at the history of agriculture, there're many examples where people choose to run away as foragers in the forest, and then the state tries to bring them back into the fold.Charles C. Mann   Right. And so this is exactly part of that dynamic. I mean, who wants to be a slave, right? So as many people as possible ended up leaving. It's easier in some places than others.. it's very easy in Brazil. There are 20 million people in the Brazilian Amazon and the great bulk of them are the descendants of people who left slavery. They're still Brazilians and so forth, but, you know, they ended up not being slaves.Slavery BanDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's super fascinating. What is the explanation for why slavery went from being historically ever-present to ending at a particular time when it was at its peak in terms of value and usefulness? What's the explanation for why, when Britain banned the slave trade, within 100 or 200 years, there ended up being basically no legal sanction for slavery anywhere in the world?Charles C. Mann   This is a really good question and the real answer is that historians have been arguing about this forever. I mean, not forever, but you know, for decades, and there's a bunch of different explanations. I think the reason it's so hard to pin down is… kind of amazing. I mean, if you think about it, in 1800, if you were to have a black and white map of the world and put red in countries in which slavery was illegal and socially accepted, there would be no red anywhere on the planet. It's the most ancient human institution that there is. The Code of Hammurabi is still the oldest complete legal code that we have, and about a third of it is about rules for when you can buy slaves, when you can sell slaves, how you can mistreat them, and how you can't–– all that stuff. About a third of it is about buying, selling, and working other human beings. So this has been going on for a very, very long time. And then in a century and a half, it suddenly changes. So there's some explanation, and it's that machinery gets better. But the reason to have people is that you have these intelligent autonomous workers, who are like the world's best robots. From the point of view of the owner, they're fantastically good, except they're incredibly obstreperous and when they're caught, you're constantly afraid they're going to kill you. So if you have a chance to replace them with machinery, or to create a wage where you can run wage people, pay wage workers who are kept in bad conditions but somewhat have more legal rights, then maybe that's a better deal for you. Another one is that industrialization produced different kinds of commodities that became more and more valuable, and slavery was typically associated with the agricultural laborer. So as agriculture diminished as a part of the economy, slavery become less and less important and it became easier to get rid of them. Another one has to do with the beginning of the collapse of the colonial order. Part of it has to do with.. (at least in the West, I don't know enough about the East) the rise of a serious abolition movement with people like Wilberforce and various Darwins and so forth. And they're incredibly influential, so to some extent, I think people started saying, “Wow, this is really bad.”  I suspect that if you looked at South Asia and Africa, you might see similar things having to do with a social moment, but I just don't know enough about that. I know there's an anti-slavery movement and anti-caste movement in which we're all tangled up in South Asia, but I just don't know enough about it to say anything intelligent.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, the social aspect of it is really interesting. The things you mentioned about automation, industrialization, and ending slavery… Obviously, with time, that might have actually been why it expanded, but its original inception in Britain happened before the Industrial Revolution took off. So that was purely them just taking a huge loss because this movement took hold. Charles C. Mann   And the same thing is true for Bartolome de Las Casas. I mean, Las Casas, you know, in the 1540s just comes out of nowhere and starts saying, “Hey! This is bad.” He is the predecessor of the modern human rights movement. He's an absolutely extraordinary figure, and he has huge amounts of influence. He causes Spain's king in the 1540s to pass what they call The New Laws which says no more slavery, which is a devastating blow enacted to the colonial economy in Spain because they depended on having slaves to work in the silver mines in the northern half of Mexico and in Bolivia, which was the most important part of not only the Spanish colonial economy but the entire Spanish empire. It was all slave labor. And they actually tried to ban it. Now, you can say they came to their senses and found a workaround in which it wasn't banned. But it's still… this actually happened in the 1540s. Largely because people like Las Casas said, “This is bad! you're going to hell doing this.”Contingency & The Pyramids Dwarkesh Patel   Right. I'm super interested in getting into The Wizard and the Prophet section with you. Discussing how movements like environmentalism, for example, have been hugely effective. Again, even though it probably goes against the naked self-interest of many countries. So I'm very interested in discussing that point about why these movements have been so influential!But let me continue asking you about globalization in the world. I'm really interested in how you think about contingency in history, especially given that you have these two groups of people that have been independently evolving and separated for tens of thousands of years. What things turn out to be contingent? What I find really interesting from the book was how both of them developed pyramids––  who would have thought that structure would be within our extended phenotype or something?Charles C. Mann    It's also geometry! I mean, there's only a certain limited number of ways you can pile up stone blocks in a stable way. And pyramids are certainly one of them. It's harder to have a very long-lasting monument that's a cylinder. Pyramids are also easier to build: if you get a cylinder, you have to have scaffolding around it and it gets harder and harder.With pyramids, you can use each lower step to put the next one, on and on, and so forth. So pyramids seem kind of natural to me. Now the material you make them up of is going to be partly determined by what there is. In Cahokia and in the Mississippi Valley, there isn't a lot of stone. So people are going to make these earthen pyramids and if you want them to stay on for a long time, there's going to be certain things you have to do for the structure which people figured out. For some pyramids, you had all this marble around them so you could make these giant slabs of marble, which seems, from today's perspective, incredibly wasteful. So you're going to have some things that are universal like that, along with the apparently universal, or near-universal idea that people who are really powerful like to identify themselves as supernatural and therefore want to be commemorated. Dwarkesh Patel   Yes, I visited Mexico City recently.Charles C. Mann Beautiful city!TeotihuacanDwarkesh Patel Yeah, the pyramids there… I think I was reading your book at the time or already had read your book. What struck me was that if I remember correctly, they didn't have the wheel and they didn't have domesticated animals. So if you really think about it, that's a really huge amount of human misery and toil it must have taken to put this thing together as basically a vanity project. It's like a huge negative connotation if you think about what it took to construct it.Charles C. Mann   Sure, but there are lots of really interesting things about Teotihuacan. This is just one of those things where you can only say so much in one book. If I was writing the two-thousand-page version of 1491, I would have included this. So Tehuácan pretty much starts out as a standard Imperial project, and they build all these huge castles and temples and so forth. There's no reason to suppose it was anything other than an awful experience (like building the pyramids), but then something happened to Teotihuacan that we don't understand. All these new buildings started springing up during the next couple of 100 years, and they're all very very similar. They're like apartment blocks and there doesn't seem to be a great separation between rich and poor. It's really quite striking how egalitarian the architecture is because that's usually thought to be a reflection of social status. So based on the way it looks, could there have been a political revolution of some sort? Where they created something much more egalitarian, probably with a bunch of good guy kings who weren't interested in elevating themselves so much? There's a whole chapter in the book by David Wingrove and David Graeber, The Dawn of Everything about this, and they make this argument that Tehuácan is an example that we can look at as an ancient society that was much more socially egalitarian than we think. Now, in my view, they go a little overboard–– it was also an aggressive imperial power and it was conquering much of the Maya world at the same time. But it is absolutely true that something that started out one way can start looking very differently quite quickly. You see this lots of times in the Americas in the Southwest–– I don't know if you've ever been to Chaco Canyon or any of those places, but you should absolutely go! Unfortunately, it's hard to get there because of the roads terrible but overall, it's totally worth it. It's an amazing place. Mesa Verde right north of it is incredible, it's just really a fantastic thing to see. There are these enormous structures in Chaco Canyon, that we would call castles if they were anywhere else because they're huge. The biggest one, Pueblo Bonito, is like 800 rooms or some insane number like that. And it's clearly an imperial venture, we know that because it's in this canyon and one side is getting all the good light and good sun–– a whole line of these huge castles. And then on the other side is where the peons lived. We also know that starting around 1100, everybody just left! And then their descendants start the Puebla, who are these sort of intensely socially egalitarian type of people. It looks like a political revolution took place. In fact, in the book I'm now writing, I'm arguing (in a sort of tongue-in-cheek manner but also seriously) that this is the first American Revolution! They got rid of these “kings” and created these very different and much more egalitarian societies in which ordinary people had a much larger voice about what went on.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. I think I got a chance to see the Teotihuacan apartments when I was there, but I wonder if we're just looking at the buildings that survived. Maybe the buildings that survived were better constructed because they were for the elites? The way everybody else lived might have just washed away over the years.Charles C. Mann   So what's happened in the last 20 years is basically much more sophisticated surveys of what is there. I mean, what you're saying is absolutely the right question to ask. Are the rich guys the only people with things that survived while the ordinary people didn't? You can never be absolutely sure, but what they did is they had these ground penetrating radar surveys, and it looks like this egalitarian construction extends for a huge distance. So it's possible that there are more really, really poor people. But at least you'd see an aggressively large “middle class” getting there, which is very, very different from the picture you have of the ancient world where there's the sun priest and then all the peasants around them.New Book ThesisDwarkesh Patel   Yeah. By the way, is the thesis of the new book something you're willing to disclose at this point? It's okay if you're not––Charles C. Mann   Sure sure, it's okay! This is a sort of weird thing, it's like a sequel or offshoot of 1491. That book, I'm embarrassed to say, was supposed to end with another chapter. The chapter was going to be about the American West, which is where I grew up, and I'm very fond of it. And apparently, I had a lot to say because when I outlined the chapter; the outline was way longer than the actual completed chapters of the rest of the book. So I sort of tried to chop it up and so forth, and it just was awful. So I just cut it. If you carefully look at 1491, it doesn't really have an ending. At the end, the author sort of goes, “Hey! I'm ending, look at how great this is!” So this has been bothering me for 15 years. During the pandemic, when I was stuck at home like so many other people, I held out what I had since I've been saving string and tossing articles that I came across into a folder, and I thought, “Okay, I'm gonna write this out more seriously now.” 15 or 20 years later. And then it was pretty long so I thought “Maybe this could be an e-book.” then I showed it to my editor. And he said, “That is not an e-book. That's an actual book.” So I take a chapter and hope I haven't just padded it, and it's about the North American West. My kids like the West, and at various times, they've questioned what it would be like to move out there because I'm in Massachusetts, where they grew up. So I started thinking “What is the West going to be like, tomorrow? When I'm not around 30 or 50 years from now?”It seems to be that you won't know who's president or who's governor or anything, but there are some things we can know. It'd be hotter and drier than it is now or has been in the recent past, like that wouldn't really be a surprise. So I think we can say that it's very likely to be like that. All the projections are that something like 40% of the people in the area between the Mississippi and the Pacific will be of Latino descent–– from the south, so to speak. And there's a whole lot of people from Asia along the Pacific coast, so it's going to be a real ethnic mixing ground. There's going to be an epicenter of energy, sort of no matter what happens. Whether it's solar, whether it's wind, whether it's petroleum, or hydroelectric, the West is going to be economically extremely powerful, because energy is a fundamental industry.And the last thing is (and this is the iffiest of the whole thing), but I'm going to go out on a limb and say that the ongoing recuperation of sovereignty by the 294 federally recognized Native nations in the West is going to continue. That's been going in this very jagged way, but definitely for the last 50 or 60 years, as long as I've been around, the overall trend is in a very clear direction. So then you think, okay, this West is going to be wildly ethnically diverse, full of competing sovereignties and overlapping sovereignties. Nature is also going to really be in kind of a terminal. Well, that actually sounds like the 1200s! And the conventional history starts with Lewis and Clark and so forth. There's this breakpoint in history when people who looked like me came in and sort of rolled in from the East and kind of took over everything. And the West disappears! That separate entity, the native people disappear, and nature is tamed. That's pretty much what was in the textbooks when I was a kid. Do you know who Frederick Jackson Turner is? Dwarkesh Patel  No.Charles C. Mann So he's like one of these guys where nobody knows who he is. But he was incredibly influential in setting intellectual ideas. He wrote this article in 1893, called The Significance of the Frontier. It was what established this idea that there's this frontier moving from East to West and on this side was savagery and barbarism, and on this other side of civilization was team nature and wilderness and all that. Then it goes to the Pacific, and that's the end of the West. That's still in the textbooks but in a different form: we don't call native people “lurking savages” as he did. But it's in my kids' textbooks. If you have kids, it'll very likely be in their textbook because it's such a bedrock. What I'm saying is that's actually not a useful way to look at it, given what's coming up. A wonderful Texas writer, Bruce Sterling, says, “To know the past, you first have to understand the future.”It's funny, right? But what he means is that all of us have an idea of where the trajectory of history is going. A whole lot of history is about asking, “How did we get here? How do we get there?” To get that, you have to have an idea of what the “there” is. So I'm saying, I'm writing a history of the West with that West that I talked about in mind. Which gives you a very different picture: a lot more about indigenous fire management, the way the Hohokam survived the drought of the 1200s, and a little bit less about Billy the Kid. Gender Ratios and Silicon Valley Dwarkesh Patel   I love that quote hahaha. Speaking of the frontier, maybe it's a mistaken concept, but I remember that in a chapter of 1493, you talk about these rowdy adventurer men who outnumber the women in the silver mines and the kind of trouble that they cause. I wonder if there's some sort of distant analogy to the technology world or Silicon Valley, where you have the same kind of gender ratio and you have the same kind of frontier spirit? Maybe not the same physical violence––– more sociologically. Is there any similarity there?Charles C. Mann   I think it's funny, I hadn't thought about it. But it's certainly funny to think about. So let me do this off the top of my head. I like the idea that at the end of it, I can say, “wait, wait, that's ridiculous.“ Both of them would attract people who either didn't have much to lose, or were oblivious about what they had to lose, and had a resilience towards failure. I mean, it's amazing, the number of people in Silicon Valley who have completely failed at numbers of things! They just get up and keep‌ trying and have a kind of real obliviousness to social norms. It's pretty clear they are very much interested in making a mark and making their fortunes themselves. So there's at least a sort of shallow comparison, there are some certain similarities. I don't think this is entirely flattering to either group. It's absolutely true that those silver miners in Bolivia, and in northern‌ Mexico, created to a large extent, the modern world. But it's also true that they created these cesspools of violence and exploitation that had consequences we're still living with today. So you have to kind of take the bitter with the sweet. And I think that's true of Silicon Valley and its products *chuckles* I use them every day, and I curse them every day.Dwarkesh Patel   Right.Charles C. Mann   I want to give you an example. The internet has made it possible for me to do something like write a Twitter thread, get millions of people to read it, and have a discussion that's really amazing at the same time. Yet today, The Washington Post has an article about how every book in Texas (it's one of the states) a child checks out of the school library goes into a central state databank. They can see and look for patterns of people taking out “bad books” and this sort of stuff. And I think “whoa, that's really bad! That's not so good.” It's really the same technology that brings this dissemination and collection of vast amounts of information with relative ease. So with all these things, you take the bitter with the sweet. Technological Stupidity in the New WorldDwarkesh Patel   I want to ask you again about contingency because there are so many other examples where things you thought would be universal actually don't turn out to be. I think you talked about how the natives had different forms of metallurgy, with gold and copper, but then they didn't do iron or steel. You would think that given their “warring nature”, iron would be such a huge help. There's a clear incentive to build it. Millions of people living there could have built or developed this technology. Same with the steel, same with the wheel. What's the explanation for why these things you think anybody would have come up with didn't happen?Charles C. Mann   I know. It's just amazing to me! I don't know. This is one of those things I think about all the time. A few weeks ago, it rained, and I went out to walk the dog. I'm always amazed that there are literal glistening drops of water on the crabgrass and when you pick it up, sometimes there are little holes eaten by insects in the crabgrass. Every now and then, if you look carefully, you'll see a drop of water in one of those holes and it forms a lens. And you can look through it! You can see that it's not a very powerful lens by any means, but you can see that things are magnified. So you think “How long has there been crabgrass? Or leaves? And water?”  Just forever! We've had glass forever! So how is it that we had to wait for whoever it was to create lenses? I just don't get it. In book 1491, I mentioned the moldboard plow, which is the one with a curving blade that allows you to go through the soil much more easily. It was invented in China thousands of years ago, but not around in Europe until the 1400s. Like, come on, guys! What was it? And so, you know, there's this mysterious sort of mass stupidity. One of the wonderful things about globalization and trade and contact is that maybe not everybody is as blind as you and you can learn from them. I mean, that's the most wonderful thing about trade. So in the case of the wheel, the more amazing thing is that in Mesoamerica, they had the wheel on child's toys. Why didn't they develop it? The best explanation I can get is they didn't have domestic animals. A cart then would have to be pulled by people. That would imply that to make the cart work, you'd have to cut a really good road. Whereas they had these travois, which are these things that you hold and they have these skids that are shaped kind of like an upside-down V. You can drag them across rough ground, you don't need a road for them. That's what people used in the Great Plains and so forth. So you look at this, and you think “maybe this was the ultimate way to save labor. I mean, this was good enough. And you didn't have to build and maintain these roads to make this work”  so maybe it was rational or just maybe they're just blinkered. I don't know. As for assembly with steel, I think there's some values involved in that. I don't know if you've ever seen one of those things they had in Mesoamerica called Macuahuitl. They're wooden clubs with obsidian blades on them and they are sharp as hell. You don't run your finger along the edge because they just slice it open. An obsidian blade is pretty much sharper than any iron or steel blade and it doesn't rust. Nice. But it's much more brittle. So okay, they're there, and the Spaniards were really afraid of them. Because a single blow from these heavy sharp blades could kill a horse. They saw people whack off the head of a horse carrying a big strong guy with a single blow! So they're really dangerous, but they're not long-lasting. Part of the deal was that the values around conflict were different in the sense that conflict in Mesoamerica wasn't a matter of sending out foot soldiers in grunts, it was a chance for soldiers to get individual glory and prestige. This was associated with having these very elaborately beautiful weapons that you killed people with. So maybe not having steel worked better for their values and what they were trying to do at war. That would've lasted for years and I mean, that's just a guess. But you can imagine a scenario where they're not just blinkered but instead expressive on the basis of their different values. This is hugely speculative. There's a wonderful book by Ross Hassig about old Aztec warfare. It's an amazing book which is about the military history of The Aztecs and it's really quite interesting. He talks about this a little bit but he finally just says we don't know why they didn't develop all these technologies, but this worked for them.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. Yeah, it's kind of similar to China not developing gunpowder into an actual ballistic material––Charles C. Mann   Or Japan giving up the gun! They actually banned guns during the Edo period. The Portuguese introduced guns and the Japanese used them, and they said “Ahhh nope! Don't want them.” and they banned them. This turned out to be a terrible idea when Perry came in the 1860s. But for a long time, supposedly under the Edo period, Japan had the longest period of any nation ever without a foreign war. Dwarkesh Patel   Hmm. Interesting. Yeah, it's concerning when you think the lack of war might make you vulnerable in certain ways. Charles C. Mann   Yeah, that's a depressing thought.Religious DemoralizationDwarkesh Patel   Right. In Fukuyama's The End of History, he's obviously arguing that liberal democracy will be the final form of government everywhere. But there's this point he makes at the end where he's like, “Yeah, but maybe we need a small war every 50 years or so just to make sure people remember how bad it can get and how to deal with it.” Anyway, when the epidemic started in the New World, surely the Indians must have had some story or superstitious explanation–– some way of explaining what was happening. What was it?Charles C. Mann   You have to remember, the germ theory of disease didn't exist at the time. So neither the Spaniards, or the English, or the native people, had a clear idea of what was going on. In fact, both of them thought of it as essentially a spiritual event, a religious event. You went into areas that were bad, and the air was bad. That was malaria, right? That was an example. To them, it was God that was in control of the whole business. There's a line from my distant ancestor––the Governor Bradford of Plymouth Colony, who's my umpteenth, umpteenth grandfather, that's how waspy I am, he's actually my ancestor––about how God saw fit to clear the natives for us. So they see all of this in really religious terms, and more or less native people did too! So they thought over and over again that “we must have done something bad for this to have happened.” And that's a very powerful demoralizing thing. Your God either punished you or failed you. And this was it. This is one of the reasons that Christianity was able to make inroads. People thought “Their god is coming in and they seem to be less harmed by these diseases than people with our God.” Now, both of them are completely misinterpreting what's going on! But if you have that kind of spiritual explanation, it makes sense for you to say, “Well, maybe I should hit up their God.”Critiques of Civilization Collapse TheoriesDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, super fascinating. There's been a lot of books written in the last few decades about why civilizations collapse. There's Joseph Tainter's book, there's Jared Diamond's book. Do you feel like any of them actually do a good job of explaining how these different Indian societies collapsed over time?Charles C. Mann   No. Well not the ones that I've read. And there are two reasons for that. One is that it's not really a mystery. If you have a society that's epidemiologically naive, and smallpox sweeps in and kills 30% of you, measles kills 10% of you, and this all happens in a short period of time, that's really tough! I mean COVID killed one million people in the United States. That's 1/330th of the population. And it wasn't even particularly the most economically vital part of the population. It wasn't kids, it was elderly people like my aunt–– I hope I'm not sounding callous when I'm describing it like a demographer. Because I don't mean it that way. But it caused enormous economic damage and social conflict and so forth. Now, imagine something that's 30 or 40 times worse than that, and you have no explanation for it at all. It's kind of not a surprise to me that this is a super challenge. What's actually amazing is the number of nations that survived and came up with ways to deal with this incredible loss.That relates to the second issue, which is that it's sort of weird to talk about collapse in the ways that they sometimes do. Like both of them talk about the Mayan collapse. But there are 30 million Mayan people still there. They were never really conquered by the Spaniards. The Spaniards were still waging giant wars in Yucatan in the 1590s. In the early 21st century, I went with my son to Chiapas, which is the southernmost exit province. And that is where the Commandante Cero and the rebellions were going on. We were looking at some Mayan ruins, and they were too beautiful, and I stayed too long, and we were driving back through the night on these terrible roads. And we got stopped by some of these guys with guns. I was like, “Oh God, not only have I got myself into this, I got my son into this.” And the guy comes and looks at us and says, “Who are you?” And I say that we're American tourists. And he just gets this disgusted look, and he says, “Go on.” And you know, the journalist in me takes over and I ask, “What do you mean, just go on?” And he says, “We're hunting for Mexicans.” And as I'm driving I'm like “Wait a minute, I'm in Mexico.” And that those were Mayans. All those guys were Maya people still fighting against the Spaniards. So it's kind of funny to say that their society collapsed when there are Mayan radio stations, there are Maya schools, and they're speaking Mayan in their home. It's true, they don't have giant castles anymore. But, it's odd to think of that as collapse. They seem like highly successful people who have dealt pretty well with a lot of foreign incursions. So there's this whole aspect of “What do you mean collapse?” And you see that in Against the Grain, the James Scott book, where you think, “What do you mean barbarians?” If you're an average Maya person, working as a farmer under the purview of these elites in the big cities probably wasn't all that great. So after the collapse, you're probably better off. So all of that I feel is important in this discussion of collapse. I think it's hard to point to collapses that either have very clear exterior causes or are really collapses of the environment. Particularly the environmental sort that are pictured in books like Diamond has, where he talks about Easter Island. The striking thing about that is we know pretty much what happened to all those trees. Easter Island is this little speck of land, in the middle of the ocean, and Dutch guys come there and it's the only wood around for forever, so they cut down all the trees to use it for boat repair, ship repair, and they enslave most of the people who are living there. And we know pretty much what happened. There's no mystery about it.Virginia Company + HubrisDwarkesh Patel   Why did the British government and the king keep subsidizing and giving sanctions to the Virginia Company, even after it was clear that this is not especially profitable and half the people that go die? Why didn't they just stop?Charles C. Mann   That's a really good question. It's a super good question. I don't really know if we have a satisfactory answer, because it was so stupid for them to keep doing that. It was such a loss for so long. So you have to say, they were thinking, not purely economically. Part of it is that the backers of the Virginia Company, in sort of classic VC style, when things were going bad, they lied about it. They're burning through their cash, they did these rosy presentations, and they said, “It's gonna be great! We just need this extra money.” Kind of the way that Uber did. There's this tremendous burn rate and now the company says you're in tremendous trouble because it turns out that it's really expensive to provide all these calves and do all this stuff. The cheaper prices that made people like me really happy about it are vanishing. So, you know, I think future business studies will look at those rosy presentations and see that they have a kind of analogy to the ones that were done with the Virginia Company. A second thing is that there was this dog-headed belief kind of based on the inability to understand longitude and so forth, that the Americas were far narrower than they actually are. I reproduced this in 1493. There were all kinds of maps in Britain at the time showing these little skinny Philippines-like islands. So there's the thought that you just go up the Chesapeake, go a couple 100 miles, and you're gonna get to the Pacific into China. So there's this constant searching for a passage to China through this thought to be very narrow path. Sir Francis Drake and some other people had shown that there was a West Coast so they thought the whole thing was this narrow, Panama-like landform. So there's this geographical confusion. Finally, there's the fact that the Spaniards had found all this gold and silver, which is an ideal commodity, because it's not perishable: it's small, you can put it on your ship and bring it back, and it's just great in every way. It's money, essentially. Basically, you dig up money in the hills and there's this long-standing belief that there's got to be more of that in the Americas, we just need to find out where. So there's always that hope. Lastly, there's the Imperial bragging rights. You know, we can't be the only guys with a colony. You see that later in the 19th century when Germany became a nation and one of the first things the Dutch said was “Let's look for pieces of Africa that the rest of Europe hasn't claimed,” and they set up their own mini colonial empire. So there's this kind of “Keeping Up with the Joneses” aspect, it just seems to be sort of deep in the European ruling class. So then you got to have an empire that in this weird way, seems very culturally part of it. I guess it's the same for many other places. As soon as you feel like you have a state together, you want to index other things. You see that over and over again, all over the world. So that's part of it. All those things, I think, contributed to this. Outright lying, this delusion, other various delusions, plus hubris.Dwarkesh Patel   It seems that colonial envy has today probably spread to China. I don't know too much about it, but I hear that the Silk Road stuff they're doing is not especially economically wise. Is this kind of like when you have the impulse where if you're a nation trying to rise, you have that “I gotta go here, I gotta go over there––Charles C. Mann   Yeah and “Show what a big guy I am. Yeah,––China's Silver TradeDwarkesh Patel   Exactly. So speaking of China, I want to ask you about the silver trade. Excuse another tortured analogy, but when I was reading that chapter where you're describing how the Spanish silver was ending up with China and how the Ming Dynasty caused too much inflation. They needed more reliable mediums of exchange, so they had to give up real goods from China, just in order to get silver, which is just a medium of exchange––but it's not creating more apples, right? I was thinking about how this sounds a bit like Bitcoin today, (obviously to a much smaller magnitude) but in the sense that you're using up goods. It's a small amount of electricity, all things considered, but you're having to use up real energy in order to construct this medium of exchange. Maybe somebody can claim that this is necessary because of inflation or some other policy mistake and you can compare it to the Ming Dynasty. But what do you think about this analogy? Is there a similar situation where real goods are being exchanged for just a medium of exchange?Charles C. Mann   That's really interesting. I mean, on some level, that's the way money works, right? I go into a store, like a Starbucks and I buy a coffee, then I hand them a piece of paper with some drawings on it, and they hand me an actual coffee in return for a piece of paper. So the mysteriousness of money is kind of amazing. History is of course replete with examples of things that people took very seriously as money. Things that to us seem very silly like the cowry shell or in the island of Yap where they had giant stones! Those were money and nobody ever carried them around. You transferred the ownership of the stone from one person to another person to buy something. I would get some coconuts or gourds or whatever, and now you own that stone on the hill. So there's a tremendous sort of mysteriousness about the human willingness to assign value to arbitrary things such as (in Bitcoin's case) strings of zeros and ones. That part of it makes sense to me. What's extraordinary is when the effort to create a medium of exchange ends up costing you significantly–– which is what you're talking about in China where people had a medium of exchange, but they had to work hugely to get that money. I don't have to work hugely to get a $1 bill, right? It's not like I'm cutting down a tree and smashing the papers to pulp and printing. But you're right, that's what they're kind of doing in China. And that's, to a lesser extent, what you're doing in Bitcoin. So I hadn't thought about this, but Bitcoin in this case is using computer cycles and energy. To me, it's absolutely extraordinary the degree to which people who are Bitcoin miners are willing to upend their lives to get cheap energy. A guy I know is talking about setting up small nuclear plants as part of his idea for climate change and he wants to set them up in really weird remote areas. And I was asking “Well who would be your customers?” and he says Bitcoin people would move to these nowhere places so they could have these pocket nukes to privately supply their Bitcoin habits. And that's really crazy! To completely upend your life to create something that you hope is a medium of exchange that will allow you to buy the things that you're giving up. So there's a kind of funny aspect to this. That was partly what was happening in China. Unfortunately, China's very large, so they were able to send off all this stuff to Mexico so that they could get the silver to pay their taxes, but it definitely weakened the country.Wizards vs. ProphetsDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, and that story you were talking about, El Salvador actually tried it. They were trying to set up a Bitcoin city next to this volcano and use the geothermal energy from the volcano to incentivize people to come there and mine cheap Bitcoin. Staying on the theme of China, do you think the prophets were more correct, or the wizards were more correct for that given time period? Because we have the introduction of potato, corn, maize, sweet potatoes, and this drastically increases the population until it reaches a carrying capacity. Obviously, what follows is the other kinds of ecological problems this causes and you describe these in the book. Is this evidence of the wizard worldview that potatoes appear and populations balloon? Or are the prophets like “No, no, carrying capacity will catch up to us eventually.”Charles C. Mann   Okay, so let me interject here. For those members of your audience who don't know what we're talking about. I wrote this book, The Wizard and the Prophet. And it's about these two camps that have been around for a long time who have differing views regarding how we think about energy resources, the environment, and all those issues. The wizards, that's my name for them––Stuart Brand called them druids and, in fact, originally, the title was going to involve the word druid but my editor said, “Nobody knows what a Druid is” so I changed it into wizards–– and anyway the wizards would say that science and technology properly applied can allow you to produce your way out of these environmental dilemmas. You turn on the science machine, essentially, and then we can escape these kinds of dilemmas. The prophets say “No. Natural systems are governed by laws and there's an inherent carrying capacity or limit or planetary boundary.” there are a bunch of different names for them that say you can't do more than so much.So what happened in China is that European crops came over. One of China's basic geographical conditions is that it's 20% of the Earth's habitable surface area, or it has 20% of the world's population, but only has seven or 8% of the world's above-ground freshwater. There are no big giant lakes like we have in the Great Lakes. And there are only a couple of big rivers, the Yangtze and the Yellow River. The main staple crop in China has to be grown in swimming pools, and that's you know, rice. So there's this paradox, which is “How do you keep people fed with rice in a country that has very little water?” If you want a shorthand history of China, that's it. So prophets believe that there are these planetary boundaries. In history, these are typically called Malthusian Limits after Malthus and the question is: With the available technology at a certain time, how many people can you feed before there's misery?The great thing about history is it provides evidence for both sides. Because in the short run, what happened when American crops came in is that the potato, sweet potato, and maize corn were the first staple crops that were dryland crops that could be grown in the western half of China, which is very, very dry and hot and mountainous with very little water. Population soars immediately afterward, but so does social unrest, misery, and so forth. In the long run, that becomes adaptable when China becomes a wealthy and powerful nation. In the short run, which is not so short (it's a couple of centuries), it really causes tremendous chaos and suffering. So, this provides evidence for both sides. One increases human capacity, and the second unquestionably increases human numbers and that leads to tremendous erosion, land degradation, and human suffering.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's a thick coin with two sides. By the way, I realized I haven't gotten to all the Wizard and Prophet questions, and there are a lot of them. So I––Charles C. Mann   I certainly have time! I'm enjoying the conversation. One of the weird things about podcasts is that, as far as I can tell, the average podcast interviewer is far more knowledgeable and thoughtful than the average sort of mainstream journalist interviewer and I just find that amazing. I don't understand it. So I think you guys should be hired. You know, they should make you switch roles or something.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, maybe. Charles C. Mann   It's a pleasure to be asked these interesting questions about subjects I find fascinating.Dwarkesh Patel   Oh, it's my pleasure to get to talk to you and to get to ask these questions. So let me ask about the Wizard and the Prophet. I just interviewed WIll McCaskill, and we were talking about what ends up mattering most in history. I asked him about Norman Borlaug and said that he's saved a billion lives. But then McCaskill pointed out, “Well, that's an exceptional result” and he doesn't think the technology is that contingent. So if Borlaug hadn't existed, somebody else would have discovered what he discovered about short wheat stalks anyways. So counterfactually, in a world where Ebola doesn't exist, it's not like a billion people die, maybe a couple million more die until the next guy comes around. That was his view. Do you agree? What is your response?Charles C. Mann   To some extent, I agree. It's very likely that in the absence of one scientist, some other scientist would have discovered this, and I mentioned in the book, in fact, that there's a guy named Swaminathan, a remarkable Indian scientist, who's a step behind him and did much of the same work. At the same time, the individual qualities of Borlaug are really quite remarkable. The insane amount of work and dedication that he did.. it's really hard to imagine. The fact is that he was going against many of the breeding plant breeding dogmas of his day, that all matters! His insistence on feeding the poor… he did remarkable things. Yes, I think some of those same things would have been discovered but it would have been a huge deal if it had taken 20 years later. I mean, that would have been a lot of people who would have been hurt in the interim! Because at the same time, things like the end of colonialism, the discovery of antibiotics, and so forth, were leading to a real population rise, and the amount of human misery that would have occurred, it's really frightening to think about. So, in some sense, I think he's (Will McCaskill) right. But I wouldn't be so glib about those couple of million people.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah. And another thing you might be concerned about is that given the hostile attitude that people had towards the green revolution right after, if the actual implementation of these different strains of biochar sent in India, if that hadn't been delayed, it's not that weird to imagine a scenario where the governments there are just totally won over by the prophets and they decide to not implant this technology at all. If you think about what happened to nuclear power in the 70s, in many different countries, maybe something similar could have happened to the Green Revolution. So it's important to beat the Prophet. Maybe that's not the correct way to say it. But one way you could put it is: It's important to beat the prophets before the policies are passed. You have to get a good bit of technology in there.Charles C. Mann   This is just my personal opinion, but you want to listen to the prophets about what the problems are. They're incredible at diagnosing problems, and very frequently, they're right about those things. The social issues about the Green Revolution… they were dead right, they were completely right. I don't know if you then adopt their solutions. It's a little bit like how I feel about my editors–– my editors will often point out problems and I almost never agree with their solutions. The fact is that Borlaug did develop this wheat that came into India, but it probably wouldn't have been nearly as successful if Swaminathan hadn't changed that wheat to make it more acceptable to the culture of India. That was one of the most important parts for me in this book. When I went to Tamil Nadu, I listened to this and I thought, “Oh! I never heard about this part where they took Mexican wheat, and they made it into Indian wheat.” You know, I don't even know if Borlaug ever knew or really grasped that they really had done that! By the way, a person for you to interview is Marci Baranski–– she's got a forthcoming book about the history of the Green Revolution and she sounds great. I'm really looking forward to reading it. So here's a plug for her.In Defense of Regulatory DelaysDwarkesh Patel   So if we applied that particular story to today, let's say that we had regulatory agencies like the FDA back then that were as powerful back then as they are now. Do you think it's possible that these new advances would have just dithered in some approval process that took years or decades to complete? If you just backtest our current process for implementing technological solutions, are you concerned that something like the green revolution could not have happened or that it would have taken way too long or something?Charles C. Mann   It's possible. Bureaucracies can always go rogue, and the government is faced with this kind of impossible problem. There's a current big political argument about whether former President Trump should have taken these top-secret documents to his house in Florida and done whatever he wanted to? Just for the moment, let's accept the argument that these were like super secret toxic documents and should not have been in a basement. Let's just say that's true. Whatever the President says is declassified is declassified. Let us say that's true.  Obviously, that would be bad. You would not want to have that kind of informal process because you can imagine all kinds of things–– you wouldn't want to have that kind of informal process in place. But nobody has ever imagined that you would do that because it's sort of nutty in that scenario.Now say you write a law and you create a bureaucracy for declassification and immediately add more delay, you make things harder, you add in the problems of the bureaucrats getting too much power, you know–– all the things that you do. So you have this problem with the government, which is that people occasionally do things that you would never imagine. It's completely screwy. So you put in regulatory mechanisms to stop them from doing that and that impedes everybody else. In the case of the FDA, it was founded in the 30 when some person produced this thing called elixir sulfonamides. They killed hundreds of people! It was a flat-out poison! And, you know, hundreds of people died. You think like who would do that? But somebody did that. So they created this entire review mechanism to make sure it never happened again, which introduced delay, and then something was solidified. Which they did start here because the people who invented that didn't even do the most cursory kind of check. So you have this constant problem. I'm sympathetic to the dilemma faced by the government here in which you either let through really bad things done by occasional people, or you screw up everything for everybody else. I was tracing it crudely, but I think you see the trade-off. So the question is, how well can you manage this trade-off? I would argue that sometimes it's well managed. It's kind of remarkable that we got vaccines produced by an entirely new mechanism, in record time, and they passed pretty rigorous safety reviews and were given to millions and millions and millions of people with very, very few negative effects. I mean, that's a real regulatory triumph there, right?So that would be the counter-example: you have this new thing that you can feed people and so forth. They let it through very quickly. On the other hand, you have things like genetically modified salmon and trees, which as far as I can tell, especially for the chestnuts, they've made extraordinary efforts to test. I'm sure that those are going to be in regulatory hell for years to come. *chuckles* You know, I just feel that there's this great problem. These flaws that you identified, I would like to back off and say that this is a problem sort of inherent to government. They're always protecting us against the edge case. The edge case sets the rules, and that ends up, unless you're very careful, making it very difficult for everybody else.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah. And the vaccines are an interesting example here. Because one of the things you talked about in the book–– one of the possible solutions to climate change is that you can have some kind of geoengineering. Right? I think you mentioned in the book that as long as even one country tries this, then they can effectively (for relatively modest amounts of money), change the atmosphere. But then I look at the failure of every government to approve human challenge trials. This is something that seems like an obvious thing to do and we would have potentially saved hundreds of thousands of lives during COVID by speeding up the vaccine approval. So I wonder, maybe the international collaboration is strong enough that something like geoengineering actually couldn't happen because something like human challenge trials didn't happen.Geoengineering Charles C. Mann   So let me give a plug here for a fun novel by my friend, Neal Stephenson, called Termination Shock. Which is about some rich person just doing it. Just doing geoengineering. The fact is that it's actually not actually against the law to fire off rockets into the stratosphere. In his case, it's a giant gun that shoots shells full of sulfur into the upper atmosphere. So I guess the question is, what timescale do you think is appropriate for all this? I feel quite confident that there will be geoengineering trials within the next 10 years. Is that fast enough? That's a real judgment call. I think people like David Keith and the other advocates for geoengineering would have said it should have happened already and that it's way, way too slow. People who are super anxious about moral hazard and precautionary principles say that that's way, way too fast. So you have these different constituencies. It's hard for me to think off the top of my head of an example where these regulatory agencies have actually totally throttled something in a long-lasting way as opposed to delaying it for 10 years. I don't mean to imply that 10 years is nothing. But it's really killing off something. Is there an example you can think of?Dwarkesh Patel   Well, it's very dependent on where you think it would have been otherwise, like people say maybe it was just bound to be the state. Charles C. Mann   I think that was a very successful case of regulatory capture, in which the proponents of the technology successfully created this crazy…. One of the weird things I really wanted to explain about nuclear stuff is not actually in the book.

covid-19 god united states america american spotify texas history world president donald trump english europe china earth japan water mexico british speaking west germany food africa ai christianity nature european italy japanese spanish north carolina ireland north america spain staying brazil african irish uber east indian bitcoin mexican massachusetts natural code silicon valley britain catholic washington post helps starbucks mississippi civil war millions dutch philippines native americans columbus prophet west coast pleasure wizard pacific vikings haiti fda diamond brazilian americas rebellions latino native prophets edinburgh new world excuse significance nuclear vc wizards similar khan indians portuguese scientific panama underrated el salvador mexico city population bolivia uncovering anarchy central america west africa grain ebola frontier imperial keeping up american revolution empires great lakes mayan south asia cort british empire clive pyramids cortes industrial revolution american west moby dick silk road puebla adam smith aztec joneses oh god cunha bengal druid critiques bureaucracy largely aztecs eurasia edo chiapas c4 undo in defense civilizations mayans chesapeake western hemisphere brazilians wizardry great plains tamil nadu yap geoengineering pizarro new laws easter island incas yucatan spaniards david graeber your god neal stephenson jared diamond niall ferguson outright green revolution new revelations las casas mesoamerica mughal east india company teotihuacan agriculture organization hammurabi tenochtitlan huck finn paul maurice james scott mccaskill mexica wilberforce malthus brazilian amazon william powell agroforestry yangtze sir francis drake ming dynasty spanish empire darwins david keith mesa verde david deutsch william dalrymple northern mexico yellow river plymouth colony bartolome norman borlaug chaco canyon bruce sterling charles c mann laurent binet mississippi valley charles mann bengalis acemoglu borlaug triple alliance will macaskill americas before columbus virginia company frederick jackson turner joseph tainter east india trading company murray gell mann north american west hohokam shape tomorrow prophet two remarkable scientists
Talking Books
Aliengg7.co.uk The First Chapters: A Philosophers Dream 114 by David Keith Greenaway

Talking Books

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 30:30


David Greenaway has spent most of his life battling mental illness/addiction issues. Despitethe many uphill struggles David has learnt to adapt his life and, overall maintain a status quo that enables him to lead a reasonably balanced lifestyle. The dark days in his life he has found solace in those close to him be they […] The post Aliengg7.co.uk The First Chapters: A Philosophers Dream 114 by David Keith Greenaway appeared first on WebTalkRadio.net.

TILclimate
TIL about electric cars

TILclimate

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 13:31 Very Popular


Electric vehicles (EVs) are being touted as a major solution to climate change. But why is that? How do they work and what kinds of changes are needed as more EVs hit the road? To dig into this, we brought in MIT Sloan Prof. David Keith, who studies transportation technology. For a deeper dive and additional resources related to this episode, visit: https://climate.mit.edu/podcasts/til-about-electric-carsFor more episodes of TILclimate by the MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative, visit tilclimate.mit.edu. CreditsLaur Hesse Fisher, Host and ProducerDavid Lishansky, Editor and ProducerAaron Krol, Associate ProducerBarrett Golding, Script WriterIlana Hirschfeld, Production AssistantMichelle Harris, Fact CheckerSylvia Scharf, Education SpecialistMusic by Blue Dot SessionsArtwork by Aaron Krol

Salty Nerd Podcast
Stephen King Week: Firestarter (1984)

Salty Nerd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 49:25


Firestarter movie review from the Salty Nerds has them marveling at just how much Netflix's Stranger Things ripped this movie off. We all know that the Duffer Brothers were heavily inspired by the work of Stephen King when they were making Stranger Things, but they essentially ripped off the Firestarter 1984 movie starring Drew Barrymore as a child gifted with powerful psychic abilities that is relentlessly pursued by a secretive government agency who wants to either control her or kill her. Also starring David Keith, Martin Sheen, and George C. Scott as a ponytailed Native American (no joke), this is one of Stephen King's best known horror movies and set the stage for Drew Barrymore to star in E.T. What is your Firestarter 1984 movie review? Did you love it? Hate it? Did it make you want to burn stuff down? Let us know in our Discord community! It's free to join and a great place to interact with the Salty Nerds and share your thoughts! Join for free here: http://www.saltynerddiscord.com And if you are a fan of a good horror podcast, scifi podcast, fantasy podcast, and movie review podcast, then be sure to check out our members area. For just $5 a month you get access to a huge uncensored ad-free back catalog of content, as well as 4 new exclusive episodes every month. Sign up here to get access: ▷ SUPPORT THE SHOW: http://www.saltynerdclub.com/ By becoming a Patron of the Salty Nerd Podcast you help us to create great content AND get awesome perks! Check out our Patreon page through the link above for more detail. Thank you! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/saltynerd/support

Macro n Cheese
Is Geoengineering the Answer to Climate Crisis? with David Keith

Macro n Cheese

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 40:50


We often talk about climate change on this podcast. The IPCC deadline is hanging over our heads like the sword of Damocles. This week Steve talks to David Keith, a professor of both Applied Physics and Applied Policy at Harvard, and author of A Case for Climate Engineering. Climate engineering, a term for solar geoengineering or solar radiation modification, would enable us to alter the Earth's reflectivity and reduce some of the climate risks that come from accumulated carbon dioxide. Keith is quick to point out that this is not a silver bullet but should be considered as part of a multi-pronged strategy. Managing climate risk involves four basic actions: Cut emissions by decarbonizing the energy system Remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere Solar radiation modification, or solar geoengineering Adaption to reduce the harms of climate change on crops, people, and ecosystems While there's no way to address climate change without replacing our energy system, it's not the entire solution. If we stop all CO2 emissions today, the climate problem won't improve, it will merely stop getting worse. We won't have reduced the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. Thus the case for climate engineering. The discussion includes the different roles for scientists and activists. They look at limitations, or flaws, in the IPCC report, and consider the importance of separating science from strategy. David Keith has worked near the interface between climate science, energy, technology, and public policy for 25 years. He took first prize in Canada's National Physics Prize exam, won MIT's Prize for Excellence in Experimental Physics, and is one of Time Magazine's heroes of the environment. He's a professor of Applied Physics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and founder of Carbon Engineering, a company developing technology to capture CO2 from the ambient air to make carbon neutral hydrocarbon fuels. He is author of “A Case for Climate Engineering.” @DKeithClimate on Twitter

Frenchtown
Epilogue

Frenchtown

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 17:12


"Frenchtown" was written and produced by Jim Gatto. The principal readers are Daina Schatz and Jeffrey Anbinder The Technical Director is David Keith. Introductory and “playout” music was written and performed by Lisa “Spike" Norman. Frenchtown's soundtrack is available at www.bluedogaudiopro.com “Whoever You Are,” and “I'm Coming Home Again,” were written by Jim Gatto. “It's Almost Tomorrow” was written by Jim Gatto based on an idea from Lorraine Nelson. Additional musical recording was provided by Chrissy Gardner, Ryan Gardner, Gracie Price, and Megan Keith. The Frenchtown graphic design is courtesy of Carolyn Komerska. Special thanks go to associate producer, Kathy Keith, and to Lorraine Nelson, Stephanie Levine, and Elaine Bessette, also to Stephen and Madeline Anbinder. "Frenchtown" is a fictionalized memoir. Although some of the places Mentioned existed at one time, they are either gone now or vastly different from what they were over 60 years ago, when Frenchtown takes place. The characters are composites of friends and relatives but they were not modeled on individuals who actually existed. Any resemblance to people or places is unintentional and coincidental. The entire contents of Frenchtown is copyrighted. For further information about Frenchtown and its contributors, please send inquiries to Frenchtowninfo@gmail.com

Death By DVD
New episodes every TWO weeks

Death By DVD

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 7:18


Brand new episodes of DEATH BY DVD are currently available for your listening displeasure EVERY TWO WEEKS. Two, count 'em 2, weeks! Be sure to subscribe at www.deathbydvd.com to receive e-mail updates on new episodes & when they come out + news, merch discounts & more. HEY, while you're still here.. have you heard...DEATH BY DVD PRESENTS : WHO SHOT HANK? The first of its kind (On this show, at least) an all original narrative audio drama exploring the murder of this shows very host, HANK THE WORLDS GREATEST! Explore WHO SHOT HANK, starting with the MURDER!  A Death By DVD New Year Mystery  WHO SHOT HANK : PART ONE  WHO SHOT HANK : PART TWO  WHO SHOT HANK : PART THREE  WHO SHOT HANK : PART FOUR  WHO SHOT HANK PART 5 : THE BEGINNING OF THE END WHO SHOT HANK PART 6 THE FINALE : EXEUNT OMNES   The Death By DVD SENTINEL remix theme by LINUS FITNESS-CENTRE

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Frenchtown
...And, to All, A Good Night.

Frenchtown

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 39:18


"Frenchtown" was written and produced by Jim Gatto. The principal readers are Daina Schatz and Jeffrey Anbinder The Technical Director is David Keith. Introductory and “playout” music was written and performed by Lisa “Spike" Norman. Frenchtown's soundtrack is available at www.bluedogaudiopro.com “Whoever You Are,” and “I'm Coming Home Again,” were written by Jim Gatto. “It's Almost Tomorrow” was written by Jim Gatto based on an idea from Lorraine Nelson. Additional musical recording was provided by Chrissy Gardner, Ryan Gardner, Gracie Price, and Megan Keith. The Frenchtown graphic design is courtesy of Carolyn Komerska. Special thanks go to associate producer, Kathy Keith, and to Lorraine Nelson, Stephanie Levine, and Elaine Bessette, also to Stephen and Madeline Anbinder. "Frenchtown" is a fictionalized memoir. Although some of the places Mentioned existed at one time, they are either gone now or vastly different from what they were over 60 years ago, when Frenchtown takes place. The characters are composites of friends and relatives but they were not modeled on individuals who actually existed. Any resemblance to people or places is unintentional and coincidental. The entire contents of Frenchtown is copyrighted. For further information about Frenchtown and its contributors, please send inquiries to Frenchtowninfo@gmail.com

Death By DVD
That's Politics, Innit? : Death By DVD does Withnail & I

Death By DVD

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 123:26


On this episode of Death By DVD we've gone on holiday by mistake. The 1987 British black comedy WITHNAIL & I is discussed at length! Possibly the quintessential British movie, join THE Linus Fitness-Centre & Harry-Scott as they pour a shot of lighter fluid and get into the politics of WITHNAIL & I. Two out-of-work actors -- the anxious, luckless Marwood (Paul McGann) and his acerbic, alcoholic friend, Withnail (Richard E. Grant) -- spend their days drifting between their squalid flat, the unemployment office and the pub. When they take a holiday "by mistake" at the country house of Withnail's flamboyantly gay uncle, Monty (Richard Griffiths), they encounter the unpleasant side of the English countryside: tedium, terrifying locals and torrential rain.This is an episode you DON'T wanna miss! And remember all hairdressers are in the employment of the government. Hair are your aerials. They pick up signals from the cosmos and transmit them directly into the brain. This is the reason bald-headed men are uptight.HEY, while you're still here.. have you heard...DEATH BY DVD PRESENTS : WHO SHOT HANK? The first of its kind (On this show, at least) an all original narrative audio drama exploring the murder of this shows very host, HANK THE WORLDS GREATEST! Explore WHO SHOT HANK, starting with the MURDER!  A Death By DVD New Year Mystery  WHO SHOT HANK : PART ONE  WHO SHOT HANK : PART TWO  WHO SHOT HANK : PART THREE  WHO SHOT HANK : PART FOUR  WHO SHOT HANK PART 5 : THE BEGINNING OF THE END WHO SHOT HANK PART 6 THE FINALE : EXEUNT OMNES   The Death By DVD SENTINEL remix theme by LINUS FITNESS-CENTRE

christmas love death halloween movies donald trump english men politics british happy new year murder fun podcasting horror spirituality aliens humor hair curse alien star trek shooting scream ghostbusters true crime dracula frankenstein new year's eve horror movies jordan peele mummy john carpenter christmas story cannes james cameron werewolf ridley scott twilight zone horror stories life and death william shatner nye krampus lancaster scary stories macdonald halloween kills wes craven suspense movie reviews spock john wayne murder mysteries norm macdonald shudder a24 swamp thing swimmers wolfman oliver stone black christmas quantum leap yule horror films westerns american psycho captain kirk tcm werner herzog phantasm herzog george a romero roger ebert 1960s firestarter leonard nimoy true crime podcasts george romero dario argento reservoir dogs roger corman thrillers movie podcast dolemite criterion christian slater giallo hunchback scream queens universal monsters troma mystery science theater ryan seacrest blue velvet taki grindhouse boris karloff film podcast munchies phan gene roddenberry drive in movies maggots milligan alamo drafthouse horror podcasts rod serling tall man classic movies seasons greetings fangoria keith david christmas podcast podernfamily monster movies zombi danny brown harry dean stanton game podcast lucio fulci trekkies richard e grant john brennan severin classic horror patty hearst wild bunch bob clark lloyd kaufman jim breuer christmas horror burt lancaster joe bob briggs deep red gorn diana prince fade to black stockwell sam peckinpah rare exports turner classic movies movie commentary new year's evil rudy ray moore maggie rogers movie critics holiday horror don coscarelli rue morgue cult movies elia kazan dean stockwell star trek the original series sydney pollack spiritual podcast film discussions video nasties star trek vi linnea quigley mick garris alain delon innit halloween podcast vinegar syndrome withnail 80shorror paul mcgann fathom events vampira movie show biro star trek movies hss indie horror frank henenlotter clement clarke moore ukpodcast twas the night before christmas moviecast cult film black magick british comedy french films david keith indiepodcast joe bob italian horror scary christmas david gregory movie review podcast horror hosts 42nd street mystery podcast driller killer horrorcore horror movie podcast john cheever cheever gialli symbionese liberation army angus scrimm star trek podcast coscarelli bruce robinson night birds british horror warren oates irish podcasts nekromantik cult podcast joseph losey severin films 90s horror khan noonien singh underground podcast hanksgiving dennis christopher garf british podcast id channel sci fi podcast reggie bannister christine chubbuck german podcast we wish you a merry christmas john bloom humor podcast frank perry horror history cult cinema horrorcast exploitation films stephen bissette brad henderson phans scripted podcast mike baldwin cult horror xmas podcast stark trek intervision forgotten films tarantino star trek zombie podcast unearthed films steve bissette science fiction podcast andy milligan 1980s movies john amplas monstervision andrew prine stephen biro scary stories podcast best movie podcast critic podcast samantha phillips grindhouse releasing graveyard carz witchraft hemi cuda horrorpod manny serrano trick baby best horror podcast
Frenchtown
Chapter Twenty- One Year Later: Johnny's Tour and Joey's Marker

Frenchtown

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 22:50


"Frenchtown" was written and produced by Jim Gatto. The principal readers are Daina Schatz and Jeffrey Anbinder The Technical Director is David Keith. Introductory and “playout” music was written and performed by Lisa “Spike" Norman. Frenchtown's soundtrack is available at www.bluedogaudiopro.com “Whoever You Are,” and “I'm Coming Home Again,” were written by Jim Gatto. “It's Almost Tomorrow” was written by Jim Gatto based on an idea from Lorraine Nelson. Additional musical recording was provided by Chrissy Gardner, Ryan Gardner, Gracie Price, and Megan Keith. The Frenchtown graphic design is courtesy of Carolyn Komerska. Special thanks go to associate producer, Kathy Keith, and to Lorraine Nelson, Stephanie Levine, and Elaine Bessette, also to Stephen and Madeline Anbinder. "Frenchtown" is a fictionalized memoir. Although some of the places Mentioned existed at one time, they are either gone now or vastly different from what they were over 60 years ago, when Frenchtown takes place. The characters are composites of friends and relatives but they were not modeled on individuals who actually existed. Any resemblance to people or places is unintentional and coincidental. The entire contents of Frenchtown is copyrighted. For further information about Frenchtown and its contributors, please send inquiries to Frenchtowninfo@gmail.com

The Guys Review
Color Out of Space

The Guys Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 74:14


Color out of space Welcome to The Guys Review, where we review media, products and experiences.  **READ APPLE REVIEWS/Fan Mail**Mention Twitter DM group - like pinned tweet @The_GuysReviewRead emails theguysreviewpod@gmail.comTwitter Poll Color Out of Space Directed: Richard StanleyWritten by H.P Lovecraft, Richard Stanley, Scarlett Amaris Starring:  Nicolas CageJoey RichardsonMadeleine ArthurElliot KnightTommy Chong Released: 20 September 2019 Budget: $6M Box Office: $1,023,510M Ratings:   IMDb 6.1/10 Rotten Tomatoes 86% Metacritic 70% Google Users 73%  Here art thine Awards My Lord Tucker the Wanker second Earl of Wessex. Lord of the Furries. Heir of Lord baldy the one eyed snake wrestler. Protector of Freedom units. Step Sibling with funny feelings down stairs. Entertainer of uncles. Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films, USA 2021Bram Stoker Awards 2020CinEuphoria Awards 2021Fangoria Chainsaw Awards 2021Festival de cine Fantástico de Canarias Isla Calavera 2019Festival du nouveau cinéma 2019Fright Meter Awards 2020Grossmann Fantastic Film and Wine Festival 2020H.P. Lovecraft Film Festival - Portland 2019Hawaii Film Critics Society 2021IGN Summer Movie Awards 2020Sitges - Catalonian International Film Festival 2019Splat! FilmFest 2019 Plot: In the wake of his wife Theresa's mastectomy, Nathan Gardner moves his family, including children Lavinia, Benny, and Jack, to his late father's farm. One night, a brilliantly glowing meteor crash-lands in their front yard, briefly traumatizing Jack. The next morning, hydrologist Ward Phillips, who is surveying the area for a dam development, along with the mayor and the sheriff of the nearby town of Arkham, arrive to see the meteor. That night, during a storm, Nathan and Lavinia witness the meteor being struck by numerous bolts of lightning. Ward notices that the groundwater has taken on an oily sheen and tests it. When his test strips begin to glow brightly with the Color, he advises the Gardners not to drink it. While notifying nearby resident Ezra of the contamination, he is shown a recording of sounds of unknown origin sounding beneath Ezra's house at night. Meanwhile, Jack becomes fixated on the property's well, observing strange plant growths and insects, as well as claiming to communicate with a 'friend' inside the well. A news crew arrives to interview Nathan about the meteor, but finds that it has vanished. Later, while Theresa is preparing dinner, she absentmindedly cuts off two of her fingers. As Nathan rushes her to the hospital, he leaves Benny in charge. On Nathan's request, Benny goes outside to put the farm's alpacas back in their stables, but does not return until late at night, claiming time had passed instantaneously for him. Meanwhile, Lavinia attempts multiple times to contact Nathan, but they are unable to hear each other through the phone. Upon the parents' return, Nathan lashes out at Benny and Lavinia with uncharacteristic rage. Later, Nathan becomes frustrated after finding that his most recent harvest of fruits has proven inedible, and Theresa snaps after losing a work client due to the faltering Internet connection, bringing the two to a fight. The same night, Lavinia tries to perform a Ritual using the Necronomicon and offering her blood to save her family, mutilating herself in the process. Theresa suddenly hears Jack and Benny screaming after entering the alpaca stables and rushes to their aid, but in the process, a bolt of Color fuses Theresa and Jack together into a deranged mass. Unable to start the car or call for help as all electronic devices have stopped functioning, and upon discovering sunlight harms Theresa and Jack, Nathan and the children carry them into the attic. Benny reveals that he had witnessed the alpacas after a horrible mutation due to the Color. Nathan decides to euthanize the alpacas with a shotgun after finding they have similarly fused together. Beginning to lose his sanity, Nathan also attempts to euthanize Theresa and Jack but is unable to bring himself to. Lavinia and Benny conspire to leave the farm using Lavinia's horse, but it runs from the property. Before returning inside, Benny insists he hears the family's dog inside the well, but upon climbing in, he is assimilated by the Color. Nathan displays more uncharacteristic rage and locks Lavinia in the attic with Theresa and Jack, who have turned to aggression. Ward and the sheriff are brought to the farm after a nearby resident discovers a fused mass of animals, and arrive just in time to break into the attic. Nathan shoots and kills the monster, saving Lavinia.After rushing outside, Nathan attempts to shoot the Color emerging from the well, but the sheriff mistakes Nathan's aim for Ward and fatally shoots him. Ward and the sheriff leave to evacuate Ezra, and Lavinia insists on staying with Nathan. At Ezra's house, the pair only find his desiccated corpse and a recording he left behind, where he surmises that the Color is attempting to remake Earth into "something it knows." Heading back towards the farmhouse, a mutated living tree kills the sheriff. Ward returns to rescue Lavinia, but finds her possessed by the Color, which explodes out of the well and forms a funnel into the sky. Ward is shown a vision of where the Color hails from, a psychedelic exoplanet inhabited by tentacled alien entities, before Lavinia disintegrates. As space and time begin to unravel, Ward enters the farmhouse and is pursued by a murderous apparition of Nathan. He hides in the wine cellar as the Color's distortion of reality drives the property to destruction, leaving Ward the only survivor as he climbs out of the remains of the farmland, now a colorless ashy "blasted heath". In an epilogue, a traumatized Ward stands on top of the finished dam which covers the former property, and narrates that having witnessed the Color's takeover, he will never drink the dam's water.   TOP 5The Color Out Of Space project was initially revealed online by Stanley in 2013, but it lacked financing. After two years, in 2015, it was announced that production company SpectreVision would produce the feature.
The production experienced further delays, and in late 2018 it was reported that Nicolas Cage had come on board to portray the main character, filming then began in Portugal in early 2019.SpectreVision is a production company that was founded in 2010 by Elijah Wood, Daniel Noah, and Josh C. Waller, and primarily produces horror films. In 2018 SpectreVision released Mandy, an action horror with Nicolas Cage in the lead role.
Mandy follows Cage's character Red and his wife Mandy, a quiet couple living in isolation in a cabin in the woods. After an interaction with a cult leader, the couple becomes terrorized by a hippie cult and a demonic biker gangLovecraft's extraterrestrial entity, the title color of the movie, was described in the short story as being made up of a color that humans had never seen. This made the entity all the more terrifying, while at the same time almost impossible to give physical form to.
Stanley experimented with infrared, and countless new technologies as he tried to come up with a visualization of the color.  As Stanley himself stated, the otherworldly monster is "like a gas with fingers", and naturally there was no blueprint for creating it. He eventually settled on a host of techniques and new technologies combined, and a strong magenta hue.Tommy Chong's character Ezra in Color Out Of Space is based on the real-life character Urani, from Richard Stanley's 2013 documentary The Otherworld. Ezra is the only one in the movie who speaks truthfully about what is happening in the world and draws many parallels with Urani. In The Otherworld, Stanley investigates a remote region of France, known as The Zone, that has a rich history of magical belief. Urani, as he is depicted in the film, lives in complete isolation and according to Stanley, claims to have tape recordings of extraterrestrial buzzing from underneath the floor of his house. Ezra makes near-identical claims in Color Out Of Space.Color Out Of Space is the fifth adaptation of the Lovecraft short story to date. The first was adaptation was Die, Monster, Die!, a 1965 movie directed by Daniel Haller. The 1987 movie The Curse directed by David Keith and set in the 1980s is more closely related to the events of the original story. **TRIPLE LINDY AWARD** **REVIEW AND RATING** TOP 5Stephen:1 Breakfast club2 T23 Sandlot4color out of space5 Mail order brides Chris:1. sandlots2. T23. trick r treat4. rocky horror picture show5. hubie halloween Trey:1) Boondocks Saints2) Mail Order Brides3) Tombstone4) Very bad things5) She out of my league  Tucker:1. T22: Tombstone4: My Cousin Vinny5: John WickNational treasure WHAT ARE WE DOING NEXT WEEK? Web: https://theguysreview.simplecast.com/EM: theguysreviewpod@gmail.comIG: @TheGuysReviewPodTW: @The_GuysReview - Twitter DM groupFB: https://facebook.com/TheGuysReviewPod/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYKXJhq9LbQ2VfR4K33kT9Q Please, Subscribe, rate and review us wherever you get your podcasts from!! Thank you,-The Guys

Death By DVD
Previews Of Coming Attractions

Death By DVD

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 13:30


DEATH BY DVD is now releasing episodes EVERY other week! This not REALLY an episode, but an episode details just that & serves as a reminder that FOR NOW...Just for now...DEATH BY DVD is releasing episodes every TWO weeks + for the first time ever, we are telling you what the next episode is! For the 13 years of Death By DVD we have always kept the next episode secret. From the live era to now, what is DEATH BY DVD doing next? No one knows! NOW, FINALLY, you know! And when you know, well, you know! NEW EPISODES EVERY OTHER WEEK + EPISODE UPDATES!  LISTEN NOW! DEATH BY DVD PRESENTS : WHO SHOT HANK? The first of its kind (On this show, at least) an all original narrative audio drama exploring the murder of this shows very host, HANK THE WORLDS GREATEST! Explore WHO SHOT HANK, starting with the MURDER!  A Death By DVD New Year Mystery  WHO SHOT HANK : PART ONE  WHO SHOT HANK : PART TWO  WHO SHOT HANK : PART THREE  WHO SHOT HANK : PART FOUR  WHO SHOT HANK PART 5 : THE BEGINNING OF THE END WHO SHOT HANK PART 6 THE FINALE : EXEUNT OMNES   The Death By DVD SENTINEL remix theme by LINUS FITNESS-CENTRE

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