Podcasts about Mechanical

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  • 1,271PODCASTS
  • 2,281EPISODES
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  • Oct 14, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Mechanical

Show all podcasts related to mechanical

Latest podcast episodes about Mechanical

History Goes Bump Podcast
Ep. 406 - Haunted Fellsmere

History Goes Bump Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 57:59


We joined Larry Lawson, founder of The Florida Bureau of Paranormal Investigation, and his team Indian River Hauntings for a paranormal event that included ghost hunting the Old School House and Marsh Landing Restaurant in Fellsmere, Florida. On this episode, we share several of the haunted locations in this small Florida town and the results of our investigation. The Moment in Oddity was suggested by John Michaels and features Giant Octopuses of the Narrows Bridge Ruins and This Month in History features the first moving train robbery by Reno Brothers. Check out the website: http://historygoesbump.com Show notes can be found here: https://historygoesbump.blogspot.com/2021/10/hgb-ep-406-haunted-fellsmere.html Become an Executive Producer: http://patreon.com/historygoesbump Music used in this episode: Main Theme: Lurking in the Dark by Muse Music with Groove Studios (Moment in Oddity) Vanishing by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4578-vanishing License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license (This Month in History) In Your Arms by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3906-in-your-arms License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Outro Music: Happy Fun Punk by Muse Music with Groove Studios All other music licensing: PODCASTMUSIC.COM License Synchronization, Mechanical, Master Use and Performance Direct License for a Single Podcast Series under current monthly subscription. Road to Your Demise by Strike Audio

Alexiomar Rodriguez
Mechanical Licensing Collective vs Harry Fox Agency

Alexiomar Rodriguez

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:23


Una de los errores más comunes es confundir la Mechanical Licensing Collective y la Harry Fox Agency. En este episodio aprenderás la diferencia entre ambas entidades y la importancia que tienen a la hora de recolectar tus regalías mecánicas. Descarga tu lista de cotejo gratis para recolectar tus regalías musicales a aquí: https://bit.ly/3tyvjVW Explora nuestros libros digitales, cursos y contratos personalizables en nuestra tienda online aquí: https://www.seedlawpr.com/tienda Únete a nuestra comunidad en YouTube aquí: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrQVqLXERkI Conoce más sobre el equipo que utilizamos para grabar video-podcasts aquí: https://bit.ly/kit_video-podcast ENLACES DE AFILIADOS: Es posible que esta descripción contenga enlaces de afiliados que te facilitan encontrar elementos, productos, o servicios, que se mencionan en este video-podcast y que nos benefician sin costo alguno para ti. Si bien nuestra plataforma puede ganar sumas mínimas cuando utilizas los enlaces, NO ESTÁS obligado de ninguna manera a usar estos enlaces. ¡Gracias por tu apoyo! © 2021 Seed Law & Alexiomar Rodriguez. Derechos Reservados. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/seedlawpr/message

This Academic Life
Ep.19 – What did we do this summer?

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 21:31


Do professors get their summers off? You'll learn about how the three of us spent our summer. Research continues, administrative tasks pile up, and the summer is simply too short! Reference list: Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com) An interesting read: https://www.higheredjobs.com/Articles/articleDisplay.cfm?ID=1711 Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

ASRA News
Restorative Neurostimulation for Intractable Mechanical Chronic Low Back Pain

ASRA News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 9:56


"Restorative Neurostimulation for Intractable Mechanical Chronic Low Back Pain," by Christopher Gilligan, MD, MBA, Chief of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.  From ASRA News, August 2021. See original article at www.asra.com/asra-news for figures and references. This material is copyrighted. 

SMACC
Impella and modern mechanical support

SMACC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 14:19


From CodaZero Live, Steve Morgan talks to us about temporary mechanical circulatory support in cardiogenic shock. Steve gives an example of a patient with refractory cardiogenic shock, who hasn't responded to pharmacological support. So, how do we go about choosing between temporary circulatory support options? First, Steve acknowledges that critical care echocardiography is central. Additionally, he discusses the use of pulmonary artery catheters.  Finally, Steve hopes that future Randomised Control Trials might contribute to a better evidence base to guide the use of these supports in specific patients. Finally, for more, head to our podcast page #CodaPodcast 

Engineering Out Loud
Burning to learn, S11E3

Engineering Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 17:01


How do engineers fight wildfires? With fire. David Blunck, associate professor of mechanical engineering, is trying to better understand and predict the behavior of embers that spread blazes. To do this, he has to burn a few of his own.

3 Wise DMs
29 DM Ideas for Spicing Up D&D 5E: New Twists for Campaigns, Combat, Equipment, Magic and More!

3 Wise DMs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 91:53


DMing is all about bringing your ideas to the table, but some ideas reach beyond the story and dialogue to change the way the game is played. Today, 3 Wise DMs open a Pandora's Box of DMing ideas and inspiration for D&D 5E. From campaign setting ideas to new weapon rules, combat formations, vampire and dragon age categories, and more, in this episode, Thorin, Tony and Dave pitch the craziest D&D house rules and setting features they'd love to play with in the future. 1:00 Campaign ideas 1. Dark Sun for 5E: Could you resurrect the survival desert setting full of slavery and cannibalism? 2. Spelljammer space travel for 5E (Note: we recorded before WotC revealed it's happening) 3. Planescape for 5E: Plane shifting between different, wacky worlds and dimensions 4. Call of Cthulhu in Ravenloft with PCs like Van Helsing and Jonathan Harker 5. Celts vs. powerful nature spirits vs. Romans in a pseudo-historical setting with limited NPC magic 6. A prehistoric game with more intense magic and active gods, but low-level technology 7. Clerics vs. Wizards: A world where arcane magic has been branded heretical 8. Do you need to limit PC class selection in worlds with low magic or low technology? 25:00 Mechanical ideas for combat and encounters 9. Technologically low and high-quality swords with non-magical +/- bonuses 10. Injury rules and not recovering all your health after long rests 11. Weapon wear and breakage 12. An aside on Viking sword and shield usage 13. Capping hit points at a lower level 14. Combat formations: shield walls, pike hedges, etc. 15. New weapon properties and action: long reach, weapon grapples 16. Called-shot attacks (Aim for the eyes!) 17. Weapons that give an AC bonus 18. Improving the shield bonus, but making it something you can lose 19. Heirloom weapons that get progressive bonuses/powers as the player advances in tiers 62:00 Magic and magic item ideas 20. Expanding spell concentration (perhaps by allowing a familiar or item to hold concentration on one of your spells) 21. Creating unique spells 22. Places of power where players can cast unique spells 23. Rare spell components that boost the spells cast with them 24. Rebalancing charges 71:00 Monster ideas 25. The bag man and other Candy Man type horror monsters 26. Giving dragons wider age categories and introducing mightier Great Wyrms 27. The Corpse Flower garden 28. Expanding vampire power levels and roles 29. Spirts of the Land 82:00 Final thoughts Support this podcast

Proprietors of Pittsburgh Podcast
Go Get It | Mark Caskey, Founder of Steel Nation

Proprietors of Pittsburgh Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 35:51


YOU CAN REACH ME AT:Website: https://www.proprietorsofpittsburgh.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/proprietorsofpittsburghpodcastFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/proprietorsofpittsburghpodcastLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/darinvilanoPhone: 412-336-8247YOU CAN REACH MARK CASKEY AT:Website: https://steelnation.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/steelnationbuildingsLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/steel-nation-inc-Phone: 724-225-2202

Keys To The Shop : Equipping the Coffee Retail Professional
ROR #8 How Post-Harvest Processing Impacts Flavor w/ Siva Subramanian and Byron Holcomb of Olam Food Ingredients

Keys To The Shop : Equipping the Coffee Retail Professional

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 72:51


How coffee is processed after harvest has an incredible impact on the final quality in the cup. Today we have the luxury of choosing form  a wide variety of processing techniques. Whether you are a roaster or a farmer, understanding what these methods contribute to the coffee as well as their impact on the environment, and the industry is critical.  On this episode of RoR from Roast Magazine, we will be discussing post-harvest processing methods from a scientific, philosophical, and practical perspective with guests, Siva Subramanian and Byron Holcomb of Olam Food Ingredients.  Siva Subramanian is Vice President & Head of coffee Innovation, Olam Food Ingredients (OFI).  He has 27 years of extensive experience in the food industry working in multiple countries including India, Singapore, and the United States.  Prior to joining OFI, Siva worked with Hindustan Unilever at the Global R&D center in Bangalore, India Siva holds degrees in Chemistry, Chemical Technology & Food Technology from the University of Mumbai, India.  Currently, Siva is leading a team engaged in creating new processing techniques to enhance the aroma, flavor, and taste of coffee & creating novel food ingredients. Byron Holcomb is the Specialty Coffee Manager, Olam Food Ingredients (OFI. Byron likes to say he is a strong generalist in coffee but not an expert at any one part of coffee. In 2009 he competed as a barista with coffee from his own farm in the Dominican Republic.  He was a coffee buyer for Dallis Bros Coffee in NYC for a few years before moving to Brazil to manage a couple farms in Sul de Minas. There he tried to bring better post-harvest management to the operation. At least one of the farms made it into CoE the 5 years he was there. Recently he received the QP3 certification. For the last few years he is based in Guatemala City supporting the Specialty business in Olam/ofi.  We cover: How processing has evolved What happens in the washed, natural, and honey process The illusion of sweetness Role of stress, microorganisms, acids, metabolites, and sugars Mechanical harvesting impact on flavor Why honey process is not ideal How much does processing contribute to the bean's true terroir?  What methods are most scalable and sustainable? How roasters can make mindful selections to support farmers and serve customers well  Experimental processing, quality, and marketing Pendulum of experimentation Links: www.olamspecialtycoffee.com www.asic-cafe.org   Subscribe to Roast Magazine! www.roastmagazine.com   Related Episodes: RoR #1: A Conversation w/ Anne Cooper of Equilibrium Master Roasters RoR #2: Exploring Quality Control w/ Spencer Turer of Coffee Enterprises RoR #3: Making Contingency Planning a Reality w/ Andi Trindle Mersch of Philz Coffee RoR #4: Practical Thermal Dynamics w/ Candice Madison of Royal Coffee / The Crown Oak RoR #5: Time and Color in Roasting w/ Morten Munchow of Coffee Mind” RoR #6: Buying Less and Doing More w/ Ever Meister RoR #7 Illustrative Sample Roasting w/ Mike Ebert of Firedancer Coffee Consultants

History Goes Bump Podcast
Ep. 405 - Haunted Guam

History Goes Bump Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 36:49


Guam is a United States territory located within the Mariana Islands. The island was occupied by humans starting around 4,000 years ago. Guam IS the Chamarro people. This indigenous group has endured hundreds of years of conquest and occupation of their island and yet their culture has survived. A wonderful culture that embraces the spirit world. On this episode, we are going to share the history, legends and hauntings of Guam! The Moment in Oddity was suggested by Duey Oxberger and features a Colonial ship found under World Trade Center and This Month in History features Scientific American reporting on radios coming into homes. Our sponsor for this episode is HelloFresh. Go to HelloFresh.com/bump14 and enter code bump14 for 14 free meals, plus free shipping! Check out the website: http://historygoesbump.com Show notes can be found here: https://historygoesbump.blogspot.com/2021/10/hgb-ep-405-haunted-guam.html Become an Executive Producer: http://patreon.com/historygoesbump Music used in this episode: Main Theme: Lurking in the Dark by Muse Music with Groove Studios (Moment in Oddity) Vanishing by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4578-vanishing License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license (This Month in History) In Your Arms by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3906-in-your-arms License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Outro Music: Happy Fun Punk by Muse Music with Groove Studios All other music licensing: PODCASTMUSIC.COM License Synchronization, Mechanical, Master Use and Performance Direct License for a Single Podcast Series under current monthly subscription.

Lone Star Outdoor Show
Episode 596: Two Year Study Puts the Mechanical vs Fixed Blade Debate to Bed, African Tick Bite Fever and Custom AR-10 Builds With Tactical Skeleton

Lone Star Outdoor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 95:38


Every bowhunter has their preferred broadhead. Taking that into account, don't switch if you're getting great results with your current set up. However, if you've been left scratching your head or are interested in longtime outdoor writer Will Brantley's 2 year study on the effectiveness of fixed blades vs mechanical broadheads then you'll want to [...]

History Goes Bump Podcast
HGB Anniversary Special 7

History Goes Bump Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 37:54


On this special anniversary episode, Diane and Kelly celebrate 7 years of the podcast, talk a little about some of the behind-the-scenes stuff and share the winners of this year's Flash Fiction Contest. We had 21 submissions, so it was hard to choose, but we have our three winners and two runner-ups to share. Thanks to everyone for your support through the years and for listening to the podcast! Check out the website: http://historygoesbump.com Become an Executive Producer: http://patreon.com/historygoesbump Music licensing: PODCASTMUSIC.COM License Synchronization, Mechanical, Master Use and Performance Direct License for a Single Podcast Series under current monthly subscription. Showbiz (Full Mix) by Atomica Music Library Ghost Processional by Kevin MacLeod Crisis Asylum Full w/ Lead Cello by ALIBI Music Showtime Tonight Full by Atomica Music Library

History Goes Bump Podcast
Ep. 404 - Walt Disney World

History Goes Bump Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 52:11


Walt Disney World is celebrating its 50th anniversary in October of 2021. This incomparable theme park is exactly what its name describes, a complete world that was the ultimate vision of Walt Disney. Walt Disney World covers a full 27,000 acres and features four theme parks, two water parks, a shopping district and 31 resorts, plus its own public works district. There is so much to see and do here, but even better, there are many legends and ghosts on this property. Join us as we share the history and haunts of Walt Disney World. The Moment in Oddity was suggested by Scott Booker and features Honey Bee reproduction and This Month in History features Fannie Farmer opening her cooking school. Our location was suggested by Josi. Check out the website: http://historygoesbump.com Show notes can be found here: https://historygoesbump.blogspot.com/2021/09/hgb-ep-404-walt-disney-world.html Become an Executive Producer: http://patreon.com/historygoesbump Music used in this episode: Main Theme: Lurking in the Dark by Muse Music with Groove Studios (Moment in Oddity) Vanishing by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4578-vanishing License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license (This Month in History) In Your Arms by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3906-in-your-arms License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Outro Music: Happy Fun Punk by Muse Music with Groove Studios All other music licensing: PODCASTMUSIC.COM License Synchronization, Mechanical, Master Use and Performance Direct License for a Single Podcast Series under current monthly subscription. Your Great Big Beautiful Smile by 5 Alarm Music Fantasy World D by 5 Alarm Music

Adafruit Industries
Choc Mechanical Keyswitches - Collin's Lab Notes

Adafruit Industries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 0:46


Kailh Choc switches have that #mechanicalkeyboard feel with a refreshingly low-profile #adafruit #collinslabnotes Shop Choc switches @ Adafruit: https://www.adafruit.com/?q=kailh+choc&sort=BestMatch Visit the Adafruit shop online - http://www.adafruit.com ----------------------------------------- LIVE CHAT IS HERE! http://adafru.it/discord Adafruit on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adafruit Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube: http://adafru.it/subscribe New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System: http://learn.adafruit.com/ -----------------------------------------

This Academic Life
Ep.18 – Academic Entrepreneurs

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


Academic and entrepreneurship are strongly linked in many ways as they work together in contributing to technology and economic developments in our society. Today, we'll learn from an academic entrepreneur, Dr. Adam Ryason, The CEO and founder of “Intelligent Medicine Inc.” and learn how he started his exciting adventures. Intelligent Medicine Inc. is a software and simulation startup company based in upstate NY.   Reference list:  Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com)  Contact list:  If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”.  Cast list: Dr. Adam Ryason is the CEO and founder of Intelligent Medicine Inc. https://www.intmed.us/#about  Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah.  Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

The Dr. Gundry Podcast
What's WRONG with tap water? | Ep175

The Dr. Gundry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 82:49


Robert Slovak – a degreed Mechanical and Aeronautical & Astronautical engineer who has been in the water treatment game since the 1970s – and I reveal the TRUTH about tap water and how the RIGHT filtration system can support better health and longer life. Full notes and transcript here: https://drgundry.com/Robert-Slovak Thank you to our sponsors! Check them out: Go to www.pendulumlife.com and use my code, "GUNDRY20” at checkout. Head to www.blublox.com and use code “GUNDRY” for 15% off your blue-light blocking glasses order. Go to www.naturenatesllc.com or at their Amazon store and use the promo code DRGUNDRY for 15% off your first order of popped sorghum. Get a quote today at www.Progressive.com and see why 4 out of 5 new auto customers recommend Progressive. Go to www.Allform.com/GUNDRY for 20% OFF your customized couch or sofa today

Screaming in the Cloud
The Maestro of the Keyboards with Jesse Vincent

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 40:03


About Jesse Jesse Vincent is the cofounder and CTO of Keyboardio, where he designs and manufactures high-quality ergonomic mechanical keyboards. In previous lives, he served as the COO of VaccinateCA, volunteered as the project lead for the Perl programming language, created both the leading open source issue tracking system RT: Request tracker and K-9 Mail for Android.Links: Keyboardio: https://keyboard.io Obra: https://twitter.com/obra TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: You could build you go ahead and build your own coding and mapping notification system, but it takes time, and it sucks! Alternately, consider Courier, who is sponsoring this episode. They make it easy. You can call a single send API for all of your notifications and channels. You can control the complexity around routing, retries, and deliverability and simplify your notification sequences with automation rules. Visit courier.com today and get started for free. If you wind up talking to them, tell them I sent you and watch them wince—because everyone does when you bring up my name. Thats the glorious part of being me. Once again, you could build your own notification system but why on god's flat earth would you do that?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. As you folks are well aware by now, this show is at least ostensibly about the business of cloud. And that's intentionally overbroad. You can fly a boat through it, which means it's at least wider than the Suez Canal.And that's all well and good, but what do all of these cloud services have in common? That's right, we interact with them via typing on keyboards. My guest today is Jesse Vincent, who is the founder of Keyboardio and creator of the Model 01 heirloom-grade keyboard, which is sitting on my desk that sometimes I use, sometimes it haunts me. Jesse, thank you for joining me.Jesse: Hey, thanks so much for having me, Corey.Corey: So, mechanical keyboards are one of those divisive things that, back in the before times when we were all sitting in offices, it was an express form of passive aggression, where, “I don't like the people around me, and I'm going to show it to them with things that can't really complain about. So, what is the loudest keyboard I can get?” Style stuff. And some folks love them, some folks can't stand them. And most folks to be perfectly blunt, do not seem to care.Jesse: So, it's not actually about them being loud, or it doesn't have to be. Mechanical keyboards can be dead silent; they can be as quiet as anything else. There's absolutely a subculture that is into things that are as loud as they possibly can be; you know, sounds like there's a cannon going off on somebody's desk. But you can also get absolutely silent mechanical switches that are more dampened than your average keyboard. For many, many people, it's about comfort, it is about the key feel.A keyboard is supposed to have a certain feeling and these flat rectangles that feel like you're typing on glass, they don't have that feeling and they're not good for your fingers. And it's been fascinating over the past five or six years to watch this explosion in interest in good keyboards again.Corey: I learned to first use a computer back on an old IBM 286 in the '80s. And this obviously had a Model M—or damn close to it—style buckling spring keyboard. It was loud and I'm nostalgic about the whole thing. True story I've never told on this podcast before; I was a difficult child when I was five years old, and I was annoyed because my parents went out of the house and my brother was getting more attention than I was. I poured a bucket of water into the keyboard.And to this day, I'm surprised my father didn't murder me after that. And we wound up after having a completely sealing rubber gasket on top of this thing. Because this was the '80s; keyboards were not one of those, “Oh, I'm going to run down to the store and pick up another one for $20.” This was at least a $200 whoops-a-doozy. And let's just say that it didn't endear me to my parents that week.Jesse: That's funny because that keyboard is one that actually probably would have dried out just fine. Not like the Microsoft Naturals that I used to carry in the mid-'90s. Those white slightly curved ones. That was my introduction to ergonomic keyboards and they had a fatal flaw as many mid-'90s Microsoft products did. In this case, they melted in the rain; the circuit traces inside were literally wiped away by water. If a cup of water got in that keyboard, it was gone.Corey: Everyone has a story involving keyboard and liquids at some point, or they are the most careful people that are absolutely not my people whatsoever because everyone I hang out with is inherently careless. And over time I used other keyboards as I went through my life and never had strong opinions on them, and then I got to play with a mechanical keyboard had brought all that time rushing back to me of, “Oh, yeah.” And my immediate thought is, “Oh, this is great. I wonder if I could pour water into it? No, no.”And I started getting back into playing with them and got what I thought was the peak model keyboard from Das Keyboards which, there was the black keyboard with no writing on it at all. And I learned I don't type nearly as well as I thought I did in those days. And okay. That thing sat around gathering dust and I started getting a couple more and a couple more, and it turns out if you keep acquiring mechanical keyboards, you can turn an interest into a problem but you can also power your way through to the other side and become a collector. And I started building my own for a while and I still have at least a dozen of them in various states of assembly here.It was sort of a fun hobby that I got into, and for me at least it was, why do I want to build a keyboard myself? Is it, do I believe intrinsically that I can build a better keyboard than I can buy? Absolutely not. But everything else I do in my entire career as an engineer until that point had been about making the bytes on the screen go light up in different patterns. That was it.This was something that I had built that I could touch with my hands and was still related to the thing that I did, and was somewhat more forgiving than other things that I could have gotten into, like you know, woodworking with table saws that don't realize my arm it just lopped off.Jesse: Oh, you can burn yourself pretty good with a soldering iron.Corey: Oh, absolutely I can.Jesse: But yeah, no, I got into this in a similar-sounding story. I had bad wrists throughout my career. I was a programmer and a programming manager and CEO. And my wrist hurts all the time, and I'd been through pretty much every ergonomic keyboard out there. If you seen the one where you stick your fingers into little wells, and each finger you can press back forth, left, right, and down, the ones that looked like they were basically a pair of flat capacitive surfaces from a company that later got bought by Apple and turned into the iPads touch technology, Microsoft keyboards, everything. And nothing quite felt right.A cloud startup I had been working on cratered one summer. Long story short, the thing went under for kind of sad reasons and I swore I was going to take a year off to screw around and figure out what the next thing was going to be. And at some point, I noticed there were people on the internet building their own keyboards. This was not anything I had ever done before. When I started soldering, I did figure out that I must have soldered before because it smelled familiar, but this was supposed to be a one-month project to build myself a single keyboard.And I saw that people on the internet were doing it, I figured, eh, how hard could it be? Just one of those things that Perl hackers are apt to say. Little did I know. It's now, I want to say something like eight years later, and my one-month project to build one keyboard has failed thousands and thousands and thousands of times over as we've shipped thousands of keyboards to, oh God, it's like 75 or 78 countries.Corey: And it's great. It's well made. The Model 01 that I got was part of an early Kickstarter batch. My wife signed me up for it—because she knew I was into this sort of thing—as a birthday gift. And then roughly a year later, if memory serves, it showed up and that was fine.Again, it's Kickstarter is one of those, this might just be an aspirational gift. We don't know. And—because, Kickstarter—but it was fun. And I use it. It's great.I like a lot of the programmability aspects of it. There are challenges. I'm not used to using ergonomic keyboards, and the columnar layout is offset to a point where I miss things all the time. And if you're used to typing rapidly, in things like chats, or Twitter or whatnot, were rapid responses valuable, it's frustrating trying to learn how a new keyboard layout works.Jesse: Absolutely. So, we got some advice very early on from one of the research scientists who helped Microsoft with their design for their natural keyboards, and one of the things that he told us was, “You will probably only ever get one chance to make a keyboard; almost every company that makes a keyboard fails, and so you should take one of the sort of accepted designs and make a small improvement to help push the industry forward. You don't want to go do something radical and have nobody like it.”Corey: That's very reasonable advice and also boring. Why bother?Jesse: Well, we walked away from that with a very different take, which was, if we're only going to get one chance of this, we're going to do the thing we want to make.Corey: Yeah.Jesse: And so we did a bunch of stuff that we got told might be difficult to do or impossible. We designed our own keycaps from scratch. We milled the enclosure out of hardwood. When we started, we didn't know where we were manufacturing, but we did specify that the wood was going to be Canadian maple because it grows like a weed, and as you know, not in danger of being made extinct. But when you're manufacturing in southern China and you're manufacturing with Canadian maple, that comes on a boat from North America.Corey: There's something to be said for the globalization supply chain as we see things shipped back and forth and back and forth, and it seems ridiculous but the economics are there it's—Jesse: Oh, my God. Now, this year.Corey: Yeah [laugh], there's that.Jesse: Supply chains are… how obscenity-friendly is this podcast? [laugh].Corey: Oh, we can censor anything that's too far out. Knock yourself out.Jesse: Because what I would ordinarily say is the supply chains are [BLEEP].Corey: Yep, they are.Jesse: Yeah. This time around, we gave customers the—for the Model 100, which is our new keyboard that the Kickstarter just finished up for—we gave customers the choice of that nice Canadian maple or walnut. We got our quotes in advance. You know, our supplier confirmed wood was no problem a few months in advance. And then the night before the campaign launched, our wood supplier got in touch and said, “So, there are no walnut planks that are wide enough to be had in all of southern China. There are some supply chain issues due to the global container shortage. We don't know what we're going to be able to do. Maybe you could accept it if we did butcher block style walnut and glued planks together.”They made samples and then a week later, instead of FedExing us the samples, I got a set of photographs with a whole bunch of sad faces and crying face emojis saying, “Well, we tried. We know there's no way that this would be acceptable to your customers.” We asked, “So, where's this walnut supposed to be coming from that you can't get it?” They're like, “It's been sitting on the docks at the origin since March. It's being forested in Kentucky in the United States.”Corey: The thing that surprised me the most about the original model on Kickstarter campaign was how much went wrong across the board. I kept reading your updates. It was interesting, at some point, it was like, okay, this is clearly a Ponzi scheme. That's the name of the keyboard: ‘The Ponzi', where there's going to be increasingly outlandish excuses.Jesse: I don't think a Ponzi scheme would be the right aspersion to be casting.Corey: There's that more pedestrian scam-style thing. We could go with that.Jesse: We have a lot of friends who've been in industry longer than us, and every time we brought one of the problems that our factory seemed to be having to them, they said, “Oh, yeah, that's the thing that absolutely happens.”Corey: Yeah, it was just you kept hitting every single one of these, and I was increasingly angry on your behalf, reading these things about, “Oh, yeah. Just one of your factory reps just blatantly ripped you off, and this was expected to be normal in some cases, and it's like”—and you didn't even once threatened to burn the factory now, which I thought was impressive.Jesse: No, nobody threatened to burn the factory down, but one of the factories did have a fire.Corey: Which we can neither confirm nor deny—I kid, I kid, I kid.Jesse: Yeah, yeah, yeah. But so what our friends who had been in industry longer that said, it was like, “Jesse, but, you know, nobody has all the problems.” And eventually, we figured out what was going on, and it was that our factory's director of overseas sales was a con artist grifter who had been scamming both sides. She'd been lying to us and lying to the factory, and making up stories to make her the only trusted person to each side, and she'd just been embezzling huge sums of money.Corey: You hear these stories, but you never think it's going to be something that happens to you. Was this your first outing with manufacturing a physical product?Jesse: This was our first physical product.Corey: But I'm curious about it; are you effectively following the trope of a software person who thinks, “Ah, I could do hardware? How hard could it be? I could ship code around the world seconds, so hardware will be just a little bit slower.” How close to that trope are you?Jesse: So, when we went into the manufacturing side, we knew that we knew nothing, and we knew that it was fraught with peril. And we gave ourselves an awful lot of padding on timing, which we then blew through for all sorts of reasons. And we ran through a hardware incubator that helped us vet our plans, we were working with companies on the ground that helped startups work with factories. And honestly, if it hadn't been for this one individual, yes we would have had problems, but it wouldn't have been anything of the same scale. As far as we can tell, almost everything bad that happened had a grain of truth in it, it's just that… you know, a competent grifter can spin a tiny thing into a giant thing.And nobody in China suspected her, and nobody in China believed that this could possibly be happening because the penalties if she got caught were ten years in a Chinese prison for an amount of money that effectively would be a down payment on an apartment instead of the price of a full apartment or fully fleeing the country.Corey: It seems like that would be enough of a deterrent, but apparently not.Jesse: Apparently not. So, we ended up retaining counsel and talking to friends who had been working in southern China for 15 years for about who they might recommend for a lawyer. We ended up retaining a Chinese lawyer. Her name's [Una 00:13:36]; she's fantastic.Corey: Referrals available upon request.Jesse: Oh, yeah. No, absolutely. I'm happy to send her all kinds of business. She looked at the contract we had with the factory, she's like, “This is a Western contract. This isn't going to help you in the Chinese courts. What we need to do is we need to walk into the factory and negotiate a new agreement that is in Chinese, written by a Chinese lawyer, and get them to sign it.”And part of that agreement was getting them to take full joint responsibility for everything. And she walked in with me to the factory. She dressed down: t-shirt and jeans. They initially thought she was my translator, and she made a point of saying, “Look, I'm Jesse's counsel. I'm not your lawyer. I do not represent your interests.”And three-party negotiations with the factory: the factory's then former salesperson, and us. And she negotiated a new agreement. And I had a long list of all the things that we needed to have in our contract, like all the things that we really cared about. Get to the end of the day and she hands it to me and she's like, “What do you think?” And I read it through and my first thought is that none of the ten points that we need in this agreement are there.And then I realized that they are there, they're just very subtle. And everybody signs it. The factory takes full joint responsibility for everything that was done by their now former salesperson. We go outside; we get into the cab, and she turns to me—and she's not a native speaker of English, but she is fluent—and she's like, how do you think that went, Jesse? I'm like, I think that went pretty well. And she's like, “Yes. I get my job satisfaction out of adverse negotiation, and the factory effectively didn't believe in lawyers.”Corey: No, no. I've seen them. They exist. I married one of them.Jesse: Oh, yeah. As it turned out, they also didn't really believe in the court system and they didn't believe in not pissing off judges. Nothing could help us recover the time we lost; we did end up recovering all of our tooling, we ended up recovering all of our product that they were holding, all with the assistance of the Chinese courts. It was astonishing because we went into this whole thing knowing that there was no chance that a Chinese court would find for a small Western startup with no business presence in China against a local factory, and I think our goal was that they would get a black mark on their corporate social credit report so that nobody else would do business with this factory that won't give the customer back their tooling. And… it turns out that, no, the courts just helped us.Corey: It's nice when things work the way they're supposed to, on some level.Jesse: It is.Corey: And then you solve your production problems, you shipped it out. I use it, I take it out periodically.Jesse: We'd shipped every customer order well before this.Corey: Oh, okay. This was after you had already done the initial pre-orders. This was as you were ongoing—Jesse: Yeah, there were keycaps we owed people, which were—Corey: Oh, okay.Jesse: Effectively the free gift we promised aways in for being late on shipping.Corey: That's what that was for. It showed up one day and I wondered what the story behind that was. But yeah, it was—Jesse: Yeah.Corey: They're great.Jesse: Yeah. You know, and then there was a story in The Verge of, this Kickstarter alleges that—da, da, da, da, da. We're like, “I understand that AOL's lawyers make you say ‘alleges,' but no, this really happened, and also, we really had shipped everything that we owed to customers long before all this went down.”Corey: Yeah. This is something doesn't happen in the software world, generally speaking. I don't have to operate under the even remote possibility that my CI/CD system is lying to me about what it's doing. I can generally believe things that show up in computers—you would think—but there are—Jesse: You would think. I mean—Corey: There a lot of [unintelligible 00:17:19] exceptions to that, but generally, you can believe it.Jesse: In software, you sometimes we'll work with contractors or contract agencies who will make commitments and then not follow through on those commitments, or not deliver the thing they promised. It does sometimes happen.Corey: Indeed.Jesse: Yeah, no, the thing I miss the most from software is that if there is a defect, the cost of shipping an update is nil and the speed at which you can ship an update is instantly.Corey: You would think it would be nil, but then we look at AWS data transfer pricing and there's a giant screaming caveat on that. It's you think that moving bytes would cost nothing. Yeah.Jesse: [unintelligible 00:17:53] compared to international shipping costs for physical goods, AWS transfer rates are incredibly competitive.Corey: No, no, to get to that stage, you need to add an [unintelligible 00:18:02] NAT gateway with their data processing fee.Jesse: [laugh].Corey: But yeah, it's a different universe. It's a different problem, a different scale of speed, a different type of customer, too, on some levels. So, after you've gotten the Model 01's issues sorted out, you launched a second keyboard. The ‘a-TREE-us', if I'm pronouncing that correctly. Or ‘A-tree-us'.Jesse: So Phil, who designed it, pronounces is ‘A-tree-us', so we pronounce it A-tree-us. And so, this is a super minimalist keyboard designed to take with you everywhere, and it was something where Phil Hagelberg, who is a software developer of some repute for a bunch of things, he had designed this sort of initially for his own use and then had started selling kits. So, laser-cut plywood enclosures, hand-built circuit boards, you just stick a little development board in the middle of it, spend some time soldering, and you're good to go. And he and I were internet buddies; he had apparently gotten his start from some of my early blog posts. And one day, he sent me a note asking if I would review his updated circuit board design because he was doing a revision.I looked at his updated circuit board design and then offered to just make him a new circuit board design because it was going to be pretty straightforward to do something that's going to be a little more reliable and a lot more cost-effective. We did that and we talked a little more, and I said, “Would you be interested in having us just make this thing in a factory and sell it with a warranty and send you a royalty?” And he said, but it's GPL. You don't have to send me a royalty.Corey: I appreciate that I am not compelled to do it. However—yeah.Jesse: Yeah, exactly. It's like, “No. We would like to support people who create things and work with you on it.”Corey: That's important. We periodically have guest authors writing blog posts on Last Week in AWS. Every single one of them is paid for what they do, sometimes there for various reasons that they can't or won't accept it and we donate it to a charity of their choice, but we do not expect people to volunteer for a profit-bearing entity, in some respects.Jesse: Yeah.Corey: Now, open-source is a whole separate universe that I still maintain that is rapidly becoming a, “Would you like to volunteer for a trillion-dollar company in your weekend hours?” Usually not, but there's always an argument.Jesse: Oh, yeah. We have a bunch of open-source contributors to our open-source firmware and we contribute stuff back upstream to other projects, and it is a related but slightly different thing. So, Phil said yes; we said yes. And then we designed and made this thing. We launched an ultra-portable keyboard designed to take with you everywhere.It came with a travel case that had a belt loop, and basically a spring-loaded holster for your keyboard if you want to nerd out like that. All of the Kickstarter video and all the photography sort of showed how nice it looked in a cafe. And we launched it, like, the week the first lockdowns hit, in the spring of 2019.Corey: I have to say I skipped that one entirely. One of the things that I wound up doing—keyboard-wise—when I started this company four years ago and change, now was, I wound up getting a fairly large desk, and it's 72 inches or something like that. And I want a big keyboard with a numpad—yeah, that's right, big spender here—because I don't need a tiny little keyboard. I find that the layer-shifting on anything that's below a full-size keyboard is a little on the irritating side. And this goes beyond. It is—it requires significant—Jesse: Oh, yeah. It's—Corey: Rewiring of your brain, on some level.Jesse: And there are ergonomic reasons why some people find it to be better and more comfortable. There's less reaching and twisting. But it is a very different typing experience and it's absolutely not for everybody. Nothing we've made so far is intended to be a mass-market product. When we launched the Model 01, we were nervous that we would make something that was too popular because we knew that if we had to fulfill 50,000 of them, we'd just be screwed. We knew how little we knew.But the Atreus, when we launched it on Kickstarter, we didn't know if we were going to have to cancel the campaign because no one was going to want their travel keyboard at the beginning of a pandemic, but it did real well. I don't remember the exact timing and numbers, but we hit the campaign goal, I want to say early on the first day, possibly within minutes, possibly within hours—it's been a while now; I don't remember exactly—ultimately, we sold, like, 2600 of them on Kickstarter and have done additional production runs. We have a distributor in Japan, and a distributor in the US, and a distributor in the UK, now. And we also sell them ourselves directly online, from keyboard.io.So, this is one of the other fascinating logistics things, is that we ship globally through Hong Kong. Which, before the pandemic was actually pretty pleasant. Inexpensive shipping globally has gotten kind of nuts because most discount carriers, the way they operated historically is, they would buy cargo space on commercial flights. Commercial international flights don't happen so much.Corey: Yes, suddenly, that becomes a harder thing to find.Jesse: Early on, we had a couple of shipping providers that were in the super-slow, maybe up to two weeks to get your thing somewhere by air taking, I want to say we had things that didn't get there for three months. They would get from Hong Kong to Singapore in three days; they would enter a warehouse, and then we had to start asking questions about, “Hey, it's been eight weeks. What's going on?” And they're like, “Oh, it's still in queue for a flight to Europe. There just aren't any.”Corey: It seems like that becomes a hard problem.Jesse: It becomes a hard problem. It started to get a little better, and now it's starting to get a little worse again. Carriers that used to be ultra-reliable are now sketchy. We have FedEx losing packages, which is just nuts. USPS shipments, we see things that are transiting from Hong Kong, landing at O'Hare, going through a sorting center in Chicago, and just vanishing for weeks at a time, in Chicago.Corey: I don't pretend to understand how this stuff works. It's magic to me; like, it is magic, on some level, that I can order toilet paper on the internet, it gets delivered to my house for less money than it costs me to go to the store and buy it. It feels like there's some serious negative externalities in there. But we don't want to look too closely at those because we might feel bad about things.Jesse: There's all kinds of fascinating stuff for us. So, shipping stuff, especially by air, there are two different ways that the shipping weight can get calculated. It can either get calculated based on the weight on a scale, or it can get calculated using a formula based on the dimensions. And so bulky things are treated as weighing an awful lot. I'm told that Amazon's logistics teams started doing this fascinating thing where ultra-dense, super-heavy shipments they pushed on to FedEx and UPS, whereas the ultra-light stuff that saved on jet fuel, they shoved onto their own planes.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I want to follow up because it seems like, okay, pandemic shipping is a challenge; you clearly are doing well. You still have them in stock and are selling them as best I'm aware, correct?Jesse: Yes.Corey: Yeah. I may have to pick one up one of these days just so I can put it on the curiosity keyboard shelf and kick it around and see how it works. And then you recently concluded a third keyboard Kickstarter, in this case. And—Jesse: Yeah.Corey: —this is not your positioning; this is my positioning of what I'm picking up of, “Hey, remember that Model 01 keyboard we sold you that you love and we talked about and it's amazing? Yeah, turns out that's crap. Here's the better version of it.” Correct that misapprehension, please. [laugh].Jesse: Sure. So, it absolutely is not crap, but we've been out of stock in the Model 01 for a couple of years now. And we see them going used for as much or sometimes more than we used to charge for them new. It went out of stock because of the shenanigans with that first factory. And shortly before we launched the Atreus, we'd been planning to bring back an updated version of the Model 01; we've even gotten to the point of, like, designing the circuit boards and starting to update the tooling, the injection molding tooling, and then COVID, Atreus, life, everything.And so it took us a little longer to get there. But there is a larger total addressable market for a keyboard like the Model 01 than the total number that we ever sold. There are certainly people who had Model 01s who want replacements, want extras, want another one on another desk. There are also plenty of people who wanted a Model 01 and never got one.Corey: Here's my question for you, with all three of these keyboards because they're a different layout, let's be clear. Some more so than others, but even the columnar layout is strange here. Once upon a time, I had a week in which I wasn't doing much, and I figured, ah, I'll Dvorak—which is a different keyboard layout—and it's not that it's hard; it's that it's rewiring a whole bunch of muscle memory. The problem I ran into was not that it was impossible to do, by any stretch, but because of what I was doing—in those days help desk and IT support—I was having to do things on other people's computers, so it was a constant context switching back and forth between different layouts.Jesse: Yeah.Corey: Do you see that being a challenge with layouts like this, or is it more natural than that?Jesse: So, what we found is that it is easier to switch between an ergonomic layout and a traditional layout, like a columnar layout, and what's often called a row-stagger layout—which is what your normal keyboard looks like—than it is to switch between Dvorak and Qwerty on a traditional keyboard. Or the absolute bane of my existence is switching between a ThinkPad and a MacBook. They are super close; they are not the same.Corey: Right. You can't get an ergonomic keyboard layout inside of a laptop. I mean, looking at the four years of being gaslit by Apple, it's clear you can barely get a keyboard into a MacBook for a while. It's, “Oh, it's a piece of crap, but you're using it wro”—yeah. I'm not a fan of their entire approach to keyboards and care very than what Apple has to say about anything even slightly keyboard-related, but that's just me being bitter.Jesse: As far as I can tell, large chunks of Apple's engineering organization felt the same way that you did. Their new ones are actually decent again.Corey: Yes, that's what I've heard. And I will get one at some point, but I also have a problem where, “Oh, yeah, you know that $3,000 laptop with a crappy keyboard, you can't use for anything? Great. The solution is to give us 3000 more dollars, and then we'll sell you one that's good.” And it's, I feel like I don't want to reward the behavior.Jesse: I hear you. I ditched Mac OS for a number of years. I live the dream: Linux on the desktop. And it didn't hurt me a lot—printing worked fine, scanning worked fine, projectors were fine—but when I was reaching for things like Photoshop, and Lightroom, and my mechanical CAD software, it was the bad kind of funny.Corey: I have to be careful, now for the first time in my life I'm not updating to new operating systems early on, just because of things like the audio stuff I have plugged into my nonsense and the media nonsense that I do. It used to be that great, my computer only really needs to be a web browser and a terminal and I'm good. And worst case, I can make do with just the web browser because there are embedded a terminal into a web page options out there. Yeah, now it turns out that actually have a production workflow. Who knew?Jesse: Yep. That's the point where I started thinking about having separate machines for different things. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, I'm rapidly hitting that point. Yeah, I do want to get into having fun with keyboards, on some level, but it's the constant changing of what you're using. And then, of course, there's the other side of it where, in normal years, I spent an awful lot of time traveling and as much fun as having a holster-mounted belt keyboard would be, in many cases, it does not align with the meetings that I tend to be in.Jesse: Of course.Corey: It's, “Oh, great. You're the CFO of a Fortune 500. Great, let me pair my mini keyboard that looks like something from the bowels of your engineering department's reject pile.” Like, what is this? It's one of those things that doesn't send the right message in some cases. And let's be honest; I'm good at losing things.Jesse: This is a pretty mini keyboard, but I hear you.Corey: Or I could lose it, along with my keys. It will be great.Jesse: Yeah. There are a bunch of things I've wanted to do around reasonable keyboards for tablets.Corey: Yes, please do.Jesse: Yeah. We actually started looking at one point at a fruit company in Cupertino's requirements around being able to do dock-connector connected keyboards for their tablets, and… it's nuts. You can't actually do ergonomic keyboards that way, it would have to be Bluetooth.Corey: Yeah. When I travel on the road these days, or at least—well, ‘these days' being two years ago—the only computer I'd take is an iPad. And that was great; it works super well for a lot of my use cases. There's still something there, and even going forward, I'm going to be spending a lot more time at home. I have young kids now, and I want to be here to watch them grow up.And my lifestyle and use cases have changed for the last year and a half. I've had an iMac. I've never had one of those before. It's big screen real estate; things are great. And I'm looking to see whether it's time to make a full-on keyboard evolution if I can just force myself over the learning curve, here. But here's the question you might not be prepared to answer yet. What's next? Do you have plans on the backburner for additional keyboards beyond what you've done?Jesse: Oh, yeah. We have, like, three more designs that are effectively in the can. Not quite ready for production, but if this were a video podcast, I'd be pulling out and waving circuit boards at you. One of the things that we've been playing with is what is called in the trade a symmetric staggered keyboard where the right half is absolutely bog-standard normal layout like you'd expect, and the left side is a mirror of that. And so it is a much more gentle introduction to an ergonomic-style keyboard.Corey: Okay, I can almost wrap my head around that.Jesse: Because if you put your hands on your keyboard and you feel the angles that you have to move on your right side, you'll see that your fingers move basically straight back and forth. On the left side, it's very different unless you're holding your hand at a crazy, crazy angle.Corey: Yeah.Jesse: And so it's basically giving you that same comfort on the right side and also making the left side comfy. It's not a weird butterfly-shaped keyboard; it is still a rectangle, but it is just that little bit better. We're not the first people who have done this. Our first prototype of this thing was, like, 2006, something like that. But it was a one-off, like, “I wonder if I would like this.” And we were actually planning to do that one next after the Model 01 when the Atreus popped up, and that was a much faster, simpler, straighter-forward thing to bring to production.Corey: The one thing I want from a keyboard—and I haven't found one yet; maybe it exists, maybe I have to build it myself—but I want to do the standard mechanical keyboard—I don't even particularly care about the layout because it all passes through a microcontroller on the device itself. Great. And those things are programmable as you've demonstrated; you've already done an awful lot of open-source work that winds up being easily used to control keyboards. And I love it, and it's great, but I also want to embed a speaker—a small one—into the keyboard so I can configure it that every time I press a key, it doesn't just make a clack, it also makes a noise. And I want to be able to—ideally—have it be different keys make different noises sometimes. And the reason being is that when we eventually go back to offices, I don't want there to be any question about who is the most obnoxious typist in the office; I will—Jesse: [laugh].Corey: —win that competition. That is what I want from a keyboard. It's called the I-Don't-Want-Anyone-Within-Fifty-Feet-Of-Me keyboard. And I don't quite know how to go about building that yet, but I have some ideas.Jesse: So, there's absolutely stuff out there. There is prior art out there.Corey: Oh, wonderful.Jesse: One of the other options for you is solenoids.Corey: Oh, those are fun.Jesse: So, a solenoid is—there is a steel bar, an electromagnet, and a tube of magnetic material so that you can go kachunk every time you press a key.Corey: It feels functionally like a typewriter to my understanding.Jesse: I mean, it can make it feel like a typewriter. The haptic engine in an iPhone or a Magic Trackpad is not exactly a solenoid but might give you the vaguest idea of what you're talking about.Corey: Yeah, I don't think I'm going to be able to quite afford 104 iPhones to salvage all of their haptic engines so that I can then wind up hooking each one up to a different key but, you know, I am sure someone enterprising come up with it.Jesse: Yeah. So, you only need a couple of solenoids and you trigger them slightly differently depending on which key is getting hit, and you'll get your kachunk-kachunk-kachunk-kachunk-kachunk.Corey: Yeah, like spacebar for example. Great. Or you can always play a game with it, too, like, the mystery key: whenever someone types in the hits the mystery key, the thing shrieks its head off and scares the heck out of them. Especially if you set it to keys that aren't commonly used, but ever so frequently, make everyone in the office jumpy and nervous.Jesse: This will be perfect for Zoom.Corey: Oh, absolutely, it would. In fact, one thing I want to do soon if this pandemic continues much longer, is then to upgrade my audio setup here so I can have a second microphone pointed directly into my keyboard so that people who are listening at a meeting with me can hear me typing as we go. I might be a terrible colleague. One wonders.Jesse: You might be a terrible colleague, but you might be a wonderful colleague. Who knows?Corey: It all depends on the interests we have. I want to thank you for taking the time to walk me through the evolution of Keyboardio. If people want to learn more, or even perhaps buy one of these things, where can they do that?Jesse: They can do that at keyboard.io.Corey: And hence the name. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me about all this. I really appreciate it.Jesse: Cool. Thanks so much for having me. I had fun.Corey: I did, too. Jesse Vincent—obra on Twitter, and of course, the CTO of Keyboardio. I am Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment, but before typing it, switch your keyboard to Dvorak.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Black Doctors Podcast
Engineer Helping Build Careers in STEM

The Black Doctors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 32:54


This episode features Dr. Nehemiah Mabry, P.E . (professional engineer). Put your hard hat on, because we are stepping outside of the hospital! Dr. Mabry shares his incredible story that started with a summer program at NASA. This experience laid the foundation for years of professional and graduate education in engineering. Dr. Mabry currently works as a Structural and Mechanical engineer. In this episode he discusses this incredible field and talks about what a typical day or week is like. He stresses the importance of mentorship and representation. Dr. Mabry is the p resident and CEO of STEMedia, an "Edutainment" digital media services company that specializes in production, content development and online learning for the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. He is also the founder of the annual STEM Success Summit , a three-day program that is packed full of incredible resources for students and professionals in STEM. The 2021 program kicks off November 17th and registration is FREE!! Are you or someone you know interested in the field of engineering? This episode is for you! Please listen to and share this episode. If you receive value from the show, please share, subscribe and leave a comment. TBDP is a volunteer passion project with the goal of inspiring all who listen. In-house music and audio production, so any ideas for improvements or suggestions for future guests are welcome. Visit www.StevenBradleyMD.com to learn more about our host. He is available for consultations or speaking engagements regarding health equity and medical ethics.

Fifth Wrist Radio
Independent Thinking - Roland Iten (@rolanditen), inventor and maker of haute mechanical accessories

Fifth Wrist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 116:16


Independent Thinking - Roland Iten (@rolanditen); inventor and maker of haute mechanical accessories Another episode of the Independent Thinking Show for FifthWrist Radio. This is a place dedicate to showcasing the great people doing interesting and cool things in the world of horology. Hosts Roman (@TimesRomanAU) and Patrick_y (moderator on watch blog WatchProSite.com) chat with Roland Iten (@rolanditen), inventor, designer and creator of unique haute mechanical accessories and objets. Best known for stunning, ingenious and complex mechanical belt buckles, Roland's other creations have also included watches, custom jewellery, watch clasps, mechanical cufflinks, credit card dispensers and many other wondrous and creative endeavours. Described as “the Philippe Dufour of Belt Buckles”, Roland talks about his career, creative process and design inspirations. Whilst there are many fine watchmakers out there, there is no-one else in the world who does what Roland Iten is doing. He is a maverick! Join us for this rare opportunity to get a glimpse into the mind and creative spirit of a true legend! Buckle up (pun VERY MUCH intended!) It's a great conversation. Hope you enjoy! Check out Roland Iten on Instagram @rolanditen and RolandIten.com Stay on Time! New Theme Music for 2021: Circle Round by Spinning Clocks (via YouTube Free Music Channel) Follow us on Instagram: @FifthWrist Fifth Wrist website and Fifth Wrist Radio podcast are projects run entirely by a bunch of enthusiasts, watchmakers and collectors. We pride ourselves on being by the watch community and for the watch community. We have zero sponsorship or advertising and welcome all honest and unbiased opinions. We reject all forms of outside brand intervention and take no cash, watches or other goods from watch companies. The future direction of the website and podcasts are driven by the people who take part in this project, and we are also happy to welcome more enthusiasts into our pirate crew. To join our crew group chat then please email us at contact@fifthwrist.com and if you have time please leave us a review wherever you listen to our podcast. Thank you for all the positive reviews & comments on our episodes. We read and appreciate each one! We hope you enjoy listening to this episode as much as we enjoyed making it! Stay On Time & Cheers from DownUnder

History Goes Bump Podcast
Ep. 403 - Butterworth Building

History Goes Bump Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 41:18


The Butterworth Building in Seattle, Washington is home to Kells Irish Restaurant & Pub. This building had once been home to a mortuary and the man who built and ran that is credited with creating the terms mortuary and mortician. Nearly all of Seattle's dead at that time passed through the doors here and with that many dead bodies, there is little surprise that this building has many ghost stories connected to it. Join us as we explore the history and hauntings of the Butterworth Building! The Moment in Oddity features The Devil of Scott County and This Month in History features Washington laying the Capitol cornerstone. Our sponsors for this episode are Best Fiends, a mobile game you can download for free on the App Store or Google Play, and HelloFresh, go to http://HelloFresh.com/bump14 and enter code bump14 for 14 free meals, plus free shipping! Check out the website: http://historygoesbump.com Show notes can be found here: https://historygoesbump.blogspot.com/2021/09/hgb-ep-403-butterworth-building.html Become an Executive Producer: http://patreon.com/historygoesbump Music used in this episode: Main Theme: Lurking in the Dark by Muse Music with Groove Studios (Moment in Oddity) Vanishing by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4578-vanishing License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license (This Month in History) In Your Arms by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3906-in-your-arms License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Outro Music: Happy Fun Punk by Muse Music with Groove Studios All other music licensing: PODCASTMUSIC.COM License Synchronization, Mechanical, Master Use and Performance Direct License for a Single Podcast Series under current monthly subscription. Wax Museum by Stock Music

America's Work Force Union Podcast
Pete Ielmini (Mechanical Insulators LMCT) / Demos Demopoulos (Teamsters Local 553)

America's Work Force Union Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 54:40


Heat and Frost Insulators Labor Management Cooperative Trust Executive Director Pete Ielmini was the first featured guest on today's edition of AWF Union Podcast. He spoke about slowing climate change through energy audits, improving energy efficiency through better mechanical insulation and more. Today's second guest was Teamsters Local 553 Secretary-Treasurer Demos Demopoulos. He rejoined the show to discuss the ongoing strike at United Metro Energy, and why United Metro Energy is being so unreasonable.

Tavern Tales
Masks: Mechanical Spiders

Tavern Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 32:31


We continue session 8 with a delightful battle against a horde of mechanical spiders. The party is a bit under-prepared…

History Goes Bump Podcast
Ep. 402 - Virginia Military Institute

History Goes Bump Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 43:46


Virginia Military Institute was founded over 180 years ago and the institute takes pride in having a competitive educational program that also develops cadets to be citizen soldiers and many have gone on to be officers in the various branches of the military. One of the members of the faculty was Stonewall Jackson and there are those who claim his spirit haunts the place. That's not the only ghost here though. Join us as we explore the history and hauntings of the Virginia Military Institute! The Moment in Oddity was suggested by Scott Booker and features dentures and This Month in History features the James/Younger Gang attacked by townspeople. Our location was suggested by Jules Schlosser. Check out the website: http://historygoesbump.com Show notes can be found here: https://historygoesbump.blogspot.com/2021/09/hgb-ep-402-virginia-military-institute.html Become an Executive Producer: http://patreon.com/historygoesbump Music used in this episode: Main Theme: Lurking in the Dark by Muse Music with Groove Studios (Moment in Oddity) Vanishing by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4578-vanishing License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license (This Month in History) In Your Arms by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3906-in-your-arms License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Outro Music: Happy Fun Punk by Muse Music with Groove Studios All other music licensing: PODCASTMUSIC.COM License Synchronization, Mechanical, Master Use and Performance Direct License for a Single Podcast Series under current monthly subscription. Forest Full of Colors by Stock Music

This Academic Life
Ep.17 – A Rollercoaster Ride: The Life of a Graduate Student

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 24:13


Graduate school can be exciting and yet stressful for a graduate student. In this episode, we talk with a couple of Ph.D. students who are a married couple, Keawepono (Pono) and  Priscilla Delgado Wong. Both Pono and Priscilla are currently biomedical engineering students at Georgia Tech. They share their journeys as graduate students.  Reference list:  Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com)  Contact list:  If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”.  Cast list: Pono and Priscilla Delgado Wong are currently Ph.D. students in the biomedical engineering department at Georgia Tech.  Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah.  Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI).Notes here Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

Rooted in Reliability: The Plant Performance Podcast
275 - Decoding Mechanical Failures: A class experience with Shane Turcott

Rooted in Reliability: The Plant Performance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021


278 – Maintenance Task Analysis with Lucas Marino Welcome Lucas Marino to the podcast. Lucas is the founder of East Partnership and initially spent a lot of time as an engineer with Coast Guard starting off as a diesel engineer and rising through the ranks. Today's topic is maintenance task analysis. But first: In this […] The post 278 – Maintenance Task Analysis with Lucas Marino appeared first on Accendo Reliability.

Idle Chatter: Hot Rod Farmer
Mechanical versus an electronic diesel

Idle Chatter: Hot Rod Farmer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 1:06


Ron Ananian The Car Doctor
The Car Doctor - 9/11/21 - Nissan Mechanical Vs. Electric Latch

Ron Ananian The Car Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 50:39


Ron starts this episode with a call on an 07 Nissan Versa where the caller is looking for a mechanical latch rather than the electric latch, and a question on a Chevy block that the caller wants to turn into a dummy motor and wanting to make it lighter : takes a call on a 17 Hyundai Elantra having intermittent misses that the dealership updated the software but it is still doing it : takes a call on an 04 Colorado asking about general maintenance and what to watch for on this vehicle : takes a call on a 12 Audi 2-5 and questions on general maintenance : takes a call on an 01 BMW 325CI with intermittent starting problems : and takes a call on an 01 Tundra with a waffling feeling when braking. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Build Show Podcast
Episode 24: Mechanicals, Plumbing and HVAC

The Build Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 40:48


Today I'm chatting with Eric Aune from @mechanicalhub, one of our newer contributors to the Build Show Network and a Mechanical Contractor, Plumber, and HVAC specialist based out of Minnesota. We'll be talking all about his career, how he got to where he is today, how his engineering spirit as a youngster led him to pursue an apprenticeship over college, and how this ultimately resulted in him starting his own business. We also cover his inspirations for setting up his very successful Instagram account and how he became the go-to content creator for  professionals in the HVAC industry.

History Goes Bump Podcast
Ep. 401 - Haunted Hannibal

History Goes Bump Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 40:57


Hannibal, Missouri is known as "America's Hometown" and author Mark Twain helped to put it on the map as this was his boyhood home. This was a quintessential river town with many men traveling here to make their fortune and they did. Many stately homes that were built during its heyday are still around today, some of them are beds and breakfasts that you can book for a stay. And many of these have ghost stories to go with them. Join us as we share the history and haunts of Hannibal, Missouri!The Moment in Oddity was suggested by Tim McCrimmon and features Sophia McLachlan's grave and This Month in History features the "Battle of the Sexes" tennis match. Our location was suggested by Christina Orf. Check out the website: http://historygoesbump.com Show notes can be found here: Become an Executive Producer: http://patreon.com/historygoesbump Music used in this episode: Main Theme: Lurking in the Dark by Muse Music with Groove Studios (Moment in Oddity) Vanishing by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4578-vanishing License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license (This Month in History) In Your Arms by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3906-in-your-arms License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Hammock Fight by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3847-hammock-fight License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Outro Music: Happy Fun Punk by Muse Music with Groove Studios All other music licensing: PODCASTMUSIC.COM License Synchronization, Mechanical, Master Use and Performance Direct License for a Single Podcast Series under current monthly subscription.

Earth Wise
Cutting The Cost Of Energy Storage | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 2:00


The cost of both solar and wind power continues to drop making the two renewable energy sources the cheapest way to make electricity in more and more places.  Given the virtually inexhaustible supply of both wind and sun power, these clean electricity sources can in principle meet all our energy needs.  The hang up is […]

Grose Misconduct
Planes, Trains & Plexi-Glass Stages

Grose Misconduct

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 77:56


In this episode:The big BBQ explosionMike's Rewind  Andrew's Ontario Tour The Vaxman Joe's Fact Check  Listener Questions, Comments & Reviews Tom Cruise's new movie Update on the Edmonton Comedy Festival Dick of the Week – Guy working at a Burger King Drive-thru WTF – Cold fries at the same Burger King Drive-thru Asshole of the week – Woman at a Mexican restaurant in Nashville You're a Covidiot – Scientist vs. Antivaxxer  Bonus: 3 – Schoolboard moms Checking in with the Politicians – Justin Trudeau, Erin O'Toole & Jagmeet Singh The Doctor's Office with Doctor Tony – Laryngitis What Does Kevin Think? – Right time for an election? How Smart Is Carole? – Business & Industry The Big Blue Folder We get played out by The Holderness Family   This episode of Grose Misconduct was sponsored by Crystal Glass, Todd's Mechanical, Leading Edge Physiotherapy, South Central Dentistry, Ol' MacDonald's Resort and The Edmonton Comedy Festival.@CrystalGlassLTD @Toddsmech @LeadingEdgePT @dr_caouette @Macker63 @yegcomedy @mikedmonton @JoesFactCheck @docTonyM  Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/GroseMisconduct)

The Green Building Matters Podcast with Charlie Cichetti
Public Private Partnership Sustainability with Kimberly Hosken

The Green Building Matters Podcast with Charlie Cichetti

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 29:19


Kimberly Hosken works building the P3 business at NORESCO with a highly skilled team of industry leaders in central plant design, construction and operations. Partnering with preferred equity firms to create the best value for owners in the P3 market. Developing best in class SOP's, operational plans and systems to achieve a quality working relationship with customers. Kimberly  joined Johnson Controls, Inc. in February 2008 as a member of the Global Energy and Sustainability team. Prior to joining Johnson Controls. Kim held the position of Director LEED, New Construction for the US GreenBuilding Council in Washington DC. She has been a speaker at multiple conferences where she has presented her work on Return on Investment (ROI)for green strategies and construction. Kimberly Hosken has rejoined Johnson Controls as part of the US P3 team on the UC MERCED 2020 project. She has been a leader in international applications of LEED leading design charrettes in China, Egypt, Chile, and Canada while continuing to support the US market. Kim has experience with all of the LEED rating systems and providing large scale benchmarking for portfolios of international companies. Kim participated in the LEED Manufacturing User Group, a dedicated group of industry professionals working to create more opportunities for greener, healthier and more efficient manufacturing facilities. She also participated in the LEED Fellow review process for the class of 2013. Kim became a LEED Fellow in 2012. As a LEED Fellow she provided training for both internal and external customers. Prior to joining Johnson Controls Kim held the position of Director LEED, New Construction for the US Green Building Council in Washington DC. She has been a speaker at multiple conferences where she has presented her work on Return on Investment (ROI) for green strategies and construction. Kim has developed and delivered multiple LEED and Green Building training programs globally, over 3000 people have attended her workshops. Kim has a MBA from Webster University, St. Louis and a B.S. in business from Sierra Nevada College, Lake Tahoe.   Show Highlights One of their first female superintendents in high rise construction in OC, California.  Contagious passion infected Kimberly's green building career path. Conversations that formed and shaped LEED mainstreamed. Green Compass tool to support LEED.  P3 brings the operations into the design.  Mechanical systems upgraded for existing building spaces.   Kimberly's great advice on how to adapt when change occurs.  Career advice on figuring out your green lens. “Be able to accept change with grace and do what you need to do to move on in the face of things that may not have been in the plan.” lol - Kimberly Hosken   Kimberly Hosken Transcript   Kimberly Hosken's Show  it and Information Miller Park  The Checklist Manifestoh Being lol Mortal  The 7 Habits  Linkedin   Connect with Charlie Cichetti and GBES Charlie on LinkedIn Green Building Educational Services GBES on Twitter Connect on LinkedIn Like on Facebook Google+ GBES Pinterest Pins GBES on Instagram   GBES is excited our membership community is growing. Consider joining our membership community as members are given access to some of the guests on the podcasts that you can ask project questions. If you are preparing for an exam, there will be more assurance that you will pass your next exam, you will be given cliff notes if you are a member, and so much more. Go to www.gbes.com/join to learn more about the 4 different levels of access to this one-of-a-kind career-advancing green building community! If you truly enjoyed the show, don't forget to leave a positive rating and review on iTunes.  We have prepared more episodes for the upcoming weeks, so come by again next week! Thank you for tuning in to the Green Building Matters Podcast!   Copyright © 2021 GBES

History Goes Bump Podcast
Ep. 400 - Whispers Estate

History Goes Bump Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 61:57


The Whispers Estate is located in Mitchell, Indiana and is thought to have been built in 1894 by Dr. George White and his wife Sarah. The estate was then bought by Dr. John Gibbons and his wife Jessie. Dr. Gibbons had his office in the house and ran that practice for twenty-six years. Many adults and children are thought to have died in the house including the doctor's wife Jessie. The house has so much activity, it is thought to be one of the most haunted locations in America and is open for ghost hunting. It's name comes from the fact that so many disembodied voices are heard whispering there. We are joined on this episode by members of the Paranormal Crew from the 502 - Shannon, Eva, Stacy and Dan - to share their experiences investigating the house. The Moment in Oddity was suggested by Scott Booker and features a Pharaoh Covering servants in honey to attract flies and This Month in History features Squeaky Fromme trying to assassinate President Ford. Check out the website: http://historygoesbump.com Show notes can be found here: https://historygoesbump.blogspot.com/2021/09/hgb-ep-400-whispers-estate.html Become an Executive Producer: http://patreon.com/historygoesbump Music used in this episode: Main Theme: Lurking in the Dark by Muse Music with Groove Studios (Moment in Oddity) Vanishing by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4578-vanishing License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license (This Month in History) In Your Arms by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3906-in-your-arms License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Outro Music: Happy Fun Punk by Muse Music with Groove Studios All other music licensing: PODCASTMUSIC.COM License Synchronization, Mechanical, Master Use and Performance Direct License for a Single Podcast Series under current monthly subscription.

This Academic Life
Ep.16 – Exploring Undergraduate Research

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 30:37


Have you ever wondered about doing undergraduate research? In this show, we learn about the benefit of doing undergraduate research from Prof. Cynthia Furse, a professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Utah. She has mentored more than 175 students throughout her career and in this show, she shares her thoughts about all aspects of undergraduate research.  Reference list:  Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com)  References for listeners:  https://www.ece.utah.edu/undergraduate-research/ Contact list:  You can find more information about Prof. Cynthia Furse on https://utah.instructure.com/courses/558911 https://faculty.utah.edu/u0029376-CYNTHIA_M_FURSE/hm/index.hml If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”.  Cast list: Prof. Cynthia Furse (guest) is a professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Utah.  Dr. Furse is a Fellow of the IEEE and the National Academy of Inventors. Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah.  Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке
Associate Professor Victoria Timchenko: 'My dream is to find a remedy that will help fight cancer'er." - "Моя мечта - найти решение, которое поможет победить раковые заболевания"

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 9:15


Interview with an Associate Professor of UNSW University, Senior Lecturer with the School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Dr.Victoria Timchenko. - Интервью с исследователем университета UNSW, доктором Викторией Тимченко, о ее научных проектах и профессиональной мечте - найти решение, которое поможет победить рак.

Teaching Beyond the Podium Podcast Series
Student-Centered Assignments Using Pressbooks

Teaching Beyond the Podium Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 14:43


Are you curious about how to create practical, engaging assignments that center learner needs? Dr. Matthew Traum, Instructional Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, shares how he involved his students in the creation of his class textbook, giving them a valuable experience they could take with them beyond UF.Music: Motivational by Scott Holmes

History Goes Bump Podcast
Ep. 399 - Korner's Folly

History Goes Bump Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 32:23


The house that is nicknamed Korner's Folly is also thought to be one of the strangest houses in America. This is a large mansion with 22 rooms that was built in a whimsical way leaving some people scratching their heads in a similar way as the Winchester Mystery House. Jule Korner was a creative genius who wanted this house to be a visual experience and the house was under renovation most of the time to make room for new design ideas. Today, it is not only a museum, but the mysterious house harbors spirits. Join us as we explore the history and hauntings of Korner's Folly! The Moment in Oddity was suggested by Jenny Lynne Raines and features Titus Carvilius Gemello's ring and This Month in History features Roanoke Colony deserted. Check out the website: http://historygoesbump.com Show notes can be found here: https://historygoesbump.blogspot.com/2021/08/hgb-ep-399-korners-folly.html Become an Executive Producer: http://patreon.com/historygoesbump Music used in this episode: Main Theme: Lurking in the Dark by Muse Music with Groove Studios (Moment in Oddity) Vanishing by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4578-vanishing License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license (This Month in History) In Your Arms by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3906-in-your-arms License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Outro Music: Happy Fun Punk by Muse Music with Groove Studios All other music licensing: PODCASTMUSIC.COM License Synchronization, Mechanical, Master Use and Performance Direct License for a Single Podcast Series under current monthly subscription. Journey by Carriage by StockMusic

Earthdawn Survival Guide
EDSG Episode 84 - Windmaster

Earthdawn Survival Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 51:39


* Paths Series: Windmaster * Background on windling-specific racial Disciplines from previous editions. * Role of the Windmaster in fourth edition. * Being invited to the path. * Disciplines suited for the path. * Reminder that paths are organizations that have obligations and responsibilities. * Windmaster testing and initiation. * The mask and its importance to the path's followers. * Advancement in the path. * Mechanical explanation of Initiative benefits from extra successes. * Windmaster Karma Ritual modification. * Windmaster half-magic abilities. * Windmaster rank bonuses and talent options. * Dive Attack–the first Windmaster unique talent, enhances damage. * Wing Blitz–the second Windmaster unique talent, enhances Initiative. * Windmaster knacks * Closing thoughts. Email: edsgpodcast@gmail.com Twitter: @EDSGPodcast Josh on Twitter: @LoreMerchant Dan on Twitter: @boice_voice Get product information, developer blogs, and more at www.fasagames.com FASA Games on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fasagamesinc FASA Games Discord Channel: https://discord.gg/uuVwS9u Earthdawn Guild Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/earthdawnguild Earthdawn West Marches: https://discord.gg/hhHDtXW

Rooted in Reliability: The Plant Performance Podcast
275 - Decoding Mechanical Failures: A class experience with Shane Turcott

Rooted in Reliability: The Plant Performance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021


275 – Decoding Mechanical Failures: A class experience with Shane Turcott Welcome Shane who is the author of Decoding Mechanical Failures. More about Shane and Steel Image: Shane is a mechanical engineer who founded Steel Image, whose primary business is analyzing information on broken parts: how it failed, mechanisms of failure, and whether the part […] The post 275 – Decoding Mechanical Failures: A class experience with Shane Turcott appeared first on Accendo Reliability.

Killed by Desk
46 Tony Erba – Mechanical Insulator ( Face Value / 9 Shocks Terror / Fuck You Pay Me )

Killed by Desk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 65:52


Tony Erba is legendary (and much talked about) for his insane stage presence and incredible bands - from Face Value all the way through to Fuck You Pay Me, but of all the conversation, little is mentioned about how Tony makes a living and the role that work plays in his life. In this in-depth dive into the world of Mechanical Insulation, unions and Cleveland (along with some great music talk as well) we get into how a guy who just wanted to play in a band and tour incessantly looks back at it all - pride, accomplishments and regrets. Of course it's funny as hell as well. Enjoy! For Full Length Episodes And Merchandise Go To https://www.patreon.com/killedbydesk Follow: Killed By Desk Insta: @killedbydeskpodcast Twitter: @killedbydesk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/killedbydesk LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/killedbydesk Links: Local 3 https://insulators3.org/ Why pipes need insulating https://www.energy.gov/energysaver/services/do-it-yourself-energy-savings-projects/savings-project-insulate-hot-water-pipes#:~:text=Insulating%20your%20hot%20water%20pipes,showerhead%2C%20which%20helps%20conserve%20water. Metal Finishing https://www.indeed.com/q-Metal-Finishing-Grinder-jobs.html?vjk=8bfad958d6dbdda3 Finnish Sandwiches https://www.yelp.com/biz/bock-terrace-helsinki Destructive Sampling https://www.twi-global.com/technical-knowledge/faqs/what-is-destructive-testing Tony Victory https://www.metalsucks.net/wp-content/uploads/2007/08/tony.jpg https://thisisnotyourscene.wordpress.com/2016/08/13/victory-records-ex-employee-releases-detailed-tell-all-manifesto/ Profane Existence https://profanexistence.com/about/ Felix Havoc https://www.noecho.net/interviews/felix-havoc-interview https://www.discogs.com/label/34582-Havoc-Records NWF https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Wrestling_Federation https://www.cleveland.com/metro/2010/07/post_325.html Cleveland https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysmLA5TqbIY&t=26s Punk Planet https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punk_Planet Polish Boy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_Boy https://www.thisiscleveland.com/locations/hot-sauce-williams Chubby Fresh https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5xd-YCeKnM Tony's Doppelganger https://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/2015/06/cavs_matt_dellavedova_has_a_cl.html Perry Nuclear Generating Station https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perry_Nuclear_Generating_Station First thing after covid https://www.cleveland.com/life-and-culture/j66j-2020/04/6ab25f7c002746/whats-the-first-thing-you-want-to-do-when-youre-free-to-go-out-clevelanders-share-their-thoughts.html Evel Knieval https://www.noecho.net/features/tony-erba-evel-knievel Bigfoot https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-x3__akoM5w Job Jumper https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1705014.Job_Jumper Manifest Destiny https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkfbEESuRbM https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manifest_Destiny_(The_Dictators_album)

Conversations on Applied AI
QingHui Yuan - The Data Science of Physical Dynamic Systems

Conversations on Applied AI

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 24:57


If you are curious how a Data Science leader thinks about applying Artificial Intelligence to physical dynamic systems in the areas of Industrial IoT, then this is the episode for you!QingHui Yuan, a Director of Modeling and Data Science at Donaldson joins us to talk about all of the topics above and much, much more!  Prior to joining Donaldson, he was a manager at Eaton in their Hydraulics Advanced Technology Group. QingHui has Master's Degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Ph.D. in Mechanical engineering, both from the University of Minnesota.I love QingHui's definition of Artificial Intelligence. He states, "Learn from the past, predict the future."  Spot on and conscience! If you are interested in learning about how AI is being applied across multiple industries, be sure to join us at a future AppliedAI Monthly meetup and help support us so we can make future Emerging Technologies North non-profit events! Emerging Technologies NorthAppliedAI MeetupResources and Topics Mentioned in this EpisodeControl EngineeringDynamical SystemEmbedded SystemPhysical SystemAutonomous DrivingInternet of Things ( IoT )AI Carbon FootprintEdge ComputingEnjoy!Your host,Justin Grammens

A Moment of Science
Mechanical Gears In An Insect

A Moment of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 2:00


Gears can be found in almost every mechanical device. Researchers discovered nature has designed some of its own.

History Goes Bump Podcast
Ep. 398 - Fort McClellan

History Goes Bump Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 31:33


Fort McClellan is located in Anniston, Alabama at the foothills of the magical Appalachian Mountains. We've always found these mountains to harbor a supernatural energy and that seems to be the case here at the Fort, which closed in 1999. The Fort had a strong presence during World War II, training half a million troops and was home to the Women's Army Corps. Several people have died on the former base, including several foreign prisoners of war who are buried on the property, and ghost stories abound. Join us as we explore the history and hauntings of Fort McClellan! The Moment in Oddity features the Cave of the Crystals and This Month in History features Son of Sam arrested. Our location was suggested by Jules Schlosser. Check out the website: http://historygoesbump.com Show notes can be found here: https://historygoesbump.blogspot.com/2021/08/hgb-ep-398-fort-mcclellan.html Become an Executive Producer: http://patreon.com/historygoesbump Music used in this episode: Main Theme: Lurking in the Dark by Muse Music with Groove Studios (Moment in Oddity) Vanishing by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4578-vanishing License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license (This Month in History) In Your Arms by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3906-in-your-arms License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Outro Music: Happy Fun Punk by Muse Music with Groove Studios All other music licensing: PODCASTMUSIC.COM License Synchronization, Mechanical, Master Use and Performance Direct License for a Single Podcast Series under current monthly subscription. Dead Redemption Full with Acoustic Guitar by ALIBI Music

Idle Chatter: Hot Rod Farmer
Hot Rod Farmer: When a mechanical issue in one area is created by something else.

Idle Chatter: Hot Rod Farmer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 68:16


Machinery is inanimate and does not have feelings and emotions as living things do. Yet, their operation is influenced by other internal systems that appear unrelated. In that way they do have a low level of feelings and emotions. The medical community identifies the symptoms of a disease or aliment using the term, presents. When it comes to machinery, I have found that you need to recognize this phenomena. An issue in one area often presents as a malady in another, leading your diagnostics down the wrong path.

This Academic Life
Ep.15 – Quantum Education

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 23:25


Have you heard of quantum education? In this show, we learn about it from Dr. Tina Brower-Thomas, a research professor in the graduate school at Howard University. She also holds a visiting faculty appointment at Harvard University. At the forefront of national quantum education, she shares with us how she got into this field and some initiatives she is currently leading.  Reference list:  Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com)  References for listeners:  http://ciqm.harvard.edu/staff.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8G1T7UGNo58 https://www.google.com/search?q=number+of+black+female+scientists+in+the+united+states&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS791US791&oq=number+of+black+female+scientists+in+the+united+states&aqs=chrome..69i57.47910j1j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8  https://ncses.nsf.gov/pubs/nsf21321  https://ncses.nsf.gov/pubs/nsf21321/data-tables  https://ncses.nsf.gov/pubs/nsf19304/digest/field-of-degree-minorities#blacks-or-african-americans https://www.quantum.gov/  Contact list:  You can find more information about Dr. Tina Brower-Thomas on https://profiles.howard.edu/profile/39526/tina-louise-brower-thomas  If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”.  Cast list: Dr. Tina Brower-Thomas (guest) is a research professor in the graduate school at Howard University. She's the Executive Director of CIQM (Center of Integrated Quantum Materials) at Howard and Education Director.   Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah.  Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

Life on the Wrist
Ep. 62 - Mechanical Alarms and the LeCoultre Memovox from the 1960's

Life on the Wrist

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 10:48


Today we take a look at mechanical alarms, in the form of a LeCoultre Memovox from the 1960's. The LeCoultre Memovox is a watch that we at Life on the Wrist have repeated thought of as some of the best value in vintage watches. We even go into why we think it is of incredible value in our article here, from 2019. We'll talk through a bit of the history of mechanical alarms, we take a look at the LeCoultre Memovox we have and discuss why it has literally not left the wrist since we got it in!The LeCoultre Memovox can be found here.Our Complications Explained article on mechanical alarms can be found here.You can find us on our Website, YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook Want to be part of the Launch of our clothing line? Check out Life on the Wrist Merch!

Stories from the Borders of Sleep
Monday Mechanical CLub

Stories from the Borders of Sleep

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 27:20


This is a story about a stenography machine, and an unusual group of people who meet in a basement .... http://www.bordersofsleep.com

Metabolic Experience Podcast
Episode 15: Mechanical Tension vs. Metabolic Stress

Metabolic Experience Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 22:52


Matt & Tim dive into two key fundamental training principles deployed here at Metabolic: Metabolic Stress ("feeling the burn") and Mechanical Tension ("setting those PR's!") in order to help you have a better understanding of how each of the training methods can help you make the most out of your training experience.  Podcast 0:00-3:00 Pizza 3:00 - Metabolic Stress and Metabolic Tension 6:23 - Applying It To Your Workout 8:00 - For Our Metabolic Clients 9:00 - Metabolic Stress: Most Valuable Movements? How to achieve success? 14:00 - Get the most out of your lifts 18:00 - Safest reps for Strength Training 20:00 - Longevity is Key  

The Element Podcast | Hunting, Public Land, Tactics, Whitetail Deer, Wildlife, Travel, Conservation, Politics and more.
E211: BEST HUNTING BROADHEADS (feat. John Lusk on Scientific Broadhead Testing, Fixed vs. Mechanical, Single Bevel, Two Three and Four Blade, How to Pick a Projectile, Steel vs. Aluminum Construction)

The Element Podcast | Hunting, Public Land, Tactics, Whitetail Deer, Wildlife, Travel, Conservation, Politics and more.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 98:29


John Lusk may be the most passionate gear nerd we've ever met! We love his energy! He also does some really cool stuff when it comes to testing various braodheads, bows, and other archery equipment.  In this episode, we go on a deep dive into some nerd-out broadhead talk. We discuss different brands like Iron Will, Rage, Exodus, Cutthroat, Grim Reaper, and many others. We cover the differences and similarities in construction and the results in real hunting applications.   Lusk Archery Adventures Channel   The MAP SCOUT CHALLENGE powered by OnX  THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE PUBLIC LAND WHITETAIL MAP SCOUTING CONTENT EVER CREATED ON YOUTUBE.  -A ten part video series featuring Tyler Jones and K.C. Smith from The Element map scouting, putting eyes and feet on the deer country, then explaining their findings so that you can learn how to find, hunt, and arrow big bucks!   TOP 4 BIGGEST BUCKS ON PUBLIC LAND!   K.C.'s KANSAS PUBLIC LAND BUCK FILM   Watch the Video from Tyler's Illinois Public Land Giant! BIGGEST 8 POINT EVER!!!   MAKE SURE YOU ARE SUBSCRIBED to our Youtube Channel. **GIANT TEXAS PUBLIC BUCK**   The best map app there is. Find Access to YOUR public lands with OnX Maps. Know where you stand. #onxhunt   Durable Customizable Arrows, Quality Components, Good People, Fast Shipping. Vector Custom Shop Comfort and Mobility Matter. Go With The Best of Both. CRUZR Tree Saddles   Need Some Dependable Trail Cameras That Won't Break The Bank? Moultrie Trail Cameras       New Shirts available in our store at: www.theelementwild.com/shop   To find out more on Texas Public Land opportunities, visit the Texas Parks and Wildlife website. TPWD   Go check out what The Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership is doing on the front lines for clean air, clean water, and wildlife! TRCP      Rock out with Tyler and the Tribe!