Podcasts about Goa

State in India

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Latest podcast episodes about Goa

IVM Likes
Ep.01 Has It Aged Well | 'Dil Chahta Hai'

IVM Likes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 57:37


On the first episode of the show Abbas and Urjita are joined by stand-up comedian, writer and Bollywood lover Sonali Thakker to revisit Farhan Akhtar's debut feature 'Dil Chahta Hai'. We discuss whether this movie invented the impromptu Goa plan, why rich people were always villains in movies before this, whether the film broke the mould for curly haired heroines, were Aamir and Ayyub Khan's characters two halves of the same coin, was Subodh the ideal guy? and which 90s sitcom connects two characters from this movie. You can read Ankur Pathak's piece about DCH here: https://fiftytwo.in/story/friends/Dil Chahta Hai through the lens of psycho analysis: https://youtu.be/ywsheV06ckgFor more fun, pop culture stuff from the IVM team subscribe to the IVM Pop feed and also check out our Youtube channel: https://bit.ly/3fa2M66Follow Abbas Momin on twitter: https://twitter.com/AbbasMomin& instagram: https://www.instagram.com/abbasmomin88Follow Urjita on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WaniUrjita& instagram: https://www.instagram.com/urjitawaniFollow Sonali on twitter: https://twitter.com/SonaliThakker& instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sonalithakker/ You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcasts App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios

Professionally Silly
MY PHONE THINKS I'M UGLY!!!

Professionally Silly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 49:20


Waffle House pissed me off…my iPhone thinks I'm ugly…People are cooking chicken in NyQuil and a whole lot more! Let's get silly! Pictures pertaining to this episode can be found on the podcast Instagram @itsprosilly. Call/text my google voice number call/text 805-664-1828 and hear yourself on a podcast episode! -MUSIC BY Anno Domini Beats “Illusions” Bail Bonds “The Monumenys and Tunnels in Goa and Hampi” -SOUND CLIPS Anthony Bourdain's description of waffle House https://twitter.com/fellinysl/status/1562417317950128128?s=46&t=HsogtLt6DvI4rW0GlDqBsw CBS 8 San Diego https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auZ1pvUZ2zA&t=1s WFAA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JA_bWeBiZq0 -PARANORMAL BLACKTIVITY PLAYLIST for this channel https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL97hCXP8Z-0IzENkb7loHNyhha4pW1qjW -NEW PARANORMAL BLACKTIVITY CHANNEL https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZsX2P3ol_RkCQL2ZCyQzNg -LINKTREE https://linktr.ee/Ambersmilesjones -VANCE GLOBAL https://vance-global.com/?rfsn=6143622.e2df34c *Use coupon code “SMILES” to get 20% OFF* -Join my Professionally Silly YouTube channel membership to get access to perks: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEabIsoT5wrN5hRSgY7wnYQ/join ******************* Amber “Smiles” Jones PO BOX 533 Lovejoy, GA 30250 *************************** Podcast Twitter/IG:@itsprosilly Personal Twitter/IG:@trusmilesjones Email me: itsprofessionallysilly@gmail.com Be sure to SUBSCRIBE/FAVORITE/REVIEW❤️ CALL ME 805-664-1828 ************************************ PAYPAL https://www.paypal.me/ambersmilesjones STEREO https://stereo.com/trusmilesjones INSTAGRAM http://instagram.com/itsprosilly TWITTER https://twitter.com/Itsprosilly --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amber-smiles-jones/message

Good Morning, Bangalore with Kay
India's Record-Holding Free Diver! ft. Mario Fernandes

Good Morning, Bangalore with Kay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 13:51


MarioFernandes, Free diver - the first Indian to hold 4 National records across depth and pool disciplines. 35-year-old Indian free diver Mario Fernandes from Goa recently put India on the freediving map by bagging 4 national records at AIDA (International Association for the Development of Apnoea) in Israel. Mario has made our nation proud by breaking 2 previous records in 2 different disciplines: DYNAMIC With Bi-Fins (DYNB) - Previous record was 64m, Mario's national record now is 86 m, and Static Apnoea (STA) the previous record was 4min 11 sec, Mario's record for STA is 04 minutes and 29 seconds. He is now all set to break his record on STA with his current breath hold of 7min. He is the first Indian to compete in the depth setting a new record for India in his first attempt for CONSTANT Weight with Bi-Fins (CWTB) with a national record of 45m (150ft) depth with a dive time of 1 min 40 sec and Free Immersion (FIM) with a national record of 40m (131ft) depth with a dive time of 1 min 35 sec. Given this was his first attempt, Mario chose to focus on setting records to put India on the global map first. He is now all set to challenge global rankings in his next attempt, at the end of this year. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/gmbwithkay/message

Sizzling Samachar of the Day
Comedian Raju Srivastav passes away

Sizzling Samachar of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 3:21


Veteran comedian Raju Srivastav passed away at the age of 58 on Wednesday. He was undergoing treatment at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) following a cardiac arrest on August 10th. The much-loved comedian gained recognition after participating in the comedy show The Great Indian Laughter Challenge. He has acted in films such as Baazigar, Big Brother, Bombay to Goa and Toilet: Ek Prem Katha.

Network Capital
Earn your first $1000 on the Internet with Louis Pereira

Network Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 36:53


In this podcast we cover - 1. The art and science of building no-code products 2. Business models and monetisation strategies for online products and software 3. Louis' journey of becoming an internet entrepreneur Louis in his own words - "I live a dual life. During the day, I work with my family to run an offline-first business in my hometown – the coastal state of Goa, located on the west coast of India. At night, I build assets on the internet. I started my journey as a creator on the internet with a newsletter called Complexity Condensed. It was fun but way too tiring. Writing is difficult work. And no matter how experienced you are, it never gets easier. After realizing this I decided to work on things that could survive without constant effort. I decided to build digital products. But I had a problem – I couldn't code. I had two options – teach myself how to code, or learn the most cutting-edge no-code tool I could get my hands on (Bubble). I chose the latter. Why? Because I'm impatient. So far, I'm having a blast, and I don't regret it one bit."

Ghosts of Arlington Podcast
#60: Introducing the Crew of Apollo 11 (The Apollo Program, Part V)

Ghosts of Arlington Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 29:23 Transcription Available


This week we will take a look at the crew of Apollo 11 and how each came to be selected as a member of the most ambitious mission undertaken in human history - the first attempt to land people on the moon.The Space Race series introduction music is Lift Off by kennysvoice.As always, a very special thanks to Mountain Up Cap Company for its continued help to spread the word about the podcast on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/MountainUpCapCompany Climb to Glory!For more information about the podcast visit: ·       The GoA website: https://www.ghostsofarlingtonpodcast.com    ·       Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ghostsofarlingtonpodcast·       Twitter: https://twitter.com/ArlingtonGhosts·       Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ghostsofarlington/

Prime Time with Ravish
प्राइम टाइम : भारत जोड़ो यात्रा पर निकली कांग्रेस, कांग्रेस छोड़ो रणनीति पर लगी है बीजेपी

Prime Time with Ravish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 36:07


Cosmic Hour Radio Show
Moon Tripper Back To The Roots Goa / Psytrance Midi Pack (Preview)

Cosmic Hour Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 2:47


Moon Tripper's "Back to the roots" Goa / Psytrance MIDI pack is the perfect tool to boost your inspirations and productions, beautiful and intense arps & melodies that will surely embrace smiles and emotions everywhere!

Espacio en blanco
Espacio en blanco - Seres en los que no creemos - 18/09/22

Espacio en blanco

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 53:57


Carlos Rodrigo, director del castillo de San Servando, nos revela la vida de Antón Goa, un toledano que se embarcó en la vuelta al mundo de Magallanes y Elcano. Jesús Callejo, nos sumerge en el mundo de esos seres en los que no creemos, pero que existen en otras realidades. En compañía de Daniel Gómez Aragonés, nos relatan algunas de las leyendas toledanas. Escuchar audio

Don Bosco, South Asia
1.122 SALESIAN FAMILY NEWS ASIA PACIFIC - # 122

Don Bosco, South Asia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 12:07


YOUTUBE : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJppYzvKMGE HEADLINES : 11th to17th September 2022 — India : Rector Major directs retreat for 12 Provincial Councils of South Asia. Fr Patrick Lepcha reports from Old Goa * India : India : Rector Major Launches Don Bosco South Asia Website. Br. Sunil Kerketta reports * India : Panjim Province marks 75 years of Salesian presence in Goa with new football and futsal courts. Fr Francis Xavier reports from Panjim * India : Church Art Kolkata honours 3 Salesians for outstanding service to society. Br. Banhunlang Lyngdoh reports from Siliguri * Vietnam : Salesian Theologate starts academic year with 60 students from 16 congregations. Fr. Agustine DuPhuoc reports from Ho Chi Minh City * Myanmar : Salesian family appeals for urgent solidarity with suffering population. Director of Radio Salesian Fr. C.M. Paul reports * India : South Asia Salesian family members study best practices of Don Bosco Mission. Br. Royston Colaco reports from Shillong. Salesian News Asia-Pacific, is a podcast service of weekly news summary about and interest to Salesian Family in 26 provinces spread out in 29 countries of the region since 24th May 2020. This episode was produced by Fr. C.M. Paul director of Radio Salesian and Salesian TV with technical assistance of Program director of Salesian TV Mr. Bruno Thapa. "For the latest Asia-Pacific Salesian Family news log on to Don Bosco South Asia portal and the news link as https://www.donboscosouthasia.org/courtyard/public/News and www.eao.bosco.lin

3 Things
SC order on BCCI, Congress cracks in Goa, and India's health expenditure

3 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 29:08


First, Indian Express' National Sports Editor Sandeep Dwivedi joins host Shashank Bhargava to talk about the Supreme Court's latest order on BCCI, and how it effectively sets the stage for Secretary Jay Shah to become the next president of the board.Next, Indian Express' Mayura Janwalkar talks about 8 out of 11 MLAs of the Congress party in Goa defecting to the BJP, and how it will help the ruling party in the 2024 Lok Sabha elections.And in the end, Indian Express' Anonna Dutt joins us to discuss the findings of the National Health Accounts (NHA) report, and what it reveals about the country's healthcare.

Politicsarca
Why 8 Congress MLAs joined Bjp in Goa?

Politicsarca

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 1:27


Why 8 Congress MLAs joined Bjp in Goa? My Instagram Page - www.instagram.com/politicsarca/ My Facebook Page - www.facebook.com/politicsarca My Twitter Page- twitter.com/politicsarca #politicsarca #goa #congress #bjp --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/politicsarca/message

Daily Dose
Daily Dose Ep 1150: Goa Congress MLAs defect, Subramanian Swamy to leave govt bungalow

Daily Dose

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 12:03


Anwiti Singh brings you the news from Goa, Maharashtra, New Delhi, Gujarat, Jammu and Kashmir, and Kazakhstan. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Art of Photography With Stanley Aryanto
Ep 44 - How Supriya Samal from Meanderquest take back her health and life when she quit her job as the bank manager and found photography

The Art of Photography With Stanley Aryanto

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 60:24


Hey Wicked Hunters,  Welcome back to The Art of Photography podcast with Stanley Aryanto. This week we will be chatting with Supriya and how she took control of her life when she quit her position as bank manager and found photography Meanderquest is the handle name for all the visual work done by artist Supriya Samal. Supriya is a photographer, digital artist, generative artist, and writer. She started her journey into photography while still working as an officer in the bank. It was also the time when she got diagnosed with Clinical Depression.   Hence, photography became a part of her healing process. She traveled with her partner and found a world of art outside the struggles of mind. Photography and digital art made her discover her strengths, mindset, and inner power. She also blends photography and digital art to create subtle yet meaningful abstract art. Mental Health and Art are her core focus in life.   Website: https://www.meanderquest.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/meanderquest Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/meanderquest NFTart: https://www.meanderquest.com/nft-art-work   Other ways to listen and subscribe to the podcast: • Spotify - http://bit.ly/twhspotify   • Apple Podcast - https://bit.ly/Theartofphotography   • Google Podcast: https://bit.ly/TheArtOfPhotographyWithStanleyAr   • Website: https://podcast.thewickedhunt.com      • Tune In (Alexa) - https://bit.ly/TuneInTheArtOfPhotographyPodcastWithStanleyAr     For those of you who want to learn more about The Wicked Hunt Photography by Stanley Aryanto: • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thewickedhunt/    • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thewickedhunt/  • Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/thewickedhunt/  • Photo prints: https://www.TheWickedHunt.com/   Don't forget to leave a review on the podcast if you enjoy this conversation. It would help us to get found and help to inspire other photographers.  ------------ Transcription: Supriya Samal From Meanderquest  0:00   Can't go through it anymore. It's just not helping me at all. And when this my health became bad, that was the last straw for me Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  0:09   Hey, Wicked Hunters Welcome back to The Art of Photography podcast by Stanley Aryanto, where we share photographers journey and how they find hope, purpose and happiness through photography. And today we have someone that I've met through Instagram and we've been connected all the way through all this time. And you know, I've seen her journey since the very first time she was, you know, asking on how to capture the first Milky Way and she just kept growing. It's just such an inspiration to to see her journey through photography and how it changed her life. So today, we have Supriya Hey, Supriya, how are you today? Supriya Samal From Meanderquest  0:55   Hey, Sandy, I'm doing good. How are you doing? Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  0:59   I'm doing well. I'm doing well. I'm so glad that you know, you made it here. And I know you have an inspiring story behind your photography, as well as you know, behind your life. So I'd love I'd love to, for you to share that because I know that the audience cannot find a lot of inspiration from it. But you know, you we cannot connect through Instagram, right? The first message you asked me, I think clubhouse was the first one I can't remember. Yes, yeah. And then you need to see your eyes about like the Milky Way. And the next thing I know is like, you just capture this crazy Mercury shot. So that's, that's amazing. But you know, before we get there, how does the passion for photography come to you like, what makes you want to do photography in the beginning? Yes. Supriya Samal From Meanderquest  1:50   So first of all, I would like to thank you for inviting me to this podcast regarding my journey, so initially, actually, I didn't have any idea regarding photography, or whatsoever. It all started back in 2017 2017 2018. So the thing is, I was actually going through clinical depression. So and at that time, I was working as a full time working as a bank manager. And it's been six years. But there was something missing, you know, in that day to day life. And with clinical depression, it only got worse for me. So at one point, I was hospitalised and my health was quite worse. So my husband, Sam, he proposed like, Let's go somewhere, you know, so we planned a trip to the Himalayas. And there was this village, those Rukwa it's like, the border village in the northern side of India. So we went to that village, it was a quite an off road. And like hardly any, you will hardly find any car or bike, you know, going there. So we were like the only persons going there. And the road was pretty bad. And we had like a near death experience that day, because we were at 13,000 feet. I remember, it was a pass mountain pass. And suddenly the cloud came from nowhere. And our houseguest. He has warned us like, you know, don't spend much time there. It's very beautiful. But you know, don't get tempted. So, but we were there and we wanted to take some pictures. So we took some pictures. And suddenly the cloud came and as we were, as we started to, you know, go down, said we didn't even know the car. No, it was on an automatically it shut down. And it was just riding down the mountain road. It was luckily, we thought like we were hearing some music. And luckily it stopped and I was like, why we're not hearing the music. Then we realised Okay, the car is not running. So Sam started the car and we were just you know, just on the edge of that road. So we stopped there. And you know, we got out of the car and I was like taking deep breaths. And I was thinking like, what am I doing with my life? It was like those moments, you know, and then we went to that quiet little village. It was a very beautiful, you know, old wooden houses and like they have preserved their mountain culture and everything. And now the beauty of that place was so good. I started taking some pictures on my phone. Sam had a camera back then because he was doing photography, you know, taking travel shots. He was a biker so he does that I had no idea how to operate a camera. But I was taking on my mobile camera and he had, he actually had to take a shot. And he was doing trying it. And he said, like, it's not coming as I want. So I was like, let me try. So, you know, I tried the camera and I took a shot and, and he said, like, yeah, I want you to take this one. So I was like, okay. No idea. But, you know, there was something like, when I hold it, and you know, I looked through the viewfinder, I took that one first photo. It's not that good. But you know, that the first feeling of doing that, like, you are doing something, you know. So after that, when we came back, I decided to quit my job. And we thought, like, you know, let's do this travel thing, because I was already feeling a little bit good, health wise. So we started travelling for the next three months. And during this time, I started taking pictures, like random pictures that I took. And but then when we came to Germany in 2019, so I got my first camera. And from there onwards, like, till today, I never look back. It was like, quite a journey for me. learning everything, but I enjoyed every bit of it. Because I sometimes think to myself, if not for photography, if not for travel, I would not have been where I am today. No. So it's it's like a blessing for me. Yes, clinical depression is something one shouldn't think of happening to someone else. But it was like a blessing for me. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  6:48   Wow. That's, that's crazy, right? I mean, it's sometimes we take our lives for granted so much, until we need to hit that rock bottom, you know, and for you, it was like that near death experience, you know, on the car, like, just on the side. Like, I mean, like, I don't know exactly how it is. But you know, I was, I was just came from Nepal, and then we go through that kind of roads. So I think I kinda can picture you know, what you mean, with the crazy road and stuff like that. And, like, so nervous when you when you eat when you share that story? That's crazy. So, you know, so it seems like photography and travel have really just deceived yourself, it has changed your life. Yeah. How, but share us a little bit more about it, right? How does it actually change your life, you know, how taking photos and going on trips, makes you happier, and, you know, become less depressed. And, you know, essentially, where you are today, where you are feeling a lot better about your life, I take it. Yeah, give us a little bit more about that journey, because I'm pretty sure our audience would love to hear that. Supriya Samal From Meanderquest  7:58   And yeah, so like, what happened when we started travelling. And initially, it was only you know, to mountains and places, because we both love spending time on mountains. And at that time, like now, also I write daily, so when we used to go on our travels, and all on the mountains. So there were some times when I was like, not thinking of anything, and just enjoying that place. You know, so the living on those moments, was like, I was experiencing something for the first time, like, on the daily basis, when we run to Office, do our work, all the stuff, you know, we forget to take those moments to ourselves. And just think about, like, where my life is going on, or just not think about anything at all. So it was those moments and the same thing I felt when I hold the camera. So like if I'm taking a photo, I just immerse myself so much, that I can't think of anything happening in my surroundings, literally nothing. And I'm the kind of person who doesn't enjoy hikes, right? I had never done any hikes before in my life. And it was only during those time. And this photography actually inspired me to go on hikes to you know, to break that boundary like that those limitations we put on ourselves. So that was like some very first things which were happening to me. And I had only heard these things from Sam because he was travelling in before me and and I was like, okay, just saying stuff. But when I experienced all those things, I was like I understood the you know the reality of it and why someone should do it and also like in travel, you meet people, you experience different cultures, you talk to them, you hear their story. And you understand like, the problems you think, you know, in you have in your life is like, so minuscule compared to what is happening in this world. And you are just in your bubble thinking about, Oh, this thing happened to me, that thing happened to me which is, which is not, it is very trivial. And in the bigger terms of life, so these are the learnings, which I get no experiencing. And regarding my depression, so, like, I was, I was in that kind of point, where my mental health was so bad, I was not talking to anyone to like any person, you know, to my friends, to my family, except them. And when you are travel, when you're travelling, you're meeting people, you're, you know, forced to have that conversation, sometimes you can't just, you know, keep mom don't say anything, it can't happen. And when they're a new person you are, it's like something new, you want to know about them. So you have to have that conversation. And like, it's, it's so intriguing, it's so interesting to learn about people. So, that also, you know, dissipate my that afraid I like I was very afraid to interact with people. So that also went away. Like the thing which is happening today, I would not have thought of doing this because I am so afraid of you know, interacting with someone. But yeah, this travel and photography, both of these helped me so so, so much. And I actually met many interesting people who have spent their life in such a way in such hardships, and yet they have so many interesting stuff to share from their life experience. And it was worth knowing, like, in this lifetime, you got to meet them and learn about them. And, yeah, that was the thing. All of this, you know, helped me with my mental health and, and my photography journey. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  12:17   That's incredible, you know, just Just hearing that I'm very happy. Much the same way. And you know why I love photography and travel, I know exactly what you mean, you know, being in the present. I remember when I was when there was a COVID Right. Now a lot of my clients is like, broken down, and a lot of my income was going to stop and I was stressed about money. And then you know, when like, I'm living here in Bali, and I wouldn't give them to like, you know, give 2000 or 5000 rupee or tips, which is not even $1, right, it's about 50 cents or 20 cents, and they are the most grateful and you know, when so I know exactly what you mean, you know, we we live in a bubble and we always look at social media and seems like we need to be like that, you know, like is simple to be happy. Right? And of course, we still need all that money to buy all of our gears because the target that is the worst. It's funny, because like, when I was in Canada, you know, like I had a car and everything. But just to put that in perspective that what I have in my bag is a lot more precious than everything else in the car, I was just like, including the car, just like holy, it's crazy. But that's, you know, it brings happiness. So when you were a bank manager, um, you know, you're in a really good place, right? Being a manager, it's a dream for a lot of people to be a manager, you know, it's a lot of people are working hard to get up there and obviously work hard to get there, right. You're a bank manager, I'm guessing you know, you're getting that really good income, you'll get really good benefit or comfortable financially, but what's missing? Why why is it that you're still you know, unhappy and depressed about it and how does that change when you and what what makes you decide to leave that career and start something different or try something? Supriya Samal From Meanderquest  14:21   Okay, actually, to narrate about that experience I need to go back a little bit further. So I did my graduation in pharmacy. And after that, I worked for a year in a pharmaceutical company as a Quality Assurance Manager and it was in Goa. So like in India go up people treat it like okay that is is such a place near to the sea. It's beautiful. It's actually a beautiful place, but people go there to you know, have their holidays, and I was working there and during like on the weekends Whenever we visit, see, I would see people in, you know, spending the holidays and everything. And I was like, why I'm not feeling that experience, I am in a place which people all over from India coming to spend their holiday, I should feel that, you know, but then I was when I was working there in that company, I was like, No, something is missing. So I thought like, maybe because this is a private sector or corporate sector, I'm not feeling it. So I should try something different. So I gave the exams and got the job in a government bank in India. So when I went there, and the first day when I met my manager, it's an interesting story. When I met my manager, he asked me like, Okay, you did graduation in pharmacy? Why do you asked me like, why did you choose to come and join the bank? And I was like, why this person is asking me this ridiculous question. And like, after, after, like, one month, I understood why that person was asking me that question. So and it was like, I was in my probation. So after three months, I had to leave that branch and go to some other branch. So my manager told me, you know, Supriya, I have very high hopes for you. You shouldn't, you know, you shouldn't continue in this bank, you should go somewhere else. Okay, you should tell me, where should I go now? Okay. I thought like, okay, maybe this is not working, you know, I should try something else. So I thought, what is the you know, highest job in India. So it was like the civil services. So I thought, okay, I love to travel, I want to travel. So maybe I should try for the foreign ambassador position. I know, there were exams. So I started studying for that. I even passed the exam, the written exams and the interview twice. Okay. But when I was preparing for the third time, I was still on to bank working. So when I was preparing for the third time, you know, this question came to my mind, every time when I was in the bank, when I was studying, it came to my mind, like, Am I doing it, right? Like, why I need this job. I'm saying, I know, I'm giving myself or using like, I want to travel, but that is not something this job entails, like okay, you got you will have, you will have the opportunity to travel, but you will have lots of other responsibilities as well, because you will be working for a nation you have, you know, you should be able to justify that. So, it got poking in my mind again and again. And when I was in the office now working, and I was thinking like, okay, the scenario is not going to change. I will be you know, working in an office with other colleagues, you know, there will be other people, but it will be the same office, I will have to sit inside this four walls and work. And okay, I will have a little bit more opportunity to travel then this banking career. But that's not just enough. So this question is what you know, I didn't write the exam that year. I decided like, okay, no, this is the time this is the high time. I know, I was continuing. But that was the last time I was like, it's everything, you know, you feel like a choking that feeling inside yourself. And it's just not enough. Like you see everyone else enjoying it. But you are like the one person I was feeling sometimes in the bank. You know, everyone else is just running. And I'm the only person sitting in that desk. And I'm just wondering about my life. It was like that. So yeah, that was a very tough decision to take. Because knowing like, you don't, you will not have your next paycheck coming for you. And it was like, you know, we were just married back then. And it was only six months. But and it was lot to you know, ask from your partner. No. So it's not something I had decided from a long back that I will do and you know, you you got to talk about it. It was not something like that, but I'm lucky on on that matter that you know, Sam was very understanding because he wanted to do all this stuff. So yeah, so that was the thing that led me to quit my job. I am saying it sincerely, Stanley. I had no idea what I was going to do. But I knew that I'm going to do something, you know. And when we took that trip, like I said, So I At this, I had this idea came to my mind, like, I should do photography, I should write about my experiences. So that was it. And like any Asian, you know, parents, my parents were not that, you know, agreeable to me leaving my job. But yeah, with time, I hope they will come around like my mom, she understands it now, my father is still a bit hung up on that, but I know with time he will come around it. So yeah. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  20:35   Wow, that's, that's really cool. You know, I know, it's how hard it is to leave that secure life. And I think what's really cool is that you keep and you keep looking for the answer, right? You try this one thing. And most people when they get stuck on, you know, get comfortable in that job, even though they don't like it, they just keep going by you go out there and try something else, and you try something else. And there you are finding something that, you know, of course, it's not perfect, because nothing is perfect. Right? It comes with the struggle and everything. But it's something that seems like you know, it's good for your health, making you happier as a person and helps you with the depression as well, which is fantastic by massive congratulations for doing that. I'm very happy to do that. So, you know, like when you quit your job? So, tell me this one thing? So are you doing photography full time now? Or what are some of the ways you are doing in order to find that income, you know, and to offset to offset the income from your previous job? Because I know, we all love photography, and we all wish that all we got to do that all we can do is take photo and travel. But unfortunately, we all need money, right? So then what did you decide to do to find that income? And how is that transition kind of work for you? Supriya Samal From Meanderquest  21:59   Okay, so, like for the initial two years, I had some savings, you know, from my previous job, which I knew I can depend upon. So that was my safety net. But then actually, when we move to Germany, here, there is a little problem when it comes to approaching clients or anything, it's that you have to learn the language, you have to know the language. So I actually wanted to join the language courses, but then COVID came and all those restrictions, the classes were not happening now, although stuff and afterwards I started learning on my own, but it was not that efficient, because the you have to give the exams and everything here. So that I will be doing now like I have already enrolled in learning the German language classes. So I will be doing it now. But yes, like after the second year, I started approaching some brands. And I had worked with some and like some were paid, and some were, you know, not paid, like just they got to the what the things which you wanted, and there was some hotel collaborations on our trips. So that was like, a good thing happened. I also, when we were on Matera trip, I also did a collaboration with our Airbnb house owner. So that was my first thing happening. So apart from that, I also did some, like paid gigs here, like there, some people want to take the portraits or there was an event in our Old City, it was happening for the farmers market. So I did a paid gig then. So it was like that, like small small gigs. But I also when last year when I joined NFT space. So that also was a source of income. And now, like after learning the language, I want to properly establish, you know, my business here, I want to register and everything because that's what you need in Germany. And yeah, after that, I want to approach the clients because Munich being a big city, here you have even more opportunity. So I'm looking forward to that and I'm quite positive about it. So Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  24:45   yeah, that's fantastic. You know, you know going and starting over basically from the having a nine to five and then you move to a different country and you have to learn the language and you know all of this struggle but you keep pushing through and I would We all know, as photographers and artists, we all know that, you know, photography is not an easy thing to make money. But I think what people don't understand is that almost everything else is not easy, right? It requires. Yeah, it's really fun. It's like, you know, as an engineer, I have to study for years, plus an extra one year for my master degree, right? So, five years, just study, when I quit my job and do photography, full time, I was expecting to be up and running in six months, it's not going to happen, you know, you have to learn how to do all these mistakes. So it's really funny how that mindset is just so different. But I'm glad that you're pushing through and you know, you get that you get, you push through, you know, a lot of this challenges to get to where you are today. So, what is some of the things that really, that you really passionate that really makes you excited when it comes to photography, like know, when you capture it or when you travel? What are some of the things that you look for? After your photos? Supriya Samal From Meanderquest  26:13   Yes, so my, when I started photography, it was initially the landscape, you know, so, I was quite drawn towards nature. I, I saw like Daniel cotton Albatros, you know, their photos and how they took it. And I was like, so fascinated about it. I was like, how how people do that? No, I want to learn that. So, that led me to, you know, different journeys on different trips. And every trip I learned something, like, I remember this trip in Germany, German Alps in Bucharest garden, okay. So there is this place called hinter z. So, I studied everything, you know, prepared everything before going to that place, and we went there. And, and the first sunrise, there was nothing happening, and no, no clouds, it was just a black sunrise, I enjoyed the sunrise came back. Then the second day, they went to the same place. And it was like, magnificent, you know, everything was so beautiful. And guess what? I took blurry pictures. And it's been like, what, seven months, I had been taking pictures. But at that moment, I took blurry pictures came back home thinking, Oh, we got some good shots. And when I looked into you know, I open this and MOLAP to lose it. Why? All this happened? How did I think blurry picture, then I understood, okay, this is the shitty tripod, which I put there. I should get a better tripod. So that was my first lesson, you know, because it was windy that morning. And I was there was the lake, the mountain I was trying to take the long exposure, and somehow everything got blurry. So So you know, after that, after that, actually, when I went in that trip only we went to another lake OBC. And then I saw photographers taking photos. And they were it was like, What 8am 8:30am and the sun was up. They were taking long exposures. And I saw they were using something you know, I didn't know about ND filters back then. And every experiences of mine, whatever I have learned it was on sale. I don't know what the hell I was researching over the Google. But Google never told me anything. So everything on sale. So I saw that. And I was like, I went to one photographer. He is a very known photographer in Austria. I went to him and I asked him, like, why you were using this? He looked definitely. He looked at me and I was like, this is an ND filter. I will say okay, what's the use? And then he explained me all the stuff. You know, I think that is something good about me. Like, I don't know, I'm not afraid of asking questions. I don't think for a second like what the other person is going to do you have a camera, you're taking photos and you're asking questions. But yeah, that's how I have learned actually on field. And that after that, I came home that day on my trade. And I he gave me some links, you know, from where I can read read about stuff. So I read a lot everything and I understood about it. And from there onwards, I got like a part how to, you know, look about stuff and how to prepare yourself before the trip and all those things. So that most of us think landscape, then, actually, when we went to Barcelona last year, like before that trip, I was a little bit of thinking like, Okay, I have only taken landscape photos, how I'm going to take any street shots, how I'm going to take any architecture shots, like, this is not something I have done. And another of my friend, Julia, she, that I met her also from Instagram, like you. So she was joining us in that trip, she lives in Madrid. So it was also new for her because she also takes only landscapes. So both of us, you know, went around exploring the city and taking all kinds of shots, you know, and it was quite fun. And after the trip, actually, I realised like, I don't have to, you know, put a pin on anything, but I do, like every photographer, you see the group, everyone grows. And this is why like, I had put a pin on my life, when I was working in that nine to five job, why I had to do the same in terms of creativity, I can grow. So that was the thing I do did Street and architecture, then I when I went to India this year, I took tribal portraits. So it's like, now I'm finding you know, everything, which I do, I want to do it in a better way. And that's the thing, I'm enjoying everything, everything related to photography. And even though astrophotography you know, that also, like, the nights you spent there standing, you know, alone and looking at the sky, that feeling that feeling is incredible. I don't want to partner with that feeling just because I take architecture shots, or you know, portrait stuff. No, I want to feel that also. So yeah, I'm going to try everything. So let's see. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  32:08   It's cool. Yeah, I think you know, I love the changes. You know, I don't like the one thing and I get bored easily. So I agree with you, I like to just be do everything right now. When it comes to branding, a lot of people say stick with one first. But at the end of the day, I think it's important to do what we love. And you know, don't let what has been done before restrict us from what we want to do. I think that's really important. So it's really cool. But I want to talk about the astrophotography there for a second. I remember that they were specifically I was running the webinar. And then you asked me about you know how to take you know, the Milky Way, because you're gonna go on the trip. And I was like away, so I didn't see your message. And then when I reply to you, you already like, you know, like, already went on the trip. And then after that you got to tracker and then you know, you just you grow really quick capturing that Milky Way, right. So tell me tell us a little bit about the jerky because shooting Milky Way is, first of all, a lot of people have a lot of restriction against it right? Go out there at my, you know, where it's dark, in the middle of nowhere. A lot of people first of all have beer doing that. But second of all, the technique and everything is very different. I know like it took me, I think about two years until I can finally successfully capture my first photo of the stars, and therefore you're not captured the motorway. But it takes a lot of a lot of a lot of journey to get there. So share with us a little bit about your journey behind your Milky Way and Astro photography, because I know that we grow very quickly and you learn very quickly and we go from asking me the question, start shooting tracker. So it's crazy. Supriya Samal From Meanderquest  34:02   Yeah, so regarding astrophotography actually, it was during the COVID. During the COVID I first saw your page on Instagram, and I saw those Milky Way shots. Even before that actually I remember in 2018 or something. I first saw one of the Milky Way shots from one Indian photographer. So it was like one image but when I came to your page, and I just saw all those images, I was like, quite hooked. And then I saw Joffrey. He was, you know going on shooting the Milky Way's I was like, What is this thing? No. Earlier I was thinking maybe this was all done in Photoshop or something, you know? And then when I saw your no so many images and then Joffrey going out there shooting I was like, I want to do this. What is this thing? I'm quite intrigued then I started reading about You know, it all the astrophotography stuff. So I asked you, you know, and then I asked to Joffrey or so. And I would search on Google like, it was like four months, I was just waiting because there was COVID restrictions and everything. So I was just reading about the stuff. And I would tell Sam every day, you know, I want to take a Milky Way shot in Madera. We had no plan whatsoever to go to Madera, you know, we were thinking of going to Slovenia, okay? And I was like, I want to go there. I don't know what about the place, I want to go there and want to take a Milky Way shot. So I read about everything. I, you know, ordered the new tripod. Okay, I ordered a new tripod and the lenses and everything. And the tracker thing, actually, it was taking some time to get delivered. In Germany, it was about a month or so. And we were about to go on a trip and 15 days. So I just madly searched over internet about Madeira photographer who is taking Astro shots, okay. And I got one, this person angry. So I contacted him. And we started talking. And I told him like, you know, we are coming to Missoula, and I want to take those Astro shots. And and I don't have a tracker. So like, can you listen to me or check? And he said yes. And he was like, okay, that will be fun, you know, to meet you guys. And so I was like, Okay, let's do that. And then we went to Madeira. And the first night, we planned to take photo, it was actually near lighthouse, okay, near the sea. And like your earlier mentioning about, you know, being afraid of the dark. If there is someone on this earth who is afraid of that it's me, like, in my own house. I get so afraid. So imagine me standing on a hill taking extra shots. It was like, that's the thing I love about photography, you know, I have done things which I would have never done in my life, if not for that. So. So we went to that lighthouse. And I wanted to take shots. It was not tracked shots. I just wanted to you know, experiment. And I learned about those 500 rule 400 rules. No. So I on the field when I was experimenting, and I asked Sam to you know, be the object of that whole scenario. So he was standing there, he was going back and forth. And I was like, okay, the stats are not that charts are blurry, the focus is not good. The entire night, we didn't sleep. And like, I think about like, after two or two and a half hours. I got what I wanted. Okay. But there was quite a bit like pollution because, you know, it wasn't the sea level and something and there was a lighthouse also. So the light, there was light pollution. But yeah, the stars were neat, and everything was good. And we took that and we came home. And then I was like, Okay, I now I want to take the track shots now that I know, I want to take the traction. So on the day when we went so our friend Andrey, he also joined us. And he had another whole setup for you know, deep sky photography with telescope and everything. And I was like, Whoa, that's one thing. I didn't know. That was a new thing for me. I was like, Okay, let me handle this small thing first and I will go for the bigger so he was setting up his and I had read about the you know, the polar star, you know, the alignment and everything. But with star tracker when you look through that, you know the tiny hole and do that polar alignment. Oh my god after after, like one hour. I was nearly blind. I was not able to see. The I was only looking through that one hole. No, no, no, Sam was trying. I was trying. It took us two hours to do the polar alignment. Okay. And we did the alignment by the time it was already dark. And but yeah, we did it. And then we took the panel shots. And it was in funnel forest. Okay. So in that forest, visited two cameras, one without tracker and one with tracker with tracker, I was taking the art shots. And another I took for the you know, to make the light trails, Star Trek sorry, star trails. So it was at one end of the forest. And it was another end of the forest. So in that dark night, we went you know, tries yeah food Times, and you know, you'll have if you have seen them funnel forest images, the tree is, you know, they look like something, you know those creatures, something like that. And imagine in the dark when you suddenly hit the light, turn them it was like, okay, something there, I was so afraid, I was just thinking about, Okay, think about the photos you are going to take, you know, that was my inspiration to go through that dark night. And the entire night I didn't we didn't sleep at all, like angry, he called us, you know, you guys too, should take some rest, you know, we should set up tent, you know, we should take some rest, and he'll go and sleep, I want to sleep. I was so excited. So, and we took all kinds of shots experimented, I also took that Andromeda galaxy shot. And then, you know, he showed us many objects, you know, many stars on the sky he showed us. So that was you know, quite a learning experience. And then about like, five ish in the morning, we started coming back home, everyone was asleep. And, and I was just thinking about, wow, how is all these photos are going to look on my laptop, I want to see them. And, of course, then we came home. And after that actually, the real struggle started. I took all these photos, I had no idea how to do a panel. Okay. But I actually had done a webinar with Daniel Colton once. So he mentioned something about particularly, no, I remember I remember that. So I was like, Yeah, I remember that was something regarding the panel, you know, you can do panels in that. So I got that software. And then I searched about how to do stalking and all those stuff. And yeah, that was quite an experience. Like, you see those images, a Milky Way arch and you think okay, well, what is in there, but no, oh my God, all that thing that experiences that, you know, the research and an after you take the images or the post processing is like a journey in itself. So yeah, I enjoy it though the astral shot. And after that also, we went to take the meteor shower pursued meteor shower shots in Germany. And they're also we had some struggle with our new star tracker, you know, the day one, we couldn't do the polar alignment. It didn't happen. And it was night it was windy, we were actually not prepared. And like after one or two, if you're not prepared and windy night, you can't just you know, stand there and do something. So we came back. And the next day, we went fully prepared. We took all the shots. And even if the forecast was, you know, it's going to be cloudy. But before the clouds we actually saw 50 meteors and took the Milky Way. And with with the meteors, so it was like it was I had never imagined it. So yeah, everything you know, in life is a first if your dries up. Yeah, I enjoyed that. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  43:18   That's cool. That is really cool. You know, like this during that journey is crazy. I think, you know, one thing that I could find inspiration from is how never scared to ask for help. Right? And you see how how fast you can learn and progress in your journey by reaching out to other people who have done it before, right? I mean, whether you buy a course or go on a webinar or just asking a question. Yeah, that's really cool that you know that, to hear that journey of you reaching out and, you know, having this photographer, local photographer who don't know you at all, but you know, also, like, let you borrow all this stuff. And that's, that's, I think that's one of the coolest thing about travel and photography is next. Right? And, yeah, so I saw some of your, you know, Astro photo, and it's just, they are incredible, you know, especially for someone who just started when I first saw it and was like, Why? Why did you ask me this question, you know, how it's like, it's crazy, but it shows how much artwork you put in there and, you know, just make such a big progress because you're committed to make that happen. So massive kudos to a massive alteration in that happen. So when you think about you know, a travel or a trip or a photo that you ever take there any particular moment or any particular photo that you're either most proud of or you love the most out of that moment and tell us why Supriya Samal From Meanderquest  45:01   Sorry, I didn't hear the last part of the question. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  45:04   Basically, like, you know, like, out of your travel and the photo that you have taken us your favourite moments or your favourite photo that you have captured, and just tell us why it is so important and why you love them so much. Supriya Samal From Meanderquest  45:21   Okay, so it's, it's very difficult to choose, you know, your favourite photos. But yeah, on in terms of like trip or journeys I had to take. So I'd say the first on my list is obviously, obviously, the Milky Way arch, which I took, because, like, six months, went into that just to make it happen. So all those research and everything. And that was my favourite, and because I also faced my fear of darkness, like, that's my major fear. And in a heartbeat, I would like to, you know, go back and live that moment, over and over again, it was such a beautiful night, like, I saw the stars, the Milky Way, I think after 15 or 16 years in my life, I saw the Milky Way for the first time. So it was like, in an experience in itself, I couldn't forget that. And if I have to choose second one, it would be this tribal portrait, which I did recently in India. So for that, that trip is also kind of an experience in itself, because we did all kinds of, you know, preparation I learned about because I had never taken portrait before that. Okay, yes, I had done some gigs. But it was something you know, when you do for your clients, they need some particular stuff. And you know about that, of course, I understand the lighting and everything. But like, when it comes to your personal project, something you want to do, you are fearful the most like that goes into me like I feel like okay, how I'm going to do this. So I had read about that stuff like okay, how this portrait stuff is, no thing happens. I saw the images, Steve McCurry have taken and all those things. And I was like, Okay, let's do that. I had no expectations from that. So for that to be actually went to a village in northeast India, northeastern India, and we didn't know that there was a cyclone, no warning for that region. Because normally when I take landscape photos, I checked the weather I check for astrophotos shots, I check the weather, but for portrait, like, Okay, why I would need to check the weather. So we went on that trip, and that part of the Himalayas mountain, it's actually the land is very, you know, muddy. And it's very, like landslides happen all the time in that region. And when we started our journey, there was no rain like and halfway through, it started raining massively, like as we, you know, started climbing up the mountain, it started raining heavily. And by the time like, I remember, it was turning dark, and we couldn't even see what is up there. You know, a little bit ahead, it was so cloudy. And around sexuals or 630 it was completely dark. And we were stuck in a road which is only mud like our car was literally floating over it you know? And the driver said we can't make it we can't go no go further. And I was like how we are supposed to be in this place. It's raining it's muddy. And it's nowhere like there was no house there was nothing there were only trees and and and the house guest where we were supposed to reach he was calling us and he was asking like where are you guys have you reached or not? And we were telling him okay, we are in the forest. We are in this road we don't know. And he was asking Is there anyone going is there any truck going? No one is working and like who is mad enough to go that weather and then like we told our driver Okay then let's return back and you know, go to the nearest village but we didn't imagine like returning also that road is also you know that muddy and everything. So that is also going to take time. So to go downhill also it took us you know another half and out. And then when we were supposed to go and look for a place to remain for that night, then our driver said, no, no, you guys have come from so far, we should go, we should try again. That was like, why we will get the half an hour to coming back here, you know, then I was like, Okay, let's go. And actually, Sam and I, we were both quite angry, open that travel agent, because we had told him, like, we want a four by four car because this route is not good. That is what we have heard, like back from the blogs and everything. And he didn't provide us a four by four card. So it was it was an adventure, like we ditch the place around 10 Like, no 11pm around 11pm Finish the place. And that too, after like people came, I Sam and I also have to get down from the car, we had to push the car, and the event and you know, we had to walk through the forest. And you know, the driver was more afraid than us know. And we like Sam and I, we will guide in him, okay, 10 take turn, like we went to Google Map for him that night. And we're like, take left take right. And then we'll reach the place. And after that those are tribes whose photos we went to take. And it is like the last generation remaining. And they are in their 80s and 90s. And, you know, when people in 80s and 90s, like many people, many travel photographers also come to take their photos, and they don't speak your language, they have a different language. So we took a guide with us who can you know, who is from them, and who can translate what we want to convey with them. So first he took us to an old lady, she is in her I think in 85 or something 8586. And then he told her, like, you know why we had come and you know, we want to take the photos and everything. So I just sat there in the house, she offered her, she offered us the local wine, you know, they do from the rice and everything. So she offered us that. And she was sitting by the fire, you know, wouldn't fire and there was the house was you know, not in a good shape, because she is the only surviving member of the family. And you know, she had to do all those stuff. And I was sitting there and I was looking at her and thinking like, I have taken great deal of you know, all this, like 15 hours of flight and all that adventure of 12 hours. And now I'm here sitting in front for her, and I want to take the photos, but how do I approach her like, I don't know the language. And because when you know the language when you talk with someone, you create something, you know, some kind of connection with that person and then it becomes easy. So I started asking questions, because I asked her that tour guide, you know, to translate all those questions and she started telling all kinds of story, like, you know, how those, like they have some kind of, you know, tattoo face tattoos and everything done. So I started asking, I started asking about her childhood and you know, she was narrating translator was narrating beside there for one and half an hour, you know, chatting with that old lady. And then I asked her like, okay, and by that time she was smiling, and you know, even though we were not talking, but we I felt like okay, I felt that connection from her story. And then like, I asked the guy like, now can I you know, can I take her photo? Can you ask her that? Then he asked her and she said yes. And then I took photos of her, like the way I have imagined the way I wanted. And it was quite good. And, and that moment when I was taking that photo of her. And then I also know, took the Instax search so that I can give some photo to remember by and she was you know, she was so happy when I gave her that photo to smile. I won't even you know forget Stanley I will never forget and she was like a childlike happiness. And we see photo every day, you know? And then you know that was something I learned that day. Like, the things we take for granted, every simple thing, every small thing can make someone smile. I take photos every day, but I was like, Okay, these are the photos. But for her, it's something to remember by you know. So these are the two moments which is quite near and dear to my heart, and will always be Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  55:23   Wow, what a story. Thanks for sharing that Supriya. It's just incredible. Yeah, I know, I do. As you were, like, explaining that, you know, when she saw that photo, and she's smiling, I just got massive goosebumps. You know, it's, it's moments like that, that makes us really enjoy photography and photography, right? Yeah. Look, Supriya It's been great having you here. You know, we're coming to the one hour mark. And one question I always ask. So my audience is that if there is one advice that you could give your younger self or also the audience, whether it is about photography, or live or mental health, or whatever it may be? What would that one single advice Supriya Samal From Meanderquest  56:03   be? Yes. So for me, like if I have to give this to younger self or someone else that would be don't be afraid to try new things in your life. Because you never know. You never know what lies ahead of you. And when you go into that path, trying new things, you will discover things that you have never imagined you will be able to do. So. Yeah, that's the one thing I would like to say. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  56:35   So beautiful advice, Willa. Super, thank you very much for being here. You know, I enjoyed this talk. enjoy listening to your story. I know we've connected to Instagram and Twitter and clubhouse. But you know, that's why that's why I love this kind of podcast is I really get to know you personally in a much different level of level. And you know, you are able to share your story and your journey as a photographer, you know, not, like, not many people know about that, you know, six months journey capturing your Astro photography, or your journey going into this tribe, you know, being able to see one of the happiest moments of someone else's life. And that really give us perspective on how lucky we are. If we have a roof over our head, you don't have to think about what to eat tomorrow and have a phone and a camera and a laptop, you should be really thankful. And in many cases we're not instead we're looking for the things that we don't have. So I think that's such a powerful, powerful thing to to share. But for people who want to learn more about you about your photography or service as well as your NFT project, I don't we didn't get to do that today. But you know, we talked about so many fun things today. What where can they find you? Supriya Samal From Meanderquest  57:47   Yeah, they can find me on meander squares, meander quest.com. That is my website. I'm also on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram. And my handle name is Manda quest. And on Twitter, they can find all my NFT is all the links that is also on my website. So yeah, if you have any questions, if you want to reach out, then please feel free to do that. I know Stanley is going to put all the links on the description. So yeah, Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  58:18   fantastic. Well, we do this thank you very much for tuning in. Hopefully, you have found a lot of jam in there. You know, Supriya have really kind enough to share not only her success story, but the journey kind of personal journey behind her life and how she finds purpose, happiness and get out of that depression, you know, true photography. And I think that's something that's really powerful. You know, I've never come to a point where I had, you know, I was diagnosed with clinical depression, but I certainly know what it feels like to lose purpose and not knowing where to go and not knowing a direction or anything meaningful to life and photography have really changed my life. And that's why I want to share more of this journey with more of you, right? But if you do enjoy this conversation, don't forget to hit the subscribe button. And, you know, give us a review a comment letting us know what if you enjoy this journey so that other people can also find find us and be able to find that whole purpose and happiness and inspiration to our artists. But with that being said, thank you very much Supriya for being here. You know, it's such a pleasure to finally get to know you much deeper level and to be able to share your story because I know how powerful that story is. Supriya Samal From Meanderquest  59:42   Thank you so much, Stanley for inviting me and you know, giving me this opportunity to share my story because I also felt good about doing that and I really enjoyed our session. It was kind of something I was hoping and I loved it. I liked Like everyone else who is watching the video, please subscribe to Stanley's podcast because he is great and I love his photos and I'm sure he is going to have some many more beautiful episodes coming, so please don't miss them. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  1:00:16   Thank you. Thank you. All right, well wiki hunters. With that being said, Keep shooting, keep creating and I'll see you guys next week.  

HT Daily News Wrap
More defections from Congress as 8 Goa lawmakers join BJP

HT Daily News Wrap

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 7:37


More defections from Congress as 8 Goa lawmakers join BJP, Power subsidy in Delhi to those who opt for it, applications open: CM Kejriwal, Cheetahs To Travel Without Food From Namibia To India and other top news in the bulletin.

Pratt on Texas
Episode 3035: Podcast-Extra: Wes Virdell, Gun Owners of America’s new Texas state director

Pratt on Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 44:21


In the last decade Gun Owners of America has become active "on the ground" in Texas. It's new Texas state director is Brady native Wes Virdell.In this interview we talk about GOA's troubling past, troubling to me and others who were on the ground working for gun rights, its new activism in Texas, and what the primary legislative goals will be next year for the organization.www.PrattonTexas.com

Morgonpasset i P3
Davids goa lilla pudding, Moa Wallin om valnatten och Jimmy Guos kinesiska skafferi

Morgonpasset i P3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 93:50


David Druid älskar sin goa lilla pudding! Moa Wallin ger oss en satirisk sammanfattning av valnatten! Ekots Tobias Mattson förklarar Sverigedemokraternas valframgång! Kocken Jimmy Guo, känd från Sveriges mästerkock går igenom (delar) av det kinesiska skafferiet. Linnea Wikblad pratar kör! Kodjo analyserar Burna Boys "Last last"! Babs Drougge från P3 Nyheter rapporterar om Åkessons lunch på M-kansliet och att Ukraina slår tillbaka. Programledare: David Druid, Kodjo Akolor och Linnea Wikblad

Seeds for Success
Saving your soil: Why nitrogen is so important

Seeds for Success

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 25:37 Transcription Available


Maurie Street and his family run "Huanita", a dryland winter cropping farm east of Dubbo. Maurie also works as the CEO of Grains Orana Alliance, a Central West-based research and development organisation, which is driven by growers, and funded through Grain Research and Development Corporation investments. In this episode, Maurie explains why his focus is on cropping at "Huanita", and why nitrogen is so important in his production system. He also details his involvement with the Grains Orana Alliance, or GOA, and shares the work they do with producers in the Central West to find solutions to local cropping problems.  Local Land Services cropping advisor, Tim Bartimote, caught up with Maurie by the fire on a very wet, rainy morning at "Huanita". This episode is part one of our two-part conversation with Maurie. Keep an eye out for the next episode, where Maurie shares his tips on how to maximise nitrogen efficiency.   Connect: Central West LLS website Central West LLS on Facebook Central West LLS on Twitter Central West LLS on YouTube   The views contained in this podcast series are not necessarily endorsed by Central West Local Land Services. Listeners are advised to contact their local office to discuss their individual situation. This show is produced in collaboration with Wavelength Creative. Visit wavelengthcreative.com for more information.

Daily Dose
Daily Dose Ep 1148: Varanasi court on Gyanvapi mosque, CBI to probe Sonali Phogat case

Daily Dose

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 8:08


Veronica Joseph brings you the news from Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat, Goa, New Delhi, and Ukraine. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Sound Kitchen
Creating a language in the Amazon rainforest

The Sound Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 21:07


This week on The Sound Kitchen you'll hear the answer to the question about the créole created by the Bushinenge people. There's the Bonus Question, the “Listeners Corner” with Michael Fitzpatrick, and lots of good music. All that, and the new quiz question, too. Just click on the “Audio” arrow above and enjoy!  Hello everyone! Welcome to The Sound Kitchen weekly podcast, published every Saturday – here on our website, or wherever you get your podcasts. You'll hear the winner's names announced and the week's quiz question, along with all the other ingredients you've grown accustomed to: your letters and essays, “On This Day”, quirky facts and news, interviews, and great music … so be sure and listen every week. Erwan and I are busy cooking up special shows with your musical requests, so get them in! Send your musical requests to thesoundkitchen@rfi.fr  Tell us why you like the piece of music, too – it makes it more interesting for us all! Be sure you check out our wonderful podcasts! In addition to the breaking news articles on our site, with in-depth analysis of current affairs in France and across the globe, we have several podcasts which will leave you hungry for more. There's Paris Perspective, Africa Calling, Spotlight on France, and of course, The Sound Kitchen. We have an award-winning bilingual series - an old-time radio show, with actors (!) to help you learn French, called Les voisins du 12 bis. And there is the excellent International Report, too. As you see, sound is still quite present in the RFI English service.  Keep checking our website for updates on the latest from our excellent staff of journalists. You never know what we'll surprise you with! To listen to our podcasts from your PC, go to our website and click on the three horizontal bars on the top right, choose “Listen to RFI / Podcasts”, and you've got ‘em ! You can either listen directly or subscribe and receive them directly on your mobile phone. To listen to our podcasts from your mobile phone, slide through the tabs just under the lead article (the first tab is “Headline News”) until you see “Podcasts”, and choose your show.  Teachers, take note!  I save postcards and stamps from all over the world to send to you for your students. If you would like stamps and postcards for your students, just write and let me know. The address is english.service@rfi.fr  If you would like to donate stamps and postcards, feel free! Our address is listed below.  Another idea for your students: Br. Gerald Muller, my beloved music teacher from St Edward's University in Austin, Texas, has been writing books for young adults in his retirement – and they are free! There is a volume of biographies of painters and musicians called Gentle Giants, and an excellent biography of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., too. They are also a good way to help you improve your English - that's how I worked on my French, reading books which were meant for young readers – and I guarantee you, it's a good method for improving your language skills. To get Br. Gerald's free books, click here. Independent RFI English Clubs: Be sure to always include Audrey Iattoni (audrey.iattoni@rfi.fr) from our Listener Relations department in all your RFI Club correspondence. Remember to copy me (thesoundkitchen@rfi.fr) when you write to her so that I know what is going on, too. N.B.: You do not need to send her your quiz answers! Email overload! And don't forget, there is a Facebook page just for you, the independent RFI English Clubs. Only members of RFI English Clubs can belong to this group page, so when you apply to join, be sure you include the name of your RFI Club and your membership number. Everyone can look at it, but only members of the group can post on it. If you haven't yet asked to join the group, and you are a member of an independent, officially recognized RFI English club, go to the Facebook link above, and fill out the questionnaire !!!!! (if you do not answer the questions, I click “decline”). There's a Facebook page for members of the general RFI Listeners Club too. Just click on the link and fill out the questionnaire, and you can connect with your fellow Club members around the world. Be sure you include your RFI Listeners Club membership number (most of them begin with an A, followed by a number) in the questionnaire, or I will have to click “Decline”, which I don't like to do! This week's quiz: On 23 July, I asked you a question about an article and a video produced by RFI English journalist Isabelle Martinetti. Called "Escaping Slavery, the Art of Breaking One's Chains", it's about the descendants of African slaves who escaped the Dutch plantations in Suriname, South America and fled to French Guyana. The runaway slaves – called the “Bushinenge” - developed communities in the Amazon rainforests nearby, and created a new language, a créole, a mix of four existing languages. That was your question: you were to write me with the name of the language developed by the escaped slaves in Guyana, and on which four languages it is based. The answer is: The créole created by the “Bushinenge" ("men of the woods") is called Nenge Tongo. Nenge Tongo was built from English, French, Portuguese, and Dutch.  In addition to the quiz question, there was the Bonus Question: What is your dream day at work or school? The winners are: Mohammad Likhon, who is a member of the Nilshagor RFI Fan Club in Nilphamari, Bangladesh. Mohammad is also the winner of this week's Bonus Question – his dream day at school, was: “My first day at college. There was lots of fun and new friends, moreover, my father was my mathematics teacher.”  Also on the list of winners this week are RFI Listeners Club members Jayanta Chakrabarty from New Delhi, India; Anika Anne from Munshiganj, Bangladesh; Mahamudul Hasan from Rajbar, also in Bangladesh, and Zenon Teles, from the Christian - Marxist – Leninist - Maoist Association of Listening DX-ers in Goa,  India. Congratulations winners! Here's the music you heard on this week's program: “Take the A Train” by Billy Strayhorn and Duke Ellington, performed by Duke Ellington and his orchestra; “Hadouk Blues” by Didier Malherbe and Loy Ehrlich; “The Flight of the Bumblebee” by Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov, “The Cakewalk” from Children's Corner by Claude Debussy, performed by the composer, and “Bane” by Thom Sonny Green, Gus Unger-Hamilton, and Joe Newman, performed by alt-J. Do you have a musical request? Send it to thesoundkitchen@rfi.fr  This week's question ... Zeenat Hansrod's article “Kenya Supreme Court rules no foul play in 2022 elections and upholds Ruto's win” to help you with the answer.   You have until 3 October to enter this week's quiz; the winners will be announced on the 8 October podcast. When you enter, be sure you send your postal address with your answer, and if you have one, your RFI Listeners Club membership number. Send your answers to: english.service@rfi.fr or Susan Owensby RFI – The Sound Kitchen 80, rue Camille Desmoulins 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux France or By text … You can also send your quiz answers to The Sound Kitchen mobile phone. Dial your country's international access code, or “ + ”, then  33 6 31 12 96 82. Don't forget to include your mailing address in your text – and if you have one, your RFI Listeners Club membership number. To find out how you can win a special Sound Kitchen prize, click here. To find out how you can become a member of the RFI Listeners Club, or to form your own official RFI Club, click here.  

GOA Presents The Weekly Show
Ep 255: We're Going To PAX!

GOA Presents The Weekly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 54:15


Stormie and Jim get excited about the GOA panel at PAX and everything that's on that weekend a month out from the big event. They also talk COD coming to Game Pass and pretty special edition consoles, as well as their Bloody Good Game Of The Week thanks to Aussie Broadband.

Roots with South Asian Today
Roots with TextaQueen: Welcome to the alt universe of Bollywouldn't

Roots with South Asian Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 24:20


Our guest is the one-and-only TextaQueen. They are a Goan-Indian artist and are known for working predominantly in felt-tip pen - aka 'texta' (hence the name) - to draw out politics of gender, race, sexuality and identity on paper. In this episode, we discuss South Asians' love-hate relationship with Bollywood but with a twist. TextaQueen's exciting new project with 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art - Bollywouldn't -  imagines an alternative universe. It deconstructs all the "-isms" in the Bollywood genre, giving agency back to South Asians, particularly those marginalised within our cultures through sexuality and gender identities.We speak about what decolonising Bollywood means, re-imagining its impact on South Asians and why art is perhaps the best way to do it. Tune in!TextaQueen's image credit: Leah Jing McIntosh.Please support the show by becoming a member and helping us publish global and progressive South Asian stories: www.buymeacoffee.com/southasiantodayVisit southasiantoday.com.au for unique South Asian stories every day.Support the show

Game On Australia
Ep 255: We're Going To PAX!

Game On Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 54:15


Stormie and Jim get excited about the GOA panel at PAX and everything that's on that weekend a month out from the big event. They also talk COD coming to Game Pass and pretty special edition consoles, as well as their Bloody Good Game Of The Week thanks to Aussie Broadband.

HT Daily News Wrap
India to observe state mourning on Sunday in respect of Queen Elizabeth

HT Daily News Wrap

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 4:39


India to observe state mourning on Sunday in respect of Queen Elizabeth, SC stays demolition of Curlies restaurant in Goa linked to Sonali Phogat's death, Brahmastra is finally in theatres after years of wait and other top news in this bulletin.

Lexman Artificial
Yannis Pappas: Greek tourist almost stranded in Goa after telling hilarious fib on travel visa application

Lexman Artificial

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 3:49


Greek tourist Yannis Pappas tells an amazing story of how he almost got stranded in Goa after telling a hilarious fib on his travel visa application. Lexman and his team of hosts dissect the entire episode, discussing everything from visas to scams to how to make the best of your travels.

STERNENTOR
SG1 S04E08 Die Unas

STERNENTOR

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 103:59


Während einer archäologischen Mission werden Daniel und seine Mannschaft von den Unas angegriffen und Daniel wird entführt und in die Wildnis verschleppt. SG-1 macht sich auf sein Teammitglied zu suchen. Erschrocken stellt Jack fest, dass das Trinkwasser auf dem Planeten mit Goa'uld-Symbionten verseucht ist. (Text: Sky) Deutsche TV-Premiere Mi 18.07.2001 RTL II

The MoodyMo Awaaz Podcast
Episode #95 : Mahua has the potential of being the National Heritage Spirit of India | Desmond & Conrad on taking Indian liqueur and spirit to the world

The MoodyMo Awaaz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 30:39


This week on The Mohua Show we have Desmond Nazareth and  Conrad Braganza.Desmond Nazareth is the principal founder and MD of Agave India and Conrad Braganza is the blender, manager of sales and marketing in Goa and in-house mixologist/bartender for Agave India. Agave India is India's first and only rurally based ‘greenfield' small batch ‘field-to-bottle' and ‘forest-to-bottle' craft distillery, which uses Indian know-how and raw materials. Their products are sold under the master brand name, ‘DesmondJi', or ‘DJ'. Their most recent products, DJ Mahua spirit and DJ Mahua liqueur were released in Goa in June 2018. They are currently working on a plan to take their international quality Mahua products to the world.In today's episode Desmond and Conrad enlighten us about the socio-cultural importance of the Mahua flower in the tribal community and their plans on making the Mahua liqueur the National Heritage Spirit of India.The Mohua Show:Instagram: @themohuashowFacebook: @themohuashowYoutube: @themohuashowTwitter: @themohuashowLinkedin: @themohuashowDisclaimer: The views expressed by our guests are their own. We do not endorse and are not responsible for any views expressed by our guests on our podcast and its associated platforms.

EpochTV
24 States Enact Pro-Gun ‘Constitutional Carry' Laws Securing 2A Rights: Texas Director of Gun Owners of America | Facts Matter

EpochTV

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 12:36


In this interview, we sat down with Wes Virdell, the Texas state director of Gun Owners of America (GOA), the second-largest gun lobby organization in the United States. The mission of GOA is to pass legislation that supports the Second Amendment while holding legislators accountable for their pro-Second Amendment campaign promises. Our discussion begins with Virdell's belief that the Second Amendment is the only thing keeping the U.S. federal government at bay right now. Virdell highlights the world's long history of tyrants disarming their citizens prior to exerting total control over their livelihoods. He points out how other western countries have recently given up their gun rights only to be saddled by their own government with tyrannical policies. Virdell also touches on a couple of recent victories for the GOA as well as some of the projects they're currently working on, including a campaign to expand constitutional carry legislation to more states as well as an effort to pass legislation that boosts legal protections for those forced to use their firearms in self-defense situations. ⭕️Watch in-depth videos based on Truth & Tradition at Epoch TV

Let's Sleep On It: Reclaiming Parenthood
An Orthodox Christian Perspective on Respectful Parenting, Discipline, and Struggling with our Children with Dr. Philip Mamalakis

Let's Sleep On It: Reclaiming Parenthood

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 62:03


Dr. Philip Mamalakis joins me to discuss Christian parenting from an Orthodox Christian perspective. Topics discussed include: Is obedience the goal of parenting? How we should discipline our children Struggling with our children The importance of repentance Naming and validating emotions while holding limits & more! Dr. Philip Mamalakis with his wife, Georgia, have seven children and one new grandchild and live in Boston, Massachusetts. Dr Mamalakis is the Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care at Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology where teaches classes on pastoral care, marriage and family, grief, death and dying, mental health, and pastoral counseling. He has an Master of Divinity from Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of theology and a Ph.D. from Purdue University in child development and family studies, specializing in marriage and family therapy. Together with Fr. Charles Joanides, Dr. Mamalakis has just completed the 2nd Edition of, The Journey of Marriage, (GOA 2012) a resource for couples preparing for marriage in the Orthodox Church and is the author of Parenting Toward the Kingdom, Ancient Faith Publishing's bestselling Orthodox parenting book (Ancient Faith Publishing, 2016). In addition to his teaching and writing, he is the founding Vice-Chair of the Assembly of Canonical Bishops of America Mental Health Task Force and the former President of OCAMPR, the Orthodox Christian Association of Medicine Psychology, and Religion. He enjoys offering seminars and retreats throughout the United States and internationally on intimacy, relationships, marriage, parenting, and family life as well as Orthodoxy and psychology. Book: Parenting Towards the Kingdom: https://store.ancientfaith.com/parenting-toward-the-kingdom/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/taylorkulik/support

Between Two Friends
Clean Energy with Anirudh Agrawal

Between Two Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 83:52


On this episode, we had the pleasure of talking to our childhood friend, Anirudh Agrawal who is a pioneer clean energy industrialist from Goa.We talk about topics around:How Anirudh was able to make the move from mining to clean energy?Learn about his clean energy companies and product development process.Anirudh's thoughts on climate change and future plans.The takeaways and his advice to folks who want to follow in his footsteps.We had a great time talking to Anirudh as we learnt first hand from his experience as a clean energy industrialist , we are sure you will too. So, listen on!

Daily Dose
Daily Dose Ep 1135: Jharkhand crisis deepens, Justice UU Lalit sworn in as CJI

Daily Dose

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 11:27


Anwiti Singh brings you the news from Jharkhand, New Delhi, Goa, Kerala, the Supreme Court, and the United Nations. Produced by Tehreem Roshan, edited by Saif Ali Ekram.Download the Newslaundry app. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

HT Daily News Wrap
Ghulam Nabi Azad resigned from all Congress party posts

HT Daily News Wrap

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 8:36


Ghulam Nabi Azad on Friday resigned from all Congress party posts, Election freebies: Supreme Court refers matter to three-judge bench, Sonali Phogat ‘murder': ‘Curlies' restaurant at Goa's Anjuna beach back in limelight after 14 years and other top nws in this bulletin.

Daily Dose
Daily Dose Ep 1134: Ghulam Nabi Azad quits Congress, SC on Yogi's hate speech case

Daily Dose

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 9:08


Tanishka Sodhi brings you the news from New Delhi, the Supreme Court, Goa, the Kerala High Court, and the World Health Organisation. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Secrets of Stargate
Upgrades

Secrets of Stargate

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 39:35


Beware of Tok'ra bearing gifts. Jack Baruzzini, Lisa Jones, and Victor Lams discuss how absolute power tends to corrupt; how Tok'ra arrogance isn't far from Goa'uld arrogance; and how General Hammond has the patience of a saint. The post Upgrades appeared first on StarQuest Media.

Travel Podcast the World
The Musafir Stories: The Original India Travel Podcast

Travel Podcast the World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 37:39


Today we take our first dedicated trip to India (in travel podcast form) with Saif Omar of The Musafir Stories, likely the first and certainly the longest-running podcast about travel in India.   Saif and his wife Faiza are both native to India: Bangalore, specifically, but having lived abroad for years, were keen to learn more about their own country, and decided to do so through starting a podcast.   That was over 5 years ago, and 135 episodes later they are going stronger than ever. Their secret is to allow their guests to share their own experiences, and all the insight therein on things to see and do, which means that Saif and Faiza are themselves travelling vicariously along with their listeners.   The show takes you not just to the well-known destinations like Mumbai, Kolkata or Goa, but in particular parts of India you may not be quite as familiar with, such as Coonoor, a hill town in Tamil Nadu, or Bundi, a quaint town in Rajasthan.   Explore history, cuisine, temples and festivals, listen to authors and bloggers, photographers and mountain climbers, accompanied by beautiful images, all sharing their insight into the many dynamic corners of India on this trailblazing podcast.   Action Advice   9:35 - On learning about your own country through your guests. 16:18 - Strategies for staying consistent, and not burning out. 17:34- The ongoing debate about adding numbers to podcast episode titles, and how The Musafir Stories was told to stop. 23:06 - The experience of moving to an established podcast network, and the opportunities to scale the show, greater marketing and cross-promotion. 26:50 - The pros and cons of joining a network. 32:26 - On finding great cover art for individual episodes. 33:26 - How the place or location is typically the protagonist for a travel episode, while the guest's role is to interpret it. 34:24 - Using Google Maps or similar to pin the locations of your episodes, with direct links therein to that episode.     Travel Podcast the World   https://www.travelpodcasttheworld.com https://twitter.com/TedFlyTed https://www.instagram.com/travel_podcast_theworld/ Submit Your Podcast form  Suggest a Podcast form     Guest Links   The Musafir Stories website   on Twitter on Instagram on Facebook   The map of episodes   References   IVM podcast network   "Postcards From Nowhere" podcast   Unsplash, for royalty-free images     People   Vaibhav Dewan, episode about Darjeeling     Places   Bangalore, Karnataka   Peninsular Gneiss, Rock formations in Bangalore   "Seven Sisters" northeast states  

Vatican News Tiếng Việt
Radio thứ Tư 24/08/2022 - Vatican News Tiếng Việt

Vatican News Tiếng Việt

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 34:56


Laudetur Jesus Christus - Ngợi khen Chúa Giêsu Kitô Radio Vatican hằng ngày của Vatican News Tiếng Việt. Nội dung chương trình hôm nay: 0:00 Tin tức 12:35 Sinh hoạt Giáo hội : Hồng y đầu tiên của giáo phận Goa, Ấn Độ, và Hồng y thứ hai của Hội Thừa Sai Phi Châu 22:28 Gương chứng nhân : Thiếu nữ Alexandra, thừa sai Lòng Thương Xót --- Liên lạc và hỗ trợ Vatican News Tiếng Việt qua email & Zelle: tiengviet@vaticannews.va Đăng ký nhận tin tức qua email: https://www.vaticannews.va/vi/newsletter-registration.html Theo dõi / follow Kênh Vatican News Tiếng Việt tại: - Website: https://vaticannews.va/vi.html Mạng xã hội: - Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/VaticanNewsVI - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vaticannews.vi - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/vaticannews.vi - Twitter: https://twitter.com/vaticannewsvi Podcast: Vatican News Tiếng Việt - Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0CPs2j2U9FGs6ktulHKcEn?si=F7LRAlscQdeYzxiGXirn6w - Google Podcast: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy80YWM3MWQ4MC9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw - Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/vn/podcast/vatican-news-ti%E1%BA%BFng-vi%E1%BB%87t/id1551917143 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/vaticannews-vi/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/vaticannews-vi/support

Gun Talk
How Gun Owners Of America Works With Other Gun Rights Groups; Evacuating With Guns; Is The AR-15 Too Loud For Home Defense?: Gun Talk Radio 08.21.22 Hour 1

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 41:18 Very Popular


In This Hour: -- Jordan Stein gives an update on the activism of the Gun Owners Of America, and how GOA works with other gun rights groups. --  Tom Gresham was forced to evacuate his home from wildfires.  How did he handle moving guns and ammunition? --  Is the AR-15 too loud to shoot indoors for self defense? What can you do about that? Tom Gresham's Gun Talk  08.21.22   Hour 1

Secrets of Stargate
Crossroads

Secrets of Stargate

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 40:24


Are the Tok'ra really any better than the Goa'uld? Jack Baruzzini, Lisa Jones, Fr. Cory Sticha, and Victor Lams discuss the flexible Tok'ra morality and whether they are good allies the humans hope they are. The post Crossroads appeared first on StarQuest Media.

Drive Thru FM
What Happened To 2012

Drive Thru FM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022


What Happened To 2012 Intro (00:00); Wok Star (01:03); Nexus Ops (02:19); Galaxy Trucker: The Big Expansion (04:14); Virgin Queen (05:12); Quarriors! Quarmageddon (06:43); Star Wars: X-Wing (08:34); Goa (10:02); Caverna: The Cave Farmers (11:33); Dominant Species: The Card Game (12:49); Glory to Rome: Black Box (13:44); Alien Frontiers: Factions (14:59); D-Day Dice (15:54); Descent: Journeys in the Dark (17:02); Wiz-War (Eighth Edition) (19:37); Race for the Galaxy: Alien Artifacts (20:44); Rex: Final Days of an Empire (21:49); Star Wars: The Card Game (23:16); Merchant of Venus (25:05); 7 Wonders: Cities (26:45); Twenty Most Anticipated Games of 2012 Geeklist - https://boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/104507/results-20-most-anticipated-games-2012

Anticipating The Unintended
#181 We Shall Overcome

Anticipating The Unintended

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 54:59


Happy Independence Day!- Pranay Kotasthane and RSJThis newsletter can often seem pessimistic about India. That isn’t true, though. Every year, on Independence Day, we remind ourselves and our readers why we write this newsletter. This is how we ended the Independence Day edition of 2020:“What we have achieved so far is precious. That’s worth reminding ourselves today. We will go back to writing future editions lamenting our state of affairs.We will do so because we know it’s worth it.”  This year we thought it would be fun (?) to run through every year since 1947 and ask ourselves what happened in the year that had long-term repercussions for our nation. This kind of thing runs a serious risk. It can get tedious and all too familiar. Most of us know the landmark events of recent history and what they meant for the nation. Maybe. Maybe not. We’ve given an honest try (of over 8000 words) to see if there’s a different way of looking at these familiar events and their impact on us. Here we go.1947 - 1960: Sense Of A Beginning 1947Perhaps the most significant “What, if?” question for independent India surfaced on 17th August 1947 when the Radcliffe Line was announced. The partition of the Indian subcontinent has cast a long shadow. What if it had never happened? What if Nehru-Jinnah-Gandhi were able to strike a modus vivendi within a one-federation framework? These questions surface every year around independence.The indelible human tragedy of the partition aside, would an Akhand Bharat have served its citizens better? We don’t think so. We agree with Ambedkar’s assessment of this question. In Pakistan or the Partition of India, he approaches the question with detachment and realism, concluding that the forces of “communal malaise” had progressed to such an extent that resisting a political division would have led to a civil war, making everyone worse off. The partition must have been handled better without the accompanying humanitarian disaster. But on the whole, the partition was inevitable by 1947.“That the Muslim case for Pakistan is founded on sentiment is far from being a matter of weakness; it is really its strong point. It does not need deep understanding of politics to know that the workability of a constitution is not a matter of theory. It is a matter of sentiment. A constitution, like clothes, must suit as well as please. If a constitution does not please, then however perfect it may be, it will not work. To have a constitution which runs counter to the strong sentiments of a determined section is to court disaster if not to invite rebellion.” [Read the entire book here]1948What if Mahatma Gandhi wasn’t killed that year? How would the course of our history change? Gandhi spoke like an idealist and worked like a realist. He was possibly the most aware of the gap between the lofty ideals of our constitution and the reality of the Indian minds then. He knew the adoption of the constitution was only half the work done. He’d likely have devoted the rest of his life to building a liberal India at the grassroots level. His death pushed a particular stream of right-wing Hindu consciousness underground. We still carry the burden of that unfinished work.1949The Constituent Assembly met for the first time in December 1946. By November 26th 1949, this assembly adopted a constitution for India. Even a half-constructed flyover in Koramangala has taken us five years. For more context, Pakistan’s Constituent Assembly began work on 10th August 1947, and their first constitution came into force in March 1956, only to be abrogated two years later. India’s founding fathers and mothers were acutely aware that they were elite, unelected, and unrepresentative of the median Indian. They dared to imagine a new nation-state while grappling with that period's harsh economic, social, and political realities. Their work should inspire us to strengthen, improve, and rebuild—but never to give up on—the Republic of India.For more, check out the miracle that is India’s Constitution in our Republic Day 2021 special edition.1950We have written about our Constitution a number of times. It is an inspiring and audacious document in its ambition to shape a modern nation. It has its flaws. Some consider it too liberal; others think it makes the State overbearing. Some find it too long; others feel it comes up short. This may all be true. However, there is no doubt our constitution has strengthened our democracy, protected the weak and continues to act as a tool for social change. It is our North Star. And a damn good one at that. 1951Few post-independence institutions have stood the test of time as the Finance Commission (FC), first established in 1951. In federal systems, horizontal and vertical imbalances in revenue generation and expenditure functions are commonplace. Closing the gap requires an impartial institution that is well-regarded by various levels of government and the people. The Finance Commission is that institution.It’s not as if it didn’t face any challenges. As a constitutional body established under article 280 of the Constitution, it was sidelined by an extra-constitutional and powerful Planning Commission until 2014. But we have had 15 FCs in total, and each key tax revenue-sharing recommendation has become government policy.1952Our Constitution adopted a universal adult franchise as the basis for elections. Every citizen was to be part of the democratic project. There was to be no bar on age, sex, caste or education. And this was to be done in one of the most unequal societies in the world. The ambition was breathtaking. To put this in context, women were allowed to vote in Switzerland only in 1971. Not only did we aim for this, but we also moved heaven and earth to achieve it in 1952. In his book India After Gandhi, Ram Guha describes the efforts of the government officials led by the first Election Commissioner, Sukumar Sen, to reach the last man or woman for their ballot. The elites may lament vote bank politics or cash for votes scams and question the wisdom of universal franchise. But we shouldn’t have had it any other way. And, for the record, our people have voted with remarkable sophistication in our short independent history. 1953 For a new nation-state, the Republic of India punched above its weight in bringing hostilities on the Korean peninsula to an end. Not only did the Indian government’s work shape the Armistice Agreement, but it also chaired a Neutral Nations Repatriation Commission (NNRC) that was set up to decide the future of nearly 20,000 prisoners of war from both sides. This experience during the Cold War strengthened India’s advocacy of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM).  1954Article 25 guaranteed the freedom of conscience and the freedom to profess, practice, and propagate religion to all citizens. But how does one define a religious practice? And can a practice under the garb of religion breach the boundary of individual rights or public morality? This is a familiar conflict zone in secular States and would inevitably show up in India because everything in India can be construed as a religious practice. Like Ambedkar said during the constituent assembly debates:“The religious conceptions in this country are so vast that they cover every aspect of life from birth to death…there is nothing extraordinary in saying that we ought to strive hereafter to limit the definition of religion in such a manner that we shall not extend it beyond beliefs and such rituals as may be connected with ceremonials which are essentially religious..."In 1954, the Supreme Court gave a landmark judgment on what constitutes a religious practice in what’s known as the Shirur Math case. It held that the term religion would cover all practices integral to that religion. Further, the Court will determine what practice will be deemed essential with reference to doctrines within that religion itself.This test of ‘essentiality’ in religion has kept the public, the legislature and the courts busy since (entry of women in Sabarimala, headscarf in Islam, to name two). The outcome has bent towards individual liberty in most contexts, but the ambiguity in the definition of essential means it could go the other way too.1955Another wild "What, if” moment that we like to recall relates to Milton Friedman’s visit to the Indian finance ministry in 1955. What shape would India’s economy have taken had his seminal document “A Memorandum to the Government of India 1955” been heeded?In this note, Friedman gets to the root of India’s macroeconomic problems—an overburdened investment policy, restrictive policies towards the private sector, erratic monetary policy, and a counterproductive exchange control regime. Being bullish about India’s prospects was courageous when most observers wrote epitaphs about the grand Indian experiment. But Friedman was hopeful and critical both.The Indian government, for its part, was humble enough to seek the advice of foreigners from opposing schools of thought. At the same time, it was too enamoured by the Soviet command and control model. In fact, many items from Friedman’s note can be repurposed as economic reforms even today.Here’re our points from Friedman’s note.1956The idea of One Nation, One ‘X’ (language, election, song, tax, choose any other) is both powerful and seductive. It is not new, however. Back in the 50s, there was a view that we must not strengthen any identity that divides us. So when the question of reorganisation of the colonial provinces into new states came up, an argument was made that it must be done on factors other than language. Nehru, ever the modernist, thought the creation of language-based states would lead us down the path of ethnic strife. The example of nation-states in Europe built on language in the 19th century and the two devastating world wars thereafter were too recent then. So, he demurred.Agitation, hunger strikes and deaths followed before we chose language as the primary basis for reorganising the states. It was perhaps the best decision taken by us in the 50s. As the years since have shown, only a polity assured of its heritage and identity will voluntarily accept diversity. The melding of our diversity into a single identity cannot be a top-down imposition. We should never forget this.1957India’s economic strategy of state-led industrialisation through deficit financing in pursuit of import substitution took off with the Second Five-Year Plan. Heavy industries needed imported machinery, inflating India’s import bill. Since the exchange rate was pegged to the British pound, it meant that Indian exports became pricier. This imbalance between rising imports and flagging exports was financed by running down the foreign exchange reserves. By 1957, India witnessed its first foreign exchange crisis. This event had a significant effect on India’s economy. Instead of devaluing the rupee, the government opted for foreign exchange budgeting - every investment in a project needed government approval for the foreign exchange required to buy foreign inputs. The immediate crisis in 1957 led to controls that worsened India’s economic prospects over the next 35 years.1958The government nationalised all insurance companies a couple of years earlier. India hadn’t gotten into a socialist hell yet, so this was a bit of a surprise. The proximate cause was a fraud that few private life insurers had committed by misusing the policyholders’ funds to help their industrialist friends. A run-of-the-mill white-collar crime that should have been dealt with by the criminal justice system. But the government viewed it as a market failure and moved to nationalise the entire industry. It would take another 45 years for private players to come back to insurance. Insurance penetration in India meanwhile remained among the lowest in the world.  Also, in 1958, Feroze Gandhi took to the floor of Lok Sabha to expose how LIC, the state insurer, had diverted its funds to help Haridas Mundhra, a Calcutta-based businessman. The same crime that private insurers had done.The government would repeat this pattern of getting involved where there was no market failure. The outcomes would inevitably turn out to be worse. Seven decades later, we remain instinctively socialist and wary of capital. Our first reaction to something as trifling as a surge price by Ola or a service charge levied by restaurants is to ask the State to interfere.1959“The longest guest of the Indian government”, the 14th Dalai Lama pre-empted the Chinese government’s plans for his arrest and escaped to India. Not only did India provide asylum, but it also became home to more than a hundred thousand Tibetans. Because of the bold move by the Indian government in 1959, the Central Tibetan Administration continues its struggle as a Nation and a State in search of regaining control over their Country to this day. This event also changed India-China relations for the decades to come.1960Search as hard as we might; we hardly got anything worth discussing for this year. Maybe we were all sitting smugly waiting for an avalanche of crisis to come our way. Steel plants, dams and other heavy industries were being opened. The budget outlay for agriculture was reduced. We were talking big on the international stage about peace and non-alignment. But if you had looked closer, things were turning pear-shaped. The many dreams of our independence were turning sour.The 60s: Souring Of The Dream1961The Indian Army marched into Goa in December 1961. The 450-year Portuguese colonial rule ended, and the last colonial vestige in India was eliminated. It took this long because Portugal’s dictator Antonio Salazar stuck to his guns on controlling Portuguese colonies in the subcontinent, unlike the British and the French. Portugal’s membership in NATO further made it difficult for the Indian government to repeat the operations in Hyderabad and Junagadh. Nevertheless, that moment eventually arrived in 1961. This was also the year when India’s first indigenous aircraft, the HAL HF-24 Marut, took its first flight. Made in Bengaluru by German designer Kurt Tank, the aircraft was one of the first fighter jets made outside the developed world. The aircraft served well in the war that came a decade later. It never lived up to its promises, but it became a matter of immense pride and confidence for a young nation-state.1962Among the lowest points in the history of independent India. We’ve written about our relationship with China many times in the past editions. The 1962 war left a deep impact on our psyche. We didn’t recover for the rest of the decade. The only good thing out of it was the tempering of idealism in our approach to international relations. That we take a more realist stance these days owes its origins to the ‘betrayal’ of 1962.1963ISRO launched the first sounding rocket in November 1963. Over the years, this modest beginning blossomed into a programme with multiple launch vehicles. The satellite programmes also took off a few years later, making India a mighty player in the space sector. 1964If you told anyone alive in 1964 that less than 60 years later, Nehru would be blamed for all that was wrong with India by a substantial segment of its population, they would have laughed you out of the room. But here we are in 2022, and there’s never a day that passes without a WhatsApp forward that talks about Nehru’s faults. It seems inevitable that by the time we celebrate the centenary of our independence, he would be a borderline reviled figure in our history. But that would be an aberration. In the long arc of history, he will find his due as a flawed idealist who laid the foundation of modern India. 1964 was the end of an era.1965As the day when Hindi would become the sole official language of the Indian Union approached, the anti-Hindi agitation in the Madras presidency morphed into riots. Many people died in the protests, and it led to the current equilibrium on language policy. The “one State, one language” project moved to the back burner, even as Hindi became an important link language across the country. The lesson was the same as in the case of the 1956 states reorganisation: melding our diversity into a single identity cannot be a top-down imposition.1966The two wars in the decade's first half, the inefficient allocation of capital driven by the second and third five-year plans, and the consecutive monsoon failure meant India was on the brink in 1966. The overnight devaluation of the Rupee by over 50 per cent, the timely help with food grains from the US and some providence pulled us back from it. The green revolution followed, and we have remained self-sufficient in food since.The experience of being on the brink taught us nothing. We still believe in the Pigouvian theory of market failure, where government policies are expected to deliver optimality.  Strangely, the idea that we reform only in crisis has only strengthened. There cannot be worse ways to change oneself than under the shadow of a crisis. But we have made a virtue out of it.1967This was the year when the Green Revolution took baby steps, and the Ehlrichian prediction about India’s impending doom was put to rest. But it was also the year when the Indian government made a self-goal by adopting a policy called items reserved for manufacture exclusively by the small-scale sector. By reserving whole product lines for manufacturing by small industries, this policy kept Indian firms small and uncompetitive. And like all bad ideas, it had a long life. The last 20 items on this list were removed only in April 2015. We wrote about this policy here. 1968In the past 75 years, we have reserved some of our worst public policies for the education sector. We have an inverted pyramid. A handful of tertiary educational institutions produce world-class graduates at the top. On the other end, we have a total failure to provide quality primary education to the masses. It is not because of a lack of intent. The National Education Policy (NEP) that first came up in 1968 is full of ideas, philosophy and a desire to take a long-term view about education in India. But it was unmoored from the economic or social reality of the nation. We often say here that we shouldn’t judge a policy based on its intentions. That there’s no such thing as a good policy but bad implementation because thinking about what can work is part of policy itself. NEP is Exhibit A in favour of this argument.1969 The nationalisation of 14 private-sector banks was a terrible assault on economic freedom under the garb of serving the public interest. The sudden announcement of a change in ownership of these banks was challenged in the courts, but the government managed to thwart it with an ordinance. Fifty years later, we still have low credit uptake even as governments continue to recapitalise loss-making banks with taxpayer money.1970The dominant economic thinking at the beginning of the 70s in India placed the State at the centre of everything. But that wasn’t how the world was moving. There was a serious re-examination of the relationship between the State and the market happening elsewhere. The eventual shift to a deregulated, small government economic model would happen by the decade's end. This shift mostly passed India by. But there were a few voices who questioned the state orthodoxy and, in some ways, sowed the intellectual seeds for liberalisation in future. In 1970, Jagdish Bhagwati and Padma Desai published their monograph, India: Planning for Industrialisation, which argued that our economic policies since independence had crippled us. It showed with data how central planning, import substitution, public sector-led industrial policy and license raj have failed. But it found no takers. In fact, we doubled down on these failed policies for the rest of the decade. It was a tragedy foretold. What if someone had gone against the consensus and paid attention to that paper? That dissent could perhaps have been the greatest service to the nation. It is useful to remember this today when any scepticism about government policies is met with scorn. Dissent is good. The feeblest of the voice might just be right.The 70s: Losing The Plot1971Kissinger visited China in July 1971 via Pakistan. Responding to the changing world order, India and the USSR signed an Indo–Soviet Treaty of Peace, Friendship and Cooperation in August of that year. India had become an ally of the USSR. Four months later, the India-Pakistan war pitted India and the USSR against Pakistan, China, and the US. The Indian strategic community came to internalise USSR as a super-reliable partner and the West as a supporter of India’s foes. It took another three decades, and the collapse of the USSR, for a change in this thinking. Even today, Russia finds massive support in the Indian strategic establishment. We had problematised this love for Russia here. 1972India won the 1972 war with Pakistan and liberated Bangladesh. India’s unilateral action stopped a humanitarian disaster. The victory was decisive, and the two parties met in Simla to agree on the way forward. This should have been a slam dunk for India in resolving festering issues on the international boundary, Kashmir and the role of the third parties. But international diplomacy is a two-level game, and Bhutto played that to his advantage. We explained this in edition 30. We paid a high price for giving away that win to Bhutto.1973The Kesavananda Bharti verdict of the Supreme Court rescued the Republic of India from a rampaging authoritarian. The basic structure doctrine found a nice balance to resolve the tension between constitutional immutability and legislative authority to amend the constitution. Bibhu Pani discussed this case in more detail here. 1974You are the State. Here are your crimes. You force import substitution, you regulate the currency, you misallocate capital, you let the public sector and a handful of licensed private players produce inferior quality products at a high cost, you raise the marginal tax rate at the highest level to 97 per cent, you run a large current account deficit, and you cannot control Rupee depreciation.Result?People find illegal ways to bring in foreign goods, currency and gold. And so was born the villain of every urban Bollywood film of the 70s. And a career option for a capitalist-minded kid like me. The Smuggler.But the State isn’t the criminal here. The smuggler is. And the State responded with a draconian law to beat all others. An act the knowledge of whose expanded form would serve kids well in those school quizzes of the 80s. COFEPOSA — The Conservation of Foreign Exchange and Prevention of Smuggling Act. A predatory state's defining feature is how it forces ordinary citizens to do unlawful activities. COFEPOSA was the mother of such laws. It has spawned many children. 1975This blank editorial by the Indian Express says it all. 1976We view our population as a core problem. The politicians, the public servants and the ordinary citizens share this view. We don’t want to acknowledge our governance deficit. Calling population a problem allows us to shirk the responsibility of running a functioning State. We have written about the flaw in thinking about the population as a problem on many occasions.How far could we go to control the population? Well, in 1976, during the peak of the Emergency, the State decided to sterilise male citizens against their wishes. This madness ended when the Emergency was lifted. But even today calls for population control keep coming back. 1977The first non-Congress union government was an important milestone for the Indian Republic. While Morarji Desai’s government did reverse the worst excesses of the Emergency rule, its economic policies were less successful. This period went on to witness a demonetisation in search of black money (2016 from the future says Hi!), and the same old counter-productive policies in search of self-reliance.1978Despite all available evidence that statist socialism was an abject failure, the Janata government that came to power decided to double down on it. One of the great ideas of the time was to force MNCs to reduce their stake in their Indian subsidiaries to below 40 per cent. A handful agreed, but the large corporations quit India. One of those who left was IBM in 1978. The many existing installations of IBM computers needed services and maintenance. In a delightful case of unintended consequences, this led to the nationalisation of IBM’s services division (later called CMC). Domestic companies started to serve this niche. Soon there were the likes of Infosys, Wipro and HCL building a business on this. CMC provided a good training ground for young engineers. And so, the Indian IT services industry got underway. It would change the lives of educated Indians forever.1979In a classic case of violating the Tinbergen rule, the Mandal Commission recommended that the reservation policy should be used to address relative deprivation. While the earlier reservations for oppressed castes stood on firm ground as a means for addressing unconscionable historical wrongs, the Mandal Commission stretched the logic too far. Its recommendation would eventually make reservation policy the go-to solution for any group that could flex its political muscles. We wrote about it here. 1980After ditching the Janata experiment and running out of ideas to keep Jan Sangh going, the BJP was formed. It wasn’t a momentous political occasion of any sort then. A party constitution that aimed for Gandhian socialism and offered vague promises of a uniform civil code and nationalism didn’t excite many. Everything else that would propel the party in later years was to be opportunistic add-ons to the ideology. The founding leaders, Advani and Vajpayee, would have been shocked if you told them what the party would be like, four decades later.The 80s: A Million Mutinies Now1981This year witnessed a gradual shift away from doctrinaire socialism in economic policymaking. “The Indira Gandhi government lifted restrictions on the expansion of production, permitted new private borrowing abroad, and continued the liberalisation of import controls,” wrote Walter Anderson. The government also “allowed” some price rises, leading to increased production of key input materials. The government also permitted foreign companies to compete in drilling rights in India. All in all, a year that witnessed changes for the better. 1982The great textile strike of Bombay in 1982 was inevitable. The trade unions had gotten so powerful that there was a competitive race to the bottom on who could be more militant. Datta Samant emerged intent on breaking the monopoly of RMMS on the city's workers. And he did this with ever spiralling demands from mill owners in a sector that was already bloated with overheads and facing competition from far eastern economies. There was no way to meet these demands. The owners locked the mills and left. Never to come back. The old, abandoned mills remained. The workers remained. Without jobs, without prospects and with kids who grew up angry and unemployed. The rise of Shiv Sena, political goondaism and a malevolent form of underworld followed. Bombay changed forever. It was all inevitable.1983The Nellie massacre in Assam and the Dhilwan bus massacre in Punjab represent the year 1983. Things seemed really dark back then. It seemed that the doomsayers would be proved right about India. Eventually, though, the Indian Republic prevailed. 1984Her Sikh bodyguards assassinated India Gandhi. The botched Punjab policy of the previous five years came a full circle with it. An unforgivable backlash against innocent Sikhs followed. A month later, deadly gas leaked out of a Union Carbide factory in Bhopal, killing and paralysing thousands. 1984 will rank among the worst years of our republic. There were two silver linings in retrospect. One, we would learn to manage secessionist movements better from the harrowing Punjab experience. Two, had Indira continued, would we have had 1991? Our guess is no.1985This was an eventful year in retrospect. Texas Instruments set up shop in Bangalore. It was to begin one of modern India’s true success stories on the world stage. This was also the year when the Anti-defection law transformed the relationship between the voter and her representative. Political parties became all-powerful, and people’s representatives were reduced to political party agents. We have written about this changing dynamic here. This was also the year when the then commerce minister, VP Singh, visited Malaysia. The visit was significant for India because it served as a reference point for Singh when he visited that country again in 1990, now as the Prime minister. Surprised by Malaysia’s transformation in five years, he asked his team to prepare a strategy paper for economic reforms. This culminated in the “M” document, which became a blueprint for reforms when the time for the idea eventually came in 1991.1986Who is a citizen of India?  This vexing question roiled Assam in the early 80s. The student union protests against the widespread immigration of Bangladeshis turned violent, and things had turned ugly by 1985. The Assam accord of 1985 sought to settle the state's outstanding issues,, including deporting those who arrived after 1971 and a promise to amend the Citizenship Act. The amended Citizenship Act of 1986 restricted the citizenship of India to those born before 1987 only if either of their parents were born in India. That meant children of couples who were illegal immigrants couldn’t be citizens of India simply by virtue of their birth in India. That was that, or so we thought.But once you’ve amended the definition of who can be a citizen of India, you have let the genie out. The events of 2019 will attest to that.1987Rajiv Gandhi’s ill-fated attempt to replicate Indira Gandhi’s success through military intervention in another country began in 1987. In contrast to the 1971 involvement, where Indian forces had the mass support of the local populace, the Indian Peacekeeping Force (IPKF) got itself embroiled in a bitter Sri Lankan civil war. Not only did this involvement end in a failure, it eventually led to Rajiv Gandhi’s brutal murder in a terrorist attack. The policy lesson internalised by the strategic community was that India must stay far away from developing and deploying forces overseas.1988Most government communication is propaganda in disguise. However, there are those rare occasions when government messaging transcends the ordinary. In 1988, we saw that rare bird during the peak era of a single government channel running on millions of black and white TV sets across India. A government ad that meant something to all of us and that would remain with us forever. Mile Sur Mera Tumhara got everything right - the song, the singers, the storyline and that ineffable thing called the idea of India. No jingoism, no chest beating about being the best country in the world and no soppy sentimentalism. Just a simple message - we might all sing our own tunes, but we are better together. This is a timeless truth. No nation in history has become better by muting the voice of a section of their own people. Mile Sur Mera Tumhara, Toh Sur Bane Hamara, indeed.  19891989 will be remembered as the year when the Indian government capitulated to the demands of Kashmiri terrorists in the Rubaiya Sayeed abduction case. It would spark off a series of kidnappings and act as a shot in the arm of radicals. 1990VP Singh dusted off the decade-long copy of the Mandal Commission report and decided to implement it. This wasn’t an ideological revolution. It was naked political opportunism. However, three decades later, the dual impact of economic reforms and social engineering has increased social mobility than ever before. Merit is still a matter of debate in India. But two generations of affirmative action in many of the progressive states have shown the fears of merit being compromised were overblown. The task is far from finished, but Mandal showed that sometimes you need a big bang to get things going, even if your intentions were flawed.1990 also saw the exodus of Kashmiri Pandits (KPs) from the valley. A tragedy that would bookend a decade of strife and violence in India. The only lesson one should draw from the sad plight of KPs is that the State and the people must protect minority rights. We’re not sure that’s what we have taken away from it. And that’s sad.The 90s: Correcting The Course1991With the benefit of hindsight, the 1991 economic reforms seem inevitable. But things could well have been different. In the minority government, powerful voices advocated in favour of debt restructuring instead of wholesale reforms. In the end, the narrative that these changes were merely a continuation—and not abandonment—of Nehru and Indira Gandhi’s vision for India carried the day. This political chicanery deserves some credit for transforming the life of a billion Indians. 1992Harshad Mehta scammed the stock markets. It wasn’t a huge scam. Nor did it hurt the ordinary Indians. Fewer than 1% invested in markets back then. Yet, the scam did something important. It set in motion a series of reforms that made our capital markets stronger and safer for ordinary investors. Notably, over the years, Mehta came to be seen as some kind of robber baron figure. Capitalism needed an anti-hero to catch the imagination of people. Someone who could reprise in the 90s the Bachchan-esque angry young man roles of the 70s. Mehta might not have been that figure exactly, but he helped a generation transition to the idea that greed could indeed be good.Also, Babri Masjid was brought down by a mob of kar sevaks in 1992. It will remain a watershed moment in our history. The Supreme Court judgement of 2019 might be the final judicial word on it. But we will carry the scars for a long time.1993The tremors of the demolition of the Babri Masjid were felt in 1993. Twelve bombs went off in Bombay on one fateful day. The involvement of the city’s mafia groups was established. The tragic event finally led to the government rescuing the city from the underworld. Not to forget, the Bombay underworld directly resulted from government policies such as prohibition and gold controls. 1994One of the great acts of perversion in our democracy was the blatant abuse of Section 356 of the constitution that allowed the union to dismiss a state government at the slightest pretext. Indira Gandhi turned this into an art form. S. R. Bommai, whose government in Karnataka was dismissed in this manner in 1988, took his case up to the Supreme Court. In 1994, the court delivered a verdict that laid out the guidelines to prevent the abuse of Section 356. It is one of the landmark judgments of the court and restored some parity in Union and state relationship.Article 356 has been used sparingly since. We are a better democracy because of it.1995India joined the WTO, and the first-ever mobile phone call was made this year. But 1995 will forever be remembered as the year when Ganesha idols started drinking milk. This event was a precursor to the many memes, information cascades, and social proofs that have become routine in the information age. 1996Union budgets in India are occasions for dramatic policy announcements. It is a mystery why a regular exercise of presenting the government's accounts should become a policy event. But that’s the way we roll. In 1996 and 1997, P. Chidambaram presented them as the FM of a weak ragtag coalition called the United Front. But he presented two budgets for the ages. The rationalisation of income tax slabs and the deregulation of interest rates created a credit culture that led to the eventual consumption boom in the next decade. We still carry that consumption momentum.1997The creation of the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) is an important public policy milestone for India. By no means perfect, the setting up of TRAI helped overturn a norm where government departments were both players and umpires. TRAI made the separation of “steering” and “rowing” functions a new normal. That template has been copied in several sectors thereafter, most recently in the liberalisation of the space sector. 1998India did Pokhran 2, which gave it the capability to build thermonuclear weapons. We faced sanctions and global condemnation. But the growing economy and a sizeable middle class meant those were soon forgotten. Economic might can let you get away with a lot. We have seen it happen to us, but it is a lesson we don’t understand fully.Also, in 1998, Sonia Gandhi jumped into active politics. The Congress that was ambling towards some sort of internal democracy decided to jettison it all and threw its weight behind the dynasty. It worked out for them for a decade or so. But where are they now? Here’s a question. What if Sonia didn’t join politics then? Congress might have split. But who knows, maybe those splinters might have coalesced in the future with a leader chosen by the workers. And we would have had a proper opposition today with a credible leader.1999This was a landmark year for public policy. For the first time, a union government-run company was privatised wholly. We wrote about the three narratives of disinvestment here. 2000We have a weak, extended and over-centralised state. And to go with it, we have large, unwieldy states and districts that make the devolution of power difficult. In 2000, we created three new states to facilitate administrative convenience. On balance, it has worked well. Despite the evidence, we have managed to create only one more state since. The formation of Telangana was such a political disaster that it will take a long time before we make the right policy move of having smaller states. It is a pity.The 2000s: The Best Of Times2001Not only was the Agra Summit between Musharraf and Vajpayee a dud, but it was followed by a terrorist attack on the Indian parliament. It confirmed a pattern: PM-level bilateral meetings made the Pakistani military-jihadi complex jittery, and it invariably managed to spike such moves with terrorist attacks. 2002There was Godhra and the riots that followed. What else is there to say?2003The Fiscal Responsibility and Budget Management (FRBM) Act and the Civil Services Pension Reform are two policy successes with many lessons for future policymakers. We have discussed these on many occasions. 2004The NDA government called for an early election, confident about its prospects. India Shining, its campaign about how good things were, wasn’t too far from the truth. It is how many of us felt during that time. The NDA government had sustained the reform momentum of the 90s with some of the best minds running the key departments. Its loss was unexpected. Chandrababu Naidu, a politician who fashioned himself like a CEO, was taken to the cleaners in Andhra Pradesh. Apparently, economic reforms didn’t get you votes. The real India living in villages was angry at being left out. That was the lesson for politicians from 2004. Or, so we were told.Such broad narratives with minimal factual analysis backing them have flourished in the public policy space. There is no basis for them. The loss of NDA in 2004 came down to two states. Anti-incumbency in Andhra Pradesh where a resurgent Congress under YS Reddy beat TDP, a constituent of NDA. TDP lost by similar margins (in vote share %) across the state in all demographics in both rural and urban areas. There was no rural uprising against Naidu because of his tech-savvy, urban reformist image. Naidu lost because the other party ran a better campaign. Nothing else. The other mistake of the NDA was in choosing to partner with the ruling AIADMK in Tamil Nadu (TN) over DMK. TN was famous for not giving split verdicts. It swung to extremes between these two parties in every election. And that’s what happened as AIADMK drew a blank.Yet, the false lesson of 2004 has played on the minds of politicians since. We haven’t gotten back on track on reforms in the true sense. 2005The Right to Information Act and the National Rural Employment Guarantee Act came into force in 2005. The “right to X” model of governance took root.2006In March 2006, George W Bush visited India and signed the Civil Nuclear Cooperation Agreement with Manmohan Singh. From facing sanctions in 1998 for Pokhran 2 to the 123 Agreement, this was a victory for Indian diplomacy and its rising status in the world. You would think this would have had bipartisan support among the political class in India. Well, the Left that was part of UPA and the BJP that worked on the deal when it was in power, opposed it. Many shenanigans later, the deal was passed in the parliament in 2008. It is often said there’s no real ideological divide among parties in India. This view can be contested on various grounds. But events like the opposition to the nuclear deal make you wonder if there are genuine ideological positions on key policy issues in India. Many sound policy decisions are opposed merely for the sake of it. Ideology doesn’t figure anywhere. 2007It was the year when the Left parties were out-lefted. In Singur and Nandigram, protests erupted over land acquisition for industrial projects. The crucible of the resulting violence created a new political force. As for the investment, the capital took a flight to other places. The tax on capital ended up being a tax on labour. Businesses stayed away from West Bengal. The citadel of Left turned into its mausoleum.2008Puja Mehra in her book The Lost Decade traces the origin of India losing its way following the global financial crisis to the Mumbai terror attack of 2008. Shivraj Patil, the home minister, quit following the attack and Chidambaram was shifted from finance to fill in. For reasons unknown, Pranab Mukherjee, a politician steeped in the 70s-style-Indira-Gandhi socialism, was made the FM. Mehra makes a compelling case of how that one decision stalled reforms, increased deficit and led to runaway inflation over the next three years. Till Chidambaram was brought back to get the house in order, it was too late, and we were halfway into a lost decade. It is remarkable how bad policies always seem easy to implement while good policies take ages to get off the blocks.2009The Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) was established in January 2009 to architect a unique digital identity for persons in a country where low rates of death and birth registrations made fake and duplicate identities a means for corruption and denial of service. Under the Modi government, the digital identity — Aadhaar — became the fulcrum of several government services. This project also set the stage for later projects such as the Unified Payments Interface (UPI) and Abha (Health ID).2010There’s petty corruption everywhere in India. It is pervasive. Not surprisingly, it is one political issue leading to mass movements in India. The anti-corruption mood gripped India in 2010 on the back of the 2G spectrum scam, where the chief accountant of the government claimed a notional loss of about Rs. 1.8 trillion to the exchequer. Auctioning of natural resources wasn’t exactly a transparent process then. It was evident there was a scam in the allotment of the 2G spectrum. But the 1.8 trillion number was a wild exaggeration that anyone with a semblance of business understanding could see through. It didn’t matter. That number caught the imagination. UPA 2 never recovered from it. More importantly, the auction policy for resources was distorted forever. We still suffer the consequences.The 2010s: Missed Opportunity2011India’s last case of wild poliovirus was detected in 2011. Until about the early 1990s, an average of 500 to 1000 children got paralysed daily in India. The original target for eradication was the year 2000. Nevertheless, we got there eleven years later. India’s pulse polio campaign has since become a source of confidence for public policy execution in India. We internalised the lesson that the Indian government can sometimes deliver through mission mode projects. 2012If you cannot solve a vexing public policy issue, turn it into a Right. It won’t work, but it will seem like you’ve done everything. After years of trying to get the national education policy right, the government decided it was best to make education a fundamental right in the Constitution. Maybe that will make the problem go away. A decade later, nothing has changed, but we have an additional right to feel good about.2013This year saw the emergence of AAP as a political force via the anti-corruption movement. AAP combines the classic elements of what makes a political party successful in India - statist instincts, focus on aam aadmi issues, populism and ideological flexibility. Importantly, it is good at telling its own version of some future utopia rather than questioning the utopia of others. 2014The BJP came to power with many promises; the most alluring of them was ‘minimum government, maximum governance’. Over the past eight years it has claimed success in meeting many of its promises, but even its ardent supporters won’t claim any success on minimum government. In fact, it has gone the other way. That a party with an immensely popular PM, election machinery that rivals the best in the world, and virtually no opposition cannot shake us off our instinctive belief in the State's power never ceases to surprise us.2015The murder of a person by a mob on the charges of eating beef was the first clear indication of the upsurge of a new violent, majoritarian polity. It was also one of the early incidents in India of radically networked communities using social media for self-organisation. Meanwhile, 2015 also witnessed the signing of a landmark boundary agreement between India and Bangladesh, which ended the abomination called the third-order enclave. The two States exchanged land peacefully, upholding the principle that citizen well-being trumps hardline interpretations of territorial integrity. 2016There will be many case studies written in future about demonetisation. Each one of them will end with a single conclusion. Public policy requires discussion and consensus, not stealth and surprise. We hope we have learnt our lesson from it.2017Until 2017, many in India still held the hope of a modus vivendi with China. Some others were enamoured by the Chinese model of governance. However, the Doklam crisis in 2017, and the Galwan clashes in 2020, changed all that. Through this miscalculation, China alienated a full generation of Indians, led to better India-US relations, and energised India to shift focus away from merely managing a weak Pakistan, and toward raising its game for competing with a stronger adversary. For this reason, we wrote a thank you note to Xi Jinping here. 2018It took years of efforts by the LGBTQ community to get Section 377 scrapped. In 2018, they partially won when the Supreme Court diluted Section 377 to exclude all kinds of adult consensual sexual behaviour. The community could now claim equal constitutional status as others. There’s still some distance to go for the State to acknowledge non-heterosexual unions and provide for other civil rights to the community. But the gradual acceptance of the community because of decriminalisation is a sign that our society doesn’t need moral policing or lectures to judge what’s good for it.2019The J&K Reorganisation Act changed the long-standing political status quo in Kashmir. Three years on, the return to political normalcy and full statehood still awaits. While a response by Pakistan was expected, it was China that fomented trouble in Ladakh, leading to the border clashes in 2020. 2020We have written multiple pieces on farm laws in the past year. The repeal of these laws, which were fundamentally sound because of a vocal minority, is the story of public policy in India. Good policies are scuttled because of the absence of consultation, an unclear narrative, opportunistic politicking or plain old hubris. We write this newsletter in the hope of changing this. 2021The second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic left behind many bereaved families. People are still trying to pick up the pieces. The sadness was also interrupted by frustration because of the delays in getting the vaccination programme going. India benefited immensely from domestic vaccine manufacturing capability in the private sector. Despite many twists and turns in vaccine pricing and procurements, the year ended with over 1 billion administered doses. In challenging times, the Indian State, markets, and society did come together to fight the pandemic. So, here we are. In the 75th independent year of this beautiful, fascinating and often exasperating nation. We are a work in progress. We might walk slowly, but we must not walk backwards. May we all live in a happy, prosperous and equal society. Thanks for reading Anticipating the Unintended! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support our work. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit publicpolicy.substack.com

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Darin Epsilon presents PERSPECTIVES - Progressive/Tech/Deep House Mixes
Live @ Marbela Beach in Goa, India (August 2022)

Darin Epsilon presents PERSPECTIVES - Progressive/Tech/Deep House Mixes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 61:27


1 hour taken from my performance at NOBO Experience hosted by Marbela Beach in Goa. What an honor it was to participate in the 75th anniversary of India's independence! Other headliners featured in the lineup included Township Rebellion, Citizen Kain, and Deniz Bul. In total there were 27 international & national homegrown talents from all across the country involved.

Probing the Wormhole: Stargate Discussion Podcast
SG1 1-11: Bloodlines a.k.a. Symbiote Liberation Army

Probing the Wormhole: Stargate Discussion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 50:07


Teal'c reveals that he has a family on Chulak and that his son, Rya'c, will soon be implanted with a Goa'uld symbiote. With the help of his team, they return to Chulak. Will they save Rya'c? In this Teal'c-centered episode, we explore issues of slavery and Daniel's shittiness. (Explicit)

Dirty Linen - A Food Podcast with Dani Valent
Rupal Bhatikar (Nomad Melbourne) - culture, values, learning, authenticity and seasoning.

Dirty Linen - A Food Podcast with Dani Valent

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 34:18


We had so much fun chatting to Abby Kitchen from Nomad Sydney that it seemed only right to find another awesome female chef to talk to at Nomad Melbourne. Rupal Bhatikar grew up in Goa and quit a high-flying corporate career to retrain as a chef. What's it been like to start again at the beginning in a new country? We talk culture, values, learning, authenticity and - crucially - seasoning! https://www.instagram.com/rupalbhatikar/?hl=en Follow Dirty Linen on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dirtylinenpodcast Follow Dani Valent https://www.instagram.com/danivalent Follow Rob Locke (Executive Producer) https://www.instagram.com/foodwinedine/ Follow Huck (Executive Producer) https://www.instagram.com/huckstergram/ LISTEN TO OUR OTHER FOOD PODCASTS https://linktr.ee/DeepintheWeedsNetwork

The Fierce Female Network
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The Fierce Female Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 28:00


BRIT FOX AND V1 Written and produced by female duo Brit Fox and V1 both residing in Cleveland, Ohio, USA and already landing placements together from Netflix to MGK, Missy Elliott, and writing for artists at Universal, Warner, Sony and more. “Knock Out” features local Ohio powerhouses like battle rapper Dallas Cash and the dynamic Britana.| https://open.spotify.com/album/0sfgVDPe1gw7lQ7AG1UE8r**************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************** NOVLIK Known best for promoting Goa trance widely across India, Novlik began focusing on producing music of his own style during the lockdown and today he's beginning to get noticed track-after-track. With collaborations that feature other trending artists such as Shanti People, Camacho and more, his journey in music-making is seeing a great start and you're likely to come across more tunes soon! ********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************** CLICK HERE TO VIEW VIRAL BREAKING NEWS VIDEO